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The newspaper for the new millennium

510-494-1999

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December 10, 2013

Vol. 12 No. 50

SUBMITTED BY OHLONE COLLEGE It’s Christmas Eve—a time of giving. Young Clara receives the gift of a nutcracker from her mysterious uncle, and is swept into a whole new world filled with sweets and magic. It seems all too good to be true! Is it all just a dream? Performed by countless ballet companies since the 1940s, the Nutcracker continues to be a classic family holiday tradition. This dreamlike fairy tale, with Tchaikovsky’s beautiful ballet score, is the perfect way to celebrate the holidays. Experience the excitement of moving toys and treats, brought to life by Yoko’s Dance Academy. Yoko’s Dance and Performing Arts Academy is known for excellent choreography, staging, costuming, and talented performers. The group has performed at various events including the Indo-American Charity Ball, the Beach Blanket Babycontinued on page 4

BY ARATHI SATISH PHOTOS BY CONNIE CHEW Las Posadas is religious and social preparation for La Navidad (Christmas) in Mexico and some Central American countries. Meaning “the inns” or “the shelters” in Spanish, Las Posadas spans nine evenings which commemorate Joseph and Mary’s difficult journey from Nazareth to Bethlehem and their search for shelter prior to the birth of Christ. Fremont’s Las Posadas, co-sponsored by the Fremont Cultural Arts Council and the Committee for the Restoration of the Mission San Jose every year since 1982, honors Fremont’s Spanish Mission heritage and this advent tradition. All are invited to join the procession and enjoy this celebration of the holiday season. It is thought that Las Posadas may have started in the 16th century by St. Ignatius of Loyola or Friar Pedro de Gant in Mexico. It began when a Spanish expedition conquered the Aztec empire and Mexico became a Spanish colony. Initiated by early friars, it combines Spanish Catholicism with the Aztec’s celebration of the birth of their sun god, Huitzilopochtli, during the last days of December.

For a fun and festive holiday display, TriCity residents don’t have very far to look. Twinkling lights and colorful cartoon characters of Crippsmas Place light up cold winter nights with their annual neighborhood display starting Saturday, December 14. Planned and operated by neighbors and volunteers known as the Crippsmas Club, Crippsmas Place boasts over 60 decorated houses along Nicolet Avenue and in the culde-sacs of Asquith Place, Cripps Place, Wellington Place, and Nicolet Court in north Fremont. Not only is Crippsmas Place a cheerful holiday event, it is also a charity fundraiser supporting six local organizations. Free candy canes are handed out on Wellington Place and cash donations accepted

for Leukemia-Lymphoma Society, Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation, SAVE (Safe Alternatives to Violent Environments), HERS Breast Cancer Foundation, Kidango “Gifts from the Heart” program (provides needy children with basics and toys), and Adopt an Angel (for children in Alameda County’s Child Protective Services). Donations can also be made online at www.crippsmasplace.org. Crippsmas Place Saturday, Dec 14 – Saturday, Dec 28 Monday – Thursday: 6 p.m. – 10 p.m. Friday and Saturday: 5 p.m. – 11 p.m. Sunday: 5 p.m. – 10 p.m. Donations on Wellington Place, Fremont www.crippsmasplace.org

continued on page 23

INDEX Arts & Entertainment . . . . . . 21

Classified. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28

Kid Scoop . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29

Community Bulletin Board . . 32

Mind Twisters . . . . . . . . . . . . 28

Contact Us . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27

Obituary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23

Bookmobile Schedule . . . . . . 22

Editorial/Opinion . . . . . . . . . 27

Protective Services . . . . . . . . 8

Business . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12

It’s a date . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21

Public Notices. . . . . . . . . . . . 32

Sports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 Subscribe . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15


Page 2

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

December 10, 2013

Every Minute Counts With Stroke Fremont Woman Recovers from Stroke Due to Quick Action at Washington Hospital Latifa Sharif was at the gym in her apartment building when she suffered an ischemic stroke. Like many people who have stroke symptoms, she didn’t know what was happening. She was on the treadmill and suddenly felt awful, but thought she was just tired from her workout. “I went home and tried to drink water, but it wouldn’t go into my mouth,” she said. “The left side of my body was droopy. I had no idea I was having a stroke. I called my husband, and he came home; then he and my son took me to Washington Hospital.” An ischemic stroke occurs when a blockage in one of the blood vessels obstructs the flow of blood to the brain. Fortunately for Sharif, Washington Hospital’s Stroke Program meets the highest quality standards for its treatment of stroke. Soon after entering the emergency room, the stroke team was activated and Sharif received the life-saving medication she needed to recover. Washington Hospital's Stroke Program is a recipient of the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association's Get With The Guidelines® Gold Plus Quality Achievement Award and the Target Stroke Honor Roll Award. In order to be a Target Stroke hospital, Tissue Plasminogen Activator (TPA), known as "clot busting" medication, must be administered intravenously within 60 minutes of a patient’s arrival to the hospital at least 50 percent of the time.

Led by a multidisciplinary Stroke Team, Washington Hospital’s Stroke Program excels in providing fast, effective treatment for stroke patients.Team members include Tashan Arrivas, RN, (left) and Christina Chuchel, RN.

Sharif received her medication in just under 60 minutes. She returned home to her family within five days of having the stroke and has completely recovered. “I am grateful for the care I received,” said Sharif, who is 48. “Now I’m taking better care of my health, exercising more and cutting the salt and fat out of my diet. I’ve already lost 10 pounds, and I have my diabetes under control.”

It’s these types of lifestyle changes that can help reduce the risk of having a stroke, according to Doug Van Houten, RN, Assistant Chief Nursing Officer and Stroke Program Coordinator at Washington Hospital. High blood pressure, diabetes, obesity, lack of exercise, smoking, and high cholesterol are all risk factors for stroke. “Stroke can be deadly, but it is also preventable and treatable,” Van Houten added.

“It can happen at any age. The key thing to remember is that every minute counts. Everyone needs education about stroke prevention, warning signs and the vital importance of seeking care as quickly as possible.” “Just like in Sharif ’s case, it is often the people around a stroke victim who see the warning signs,” he stated. Van Houten suggested the acronym FAST as a way to recognize stroke symptoms and take action: • Facial weakness, usually on one side • Arm weakness • Speech, meaning slurred speech or difficulty talking • Time matters, so call 911 Once the patient arrives at the hospital, the stroke team must act quickly as well. TPA generally is not administered if more than four or five hours have passed since the stroke symptoms began, Van Houten explained. If the patient doesn’t come to the hospital immediately, precious time has already been lost. “Effective stroke care requires a team of physicians, nurses, neurologists, radiologists, pharmacists, and other hospital staff to be at the top of their game,” he added. “We meet and exceed those high standards at Washington Hospital.” Learn More About the Washington Hospital Stroke Program Washington Hospital is a nationally recognized leader in stroke care. To learn more about the Stroke Program, visit www.whhs.com/stroke.

InHealth broadcasts on Comcast Channel 78 in Fremont, Newark and Union City and online at www.inhealth.tv The full schedule of InHealth programs listed below can also be viewed in real time on the Washington Hospital website, www.whhs.com T U E S DAY

W E D N E S DAY

T H U R S DAY

F R I DAY

S AT U R DAY

S U N DAY

M O N DAY

12/10/13

12/11/13

12/12/13

12/13/13

12/14/13

12/15/13

12/16/13

12:00 PM 12:00 AM 12:30 PM 12:30 AM

Diabetes Matters: Vacation or Travel Plans?

Sidelined by Back Pain? Get Back in the Game

Deep Venous Thrombosis

Women's Health Conference: Age Appropriate Screenings

Minimally Invasive Treatment for Common Gynecologic Conditions Women's Health Conference: Aging Gracefully

1:00 PM 1:00 AM

1:30 PM 1:30 AM

Voices InHealth: Healthy Pregnancy

2:00 PM 2:00 AM

2:30 PM 2:30 AM

Deep Venous Thrombosis

3:00 PM 3:00 AM

3:30 PM 3:30 AM

4:00 PM 4:00 AM

Washington Township Health Care District Board Meeting November 13th, 2013

Raising Awareness About Stroke

Get Your Child's Plate in Shape

Heel Problems and Treatment Options

Minimally Invasive Surgery for Lower Back Disorders

Get Your Child's Plate in Shape

Living Well with Diabetes: Overcoming Challenges Washington Township Health Care District Board Meeting November 13th, 2013

Don't Let Back Pain Sideline You Disaster Preparedness

Your Concerns InHealth: Measles Resurgence

Treatment Options for Knee Problems

From One Second to the Next Voices InHealth: The Legacy Strength Training System

6:00 PM 6:00 AM

Keeping Your Heart on the Right Beat

Superbugs: Are We Winning the Germ War? Alzheimer's Disease

Raising Awareness About Stroke

Alzheimer's Disease

Healthy Nutrition for Your Heart

7:00 PM 7:00 AM

7:30 PM 7:30 AM

9:00 PM 9:00 AM

Learn About Nutrition for a Healthy Life

Turning 65? Get To Know Medicare Arthritis: Do I Have One of 100 Types?

8:00 PM 8:00 AM

8:30 PM 8:30 AM

Your Concerns InHealth: Senior Scam Prevention

Washington Township Health Care District Board Meeting November 13th, 2013

Diabetes Matters: Diabetes Meal Planning

What You Should Know About Carbs and Food Labels

Treating Infection: Learn About Sepsis

Vitamins and Supplements - How Useful Are They?

Important Immunizations for Healthy Adults

Important Immunizations for Healthy Adults

Washington Township Health Care District Board Meeting November 13th, 2013

Washington Township Health Care District Board Meeting November 13th, 2013

Shingles

Diabetes Meal Planning: Strategies for Seasonal Success

Keys to Healthy Eyes

Important Immunizations for Healthy Adults

Diabetes Matters: Protecting Your Heart

What You Should Know About Carbs and Food Labels

Keeping Your Heart on the Right Beat

Living with Arthritis 10:00 PM 10:00 AM

Diabetes Matters: Diabetes Viewpoint

10:30 PM 10:30 AM

11:00 PM 11:00 AM

11:30 PM 11:30 AM

Do You Suffer From Breathing Problems? Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease or Asthma Inside Washington Hospital: Patient Safety

From One Second to the Next

Diabetes Matters: Diabetes Update: What's New? 2013

Living with Arthritis

Living with Arthritis

Diabetes Meal Planning: Strategies for Seasonal Success

The Weight to Success Diabetes Matters: Diabetes Viewpoint

9:30 PM 9:30 AM

Diabetes Meal Planning: Strategies for Seasonal Success Latest Treatments for Cerebral Aneurysms

Lunch and Learn:Yard to Table Washington Township Health Care District Board Meeting November 13th, 2013

Voices InHealth: The Greatest Gift of All

Your Concerns InHealth: Senior Scam Prevention

Skin Cancer 6:30 PM 6:30 AM

Washington Township Health Care District Board Meeting November 13th, 2013

Inside Washington Hospital: The Green Team

Lunch and Learn:Yard to Table

5:00 PM 5:00 AM

5:30 PM 5:30 AM

Treatment Options for Knee Problems

Strengthen Your Back! Learn to Improve Your Back Fitness

Minimally Invasive Surgery for Lower Back Disorders

Community Based Senior Supportive Services

4:30 PM 4:30 AM

Strengthen Your Back! Learn to Improve Your Back Fitness

Movement Disorders, Parkinson's Disease, Tremors and Epilepsy

How to Maintain a Healthy Weight: Good Nutrition is Key

Deep Venous Thrombosis

Peripheral Vascular Disease: Leg Weakness, Symptoms and Treatment & Percutaneous (Under the Skin) Treatment

Diabetes Matters: Protecting Your Heart Financial Scams: How to Protect Yourself

Alzheimer's Disease

Diabetes Matters: Research: Advancing Diabetes Management

Learn If You Are at Risk for Liver Disease

Healthy Nutrition for Your Heart

Wound Care Update


December 10, 2013

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Proper Rest Can Help You Manage Stress and Enjoy the Festivities

W

ith all the decking of the halls and roasting of the chestnuts, are you getting enough sleep this holiday season? The holidays can be filled with joyful times, but they can also interfere with normal sleep patterns. Getting a good night’s sleep can be even more difficult to achieve when some of the stress that comes with the holidays is added to the equation. “There is a lot going on during the holidays, including a lot of nervous anticipation,” said Dr. Nitun Verma, medical director for the Washington Township Center for Sleep Disorders and a member of the Washington Hospital medical staff. “Stress can make it hard to get a good night’s sleep, but it doesn’t necessarily have to be a negative thing. Think 7-year-old on the night before Christmas - sheer anticipation can make it hard to get a good night’s sleep.” Holiday travel can also interfere with a good night’s sleep. “Crossing time zones, schedule changes and different bedtime routines and sleeping arrangements can all interrupt sleep patterns,” he added. “And while travel can be fun, it can also be stressful.”

With buying presents, attending parties, and meeting other obligations, there is a lot to get done during the holidays. Dr. Verma explained that stress can cause anxiety and racing thoughts, making it hard to fall asleep and get a restful night’s sleep. “Sometimes it’s important to manage expectations during the holidays,” Dr. Verma said. “Being realistic about what you can accomplish and how many commitments you can make can help reduce stress and anxiety. Focus on what is truly important to you.” While stress can interfere with your ability to get a good night’s sleep, getting proper rest can improve your ability to manage stress. “If you want to get the most out of the holidays, it’s important to get enough sleep,” he added. Dr. Verma offered the following tips for getting a good night’s rest. Follow the same sleep schedule. Go to bed and wake up at the same time every day. This can be more difficult during the holidays with late-night events and disrupted routines, but do the best you can. Exercise early in the day. Exercising 30 minutes on most days of the week can not only improve your sleep, but it can also

Washington Wellness Center Offers Holiday Packages Consider putting a relaxing massage on your holiday gift list this holiday season. Massages make great presents and offer respite after a busy day of shopping. The Washington Wellness Center is featuring a special massage package that can make the holidays brighter for the people in your life, including yourself. “You can treat your sister, mother, father, husband, or girlfriend to a wonderful experience,” said Laura Constantine, R.N., Washington Women’s Center coordinator. “A massage is the perfect way to take a break from busy holiday schedules.” The Wellness Center’s licensed massage therapists each have more than 12 years’ experience. Therapists continued on page 7

Special pricing on a holiday package is available through December 31. To learn more about this holiday package, or to schedule a massage, call (510) 608-1301.

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The Washington Township Center for Sleep Disorders can help those who have difficulty getting a good night’s sleep on a regular basis. The clinic treats all types of sleep disorders, including snoring, apnea, sleepiness, and restless legs syndrome. To learn more about the Center, visit www.washingtonsleep.com.

help manage your weight, with all the added holiday eating, and reduce your stress. However, don’t exercise too late in the day – complete your workout no later than two hours before bedtime. Avoid caffeine late in the day. Caffeine is a stimulant, so consuming some in the afternoon can make it harder to fall asleep at night. Don’t drink too much alcohol. People tend to consume more alcohol around the holidays. Avoid drinking too much, particularly just before bed. Alcohol in small doses may help you relax, but too much interferes with deep sleep. Avoid late-night meals. With parties and late-night events, the temptation to continue eating into the night is great; however, those late meals can cause indigestion that interrupts sleep. Don’t nap after 3 p.m. You may want to get a quick nap before going out for the evening, but avoid taking one after 3 p.m. Late-afternoon naps can make it difficult to get to sleep when you turn in for the night. Relax before bed. With your busy holiday schedule, you may be tempted to go, go, go, right up until bedtime. But you need to leave time to unwind. Consider doing a relaxing activity like reading a book or listening to music before you go to sleep. Make sure you have a good sleeping environment. This may be more difficult if you

are traveling over the holidays, but no matter where you stay, try to get rid of anything that will distract you from sleep. This could be unwanted noises, bright lights, an uncomfortable bed, or electronic devices. Have the right light exposure. With the shorter days, it’s dark in the morning. Turn on bright lights as soon as you wake up. It will help you feel more alert throughout the entire day. Don’t lie in bed awake for too long. If you are still awake after 20 minutes or so, or if you are starting to feel anxious about not being able to sleep, get up and do a relaxing activity until you feel sleepy. The anxiety will make it too hard to fall asleep. Consult your doctor if you continue having difficulty sleeping. Sleep disruptions during the holiday season are not uncommon. If you continue to have trouble getting a good night’s sleep even after the holidays are over, you may want to talk to your doctor. The Washington Township Center for Sleep Disorders can help those who have difficulty getting a good night’s sleep on a regular basis. The clinic treats all types of sleep disorders, including snoring, apnea, sleepiness, and restless legs syndrome. To learn more about the Center, visit www.washingtonsleep.com. For information about programs and services at Washington Hospital that can help you stay healthy, visit www.whhs.com.


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WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

December 10, 2013

continued from Page 1

lon Scholarship Performance, and a variety of competitions. In addition, a group of Yoko’s dancers performed at the London Invitational in 2012. Yoko Young extended her nurturing quality to teach and mentor thousands of Bay Area children. She passed away in late October but her legacy lives on through the students she guided to great accomplishments. In her memory, a special performance with the Golden Gate Festival Orchestra, conducted by maestro David Sloss, takes place at the Sunday afternoon show. Bring the family and celebrate the holidays with this classic Christmas tale. Yoko’s Nutcracker Friday, Dec. 13 8 p.m. Saturday, Dec. 14 2 p.m. & 8 p.m. Sunday, Dec. 15 – Live Orchestra 2 p.m. Smith Center at Ohlone College 43600 Mission Blvd, Fremont (510) 659-6031 To purchase tickets online, visit www.smithcenter.com Tickets: $15 Students, $20 Seniors, $25 General Admission Tickets for Live Orchestra Performance: $20 Students, $40 General Admission $2 Event Parking

SUBMITTED BYDIANE DRAGONE The sparkle of the Mexican holiday celebration comes alive this season at the San Leandro Performing Arts Center on Saturday, December 14 and Sunday December 15. The Ballet Folklorico Costa de Oro presents “Fiestas Navideñas,” an exciting Ballet Folklorico performance that features a cast of 50 dancers of all ages. The performance takes you on a musical journey through the traditions of the Mexican Christmas and showcases the dances of the various states of Mexico, all done in traditional dress. This is the perfect holiday entertainment for the whole family. Fiestas Navideñas Saturday, Dec. 14: 3 p.m. & 7 p.m. Sunday, Dec. 15: 3 p.m. San Leandro Performing Arts Center 2250 Bancroft Ave, San Leandro www.bfcostadeoro.com Tickets at: www.brownpapertickets.com/event/511637 or at the door Tickets: $20 - $25 (free for children three and younger) Parking available in lot adjacent to the theatre


The Fremont Fire Department is Collecting Food,Toy Donations this Holiday Season Fremont’s getting into the spirit of giving. The Fremont Fire Department is teaming up with Tri-City Volunteers, a local nonprofit, to collect non-perishable food and new unwrapped toys at all 10 fire stations and the Fire Department’s main office at 3300 Capitol Ave., Building A. Donations are being accepted through Wednesday, Dec. 18, 2013. For more information call the Fremont Fire Department at (510) 494-4299. Make a Family or Senior’s Day Special with Fremont’s Giving Hope Holiday Program The holidays are fast approaching and there’s no better way to celebrate than by spreading the joy of the season to others.

The City’s Human Services Department is calling on you to take part in Giving Hope, a program dedicated to aiding needy families,

children, and frail isolated seniors by bringing them some holiday cheer. Anyone interested in participating and making a difference in the lives of those Giving Hope serves can help in any of the following ways: • Cash donations (corporate matching gifts gladly received) • Gift cards for groceries, restaurants, entertainment • Personalized gifts for a family or senior using their very own wish list Donations can be made online at www.Fremont.gov/HSdonate. If sending a check, please make it payable to the following: City of Fremont Giving Hope Holiday Program Human Services Department 3300 Capitol Ave., Building B Fremont, CA 94538 Donations and holiday gifts from a personalized wish list will be accepted until Thursday, Dec. 12 for the holiday fundraiser and all year for the Giving Hope Program. In appreciation of your generosity, each sponsor will receive a thank you letter for tax purposes in January. For more information on how to participate, please contact the City’s Monica Dominguez at mdominguez@fremont.gov or (510) 574-2057.

Enjoy an enchanting Victorian evening at the Patterson House. On Friday, Dec. 13, the house will be elegantly lit in its entire Victorian splendor! The Patterson House is a 16-room Queen Anne Victorian historical home operated as a museum of local history and Victorian life. Enjoy holiday music, Victorian inspired decorations, and much more. The tours begin at 5 p.m. Advance tickets cost $6 for adults and seniors and $3 for children ages six to 17. Tickets purchased at the door cost $7 for adults and seniors and $3.50 for children ages six to 17. Children 5 and under are free. All fees include Ardenwood Historic Park admission. Check out our Recreation Guide for more events and activities or visit www.RegeRec.com. For information on the Patterson House and its collections, house tours, or volunteer opportunities, call the Patterson House office at (510) 791-4196 or visit www.Fremont.gov/PattersonHouse.

There is no better time than the present to give an animal a new home for the holidays. Through Jan. 4, 2014, all pet adoptions from the TriCity Animal Shelter will be free to qualified and approved homes. The adoption will include spay or neuter, a rabies vaccine, and a microchip; the pet license for Fremont residents will be the only item not included. Currently, the shelter is full of pets just waiting to be taken home to their new forever home. Many of the pets have already been spay or neutered and can be taken home today. Every attempt will be made to get all adopted pets spay or neutered before the holidays, however, it is strongly encouraged to come early in the month. The Tri-City Animal Shelter is open Tuesday through Friday from 12 p.m. to 4 p.m. and on Saturdays from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. The shelter is closed every Sunday and Monday and will also be closed for the City-observed holidays of Dec. 24, 25, 31, 2013, and Jan. 1, 2014. To view all of the available pets, visit www.PetHarbor.com and search for the Fremont Animal Shelter. You can also check out our Facebook page this month to see some of the featured pets at www.Facebook.com/FremontPoliceDepartment.

City of Fremont Holiday Closure Scheduled for Dec. 23, 2013 - Jan. 1, 2014 Police, Fire Services Not Affected The City of Fremont is implementing a Holiday Closure for many non-essential City Services from Monday, Dec. 23, 2013, through Wednesday, Jan. 1, 2014. The Holiday Closure is scheduled for Dec. 23, 26, 27 and 30, 2013, while City holidays are observed on Dec. 24, 25, 31, 2013, and Jan. 1, 2014. City offices participating in the Holiday Closure will reopen for business on Thursday, Jan. 2, 2014. This closure will not affect police and fire services. Offices that are taking part in the Holiday Closure include: • City Hall, 3300 Capitol Ave., Building A and Building B (Administrative offices)

During the Holiday Closure: • The Fire Department and Police Department will continue to provide public safety services. • A minimum number of City staff will be available in an on-call status to provide emergency maintenance services such as responding to storm-related issues. • Animal Services will provide regular services and the Tri-City Animal Shelter, located at 1950 Stevenson Blvd., will be open Thursday, Friday, and Saturday, Dec. 26-28.

• Fire Administration, 3300 Capitol Ave., Building A

• The Human Services Department will have two crisis counselors available at the Family Resource Center, located at 39155 Liberty St.

• Development Services Center, 39550 Liberty St.

• The Parks and Recreation Department will offer camps and other programs.

• Maintenance Center, 42551 Osgood Rd.

• Community members with active building permits can call (510) 494-4885 for inspections on Dec. 23, 26, 27, and 30, 2013.

• All Community Centers Offices and facilities providing limited services during the Holiday Closure include: • Parks and Recreation, 3300 Capitol Ave., Building B (for enrollment of recreation programs only, from 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. Call (510) 494-4300 for additional information.) • Community Centers and Recreation buildings with Holiday Day Camps, Programs, and pre-booked facility rentals • Life Eldercare (clients should contact (510) 574-2090 for additional information) • Afghan Elderly Association (clients should contact their caseworker for additional information)

• The Fremont Tennis Center will be open for public play, weather permitting. Some holiday public hours; call (510) 790-5510 for tennis-related information. Historically, demand for many City services during the December and January holiday season is low. It is anticipated that the Holiday Closure will have little or no impact on service delivery efficiency. For more information, visit www.Fremont.gov/HolidayClosure or call (510) 284-4093.


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WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

December 10, 2013

SUBMITTED BY TONY CLARK

THE PLOT THICKENS

I

n order for engine oil to lubricate properly, it must flow freely. While thinner 5weight oil pumps well while cold, it thins out as it gets hotter. As a result, it is less able to provide a cushioning film. On the other hand, thicker 30weight oil provides a good cushioning film that does not thin out when hot; however, it is difficult to pump when cold. With all this in mind, auto manufacturers specifically recommend oil that provides the advantages of both thin and thicker oils. Multi-viscosity oil, such as 5W30, is thin enough to pump when it is cold, but it thickens as it heats up. In any case, it is important to follow manufacturer recommendations.

Is your engine oil ready for the cooler weather? Do you even know what sort of oil is in your car? At BAY STAR AUTO CARE, our ASE Master-certified technicians can get your car in shape for winter in a lot of small ways that can add up to big improvement in your driving experience and your car's longevity. In addition, we can provide the regular care your car needs to keep it running smoothly and safely. Please call our office for an appointment today.

Do your kids want to spend more time with the jolly man in red? Well, here’s your chance. Enjoy a breakfast meal with Santa. The whole family’s welcome! The menu includes all-you-can eat pancakes, sausage, fresh fruit, coffee, and juice. Don’t forget to bring your camera to snap photos with Santa!

Breakfast with Santa Saturday, Dec. 14 9 a.m. – 11 a.m. Fremont/Newark YMCA 41811 Blacow Rd, Fremont (510) 657-5200 tclark@ymcaeastbay.org Tickets: $10 for adults, $7 for kids 4 and older (kids 3 and under are free)

Hayward man honored as Officer of the Year SUBMITTED BY ALLISON BORMEL U.S. Representative Eric Swalwell (CA-15) recently honored Sergeant 1st Class Jason Manella

and brightest among us, and overcame serious setbacks to win this grueling competition. Sgt. Manella’s service and success can be an inspiration to all us, and I am honored to represent him in

of Hayward on the House Floor for winning the Non-Commissioned Officer of the Year Award during the Army’s Best Warrior Competition. The Army’s Best Warrior Competition is a three-day event that tests a soldier’s physical and mental toughness. Sergeant Manella is the first ever reservist to win this prestigious Army-wide title. “Congratulations to Sgt. Jason Manella on this impressive achievement. He represents the best

the U.S. Congress,” said Rep. Swalwell. “Sergeant Manella is a member of the Reserve’s 445th Civil Affairs Battalion based in Mountain View; and while serving in Afghanistan in 2012, Sergeant Manella had his convoy attacked. And while it was attacked, it left him with a traumatic brain injury,” said Rep. Swalwell. “Sergeant Manella’s story is one of hope and the power of resilience.”

HINT: Using the wrong oil viscosity is the single most common cause of premature engine wear.

Gary Singh is the owner of Bay Star Auto Care at 1275 Atlantic St. near Western Ave., here in Union City. Phone: 489-3331

Shop to support our elderly SUBMITTED BY PATRICIA OSAGE Did you know Local volunteers deliver hundreds of meals every day to elderly, frail, and disabled seniors throughout Fremont, Newark, and Union City? Whole Foods Market Fremont has teamed up with LIFE ElderCare and created a way to provide enough meals for those who need it most this holiday season. On Wednesday, December 11 people can shop to support LIFE ElderCare Meals on Wheels program, the Fremont-based nonprofit that feeds hungry, homebound seniors in the TriCity area. 5% of the day’s net sales will be donated to LIFE ElderCare to benefit Meals on Wheels. “Good nutrition for our vulnerable seniors is a top priority in maintaining good health. And healthy, well-nourished residents strengthen communities for everyone,” Patricia Osage, Executive Director said. “Thank you for shopping Whole Foods Fremont on December 11th and doing your part this holiday season to feed hungry frail and disabled seniors right here in our neighborhoods.” Whole Foods donation to Meals on Wheels Wednesday, Dec 11 8 a.m. to 9 p.m. Whole Foods Market 3111 Mowry Ave, Fremont (510) 401-5880 fremontevents@wholefoods.com

Holiday giving with Abode SUBMITTED BY KATIE DERRIG Your holiday season to-do list probably contains items like planning celebratory meals, selecting special gifts for the people you love, and getting your favorite decorations out of storage. And, like many people this time of year, you may have another todo item: sharing the spirit of the season with people in our community who are in need. Abode Services provides housing, shelter, and services to more than 4,000 children and adults who are homeless and very low-income. For these families, who struggle with providing even basic needs for their children, any kind of holiday celebration can seem sadly out of reach. Your donation to Abode Services can change that, and create a joyful holiday for a child or adult in Abode’s programs. Pick up a few $25 gift cards while you’re out doing your holiday shopping. Pre-loaded Clipper, BART, or bus cards are another great choice for working parents and children traveling to school. Put together a gift basket of small, handy supplies that will brighten someone’s day. If you visit Abode’s website, you’ll find a holiday wish list of other items – from new socks to art supplies to dishware – that make great gifts for the participants in their programs. All in-kind donations can be delivered to Sunrise Village Emergency Shelter, 588 Brown Road in Fremont. Best of all, because of a generous challenge match from the Sobrato Family Foundation, new or increased gifts will be matched – making your donation go twice as far this holiday season! If you have any questions about these giving opportunities, please contact Community Outreach Director Jean Morgan at (510) 657-7409 ext. 804 or jmorgan@abodeservices.org. For more information on Abode Services, visit: www.abodeservices.org.

Sabercat Creek area meeting SUBMITTED BY BART Join the City of Fremont, the Alameda County Resource Conservation District, and the BART Warm Springs Extension Project for a neighborhood meeting on Tuesday, December 17. The meeting is scheduled to provide an update of the restoration efforts in the Sabercat Creek area. Neighborhood Meeting Tuesday, Dec. 17 6:30 p.m. Olive Hyde Program Center 123 Washington Blvd, Fremont (510) 476-3900 bartwarmspringsextension@bart.gov


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Washington Wellness Center Offers Holiday Packages tailor their massages to meet the individual needs of each person.“The Wellness Center is a comfortable place to enjoy a personalized massage,” she added. “If you would like to be pampered in a spa-like setting that offers fresh robes, a private dressing area and individual lockers, Washington Wellness Center is the place for you.” The Wellness Center is more than just a place to get a massage. “Women are invited to linger after their treatment and bask in that calm and relaxed feeling that comes from having a massage,” Constantine said. “Guests can sit in their robes and enjoy a nice cup of tea or coffee. We can even provide a warm blanket to curl up in.” There is a separate men’s massage area that is also welcoming and relaxing. Separate entrances for the men’s and women’s massage areas assure privacy. “A lot of people feel more comfortable getting a massage at a hospital,” she said. “There is a trust factor here because our focus is on health. Some of our clients who come for regular massages have arthritis or other health issues, and they feel confident knowing that their individual needs will be met.” It Feels Great “A massage simply feels great,” Constantine said. “It is designed to relieve stress and is customized to your specific needs. We offer the whole gamut of treatments, from Swedish to hot stone massages.” Swedish massage uses long, fluid strokes and deep, circular motions to reduce tension, improve circulation and alleviate stress and stiffness in the body. Sports massage is similar to a Swedish massage, but it is designed for clients who work out frequently or are involved in sports. This massage combines broad strokes, direct pressure and stretching to help improve flexibility, cleanse lactic acid buildup from the muscles and rejuvenate the body. Deep tissue massage works deep into the muscle to help ease and release muscular tension. It uses slower, more forceful strokes to target the deeper layers of the muscles and connective tissue. Through deep tissue, the body’s balance is restored. Pregnancy massage is for expectant mothers. A prenatal massage consists of specialized techniques of Swedish massage that safely addresses low back pain, shoulder stress, swelling and balance issues

common with pregnancy. It also encourages circulation, providing some relief from the discomfort of pregnancy. Therapeutic massage integrates neuromuscular therapy and reflexology with Swedish massage strokes to help relax and restore balance to the body. Hot Stone Massage uses water-heated, smooth, flat stones that are placed on key points on the body. The massage therapist may also hold the stones and use them with warm oil to gently glide over muscles. Hot stone massage promotes deep muscle and tissue relaxation, alleviates stress and releases toxins. It also relieves pain, improves circulation, and calms the psyche. Reflexology is a gentle massage of the foot that helps to relieve tension and can have a positive impact on all areas and systems of the body. “You can give the gift of relaxation by giving a massage this holiday season,” Constantine said. “With work and family pressures, most women would say that is priceless.” Make a Massage Appointment Today! To make a massage appointment or purchase a massage gift certificate, please call the Washington Wellness Center at (510) 608-1301. The Wellness Center is located at 2500 Mowry Avenue (Washington West) in Fremont, Suite 150. For information about other services offered at the Washington Women’s Center, visit www.whhs.com/womenscenter. Holiday Specials Special pricing on a holiday package is available through December 31. The Rejuvenation Package includes six 50-minute sessions of your choice (Swedish, therapeutic, deep tissue, or sports) for $270. Mothers and daughters, sisters, or girlfriends could create a special holiday outing around a massage. Get a massage together and combine it with a special lunch out or some shopping before or after. Massages are offered by appointment only at the Washington Wellness Center on Saturdays from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. During the week, massages are available from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays, and from 8 a.m. to 7 p.m. on Tuesdays and Thursdays. To learn more about this holiday package, or to schedule a massage, call (510) 608-1301.

SUBMITTED BY FREMONT POLICE DEPARTMENT There is no better time than the present to give an animal a new home for the holidays. Now through January 4, 2014, all pet adoptions from the Tri-City Animal Shelter will be free to qualified and approved homes. The adoption will include spay or neuter, a rabies vaccine, and a microchip (the pet license for Fremont residents will be the only item not included). Currently the shelter is full of pets just waiting to be taken home to their new forever home. Many of the pets have already been spay or neutered and can be taken home today. The Tri-City Animal Shelter will make every attempt to get all adopted pets spay or neutered before the holidays, but they strongly encourage that you come early in the month. To view all available pets, go to www.petharbor.com and search for the Fremont Animal Shelter. Holiday Hours Tuesday – Friday: 12 p.m. - 5 p.m. Saturday: 11 a.m. - 5 p.m. Tri-City Animal Shelter 1950 Stevenson Blvd, Fremont (510) 790-6630 The shelter will be closed December 24, 25, 31, 2013 and January 1, 2014

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Page 8 Information found in ‘Protective Services’ is provided to public “as available” by public service agencies - police, fire, etc. Accuracy and authenticity of press releases are the responsibility of the agency

December 10, 2013

providing such information. Tri-City Voice does not make or imply any guarantee regarding the content of information received from authoritative sources.

San Leandro and surrounding communities awarded CalGrip grant SUBMITTED BY SAN LEANDRO PD The City of San Leandro- Police Department is pleased to announce that it will receive an award of $500,000 from the Gang Reduction, Intervention, and Prevention initiative (Cal GRIP). The Cal GRIP initiative is designed to address the increased presence of gangs across the state and their proliferation in suburban and rural areas. With assistance from REACH, the City of San Leandro secured Cal GRIP funding for the next two years. The current award is part of a total of 9.2 million in competitive grants that were awarded to 20 cities in California that face challenges from gang violence. The 2013 Cal GRIP award will fund the implementation of diversion and after school programs in the City of San Leandro. The programs would include education, prevention and gang enforcement. A key to the project will be increasing the collaboration between community and law enforcement in addressing the problem of gang violence. Core partners in the project include the City of San Leandro Police Department, Alameda County Juvenile Probation, Reach Ashland Youth Center,

Sons In Retirement is a nonprofit public benefit corporation for retired men. SIR Branch 59 is one of over 100 SIR branches located throughout Northern California meets at noon on the third Thursday of each month at the Newark Pavilion. Every meeting features a guest speaker from the community. Speakers have included college professors, police officers, retired SF Giant and 49er players, and even the editor of TCV. Twice a year the meeting is open to spouses – the May sweetheart luncheon and the December Holiday Luncheon. The goal of Branch 59 and all other SIR branches throughout Northern California is to provide an avenue for men to have fun in their retirement years. Activities include golf, bowling, walking, computer club, sports, bridge, reading, and much more. Two of the more popular activities are bowling and golf. Members bowl once a week and participate in about 20 tournaments a year. Tournament days usually begin with a breakfast meeting followed by travel to the tournament, sometimes as far as Reno. Some branches allow women to join them in bowling. SIR branch 59 is NCGA certified and plays golf weekly at Sunol. They attend state tournaments about seven times a year. To find more information about the SIR golf group, visit their website at www.sirstategolf.com. The golfers travel to Reno, Las Vegas, Solvang, and the Monterey area for their tournaments. The standard format is scramble, but there is also individual play and 2-man best ball. Ladies (with NCGA handicaps) have a separate tournament at the state tournament, always a scramble format. The average handicap for the SIR golfers statewide is mid-20s.

SIR branch 59 is always looking for new members If interested, visit the SIR websit www.sirinc.org or call 510-794-1184

Alameda County Deputy Sherriff ’s Activity League and the Alameda County Sherriff ’s Office. We are ecstatic that California’s leadership believed in our ideas and they were willing to award us the necessary funds to make our visions come true. Chief Sandra Spagnoli stated, “Community partnerships are key to public safety and protecting our youth from being enticed by joining an organized street gang. CalGrip funding is an investment in San Leandro youth which will pay off in the future through programs and initiatives designed to keep kids and families on the right track.” “We are grateful to receive substantial funding to boost our efforts in guiding our youth to not become involved in gang activity,” stated Mayor Stephen Cassidy. “I congratulate our Police Department and all who worked on obtaining the grant for their success and thank them for their efforts in assisting our youth make sound career and life decisions.” Pedro Naranjo, Executive Director REACH Ashland Youth Center stated, “we want to see young people living in safe neighborhoods where they can walk the streets safely. We want to see young people graduate from high school, make it to college and have ca-

Fremont Police Log SUBMITTED BY GENEVA BOSQUES Friday, November 29 At approximately9:00 a.m. officers were flagged down near the intersection of Mowry Ave and Paseo Padre Pkwy by a citizen who wanted to report that his vehicle had been stolen. His silver 1996 4-door Honda Accord, license plate 3NNA513, was stolen from in front of his residence sometime during the night on the34100 block of Cartwright Place. A 53 year old adult male, transient, was caught by loss prevention at Walmart on Albrae St. cutting open packages. No theft, but he was received into custody by Officer Kindorf for vandalism and possession of burglary tools. He was booked into our jail. Swings and midnight officers were tied up early in the shift (8:30 p.m.) with another large gathering of car enthusiasts in the Costco lot at Pacific Commons. Officers were called to the area on reports of reckless driving. Several callers reported what looked to be a “car show” and gathering of more than 150 vehicles. Upon arrival, officers observed a burgundy Mustang spinning its wheels out, causing smoke. The driver was cited for reckless driving in off street parking and allowed to park the car. Four CHP units assisted with the evening’s traffic enforcement. CSO Allen responded to take a residential burglary report at approximately10:45 p.m.on the39500 block of Logan Dr. The burglary occurred sometime during the evening hours. Unknown suspect(s) entered the home via an open window. The suspects conducted a methodical search, only looking for cash and quality jewelry. Sunday, December 1 At approximately 9:50 a.m. CSO Baca responded to the 46100 block of Research Ave to take an auto theft report. Unknown suspects took the victim’s 2001 light green Lexus GS300 bearing license plate 4NIV723 from the rear parking lot of Motel 6 (south). Based on video surveillance it appears the suspect entered the victims hotel room and took the keys to the Lexus as well as the keys to a Honda Accord, a laptop, a leather jacket and iPod. The suspect is a Hispanic or white male adult, 18-25 years old and was wearing a white and red hat with blue lettering, a dark sport coat with white sleeves, jeans and white shoes. At 11:45 a.m. CSO Aguirre responded to the 4200 block of Bay St to take a stolen vehicle report. A black 1994 Honda Accord 4-door bearing license plate 6JSX624 was taken from the parking lot sometime between 8:30 a.m. - 11:30 a.m. At approximately 12:20 CSO Aguirre responded to the34600 block of Wells Ave to take a late reported residential burglary. The burglary occurred between 10:30 a.m. and 7:00 p.m. on November 30th. The un-

reer opportunities. We want to see less young people struggling to raise children before they are ready. We think these changes are possible. Creating a supportive community that has real alternatives to gangs and violence, and help to get youth out of gangs is essential for creating these changes. The regional collaboration that has come together to create the REACH – OUT: Gang Prevention and Intervention Project will help make these changes come true.” Johri Vassilisa, Director of Health and Wellness at the Reach Ashland Youth Center stated, “Gang interventions are not simple fixes. Young people turn to gangs in search of something missing in their lives they want something compelling, something fundamental - love, belonging, loyalty, family, tribe. These things, along with fear and coercion, are ties that bind. We have to be equally compelling in our solutions to gang involvement and violence. We have to get in with young people and offer something authentic and worthwhile. That requires a commitment to building another road, not just a reaction. We need expertise, capacity and ongoing resource for that.

Union City Police Log

known suspect(s) removed several window screens and broke two dualpane windows to make entry into the residence. Loss is jewelry. Monday, December 2 At approximately 12:40 p.m., officers were dispatched to an address on Morada Ct. after a neighbor witnessed two adult males running from a neighboring residence. The two men got into a red Prius and it left the court. At about the same time we received an alarm activation from the victim residence. Officers checked the area for the suspects, but were unable to locate them. Officer Snyder handled the investigation. Suspect #1: Hispanic male adult, early 30’s, 5’06”, with short black hair wearing a green sweater. Suspect #2: Hispanic male adult, 30’s, approximately 5’06”, short curly black hair no clothing description provided Suspect #3: Driver of the vehicle, no description Suspect Vehicle: Red newer model Toyota Prius At approximately 6:30 p.m., officers responded to the 44000 block of Laurel Canyon Way to investigate a residential burglary that had occurred sometime during the day. The suspects entered a side gate and defeated a lock on the back window of the residence to gain entry. Officer Peters arrived and learned that a red Toyota Prius was seen in the area between 2:30 p.m. – 3:00 p.m., which sounded similar to the vehicle used in the burglary mentioned above. The driver was described as a South Asian Indian adult male. Officers responded to a residential burglary that occurred on the 4100 block of Eggers Dr. on 11/30/13 at approximately 12:30 p.m. Unknown loss, but excellent video of the suspect was obtained. BART report: A victim reported his 2007 red Toyota Yaris was burglarized while it was parked and locked between 7:30 p.m. – 7:00 p.m. The driver side window was smashed, and the interior of the vehicle was ransacked. A victim reported his light blue 6 speed bicycle (unknown model) was stolen while it was U locked near the food vender between 8 a.m. – 6 p.m. Tuesday, December 3 A resident on the 1700 block of Firth Court reported someone knocked on his front door. Moments later, the resident heard the suspect open an interior garage door. The suspect fled the scene when he heard the resident begin to investigate the situation. Officers responded to the area and located a 22 year old adult male, Fremont resident, fleeing the scene. The male’s clothing description and other physical evidence (shoe prints) linked him to the crime. The 22 year old was arrested and transported to FPD and booked for Burglary.

Thursday, November 21 At 12:22 a.m., officers investigated a burglary that occurred at the Game Stop located at the Union Landing shopping center. In this case unknown suspects gained entry into Game Stop by breaking into the vacant building next to the store and burrowing through a shared wall. The burglars were in the process of loading the merchandise in their vehicle when they were interrupted by a security guard. The suspects fled in their vehicle. Officers investigated an assault that occurred on Alvarado Blvd. near the railroad tracks at 11:42 a.m. In this case a female victim was walking when she saw a female suspect throwing rocks at passing motorists. The suspect suddenly focused her attention on the victim and struck her in the arm with a metal object. The suspect then fled the area. Officers investigated a robbery that occurred at the Lucky’s store at Union Landing at 7:35 p.m. In this case a female suspect tried walking out of the store without paying for some alcohol. Store employees attempted to stop her when she suddenly produced a folding knife. The suspect threatened to stab the employees in the neck and then ran away. Officers responded to Wal-Mart at 8:56 p.m. on an assault involving a BB-Gun. In this case a victim reported that he was shopping in the store when he noticed a male juvenile riding a bicycle inside the store. The juvenile suddenly produced some type of BB-Gun and shot the victim in the neck. Store security was called, but the juvenile was not located. Fortunately the victim did not sustain any serious injuries. At 11:46 p.m., officers were patrolling the Shell Gas Station located on Alvarado-Niles Rd. at Almaden Blvd. when they observed a 16 year old male acting very suspicious in the parking lot. The officers contacted the juvenile to make sure he was not a runaway or in need of assistance. As officers spoke with the juvenile, he suddenly turned and ran away. The officers chased the juvenile and detained him a short distance away. The officers located a loaded .38 caliber handgun in the juvenile’s waistband. The juvenile, who appears to be involved in gangs, was arrested and taken to Juvenile Hall. Friday, November 22 At 9:58 p.m., officers stopped a vehicle on Alvarado-Niles Rd. for having expired registration. Officers noticed the smell of marijuana coming from the vehicle. The driver was searched and found to have a stolen 9mm handgun tucked in his waistband. The suspect, Jesse Higgins, was arrested and booked.

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SUBMITTED BY UNION CITY PD


December 10, 2013

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Advisory Council Member position available SUBMITTED BY JUDY YU The Bay Area Air Quality Management District (Air District) is currently seeking to appoint an Advisory Council Member in the Conservation Organization category. There are two vacancies. The Air District is a regional government agency, committed to achieving clean air to protect the public’s health and the environment. The Air District accomplishes this goal through regulation of industrial facilities and various outreach and incentive programs designed to encourage clean air choices. The Air District’s jurisdiction encompasses all of seven counties - Alameda, Contra Costa, Marin, San Francisco, San Mateo, Santa Clara and Napa, and portions of two others southwestern Solano and southern Sonoma. The Air District’s Advisory Council consists of 20 members who live in the Bay Area and bring a variety of backgrounds and areas

SUBMITTED BY KEITH ELROD

E

ight historic homes will open their doors on December 14, giving visitors a peek into the unique charm of Niles during the holiday season. All homes participating are within a 10block radius of the historic Old Niles neighborhood. Attendees will receive a map and can walk or drive the route to see all eight homes on the tour. Ticket proceeds go to the Niles Main Street Association and support events like the summer concert series and NMSA’s historic preservation activities. This year, NMSA is also promoting awareness and fundraising for the Giving Hope program, a program dedicated to helping local seniors, families, and children in need. Giving Hope evolved from the City of Fremont’s employees and a giving program they launched to help local seniors and families in need. Their efforts have brought in an impressive $8,000 each year. In 2009, members of the Niles Community asked to join and help expand the effort. A spark was lit and the program has continued to grow year after year. Like the Niles Main Street Association,

of expertise to discussions and recommendations for addressing air quality issues. The purpose of the Advisory Council is to advise and consult with the Board of Directors and the Air Pollution Control Officer on issues related to air pollution emissions control, health and the environment. This includes studying and making recommendations on specific matters referred to the Advisory Council from the Board of Directors or the Air Pollution Control Officer, including the technical, social, economic, environmental and fiscal aspects of matters being addressed by the Air District. The Council also may identify areas of interest for exploration and study. To apply online or for more information, please visit our website at www.baaqmd.gov/jobs. The application deadline is Thursday, December 12, 2013. If you have further questions call (415) 749-4626.

Giving Hope is a highly collaborative organization that relies on community volunteers. As the Niles Holiday Home Tour attendees roam from house to house, they will have the opportunity to learn more about Niles Main Street Association, the history of Niles, and the Giving Hope program. “Niles is known for neighbors getting to know one another and help each other, and as residents and members of the community, this is exactly the type of program we want to be associated with, and it’s always a lot of fun for everyone involved” said event sponsor, Arin Westendorf. Tickets and a map of the home tour will be available at the Niles Essanay Silent Film Museum located at 37417 Niles Blvd, on the morning of December 14. Niles Holiday Home Tour Saturday, Dec. 14 11 a.m. – 4 p.m. www.niles.org Tickets are $15 in advance or $20 on the day of the event. Tickets can be purchased online at www.niles.org, or at My Friends & I, located at 37521 Niles Blvd, Fremont.

SUBMITTED BY TARTE COSMETICS In the spirit of giving, Tarte will collect canned goods and non-perishable food items to benefit the Food Bank of Alameda County on December 14 at the Ulta in Fremont. If a customer brings in three cans or more, they’ll be issued a raffle ticket to win a gift basket worth $300 of Tarte products! Shop, Donate, and Win Saturday, Dec. 14 Store Hours: 10 a.m. – 9 p.m. Ulta 39221 Fremont Hub, Fremont http://tartecosmetics.com.

Discounts/Discounts/Don’t Discount Us Out INSURANCE

Who’s Got Your Hands? 510-790-1118 www.insurancemsm.com

#OB84518

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History

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rivers speeding down Mission Boulevard may not realize that they are following an early pioneer route and passing some of the most historic spots in Alameda County. Stanford Winery at

plant vineyards and establish an extensive winery operation. An historical landmark plaque states that the winery was founded by Leland Stanford; “The vineyard planted by his brother, Josiah Stanford, helped prove that wines

erected to the rear of the mill buildings formed a kind of quadrangle. A flume from Niles Canyon led the water around behind the warehouse to the mill where it turned a huge, 30 foot water wheel that powered the

Webel Vineyards

Mission San Jose Boulevard

Warm Springs, Mission San Jose and the Vallejo Flour Mill are registered California historical landmarks. The historic Dry Creek Picnic area near Decoto is a regional park.

equal to any in the world could be produced in California.” Restored buildings and the winery were later occupied and operated by the Weibel Champagne Vineyards that have moved to Mendocino County. Ohlone College occupies the previous site of the famous Linda Vista vineyard, orchard, park and dairy. Below the campus is the relocated Mission Rectory and Museum of Local History. Located a short distance away, across Washington Boulevard, the famous Palmdale Gardens are located, now owned by the Sisters of the Holy Family. Mission San Jose, the fourteenth of the Alta California Missions, was founded June 11, 1797. It grew until vast herds covered the land for miles around; its cattle and crops made it one of the most prosperous missions that supplied food to soldiers and others even when food was hard to get. A huge complex of adobe buildings was

grinding machinery inside. The City of Fremont owns the property and has periodically reviewed plans to reconstruct part of the mill, but so far, it remains in ruins. Dry Creek was once the most famous picnic site in our area. The Dry Creek Apartment complex at Whipple Road and Mission Blvd. marks the former entrance to the picnic grounds well-known from about 1855 to 1883. Many great May Day and Independence Day celebrations were held here. Families came from miles around to enjoy refreshments, visiting, dancing, games, contests, sports, gunning, Maypole, speeches, music, literary and patriotic exercises. As more people joined the festivities, one day was not enough for the fun seekers so some May Day festivities were expanded to three or four days. Horse-drawn wagons and surreys sometimes were available to carry railway passengers from the train depot. Dry Creek Pioneer Park is operated in tan-

Massonic Home

It takes a bit of imagination to visualize Warm Springs Landing. It used to be just beyond the Nimitz Freeway where it intersects Mission Boulevard at its southern end. The original Warm Springs Village was located nearby, where Mission Boulevard meets Warm Springs Boulevard; a lone palm tree serves as a reminder of days gone by. Among the most interesting and historical features of our area, five of the six springs were located at the end of Stanford Lane. Water gushed from the side of a hill at about 90 degrees and contained a mixture of minerals, making it very soft. Spanish families came long distances to wash their clothes in the warm, soft water. Clement Columbet piped the waters into his hotel at the springs and established the most famous and fashionable resort in California. Leland Stanford bought the property in 1870 and asked his brother to build a race track,

erected around a quadrangle of dormitories, workshops, storerooms and the church. Under Father Narciso Duran, the mission became the administrative seat for all of the missions and gained fame for its talented native musicians. Today you can visit the surviving Adobe that houses a museum, the reconstructed adobe church and adjacent cemetery. Signs on Mission Boulevard note the Vallejo Flour Mill site, Historical Landmark No. 46. A small sign just north of Niles Canyon Road indicates that you have arrived at the site. Straight ahead are Eucalyptus trees, a pit and crumbling stone foundation, all that remains of what was one of the most famous flour mills in California. These are vestiges of Vallejo’s second mill which towered over the site. His first mill, built in 1841, housed a 100 foot long, two-story adobe building. A 200 foot long wooden warehouse

dem with Garin Regional Park but is a separate park under terms of property transfer from previous owners, the Meyers sisters.

PHILIP HOLMES PEEK INTO THE PAST www.museumoflocalhistory.org Photos courtesy of The Museum of Local History


December 10, 2013

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Ohlone Humane Society

BY NANCY LYON I’m not sure what happened to October and November; they seem to have run through my reality without much notice and here it is – December. Since this is a time of celebration for a number of traditions that include the giving of gifts, whenever I can, I like to make my gift a book – although I have to admit it’s usually one I hope to “borrow” and read when time allows. While browsing the many selections that are available in hard/paper cover and electronically, there were some great possibilities that I feel many animal-caring friends would appreciate. They are stories that may even touch and enlighten those who have not been fortunate enough to have animals grace their lives. Because I’m a fan of Dr. Marc Bekhoff, Ph.D., my first choice is The Emotional Lives of Animals: A Leading Scientist Explores Animal Joy, Sorrow, and Empathy and Why They Matter. I’ve enjoyed not only his previous observations as a scientist but his subtle humor and obvious respect and understanding of other-thanhuman animals. There is a wonderful and inspiring forward by famed primatologist Dr. Jane Goodall that is not to be missed, and a message in the introduction from His Holiness the Dalai Lama that reads in part, “…as rational human beings, we have an obligation to contribute in whatever way we can to the happiness of other species and try our best to relieve their fears and sufferings, I firmly believe the more we care for the happiness of others, the greater our sense of well-being becomes. Therefore, I welcome Marc Bekoff’s The Emotional Lives of Animals.”

My second choice would be Unlikely Friendships: 47 Remarkable Stories from the Animal Kingdom by Jennifer Holland. Holland Read more is a writer for National Geographic magazine that has documented accounts of deep bonds of friendship and loyalty between animal species that usually do not interact. These relationships clearly indicate that their emotions are akin to those of humans. Revealing tales directly challenge the scientific community’s assertions that this is not possible and are simply misinterpretations by the observer. The 47 stories of “other kingdoms” seriously question the validity of this limited world view. Jennifer Holland has also authored several noteworthy books for children, depicting these surprising, “unlikely friendships” between other-than-human animals. While checking through the many children’s books about animals, it was easy to select the beloved works of veterinarian and author James Herriot. My choice was his wonderful children’s book: James Herriot’s Treasury for Children: Warm and Joyful Tales by the Author of All Creatures Great and Small; a delightful collection of heartwarming true stories located in the dales of northern England in the midtwentieth century. Wonderful

stories that touch the heart, two of my favorites are The Christmas Kitten and Smudge, the Lost Lamb; the truth is, you don���t have to be a youngster to enjoy the stories and the beautiful illustrations of a time that seems so long ago still touch us today. Highly recommended for all who are young at heart. Here’s wishing you time to read and ponder the remarkable lives of species other than our own, and a Merry Christmas and Happy Holidays! “Whenever you read a good book, somewhere in the world a door opens to allow in more light.” ~ Vera Nazarian The Emotional Lives of Animals: A Leading Scientist Explores Animal Joy, Sorrow, and Empathy - and Why They Matter; New World Library; First Trade Paper Edition Unlikely Friendships: 47 Remarkable Stories from the Animal Kingdom; Workman Publishing Company James Herriot’s Treasury for Children: Warm and Joyful Tales by the Author of All Creatures Great – available in hardcover/paperback and audio CD; St. Martin’s Press; 1st edition (September 1, 1992)

510-792-4587 39120 Argonaut Way #108, Fremont, Ca. 94538-1304

SUBMITTED BY RUBY ’S PLACE Ruby’s Place (formerly Emergency Shelter Program), a shelter and resource center created especially for women and children who have been the victims of abuse, exploitation, or homelessness, is proud to announce its new name. More than 100 guests gathered to celebrate during an elegant champagne brunch on October 20 to unveil their new name and hear inspirational words from Vera R. Ciammetti, executive director of Ruby’s Place, as she shared the organization’s 40 year history and thanked those who helped select the agency’s new name. Attending the celebration brunch was Betty Moose, one of the shelter’s founders, who shared her story of how ESP became the first shelter for battered women and children in the Bay Area. “In those days, there was no government funding,” shared Moose. “We did what we could and passed the plate during Sunday church services.” Anthony and Melanie Narducci, who created the name after responding to a contest the agency held in September, further demonstrated their support by kick-starting a special “Ruby’s Fund.” Their pledged was met with extreme generosity as a donation basket was passed throughout the room, in

www.ohlonehumanesociety.org

keeping with the spirit of the story told by the founder. The audience was also honored to hear the story of Menbe Aklilu, hostess, owner, and founder of Salute Ristorante in Richmond. Aklilu survived years of abuse, violence, and even witnessed her mother’s murder in Ethiopia. She shared stories about her journey from homelessness in Ethiopia, to Italy, where she gave birth to a son in a women’s shelter, and eventually arriving in America. Despite years of hopelessness, she is proud business owner. While enjoying great food, company, and ambiance, guests were able to participate in a silent auction. In addition, Ruby’s Place Board members, staff members, donors, and volunteers were all recognized for their outstanding dedication, commitment, and support of Ruby’s Place throughout the years. Learn more about the free services offered at Ruby’s Place by visiting www.rubysplace.org or by calling the office at (510) 581-5626 or the hotline at (888) 339-SAFE.

The Tri-City Alameda County Chapter invites Tri-City churches and other organizations to toll their bells on December 14. A service will follow. Sponsors for the event include: Tri-City Alameda County Chapter Brady Campaign to Prevent Gun Violence, The Tri-City Interfaith Council, Pax Christi Fremont, Dominican Sisters of Mission San Jose, Sisters of the Holy Family, and Interfaith Women of Peace. Please not that this is a solemn non-political interfaith vigil. No signs, please.

SUBMITTED BY TONI SHELLEN As we solemnly remember the one-year anniversary of the tragedy at Sandy Hook School, honor all victims lost to gun violence and strengthen our collective recommitment to prevent gun violence. The Tri-City Alameda County Chapter of the Brady Campaign to Prevent Gun Violence has planned an Interfaith Vigil for that day.

Sandy Hook Vigil Saturday, Dec. 14 9:30 a.m. The Mission bells will toll 26 times at 9:35 a.m. Mission San Jose Church 43300 Mission Blvd, Fremont For information and/or to commit to bell tolling, please contact Toni Shellen at tricitybrady@gmail.com.

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WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

December 10, 2013

Rising riches: 1 in 5 in US reaches affluence BY HOPE YEN ASSOCIATED PRESS

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Costly Homeseller Mistakes You Need to Avoid When You Sell Your Home! Tri-City – A new report has just been release which reveals 7 costly mistakes that most homeowners make when selling their home, and a 9 Step System that can help you sell your home fast and for the most amount of money. This industry report shows clearly how the traditional ways of selling homes have become increasingly less and less effective in today’s market. The fact of the matter is that nearly three quarters of homesellers don’t get what they want for their home and become disillusioned and – worse – financially disadvantaged when they put their home on the market. As this report uncovers, most homesellers make 7 deadly mistakes that cost them literally thousands of dollars. The good news is that each and every one of these mistakes is entirely preventable. In answer to this issue, industry insiders have prepared a free special report entitled “The 9 Step System to Get Your Home Sold Fast and For Top Dollar”. To hear a brief recorded message about how to order your free copy of this report, call 1-800-228-3917 and enter ID #1000. You can call anytime, 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. This report is courtesy of Capital Realty Group. Not intended to solicit properties currently listed for sale.

WASHINGTON (AP), It’s not just the wealthiest 1 percent. Fully 20 percent of U.S. adults become rich for parts of their lives, wielding outsize influence on America’s economy and politics. This littleknown group may pose the biggest barrier to reducing the nation’s income inequality. The growing numbers of the U.S. poor have been well documented, but survey data provided to The Associated Press detail the flip side of the record income gap – the rise of the “new rich.’’ Made up largely of older professionals, working married couples and more educated singles, the new rich are those with household income of $250,000 or more at some point during their working lives. That puts them, if sometimes temporarily, in the top 2 percent of earners. Even outside periods of unusual wealth, members of this group generally hover in the $100,000-plus income range, keeping them in the top 20 percent of earners. Companies increasingly are marketing to this rising demographic, fueling a surge of “mass luxury’’ products and services from premium Starbucks coffee and organic groceries to concierge medicine and VIP lanes at airports. Political parties are taking a renewed look at the up-forgrabs group, once solidly Republican. They’re not the traditional rich. In a country where poverty is at a record high, today’s new rich are notable for their sense of economic fragility. They’re reached the top 2 percent, only to fall below it, in many cases. That makes them much more fiscally conservative than other Americans, polling suggests, and less likely to support public programs, such as food stamps or early public education, to help the disadvantaged. Last week, President Barack Obama asserted that growing inequality is “the defining challenge of our time,’’ signaling that it will be a major theme for Democrats in next year’s elections. New research suggests that affluent Americans are more numerous than government data depict, encompassing 21 percent of working-age adults for at least a year by the time they turn 60. That proportion has more than doubled since 1979. At the same time, an increasing polarization of low-wage work and high-skill jobs has left middle-income careers depleted. “For many in this group, the American dream is not dead. They have reached affluence for parts of their lives and see it as very attainable, even if the dream has become more elusive for everyone else,’’ says Mark Rank, a professor at Washington University in St. Louis, who calculated numbers on the affluent for a forthcoming book, “Chasing the American Dream,’’ by the Oxford University Press. As the fastest-growing group based on take-home pay, the new rich tend to enjoy better schools, employment and gated communities, making it easier to pass on their privilege to their children. Their success has implications for politics and policy. The group is more liberal than lower-income groups on issues such

as abortion and gay marriage, according to an analysis of General Social Survey data by the AP-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research. But when it comes to money, their views aren’t so open. They’re wary of any government role in closing the income gap. In Gallup polling in October, 60 percent of people making $90,000 or more said average Americans already had “plenty of opportunity’’ to get ahead. Among those making less than $48,000, the share was 48 percent. “In this country, you don’t get anywhere without working hard,’’ said James Lott, 28, a pharmacist in Renton, Wash., who adds to his sixfigure salary by day-trading stocks. The son of Nigerian-American immigrants, Lott says he was able to get ahead by earning an advanced pharmacy degree. He makes about $200,000 a year. After growing up on food stamps, Lott now splurges occasionally on nicer restaurants, Hugo Boss shoes and extended vacations to New Orleans, Atlanta and parts of Latin America. He believes government should play a role in helping the disadvantaged. But he says the poor should be encouraged to support themselves, explaining that his single mother rose out of hardship by starting a day-care business in their home. “I definitely don’t see myself as rich,’’ says Lott, who is saving to purchase a downtown luxury condominium. That will be the case, he says, “the day I don’t have to go to work every single day.’’ ––– Sometimes referred to by marketers as the ``mass affluent,’’ the new rich make up roughly 25 million U.S. households and account for nearly 40 percent of total U.S. consumer spending. While paychecks shrank for most Americans after the 2007-2009 recession, theirs held steady or edged higher. In 2012, the top 20 percent of U.S. households took home a record 51 percent of the nation’s income. The median income of this group is more than $150,000. Once concentrated in the oldmoney enclaves of the Northeast, the new rich are now spread across the U.S., mostly in bigger cities and their suburbs. They include Washington, D.C., Boston, Los Angeles, New York, San Francisco and Seattle. By race, whites are three times more likely to reach affluence than nonwhites. Paul F. Nunes, managing director at Accenture’s Institute for High Performance and Research, calls this group “the new power brokers of consumption.’’ Because they spend just 60 percent of their before-tax income, often setting the rest aside for retirement or investing, he says their capacity to spend more will be important to a U.S. economic recovery. In Miami, developers are betting on a growing luxury market, building higher-end malls featuring Cartier, Armani and Louis Vuitton, and hoping to expand on South Florida’s Bal Harbour, a favored hideaway of the rich. “It’s not that I don’t have money. It’s more like I don’t have time,’’ said Deborah Sponder, 57, walking her dog Ava recently along Miami’s blossoming Design District. She was headed to one of her two art galleries – this one between the Emilio Pucci and Cartier stores and close to the Louis Vuitton and Hermes

storefronts. But Sponder says she doesn’t consider her income of $250,000 as upper class, noting that she is paying college tuition for her three children. “Between rent, schooling and everything – it comes in and goes out.’’ Economists say the group’s influence will only grow as middle-class families below them struggle. Corporate profits and the stock market are hitting records while the median household income of $51,000 is at its lowest since 1995. That’s a boon for upper-income people who are more likely to invest in stocks. At the same time, some 54 percent of working-age Americans will experience near-poverty for portions of their lives, hurt by globalization and the loss of good-paying manufacturing jobs. ––– Both Democrats and Republicans are awakening to the political realities presented by this new demographic bubble. Traditionally Republican, the group makes up more than 1 in 4 voters and is now more politically divided, better educated and less white and male than in the past, according to Election Day exit polls dating to the 1970s. Sixty-nine percent of upper-income voters backed Republican Ronald Reagan and his supply-side economics of tax cuts in 1984. By 2008, Democrat Barack Obama had split their vote evenly, 49-49. In 2012, Obama lost the group, with 54 percent backing Republican Mitt Romney. Still, Obama’s performance among higher-income voters exceeded nearly every Democrat before him. Some Democratic analysts have urged the party to tread more lightly on issues of income inequality, even after the recent election of New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio, who made the issue his top campaign priority. In recent weeks, media attention has also focused on growing liberal enthusiasm for Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., whose push to hold banks and Wall Street accountable could stoke Occupy Wall Street-style populist anger against the rich. “For the Democrats’ part, traditional economic populism is poorly suited for affluent professionals,’’ says Alan Abramowitz, an Emory University professor who specializes in political polarization. The new rich includes Robert Kane, 39, of Colorado Springs, Colo. A former stock broker who once owned three houses and voted steadfastly Republican, Kane says he was humbled after the 2008 financial meltdown, which he says exposed Wall Street’s excesses. Now a senior vice president for a private equity firm specializing in the marijuana business, Kane says he’s concerned about upward mobility for the poor and calls wealthy politicians such as Romney “out of touch.’’ But Kane, now a registered independent, draws the line when it comes to higher taxes. “A dollar is best in your hand rather than the government’s,’’ he says. ––– AP Director of Polling Jennifer Agiesta, News Survey Specialist Dennis Junius, and AP writers Suzette Laboy in Miami and Kristen Wyatt in Denver contributed to this report.

Spotify to unveil free mobile streaming service BY RYAN NAKASHIMA AP BUSINESS WRITER

LOS ANGELES (AP), Spotify, the Swedish music streaming service, is set to announce a new feature that will allow users to pick specific tracks and listen to them on mobile devices for free. That’s according to a person familiar with the matter who was not authorized to speak about the feature. It will be announced at an event in New York on Wednesday. The person spoke on condition of anonymity. The Wall Street Journal reported earlier on the free feature, saying it will mostly serve up music based on the user’s input. The person went further, saying users can pick tracks and put them in a playlist. If the playlist is long

enough, Spotify will shuffle the songs and play them back a limited number of times, interspersed with ads. If there are not enough songs in the selection, Spotify will fill in the gaps with other songs, the person said. A Spotify spokesman declined to comment Thursday. Currently, Spotify offers free mobile listening of randomized songs along genres in the U.S. but doesn’t allow users to pick specific tracks without paying. Free ad-supported listening with track selection is available on computers. As more listening occurs on the go, the company sought a way to adapt its ``freemium’’ model, where it hooks people with the free version and entices them to upgrade to a paid premium plan, the person said.

A premium subscription, which costs $10 a month in the U.S., allows customers to listen to any songs or albums they choose, without ads. The premium plan also allows users to save music to their mobile devices. The free version of Spotify won’t allow that, meaning subway commuters might face some interruptions while streaming. The new feature is set to be unveiled after the company this week released a slew of data and new tools that enable artists to track playback of their songs on the service. Spotify said that as of March it had over 24 million users globally, of which 6 million paid $10, 10 pounds or 10 euros per month for premium service. It also said it had paid out more than $1 billion in royalties for songs.


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Supreme Court will take up new health law dispute BY MARK SHERMAN ASSOCIATED PRESS WASHINGTON (AP), The Supreme Court agreed Tuesday to referee another dispute over President Barack Obama’s health care law: whether businesses may use religious objections to escape a requirement to cover birth control for employees. The justices said they will take up an issue that has divided the lower courts in the face of roughly 40 lawsuits from for-profit companies asking to be spared from having to cover some or all forms of contraception. The Obama administration promotes the law’s provision of a range of preventive care, free of charge, as a key benefit of the health care overhaul. Contraception is included in the package of cost-free benefits, which opponents say is an attack on the religious freedom of employers. The court will consider two cases. One involves Hobby Lobby Inc., an Oklahoma City-based arts and crafts chain with 13,000 full-time employees. Hobby Lobby won in the lower courts. The other case is an appeal from Conestoga Wood Specialties Corp., a Pennsylvania company that employs 950 people in making wood cabinets. Lower courts rejected the company’s claims. The court said the cases will be combined for arguments, probably in late March. A decision should

come by late June. The cases center on the provision of the law that requires most employers that offer health insurance to their workers to provide the range of preventive health benefits. In both instances, the Christian families that own the companies say that insuring some forms of contraception violates their religious beliefs. The key issue is whether profitmaking corporations may assert religious beliefs under the 1993 Religious Freedom Restoration Act or the First Amendment provision guaranteeing Americans the right to believe and worship as they choose. Nearly four years ago, the justices expanded the concept of corporate “personhood,’’ saying in the Citizens United case that corporations have the right to participate in the political process the same way that individuals do. Some lower court judges have applied the same logic in the context of religious beliefs. “The government has no business forcing citizens to choose between making a living and living free,’’ said David Cortman of the Alliance Defending Freedom, the Christian public interest law firm that is representing Conestoga Wood at the Supreme Court. White House press secretary Jay Carney said the health care law “puts women and families in control of their health care by covering vital

preventive care, like cancer screenings and birth control, free of charge.’’ Carney said the administration already has exempted churches from the requirement, and has created a buffer between faith-affiliated charities and contraceptive coverage by requiring insurers or another third party to provide contraceptive coverage instead of the religious employer. Separate lawsuits are challenging that arrangement. The issue is largely confined to religious institutions and family-controlled businesses with a small number of shareholders. A survey by the Kaiser Family Foundation found 85 percent of large American employers already had offered coverage before the health care law required it. Hobby Lobby calls itself a ``biblically founded business’’ and is closed on Sundays. Founded in 1972, the company now operates more than 500 stores in 41 states. The Green family, Hobby Lobby’s owners, also owns the Mardel Christian bookstore chain. The 10th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals said corporations can be protected by the 1993 law in the same manner as individuals, and ``that the contraceptive-coverage requirement substantially burdens Hobby Lobby and Mardel’s rights under’’ the law. In its Supreme Court brief, the administration said the appeals court ruling was wrong and, if allowed to stand, would make the law “a sword

Govt plan aims to keep older drivers safe on road BY KEVIN FREKING ASSOCIATED PRESS WASHINGTON (AP), Silver could take on a whole new meaning when it comes to car shopping. With more older drivers on the road, the federal government is contemplating a ``silver car’’ rating system that will help identify which cars better protect elderly drivers and passengers in a crash. Federal highway safety officials will investigate the possibility of such a rating system as part of a five-year plan designed to reduce the number of fatal and injury-causing accidents among older drivers. The plan, released Thursday, also called for more research into how technology could prevent crashes or reduce their severity. One promising technology warns drivers when their car has moved outside its lane. Another automatically applies the brakes when a car is destined to ram the vehicle in front of it. Over the past decade, the number of fatality crashes in the U.S. has declined significantly, but the progress had been more modest for older drivers, and came to a halt last year when 5,560 people over the age of 65 were killed as a result of motor vehicle crashes, a 3 percent increase from 2011. Another 214,000 were injured, a rise of 16 percent. The government has a 5-star safety rating system for vehicles. It’s now asking whether it can do better when it comes to older drivers. They are expected to drive more miles and drive later into life than previous generations. “Let me be clear. What we’re talking about here is information. Information is power. This is not something that is going to change the price of vehicles,’’ said David Friedman, deputy administrator for the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. ``The idea is to get consumers as smart as they

can be about their safety choices when they walk into the showroom.’’ About one in five drivers, or 35 million, currently are 65 or older. The aging of the 77 million baby boomer generation – those born between 1946 and 1964 – will add to the number of older drivers on the road. NHTSA’s plan focused on helping them drive as safely and as long as possible rather than trying to restrict their driving access. Outside safety analysts said the plan’s emphasis on technology was welcome because it should lead to more confident and safe drivers. Lane departure warnings and smart headlights that adjust based on distance to traffic are already available, but they are often considered a luxury item. Such technology will become more and more prevalent in the coming years, said Jodi Olshevski, director of the Hartford Center for Mature Market Excellence. “The technology is evolving so quickly that understanding more about how it can benefit older drivers is really critical,’’ Olshevski said. Friedman said the technology developed in recent years has done much to make cars safer when they crash. Now, the question is whether crashes can be prevented entirely. He said the ``holy grail’’ for drivers, especially older drivers, is a vehicle that can drive itself. “This is I think where a lot of folks would like to see us go. There’s incredible potential,’’ Friedman said. ``It’s something we’re working day and night on to do the research to make sure it can be done right, it can be done safely and it can be done right out of the gate.’’ Olshevski said the plan’s emphasis on keeping drivers on the road is the right one because it will help more of the elderly maintain their independence.

used to deny employees of for-profit commercial enterprises the benefits and protections of generally applicable laws.’’ Conestoga Wood is owned by a Mennonite family who “object as a matter of conscience to facilitating contraception that may prevent the implantation of a human embryo in the womb.’’ The 3rd U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals ruled against the company on its claims under the 1993 law and the Constitution, saying ``for-profit, secular corporations cannot engage in religious exercise.’’ The Supreme Court will have to confront several questions: Can these businesses hold religious beliefs; does the health care provision significantly infringe on those beliefs and, even if the answer to the first two questions is “yes,’’ does the government still have a sufficient interest in guaranteeing women who work for the companies access to contraception? The justices chose two cases in which the companies object to only a few of the 20 forms of contraception approved by the Food and Drug Administration. In a third case in which the court took no action Tuesday, Michigan-based Autocam Corp. doesn’t want to pay for any contraception for its employees because of its owners’ Roman Catholic beliefs. The emergency contraceptives Plan B and Ella work mostly by pre-

Consistent hiring points to stronger economy ahead BY CHRISTOPHER S. RUGABER AP ECONOMICS WRITER WASHINGTON (AP), The job market is showing signs of the consistent gains the nation has awaited in the 41/2 years since the Great Recession. Employers added 203,000 jobs in November, and the unemployment rate fell to 7 percent, a five-year low, the Labor Department reported Friday. Four straight months of robust hiring have raised hopes that 2014 will be the year the economy returns to normal. The steady job growth could also hasten a move by the Federal Reserve to reduce its stimulus efforts. Stock investors were heartened by the report. The Dow Jones industrial average jumped 198 points. A steadily improving job market could give consumers and business executives the confidence to keep spending and investing, even if a pullback by the Fed leads to higher interest rates. The Fed has been buying bonds each month to try to keep long-term borrowing rates low to spur spending and growth. The celebration on Wall Street suggested that investors think a healthier job market, if it fuels more spending, would outweigh higher borrowing rates caused by a Fed pullback. “It’s hinting very, very strongly that the economy is starting to ramp up, that growth is getting better, that businesses are hiring,’’ said Joel Naroff, president of Naroff Economic Advisors. The economy has added a four-month average of 204,000 jobs from August through November, up sharply from 159,000 a month from April through July. “The consistency (in hiring) is actually reassuring,’’ said Doug Handler, chief U.S. economist at IHS Global Insight. ``Slow and steady is something you can plan and build on.’’ The Fed could start slowing its bond purchases as soon as its Dec. 17-18 meeting. Some economists think the Fed may only telegraph a move at that meeting and wait until early next year to cut back. Even if the Fed does start reining in its stimulus, most economists

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venting ovulation. The FDA says on its website that Plan B ``may also work by preventing fertilization of an egg ... or by preventing attachment (implantation) to the womb (uterus),’’ while Ella also may work by changing the lining of the uterus so as to prevent implantation. Hobby Lobby specifically argues that two intrauterine devices (IUDs) also may prevent implantation of a fertilized egg. The company’s owners say they believe life begins at conception, and they oppose only birth control methods that can prevent implantation of a fertilized egg in the uterus, but not other forms of contraception. In siding with the administration, several women’s groups rejected what they see as efforts by the businesses to come between women and their doctors. The health care law’s inclusion of contraception among preventive health benefits was a major victory in a decades-long fight for equal coverage for women’s reproductive health care needs, said Marcia Greenberger, co-president of the National Women’s Law Center. Citing the example of IUDs, Greenberger said the devices may be the safest, most effective way to prevent pregnancy for women who cannot take the birth control pill. But at $500 to $1,000 for an IUD, “the cost can be prohibitive,’’ she said.


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December 10, 2013

Pat Kite’s Garden BY PAT KITE My daughter insists I make fresh cranberry sauce for our Holiday dinner. Every year I concoct this, and every year it tastes like pucker central. Nobody eats it, so I take home the leftovers. Since I hate wasting food, I try to make something with the leftovers, such as cranberry chutney. After a week or so, I plop the resulting concoction into my compost pile, otherwise I will eat it all despite the taste. Resident sparrows check out the compost pile. Eventually it becomes worm food if worms like cranberries. Actually, cranberries are rather healthy, containing Vitamin A, C, and potassium. Our Native Americans were using wild cranberries long before Columbus parked his boots on the new world. Names varied: “Sassamanesh” by eastern Indians and “Atoqua” by the Algonquians in Wisconsin. These names more or less translate as “sour berries.” In that long ago organic world, Native Americans cooked

cranberries with dried deer meat and melted fat for a winter survival meal, sweetening it with maple sugar or honey. Cranberries and cornmeal were baked to make bread. Cape Cod tribes used a cranberry dressing to treat wounds from poisoned arrows. Cranberry juice dye colored rugs, clothing and blankets. Our Pilgrims learned from the Indians, creating sauces, cranberry tarts and cranberry drinks. They apparently coined the word “cranberry” coming from “crane berry” since the plant’s pale pink flowers resembled the head of cranberry-nibbling sand-hill crane birds. About 200 years after Pilgrim landing, Massachusetts’s settlers began cultivating cranberries in drained bogs with acid subsoil. Among other uses was protecting sailors against scurvy. Today, about two-thirds of our nation’s crop comes from the sandy bogs of Cape Cod. I know somebody is going to ask me if they can grow cranber-

ries in their backyard. From a garden book, I quote, “Unless your garden is a bog there is only one practical way to grow Cranberries. Dig a hole about one yard square and one spit deep. Line it with polythene and fill with a mixture of three parts moss peat, one part loam, one part sharp sand and one part sawdust…” Etc. Since most folk have cranberry sauce at a seasonal Holiday dinner, and have family who prefer canned to my home-macerated concoction, thanks go to Elizabeth Lee. She was a New Jersey cranberry farmer who first made cranberry sauce. In 1917 she began selling it in cans, labeled “Bog Sweet.” Later she joined up with Marcus Urann of Massachusetts. Together they formed the company known as Ocean Spray. Today the company harvests over 120 million pounds of cranberries. I shall think of this during my Holiday dinner… burp. And a Happy Newest Year to you-all.

TRI-CITY GARDEN CLUB MEETINGS: Friends of Heirloom Flowers Work Parties - Every Tuesday - at Shinn Park, 10 a.m. - 12 p.m.

1251 Peralta near Mowry, Fremont (510) 656-7702 Bring gloves and tools. - Social Hour afterward Every Thursday, 10 a.m. - 12 p.m. Niles Rose Garden - 36501 Niles Boulevard, Fremont Bring gloves and tools. [Across Driveway from Mission Adobe Nursery] Contact Joyce Ruiz: 659-9396 Meetings are held quarterly. Call for details Fremont Senior Center Garden Club First Friday of each month, 2 p.m. Janice Anderman, program coordinator 510-790-6602 Fremont Garden Club The Fremont Garden Club meets the third Wednesday of each month, February - October, in members’ homes & gardens, 6:30 p.m. - 8:30 p.m. Locations are posted on the Fremont Garden Clubs’ web site at www.fremontgardenclub.org or email: fremontgardenclub@hotmail.com

SUBMITTED BY SANTA CLARA VALLEY TRANSPORTATION AUTHORITY The Santa Clara Valley Transportation Authority (VTA) has launched its annual food drive to help the hungry, and invites the public to help them reach their goal of donating 1,500 pounds of food and $500 to Second Harvest Food Bank. VTA is partnering with Second Harvest to bring relief to the one in 10 people the Food Bank serves each month in Santa Clara and San Mateo counties. “Hunger is not a seasonal issue, although it is certainly on our minds more during the holidays; as we count our blessings, we also reflect on the 49 million people in our country who do not have enough to eat,” said Greta Helm, VTA Chief External Affairs Officer. “VTA employees and our cus-

PAT KITE L. Patricia [Pat] Kite’s several garden books include KISS Guide to Gardening, Gardening Wizardry for Kids, Raccoons, Ladybug Facts and Folklore and Silkworms. They may be found at Amazon.com and Alibris.com.

tomers know that recent increases in housing and other basic living expenses are straining many family budgets. We look forward to this opportunity to share with our neighbors in need.” The most needed foods include: meals in a can (stew, chili, soup, etc.), tuna and canned meat, peanut butter, canned foods with pop-top lids, lowsugar cereals, 100% fruit juices in single serving boxes, and canned vegetables (low salt). VTA asks that you help avoid breakage by not donating items in glass containers. You can help by donating at VTA’s Downtown Customer Service Center located at 55-A West Santa Clara Street in downtown San Jose. For more information, contact VTA Customer Service at (408) 321-2300 or visit www.vta.org.

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December 10, 2013

BY FRANK JAHN, ACWD PUBLIC INFORMATION SUPERVISOR The sense of anticipation was palpable as the crowd waited for the explosion. The year was 1969. My brother and I, as well as a number of the neighborhood kids,

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

enough, and with a muffled roar disgorged its contents all over her. Raucous laughter filled the yard as my sister burst into tears. My mom moved to comfort her dripping daughter, my dad set about cleaning up the mess, the crowd dispersed, and I walked away with an indelible memory.

The author (second from the right), his siblings, and neighborhood friends await the coming explosion.

were gathered in my backyard. In front of us stood my dad, a grim expression clouding his face. On the ground sat my eight year old sister who looked nervously at the large unstable object behind her. It would happen any time now… An hour earlier, my dad had gathered the necessary paraphernalia for an annual demonstration that had become legendary in our neighborhood. The ingredients were simple: an old inner tube, preferably from the tire of a large pickup truck; a garden hose; some baling wire; and children willing to suffer public humiliation. As the crowd gathered, my dad began the ritual. He cut the inner tube, turning it into a long, hollow tube. Next, he wrapped baling wire around one end to make a water-tight seal. He then thrust a garden hose into the other end and used wire to seal it inside. Finally, he turned on the water and the black beast came to life. A large inner tube can hold hundreds of gallons of water, and so it took a while before the dares began. But once it had grown to resemble a giant, black sausage it was obligatory for each spectator to take their turn sitting up against its quivering black mass. Someone would be unfortunate enough to be sitting there when it reached its carrying capacity. The moment we were all waiting for had taken various forms in past years. Sometimes the inner tube would spring one or more leaks and drain slowly in an anticlimactic way. Sometimes the baling wire seal would fail, sending a miniature tsunami toward unsuspecting spectators off to the side. And sometimes there would be a mighty explosion, drenching anyone standing within the blast zone. Whatever might happen this time around, none of us wanted to bear the ridicule that would be ours if we were in the wrong place at the wrong time. We had all had at least one turn in the hot seat when my sister’s turn came around again. She smiled – apprehensively – for the camera when my mom snapped a picture. And then, without warning, the inner tube had had

Water plays a central role in so many of my memories. For instance, there was the time in Icy Bay in Alaska when I watched millions of sun-illuminated rain drops streak across the sky like so many glittering diamonds. And the time on the shore of the Alsek River in Canada when I had to outrun a wave created when the Tweedsmuir Glacier calved a skyscraper’s worth of ice into the water. And the time, when I was in grade school, when I almost drowned in Roslyn Lake. (Never mind the fact that I was in only three feet of water and simply needed to stand up to escape my doom.) And the time in high school, when I was nearly swept over the lip of a 150-foot high waterfall. As I search my memory, however, I can find no recollection of ever really wanting for water. Sure, there has been the occasional backpacking trip when my water bottle has run dry, but those were self-inflicted circumstances. In my everyday life, water has been a constant companion… there whenever I’ve wanted it. And not only that, the water has always been safe to drink, abundant, and convenient. If you grew up in the United States, I suspect your experience has been similar. We live in a country where nearly everyone has access to clean, abundant, low-cost tap water. We are in the minority, however. Billions of people around the world lack this basic necessity. And if you were to ask these people how water impacts their memories, I’m afraid you’d all too often hear stories of children lost to water-borne diseases, daily journeys to the local well or river, and the time consuming nature of washing dishes or doing laundry. As you celebrate this holiday season with family and friends, think of those whose lives are dominated by a struggle for clean water and make a commitment, no matter how small, to help alleviate that struggle. Leave them with memories of water they’ll be glad to recall.

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December 10, 2013


December 10, 2013

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

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Hilarious Holiday Farce David Tuttle is moonlighting as a department store Santa so he can buy his wife a fur for Christmas. He tells her he’s working late at the office, but she finds out he isn’t at the office. A suspected other woman, hypnotism, the notorious Santa burglar, Kris Kreigle, and his gun-toting fiancée, and a confused policeman add up to a rollicking tale that is hilarious Christmas (or anytime) entertainment.

November 15 – December 21

For reservations and information, call 510-683-9218, or purchase tickets on our website at www.broadwaywest.org Broadway West Theatre Company, 4000-B Bay Street in Fremont

Holiday Home Tour - December 14th - 11am to 4pm

Holiday Home Tour December 14th 11am -4pm


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WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

December 10, 2013

SUBMITTED BY BRUCE BATEMAN The Mission Peak Chamber Singers will present the 28th annual Christmas at the Mission Concert on December 14 and 15. The theme for this year’s concert is The Season of Song, celebrating the Holiday Season with Hanukkah songs, Christmas secular and sacred songs, and the featured jingle, Conrad Susa’s “Carols and Lullabies” sung in Spanish, Catalan, and English. The featured instrumentalists are Karen Thielen, harp; Mason Razavi, guitar; and Mark Haygood, marimba. Conductor Michael Morris directs the Mission Peak Chamber Singers and Laura Green serves as accompanist.

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510-790-1118 www.insurancemsm.com

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Christmas at the Mission Concert Saturday, Dec. 14 8 p.m. Sunday, Dec. 15 4 p.m. Old Mission San Jose 43300 Mission Blvd, Fremont (866) 530-5391 www.chambersingers.org Tickets: $ 10 - $12


December 10, 2013

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Page 21

$ = Entrance or Activity Fee R= Reservations Required Schedules are subject to change. Call to confirm activities shown in these listings.

Continuing Events Mondays, Sep 9 - Thursdays, Dec 20

10th Street After-School Program

4 p.m. - 6 p.m. Sports, arts-n-crafts, games & special events

Drop-in program, no day care 10th Street Community Center 33948 10th Street, Union City (510) 675-5276 wwwUnionCity.org

McConaghy Victorian House 18701 Hesperian Blvd., Hayward (510) 581-0223 www.haywardareahistory.org

Irvington High School 41800 Blacow Rd, Fremont www.ihsdrama.com Tickets: $10 - $14

Monday, Dec 2 - Friday, Dec 13

Friday, Dec 6-Saturday, Dec 21

Food and Toy Drive on Trash Collection Days

Much Ado About Nothing $

6 a.m.

Shakespeare’s comedic play about young love

Place non-perishable food & new unwrapped toys curbside in Newark

Republic Services 42600 Boyce Rd., Fremont (510) 657-3500

Washington High School 38442 Fremont Blvd., Fremont (510) 791-3414 www.whstheater.com

Monday, Dec 3 - Thursday, Dec 19

Fridays, Dec 6 thru Dec 27

Homework Help Center

6:30 p.m. & 10:00 p.m.

3:30 p.m. 5:30 p.m.

Laser light show & holiday music

Help for children grades K - 6th grade

Fremont Main Library 2400 Stevenson Blvd., Fremont (510) 745-1421

Chabot Space & Science Center 10000 Skyline Blvd., Oakland (510) 336-7300 www.chabotspace.org

Tuesday, Dec 3 - Thursday, Dec 19

Saturday, Dec 7 - Sunday, Dec 15

Homework Express

Merchants Christmas Tea

3:30 p.m. - 5:30 p.m.

1 p.m. - 3 p.m.

Help & test prep for grades K – 12

Enjoy refreshments while shopping

Newark Branch Library 6300 Civic Terrace Ave., Newark (510) 795-2627 khannon@aclibrary.org

Niles District Niles Blvd., Fremont (510) 742-9868 www.niles.org

Artwork display by June Yokell

Monday, Dec 3-Friday, Dec 19

Monday, Dec 9 - Friday, Jan 15

Hayward Shoreline Interpretive Center 4901 Breakwater Ave., Hayward (510) 670-7270 shoreline@haywardrec.org

Letters to Santa Program $

Art Works of Al & Joe Mudach

10 a.m. - 3 p.m.

8:30 a.m. - 4:00 p.m.

Volunteer to adopt a family

Various pieces by father & son duo

USPS Processing Center 1675 7th Street, Oakland (510) 874-8737

Hayward Area Senior Center 22325 North Third St., Hayward (510) 881-6766

Friday, Nov 1–Sunday, Jan 12

“Still Here”

Thursday Dec 5 – Saturday: Dec. 14

9 a.m. - 5 p.m.

A Midsummer Night’s Dream

Native American Portraits exhibit

7 p.m.

PhotoCentral 1099 E St., Hayward (510) 881-6721 www.photocentral.org

(Saturday, Dec. 7 & Sunday, Dec. 8 at 2:30 p.m.)

Saturdays, Sep 21 - Sundays, Dec 29

San Leandro Art Association Member Exhibit

11 a.m. - 3 p.m. Variety of art work on display

Casa Peralta 384 West Estudillo Ave, San Leandro (510) 357-4650 Saturday, Oct 26 - Sunday, Jan 5

“Lure of the Wetlands”

10 a.m. - 5 p.m.

Sundays, Nov 10 thru Dec 15

Nutrition Class for Parents and Caregivers – R

1:30 p.m. - 3:00 p.m. Open Every Day Until Christmas. Mon - Sat 10am- 6pm Sun 12 noon - 5pm

7 p.m.

Certificate of completion for attending all six classes

Fremont Main Library 2400 Stevenson Blvd., Fremont (510) 745-1400 Through Saturday, Dec 21

Sorry! Wrong Chimney! $

8 p.m. (Sunday matinees: 1 p.m.) Mistaken identities and zany foul-ups

Broadway West Theatre Company 4000-B Bay St., Fremont (510) 683-9218 www.broadwaywest.org Monday, Nov 26 - Sunday, Dec 24

Santa Claus is Coming to Town $

11 a.m. - 8 p.m. Meet Santa & share your wish list

Prices vary for photos Great Mall 447 Great Mall Dr., Milpitas (408) 956-2033 www.greatmallbayarea.com Friday, Nov 29 - Thursday, Dec 24

Christmas Tree Lot and Store $

3 p.m. - 9 p.m. Trees & decorative items for sale Open daily The Pentecostals of Hayward 25715 Mission Blvd., Hayward (510) 733-0443 Friday, Nov 29 -Sunday, Dec 29

Train of Lights $

4:30 p.m. Holiday Canyon

excursion

through

Niles

Niles Station 37001 Mission Blvd., Fremont (510) 996-8420 www.ncry.org Saturdays, Nov 30 - Sundays, Dec 22

Rocking Around the Christmas Tree

Sat: 10 a.m. - 4 p.m. Sun: 1 p.m. - 4 p.m. Visit the house decorated for the holidays

Laserium: Laser Holidays $


Page 22

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Farmers’ Markets 0FREMONT: Centerville

MILPITAS: Milpitas Farmers’ Market at ICC

Saturdays 9 a.m. - 1 p.m.

Year-round Bonde Way at Fremont Blvd., Fremont (510) 909-2067 www.fremontfarmersmarket.com Kaiser Permanente Fremont Farmers’ Market

Thursdays 10 a.m. – 2 p.m.

Monday, Dec 9 - Friday, Jan 31

Wednesday, Dec 11

Wednesday, Dec 11

Watercolor Passion

Free Legal Assistance – R

Prevent Elder Abuse

9 a.m. - 5 p.m.

6 p.m. - 8 p.m.

1:30 p.m.

Exhibit by various artists

Use video conferencing to speak with an attorney

Avoid becoming a victim

Hayward City Hall 777 B St., Hayward (510) 208-0410 Monday, Dec 9 - Friday, Feb 7

Sundays 8 a.m. – 1 p.m.

Art Warming Up for Winter

Year-round India Community Center 525 Los Coches St. 800-949-FARM www.pcfma.com

Featuring the works of various artists

10 a.m. - 5 p.m.

NEWARK: Newark Farmers’ Market

Hayward Chamber of Commerce 22561 Main St., Hayward (510) 537-2424 Thursdays, Dec 12 - Sundays, Dec 22

Christmas Patterson House Tours $

Sundays 9 a.m. - 1 p.m.

1 p.m., 2 p.m. & 3 p.m.

Irvington Farmers’ Market

Year-round NewPark Mall 2086 NewPark Mall, Newark 1-800-897-FARM www.agriculturalinstitute.org

Ardenwood Historic Farm 34600 Ardenwood Blvd., Fremont (510) 791-4196 www.ebparks.org

Sundays 9 a.m. – 2 p.m.

Bayfair Mall

Year-round 39400 Paseo Padre Pkwy., Fremont 800-949-FARM www.pcfma.com

Year-round Bay Street and Trimboli Way, Fremont 800-949-FARM www.pcfma.com HAYWARD: Hayward Farmers’ Market

Saturdays 9 a.m. - 1 p.m.

Year-round Hayward City Plaza 777 B. St., Hayward 1-800-897-FARM www.agriculturalinstitute.org Kaiser Permanente Hayward Farmers’ Market

Wednesdays 10 a.m. – 2 p.m.

Year-round 27400 Hesperian Blvd., Hayward 800-949-FARM www.pcfma.com South Hayward Glad Tidings

Saturdays 9 a.m. - 3 p.m.

Year-round W. Tennyson Rd. between Tyrell Ave. and Tampa Ave., Hayward (510) 783-9377 www.cafarmersmarkets.com

Guided tours of historic home

Saturdays 9 a.m. - 1 p.m.

Tuesday, Dec 10

Holiday Open House

5:30 p.m. - 8:00 p.m.

UNION CITY:

Refreshments with Supervisor Scott Haggerty

Kaiser Permanente Union City Farmers’ Market

Bring a new unwrapped toy Alameda County Fairgrounds 4501 Pleasanton Ave., Pleasanton (925) 551-6995

Tuesdays 10 a.m. – 2 p.m.

Year-round Kaiser Permanente Medical Offices 3553 Whipple Rd., Union City 800-949-FARM www.pcfma.com Union City Farmers’ Market

Saturdays 9 a.m. – 1 p.m.

Year-round Old Alvarado Park Smith and Watkins Streets, Union City 800-949-FARM www.pcfma.com

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A positive path for spiritual living

Unity of Fremont Sunday 12:30 pm

1351 Driscoll Rd, Fremont (at Christian Science Church) www.unityoffremont.org 510-797-5234

Milpitas Library 160 North Main St., Milpitas (408) 262-1171 www.probonoproject.org/virtualclinics

Program for older adults Union City Branch Library 34007 Alvarado Niles Rd., Union City (510) 745-1464 Wednesday, Dec 11

Wednesday, Dec 11 - Thursday, Dec 12

Moreau High School Jazz Ensemble $

NHUSD Chromebook Introduction

7:30 p.m.

Wed: 6 p.m. Thurs: 11 a.m.

Chabot College 25555 Hesperian Blvd., Hayward (510) 723-6976 www.moreaucatholic.org

Parent information meeting for new classroom computers

James Logan High School 1800 H Street, Union City Wednesday, Dec 11

Job Search Strategies

3:30 p.m. - 5:00 p.m.

Winter jazz big band concert

Wednesday, Dec 11

Business and Economic Development Meeting – R

10 a.m. - 12 noon

Learn about the hidden job market

Workshop for California business tax credits

Fremont Main Library 2400 Stevenson Blvd., Fremont (510) 745-1400

Hayward City Hall 777 B St., Hayward (510) 208-0410 continued from page 24

Year-round Fairmont and East 14th St., San Leandro (925) 465-4690 www.cafarmersmkts.com

510-790-1118 www.insurancemsm.com

December 10, 2013

Saturday, Dec 10

Coyote Hills Open House

10 a.m. - 12 noon Meet reptiles, hear stories & create crafts

Coyote Hills Regional Park 8000 Patterson Ranch Rd., Fremont (510) 544-3220


December 10, 2013

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

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Alameda County Renew books by phone (510) 790-8096 For more information about the Bookmobile call (510) 745-1477 or visit www.aclibrary.org. Times & Stops subject to change Tuesday, December 10 9:15–11:00 Daycare Center Visit FREMONT 2:00–2:30 Daycare Center Visit - FREMONT 2:30 – 3:25 Cabrillo School, 36700 San Pedro Dr., FREMONT 4:45 – 5:30 Baywood Apts., 4275 Bay St, FREMONT 5:50 – 6:30 Jerome Ave. and Ohlones St., FREMONT Wednesday, December 11 1:00 – 1:45 Hillside School, 15980 Marcella St., SAN LEANDRO 2:00 – 2:45 Eden House Apts., 1601 - 165th Ave., SAN LEANDRO 3:15– 3:45 Baywood Ct., 21966 Dolores St., CASTRO VALLEY 6:00 – 6:30 Camellia Dr. & Camellia Ct., FREMONT Thursday, December 12 9:50 – 10:20 Daycare Center Visit FREMONT 10:40–11:30 Daycare Center Visit NEWARK 1:15 – 1:45 Stellar Academy, 38325 Cedar Blvd., NEWARK 2:00 –3:15 Graham School, 36270 Cherry St, NEWARK Friday, December 13 9:45 - 11:15 Fame Charter School, 16244 Carolyn St., SAN LEANDRO 11:45 –12:15 7 TH Step, 475 Medford Ave., HAYWARD (unincorporated) 2:00 –3:00 Hesperian School, 620 Drew St., SAN LORENZO

Monday, December 16 9:20-10:00 Daycare Center Visit FREMONT 10:15-11:15 Daycare Center Visit FREMONT 1:45 – 2:45 Pioneer School, Blythe St. & Jean Dr., UNION CITY 3:05 – 3:25 Alvarado Elementary School, Fredi St. & Smith St., UNION CITY 4:15 – 4:45 Greenhaven Apts., Alvarado Blvd. & Fair Ranch Rd., UNION CITY 5:15 – 6:45 Forest Park School, Deep Creek Rd. & Maybird Circle, FREMONT Tuesday, December 17 10:00 -11:15 Daycare Center Visit UNION CITY 1:30 – 2:30 Mission Hills Middle School, 250 Tamarack Dr., UNION CITY 2:45 – 3:30 Purple Lotus Buddhist School, 33615 - 9th St., UNION CITY 4:50 – 5:30 Mariner Park, Regents Blvd. & Dorado Dr., UNION CITY 5:40 – 6:20 Sea Breeze Park, Dyer St. & Carmel Way, UNION CITY Wednesday, December 18 3:00 – 4:00 Warm Springs Community Center, 47300 Fernald St., FREMONT 4:15 – 4:50 Lone Tree Creek Park, Starlite Way & Turquoise St, Warm Springs, FREMONT 6:00 – 6:30 Camellia Dr. & Camellia Ct., FREMONT

Milpitas Bookmobile stops Renew books by phone (800) 471-0991 For more information (408) 293-2326 x3060 Wednesday, December 11 1:45-3:00 1991 Landess Ave., Milpitas 3:15-3:45 120 Dixon Landing Rd., Milpitas

FREE Adult Reading and Writing Classes are offered at the Alameda County Library

Tell A Friend

Call Rachel Parra 510 745-1480


Page 24

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Friday, Dec 13

Saturday, Dec 14

Tree Lighting Ceremony & High School Choral Competition

Snow-Much-Fun 6th Grade Dance $

Niles Holiday Home Tour $

7:00 p.m. - 9:30 p.m.

Historic homes decorated for the holidays

5 p.m.

DJ music, dancing, games & snacks

Tree lighting, entertainment, refreshments & raffle

Fremont Teen Center 39770 Paseo Padre Pkwy., Fremont (510) 494-4344 www.RegeRec.com

Niles District Niles Blvd., Fremont (510) 792-0118 www.niles.org

Thursday, December 12

Washington Hospital 2500 Mowry Ave., Fremont (510) 791-3428 www.whhs.com/foundation

11 a.m. - 4 p.m.

Saturday, Dec 14

Friday, Dec 13

Breakfast with Santa $

Thursday, Dec 12

Christmas Evening Open House $

9 a.m. - 11 a.m.

Chamber Holiday Mixer

5:00 p.m. - 8:45 p.m.

5:30 p.m. - 7:30 p.m. No host bar, raffle & prizes

Victorian home decorated for the holidays

Bring a new unwrapped toy Eden Medical Center 20103 Lake Chabot Road, Castro Valley (510) 537-1234

Ardenwood Historic Farm 34600 Ardenwood Blvd., Fremont (510) 791-4196 www.ebparks.org

Bring your camera & take pictures with Santa Fremont/Newark Family YMCA 41811 Blacow Rd., Fremont (510) 657-5200 tclark@ymcaeastbay.org

Thursday, Dec 12

Friday, Dec 13

Adapting to Rising Tides: The New Normal

Works in Progress $

Tactile Toy Making

10 a.m. - 12 noon

7 p.m.

4:00 p.m. - 5:30 p.m.

Learn about king tides

Musicians share ideas for new songs

Help make toys for blind students

Mudpuddle 34733 Niles Blvd., Fremont (510) 794-9935 info@michaelmcnevin.com

Ages 10+ Fremont Main Library 2400 Stevenson Blvd., Fremont (510) 745-1400

Hayward Shoreline Interpretive Center 4901 Breakwater Ave., Hayward (510) 670-7270

All you can eat pancakes

Saturday, Dec 14

Saturday, Dec 14 Thursday, Dec 12

Friday, Dec 13

Holiday Open House – R

American Red Cross Blood Drive – R

4:00 p.m. - 6:30 p.m. Join Supervisor Richard Valle for refreshments

11:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.

Bring a new unwrapped toy District 2 Office 24301 Southland Drive, Suite 101, Hayward (510) 272-6692 Distric2@acgov.org

Use sponsor code: KAISERUNION Kaiser 3555 Whipple Road, Union City (800) 733-2767

Schedule an appointment

Christmas at the Mission Concert $

8 p.m. Holiday performance by Mission Peak Chamber Singers

Old Mission San Jose 43300 Mission Blvd., Fremont (866) 530-5391 www.chambersingers.org Saturday, Dec 14

Friday, Dec 13-Sunday, Dec 15 Thursday, Dec 12

Night of Comedy – R

The Nutcracker $

“Edible Holidays Around the World” $R

6:30 p.m. - 9:00 p.m.

Fri & Sat: 8 p.m. Sat & Sun: 2 p.m.

Food, music, entertainment

6 p.m.

Classic tale performed by Yoko’s Dance Academy

Celebrate with dinners from various cultures

Whole Foods Market 3111 Mowry Ave, Fremont (510) 401-5880 http://bit.ly/1av6ZqG

Smith Center 43600 Mission Blvd., Fremont (510) 659-6031 www.smithcenter.com

Bring a new unwrapped toy DeVry University Campus 6600 Dumbarton Cir., Fremont (510) 574-1219 dcardenas@devry.edu Saturday, Dec 14

Friday, Dec 13 Thursday, Dec 12

“Gasland Part II” Documentary

Science Lecture for Children

Toy Drive and Car Show

1:30 p.m.

4:30 p.m.

10 a.m. – 4 p.m. Meet Santa in the Hot Rod Hearse Bring a new unwrapped toy Gilbert’s Body & Paint 2964 Arf Ave., Hayward (510) 783-0500

For elementary school-age kids

Film explores the dangers of drilling for oil & gas

Fremont Main Library 2400 Stevenson Blvd., Fremont (510) 745-1400

Niles Discovery Church 255 H Street at 3rd, Fremont 510-797-0895

Friday, Dec 13

Saturday, Dec 14

Toddler Ramble: Winter Potpourri

Santa Claus is Coming to McConaghy

10:30 a.m. - 11:15 a.m.

10 a.m.

Hands-on activities for ages 1 – 3

Visit the historic home & see Santa

Hayward Shoreline Interpretive Center 4901 Breakwater Ave., Hayward (510) 670-7270

McConaghy Victorian House 18701 Hesperian Blvd., Hayward (510) 581-0223

December 10, 2013

Saturday, Dec 14

Sunday, Dec 15

Sandy Hook Vigil

Ballet Folklorico’s “Navidad en Mexico” $

9:30 a.m. The Mission bells will toll 26 times at 9:35 a.m. Mission San Jose Church 43300 Mission Blvd, Fremont tricitybrady@gmail.com Saturday, Dec 14 - Sunday, Dec 15

3 p.m. Traditional dance & music for Christmas

Chabot College Hayward (510) 562-6046 www.brownpapertickets.com

Holiday Tea of Good Tidings $R

Sunday, Dec 15

11:00 a.m. - 2:30 p.m. Enjoy a variety of treats & tea Tyme for Tea & Co. 37501 Niles Blvd., Fremont (510) 790-0944

Weekend Weed Warriors

Saturday, Dec 14

1 p.m. - 4 p.m. Volunteers remove non-native plants

Hayward Shoreline Interpretive Center 4901 Breakwater Ave., Hayward (510) 670-7270

Live Winter Concert

2 p.m.

Sunday, Dec 15

Hillside Woodwind Quintet & Montecito Brass Ensemble

Flyin’ in the Wind

Castro Valley Library 3600 Norbridge Ave., Castro Valley (510) 667-7900

Explore birds in flight & make paper airplanes

Saturday, Dec 14 - Sunday, Dec 15

2:30 p.m. - 4:00 p.m.

Coyote Hills Regional Park 8000 Patterson Ranch Rd., Fremont (510) 544-3220

Ballet Folklorico “Fiestas Navidenas” $

Sunday, Dec 15

Sat: 3 p.m. & 7 p.m. Sun: 3 p.m.

6 p.m. - 8 p.m.

Traditions of Mexico celebrated in dance

San Leandro Performing Arts Center 2250 Bancroft Ave., San Leandro (510) 397-1980 www.bfcostadeoro.com Saturday, Dec 14

Movie Night $

7:30 p.m. “Hoodoo Ann,” “Bubbles,” & “Stick Around”

Niles Essanay Theater 37417 Niles Blvd, Fremont (510) 494-1411

Christmas Drive Thru View scenes of Christmas from your vehicle

Bethel Baptist Church 4216 Dyer St., Union City (510) 351-7511 Friday, Dec 13

Reviving the Christmas Spirit in Song

7 p.m. Teves Theatre Moreau Catholic High School 27170 Mission Blvd., Hayward (510) 881-4300 www.moreaucatholic.org Tickets: $5 Moreau students/alumni, $8 students/seniors, $10 general admission

Saturday, Dec 14

A Home for the Holidays $

Sunday, Dec 15

11 a.m. - 5 p.m.

Brian Copeland: “The Jewelry Box”

Adopt kittens, cats, dogs, puppies & bunnies

Hayward Animal Shelter 16 Barnes Ct., Hayward (510) 293-7200 www.haywardanimals.org Sunday, Dec 15

Christmas Concert

7 p.m. Instrumental and vocal performances

Christ the King Church 1301 Mowry Ave., Fremont (510) 797-3724 www.ctkfremont.org

7:30 p.m. Teves Theatre Moreau Catholic High School 27170 Mission Blvd., Hayward (510) 881-4300 Tickets and details at www.moreaucatholic.org Tuesday, Dec. 17

Neighborhood Meeting: Sabercat Creek restoration

6:30 p.m. Olive Hyde Program Center 123 Washington Blvd, Fremont (510) 476-3900 bartwarmspringsextension@bar t.gov

Become an exchange student rep SUBMITTED BY CAROL BERGER Nacel Open Door (NOD) is a nonprofit high school student exchange organization headquartered in St. Paul, MN. Each year, the Academic Year Program places about 500 students with a volunteer American host family for an academic year or semester. Local representatives act as the primary link between our exchange students, host

families, and local high schools. Local representatives serve as the exchange student’s advocate and support system while they are in the United States. Local representatives are required to maintain monthly contact with each of the students and families and to address problems they bring to your attention. Duties of a Local representative include recruiting new host families and helping

them through the completion of their host family application, obtain school acceptance for students, conduct home interviews with potential host families, and conduct orientations and monthly contacts with their students and host families. A qualified candidate should be interested in cross-culture education, be outgoing, and have a flexible and positive attitude. Local representatives must feel

comfortable approaching schools, churches, organizations, and individuals in order to identify hosts. The ideal candidate is highly organized, resourceful, a good judge of character, connected to the community, and has experience with students. Local representatives do receive a stipend. For more information, visit www.nacelopendoor.org.


December 10, 2013

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Page 25

For more information 510-494-1999 tricityvoice@aol.com

Birth

Obituaries

Marriage

LANAS ESTATE SERVICES Estate Sales, Complete or Partial Clean out, Appraisals and more

Fremont Memorial Chapel (510) 793-8900 FD 1115 3723 Peralta Blvd. Fremont www.fremontmemorialchapel.com

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Patricia H. O’Toole RESIDENT OF FREMONT September 19 1925 – November 30, 2013

M.O. Sabraw Bernard “Bill” Kabage

RESIDENT OF WALNUT CREEK July 20, 1926 – November 30, 2013

RESIDENT OF MODESTO December 7, 1946 – November 8, 2013

Francis E. Lachance

Kathern Ann Bell

RESIDENT OF FREMONT Dec. 16, 1920 – December 1, 2013

RESIDENT OF PLEASANTON August 26, 1937 – November 19, 2013

Virginia D. Anderson

Margaret Ann Carnell

RESIDENT OF FREMONT June 2, 1921 – December 1. 2013

RESIDENT OF FREMONT September 8, 1918 – November 23, 2013

Ranidevi Sharma

John Woodward Jackson RESIDENT OF FREMONT January 23, 1923 – November 26, 2013

Charles “Ed” Gillis

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Lana August Puchta Licensed Estate Specialist In Resale Over 30 Years

RESIDENT OF FREMONT September 14, 1926 – December 3, 2013

510-657-1908 www.lanas.biz

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Herbert G. Taus RESIDENT OF FREMONT March 8, 1928 – December 8, 2013

RESIDENT OF FREMONT August 23, 1929 – November 30, 2013

Teresa D. Travis RESIDENT OF HAYWARD April 27, 1962 – December 3, 2013

Florence Young RESIDENT OF FREMONT May 30, 1915 – December 3, 2013

Berge • Pappas • Smith

Chapel of the Angels (510) 656-1226 40842 Fremont Blvd, Fremont

Fremont Chapel of the Roses (510) 797-1900 FD1007 1940 Peralta Blvd., Fremont www.fremontchapeloftheroses.com

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ife Cornerstones will acknowledge important events that occur during the cycle of life in our community. In order to give a broad and fair opportunity for all citizens to be recognized, a basic listing is offered at no cost. Such announcements may include births, deaths, marriages, anniversaries, bar/bat mitzvah, Quinceañera, etc. Many cultures celebrate different milestones in life and this list will be as inclusive as possible. Please contact TCV at (510) 494-1999 or emailtricityvoice@aol.com for submissions or further information. Free listings are limited to residents and families of the Greater Tri-City Area.

Govt plan aims to keep older drivers safe on road continued from page 13

“Being able to get In your car and go where you want to go as long as possible and as safely as possible is important to quality of life as we age,’’ Olshevski said. The plan also seeks to increase seat belt use among the elderly because the consequences of being unbelted are worse for them. For comfort reasons, some of those who use seat belts don’t use them appropriately. In the coming months, NHTSA it will test public service messages aimed at increasing seat belt use and provide educational materials about ways car

owners might be able to increase the comfort and fit of their seat belts. The agency also released new guidelines for the states to improve safety for older drivers. One of the recommendations called for in-person renewal of driver licenses once a person hits a certain age if a state determines there is a problem with older driver crashes. Another guideline called for all states to establish medical advisory boards that assess the medical fitness of individuals to drive. About two-thirds of the states have such boards.

Caltrans and Amtrak California set rail ridership record SUBMITTED BY TRENT FREEMAN In a state noted for its freeways, Californians are riding trains in unprecedented numbers. In 2012-13, Amtrak California carried a record 3.9 million passengers on its thriving Pacific Surfliner and San Joaquin rail lines. Over the past ten years, ridership on the Pacific Surfliner, the second-busiest rail corridor in the nation, and the San Joaquin, the fifth-busiest, increased by nearly one million passengers, and ticket revenues skyrocketed from $44 million to $102 million. Caltrans provides funding to run all three intercity passenger rail lines in California: the Pacific Surfliner,

the San Joaquin, and the Capitol Corridor, which had a combined ridership of 5.6 million passengers in 2012-13. The recently approved 2013 California State Rail Plan includes plans to add more trips to each of the routes. Caltrans has invested $460 million since 1979 to improve the San Joaquin corridor between Bakersfield-Sacramento-and the San Francisco-Oakland Bay Area. Passenger service has increased from one daily round trip to six (four between Oakland and Bakersfield and two between Sacramento and Bakersfield). Visit us at www.amtrakcalifornia.com

continued from page 13

Consistent hiring points to stronger economy ahead think growth will accelerate next year. Drew Matus, an economist at UBS, forecasts that growth will top 3 percent in 2014, from roughly 2 percent this year. That would be first time growth had topped 3 percent for a full calendar year since 2005. In addition to the solid job gains and the drop in unemployment, Friday’s report offered other encouraging signs: – Higher-paying industries are adding jobs. Manufacturers added 27,000, the most since March 2012. Construction companies added 17,000. The two industries have created a combined 113,000 jobs over the past four months. – Hourly wages are up. The average rose 4 cents in November to $24.15. It’s risen just 2 percent in the past year. But that’s ahead of inflation. Consumer prices are up only 0.9 percent in that time. – Employers are giving their workers more hours. The average workweek rose to 34.5 hours

from 34.4. A rule of thumb among economists is that a onetenth of an hour increase in the workweek is equivalent to adding 300,000 jobs. – Hiring was broad-based. In addition to higher-paying industries, retailers added 22,300 jobs, and restaurants, bars and hotels 20,800. Education and health care added 40,000. And after years of cutbacks, state and local governments are hiring again. In November, governments at all levels combined added 7,000 jobs. The report did contain some sour notes: Many Americans are still avoiding the job market, neither working nor looking for work. That’s one reason the unemployment rate has fallen in recent months. The percentage of adults either working or searching for jobs remains near a 35year low, at 63 percent. And America’s long-term unemployed are still struggling. More than 4 million people have been out of work for six months or

longer. That figure was essentially unchanged in November. By contrast, the number of people who have been unemployed for less than six months fell. Low-wage industries also still account for a disproportionate share of jobs added. About 45 percent of jobs created in the past year have been in retail, hotels, restaurants and entertainment, temporary positions and home health care. Melinda Popel, 42, has worked at McDonald’s in Kansas City, Mo., for most of the past 10 years. She left on two occasions to return to school but hasn’t been able to find a job with the skills she gained. She makes $7.35 an hour, just enough to pay her rent, and relies on food stamps to feed her three children. Popel took part in strikes on Thursday by fast-food workers seeking $15 an hour. The steady decline in unemployment, from a high of 10 percent four years ago, is welcome news for the White House. But Jason Furman, President Barack

Obama’s top economic adviser, said the plight of the long-term unemployed points to the need to extend emergency unemployment benefits. About 1.3 million people who’ve been out of work for six months or more will lose unemployment aid if a 5-year-old program to provide extra benefits expires on Dec. 28. The Congressional Budget Office has estimated the cost of an extension at $25 billion. Some Republicans have balked at the cost. But on Thursday, House Speaker John Boehner said he was willing to consider extending the program. Among companies ramping up hiring is Eat24, which handles online restaurant deliveries. Eat24, based in San Francisco, expects this month to hire 10 to 15 salespeople, mobile application developers and data analysts, on top of its 150-person workforce. “The economy is picking up a little bit,’’ said Amir Eisenstein, the chief marketing officer. “In the last couple of years, the mo-

bile market has boomed.’’ If hiring continues at its current pace, what economists call a virtuous cycle will likely kick in: More jobs typically lead to more pay, more spending and faster growth. That said, more higher-paying jobs are needed to sustain the economy’s momentum. Consumers have been willing to spend on big-ticket items. Autos sold in November at their best pace in seven years, according to Autodata Corp. Newhome sales in October bounced back from a summer downturn. But early reports on holiday shopping have been disappointing. The National Retail Federation said sales during the Thanksgiving weekend – probably the most important stretch for retailers – fell for the first time since the group began keeping track in 2006. Associated Press writers Josh Boak and Jim Kuhnhenn contributed to this report.


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Sudoku: Fill in the missing numbers (1 – 9 inclusive) so each row, column and 3x3 box contains all digits.

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Across 1 Possibilities that can help someone grow (13) 5 Verse (6) 7 Dejection at something not turning out the way it should (14) 10 Groups of wolves (5) 12 Go with (9) 13 Funny (8) 15 Make fit (6) 16 Making something relative to another (9) 18 Bring up the rear (5) 21 Operated by machinery (10) 22 Gather (7) 25 In three parts (6) 26 Positions in a hierarchy (5) 27 Openings of a chamber (5) 29 Places to eat (11) 31 Accept (5)

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Song holder (8) Therefore (7) Where Santa leaves the gifts (9,8) Duties (5)

Down 1 Fuddy-duddy (3-9) 2 Symbol of hotness (6) 3 Without any delay (9) 4 Not natural in case of fibres (9) 6 Back up (6) 8 Spectrum of things that can happen (13) 9 The Dow, e.g. (5) 10 Ratios (11) 11 Kids and adults love to eat them (10) 14 Features (15) 17 Parents' parents (12) 19 Finger ___ (5) 20 People who make a scientific study of ce-

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Tri-City Stargazer DECEMBER 11 – DECEMBER 17, 2013 BY VIVIAN CAROL For All Signs: Jupiter, planet of hope and expansion, makes a favorable aspect to Saturn, ruler of boundaries, reality, and careers. This is the second of three, the last aspect being exact in May of 2014. The first one was in July, 2013. For the majority, this cycle is most readily visible in the ca-

Aries the Ram (March 21April 20): This is a week in which your physical cycle is “off”. Don’t press your body beyond what it wants to do, just because it could do that thing last week. Pay special attention to your temporary boundaries right now and by next week, things will return to your personal normal. Taurus the Bull (April 21May 20): This is a highly social week with communications flying all around you. Those involved with higher education are scurrying to complete tests and papers. While stressful, nothing in the sky says you will fail, so keep it up!

reer or outer world's work. Jupiter represents hope and optimism while Saturn represents pessimism and contraction. When they flow well together, we see expansion which is appropriate to the real circumstances of the world’s “rules.” Positive expectations are more easily met with literal rewards

in the outer world. In part this is due to our realistic points of view. This aspect will assist us to balance emotional highs and lows.

creative works. Activities involving your children (regardless of their age) are positive, though you may need to make small adjustments in that department. Romance and partnership is showing special strength.

Your body is subject to take on infections. Avoid allergens and symptomatic people. Your immune system is depleted. This will pass but it may take a couple of weeks. If you go shopping, you are subject to impulse buys.

are likely to yield positive outcomes. All relationships are favored at this time, including those which are social and romantic. There may be an increase in clientele for those who have a business.

Leo the Lion (July 22-Aug 22): You are all about generating fun for yourself and everyone else. You will be in the spotlight and at the center of all activities. You may be asked for your opinions. Offer them but don’t take your ideas as the final, definite truth of things. Enjoy your children. Romance may be hot.

Scorpio the Scorpion (October 23-November 21): Those with interests in the law, travel, education, Internet, or publishing may be met with favorable news this week. These areas are auspicious for expansion at this time. If you meet resistance on any front, let go of your drive to move forward. Wait for a better time.

Aquarius the Water Bearer (January 20-February 18): Lights are green concerning work, co-workers, and personal health. Those who wish to rent or lease property will find takers. There may be a legal fly in the ointment that slows you from forward motion, but it is not a project killer. Do what you must to get around it.

Gemini the Twins (May 21June 20): Everything in your world worth noting is all about being with and conversing with others. Your partner may take the lead in social developments, but you are right alongside as a willing helper. The Full Moon in your sign on the 17th brings you energy.

Virgo the Virgin (August 23September 22): During this week your attention is focused on home, hearth, and family. Your expectations may be changing quickly as others make changes in plans. Relax the worry-wart side of yourself and everything will turn out to the good. Just go with the flow and things will end as they should be.

Sagittarius the Archer (November 22-December 21): This week you likely will be doing quite a lot of communicating, whether oral or written. You may be hoping to persuade others to your point of view, but don’t attempt to push the river too far from its present banks. Plant seeds and reconnect occasionally.

Cancer the Crab (June 21July 21): This is an especially favorable time to display your

Libra the Scales (September 23-October 22): Take your vitamins and get plenty of sleep.

Capricorn the Goat (December 22-January 19): This is a time in which works of the past

Pisces the Fish (February 19-March 20): Your intuition and creative energies are high right now. But “something” keeps you from allowing the muse to manifest through you. Is it fear of being wrong? As long as you are not trying to prove yourself better than others, you can allow a pure expression of the muse.

Are you interested in a personal horoscope? Vivian Carol may be reached at (704) 366-3777 for private psychotherapy or astrology appointments (fee required).

www.horoscopesbyvivian.com


December 10, 2013

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

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Susie, Bar the Door! In any event, the intent of the phrase is unmistakable. In a letter from City of Newark Administrative Services Director Susie Woodstock to Mr. Shawn Gutterson, BLT Enterprises, Inc., responsible for Fremont’s recycling and solid waste transfer station, her sentiments toward a proposed “Extraordinary Adjustment to Transfer Station Service Fees” were unmistakable. A previous request to the Fremont City Council for approval of rate increases had been continued until December 10, 2013 meeting and, it appears, with good reason.

WILLIAM MARSHAK “Katy, bar the door!” is an idiom rarely used these days, but expresses a sense of impending trouble. I remember that when I heard it during my childhood, it was reserved for situations that called for immediate remedial action or suffering unpleasant consequences. Although the origin of this expression is unclear, it has been used to express marital discord in a poem by James Whitcomb Riley in 1902, “When Lide Married Him.” Some believe a medieval Scottish ballad “Get Up and Bar the Door” or an attempt by Catherine Douglas (thereafter known as Catherine Barlass) to protect Scottish King James I from assassins by using her arm in place of a missing iron bar for a door may give clues to its origin.

Newark Police Log SUBMITTED BY NEWARK PD Monday, November 25 CSO Parks and Officer S. Kovach located a stolen vehicle in the parking lot of Home Depot at 1:59 a.m. The vehicle, a 1997 Toyota Corolla Cal license #3XGL211, was found to be stolen out of Fremont. Tuesday, November 26 During a call at a residence in the 5400 block of St. Mark at 6:51 a.m., Officer Khairy arrested Carlos Ortiz of Newark for domestic violence. Ortiz was booked at Fremont Jail. CSO Verandes investigated a theft of a vehicle at 7:26 a.m. The vehicle, a 2001 blue Pontiac Firebird, CA lic. # 5VOV885, was taken from a residence in the 37000 block of Magnolia St. Between 11/25 at 1800 hours and 11/26 at 7:20 a.m. Thursday, November 28 At 8:18 a.m., Officer Katz investigated a window smash commercial burglary at 6180 Jarvis Ave. #T (Pho Saigon). Loss was approximately $200.00 from the register and occurred around 0300 hours. Friday, November 29 Officer Coffey accepted the citizens’ arrest of Mercedes Villarreal of Fremont from Macy’s for petty theft at 8:23 a.m. She was cited and released.

Woodstock points out in her letter that the analysis used for the proposed adjustments is in error. In contradiction to the original agreement of September 27, 2007, BLT has included labor costs prior to the start of a modified Service Agreement, ignored other users including “self-haulers, Household Hazardous Waste customers, and BLT contract users” and built in “18% for company profit and administrative expenses” as part of its cost analysis.

only’” and, when discussing transportation costs, “It does not appear that BLT has met its burden of showing that increased costs from a subcontractor qualify as an extraordinary review of compensation…” Woodstock also says that BLT did not meet its “burden” to justify an extraordinary review under an “uncontrollable circumstances” clause or changes in City collection practices. Although much of this will be worked out through negotiations between staff of affected cities and BLT, the result will be increased costs to consumers. In light of an impending flood of upward wage pressures, it is reassuring to know that at least some of our civic gatekeepers are awake and aware, assuring contract compliance. I hope that the administrative staff of Newark was not alone when it was time to bar the door.

Future wage and healthcare costs do not appear to be the issue but the formula for allocating costs and ascertaining whether costs incurred by subcontractors qualify as part of contractual review are debatable. Susie’s letter quotes the original agreement… “any rate adjustments shall be for ‘future labor cost impacts

Officer Knutson accepted the citizens’ arrest of Thi Do of Hayward at 12:13 p.m. from Macy’s for petty theft. She was cited and released. Officer Knutson investigated an attempted robbery at 35201 Newark Blvd. (Harbors Seafood) at 5:15 p.m. Two male subjects on bikes, one described as an adult black male, the second suspect was described as an adult Hispanic male, both were wearing dark clothing attempted to pull a bag of merchandise out of the hands of the victim. They fled the area after the attempt. Sunday, December 1 At 11:54 p.m., Officer Losier followed up on his purse and vehicle theft case from Kids Castle on November 29, 2013. The victim provided Officer Losier credit card usage statements leading him to Five Star Liquors on Jarvis Ave. Officer Losier was able to obtain video footage showing a female suspect using the victim’s credit cards and Officer Warren was able to identify the suspect as Regina Gibson of Newark. With the assistance of Officers Smith, Rodgers and Hogan, a probation search was conducted at Gibson’s residence looking for the outstanding purse and Christmas presents/electronics from the vehicle. No property was recovered, but Gibson confessed to her involvement and the whereabouts of the remaining

stolen property. This led to another probation search at the Psychic House on Thornton Ave. Inside the bedroom of Dana Rodrigues was much of the outstanding stolen property except for the victim’s iPad. When officers went to Horacio Gutierrez’s residence on Laurel St. to conduct yet another probation search, Gutierrez was contacted sitting on his bed surfing the internet on the victim’s iPad. The only property not recovered was the victim’s purse and two removable seats from the vehicle. In the end, Rodrigues, Gutierrez and Gibson were arrested and Gibson. All three suspects were booked at FPD Jail and the victim’s family contacted Officer Losier and expressed their gratitude to the entire shift for recovering most of their lost belongings. Officers responded to a burglary alarm at Low Price Hobbies on Cedar Blvd. at 3:40 a.m. and found the front window smashed. The suspect/s gained entry into the business after breaking the glass and prying open the interior security bars. There did not appear to be any loss as all of the high dollar merchandise was secured separately inside the store. Monday, December 2 Officer Khairy responded to Macy’s at 3:19 p.m. and arrested Garima Kakani for petty theft.

PUBLISHER EDITOR IN CHIEF William Marshak DIRECTOR OF OPERATIONS Sharon Marshak PRODUCTION/GRAPHIC DESIGN Ramya Raman ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT Sharon Marshak EDUCATION Miriam G. Mazliach FEATURES Julie Grabowski TRAVEL & DINING Sharon Marshak PHOTOGRAPHERS Mike Heightchew Don Jedlovec OFFICE MANAGER Karin Diamond ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT Margaret Fuentes BOOKKEEPING Vandana Dua

DELIVERY MANAGER Carlis Roberts

William Marshak PUBLISHER

Tuesday, December 3 Officer Sandoval investigated a stolen vehicle from 37370 Hill St. at 9:40 p.m. The vehicle is a1998 Nissan Sentra Cal License # 4CTB370. Wednesday, December 4 Detective Schwerin investigated a stolen gray 1999 Nissan Sentra 4dr. CA license 4FXN119. Occurred between 2 a.m. and 9 a.m. Thursday, December 5 Officer Eriksen accepted the arrest of Destiny Knox of Union City for petty theft from Macy’s at 3:30 p.m. She was also under the influence of Cocaine and possessed several “rocks” of cocaine. She was transported to Santa Rita Jail for booking. Friday, December 6 Officers responded to Cherry St. and Redeker St. at 7:37 a.m. regarding an auto vs. pedestrian collision. A 14 year old female was struck by a vehicle and transported to a local trauma center, unconscious and listed in critical condition. Any person with any information concerning these incidents can contact the non-emergency line at 510578-4237. Information can also be left anonymously on the “silent witness” hotline at 510-578-4000, extension 500.

REPORTERS Frank Addiego Jessica Noël Flohr Sara Giusti Janet Grant Philip Holmes M.J. Laird Gustavo Lomas Isabella Ohlmeyer Medha Raman Mauricio Segura Steve Taylor INTERN Nicole Ellis Britney Sanchez

WEB MASTER RAMAN CONSULTING Venkat Raman LEGAL COUNSEL Stephen F. Von Till, Esq.

ADJUDICATION: What’s Happening’s Tri-City Voice is a “newspaper of general circulation” as set forth in sections 6000, et. seq., of the Government Code, for the County of Alameda, and the State of California. What’s Happening’s TRI-CITY VOICE® ™

What’s Happening’s The Tri-City Voice is published weekly, issued, sold and circulated in and from Fremont, Newark, Union City, Hayward, Milpitas and Sunol and printed in Fremont, California. The principal office of Tri-City Voice is at 39737 Paseo Padre Pkwy., Ste. B Fremont, CA 94538. William Marshak is the Publisher

Subscribe. Call 510-494-1999 or sign up on our web site www.tricityvoice.com

510-494-1999 fax 510-796-2462 tricityvoice@aol.com www.tricityvoice.com COPYRIGHT 2013® Reproduction or use without written permission from What’s Happening’s Tri-City Voice®™ is strictly prohibited


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Do you like to write about interesting topics? Are you a whiz with words and like to share your thoughts with others? Can you find something fascinating about lots of things around you? If so, maybe writing for the Tri-City Voice is in your future. We are looking for disciplined writers and reporters who will accept an assignment and weave an interesting and accurate story that readers will enjoy. Applicants must be proficient in the English language (spelling and grammar) and possess the ability to work within deadlines. If you are interested, submit a writing sample of at least 500 words along with a resume to tricityvoice@aol.com or fax to (510) 796-2462.


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December 10, 2013

Cal State East Bay Report Basketball

Men victorious in home opener SUBMITTED BY STEVE CONNOLLY The Cal State East Bay Pioneer men’s basketball team defeated visiting Cal State Dominguez Hills 69-64 on the opening night of CCAA play, December 6, 2013. The Pioneers have now won three straight conference openers and are 2-0 at home to begin the 2013-14 Season. Gabe Kindred scored 18 points to lead a group of four Pioneers in double figures.

Women Pioneers defend home court in league opener SUBMITTED BY SCOTT CHISHOLM Cal State East Bay women’s basketball made an impressive

home and California Collegiate Athletic Association (CCAA) debut on December 5, 2013 by defeating Cal State Dominguez Hills 68-55. The host Pioneers never trailed while holding the Toros to only 19 first half points. Cal State East Bay (4-4, 1-0 CCAA) built an early cushion as the defense held CSU Dominguez Hills (2-2, 0-2 CCAA) to just four points during a 10-minute stretch in first half. CSUEB led 21-8 following the scoring run and led by double figures over the entire second half. Despite limited minutes due to foul trouble, senior Brianna Terrance led all players with 20 points. She went 7-of-12 from the floor and knocked down 6-of-6 free throws to score 20-plus points for the third time this season. “Brianna has been consistent most games and it is key that we have her playing at a high level,” said East Bay Head Coach Suzy Barcomb following Friday night’s win. “Danielle Peacon was huge on the boards tonight. We needed every one of her rebounds

and her defensive effort.” Peacon’s 16 rebounds are the most by any Pioneer player this season. She finished with nine points, three blocked shots, and a pair of assists, while playing a season-high 28 minutes. Sarah Finlay knocked down the only 3-point baskets by either team and finished with 11 points. Tori Breshers led the reserves with 11 points and six rebounds. Tayler Champion and Monay Lee had combined to average 26 points and over 20 rebounds per game heading into Friday. The Toro duo was held in check to the tune of 11 points and eight rebounds in 31 combined minutes of floor time. Ashanti Sweezer posted a season-high 14 points courtesy of a 7-for-11 shooting performance from the floor. She also grabbed seven boards to tie Champion for the team-high. Note: Cal State East Bay lost its contest with Cal State L.A. on December 7, 51-47.

School records fall at U.S. Winter Nationals Women’s Swimming

SUBMITTED BY SCOTT CHISHOLM

Trojans claim conference title Football SUBMITTED BYE MIKE HEIGHTCHEW Milpitas puts together a third quarter comeback to win the Central Coast Section title. The game started off as a real back and forth battle between the Trojans of Milpitas and the San Benito Balers; neither team took control. After an interception by Balers Cody Freitas, followed by a great play by Zach Hicks who took the ball 17 yards on a run to set up a one yard dash into the end zone, the Balers look like they were ready to run away with the game. In the second quarter, the Trojans found themselves on the short end of a 16-14 score. It was up to the Trojans defense and they stepped up at just the right time when Christian Rita intercepted a pass to stop the Balers at the eight yard line and moved the ball back down the field just as the first half ended. The turning point of the game came in the third quarter when a Balers fumble on a punt return gave the ball to the Trojans on the Balers 36-yard line. The Trojans offense then went to work and Squally Canada started his great night on the gridiron. He took the ball five straight times, and along with some great blocking on the line by his guards, scored and added a two-point conversion to give the Trojans a 22-16 lead. Trojans Quarterback Ronnie Reed found Canada on a forty-one yard touchdown pass to open a 30-16 lead, but the Balers were not going down without a fight as moved the ball 53 yards. With great offensive calls, the Balers cut the lead back to 30-23. A Trojan victory was in the works when Christian Rita found himself in just the right place again for his second interception of the night. Squally and Royce Kim then closed the door on the Balers; Canada took the ball 40 yards down the field, then Kim ended the night for Balers with a run into the end zone sealing a 37-23 victory.

James Logan v Castro Valley

Brittany Rojo and Mariam Lowe broke school records during the 2013 AT&T Winter National Championships at the Allan Jones Aquatic Center in Knoxville, Tennessee on December 6, 2013. Rojo became the first swimmer in Pioneer history to finish the 100-yard butterfly in under 56 seconds. Lowe finished the 100-yard backstroke in 58 seconds flat for her second program record in as many days. Rojo’s time of 55.90 in the 100 fly was good enough to place 41st overall among a field of 66 athletes including U.S. Olympic medalists and top collegiate stars.

Her lifetime best effort on Friday is well under the NCAA Division II provisional qualifying standard of 57.84, which could earn a spot to the NCAA national championships at the end of the season. Lowe’s mark of 58.00 in the 100 back was just shy of the NCAA Division II provision qualifying time of 57.75. She now owns the program’s backstroke record for both the 100 and 200 distances. East Bay falls in home debut versus Fresno State Cal State East Bay swimming hosted NCAA Division I Fresno State on December 7, 2013 at Pioneer Pool in the program’s 2013-14 home debut. Caitlin DeNise, Madison Hauanio, and Hannah Cutts won back-to-back-

to-back individual events, but the Pioneers fell short 119-84 to the Bulldogs. DeNise won the 100-yard freestyle (54.50) by a full second over the rest of the field for the team’s first individual event win of the meet. Hauanio took down the 200 back (2:10.86), followed by Cutts (5:18.99) and teammate Rachel Shimizu (5:24.13) finishing first and second in the 500 free. Fresno State’s Hailee Baldwin led all competitors winning two individual events. She was first to touch the wall in the 400 individual medley (4:37.07) and the 200 breast (2:23.54). Baldwin also beat the field in the 500 free (5:12.93) as an exhibition swimmer.

Lady Cougars honor former and current players

Among Lady Cougar basketball players recognized: (Left to Right) Ashley Hodges (462 points – 2004-05), Ni’Yesha Brown (379 points – 2012-13), Chaunise Powell (1,344 points – 2007-10, 523 points – 2009-10), Taylor Presley (351 points – 2010-11), and Ty Tobin (398 points – 2004-05).

Men’s Soccer December 5, 2013 Winter Classic #3 Logan 4, Castro Valley 1 1st Half Scoring: JL: Moises Gonzalez (Jason Jattan) 10:00, German Villalobos 29:00 2nd Half Scoring: JL: Martin Sierra (Rufus Wollo) 68:00, Rufus Wollo 69:00 CV: 75:00 JL Goalie: Andres Marquez, 80 Min, 3 saves, 1 GA CV Goalie: Sam Hanson, 80 Min, 6 saves, 4 GA JL Record: 1 - 1 - 2

Basketball SUBMITTED BY COACH DARRYL REINA PHOTO BY ALFRED BRUCKNER The Newark Memorial girl’s varsity basketball team tipped-off the 2013-14 Season with a convincing 62-36 win over Arroyo on December 3, 2013. Before the game, the coaching staff honored five former and current players who achieved career and single-season scoring milestones over the past decade, and are members of the Lady Cougars

“1,000” and “300” Point Clubs. A special banner was unveiled and is now on display in the school’s Event Center. Those recognized included Ashley Hodges (462 points – 2004-05), Ni’Yesha Brown (379 points – 2012-13), Chaunise Powell (1,344 points – 200710, 523 points – 2009-10), Taylor Presley (351 points – 2010-11), and Ty Tobin (398 points – 2004-05), Danielle Robledo (1,384 points – 200509, 422 points – 2008-09), Taylor Norman (1,376 points – 2009-13, 434 points – 2012-13), and Rachelle Zemlok (368 points – 2003-04).


December 10, 2013

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

SUBMITTED BY WINDA SHIMIZU Watercolor Passion, the new exhibit at the John O’Lague Galleria at the Hayward City Hall features the work of Annie Boddum, Sheila Fimreite, Dawn Hyde, Sally Lampi, Dorothy Lyons, Jan Matsuoka, Molly McKenzie, Nan Soldahl, and Grace Yun. The impressive watercolor artwork delights the viewers with powerful and colorful details representing the vision of nine artists from the Watercolor Connection Group. “We are constantly challenging and learning new techniques to improve our work. Not only are we supportive and encouraging of one another, but we have become friends,” said Dorothy Lyons. The watercolor group has been painting together for over seven years. Their creative expression for the medium is represented in this fabulous collection. “I love that you can look at a watercolor painting everyday and see something new, something whimsical, something illusive, and something magical,” added Molly McKenzie.

SUBMITTED BY CHRIS GIN Thinking about adopting a pet for Christmas? Adopting from a local shelter is a great place to find your new pet. Cozy up next to your new friend this holiday season with the help of the Hayward Animal Shelter. The Hayward Animal Shelter volunteers are sponsoring the “A Home for the Holidays” adoption event. If you or a loved one is looking for a kitten, cat, puppy, dog, or rabbit, this might be the place for you.

Sponsored by the Hayward Arts Council, the show will be in view through January 31, 2014. Get ready to be fascinated by these brilliant and vibrant watercolor paintings!

Page 31

Shaffer retires as Alameda County Fire chief

Watercolor Passion Monday – Friday, through Jan. 31 9 a.m. – 5 p.m. John O’Lague Galleria 777 B St, Hayward www.haywardarts.org.

Adoption fees for all pets are $20, with the exception of a license fee for dogs adopted by Hayward residents.

A Home for the Holidays Saturday, Dec. 14 11 a.m. – 5 p.m. Hayward Animal Shelter 16 Barnes Court, Hayward (510) 293-7200, ext. 7.

SUBMITTED BY GUY ASHLEY

Hayward Town Hall meetings SUBMITTED BY MIGDALIA RUIZ

Child care will also be provided.

Hayward Unified School District Superintendent and CEO Stan “Data” Dobbs will be holding two Town Hall Meetings titled “Voices in Education” on Tuesday, December 10 and Thursday, December 12. Parents of any school age child, as well as interested community members, are warmly invited to attend either of these two meetings. These meetings will allow participants to hear about common core standards, graduation requirements, school safety, measure “Next,” and other topics. Additionally, there will be time for participants to ask questions and get responses from Dobbs and his staff.

Town Hall Meetings Tuesday, Dec. 10 6:30 p.m. Mt. Eden High School 2300 Panama St, Hayward Thursday, Dec. 12 6:30 p.m. Hayward High School 1633 East Ave, Hayward For more information, visit: http://www.husd.k12.ca.us/

County Fire Chief Demetrious Shaffer advised the Board of Supervisors that he plans to retire at the end of this year to spend time with his family. He was appointed as County Fire Chief in December 2012 after serving as the Interim Fire Chief for six months. Chief Shaffer began his career as a firefighter in Mountain View and was appointed Fire Chief for the City of Newark in 2005. He joined Alameda County when the City of Newark began contracting with the County for fire services in 2010. Chief Shaffer has successfully led the department over the last 18 months during challenging financial times and has been integral to the consolidation efforts aimed at achieving regional efficiencies in the delivery of fire services. The County Fire Department now serves unincorporated Alameda County as well as the cities of Dublin, Emeryville, Newark, San Leandro, and Union City and the Lawrence Berkeley and Livermore laboratories. Board President Keith Carson said, “The Board of Supervisors extends its sincere appreciation to Chief Shaffer for his vision, leadership and professionalism. He will be missed as a key member of the County’s executive leadership team and we wish him all the best in his future endeavors.”

Grapplers take center stage 160 1st A. Mora Fire, 2nd C. Peterson St F, 3rd Z. Yasar MSJ 170 1st J. Leal Chico, 2nd C. Hoekstra GV, 3rd A. Dereis Wash 182 1st E. Johnson Wash, 2nd T. Bowden GV, 3rd N. Maximor Chi 195 1st J. White Wash, 2nd J. Martinez GV, 3rd S. Giambalvo Chi 220 1st G. Matta Dub & D. Perez GV, 2nd Louis Ortiz Fire 285 1st M. Hopkins Chico, 2nd C. Gama-Macias GV, 3rd T. Fattah Dub Rich Swift Award (Most Pins) 106 Muarcelino Maoriz, Firebaugh 152 1st T. Serna Fire, A Dunhan Dublin, 3rd N. Lemas GV

SUBMITTED BY MIKE HEIGHTCHEW PHOTOS BY MIKE HEIGHTCHEW Gold Valley wins Newark Rotary Ironman Wrestling Dual Tournament; Mission Valley Athletic League (MVAL) teams do well in lighter division Gold Valley won the Newark Rotary Ironman Wrestling Dual tournament on November 7, 2013 in a tune-up for the local MVAL league competition on the horizon. Top performances from Mission Warriors in the lighter weight divisions are a good indicator of good things to come. They finished fourth in the tournament. Host Cougars of Newark Memorial also looked good in the light weight division as Ethan Ypil fought hard in his last match to take a well-earned third place in the 106 wt. division; Marlin Hess won the 132 wt division and Peter Saksrithai grabbed third in the 126 wt division. It was an impressive day, filled with exciting wrestling. The final results:

Team: 1st Golden Valley 6-0 2nd Chico 5-1 3rd Firebaugh 4-2 4th Mission San Jose 3-3 5th Dublin 4-2 6th J. F. Kennedy 3-4 7th Washington 2-4 8th St. Francis 1-6 9th Newark 2-4 10th Miramonte 2-4 Place Winners: 106 1st Muarcelino Maoriz Fire, 2nd C. Rivera GV, 3rd Ethan Ypil Newark 113 1st T. Browning GV, 2nd D. Silva Chico, 3rd J. Daco MSJ 120 1st B. Mello GV, 2nd B. Sawyer Chico, 3rd D. Sirwit MSJ 126 1st M. Climaco JFK & E. Yang MSJ, 2nd J. Perry GW, 3rd P. Saksrithai Newark 132 1st C. Racino St. Francis, 2nd J. Terry GV, 3rd Marlin Hess Newark 138 1st A. Lujan-Arias St. Francis, 2nd E. Coronado Fire, 3rd B. Kiester JFK 145 1st A. Molina Fire, 2nd E. Morse GV, 3rd E. Green MSJ


Page 32

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

December 10, 2013

PUBLIC NOTICES CIVIL CITACIÓN DE COMPARECENCIA REFERENTE AL TEMA DE LIBERACIÓN DE LA CUSTODIA Y EL CONTROL PARENTAL CASO NÚMERO: A59215 Referente a YULISA MIA TORRES MACIAS Fecha de nacimiento 28/06/2009 Menor de edad A: HÉCTOR VEGA Por la presente queda usted notificado que debe comparecer ante el Tribunal Superior del Estado de California, Condado de San Diego, en el Departamento Uno del TRIBUNAL SUPERIOR DE CALIFORNIA, CONDADO DE SAN DIEGO, División Central, Tribunal de Menores, 2851 Meadow Lark, San Diego, Condado de San Diego, CA 92123 EL DÍA 13 DE DICIEMBRE DEL 2013, A LAS 9:00 DE LA MAÑANA, para mostrar causa, si la tuviera, de por qué no habría que declarar la liberación de la custodia y el control parental de la menor YULISA MIA TORRES MACIAS (*para el propósito de la colocación para adopción) tal y como pide la solicitud. Usted queda notificado que si uno de los padres o ambos están presentes a la hora y en el lugar arriba indicados, el juez leerá la solicitud y, si se le pide, podrá explicar el efecto que surtirá la aprobación de tal solicitud y, si se le pide, el juez explicará cualquier término o afirmación allí contenido y la naturaleza del proceso, sus procedimientos y posibles consecuencias y podrá dar continuación al asunto durante no más de 30 dias para permitir el nombramiento de abogados o para dar al abogado tiempo para prepararse. Es posible que el tribunal nombre a un abogado para representar a la menor pueda o no la menor asumir el costo de un abogado. Si comparece uno de los padres y no tiene condiciones de pagar a un abogado, el tribunal nombrará a un abogado para que represente a cada padre que comparezca al menos que se renuncie con conocimiento e inteligentemente a tal representación. Si usted desea buscar el consejo de un abogado referente a este asunto, deberá hacerlo pronto para que se entregue al tribunal su declaración, si la tuviera, a tiempo. Fecha: 11 DE SEPTIEMBRE DEL 2013 por K CHHAY, Delegado, Secretario del Tribunal Superior 11/19, 11/26, 12/3, 12/10/13 CNS-2557240# SUMMONS (Family Law) CITACIÓN (Derecho familiar) CASE NUMBER (NÚMERO DE CASO): HF13689961 NOTICE TO RESPONDENT (Name) AVISO AL DEMANDADO (Nombre): Gurmeet Singh You are being sued. Lo están demandando. Petitioner’s name is Nombre del demandante: Heidi Marie Singh You have 30 calendar days after this Summons and Petition are served on you to file a Response (form FL-120 or FL-123) at the court and have a copy served on the petitioner. A letter or phone call will not protect you. If you do not file your Response on time, the court may make orders affecting your marriage or domestic partnership, your property, and custody of your children. You may be ordered to pay support and attorney fees and costs. If you cannot pay the filing fee, ask the clerk for a fee waiver form. If you want legal advice, contact a lawyer immediately. You can get information about finding lawyers at the California Courts Online Self-Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), at the California Legal Services Web site (www.lawhelp california.org), or by contacting your local county bar association. Tiene 30 días corridos después de haber recibido la entrega legal de esta Citación y Petición para presentar una Respuesta (formulario FL-120 ó FL-123) ante la corte y efectuar la entrega legal de una copia al demandante. Una carta o llamada telefónica no basta para protegerlo. Si no presenta su Respuesta a tiempo, la corte puede dar órdenes que afecten su matrimonio o pareja de hecho, sus bienes y la custodia de sus hijos. La corte también le puede ordenar que pague manutención, y honorarios y costos legales. Si no puede pagar la cuota de presentación, pida al secretario un formulario de exención de cuotas. Si desea obtener asesoramiento legal, póngase en contacto de inmediato con un abogado. Puede obtener información para encontrar a un abogado en el Centro de Ayuda de las Cortes de California (www.sucorte.ca.gov), en el sitio Web de los Servicios Legales de California (www.lawh elpcalifornia.org) o poniéndose en contacto con el colegio de abogados de su condado. NOTICE: The restraining orders on page 2 are effective against both spouses or domestic partners until the petition is dismissed, a judgment is entered, or the court makes further orders. These orders are enforceable anywhere in California by any law enforcement officer who has received or seen a copy of them. AVISO: Las órdenes de restricción que figuran en la página 2 valen para ambos cónyuges o pareja de hecho hasta que se despida la petición, se emita un fallo o la corte dé otras órdenes. Cualquier autoridad de la ley que haya recibido o visto una copia de estas órdenes puede hacerlas acatar en cualquier lugar de California. NOTE: If a judgment or support order is entered, the court may order you to pay all or part of the fees and costs that the court waived for yourself or for the other party. If this happens, the party ordered to pay fees shall be given notice and an opportunity to request a hearing to set aside the order to pay waived court fees. AVISO: Si se emite un fallo u orden de manutención, la corte puede ordenar que usted pague parte de, o todas las cuotas y costos de la corte previamente exentas a petición de usted o de la otra parte. Si esto ocurre, la parte ordenada a pagar estas cuotas debe recibir aviso y la oportunidad de solicitar una audiencia para anular la orden de pagar las cuotas exentas. 1. The name and address of the court are (El nombre y dirección de la corte son): Superior Court of California, 24405 Amador Street, Hayward, CA 94544 2. The name, address, and telephone number of the petitioner’s attorney, or the petitioner without an attorney, are (El nombre, dirección y número de teléfono del abogado del demandante, o del demandante si no tiene abogado, son): In Pro Per, Heidi Marie Singh, 1327 Navy Street, San Leandro, CA 94577 Date (Fecha): August 1, 2013 Leah T. Wilson, Executive Officer/Clerk, by (Secretario, por) Patsy Smith, Deputy (Asistente) (SEAL) NOTICE TO THE PERSON SERVED: You are served AVISO A LA PERSONA QUE RECIBIÓ LA ENTREGA: Esta entrega se realiza as an individual. (a usted como individuo.) 11/19, 11/26, 12/3, 12/10/13 CNS-2556752#

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAMES FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 485185 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Chef Chai, 47894 Warm Springs, Fremont, CA 94539, County of Alameda Chonthicha Tieojaroenkit, 2151 Oakland Rd., Spc. #137, San Jose, CA 95131 This business is conducted by an individual The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on N/A I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Chonthicha Tieojaroenkit This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on November 19, 2013 NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 12/10, 12/17, 12/24, 12/31/13 CNS-2565910# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS

NAME STATEMENT File No. 485650 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Landream Law Firm, 35640 Fremont Blvd. #122, Fremont, CA 94536, County of Alameda Guolan Chen, 34241 Xanadu Ter, Fremont, CA 94555 This business is conducted by an individual The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on N/A I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Guolan Chen This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on December 5, 2013 NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 12/10, 12/17, 12/24, 12/31/13 CNS-2565898# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 484971 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Leandros Publishing, 2940 Claremont Ave. #3, Berkeley, CA 94705, County of Alameda James E. Ohara, 2940 Claremont Ave #3, Berkeley, CA 94705 This business is conducted by An Individual. The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on N/A. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ James E. Ohara This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on November 14, 2013. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 12/10, 12/17, 12/24, 12/31/13 CNS-2565396# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 484973 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Strategic Solutions HR Consulting, 150 Cherrywood Ave., San Leandro, CA 94577, County of Alameda Elisha T. Moody, 150 Cherrywood Ave., San Leandro, CA 94577 This business is conducted by an Individual. The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on N/A. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Elisha T. Moody This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on November 14, 2013. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 12/10, 12/17, 12/24, 12/31/13 CNS-2565392# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 485497 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Eva Learning Center, 35233-G Newark Blvd., Newark, CA 94560, County of Alameda Siyu Yan, 6057 Birch Pl., Newark, CA 94560 This business is conducted by an individual The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on 1/1/2014 I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Siyu Yan This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on December 3, 2013 NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 12/10, 12/17, 12/24, 12/31/13 CNS-2565282# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 485106 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Patterson Power Group, 5486 Clarendon Park Court, Fremont, CA 94538, County of Alameda, 45252 Industrial Drive, Suite 47, Fremont, CA 94538, County of Alameda Malcolm L. Patterson, Jr., 5486 Clarendon Park Court, Fremont, CA 94538 This business is conducted by an individual The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on n/a I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Malcolm L. Patterson, Jr., This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on November 18, 2013 NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 12/10, 12/17, 12/24, 12/31/13 CNS-2564894# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 485201 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Shine Insurance Agency, 652 Boar Circle, Fremont, CA 94539, County of Alameda Hardeep Kaur Rajasonsi, 652 Boar Circle, Fremont, CA 94539 This business is conducted by an Individual. The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on 10/10/2013. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be

false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Hardeep Kaur Rajasonsi, Owner This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on November 20, 2013. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 12/10, 12/17, 12/24, 12/31/13 CNS-2564585# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 485303 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Fty-East Bay, 4636 Alameda Dr., Fremont, CA 94536, County of Alameda Justin Dutcher, 3542 East Ave., #A, Livermore, CA 94550 This business is conducted by an individual The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on N/A I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Justin Dutcher This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on November 22, 2013 NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 12/10, 12/17, 12/24, 12/31/13 CNS-2564583# STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT OF USE OF FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME File No. 431736 The following person(s) has (have) abandoned the use of the fictitious business name: Economy Air Travels, 1945 Berry More Common #L, Fremont, CA 94538; Mailing Address: 39962 Cedar Blvd., #278, Newark, CA 94560 The fictitious business name statement for the Partnership was filed on 11/18/2009 in the County of Alameda. Jaffar Salih Shaik Abubacker, 350 Franciscan Ct., #19, Fremont, CA 94539 Shakila Banu Syed Jaffar, 1945 Berry More Common, #L, Fremont, CA 94538 This business was conducted by: General Partnership S/ Jaffar Salih Shaik Abubacker This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on November 22, 2013. 12/3, 12/10, 12/17, 12/24/13 CNS-2563890# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 484902 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: J & D Custom Cabinets, 5423 Central Av., Suite #13, Newark, CA 94560, County of Alameda Julio R. Chamale, 36436 Buckeye St., Newark, CA 94560 This business is conducted by an Individual The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on N/A I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Julio R. Chamale This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on November 13, 2013 NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 12/3, 12/10, 12/17, 12/24/13 CNS-2563237# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 484831 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Cal Bear Scientific and Engineering, 2452 Silsby Ave., Union City, CA 94587, County of Alameda Jeffrey E. Huling, 2452 Silsby Ave., Union City, CA 94587 This business is conducted by an Individual. The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on N/A. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Jeffrey Huling This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on November 8, 2013. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 11/26, 12/3, 12/10, 12/17/13 CNS-2560973# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 484913 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Irvington Auto Center, 43600 Fremont Blvd., Fremont, CA 94536, County of Alameda Michael T. Nguyen, 4417 Elaiso Common, Fremont, CA 94536 This business is conducted by an Individual The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on N/A I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Michael Nguyen This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on November 13, 2013 NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 11/26, 12/3, 12/10, 12/17/13 CNS-2560684# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 484914 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Irvington Auto Service, 493 Washington Blvd., Fremont, CA 94539, County of Alameda

Minh Kha Nguyen, 4497 Cherrywood Ave., Fremont, CA 94538 This business is conducted by an individual The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on 11/12/13 I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Nguyen Minh This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on November 13, 2013 NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 11/26, 12/3, 12/10, 12/17/13 CNS-2560681# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 484986 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Silicon Valley Education Association, 4861 Ridgewood Dr., Fremont, CA 94555, County of Alameda Shamin Mo, 4861 Ridgewood Dr., Fremont, CA 94555 This business is conducted by an individual The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on 11/8/2013 I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Shamin Mo This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on November 14, 2013. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 11/19, 11/26, 12/3, 12/10/13 CNS-2558921#

GOVERNMENT

To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: Larry Calloway Smith, Sr. A Petition for Probate has been filed by Gene L. Smith in the Superior Court of California, County of Alameda. The Petition for Probate requests that Gene L. Smith be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. The Petition requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A hearing on the petition will be held in this court on 1-28-14 at 9:30 am in Dept. 201 located at 2120 Martin Luther King Jr. Way, Berkeley, CA 94704. If you object to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. If you are a creditor or a contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in California law. You may examine the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Petitioner: GENE L. SMITH, 300 Pinto Court, Vallejo, CA 94591, Telephone: 707557-2862 12/3, 12/10, 12/17/13 CNS-2562918#

CITY OF UNION CITY DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS NOTICE OF REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS (RFP) TO PROVIDE DESIGN SERVICES FOR ALVARADO-NILES ROAD PEDESTRIAN SAFETYIMPROVEMENTS PROJECT CITY PROJECT NO. 12-10 FEDERAL PROJECT NO. HSIPL-5354 (035) Proposals to provide design services for the Alvarado-Niles Road Pedestrian Safety Improvements will be received at the City of Union, Public Works Department, 34009 Alvarado-Niles Road, Union City, California until Monday, January 13, 2014 at 5 p.m. This project includes federal funds. The City has established a DBE goal of 8.0% for this contract. Contact the Department of Public Works at (510) 675-5308 to request a copy of the RFP. All questions should be faxed to Michael Renk, City of Union City at (510) 489-9468 or emailed to mrenk@ci.unioncity.ca.us. City of Union City Dated: November 26, 2013 12/10, 12/17/13 CNS-2564593#

PROBATE NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF MABEL M. LUI CASE NO. RP13703518 To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: Mabel M. Lui A Petition for Probate has been filed by Raphael Mak in the Superior Court of California, County of Alameda. The Petition for Probate requests that Raphael Mak be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. The Petition requests the decedent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examination in the file kept by the court. The Petition requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A hearing on the petition will be held in this court on 1-22-14 at 9:30AM in Dept. 201 located at 2120 Martin Luther King Jr. Way, Berkeley, Calif 94704. If you object to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. If you are a creditor or a contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in California law. You may examine the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for Petitioner: Gerard Lam, 1407 Webster Street, Suite 216, Oakland, California 94612, Telephone: (510) 4656685 12/3, 12/10, 12/17/13 CNS-2562923#

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF LARRY CALLOWAY SMITH SR. CASE NO. RP13704068

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF WINTON SINCLAIR TURNER CASE NO. RP13696684 To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: Winton Sinclair Turner A Petition for Probate has been filed by Soojung Ko Hobi in the Superior Court of California, County of Alameda. The Petition for Probate requests that Soojung Ko Hobi be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. The Petition requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A hearing on the petition will be held in this court on 01-21-14 at 9:30 a.m in Dept. 201 located at 2120 Martin Luther King. Jr., Way, Berkeley, CA 94704. If you object to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. If you are a creditor or a contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in California law. You may examine the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for Petitioner: Clare H. Springs, Diane J. Fong, Springs & Associates, 601 California Street, Suite 1001, San Francisco, CA 94108, Telephone: (415) 675-1090 11/26, 12/3, 12/10/13 CNS-2560504#

PUBLIC AUCTION/SALES NOTICE OF LIEN SALE AT PUBLIC AUCTION Notice is hereby given that personal property in the following units will be sold at public auction: on the 16th day of December, 2013 at or after10: 30 am pursuant to the California Self-Storage Facility Act. The sale will be conducted at: U-Haul Moving & Storage of Thornton, 4833 Thornton Ave. Fremont, CA 94536. The items to be sold are generally described as follows: clothing, furniture, and / or other household items stored by the following people: Name Unit # Paid Through Date Jennifer Russell AA8048A 9/25/13 Gregory Dumlao B119 6/20/13 Timothy Gray B136 9/29/13 Venecio Torres B137 7/17/13 Sherry Martinez B185 9/20/13 Jorge Bran B201 9/11/13 Denise Williams B231 8/4/13 Bertha Jackson-Coney B269 8/30/13 Carter Small B286 9/30/13 Sergio Hernandez B296 4/2/13 Frank Safford B309 8/6/13 Yin Hsin Chu B313 9/29/13 Craig Seiden C107 10/3/13 Oliver Allen C118 8/15/13 James Hoffman C170 6/14/13 Gerald Holmes C173 10/12/13 Sonia Young C224 6/10/13 Brenda Rossi C231-32 12/9/12 Maricela Diaz C273 7/1/13 James Hoffman C278 7/30/13 Craig Seiden C283 9/25/13 Nixon Matignas C289 4/30/13 Sonia Young C304 6/10/13 12/3, 12/10/13 CNS-2562462#


December 10, 2013

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Page 33

Government Briefs City Council summaries do not include all business transacted at the noted meetings. These outlines represent selected topics and actions. For a full description of agendas, decisions and discussion, please consult the website of the city of interest: Fremont (www.fremont.gov), Hayward (www.hayward-ca.gov), Milpitas (www.ci.milpitas.ca.gov), Newark (www.ci.newark.ca.us), Union City (www.ci.union-city.ca.us).

Fremont City Council December 3, 2013 Consent: Approve Phase 1 of Vargas Road Funding Agreement with East Bay Regional Park District. Appropriate $260,000 of EBRPD funding. Ceremonial: Honor Systems Analyst/Programmer John Leon for 25 years of service.

Oral Communications: Members of Fremont Association of City Employees (FACE) spoke of their conflict and vote to disengage with Service Employees International Union (SEIU) and disagreement with the oral communication by SEIU at the

Milpitas City Council Meeting

November 19, 2013 city council meeting. Other Business: Continued until council meeting scheduled for December 10, 2013. Approve extraordinary adjustment to Transfer Station service fees due to Labor, Health Care, and Transportation costs in excess of CPI, effective January 2014. Council Communications: Appoint Councilmember

Bacon as the Vice Mayor for the 2014 term. Mayor Bill Harrison Vice Mayor Anu Natarajan Absent Suzanne Lee Chan Vinnie Bacon Raj Salwan

Aye

Aye Aye Aye

State workers get $516M in bonus pay BY JULIET WILLIAMS ASSOCIATED PRESS SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP), Many California state employees received a boost this year after complaining of furloughs and salary cuts during the recession, with some of the largest bargaining units agreeing to raises of 2 to 3 percent annually over the next few years. But even as their unions were criticizing the unpaid days off, thousands of state workers continued to collect hundreds of millions of dollars a year in contractually negotiated bonuses and other types of extra payments, on top of overtime and regular pay raises, according to a review by The Associated Press. The add-ons have been part of the state’s compensation system for decades, and the costs have been rising steadily in the last five years. The total cost reached $516 million in 2012, up from $373 million in 2008. The money was distributed among 95,705 employees who took on special duties or skills affiliated with their jobs, according to five years of California pay records for 250,000 state employees requested by the AP. The costs have gone up in part because of dozens of new categories the state was required to add by federal court receivers overseeing the state’s troubled prison system. The average payout in 2012 was $5,382 per employee for those who received extra pay, a 17 percent increase over the previous year and a 39 percent increase from five years earlier. The most extra pay received by one worker

was nearly $531,000 for a senior psychiatrist at a state mental hospital, nearly double his annual salary. The payouts have been part of collective bargaining for many years, but some categories seem to reward work or skills that are part of the job the employee was hired to do. California has more than 325 types of special pay for a range of skills, certifications or benchmarks. The category includes bonuses, incentive pay, retention pay and pay differentials. The money is awarded for such things as knowing multiple languages, holding a college degree, riding a motorcycle on the job or, in some cases, just for sticking around. State workers also can receive special pay for obtaining a credential, driving the office carpool, taking dictation or working on deadline. Some examples include: – A $1,000 bonus for parking attendants at the state Department of Food and Agriculture, a perk negotiated by the Teamsters Union. – $1,600 a year in “fitness incentive pay’’ for prison guards and psychiatric facility workers for submitting to a physical exam. – An extra $10 an hour for Air Resources Board employees who are forced to climb to take air quality samples. Climbing “does not include such things as taking an elevator,’’ according to the memorandum of understanding. A number of the categories deal with law enforcement functions, including several for California Highway Patrol officers.

December 3, 2013 Presentations Recognition of North American Punjabi Association and 100th anniversary of the Ghadar party, formed to liberate India from British rule. Recognition of Milpitas Executive Lions Club for participation in “Adopt-a-Spot” program. Certificate of appreciation to JDS Uniphase for volunteer work in Milpitas. Consent: Approve reappointment of Barbara Ebright and Mary Banick to Senior Advisory Commission. Approve $115,000 of fire prevention budget to fund permanent full-time inspector. Approve $500 donation to toy program. Adopt ordinance to add provisions for emergency shelters, transitional housing, single room occupancies, supportive housing and reasonable accommodations. Adopt a resolution granting initial acceptance of South Main

Street Median Improvements project and reducing faithful performance bond to $51,900. Adopt a resolution to declare weeds on certain properties to be a public nuisance and hold a hearing on January 7, 2014. Public Hearings Accept report on water system’s public health goals. All samples met state and federal standards with regards to bacteria, physical properties, and chemicals, etc; but not the public health goal levels: coliform and lead levels too high. Introduce ordinance to restrict single-use carry-out plastic bags. After a long public hearing, council moved to deny staff ’s recommendation. 3 Aye, 2 Nay (Esteves, Montano) Conduct public hearing for review of Community Development Block Grant priorities. Unfinished Business Receive update report on Milpitas 60th anniversary celebration. Festivities will begin January 25 with a gala event. The event is currently budgeted at $51,000.

Reports of Mayor and Commissions The first annual Milpitas car show exceeded expectations, and featured 27 sponsors including Peet’s Coffee and Honda of Milpitas. Ordinances Consider introduction of ordinance limiting campaign contribution account transfers in excess of $250 per donor. 3 Aye, 2 Nay (Esteves, Gomez) Resolutions Adopt a resolution authorizing the City Manager to set terms under which police officers can work as reserve officers at Santa Clara Stadium. 4 Aye, 1 Absent (Giordano) Mayor José Esteves: 4 Aye, 2 Nay Vice-Mayor Althea Polanski: Aye Debra Indihar-Giordano: 5 Aye, 1 absent Armando Gomez: 5 Aye, 1 Nay Carmen Montano: 5 Aye, 1 Nay

Hayward City Council December 3, 2013 Consent: Authorize the submission of an application in partnership with Abode Services for The Emergency Solutions Grant (ESG), a program of the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) that provides funding to states and local governments for emergency services and housing support for homeless and at-risk households. The amount of available funding per applicant is $168,385. Local shelter providers (FESCO and ESP) are preparing to submit separate applications for ESG funds. Adpot an Ordinance to allow Health Clubs and Kennels as permitted uses in the Central Business (CB) Zoning District. Public Hearing: Introduce an ordinance to adopt revised Wastewater Discharge Regulations.

Legislative Business: Approve a decrease in the existing surcharge from 50% to 15% on water service for customers outside of the City currently just over 200 properties, primarily located in the Castle Homes area. Conditionally authorize the issuance of up to $5,500,000 in tax-exempt multifamily housing revenue bonds, to assist in the development of the Hayward Senior Housing Phase II Project. Due to the Site’s small size, its relatively irregular shape, and its proximity to the existing senior housing project located at the corner of C and Grand Streets (“Hayward Senior Housing”), built and operated by Eden Housing, Inc. (Eden), the City chose to partner with Eden to develop the Site with twenty-two (22) additional affordable senior housing units. The project would complement the adjacent Hayward Senior

Housing development and allow for cost savings through shared facilities and parking. Bond proceeds will be structured as a construction loan to Eden with a minimum 24-month and a maximum 36-month term. Repayment will be from the HUD 202 Capital Advance and the Tax Credits. Approval based on final California Debt Limit Allocation Committee allocation, expected on December 11, 2013.

That includes an extra $240 a month for certain CHP officers who have a bachelor’s degree, extra pay for officers who ride a motorcycle or work in a canine unit and a stipend of 3.5 percent of base pay for time spent putting on protective gear and inspecting weapons and vehicles. Several telephone messages left with the California Highway Patrol Association were not returned. Jon Coupal, president of the Howard Jarvis Taxpayers’ Association, said some of the bonus pay categories seem legitimate, such as having an additional language skill. But he questioned why they need to be separate from the employees’ regular salaries. “Why aren’t the jobs described with particularity and the skill set described, and you hire people with that skill set, and that’s it?’’ he said. “If speaking another language is another bona fide qualification for having that job, then it should be part of the job.’’ Patricia McConahay, a spokeswoman for CalHR, the state’s human resources department, said the extra pay categories are a way to reward skills or knowledge the state needs and can help fill less desirable positions without requiring the state to constantly add or revise its more than 4,000

job descriptions. “Not every employee in a specific job classification needs to be paid a differential. We wouldn’t want to create a specific job classification for every job,’’ she said. “Attracting people for some of these very far off locations like Susanville or Pelican Bay, that’s not easy.’’ The number and types of extra pay have changed over the last 30 years as categories are added and removed. McConahay said during that time, about 75 special pay categories have been eliminated, most of them for recruiting or retaining staff in specific jobs. She said 15 new pay categories have been added since Gov. Jerry Brown took office in 2011. Major changes to the practice are unlikely because the system is deeply engrained and the public employee unions that benefit are among the chief benefactors to Democrats who control state government. The state’s largest public employee union, Service Employees International Union 1000, declined comment. Employees who work in California’s prison system and its state hospitals are among the biggest recipients of special pay, partly because of 34 categories the state was forced to add from 2006 to

2010 by federal court receivers based on problems with the state’s prison system. Dozens of registered nurses who work in correctional facilities receive tens or hundreds of thousands of dollars annually in bonus pay. Four of the top five highest recipients in 2012 worked at the Salinas Valley Psychiatric Program, a mental health hospital for incarcerated men in Soledad, about 45 miles east of Monterey. The facility has a range of incentives to keep staffers on the job, including a $5,000 payment for psychiatrists who work there for six consecutive pay periods and another $5,000 for sticking around for 24 consecutive pay periods. Ken Paglia, a spokesman for the Department of State Hospitals, said the need to staff facilities 24 hours a day and a long list of state and federal regulations also boost the pay of state hospital psychiatrists. The added pay is needed to recruit and retain qualified individuals for demanding jobs, often in remote locations, he said. –––

Mayor Michael Sweeney Absent Barbara Halliday Aye Greg Jones Aye Al Mendall Aye Marvin Peixoto Aye Mark Salinas (Mayor pro tem) Aye Francisco Zermeno Aye

Associated Press writer Hannah Dreier in Las Vegas contributed to this report.


Page 34

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

December 10, 2013

10 lines/$10/ 10 Weeks $50/Year Rotary Club of Niles We meet Thursdays at 12:15 p.m. Washington Hospital West 2500 Mowry Ave. Conrad Anderson Auditorium, Fremont www.nilesrotary.org

(510) 739-1000

Rotary Club of Fremont We meet Wednesday at 12:15 p.m. at Spin-a-Yarn Restuaruant 45915 Warm Springs Blvd. Fremont, 510-656-9141 Service through Fun http://the/ fremontrotaryclub.org Please come visit our club We wlecome new members

Dawn Breakers Lions Club Our Motto is: WE SERVE Meetings -1st & 3rd Thursdays 6:45am-8am El Patio Restaurant 37311 Fremont, Blvd., Fremont We welcome Men & Women with desire to serve our community 510-371-4065 for Free Brochure

Daughters of the American Revolution Ohlone Chapter Visit our meetings. We have activities promoting historic preservation, education & patriotism 1st Sat of each mo. Sept - May - 10 am-12 p Centerville Presbyterian Church 4360 Central Ave, Fremont

Friendship Force of San Francisco Bay Area Experience a country and its culture with local hosts and promote global goodwill. Clubs in 56 countries. Visit Australia in Feb. Host French in Sept. Monthly programs & socials. www.ffsfba.org www.thefriendshipforce.org Call 510-794-6844 or 793-0857.

Afro-American Cultural & Historical Society, Inc. Meetings: Third Saturday 5:30pm in member homes Call: 510-793-8181 for location Email: contact@aachisi.com See web for Speical Events www.aachis.com We welcome all new members Celebrating 40th anniversary

The League of Women Voters invites you to visit our website at www.lwvfnuc.org

NARFE National Assoc of Active and Retired Federal Employees

You'll find valuable information about your community and voter issues. Keep up to date & learn about our Tri-City area monthly programs. Our programs are non-partisan and free to the public.

Meet 4th Friday of Month Fremont Senior Center Central Park @ Noon All current or retired Federal Employees are welcome. Call Ellen 510-656-7973

Hayward Demos Democratic Club Monthly meetings-learn about current issues from experts, speak with officials. Annual special events such as Fall Festival, Pot-lucks and more Meetings open to all registered Democrats. For information www.haywarddemos.org

Bring Your Heart to Hospice Hold a hand, lend an ear, be a hospice volunteer. Vitas Innovative Hospice Care Call Alicia Schwemer at 408/964/6800 or Visit Vitas.com/Volunteers

Celebrate Recovery Free yourself from any hurt, hang-up or habit Join us at 33450 9th street Union City Thursdays 7pm -9pm or call anytime 510-586-5747 or 510-520-2769

SAVE (Safe Alternatives to Violent Environments) Domestic Violence Support Group (Drop In & FREE) Tue. Hayward PD 1-4 pm (510) 293-7125 Wed. Fremont PD 9 am-1pm (510) 790-6939 Thu. San Leandro PD 9 am-12pm (510) 577-3267

AARP Newark Meetings Newark Senior Center 7401 Enterprise Drive., Newark last Monday of each month at 10:00 am. All seniors (50+) are welcome to attend Contact 510-402-8318 http://aarp-newark-californiawebs.com/

Tri-City Volunteers Food Bank Invigorate your spirit & volunteer. Drop ins welcome Mon - Fri. Work off your Traffic violation by giving back to the community in need. Students 14 years & older welcome. Email Erin: ewright@tri-Cityvolunteer.org

Sun Gallery Holiday Boutique Event All kinds of hand made items for Holiday Gift Giving. Supports our Children’s Art Programs 1015 E Street Hayward Thursday, Sat & Sun 10-4pm Fri noon-6pm 510-581-4050 Need Vendors Also

SAVE (Safe Alternatives to Violent Environments) FREE Restraining Order Clinic (Domestic Violence) Tues. Hayward Police 1-4 pm Wed. Fremont Police 9 am - 1 pm Thurs. San Leandro Police 9 am - noon

Fri SAVE Office 9 am - noon Office (510) 574-2250 24/7 Hotline (510) 794-6055 www.save-dv.org

Serious Mental Illness Free 12 week course for caregivers of someone with a serious mental illness. Starting Jan 11 From 9am-11:30am in Fremont. Registration required. Contact: Joe Rose at 510-378-1578 or email to info@NAMIacs.org www.NAMI.org

Maitri Immigration Program Free Assistance and Referrals for Domestic Violence Survivors. Provide Services in Hindi, Punjabi, Bangla, Tamil and many other South Asian languages. Crisis line: 888-8-Maitri Please call for screening.

Fremont Area Writers Want to write? Meet other writers? Join us from 2-4 p.m. every fourth Saturday except July and December. Rm. 223 at DeVry University, 6600 Dumbarton Circle, Fremont Call Carol at (510) 565-0619 www.cwc-fremontareawriters.org

KIWANIS CLUB OF FREMONT We meet Tuesdays at 7:00 a.m. Fremont/Newark Hilton 39900 Balentine Drive, Newark www.kiwanisfremont.org Contact Elise Balgley at (510) 693-4524

Fremont Cribbage Club teaches cribbage to new players & tournament cribbage to all players of any skill level every Tues. 6:15pm at Round Table Pizza 37480 Fremont Blvd., Centerville Email:Accgr43@gmail.com Or call Tracy (510) 793-6472 American Cribbage Congress www.cribbage.org

Writers Open Mic Share your creativity with an audience! 7-9 p.m. fourth Mondays BookSmart, Lower Level, NewPark Mall, in Newark Tony Pino (510) 857-6722 www.cwc-fremontareawriters.org

Interested in Portuguese Culture and Traditions? PFSA (Portuguese Fraternal Society of America) Promotes youth scholarships, community charities, and cultural events. All are welcome. Contact 510-483-7676 www.mypfsa.org

Steps Along the Way The Journey to Healing and Wholeness from hurts and hangups using the 12 steps Wednesday nights 7pm New Hope Community Church 2190 Peralta Blvd., Fremont www.newhopefremont.org 510-739-0430

Enroll in CS 162:HTML5 This class starts on Wed. 1/29/14 in the Fremont Campus, room HH-117, 6:30-9:30pm Contact 510-659-6080 510-402-8318 https://webadvisor.ohlone.edu

Shout out to your community Our readers can post information including: Activities Announcements For sale Garage sales Group meetings Lost and found For the extremely low cost of $10 for up to 10 weeks, your message will reach thousands of friends and neighbors every Friday in the TCV printed version and continuously online. TCV has the right to reject any posting to the Community Bulletin Board. Payment must be received in advance.

Payment is for one posting only. Any change will be considered a new posting and incur a new fee. The “NO” List: • No commercial announcements, services or sales • No personal services (escort services, dating services, etc.) • No sale items over $100 value • No automobile or real estate sales • No animal sales (nonprofit humane organization adoptions accepted) • No P.O. boxes unless physical address is verified by TCV

FREE AIRPLANE RIDES FOR KIDS AGES 8-17 Young Eagles Hayward Airport various Saturdays www.vaa29.org Please call with questions (510) 703-1466 youngeagles29@aol.com

Kennedy High School Flea Market First Saturday Every Month Except January 8 a.m. – 4 p.m. All Spaces $20 For more info call 510-657-4070 x27150 bsterling@fremont.k12.ca.us 39999 Blacow Rd., Fremont

Unity of Fremont A Positive Path for Spiritual Living 12:30 am Sunday Service 1351 Driscoll Rd (at Christian Science Church), Fremont 510-797-5234 www.unityoffremont.org “The Church of the Daily Word”

LOTS OF NEWS AT TEMPLE BETH TORAH Pre-Hanukkah dinner/ services Fri., Nov 22nd (RSVP) Fun event Dec 25th! Sanctuary remodel almost complete! Openings preschool. Explore our Inclusive Reform community. 510-656-7141 www.bethtorah-Fremont.org

Troubled by someone’s drinking? Help is Here!

Serious Mental Illness

Al-Anon/Alateen Family Groups A no cost program of support for people suffering from effects of alcoholism in a friend or loved one. Call 276-2270 for meeting information email: Easyduz@gmail.com www/ncwsa.org You are not alone.

Free courses and presentations for caregivers of someone with a serious mental illness and those with a mental illness in Alameda County. For details, confidentially contact: Joe Rose at 510-378-1578 or email to info@NAMIacs.org www.NAMI.org

The Union City Historical Museum

Help with Math & Reading

Holy Trinity Lutheran Church Caring, Sharing, Serving God 38801 Blacow Rd., Fremont Sun Worship:8:45am 11:00am Child-care provided.Education for all ages: 10:00am. Nacho Sunday: First Sunday of every month. (510)793-6285 www.holytrinityfremont.org

Messiah Lutheran Church Church Service - Sunday 10 a.m. Bible Study - Sunday 9 a.m. Sunday School 2nd & 4th Sunday each month @ 11:15am and community events 25400 Hesperian Blvd., Hayward Phone: (510) 782-6727 www.MessiahHayward.org

FREMONT UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT OFFERS CHINESE IMMERSION K THRU 6TH GRADE Immerse your child in Mandarin with a diverse group of students. The benefits of a dual language will last a lifetime. Call 24/7 (510) 857-1038

Tri-City Ecology Center

3841 Smith St. Union City Open Thurs.-Sat 10am-4pm Visit our Museum. You’ll find valuable information about our community, past history and current happenings. www.unioncitymuseum.com Call Myrla 510-378-6376

You can make a difference by helping Newark children with Math and reading. If you can give one hour a week, you can give a life-long gift of learning to a child. Contact 510-797-2703 dia_aarp_4486@yahoo.com

Your local environmental leader! Eco-Grants available to Residents & Organizations of the Tri-City area working on Environmental projects. www.tricityecology.org Office open Thursdays, 11am-2pm 3375 Country Dr., Fremont 510-783-6222

Help with Home Repairs from Alameda County

New DimensionChorus Men’s 4 Part Vocal Harmony In the “Barbershop” style

Little Lamb Preschool Open House Saturday, March 15

No cost or favorable, low interest loans are available for home remodeling for qualified homeowners in Fremont, Union City, Sunol and Newark. Call (510)670-5399 for an application and more information. http://www.acgov.org/cda/nps/

Create & Design Websites At Ohlone College

510-494-1999 tricityvoice@aol.com

The Bridge of Faith Christmas Crafts Boutique 27343 Whitman, Hayward December 7, 8am-4pm Starts 10am Santa presents Bring own cameras Arts-CraftsRaffle-Bake Sale! Contact: Priscilla For Details 510-861-2680 Kauaistar59@yahoo.com

Thursdays at 7pm Calvary Luther Church 12500 Via Magdelena SanLorenzo Contact: ncchorus@Yahoo.com 510-332-2489

50th Year Class Reunion Washington High School Class of 64’ & Friends September 26 & 27, 2014 Spin A Yarn Steakhouse,Fremont Contact Joan Martin Graham billjoan3@pacbell.net

1pm-4pm. Drop in and visit the class rooms ad meet the teachers. Registration information will be available. Free ice cream sundaes. Everyone invited!

Premier Soccer Development Program Tryout for U11 & U14 Boys PSDP is designed to identify and develop talented, committed youth soccer players Call 510-516-3031 or Email TCPSDP@gmail.com Signup now by Visiting http://tcpsdp.wix.com/psdp


December 10, 2013

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Page 35

HOME SALES REPORT CASTRO VALLEY | TOTAL SALES: 22 Highest $: 825,000 Median $: 552,000 Lowest $: 320,000 Average $: 563,273 ADDRESS

ZIP

17829 Center Street 19615 Forest Avenue 3335 Jeanine Way 18328 Jill Way 19939 Josh Place 4964 Kathleen Avenue 19736 Lake Chabot Road 3629 Lorena Avenue 19121 Mayberry Drive 3840 Modesto Street 22072 Queen Street 20054 Redwood Road 19157 San Miguel Avenue 19385 Vaughn Avenue 2525 Watson Street 17712 Chateau Court 5394 Greenridge Road 18805 Masterson Place 5696 Shadow Ridge Drive 20395 Summercrest Drive 20398 Summerpark Place 5757 Thousand Oaks Drive

94546 94546 94546 94546 94546 94546 94546 94546 94546 94546 94546 94546 94546 94546 94546 94552 94552 94552 94552 94552 94552 94552

SOLD FOR BDS

798,000 499,000 487,000 650,000 639,000 575,000 468,000 552,000 320,000 427,000 330,000 410,000 492,500 550,000 410,000 730,000 741,000 722,000 619,000 557,500 590,000 825,000

3 3 3 1 3 3 3 3 2 2 2 3 2 3 2 3 4 5 3 3 4 4

SQFT

BUILT

CLOSED

2585 1782 1039 2212 1754 1415 1165 1847 859 893 1147 1278 1331 1191 1465 1890 1834 2519 1723 1443 1666 2262

1985 1937 1954 1961 1999 1954 1948 1949 1949 1950 1947 1951 1949 1954 1948 1984 1960 1985 1973 1998 1998 1985

10-28-13 10-30-13 10-28-13 10-28-13 10-25-13 10-29-13 10-29-13 10-30-13 10-25-13 10-25-13 10-25-13 10-25-13 10-25-13 10-29-13 10-25-13 10-25-13 10-25-13 10-30-13 10-30-13 10-29-13 10-30-13 10-25-13

FREMONT | TOTAL SALES: 32 Highest $: 1,800,000 Median $: Lowest $: 185,000 Average $: ADDRESS

ZIP

37231 2nd Street 94536 3330 Alder Avenue 94536 37311 Aspenwood Cmn #204 94536 4598 Devonshire Common 94536 3754 Dunbar Place 94536 4374 Eggers Drive 94536 1170 Gilbert Court 94536 37200 Meadowbrook Cmn 20494536 38454 Nebo Drive 94536 37362 Parish Circle #18I 94536 4193 Patricia Street 94536 35435 Ronda Court 94536 4630 Westwood Avenue 94536 4213 Chetwood Avenue 94538 3338 Clifton Court 94538 4374 Millard Avenue 94538 4780 Quadres Court 94538 4838 Regents Park Lane 94538 3026 Rockett Drive 94538 2303 Abaca Way 94539 1361 Bedford Street 94539 40484 La Jolla Court 94539 132 Mission Cielo Avenue 94539 42223 Palm Avenue 94539 3945 Avocet Terrace 94555 34336 Gadwall Common 94555 3155 Lake Pillsbury Drive 94555 4520 Norocco Circle 94555 5998 Pompei Terrace #128 94555 34714 Powder River Place 94555 34587 Salinas Place 94555 34930 Seal Rock Terrace 94555

SOLD FOR BDS

SQFT

BUILT

CLOSED

361,000 681,000 310,000 335,000 570,000 650,000 784,000 370,500 505,000 363,000 185,000 771,000 491,000 685,000 753,000 450,000 582,500 588,000 352,000 839,500 1,190,000 1,210,000 1,800,000 1,225,000 628,000 495,000 570,000 743,000 629,000 630,000 590,000 525,000

1392 1708 936 945 1503 1340 1785 962 1120 942 1344 1868 1148 1680 2400 1258 1636 1285 950 1370 2014 2115 3230 2256 1607 1405 1234 1717 1514 1709 1402 1555

1914 1973 1985 1987 1977 1958 1977 1984 1955 1989 1960 1968 1953 1960 1958 1955 1959 1961 1954 1970 1959 1966 1999 1970 1987 1981 1977 1982 1992 1973 1972 1985

10-28-13 10-25-13 10-29-13 10-25-13 10-25-13 10-30-13 10-29-13 10-25-13 10-25-13 10-25-13 10-28-13 10-30-13 10-29-13 10-30-13 10-25-13 10-25-13 10-28-13 10-30-13 10-30-13 10-25-13 10-29-13 10-25-13 10-25-13 10-25-13 10-25-13 10-29-13 10-30-13 10-29-13 10-29-13 10-30-13 10-25-13 10-25-13

2 3 1 2 3 2 3 2 3 4 3 4 4 3 3 3 3 3 3 4 5 5 3 2 4 4 3 3 4 3

HAYWARD | TOTAL SALES: 27 Highest $: 880,000 Median $: Lowest $: 111,000 Average $: ADDRESS

ZIP

1749 B Street 18023 Castlewood Court 1217 George Circle 21130 Haviland Avenue 22981 Holly Court 24030 Marchand Court 2364 Morrow Street 2368 Morrow Street 21950 Rockford Road 22595 Valley Brook Court 22406 Victory Drive 1268 Highland Boulevard 28575 Aragon Avenue 31299 Brae Burn Avenue 30158 Bridgeview Way 31032 Carroll Avenue 31847 Carroll Avenue 426 Culp Avenue 945 Fletcher Lane #D325 624 Janice Avenue 25706 Lewis Drive 751 Lilly Avenue 27150 Manon Avenue 29087 Rosecliff Lane 442 Schafer Road 24914 Thomas Avenue 26724 Lauderdale Avenue

94541 94541 94541 94541 94541 94541 94541 94541 94541 94541 94541 94542 94544 94544 94544 94544 94544 94544 94544 94544 94544 94544 94544 94544 94544 94544 94545

588,000 651,922

SOLD FOR BDS

270,000 300,000 486,000 325,000 365,000 378,000 485,500 555,500 500,000 417,000 280,000 450,000 410,000 390,000 880,000 352,000 420,000 425,000 175,000 459,000 225,000 345,000 471,000 500,000 225,500 111,000 340,000

3 3 2 2 2 4 3 3 3 3 5 3 3 4 1 3 2 2 4 4 2 3 3

390,000 390,389

SQFT

BUILT

CLOSED

1162 1314 780 841 1790 1560 1364 2382 1329 1490 2951 1161 1221 1577 740 1175 812 824 2395 2090 1044 960 1215

1922 1973 1917 1950 1986 1953 1986 1943 1958 1955 2000 1955 1951 1950 1986 1955 1951 1950 1959 1994 1980 1952 1957

10-29-13 10-25-13 10-28-13 10-25-13 10-25-13 10-25-13 10-25-13 10-30-13 10-29-13 10-29-13 10-28-13 10-28-13 10-30-13 10-29-13 10-25-13 10-25-13 10-29-13 10-25-13 10-25-13 10-25-13 10-30-13 10-28-13 10-28-13 10-25-13 10-29-13 10-29-13 10-30-13

MILPITAS | TOTAL SALES: 11 Highest $: 1,501,000 Median $: 639,000 Lowest $: 380,000 Average $: 704,500 952 Cardoza Lane 95035 953,000 - 11-08-13 823 Fulton Court 95035 712,000 3 1757 1981 11-08-13 282 Geneva Road 95035 591,000 2 1350 1987 11-08-13 381 Marylinn Drive 95035 412,500 3 1095 1958 11-07-13 1266 Nestwood Way 95035 552,000 - 11-08-13 1270 Nestwood Way 95035 639,000 - 11-06-13 1038 North Hillview Drive 95035 728,000 3 1644 1977 11-08-13 586 Old Evans Road 95035 670,000 3 1468 1984 11-06-13 1708 Pinewood Way 95035 611,000 3 1247 1967 11-08-13 167 South Main Street 95035 1,501,000 - 11-06-13 1101 South Main Street #328 95035 380,000 1 768 2007 11-12-13 NEWARK | TOTAL SALES: 08 Highest $: 809,000 Median $: Lowest $: 310,000 Average $: ADDRESS

ZIP

7310 Carter Avenue 5549 Forbes Drive 35167 Lido Boulevard 36829 Newark Boulevard #A 8516 Peachtree Avenue 39672 Potrero Drive 39733 Potrero Drive 8305 Rinconada Court

94560 94560 94560 94560 94560 94560 94560 94560

SOLD FOR BDS

600,000 809,000 310,000 358,000 615,000 560,000 575,000 769,000

3 5 2 3 3 3 3 4

1849 Clarke Street

ZIP

94577

SOLD FOR BDS

380,000

2

94577 94577 94577 94577 94577 94577 94577 94578 94578 94578 94579 94579 94579

626,000 479,000 470,000 690,000 675,000 303,000 290,000 339,000 480,000 650,000 420,000 406,000 480,000

3 3 3 4 4 3 2 3 3 3 3 3 3

1744 1492 1660 2166 2467 1018 832 1080 1582 1708 1246 1190 1583

1933 1941 1948 1965 1961 1950 1943 1947 1984 1966 1958 1956 1953

10-25-13 10-25-13 10-29-13 10-28-13 10-25-13 10-25-13 10-29-13 10-25-13 10-29-13 10-30-13 10-30-13 10-29-13 10-29-13

SAN LORENZO | TOTAL SALES: 04 Highest $: 390,000 Median $: 385,000 Lowest $: 376,000 Average $: 384,875 ADDRESS

ZIP

919 Bockman Road 1181 Via Dolorosa 1430 Via Manzanas 17105 Via Pasatiempo

94580 94580 94580 94580

SOLD FOR BDS

385,000 388,500 390,000 376,000

3 4 3 3

SQFT

BUILT

CLOSED

1051 1629 1973 1068

1947 1950 1951 1947

10-25-13 10-29-13 10-25-13 10-28-13

UNION CITY | TOTAL SALES: 11 Highest $: 700,000 Median $: Lowest $: 299,000 Average $: ADDRESS

ZIP

33339 4th Street 33041 Alicante Terrace #63 2466 Andover Drive 33100 Arizona Street 2636 Crown Court 32262 Mercury Way 35471 Monterra Circle 4864 Nadine Court 2527 Oregon Street 2653 Royal Ann Drive 31333 Santa Elena Way

94587 94587 94587 94587 94587 94587 94587 94587 94587 94587 94587

SOLD FOR BDS

299,000 455,000 580,000 700,000 463,000 300,000 444,000 605,000 540,000 419,000 559,000

2 4 4 4 4 2 2 3 3 5

463,000 487,636

SQFT

BUILT

CLOSED

480 1449 1888 2081 1566 856 1294 1349 1340 1392 2412

1949 1997 1969 1975 1971 1971 2001 1977 1964 1973 1969

10-29-13 10-25-13 10-25-13 10-29-13 10-29-13 10-25-13 10-25-13 10-30-13 10-30-13 10-25-13 10-25-13

Fremont Fire gives back SUBMITTED BY CITY OF FREMONT Fremont’s getting into the spirit of giving. The Fremont Fire Department is teaming up with Tri-City Volunteers, a local nonprofit, to collect non-perishable food and new unwrapped toys at all 10 fire stations and the Fire Department’s main office at 3300 Capitol Ave., Building A. Donations are being accepted through Wednesday, December 18. For more information call the Fremont Fire Department at (510) 494-4299. Fire Station 1: 4200 Mowry Ave Fire Station 2: 37299 Niles Blvd Fire Station 3: 40700 Chapel Way Fire Station 4: 1000 Pine St. Fire Station 5: 55 Hackamore Ln. Fire Station 6: 4355 Central Ave Fire Station 7: 43600 South Grimmer Blvd Fire Station 8: 35659 Fremont Blvd Fire Station 9: 39609 Stevenson Pl. Fire Station 10: 5001 Deep Creek Rd

SUBMITTED BY MELISSA PONCHARD Once again, an annual appeal has been launched by Tri-City Volunteers food bank to collect food and financial donations to support vulnerable and elderly people living in the area. The project has already helped to distribute 4,130 Thanksgiving packages, including 1,000 turkeys. Another 4,000 packages will also be needed for Christmas. With government cuts to food stamps and the prospect of another grim economic holiday forecast, young families as well as older and other vulnerable people are at risk emotionally as well as nutritionally. We have 16,000 people struggling with poverty in

our area. One quarter of our food bank recipients are children, with seniors (a great many of whom live alone) making up another quarter. Your response to the Making Hunger History appeal through the overwhelming generosity of local supporters will hopefully mean that Tri-City Volunteers can make it through its 43rd year helping thousands of people access needed food. All the money Tri-City Volunteers raises is used for the direct benefit of the older people and vulnerable families who suffer because of poverty. Your donations support those most in need of help, allowing the organization to make sure people stay warm, eat well, and remain positive. Anyone interested in setting up a collection point at their work, school, or church to receive non-perishable food items is encouraged to contact Tri-City Volunteers at (510) 793-4583 or email sgovea@tricityvolunteers.org. For more information about Tri-City Volunteers, visit www.tri-cityvolunteers.org.

575,000 574,500

SQFT

BUILT

CLOSED

1830 3148 972 1330 1632 1766 1762 2317

1999 2000 1971 1987 1994 1993 1991 1998

10-30-13 10-29-13 10-30-13 10-30-13 10-25-13 10-29-13 10-25-13 10-25-13

SAN LEANDRO | TOTAL SALES: 14 Highest $: 690,000 Median $: 470,000 Lowest $: 290,000 Average $: 477,714 ADDRESS

992 Collier Drive 433 Dolores Avenue 13570 Doolittle Drive 2778 Marineview Drive 1800 Skyview Drive 2427 State Street 1453 Virginia Street 2180 Altamont Road 14975 Portofino Circle 2493 Yaffe Drive 907 Burkhart Avenue 15459 Farnsworth Street 1680 Sagewood Avenue

SQFT

BUILT

1248

1930 10-30-13

CLOSED

SUBMITTED BY LAUREL SKURKO Brian Copeland’s (Moreau, Class of ‘82) new Christmas solo show, “The Jewelry Box,” is currently enjoying a critically acclaimed run at The Marsh Theater in San Francisco. The play will be coming to Moreau Catholic High School for a very special, exclusive event! This will be your only op-

portunity to see this gem without driving to San Francisco. This event will provide a meaningful way to gather family members and friends (recommended age 12 and up) during the holiday season. The story is a Christmas memoir and prequel to Copeland’s first acclaimed solo play, Not A Genuine Black Man, the longest running one-man play in San Francisco Theater history!

City of Fremont holiday building code schedule City of Fremont offices, for many non-essential services including the Building Division, will be closed from December 23, 2013 and reopen on January 2, 2014. With the upcoming 2013 Building Standards Code, taking effect on January 1, 2014, City of Fremont will be allowing submittal of projects under current 2010 California Building Standards Code as follows: • A complete permit application and all applicable fees must be paid by the cutoff date of December 20, 2013. • Plans must be drawn and a complete package of all required construction documents shall be submitted by Friday January 10, 2014 or the application will be deemed incomplete. • Any incomplete packages submitted after December 20, 2013 shall be reviewed in accordance with the 2013 California Building Standards Code. • Any projects submitted after January 1, 2014 will be reviewed in accordance with the 2013 California Building Standards Code. • If all required fees and completed applications were not received prior to the cutoff date of December 20, 2013 those projects will be reviewed under the 2013 California Building Standards Code. • All projects that have submitted complete construction document packages prior to the December 20, 2013 cutoff date will be reviewed under the current codes. For additional information, call (510) 494-4460.

Local Girl Scouts continue to make a difference SUBMITTED BY CATHY KEEBAUGH In the past couple of weeks, Girl Scouts Cadette Troop #32018 has been collecting donations of clothing, shoes, towels, blankets, and non perishable food to help victims of the super typhoon in the Philippines. With the overwhelming support of fellow Girl Scouts in the Coyote Hills service unit and the community, our Troop was able to fill a total of 19 Balikbayan boxes and ship them for free, compliments of LBC Shipping Cargo in Hayward. The Girl Scouts of the Philippines received these goods and handled distribution in the affected area of Tacloban City and surrounding islands.

The Jewelry Box is about a very special Christmas when Brian was six years old while living in East Oakland in 1970. He decides to buy his mother a jewelry box from the Old White Front Store on Hegenberger Road. He has three weeks until Christmas Eve to find a way to earn $11.97 for this special gift. Follow Brian along the streets of 1970 Oakland as he deals with the times while he tries to achieve his goal.

The Jewelry Box Sunday, Dec 15 7:30 p.m. Teves Theatre, Moreau High School 27170 Mission Blvd., Hayward (800) 838-3006 http://www.brownpapertickets.com/event/press/526608


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WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

“Places of Worship” is published on the first Tuesday of every month. Faith-based organizations that have agreed to distribute Tri-City Voice to their congregations are included. A complete list of all greater Tri-City faith-based organizations can be found at: www.tricityvoice.com under “Community Resources.”

ASSEMBLY OF GOD Calvary Assembly of Milpitas 130 Piedmont Rd. Milpitas (408) 946-5464 www.camilpitas.org Christian Life Center 33527 Western Ave., Union City 510-489-7045 Harbor Light Church 4760 Thornton Ave., Fremont 510-744-2233 www.harborlight.com

BAPTIST Alder Avenue Baptist Church 4111 Alder Ave., Fremont 510-797-3305 www.alderavebc.com Bay Area Baptist Church 38517 Birch St., Newark 510-797-8882 www.bayareabaptist.org Berean Baptist Church 2929 Peralta Blvd., Fremont 510-792-3928 Calvary Baptist Church 28924 Ruus Rd., Hayward 510-589-9677 Chinese Independent Baptist Church 37365 Centralmont Pl., Fremont 510-796-0114 www.cibcfremont.org Christ Centered Missionary Baptist Church 22979 Maud Ave., Hayward Community Church of Hayward 26555 Gading Rd., Hayward 510-782-8593

Holy Spirit Catholic Church 37588 Fremont Blvd., Fremont 510-797-1660 www.holyspiritfremont.org Old Mission San Jose Church 43266 Mission Blvd., Fremont 510-657-1797 Our Lady of Guadalupe Parish 41933 Blacow Rd., Fremont 510-657-4043 www.guadalupe-parish.org Our Lady of the Rosary Church 703 C St., Union City 510-471-2609 www.olrchurch.org St. Elizabeth Catholic Church 750 Sequoia Dr., Milpitas 408-262-8100 St. James the Apostle 34700 Fremont Blvd. (w. of Decoto Rd.), Fremont 510-792-1962 www.sjapostle.net St. John the Baptist Catholic Parish 279 S. Main St., Milpitas 408-262-2546 www.sjbparish.org

CHRISTIAN Abundant Grace Community Church meets at SDA Church 32441, Pulaski Dr, Hayward (650)575-3345 http://www.abundantgcc.org/ Calvary Bible Church of Milpitas 1757 Houret Ct., Milpitas 408-262-4900 www.calvarybiblechurch.us

Fairway Park Baptist Church 425 Gresel St., Hayward 510-471-0200 www.FPBC.org

Calvary Chapel Fremont 42986 Osgood Rd., Fremont 510-656-8979 www.calvaryfremont.org

First Baptist Church of Russell City 2979 Maude Ave., Hayward 510-538-3320

Cedar Blvd. Neighborhood Church 38325 Cedar Blvd., Newark 510-791-8555 www.cbnc.net

First Baptist Church of Newark 6320 Dairy Ave., Newark 510-793-4810

Christ's Chosen Vessel Ministries International (Meets at Spring Valley Bible Church Building, 220 S. Main St. Milpitas (650) 834-3776

Heritage Baptist Church 2960 Merced St., San Leandro 510-357-7023 www.hbc.org Mission Way Baptist Church 38891 Mission Blvd., Fremont (510) 797-7689 New Hope Baptist Church 925 F St., Union City 510-487-7472 Palma Ceia Baptist Church 28605 Ruus Road, Hayward 510-786-2866 www.palmaceiachurch.org Park Victoria Baptist Church 875 S. Park Victoria Dr., Milpitas 408-263-9000 www.parkvictoria.org Pathway Community Church 4500 Thornton Ave., Fremont 510-797-7910 www.pathwaycommunity.info Shiloh Baptist Church 22582 South Garden Ave., Hayward 510-783-4066 shilohbc @sbcglobal.net Warm Springs Church 111 E. Warren Ave., Fremont 510-657-4082 www.warmspringschurch.org

BUDDHIST Buddhanusorn Thai Temple 36054 Niles Blvd., Fremont 510-790-2294 So. Alameda County Buddhist Church 32975 Alvarado Niles Rd., Union City 510-471-2581 www.sacbc.org

CATHOLIC Corpus Christi Church 37891 Second St., Fremont 510-790-3207 www.corpuschristifremont.org

Christ Community Church of Milpitas 1000 S. Park Victoria Dr., Milpitas 408-262-8000 www.cccmilpitas.org Christian Worship Center 241 So. Main St., Milpitas 408-263-0406 http://www.cwcsj.org Church of Christ 977 Grant Ave., San Lorenzo 510-276-4693 www.church-of-christ.org/slzca Church of Christ of Fremont 4300 Hanson Ave., Fremont 510--797-3695 www.fremontchurchofchrist.org Church of Christ – Hayward 22307 Montgomery St., Hayward 510-582-9830 www.haywardchurchofchrist.org Family Bible Fellowship 37620 Filbert St., Newark 510-505-1735 www.fbfministries.org Fremont Asian Christian Church Meets Centerville Community Center 3355 Country Drive, Fremont 510-795-2828 www.fremontasianchristianchurch.org Fremont Community Church 39700 Mission Blvd., Fremont 510-657-0123 www.gofcc.org Fremont Journey of Faith Church 39009 Cindy St., Fremont 510-793-2100 www.jof-fremont.com Good Shepherd South Asian Ministry MultiCultural Worship 4211 Carol Ave., Fremont 510-552-4476 gssam@sbcglobal.net

Grace Church Fremont Multi-Ethnic 36060 Fremont Blvd., Fremont 510-936-1423 www.gracechurchfremont.org Hayward First Church of the Nazarene 26221 Gading Rd., Hayward 510-732-0777 InRoads Christian Church 3111 Washington Blvd., Fremont 510-657-0251 www.inroadschurch.com Jyoti Fellowship church Located in First Church of the Nazarene 26221 Gading Rd., Hayward 510-427-0491 Liberty Church International Veteran’s Bldg., 37154 Second St. (Fremont Niles) 510-324-1400 www.libertyvision.org Mount Olive Ministries 1989 E. Calaveras Blvd., Milpitas 408-262-0506 www.mt-olive.org New Life Community Church 39370 Civic Center Dr. #119 Fremont 510-432-9250 www.newlifeeastbay.org New Life Christian Fellowship 22360 Redwood Road Castro Valley, 510-582-2261 www.newlifebayarea.org New Life Church 4130 Technology Pl., Fremont 510-657-9191 Newlifechurchofsf.org Solid Rock Church of God In Christ 5970 Thornton Ave., Newark 510-791-7625 www.solidrockcogic.org

CHRISTIAN (ESPANOL) Arbol de Vida 4140 Peralta Blvd., Fremont 510-790-2140 Iglesia Apostolica de Union City 33700 Alvarado Niles Rd., Union City 510-489-0687 www.ucapostolic.org Iglesia Bautista Mission Peak 41354 Roberts Ave., Fremont 510-656-5311 www.missionpeakbaptist.org Iglesia Biblica El Faro 280 Mowry Ave., Fremont Estudio Bíblico 510-585-1701 lbfchurch.org Ministerios Cosecha "Fuente de Vida" 4360 Central Ave., Fremont (510) 573-1800 mcofremont@yahoo.com Mision Hispana Esperanza Viva 4673 Thornton Ave. Suite P, Fremont 510-754-5618 www.esperanzaviva.org

CHRISTIAN FILIPINO Christian Fellowship International Church (Meets in the Park Victoria Baptist Church bldg.) 875 S. Park Victoria Dr., Milpitas 408-386-2215 http://cficmilpitas.multiply.com/ Light By The Mountain Church 606 H St., Union City 510-378-0159

CHRISTIAN INDONESIAN Graceful Christian Community Church At Immanuel Presbyterian Church 4333 Hansen Ave., Fremont 510-792-1831 www.gracefulcommunity.org

CHRISTIAN REFORMED Christ’s Community Church 25927 Kay Ave., Hayward 510-782-6010 ccchayward@sbcglobal.net

December 10, 2013

PLACES OF WORSHIP EPISCOPAL St. James Episcopal Church 37051 Cabrillo Terr., Fremont 510-797-1492 www.saintj.com

EVANGELICAL COVENANT South Bay Community Church 47385 Warm Springs Blvd., Fremont 510-490-9500 www.sobcc.org

EVANGELICAL FREE CHURCH OF AMERICA Newark Community Church 37590 Sycamore St., Newark 510-796-7729 www.newarkcommunitychurch.org Asian Indian Church Ministries Meet at Newark Community Church 510-795-7770 www.asianindianchurchministries.org

HINDU TEMPLE Paramahamsa Nithyananda Meditation - Sundays 451 Los Coches St., Milpitas 510-813 6474 www.LifeBliss.org Shreemaya Krishnadham 25 Corning Ave., Milpitas 408-586-0006 www.bayvp.org Vedic Dharma Samaj Hindu Temple and Cultural Center 3676 Delaware Dr., Fremont 510-659-0655 www.fremonttemple.org

JEWISH Congregation Shir Ami 4529 Malabar Ave., Castro Valley 510-537-1787 www.congshirami.org Temple Beth Torah 42000 Paseo Padre Pkwy., Fremont 510-656-7141 www.bethtorah-fremont.org

LDS (MORMON) Glenmoor Ward 38134 Temple Way, Fremont 510-793-8060

LUTHERAN Chinese Mission of Hope Evangelical-Lutheran Church 3800 Beard Rd, Fremont 510-938-0505 http://www.hopelutheranfremont.org/zh.html Calvary Lutheran Church & School (Behind Wendy’s) 17200 Via Magdalena, San Lorenzo 510-278-2555 Sch 278-2598 www.calvaryslz.com Christ the King Lutheran Church 1301 Mowry Ave., Fremont 510-797-3724 www.Ctkfremont.org Good Shepherd Lutheran Church 166 W. Harder Rd., Hayward Iglesia Luterana "El Buen Pastor" 510-782-0872 www.gslchayward.org Good Shepherd South Asian Ministry 4211 Carol Ave., Fremont 510-656-0900 www.gssam.org Holy Redeemer Lutheran Church 35660 Cedar Blvd., Newark 510-793-1911 office@hrlc-newark.org Holy Trinity Lutheran Church 38801 Blacow Rd., Fremont 510-793-6285 www.holytrinityfremont.org Hope Lutheran Church 3800 Beard Rd., Fremont 510-793-8691 http://hopelutheranfremont.org/

Messiah Lutheran Church 25400 Hesperian Blvd., Hayward WWW.messiahhayward.org 510-782-6727 Oromo Christ Evangelical Lutheran Church 100 Hacienda Ave., San Lorenzo 510-276-7980 ollibuse@yahoo.com Our Savior Church & Preschool 858 Washington Blvd., Fremont 510-657-3191 www.oslfremont.com

Prince of Peace Lutheran Church/School 38451 Fremont Blvd., Fremont 510-793-3366 www.popfremont.org

METHODIST African Methodist Episcopal Church 201 E St., Union City 510-489-7067 www.tricityame.org First Chinese United Methodist Church 2856 Washington Blvd. Fremont (510) 490 – 0696 www.chinesemethodist.org First United Methodist Church 2950 Washington Blvd, Fremont 510-490-0200 www.fremont-methodist.org St. Paul United Methodist 33350 Peace Terr., Fremont 510-429-3990 www.stpaulumcfremont.org VICTORY CENTER A.M.E. ZION CHURCH 33450 Ninth Street- Union City 510-429-8700

MUSLIM Islamic Society of East Bay 33330 Peace Terr., Fremont 510-429-4732 www.iseb.org

NON DENOMINATIONAL Grace Church Fremont 36060 Fremont Blvd., Fremont 510-936-1423 www.gracechurchfremont.org Heavenly Christ's Church (Meets in Calvary Lutheran Church) 17200 Via Magdalena San Lorenzo 510-303-5592 Mission Springs Community Church 48989 Milmont Dr., Fremont 510-490-0446 www.msccfremont.org Morning Star Church 36120 Ruschin Dr., Newark 510-676-1453 www.msconline.org New Seed of Faith Ministry 36600 Niles Blvd., Fremont www.nsofm.com 510 612-4832

ORTHODOX CHRISTIAN St. Christina Orthodox Church 3612 Peralta Ave., Fremont 510-739-0908 www.stchristinaorthodox.org

PENTECOSTAL Union City Apostolic Church 33700 Alvarado Niles Rd., Union City 510-489-0687 www.ucapostolic.org

PRESBYTERIAN Centerville Presbyterian Church 4360 Central Ave., Fremont 510-793-3575 www.cpcfremont.org First Presbyterian Church of Hayward 2490 Grove Way, Castro Valley (510) 581-6203 http://firstpreshayward.com


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First Presbyterian Church of Newark 35450 Newark Blvd., Newark 510-797-8811 www.newarkpres.org Immanuel Presbyterian Church of Fremont 4333 Hansen Ave., Fremont 510-494-8020 www.ipcf.net

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Sikh community feeds the hungry SUBMITTED BY KASHMIR SINGH SHAHI On an early winter evening, November 22, 2013, when a bunch of kids could have seen a movie at home or with friends at a theater, they chose instead to make Holiday cards for their fellow Americans to wish

Irvington Presbyterian Church 4181 Irvington Ave. (corner Chapel & Irvington), Fremont 510-657-3133 New Bridges Presbyterian Church 26236 Adrian Ave., Hayward 510-786-9333 newbridgespresby@gmail.com

REFORMED CHURCH IN AMERICA New Hope Community Church 2190 Peralta Blvd., Fremont 510-739-0430 www.newhopefremont.org

SALVATION ARMY Hayward Citadel Corps 430 A St., Hayward 510- 581 - 6444 The Tri-Cities Corps 36700 Newark Blvd., Newark 510-793-6319 Korean Congregation Army 36700 Newark Blvd., Newark 510 - 793 - 6319

SEVENTH DAY ADVENTIST Community Seventh-Day Church 606 H St., Union City 510-429-8446 www.unioncity22.adventistchurchconnect.org/ East Bay Fil-Am Seventh Day Adventist Church 32441 Pulaski Dr., Hayward 510-324-1597 Fremont Chinese Seventh-Day Adventist Church 1301 Mowry, Fremont 415-585-4440 or 408-616-9535 Milpitas Adventist Center 1991 Landess Ave., Milpitas 408 726-5331 www.milpitas.netadventist.org

SIKHISM Fremont Gurdwara 300 Gurdwara Rd., Fremont 510-790-0177 www.fremontgurdwara.org

UNITARIAN Mission Peak Unitarian Universalist Congregation (meets at FUMC's Cole Hall) 2950 Washington Blvd., Fremont 510-252-1477 http://www.missionpeakuu.org/

UNITED CHURCH OF CHRIST Eden United Church of Christ 21455 Birch St. @ Grove Way, Hayward 510-582-9533 www.edenucc.com Filipino American United Church of Christ 4587 Peralta Blvd., Fremont 510-797-8408 filamucc@sbcglobal.net Fremont Congregational Church 38255 Blacow Rd., Fremont 510-793-3970 www.fremontucc.net Niles Discovery Church 255 H St., Fremont 510-797-0895 www.nccucc.org San Lorenzo Community Church 945 Paseo Grande, San Lorenzo 510-276-4808

UNITY CHURCH Unity of Fremont 36600 Niles Blvd., Fremont (in the future home of Niles Discovery Church 510-797-5234 www.unityoffremont.org

them “Happy Holidays.” The next morning, families of these Sikh kids joined fellow Bay Area Sikhs to serve tasty and healthy food (langar) to over 800 people at the Glide Memorial Church in San Fran-

Fremont Police Log Continued from page 8

CHP Air Support unit contacted dispatch regarding a lo-jack hit in the area of Fremont Bl and Automall Pkwy. Officers Dodson and Hanrahan converged on the area and located the stolen vehicle on Charleston Way. Further investigation revealed the car had been “dumped” several days ago. Nice teamwork with CHP, dispatch a patrol officers. According to the victim, this was the 3rd time her car had been stolen. At approximately 9:10 p.m., Officer Lobue responded to a disturbance at the Glenview Apts. The caller stated that his ex-girlfriend, a 33 year old adult female, San Jose resident, was pounding and kicking on his door. She also began screaming and then threw rocks at his window. The caller advised that he thought she was intoxicated. Officers attempted to make contact, butthe femaleran and attempted to jump over a wall. In the end, she goes to jail for resisting arrest and for tampering with a fire alarm at the complex. Wednesday, December 4 At approximately 5:00 a.m., a reporting party calls Fremont PD to report a suspicious male trying to force open the locked doors to his business in the 34200 block of Fremont Blvd. The business is a laptop repair shop and the reporting party is watching from inside the business via closed circuit television. As officers respond, the reporting party provides updated information that the male is trying to break the doors open with an object.

Union City Police Log Continued from page 8

Saturday, November 23 Officers investigated a robbery that occurred at the Subway store located on Alvarado-Niles Rd. at 6:02 p.m. In this case a male suspect entered the store with a handgun and a bandana over his face. He ordered the clerk to get on the floor and proceeded to the cash register. The suspect removed cash from the register and fled the store. The clerk was not injured. Tuesday, November 26 At 1 p.m., officers investigated an auto burglary that occurred in the parking lot of the Chili’s restaurant at Union Landing. In this case, a male suspect was seen smashing the victim vehicle’s window and removing property. The suspect was described as a Hispanic male with tattoos covering both his arms. At 11:45 p.m., officers were patrolling the area of 4th St and D St when they noticed a suspicious vehicle parked in the area. They contacted the occupants of the vehicle and discovered that they had been smoking marijuana. One of the occupants was on probation with a search clause. Officers searched the vehicle and discovered methamphetamine. One of the occupants was arrested

cisco. Langar symbolizes the recognition of the human race as one, irrespective of color creed religion or caste. Sikhs are known for this selfless service ever since the inception in 1469 of, Sikhism by Guru Nanak Dev Ji. Sikhs maintain their distinct identity even though this can create misunderstandings at times. They feel honored that the California legislature passed a resolution that celebrates November as ‘Sikh awareness and Appreciation month’. They hope that every time a fellow American sees them, they will understand that those who wear a turban to cover their uncut hair are Sikhs, the fifth largest religion in the world, which believes in fatherhood of the almighty and brotherhood of man. As a minority, it’s surprising how Sikhs all over the world reach many people by serving free food whether at their place of worshipgurudwara - or by volunteering wherever there is a need. Keeping the tradition alive, Sikhs in their colorful turbans, spent the day at Glide Memorial, bringing smiles to hundreds of people. For more information, email: californiafeedtheneedy@gmail.com

Officer Madsen is first on scene and spots a white pick-up truck leaving the business. Officers Little and Wright spot the vehicle and make an investigative stop near the intersection of Fremont and Decoto Rd. The truck is driven by a 23 year old adult female, San Jose resident and she has with her, a bloodied male passenger who is identified as a 35 year old adult male, San Jose resident, who happens to be on parole for burglary. As officers are figuring this incident out, Dispatch receives a call of a late reported burglary at a business in the 42000 block of Blacow Rd. Similar modus operandi with the suspect in that case, matching the description of the adult male passenger in the pick-up truck. The male/female burglary team also matches other similar recent burglaries. Ultimately, the passenger and his “Bonnie” are arrested for burglary and were transported back to meet with Burglary Detectives arriving to work for their shift.Managed by Sgt. Shadle. At approximately 7:00 a.m. a caller told dispatch that his beige 1991 Acura Integra 2-door, bearing CA license #6WLD357 was stolen sometime during the night from the parking lot of their apartment complex (Countrywood Apts). Officer Francisco responded for the report. At approximately 8:10 a.m. CSO Anders responded to take an auto theft report on the 4200 block of Vincente Street. The victim stated that her grey 1993 Nissan Altima was stolen sometime during the night. Later in the day CSO Goralczk was dispatched to a stolen vehicle recovery report. The victim’s Nissan was

located in the parking lot of 34905 Newark Blvd at approximately 5:35 p.m. by Newark PD. The vehicle was not burned, wrecked or stripped. No suspects were located. Officers responded to Lorenzo Terrace to investigate a stolen red 2006 4-door Saturn Vue bearing CA license plate 5WDX147. The victim stated that the vehicle had been taken without his permission sometime during the night. Officers responded to the 3800 block of Darwin Drive to investigate a stolen vehicle. The reporting party stated that sometime during the night, his maroon 1995 Nissan Sentra 4-door was taken from in front of his residence without permission. Thursday, December 5 Unknown suspects used a torch to remove padlocks and take construction tools from the area of Union St/Washington Blvd sometime during the night. Sometime during the night unknown suspect(s) gained entry into a business on the38000 block of Martha Aveby breaking the glass of a door and window. Approximately 500 pairs of designer sunglasses were taken. Officers were dispatched to what they initially believed was theft at the CVS store located at the Hub. Two female suspects, 28 years old and 31 years old, both Oakland residents, attempted to steal alcohol and baby formula. As they were leaving the store with the goods, an employee attempted to stop them. The 28 year old suspect threatened to beat up the employee so the employee, in fear, went back into the store to call 9-1-1. Officer Little spotted the suspect ve-

hicle (Silver 4-door 2006 Chevy Malibu) as it was driving westbound on Mowry. Officers stopped the vehicle and the two suspects were identified and arrested for robbery. The driver of the vehicle, a 34 yr. old adult female, claimed to have no knowledge of the theft. She was cited for possession of an open container in her vehicle. Case investigated by Officer Nordseth and FTO Sasser. At approximately1:30 a.m., Officers were dispatched to the parking lot of Claim Jumpers at Pacific Commons for a report of a drunk male causing a disturbance. Officer Settle arrived and found the suspect standing next to a vehicle with a flat tire. Officer Settle attempted to speak with and then detain the suspect, who was later identified as a 20 year old adult male, Fremont resident; however, he failed to comply with commands and began to step towards Officer Settle and challenge him. In the end, the adult male was Tased and transported to WTH for medical treatment. Officer Settle placed the 20 year old man on a mental health evaluation hold because he made several statements about wanting to die. As assisting officers were interviewing witnesses to the incident, we learned that prior to police arrival; the 20 year old suspect stopped a security guard in the parking lot and attempted to carjack him. He had physically pulled the security guard out of his car, claimed he had a gun and threatened to kill him if he didn’t let him have his vehicle. Officer Settle is the case agent and is seeking criminal charges against the adult male for robbery carjacking and resisting/obstructing after he is released from the mental health evaluation hold.

and taken to jail. Wednesday, November 27 Officers investigated a robbery at 12:41 a.m. that occurred at Jim’s bar on Alvarado-Niles Rd. In this case, the bar tender was alone in the bar when a male suspect entered and asked for a drink. The suspect suddenly punched the bartender and hit him with bottles and other objects. The suspect stole the bartender’s cell phone, vehicle, and cash from the business. The investigation led officers to Oakland where the victim’s vehicle was located and the suspect was arrested. Friday, November 29 Officers investigated an attempted robbery at 1:46 a.m. that occurred on Railroad Ave at Whipple Rd. In this case, a male victim was walking on Railroad Ave, when a white van drove up next to him. A male suspect in the van demanded money from the victim. The victim became frightened and ran away without providing the suspect any property. The suspect vehicle then fled the area. Officers investigated a robbery at 9:33 a.m. that occurred at Wal-Mart. In this case, loss prevention agents attempted to detain several subjects for shoplifting. The loss prevention agents were pushed down by the suspects and the suspects fled on foot. The suspects were not located.

Officers responded to an address on H St. at 1:06 p.m. for a report of a male subject who was trespassing and squatting in a trailer. A witness also reported seeing the subject in possession of a handgun. Officers arrived and contacted the suspect, Jason Guzman. As officers attempted to speak with the suspect, he suddenly pulled away and attempted to flee. Officers were able to physically restrain him and prevent him from escaping. The suspect was found in possession of a replica firearm. The suspect was arrested for having active arrest warrants and resisting the officers. At 1:58 p.m., officers returned to Wal-Mart on another in-progress theft. In this case, a shoplifter was being detained by loss prevention when officers arrived on scene. The suspect, Tyrique Stewart, was able to break free from loss prevention. Arriving officers chased the suspect and detained him a short distance away. The suspect was arrested and taken to jail. Saturday, November 30 At 3:58 p.m., officers received a bulletin from Fremont PD regarding a wanted suspect. The suspect was wanted for assault and kidnapping charges and was reported to have fled from Fremont PD officers earlier in the day. The suspect was last seen on a motorcycle and possibly in route to

Union City or Hayward. Union City officers spotted a motorcycle on Mission Blvd. believed to be driven by the suspect. The suspect fled from officers and dumped the stolen motorcycle in the Hayward neighborhood. The suspect was not located on Saturday. On Tuesday December 4, 2013, Major Crimes Task Force personnel and Fremont SWAT found the suspect hiding in an address on Carobee Court, in Union City. Suspect Matthew Rossi was found inside of the residence and arrested without further incident. Monday, December 2 At 12:35 a.m., officers noticed a speeding motorcycle on Whipple Rd. near Ithaca St. As officers turned to catch up to the motorcycle, it sped away in an attempt to flee. The motorcycle suddenly stalled and came to a stop. Officers detained the driver, James Harvey, and discovered that the motorcycle was stolen out of San Jose. Harvey was also found in possession of methamphetamines. Mr. Harvey was arrested for being in possession of the stolen motorcycle and methamphetamine. Anyone with information on any of the above listed cases should contact the Investigations Division at 510-675-5247. Those wishing to remain anonymous can contact the tips line by calling 510-675-5207 or email Tips@union-city.org.


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WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

SUBMITTED BY SHARAT G. LIN

A

natural gas boom is taking place in the United States, led by North Dakota, Pennsylvania, and Texas, made possible by the commercialization of the new technology of hydraulic fracturing, or fracking. It has been touted as a new path to energy self-sufficiency, and could soon make the U.S. and net exporter of natural gas. But communities near fracking oilfields are finding that their ground water is being contaminated with natural gas and toxic chemicals. Fracking releases more methane into the atmosphere than conventional drilling, and methane is a far worse greenhouse gas than carbon dioxide.

Fracking is a method of using explosives to fracture shale rock containing natural gas or crude oil, while pumping immense quantities of water, toxic chemicals, and sand into the well to get the natural gas or crude oil to flow out. The documentary films Gasland and Gasland Part II take an unprecedented close look at the consequences of fracking for local residents, the environment, and democracy. Following up on his film Gasland, filmmaker Josh Fox uses his trademark dark humor to take a deeper, broader look at the dangers of hydraulic fracturing, or fracking, the controversial method of extracting natural gas and oil from shale. Gasland Part II, which premiered at the 2013 Tribeca Film Festival, shows

how the stakes have been raised on all sides in one of the most important environmental issues facing our nation today. The film argues that the gas industry’s portrayal of natural gas as a clean and safe alternative to oil is a myth and that fracked wells inevitably leak over time, contaminating water and air, hurting families, and endangering the earth’s climate with the potent greenhouse gas, methane. In addition the film looks at how the powerful oil and gas industries are in Fox’s words “contaminating our democracy.” Discussion following the film will be led by Lance Simmens, California State Director of Gasland Grassroots, who is also inter-

December 10, 2013

viewed in the film. Audience participation is always welcomed. Admission is free, although donations are welcomed. Screening of The House I Live In is part of the Second Saturday Documentary Series, and is sponsored by Tri-City Perspectives, Niles Discovery Church, the San Jose Peace and Justice Center, and the Sierra Club of South Alameda County. Gasland Part II Saturday, Dec. 14 1:30 p.m. Niles Discovery Church Auditorium 255 H St, Fremont (enter on 3rd Street) (510) 797-0895 www.tricityperspectives.org

sion is to transform opera from being an elitist and inaccessible art form, to one that can be enjoyed by all audiences at affordable and casual venues.

SUBMITTED BY DAVID OJAKIAN Curtain Call Performing Arts (CCPA) is proud to announce opera troupe Opera On Tap: San Francisco (OOT:SF) has taken residency following a sold-out run of Mozart’s Figaro last summer. The San Francisco chapter of OOT will perform two operas in downtown San Leandro as part of Curtain Call’s 5th anniversary season. The first production is Giocomo Rossini’s Cinderella themed opera, La Cenerentola with five performances scheduled Friday through Sunday, December 13-15. La Cenerentola will be presented as an abridged oneact matinée for children on Saturday,

SUBMITTED BY HAYWARD AREA HISTORICAL SOCIETY Santa Claus is visiting McConaghy House. Bring the kids for a visit with Santa. There will be crafts, story time, cookies, and cider. Santa at McConaghy House Saturday, Dec. 14 10 a.m. McConaghy House 18701 Hesperian Blvd, Hayward (510) 581-0223 Adults $5, seniors and students $3, children under 10 and HAHS members free

December 14 and Sunday, December 15 and in its uncut entirety on Friday, Saturday, and Sunday December 13-15. This holiday season audiences can experience the colorful presentation of Giocomo

Rossini’s bel canto masterpiece, La Cenerentola. The story of Cinderella is weaved into a relevant and authentic parable maintaining the fantasy and triumph cherished by children and adults alike. Sung in its original language of Italian, ‘Cenerentola’s’ soaring vocal lines and florid melisimatic passages are sure to delight. Evening performances will feature a chamber orchestra, while matinee performances have been specially designed for children and will include students from La Nueva School. Opera on Tap was born in Freddy’s Bar in Brooklyn, New York, in 2007 and their mis-

La Cenerentola Friday, Dec 13 – Sunday, Dec 15 8 p.m. (Sat & Sun also at 2 p.m.) California Conservatory Theatre 999 E. 14th Street, San Leandro (510) 909-9516 www.curtaincallperformingarts.org Tickets: $10 - $28


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WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

SUBMITTED BY ELIDA PADILLA PHOTOS BY SUZI RUIZ Celebrating Christmas in Mexico is truly a wonderful and unique experience. The festivities begin December 16 with the traditional Posada, which is a procession that starts at the main church and proceeds from house to house for nine consecutive evenings. Mary and Joseph are at the head of the procession and followed by people singing, praying, and holding lighted candles. With this people remember the wanderings of Mary and Joseph

through the streets of Bethlehem in search of lodging. Through “Navidad en Mexico” Ballet Folklorico Mexicano de Carlos Moreno will show you how Mexico celebrates Christmas and takes you to various regions to share the fun and excitement of its folklore through music, song, and dance. Founded in 1967, Ballet Folklorico Mexicano presents artistic and traditional forms of dance from the different regions of Mexico, and tours regularly throughout the U.S. and Mexico. “Navidad en Mexico” has been presented annually since 1971 and features around 50 performers who deliver an exciting show for the whole family.

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Navidad en México Sunday, Dec 15 3 p.m. Chabot Community College Performing Art Center 25555 Hesperian Blvd., Hayward (510) 562-6046 www.balletfolkloricomexicano.org Tickets: $35 adults, $25 children http://www.brownpapertickets.com/event/430893


December 10, 2013

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

LETTERS POLICY The Tri-City Voice welcomes letters to the editor. Letters must be signed and include an address and daytime telephone number. Only the writer’s name will be published. Letters that are 350 words or fewer will be given preference. Letters are subject to editing for length, grammar and style. tricityvoice@aol.com

B

ay Area attorney, Las Vegas entertainer and Past World President of Rotary International, Richard King will perform his annual cabaret show at the Oakland Inter-Stake Center (Mormon Temple) on Tuesday, December 17. The show is part of a series of Christmas entertainment programs, held nightly in December, sponsored by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints. Mr. King has performed in the Bay Area, Las Vegas and in front of audiences all over the world. As a professional entertainer, he has starred in West Coast productions of many Broadway musicals such as “The Music Man”, “Carousel”, “Oklahoma”, “South Pacific”, “Brigadoon”, “Guys and Dolls”, “Mame”, “No String”, “Plain and Fancy”, “No, No Nanette”,

“The Sound of Music”, “On A Clear Day You Can See Forever” and “Finian’s Rainbow.” A versatile entertainer, Mr. King has also been a cast in dramatic leading roles including Gore Vidal’s “The Best Man” and “The Night of the Iguana.” Mr. King’s cabaret show includes Broadway Show tunes such as “On a Wonderful Day Like Today (from “The roar of the Greasepaint, the smell of the Crowd”), “Get Me to the Church on Time” (from My Fair Lady) and “They Call the Wind Maria” (from Paint Your Wagon). Of course, the show includes Christmas favorites as well. He will be accompanied by the president of the Fremont Symphony Orchestra, Steve Pietkiewicz. Richard King resides in the Kimber Park area of Fremont. He is married to

Cherie Kay, former Line Captain of the Corolene Duane Dancers; they have two sons and two grandchildren. Mr. King has been an attorney for 51 years and has traveled all over the world, 135 countries, in humanitarian causes. He has addressed audiences in every U.S. State and over 120 nations of the world. He serves on many boards, including the Bay Area Directors of the Boy Scouts of America, Fremont Symphony and the High Council of the LDS Church. Christmas Concert Tuesday, Dec 17 8 p.m. Oakland Interstake Center 4770 Lincoln Ave, Oakland (510) 531-3200 http://www.ldschurchtemples.com/oakland/

Free and open to the public

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