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HIBISCUS FESTIVAL BRINGS FAMILIES AND FRIENDS DOWNTOWN FOR A PARTY SOCIAL | LIFESTYLE KITEBOARDING IS GROWING PASTIME FOR ADRENALINE JUNKIES AROUND VERO BEACH ACTIVE LIFE

Vero Beach N E W S W E E K LY T H U R S D A Y



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MARK SCHUMANN / VERO BEACH NEWSWEEKLY

This year’s Hibiscus Festival drew thousands to a weekend party downtown. The creatures that captivate Aniella Kelly, 2, are from More Good Gifts. Story, Social | Lifestyle

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WORST CASE The “worst case scenario” for the County Commission, Olson said,

would be a total lack of agreement or cooperation with the city of Vero Beach through the transition, and it would cost the county about $6.5 million to run pipelines from north and south of Indian River Shores and tie into the Shores pipes. If Vero Beach were willing to sell its underwater pipelines to the county, the construction project would cost about $4 million less, Olson said. Olson and county commissioners repeatedly stressed the huge untapped capacity – more than 12 million gallons per day for water treatment and the same for sewage treatment – plus the county’s financial position, and the fact that its rates have not been raised since 1999.

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sewer bills for customers there. County commissioners voted 4-1 to compete for the 1,912 water and 1,727 sewer customers in Indian River Shores. They would offer the same water-sewer rates charged to all county customers in a proposal to be presented April 28 to Indian River Shores. Indian River Shores officials are considering whether to continue with the city or have Indian River County provide the services. Shores town officials have indicated they want some price guarantees in addition to more reuse water for their community as they consider a new franchise agreement for water and sewer service.

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In a bold move sure to ignite a storm of debate from the beaches to the mainland, Indian River County commissioners Tuesday offered to acquire the city’s water and sewer system by taking over its $24 million debt. Plenty of drinking water, plenty of capacity to treat sewage, and plenty of irrigation-grade treated water to defray some of the cost of watering the lush lawns and tropical vegetation of Indian River Shores and other island communities who can’t get enough of it from Vero Beach. That was county Utilities Director Erik Olson’s message. Not only can the county serve Indian River Shores, which now gets its water-sewer needs met by Vero Beach, but the county can

handle all of Vero Beach’s customers as well. “Why not merge the system into one?” Olson said. A merger would mean the occasionally fragrant city sewer plant at the bridge would no longer be needed. “Do you need that wastewater plant on the 17th Street bridge there?” Olson said. “That plant could just go away.” Indian River Shores has until October to tell Vero Beach whether its residents will continue as city customers at the end of a 30-year contract, which expires in 2016, giving five years’ notice. The city of Vero Beach has offered to continue serving Indian River Shores, but authorities in the Shores have asked that Vero Beach drop the 10 percent surcharge it puts on water and

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BY MICHAEL CROOK VERO BEACH NEWSWEEKLY

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County offers to buy Vero Beach water-sewer system


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“And there is no immediate perspective to raise rates,” Olson said. “Who wins out of this? It is our belief that everybody wins.” Combining strengths with Vero Beach makes it less likely that customers will see rate increases – a consultant told Vero Beach in the recent past that the water-sewer system needs a dramatic rate increase to keep the city’s head about water – and there will be plenty of capacity to serve current customers and future county growth. “It’s inevitable,” that the city must increase its water-sewer rates, said County Administrator Joe Baird. “We’re very strong and we won’t need a rate increase.” As County Commission Chairman Bob Solari said in opposing a surcharge on Indian River Shores to pay for construction, “The philosophy behind taking over the city of Vero Beach’s system is not necessarily financially based … It’s about what’s the best way to move forward for all the citizens of Indian River

STAFF/VERO BEACH NEWSWEEKLY

The County Commission has offered to buy Vero Beach’s water and sewer system. The facility at the 17th Street bridge, above, would become unnecessary, county utilities Director Erik Olson said.

County.” O’Bryan predicted a battle ahead, eschewing the optimism of his fellow commissioners. “In practicality, I don’t see it happening,” O’Bryan said. “I don’t see the city

coming to the table in a unified system.” Despite seeing “some protectionism,” a comment by Commissioner Gary Wheeler that drew laughter, “I’m kind of an optimist, I think, at this point,” Wheeler said. “I think there’s room for movement.” On April 29, county commissioners are scheduled to meet Vero Beach City Council members for an open debate about the future of water and sewer customers who now get these vital services from the city. BOTTOM LINE County resident Glenn Heran, a frequent critic of the city’s utility systems, said the city is debt-ridden and Indian River Shores residents are paying significantly more now than they would if they were county utility customers. He also indicated that if the South Beach area leaves the city’s systems, it could see higher rates to make up for the lost revenue. GAI Consultants last November, however, said the average Indian River Shores resident was paying slightly less for water and sewer under the city’s rate structure than under the county’s rates. Vero Beach Water and Sewer Director Rob Bolton has also said in the past that if the South Beach area were to leave, some of the city’s costs would be reduced with a scaled back system. In 2009, consultants Public Resources

Management Group did a rate study for the city system that recommended increases of more than 60 percent in the sewer rate over five years and 37.5 percent in the water rates. Based on that study, the City Council raised water rates by 7.5 percent and sewer rates by 18 percent effective October 2009. A 2009 report showed the city’s sewer and water department was staring at a deficit of more than $1 million that budget year. The city had already advanced the department $2 million in 2008 and was initially expected to advance it another $1.4 million in 2009 to cover shortages. A second increase in the sewer rate of 11.5 percent took place last year, but the council canceled the rest of the projected increase. Moreover, the city is still paying off $24 million in bonds and loans on the water-sewer system. “The end of the story comes down to economies of scale,” Olson said, meaning, in this case, the bigger water-sewer system can deliver services cheaper. That is bound to be the bottom line for folks who, in certain months, see their combined water-sewer bills exceed their electric bill from Vero Beach. But there’s a long way to go to the bottom line in this historic game of Vero Monopoly, with players like FP&L rolling the dice to see if they can buy the Electric Company or if the county lands on Water Works.


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Real estate market Beginning to heat up

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Fidelity Investment was a recent commercial deal completed by Terry Torres of Bird Realty Group. The revamped Cardinal Drive office opened on March 7. BY IAN LOVE VERO BEACH NEWSWEEKLY

Local Realtors handling property on both sides of the bridges are seeing the market heat up with a flurry of sales since the beginning of the month. In the first week of April, there were 27 properties that exchanged hands on the barrier island, while sales on the mainland have steadily improved. One home in Diamond Lakes went on the market on March 23 with a list price of $214,000 and sold a week later for $265,000. Though such a sale is not typical in this new market, the trend for sellers is improving. “We are starting to see multiple offers on the lower end of the market, homes below $150,000,” said Steve Schlitt of Coldwell Banker Ed Schlitt Realtors. “And we are getting close to our asking price.” Schlitt added that in the higher end market prices seem to have stabilized as well, but again reflecting the reset the market has undergone.

“We have seen a pickup from last year and those prices, too, have stabilized,” Schlitt said. “I think people have realized that prices have come down about as far as they are going to go and there is no advantage to holding on to get a better deal later.” One of the changes that has occurred recently is that rental properties that looked so attractive a couple of years ago while unsold homes flooded the market are beginning to lose their luster. In fact, prices are up about 10 percent over last year. “What I think you have seen over the last 18 months is a bubble buildup in the rental market and now it is getting cheaper to buy than to rent,” said Carl Sciara of Dale Sorensen Real Estate. “I had a customer who had been renting the last few years, but they have started to see their rents go up and realized that the sales prices probably aren’t going to go any lower,” Schlitt said. CONTINUES ON PAGE 6

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STAFF/VERO BEACH NEWSWEEKLY

The former Carlucci Gourmet Market on south A1A has been generating much interest and may come back as an upscale eatery.

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REAL ESTATE FROM PAGE 5

One of the interesting changes that has taken root at least thus far in this rebound is that buyers are not using exotic mortgage instruments to fund their purchases -- they are coming in with cash. Adam Preuss of Adam Preuss Appraisal and President of the Realtors Association of Indian River County says he has done his own investigating into the matter and finds that about 70 percent of all sales in Indian River County are with cash. The influx of cash sales shows that at least some of the rebound thus far is coming from investors, who have been parking their money on the sideline as the market slid. With that downward pressure on sales prices easing off, they are concluding now is the time to get back into the market. “One of the reasons we are starting to see multiple offers in lower end properties is that investors see they can get an immediate cash flow and turn a nice profit right away,” Schlitt said. On the commercial side, there is still a lot of available inventory that must be sorted out. One commercial property that has captured the interest of of a lot of South Beach residents is the old Carlucci Gourmet Market on A1A. A deal had been close to being struck

of bringing in another gourmet-type market establishment, but those talks have stalled. Billy Moss of Commercial Real Estate says there is still a chance that deal or another one like it can go through, but he is also seeing interest in making the property a professional building. “Commercial (sales) is not quite out of the woods yet, although we are starting to see an interest in leasing,” Sciara said. “That is a good thing to work through some of this excess inventory, but we still are not seeing a lot of start-up activity.” Moss just returned from a convention in Orlando that matches up commercial real estate agents with national companies such as Banana Republic, Grill 54 and BJ’s Wholesale Club. “Compared to years past, there is an interest in Indian River County from some of these national brands,” Moss said. “I am talking about top restaurants, retailers, you name it. There is a lot more attention being paid now.” Moss also said he his starting to see an interesting tie-in of baby boomers from up north buying homes in Indian River County, but instead of a retirement by the pool, they are looking for business deals similar to what work they were doing at home. “These baby-boomers might want to slow down, but they don’t want to retire,” he said. “They were movers and shakers and still want to be part of that action.”


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County Commission gets first taste of looming budget battles

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BY IAN LOVE

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VERO BEACH NEWSWEEKLY

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B E A C H

Commissioner Joe Flescher voted in favor of the motion while O’Bryan and Wesley Davis, Gary Wheeler and Bob

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O’Bryan to take $100,000 out of the general fund to more than cover the proposed cut.

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STAFF/VERO BEACH NEWSWEEKLY

Commissioners Wesley Davis, left, and Peter O’Bryan could be looking at a summer filled with difficult budget choices.

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Indian River County Board of Commissioners this week considered cutting and then restoring its funding allocation for Children’s Services, which provides aid to at-risk children in the community. On the table was a recommendation by Budget Director Jason Brown to reduce funding for the agency by 13 percent from $691,290 this fiscal year to $600,000 for fiscal year 2011-2012. County Administrator Joe Baird has asked other departments, agencies and offices which receive funding from the county to reduce their budgets by 5 percent in anticipation for another year of reduced revenues. Following an impassioned debate about the assistance the 15 organizations to which Children’s Services provides resources, commissioners voted 3-2 against a motion brought by Commissioner Peter

Solari voted against. In anticipation that more funding might become available before the budget must be approved in September, the commission voted 5-0 to have the Children’s Services Advisory Committee prepare budgets with various reductions ranging from 5 percent to the recommended 13 percent. Commissioners all recognized the valuable work Children’s Services programs provide at-risk children, but those voting against pointed to declining revenues and their desire not increase the property tax rate as their reason for cutting the funding. “The reason not to cut the funding (for Children’s Services) is the same that we hear for almost every other service,” Solari said. “And we can transfer that to the governmental services and essential services,


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Jay Kramer, the man who did not run for mayor BY MICHAEL CROOK VERO BEACH NEWSWEEKLY

He ran for Vero Beach City Council on familiar themes: fiscal responsibility, active city council management, transparency and financial review, more effective budgeting. Jay Kramer, the guy with the MBA and a tech-business background, won his seat on the council. He still seems surprised that his fellow council members elected him mayor. That’s the way mayors are selected here, for a year at a time, but for Kramer, it was unexpected. “I’m a numbers guy,” he said. “I didn’t run to be mayor. I’m a pretty unabrasive person.” So it is, though, that this numbers guy is at the seat of city government at a truly historic moment as Vero Beach looks closely at its power plant, water works and sewer plant complex. Along with the Police Department, these are the biggest things Vero Beach government does. Suddenly, a bidding war for the city’s customers – people like you and me, who pay electric, water and sewer bills to the City of Vero Beach – has begun, with FP&L offering up to $100 million for the power plant and its customers, and the Indian River County Commission bidding for customers of Vero Beach’s water and sewer system. Kramer and the rest of the council may preside over the dismantling of

MICHAEL CROOK/VERO BEACH NEWSWEEKLY Vero Beach Mayor Jay Kramer discusses budget, electricity, water and more topics in his office recently.

what is effectively a utility monopoly. At the same moment, city staff, the people who bring institutional memory with them to work every day, is in shambles. “Vero Beach is at its weakest point ever,” Kramer said. City manager Jim Gabbard re-

signed last fall. City Attorney Charles Vitunac has been terminated by the council. City Finance Director Stephen Maillet is retiring. Even the acting utilities director stepped down from the interim post. A BUSY MAN Mayor Kramer is not one of those

executives who seem to get their jobs done without paper, pen or computer. His desk is what might gently be called an orderly mess. “It’s pretty busy,” says the mayor. “You do the best you can. With everything we’ve got going on, you don’t get the opportunity to dig as deeply into some issues as you might like.” There’s a stack of budget books going back many years. There is the computer screen, where he turns to cite data on electric rates charged around the state. There are proclamations to be read at places like the Irish Club (which has the best Italian food, Kramer said) and the Italian Club. There are agenda items for upcoming meetings. About those meetings. When four new members joined the council, there were high expectations for change in government …. If not immediate change, make it quick. After six months of working together, the City Council doesn’t always seem to be working together. There have been sharp exchanges about better ways to manage council meetings. Kramer is unfailingly cordial in his comments about council members Tracy Carroll, Brian Heady, Pilar Turner and Craig Fletcher. “That’s the great thing about this council, is that you do have five members bringing scrutiny to all CONTINUES ON PAGE 9

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B E A C H

Jeffrey Barton, who will have served as Clerk of the Circuit Court for 24 years when his term expires next year, announced this week he will not seek re-election. Barton began working in the office of the Clerk of the Circuit Court as Finance Director in April of 1978. He was elected Clerk of the Circuit Court in 1988. “It is time for me to pass on the mantle to someone else,” he said. Barton counts among his major accomplishments updating an antiquated computer system. He said the process is ongoing and when it is complete Indian River County will have stateof-the-art technology comparable to other systems in the state. “In the 22 years I have been here, it has taken us that long to institute changes and bring this office into the 2000s,” he said. “It is very difficult to do, employees get set in their ways,

management gets set in its ways. We’ve worked very hard to get these things implemented.” He said one of his biggest challenges has been dealing with the budget cuts that have been passed on to all government agencies. He noted as his budget became smaller and staffing became tighter, the workload in his office has steadily increased. “It is a freight train that is about to wreck,” he said. “The only way to meet the budget cuts is with layoffs, but that just increases the workload. We have had a 40 percent increase in the work we have to get done and less people to handle it.” Barton served four years as a member of the Vero Beach City Council. He was also Director of the Office of Management and Budget for Indian River County and was the Assistant Director of Utility Services before running for Clerk of Circuit Court. Barton’s chief deputy, Jeffrey Smith, intends to seek the open seat.

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BY IAN LOVE VERO BEACH NEWSWEEKLY

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Clerk of Court Barton not seeking re-election

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WHAT’S THE DEAL? Now he’s worried about getting the best deal for the people of Vero Beach, concerned that FP&L will continually be seeking rate increases. And he’s now acutely aware that the electric company supports the city with millions of dollars, paid by electric customers, each year. Take away the electric company, and property taxes would need to double, he said. “Either that, or you can’t even have a police department,” Kramer said of the dramatic cuts in city services that the loss of the utility money would trigger. Then there’s the water and sewer plants. Kramer favors moving the sewage plant from its prime river-

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these issues from different perspectives,” he said. “I think a lot of people are surprised that I don’t argue. I’m a pretty thick-skinned individual.” On the other hand, running a city with a weak mayor form of government (Kramer corrects: City Manager form of government) is different from his business life, where an individual can take hold of a project, evaluate its merits and make decisions without long public debate and consensus-building, Kramer said. “It is at times very rewarding,” he said. “Other times it is very frustrating.” So what does Mayor Jay Kramer want to do? He’s the candidate who said, “Our

front location – a vestige of the decades when wastewater was piped directly into the Indian River Lagoon – to a site at the airport. “The county proposes $50 million just to pipe things around,” Kramer said, referring to the County Commission’s proposal to take over water and sewer customers from the city. What does he want? The lowest rates for the people and businesses of Vero Beach. “The whole goal is to get that price down there,” Kramer said. As for the speed bumps that are inevitable when a new city council faces monumental decisions, Kramer again praised his colleagues. “A lot of us came in, we have predispositions,” Kramer said. “But our council really does look at the facts. At the end of the day, they really do take it to heart.”

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electric utility is acting like a hidden tax that is bankrupting our local businesses and overburdening our families.”

KRAMER


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STAFF/FOR VERO BEACH NEWSWEEKLY Above are just some of the agencies that may be left with less money if the county goes forward with plans to cut the Children’s Services budget next fiscal year.

BUDGET FROM PAGE 7

from the Sheriff’s Department to roads. A bad road or a pothole can lead to an accident or death and it can be argued that a cut in that service is just as bad as a reduction in Children’s Services.” Kip Jacoby, a member at large on the Children’s Services Committee, made an argument based on the money being spent as preventive dollars to help break the cycle of abuse and violence many atrisk children face. “We are not funding bridges to nowhere, we are funding bridges of opportunity to help these children become productive citizens today and into the future,” he said. Children’s Services came up early in the process because it also applies for federal grants to fund its projects and needs to have an idea of what funding level it will receive from the county. O’Bryan, who serves as the commissioner’s liaison to Children’s Services and whose wife is a teacher, said after three years of cutting the county budget and reducing staff in order not to increase the tax rate to county tax payers it may be time to dip into the general fund to protect the current levels of service. “I think we have reached the point where further cuts are counterproductive,” he said. “If we do not adequately fund the health, safety and welfare of the community the continued cutting will lead to more costly solutions in the future. At some point I think we need to say there is a minimal level of service we will provide and we need to find a way to provide.” O’Bryan noted that with the proposed cut to Children’s Services would reduce

the per dollar level of support for the 8,092 children helped this year from $94.71 per child to $74.15 per child. “We currently pay the Humane Society $83 for every stray dog they pick up,” he said. “We are proposing to pay less yearround to keep a child out of danger than we pay to pick up a stray dog. I don’t find that what we should be doing as stewards of the community.” O’Bryan proposed to dip into the $33 million in a reserve account in the general fund to restore the proposed cut and avoid raising taxes. “I think if there was ever a time we need to use reserve funds it will be this year,” he said. “We have cut and cut and cut. Further cuts will lower our quality of service and impact the safety of our children.” County Administrator Joe Baird pointed out that it is a slippery slope once you begin dipping into reserves. “I’ve already received calls that we want our 5 percent to come out of your reserves,” Baird said. “If we do that we’ll have real problems in a few years.” Commissioner Wesley Davis said he might be persuaded to change his vote against dipping into the general fund when he is sure the drop in property values has abated. “I am reasonably optimistic we are on that path, but until I know for sure I have to vote against going into the general fund,” he said. The budget process gets into full swing in July with workshops where budgets are presented and discussed by commissioners, agency and department heads and the public. The final budget will be approved in September.


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Social | Lifestyle

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Charlotte Terry, Doug Graybill

Frank and Marianne Mannino, Margie and Ron Zunk

Rene and Alice Donars

Elaine Harrison, Linda Proctor, Doreen and Derrick Kantzler

Attendees naming stars from the 40s.

STAFF / VERO BEACH NEWSWEEKLY

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Ron and Christine Hughes

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Last Sunday evening, Literacy Services of Indian River County held a fundraiser at the Orchid Island Beach Clubhouse. The nonprofit’s “1940’s Cabaret Gala” featured international jazz, opera and folk singer, Sylive Lewis, who is currently touring Europe with the acclaimed L’orchestra di Piazza Vittorio. Lewis is singing the part of Pamina in the contemporary adaption of Mozart’s “Magic Flute.” Literacy Services of Indian River County is an organization designed to improve literacy skills for the community, particularly for adults who want to improve their reading and writing skills and those who speak English as a Second Language, which often means that entire families may come in to get help. Literacy Services provides their tutors free of charge (and confidentially) to anyone in the community who needs help. They are supported by several local groups and individuals in and near Vero including George E. Warren Corporation, PNC Wealth Management, George & Marlen Higgs, Normal and Stephanie Berke, Bob and Sue Bond, Catherine Lambert, Sorensen Real Estate, Don and Linda Proctor, The Press Journal, Don and Sandy Mann, Fidelity Investments, Treasure Coast Rotary Club of Vero Beach, and Monti’s Flower Shop. To learn more about the Literacy Services and how you (or a loved one) can get help or to volunteer, call (772) 778-2223 or go to: www.literacyservicesirc.org.

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BY SIOBHAN FITZPATRICK VERO BEACH NEWSWEEKLY

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Cabaret Gala benefits Literacy Services organization


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HibiscusFestivalbringsoutthousandsforstreetparty BY SIOBHAN FITZPATRICK

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This year, the “Miss Hibiscus Pageant” which kicked off the annual Hibsicus Festival last Friday night, had extra charm this year as it was chaired by the original Miss Hibiscus in 1953: Elizabeth Graves Bass. Vero Beach High School senior, Courtney Swan, who won the prestigious Ms. Hibiscus 2011, had the honor of being crowned by her royal predecessor, Mrs. Bass. The all-weekend festival began with a 5k Hibiscus run sponsored by Joe Thomas, DDS of Vero Beach. According to publicist and co-chair of the sponsorship committee, Beverly Paris, 10,000 to 15,000 people attended the festival which, as usual, took place in the historic section of downtown

Vero Beach and included a pancake breakfast, face-painting, juried fine art show and a farmer’s market. Fourteenth Avenue was lined with nearly 200 market place booths. Some of the new events included a Doggie Easter Bonnet Parade down 14th Avenue (not only was a special gift provided for each dog, but free ‘poop bags’ were available for “everyone’s convenience”!) and a mini Indian Powwow at the tennis courts. In addition, there was the Wasabi Anime Retrocade in the Community Center, a unique video game experience that focused on classic games including the coveted Atari 2600. The Indian River County Historical Society had an model train display that included a Buddy L train with antique cars. In the evening, guests boogied to the

“Dancin Through the Decades” with the Solid Gold Band until 8:30pm. The purpose of the festival was to not only have a fun time, celebrate the history of downtown, but also raise money for two non-profit organizations: Main Street Vero Beach, a group of concerned citizens committed to resurrecting the historic downtown area, particularly the Vero Beach Movie Theater on 14th Avenue, and the Vero Heritage Center. Event sponsors included All Florida Pest Control & Fertilization, George E. Warren Corp., Marine Midland Bank, Indian River Federal Credit Union, and others. Paris said that it will be at least one week before the sponsorship committee tallies money raised, but she anticipates that it will be more than last year, which she said was $17,000 to $20,000.

MICHAEL CROOK / VERO BEACH NEWSWEEKLY

SIOBHAN FITZPATRICK / VERO BEACH NEWSWEEKLY

STAFF / VERO BEACH NEWSWEEKLY

SIOBHAN FITZPATRICK / VERO BEACH NEWSWEEKLY

MICHAEL CROOK / VERO BEACH NEWSWEEKLY


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Children’s Home Society hosts dinner dance at Rock City Garden BY IAN LOVE VERO BEACH NEWSWEEKLY

The Children’s Home Society held its major fundraiser last weekend, combining its Rockin’ Vero Beach party with its Tumba La Casa dance. The result could not have been better, said Jan Huffert, Executive Director of the organization. At Rock City Garden, more than 300 guests attended the event, which featured a VIP room with a formal fivecourse dinner and later in the evening the top Guatemalan rock and roll band, El Tambor de la Tribu, for the young and young at heart to dance the night away. “I think the highlight was that so many people came out to help these kids,” said Huffert. Proceeds go toward funding the various Children’s Home Society programs to break the cycle of child abuse and to improve the chances for children and families to live healthy, productive lives. The CHS is involved with helping with adoptions, education, and aiding 18-year-olds who have transitioned out of state programs. “Once a child turns 18 they are no longer eligible for benefits, whether or not they are in high school,” Huffert said. “I am just so thankful we have the support we do from the community.” The event was co-chaired by Melissa Shine and Abby Wright.

1. Sharon and Jeff Luther 2. Anne Brooke, John Houx, Sunny Adams 3. Barbara and Mark Leigh, Suzanne Leigh 4. Christine O’Hagen, Steve Lauer 5. Jessica and Richard Giessert 6. Ted and Sandy Howe, Stephanie and Tim Womack 7. Diane and Roger Pridgeon 8. Diane and Vinnie Parentela 9. Tom and Linda Nelson

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daughters – Susan -- has been active in the GYAC since its inception. In 2002 he helped create the GYAC Foundation in 2002 with the goal of providing long-term funding for the organization. “I think Dr. Hudson said it best,” said Freddie Woolfolk, Director of Marketing at the GYAC. “In his remarks he said, ‘We have crossed the river, but the ocean still lies ahead.’” The event was held at the Richardson Center on the Mueller Campus at Indian River State College.

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Dr. A. Ronald Hudson and Carter W. Hopkins, were honored last week during ceremonies for the sixth Dan K. Richardson Humanitarian Award. The event is sponsored by the Gifford Youth Activity Center to acknowledge those who have helped in its mission to “promote self esteem and good moral character to help all individuals, both young and old, to achieve his or her ultimate potential.”

Hudson, who began his career in education in 1957 until his retirement in 1988 as Assistant Superintendent, was instrumental in getting the center built in 1998 with the help of Richardson. Over the past 13 years he has maintained a number of key leadership roles within the center. The GYAC conducts a number of programs including after school care for children and continuing education courses for adults. Hopkins, who is married to one of Richardson’s

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Dan K. Richardson Humanitarian awards given to Hudson, Hopkins

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Bill and Karen Penney

Jessica Baslow, Adam Baslow, Laura and Ken McKeller

Ann and Bill Moller, Freddie Woolfolk

Cornelia Perez, Dr. Ronald Hudson, Renee Perez

Laura McKeller, Robin Williams, Susan Hopkins

Hugh McCrystal, Kathy and Todd Fennell

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Carter Hopkins, Dr. Edward Massey


First Birthdays

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Rylee Meslin, daughter of Kelly and Todd Meslin of Vero Beach, celebrated her first birthday April 7.

Weddings Spencer-O’Brien Meghan O’Brien of Sebastian, daughter of Jeannine O’Brien of Sebastian, was married to Stephen Spencer of Vero Beach on March 19 at The Links at Pointe West in Vero Beach, with the Rev. Michael Lyle officiating. Spencer is the son of Lawrence Spencer of Vero Beach and Carol Price of Vero Beach. Lauren O’Brien of Athens, Ga., was maid of honor, with Bethany Koehler as bridesmaid. Flower girl was Jaden Bailey. Adam Bailey of Vero Beach was best man, with Jeremy Kerbs as usher. Cole Bailey was ring bearer. A reception at The Club at Pointe West in Vero Beach followed the ceremony. The bride graduated from Sebastian River High School in 2001 and from the University of Central Florida in Orlando in 2005 with a Bachelor of Science in health services administration. She is employed by the School District of Indian River County in Vero Beach. The groom graduated from Vero Beach High School in 1999 and

from the University of Central Florida in Orlando in 2003 with a Bachelor of Science in management of information systems.He is employed by the city of Vero Beach as a systems analyst. After a wedding trip to New York, New York the couple reside in Vero Beach.

Engagements Friesen-Kendrick Megan Lee Friesen of Vero Beach, daughter of Wesley Friesen of Vero Beach and Edie and Mel Ratcliff of Vero Beach, is engaged to Jason Kendrick of Vero Beach. Kendrick is the

son of Mike and Marta Kendrick of Vero Beach. Friesen graduated from Vero Beach High School in 2000 and from the University of Florida in 2004 with a bachelor’s degree in business administration. She is employed by the Indian River County School District as an eighth-grade teacher at Storm Grove Middle School. Kendrick graduated from Vero Beach in 1995 and from Indian River State College with an associate degree in business administration.He is self-employed as a citrus harvesting manager. The couple plan to marry June 26.

Enjoy the Benefits of 100% Plus “We know our ad in Vero Beach Newsweekly works. It makes our phone ring.” Do you have a timely anniversary, wedding, college graduation or birth announcement you would like to have published free of charge in Vero Beach Newsweekly? Photos must be 200 dpi or higher resolution to be considered for publication. Announcements and photos may be e-mailed to milestones@verobeachnewsweekly.com. Items may be mailed to Milestones, Vero Beach Newsweekly, 1801 U.S. 1, Vero Beach, FL 32960.

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“Cobb” the story of a cracked icon

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s?;=uoD;O?;TKDGOD; BY SIOBHAN FITZPATRICK

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Baseball legend Ty Cobb comes to life in “Cobb” at the Riverside Theatre April 21. But this unique one-act is not merely about a great ball player; it is about what kind of a legacy a person leaves behind. Playwright Lee Blessing explores the complexities of a man who was not only known for his physical prowess, but his belligerent personality in a fast-paced, often humorous way. “Cobb was a controversial figure in sports and American history. He came along the same time America was flexing her imperialistic muscles,” said director John Briggs. “He is a metaphor for the nation at the turn of the 20th century. His story, in some very recognizable ways, is our story; his short-comings, his greatness, it’s ours too.” Born in 1886, Cobb grew up in Royston, Ga. and was called “Peach,” as in the Georgia fruit. His mother was only 12 when she married his father, and 15 when she gave birth to Ty. His father was a domineering, selfmade man who ultimately became a politician and county school commissioner. He pressured Ty to go to college, but the willful Peach was determined to play baseball. His father relented but sternly warned him, “Don’t come home a failure.” Hardly. In Cobb’s 24 seasons of play (from 1905 to 1928-mostly for the Detroit Tigers and a few with the Philadelphia Athletics), he exceeded the .300 barrier 23 times. In 1907, he was key to bringing the Tigers all the way to the World Series. He won nine consecutive batting titles beginning in 1907. To date, no one has improved upon his .367 lifetime average, 12 batting titles or 2,245 runs scored. Despite his amazing ability, Cobb was unpopular among his teammates because of his aggressive, offensive behavior, and was hated, if respected (Cobb received the most votes of any player on the inaugural Baseball Hall of Fame ballot in 1936, receiving 222 out of a possible 226 votes), by opposing teams because of his harsh playing style (he was known for sliding into any base with his cleats up, ready to maim an opponent, with a grin on his face). Cobb was also racist, and Blessing pointedly features another great ball-player at the time in his one-act, Oscar Charleston, who played for the Negro League and was known as “the Black Cobb.” Reflecting the times, Charleston’s statistics were never recorded. “Because he was black, no one cared. He left no legacy,” said Jacob Knoll, who plays the role of

PHOTO PROVIDED TO VERO BEACH NEWSWEEKLY

Jacob Knoll, Michael Jerome Johnson and Brit Whittle strike a pose at Riverside Park.

“Peach” as a young man. Cobb was known just as much for his obnoxious behavior and addictive personality (he was known to drink excessively) as he was for his athleticism. Some attribute Cobb’s demeanor to a tragic event in his life that happened shortly before he reached the majors: His mother killed his father. Officially, it was listed as an accident, but clearly Cobb does not buy this-or at least Blessing doesn’t. The playwright ponders this question—and others— uniquely in the play by splitting Cobb into three differently aged versions of himself: The Peach, a teenager at the beginning of his long career; Ty, in his forties and near the end of his playing days (played by Brit Whittle); and Mr. Cobb, in his early seventies and near the end of his life (played by Gordon McConnell). Something less known about Cobb was his business acumen. He took the money he earned from baseball and invested it wisely, including such blue-chip stocks as Coca- Cola at the turn of last century. He went on to

become a spokesman for Coca-Cola. When he died, he owned 20,000 shares and owned three bottling plants. But his personal life was never as successful. He married his wife, Charlie, when she was only 17, but it was not long before he was said to be cheating on her. The couple had two sons, both of whom died in their 40s, when Cobb was still alive. “He’s a misogynist, infidel and alcoholic, a cracked icon,” said Jacob Knoll, “and yet, that is what also makes him so human.” “Cobb” performs April 21-May 1, 2011 on the Waxlax Second Stage at Riverside Theatre. Tickets are $40 and can be purchased by calling the Box Office at 772-231-6990 or 800-445-6745 or online at riversidetheatre.com. Performances are Tuesday through Saturday evenings at 8pm and Wednesday, Saturday & Sunday matinees at 2 p.m.


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Noted abstract expressionist and works seen at Intrepid Gallery BY SIOBHAN FITZPATRICK VERO BEACH NEWSWEEKLY

The Intrepid Gallery hosted a reception last Friday night for Timothy Sanchez, an accomplished abstract expressionist artist. Sanchez used to split his time between New York City and Vero Beach but now lives in Vero full-time. With a concentration in Abstract Expressionistic painting, his large canvases evoke an energized feeling of action handled with fluid brushstrokes in a controlled and skilled manner, according to his website.

Helen Harrison, an art critic for the New York Times, in her review of Mr. Sanchez’s show, “Atmospheric Conditions,” wrote, “He succeeds in translating intangible fleeting phenomena into concrete form.” Sanchez’s show runs through May 20th at the Intrepid Art Gallery, which is located at Pelican Plaza, 4807 North A1A. Its hours are Tuesday through Saturday, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m., and Sunday by appointment. The artist holds a B.S., M.S., M.A., M.F.A. and a Professional Diploma in Academic Administration.

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Alesandra Valenzuela admires Sanchez’s work.

Friends Beth & Keith Kalish and Mary & Andrew Lunn. SIOBHAN FITZPATRICK/VERO BEACH NEWSWEEKLY

People mingling in front of the gallery for Sanchez’s opening.

VERO BEACH

BEST SELLER LIST

Bestsellers — Hardcover Fiction 1. The Fifth Witness -- Michael Connelly 2. The Paris Wife -- Paula McLain 3. Live Wire -- Harlan Coben 4. The Tiger’s Wife -- Tea Obreht 5. Afraid of the Dark -- James Grippando 6. I’ll Walk Alone -- Mary Higgins Clark 7. Mystery -- Jonathan Kellerman 8. Swamplandia -- Karen Russell 9. The Saturday Big Tent Wedding Party -- Alexander McCall Smith 10. The Land of Painted Caves -- Jean M. Auel 11. The Trinity Six -- Charles Cumming 12. 44 Charles Street -- Danielle Steel 13. Elizabeth I -- Margaret George 14. Minding Frankie -- Maeve Binchy 15. The Silver Boat -- Luanne Rice

Bestsellers — Hardcover Non-Fiction 1. The Foremost Good Fortune -- Susan Conley 2. Unbroken -- Laura Hillenbrand 3. Yellow Dog Café Cookbook -- Stuart Borton 4. She Walks in Beauty -- Caroline Kennedy 5. Social Animal -- David Brooks 6. Wild Bill Donovan -- Douglas Waller 7. Bossypants -- Tina Fey 8. Cleopatra: A Life -- Stacy Schiff MILT THOMAS BY 9. The 17-Day Diet -- Mike Moreno 10. Brothers, Rivals, Victors -- Jonathan Jordan 11. I’m Over All That -- Shirley MacLaine 12. The Dressmaker of Khair Khana -- Gayle Lemmon 13. Jesus of Nazareth -- Pope Benedict XVI 14. The Timeless Swing -- Tom Watson 15. Eva’s Kitchen -- Eva Longoria

Source: Vero Beach Book Center

Proud owners of the Intrepid Gallery Sylvia Medina and Victoria Palacios.


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Community Forum

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Editorial

How can any of us broaden our understanding if we continue to draw from the same well? If you find yourself continually relying on only one source for information, be it a website, or a cable news network, or a newspaper, it’s probably wise to check your motives. Are you tuning in for information, or for the ammunition you hope to make good use of in your next debate? Think about it. If all we are looking for in our media diet is confirmation of what we already believe, then how will any of us come to understand each other more fully? Locally, there are numerous debates on important issues, from the City’s consideration of FP&L’s offer to purchase its electric utility, to the County’s proposal to buy the City’s water and sewer utilities, to difficult decisions to be made about how to fund agencies that are doing their very best in challenging times to meet basic human needs. While the answers may seem elusive, one thing is for certain. The truth is bigger than any of us, and we would all do well to engage in debates with humility and open-mindedness.

Vero Beach Newsweekly is distributed throughout Vero Beach and the barrier island. Ian Love Lead Writer 978-2251 ian.love@scripps.com

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Mail may be sent to Vero Beach Newsweekly, 1801 U.S. Highway 1, Vero Beach, Florida, 32960 To advertise call Martine Fecteau at 772-696-2004, or Mark Schumann at 772-696-5233.

N E W S W E E K L Y

In her 2006 memoir, “Leaving Church,” Barbara Brown Taylor writes, “Where Mother Church is concerned, those who stray furthest not only forfeit their protection; they may also be shunned as heretics by those who stay home.” Taylor, of course, is describing the experience of many a spiritual seeker. After wandering far from base camp, they inevitably encounter fellow seekers who are also hungering for a larger map of the truth. Before long these truth-seeking vagabonds find themselves in conversation with people quite different from themselves. Though they are in many ways born and bred to see the world from deeply contrasting perspectives, these fellow truth seekers find themselves warmed by the same sun, and inspired by the same full moon. Taylor’s portrayal is equally descriptive of the challenges faced by those in the political arena who, in an effort to come to a deeper and broader understanding of the important issues we face as a nation, as a state, and as a community, are willing to engage those who see things differently.

B E A C H

It was a principled discussion by principled men (too bad there wasn’t a woman up on the dais to perhaps broaden the debate) and to decide the county simply does not have the resources should not suggest our elected officials are not sympathetic or concerned about the plight of atrisk children. But years of cutting may have brought us to a point where we must carefully decide if we need to begin using the money the county has accumulated to provide needed services to those hurt most by the recession. A consideration of that option should not suggest a reckless or unwarranted use of the public’s money. The difficult choices to be made are in the hands of our elected officials. Let’s hope in the hot summer ahead they are neither too rigid in their political philosophy when it comes to the plight of others nor too easily swayed to fund every request to dip into the reserves that will surely come their way. A move in either direction will be a disservice to us all.

V E R O

With respect to the 2011-2012 fiscal budget, this could be a long, hot summer for County Commissioners. After three years of admirable and proactive budget cutting in light of declining revenues, they will come under increasing pressure to dip into the $33 million in unallocated reserves to help float departments and agencies which are now operating on paper thin margins. The difficult choices they will be facing came into sharp focus at the most recent Commission meeting when advocates from Children’s Services spoke out against a request by county staff of a 13 percent reduction from last year’s budget from $691,220 to $600,000. Those against the cut spoke passionately about protecting the most vulnerable among us and the need to provide them with the resources for a chance at a better life. Those in favor of the 13 percent reduction spoke just as reasonably that we are living in a new world of dwindling resources which means all of us having to get by with less of the taxpayers’ -- our -- money.

Wandering from base camp

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kOHAKDM kTDP= Coming home to Children’s Home in Vero Beach BY SIOBHAN FITZPATRICK

ing her friend’s statement. And she already knows what she wants to major in: marine biology. Sixteen-year-old “Jane” entered the The Children’s Home Society of foster care system when she was four Florida receives 75 percent of its years old, and has since lived with her funding from state sources (the state grandmother, cousin, in three foster gives dollars to community-based care homes and in a group home in providers that determine who gets South Florida. that money). That was all before she moved into The remaining 25 percent comes the Baines Hall group home for teen from different groups including Unitgirls in Vero Beach two years ago. ed Way, United For Families and fun“It’s been a journey,” she said. Unfordraisers that the board spearheads. tunately, her story is not unique. AnThis past weekend Bain Hall hosted other resident, “Susie,” who entered its biggest event of the year-a gala foster care when she was five and who dinner with a Latin theme, “Rockin is also 16, arrived at Baines a year ago at Tumba la Casa,” which was held at after having been in four foster care Rock City Garden in Wabasso. homes. Some of the girls who stay in the Fortunately, their sad stories both group home are available for adoptook a turn for the better when they tion (meaning the parents’ rights have SIOBHAN FITZPATRICK / VERO BEACH NEWSWEEKLY entered Baines Hall, which is staffed by Susan Robbins, Judy Weber and Matt Anderson stand inside Baines Hall, which Mrs. Weber been terminated by family court); for a caring group of people and is warm decorated in cheery colors. the others, the staff at the group home and welcoming. Designer and memare still working to reunite them with ber of the advisory board, Marta Schneider, did an “I enjoy myself,” Jane said humbly. their families. Jane and Susie fall into this latter catoutstanding job of decorating the house in cheerAfter the girls have finished their volunteering, egory. ful colors--using lots of red and yellow in the living Lee often takes them to lunch or the movies, and she Baines Hall therapist Susan Robbins said that the room along with comfortable furniture to truly give is always there to take them out for their birthday Baines staff has been proactive in recruiting parents it the cozy feeling of home. The girls’ six bedrooms and Christmas. “She’s awesome,” said Susie. for adoptable girls. “In the past four or five years, each has a theme, including the jungle room, the hiOnce the girls turn 18, they are no longer eligible we’ve increased from 10 percent to about 50 percent biscus room and the butterfly room. to stay at the home. By this point, the group home in our success rate of finding ‘forever families’ for “It’s a nice place to stay in,” Jane said. has attempted to help them either find a job or get our adoptable girls,” said Robbins. Currently, there There are five girls living here now. They all end- into college. The state pays for 100 percent of tuition are 50 kids in the Treasure Coast waiting for forever ed up at the home when a foster care home was no plus a stipend as long as they attend a Florida school. families. longer an option, usually because the foster parents Unfortunately, said Matt Anderson, a program Matt Anderson added that becoming an adopcannot provide sufficient care for them, whereas the director for the Children’s Home Society of Florida tive parent is not a simple process in Indian River staff at the group home can provide high-level ser- (the umbrella organization that Baines falls under), County. “Anyone going to adopt goes through an invices such as group and individual therapy and men- despite the efforts by the staff at Baines and other tense investigation. It’s a very intense process. Even a toring programs. group homes to ensure a productive, healthy future, grandmother adopting her grandchild is thoroughly Baines also provides fun activities for the girls both the time when the grown children leave the home investigated,” he said. inside and outside the home with the help of volun- is critical--and when the statistics become startling. The importance of an in-depth inspection canteers, including one woman who provides sewing “They are the fastest growing homeless popula- not be overstated, underscored by the recent adopclasses and another who gives cooking classes. tion, alcohol and drug abusers, and single parents in tive family in Miami-Dade who beat and killed their Still another volunteer, Maureen Lee accompanies the country,” said Anderson. adopted daughter, 10-year-old Nubia Barahona, and the girls to Kidz Closet, a local nonprofit that proJane and Susie are determined not to become one tortured her twin brother, Victor. vides clothes and other items for children in need, of these statistics. “It forced the state to take a close look at the qualwhere they all volunteer together on Saturdays. “I’m definitely going to college,” said Susie, echo- ity of service provided,” said Anderson. VERO BEACH NEWSWEEKLY


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up their sleeves and got to work. They soon realized they had a month to sway the County Commission to reject the staff’s recommendation. Liguori sent out an e-mail to the HOA presidents and they gathered at his association clubhouse on March 7 to decide on a plan of action. On March 10 the group, now called the South County Preservation Society, held an informational meeting for residents and county staff to discuss why approval for the plant had been granted. “We had six county officials and over 200 people at our clubhouse, it was standing room only inside and outside,” Liguori said. “From that meeting we got the idea that people were concerned, they were worried about their property values, their health, the quality of their air, quality of life. I knew we had a good chance.” Over the next two weeks, the once strangers and now friends united by a cause, worked 10 and 12 hour days, informing neighbors of the latest news, lining up experts, talking with their lawyers and learning more about the place they called home. “It broadened our sense of neighborhood as to this whole area,” Inhoff said. “Part of this is that it changed our idea of who our neighbors were. Until February 25 I had never gone down 5th Street (just north of Oslo Road). It was a beautiful drive, I had no idea

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Robert Inhoff (left) and Nick Liguori joined forces to fight the proposed cement recycling plant in their backyard.

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When south county residents Nick Liguori and Robert Inhoff read the paper one morning last February they became outraged. They then they became activists, bringing together 1,400 homeowners to fight a plan approved by county staff to allow an exception to the zoning laws for a concrete and wood mulching recycling plant on Oslo Road and 58th Avenue, within walking distance of many of their residences. Within the space of a month the two men spearheaded a drive to rally their neighbors and convinced the County Commission by a 5-0 vote on March 22 to deny the staff recommendation to allow the project. “Of all the controversial public hearings that I have been to over the last 20 years, this by far was the most exceptional on the positive side,” said Commissioner Gary Wheeler, in whose district the plant would have been built. “The thing I was so impressed with was how mannerly they were, even though it was a very emotional thing. The way they handled it was exceptional.” Despite living within a mile of each other Liguori and Inhoff did not know one another when they opened their newspapers that Feb. 25th morning. Realizing the plant was within a mile of his South Lakes home, retiree Inhoff decided that day to create a blog to voice his concern and perhaps get some of his neighbors to join in. “I decided to start with a blog because I knew you could attach things to it and it doesn’t cost anything to do it,” Inhoff said. “It was a very simple blog: Here is our house, here is where the proposed plant is, look how close we are to that. It was just a start, but the blog gives you a format where people can make comments and do different things. It grew from something that simple.” Liguori, a retiree himself and president of his Citrus Spring homeowners association, was just as concerned. A friend e-mailed him the link to the blog and a movement was born. “I looked at the Web site which was very well done and I called Bob immediately,” Liguori said. “I introduced myself as the president of a local HOA and told him I have contacts for 1,400 homes here in 12 or 13 different HOA communities and asked if he would mind if I sent the link out.” From that digital introduction, the two met rolled

there was a vegetable farm in our area, now we buy our vegetables there. I saw the pre-school nearby and said to myself there is a story here beyond what it does to us and to our communities.” One of the keys to building their momentum and bringing along HOAs, individual homeowners and area businesses was the Internet, which Inhoff referred to as the new town hall. “We videotaped the March 10 meeting and put it up on the Web site so anyone could see the entire exchange,” Liguori said. “I would say the two things that we needed or we would not have been able to pull this off, was the Internet and our attorneys.” The web site was crucial, in the critical month that it was up it garnered over 10,000 hits, which is phenomenal for this area in such a short period of time. Liguori and Inhoff also refuse to take full credit for their successful efforts, pointing to Peggy Hoffman and Joe Gadreault among many other as providing important backing and help along the way. In fact, Inhoff was struck by how neighbor helping neighbor was such an essential part of the endeavor. “One of the things I took away from this was there were 1,200 homes or so and well over 2,400 people that were affected,” Inhoff said. “They are a remarkable group of people that live here with interesting stories and life experiences. There is a lot of knowledge.We had a physician from Citrus Springs who could speak on the respiratory issues, there were several nurses who spoke to some of the health issues We had a graphic artist and printer help us get the flyers together. Different people played different parts to make this happen. “It was interesting to discover these new neighbors.” And from this new-found sense of place a movement may have been born. Inhoff and Ligouri want to try and build on the spirit of community they have helped create. “We are in the process of creating a new Web site which will be called the South County Preservation Society and to build a sense of community and the neighborhood resources we have available to us,” Inhoff said. “(The recycling plant) should fade into history, but we don’t want that to be our primary identity we want to represent south county.” Editor’s Note: The A1 Walee owners have until April 22 to appeal the County Commission vote to deny granting the special zoning exception.

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Neighbors respectfully rally for a common cause


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At 25, Capt. Hiram’s a full-grown resort BY MICHAEL CROOK VERO BEACH NEWSWEEKLY

A quarter-century ago, it didn’t seem like a marina in Sebastian at Intracoastal Marker 66 would evolve into a sort of Indian River theme park. This month, with a free concert April 23, Capt Hiram’s Resort turns 25 years old. Along the way, it’s become a favorite place to play on and along the calm waters of the lagoon. Couples get married there. People have important birthday parties. Boaters visit from far northern origins, as the marina is still here, and bigger. Capt Hiram’s, with its unlikely name (a sea captain, or a pirate, named Hiram?) that turns out to be poignant, the business has grown from a small marina into the area’s largest waterfront resort and restaurant. Tom Collins bought the property in 1986. Collins partnered with Jimmy Hoffman and Martin Carter to open what was then known simply as Sebastian Inlet Marina. Capt Hiram’s was named in honor of Sergeant

Hiram Collins, Tom Collins’ Great Uncle, who was killed at Normandy Beach, in World War II. With the growth of the resort came the addition of owners Liz and Mickey Capp in 2001. Capt Hiram’s River Raw Bar opened on June 1, 1987 with just 28 seats. The restaurant has expanded continuously over the years, and now seats more than 500 people. The upstairs waterfront banquet and meeting facilities and The Tiffany Room replaced the apartment that housed the original owners, prior to the purchase by Tom, Martin and Jimmy. In the mid 1990’s the SandBar was added and that casual part of the operation has continuously expanded, most recently with the addition of the Coral Bar, Scoops, Bimini Beach and the Grand Sand Bandstand. The marina has also evolved over the years, growing from a facility having approximately 14 boat slips to what now comprises a full service marina, with 60 slips, ship’s store and transient facilities for boating guests.

STAFF / VERO BEACH NEWSWEEKLY

On the river shore is the beach at Capt. Hiram’s Resort in Sebastian, celebrating its 25th anniversary this month.

The hotel originated in 1994 with the construction of four Captain’s Quarters rooms, located over the ship’s store. The success of these rooms led to the development of the 56-unit and a 14-unit Riverfront Building, which opened in March of 2004. Four years ago, the hotel changed its name to the Inn at Capt Hiram’s “to become an independent hotel and associate itself with its true franchise, Capt Hiram’s.” It’s become a complex operation. “There are many Capt Hiram’s activities to fill your days and your evenings,” said marketing director Debra Janssen. “From boating, fishing and kayaking, to eating, drinking and dancing, we have something to appeal to all our wonderful guests.” Experienced fishing guides are available for hire at the marina. Boat rentals are available, “or if you prefer, we have cruises that will take you to see all the wonderful wildlife Sebastian, Florida has to offer, If up close and personal is your way to enjoy nature, why not take advantage of the kayak tours that leave from our Bimini Beach area. “ The Capt Hiram’s SandBar features three full service bars: the beautiful SandBar, which is under cover, the scenic Coral Bar, and Scoops, all of which overlook the Indian River. The elevated premium bar, Scoop’s, offers libations to guests with more discriminating tastes. An authentic lifeboat from the Sky Princess cruise ship provides covered seating, and the capability of holding catered parties, according to hirams.com. The Grand Sand Bandstand accommodates Capt Hiram’s SandBar’s extensive live entertainment lineup, which includes national acts that appear as part of the Capt Hiram’s Concert Series. The covered band shell features acts that draw larger audiences; and a smaller tiki stage offers more low-key musical acts, allowing for a more intimate setting — all within the SandBar. Regular nightly entertainment is provided. The resort gets generally very good reviews online. For example, a visitor from Myrtle Beach, S.C., wrote on Tripadvisor.com, “Very nice fun place to stay! Laid back “relax” atmosphere, very friendly employees in hotel and sand bar! Nick at sand bar was great and our room was very comfortable and clean, nice bed very affordable place to stay and party or just relax.” “I live 2 hours South and cannot get here enough,” wrote a Fort Lauderdale visitor. “It is a laid back, music filled, relaxing joy.” On April 23, Capt Hiram’s presents a free country music show featuring Lee Brice, Jerrodd Neimann and CMT recording artist Tyler Farr. The show runs 7:30 to 11:30 p.m.


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Kevin Healy catches some air time during a downwinder.

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Rick Krause, Dale Jakubowski and Kevin Healy became friends more than 20 years ago--in the ocean. Avid windsurfers, the trio took every opportunity outside of work to catch “good wind.” When another extreme marine sport came along about a decade ago, kiteboarding, they all put down their sails and took it up. “Kiteboarding is kind of like windsurfing taken to the next level,” says Jakubowski, 60, a recently retired airline pilot.

In many ways, these men are pioneers, as many people still do not even know what kiteboarding is. It’s similar to windsurfing , but the boards are smaller. And instead of being powered by a sail attached to a board, they are pulled by a big power kite that they maneuver, which often takes them clipping along much faster and more dangerous than windsurfing. It is precisely this challenge that attracts people like Krause, Jakubowski and Healy. “It’s an adrenaline sport for the wild things you can do,” says Krause, a former windsurfing instructor, known as “Surfer Rick,” in Vero for 20 years. ”You can fly through the air if you like, or if you don’t like you can just cruise around.” That’s not the only reason Krause and his friends enjoy the sport so much. “It’s also deeply soothing because you’re embraced and surrounded by all the elements: the ocean, the wind. I think you have to have a strong connection to nature to like this sport,” says Krause. The trio (in addition to about five other friends) usually begin their “downwinders” at Castaway Cove and end up at the pier in the north end of town--or reverse, depending on the wind. This camaraderie is another plus. “It’s a fun way to get together,” said Healy, 56. Healy adds that it’s a sport that you can do solo, something his friend Krause ends up doing a lot because he lives farther away, near Melbourne-which is just fine with him. “While I love to meet up with the guys, I equally love flying solo. It’s a way to connect with the sky, the surf,” says Krause. “It can be a spiritual experience.” Watching athletes like Krause, Jakubowski and Healy might lead the novice onlooker to believe that kiteboarding is easy, but it’s called an extreme sport for a reason. “Things happen very quickly. The kite can suddenly lift you higher than you’ve ever been before-30-40 feet in the air,” says Krause.” You can easily break all of your bones or be dragged under water because you’re attached to the kite by a harness. It’s not a sport you can pick up in one day.” Says Healy: “It’s not one of those sports like golf, where you can take a lesson, and then prac-

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Adrenaline junkies get fix kiteboarding

RUS METZ / VERO BEACH NEWSWEEKLY

Rick Krause clipping right along in choppy waters.

tice on your own. With kiteboarding, you need some coaching.” Unfortunately, says Krause, a lot of people don’t realize this and take one lesson and go out on their own. “That’s why there are a lot of accidents. If you’re not in control, you’re out of control. A lot of people end up being dragged by their sail.” Healy, a Vero Beach chiropractor, ends up seeing some of the injured. “It really can be a very dangerous sport. Good Kiteboarders take risks, and new kiteboarders unwittingly take risks because they don’t know what they’re doing.” But Healy also notes that in the past few years, the equipment has become safer by making the kites easier to maneuver. But they are expensive: An average board costs upwards of $1,500. Still relatively young, kiteboarding has not caught on very quickly in the United States and worldwide compared with the two-decade old windsurfing. According to Sporting Goods Manufacturer’s Association International’s analysis, there were 779,000 windsurfers in the US by 2003 and a CONTINUES ON PAGE 24


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Boat show draws a crowd to the riverside BY MICHAEL CROOK VERO BEACH NEWSWEEKLY

The widest array of watercraft, from paddleboards to pontoons to offshore-ready powerboats, drew hundreds to Riverside Park for the 28th Annual Vero Beach Spring Boat Show. Area boat dealers and marine suppliers like Vero Marine Center, Atlantic Upholstery and West Marine displayed their product lines and made staff available to welcome browsers and potential customers aboard the bigger boats. The Marsh Island Club advertised available boat slips. Even finance and insurance representatives were onsite to help deals get sealed. When a boater makes a decision, they want to get in the water as soon as is practical. The event wasn’t all about commerce. Nonprofit groups with maritime interests, such as the U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary, which provides boater safety initiatives, the Vero Power Squadron, and the Marine Cleanup Initiative, came to connect with boating enthusiasts. “When we toss litter along the roadside or directly into our waterways, we’re not really getting rid of the trash,” according to the cleanup group. Peter Hinck, member of the Kayak Fishing Club of the Palm Beaches, conducted offshore and inshore kayak fishing seminars that drew attentive groups of listeners.

STAFF / VERO BEACH NEWSWEEKLY

Grady-White power boats got a lot of attention at the annual Vero Beach Boat Show.

KITEBOARDING FROM PAGE 23

whopping 20 million worldwide by 2004, according to an article in Westcountrynow.com. On the other hand, there were 220,000 kiteboarders in the world and only 39,600 of these were from the U.S. and Canada, according to a study by SBC Kiteboard magazine in 2006. But these statistics might change significantly in five years if the International Sailing Federation has its way. According to a Feb. 9 article New York Times, the federation is proposing to replace windsurfing with kiteboarding in the 2016 Olympic Games. To Krause, Jakubowski and Healy, this would be good news. “Kiteboarding would finally get the respect it deserves,” says Jakubowski.

A wide range of watercraft, from paddle to power, were seen and demonstrated at the boat show.


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Nick Thomas is a lawyer and certified family mediator. Reach him at nthomaslaw@comcast.net.

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tack; but with a couple of stents and a little rest, he was back on his feet within days and talking about next hunting season. Now what does all of this have to do with food, you might ask? First, he was snipe hunting. So this counts as a food column. But second, JP is the very same John Paige that, along with his sweet wife, Lisa, hosts an extraordinary food event each spring – The Beast Feast, a raucous neighborhood jam of longstanding. Having outgrown the family home, the Beast Feast is now held in late May at the Bethel Creek House on A1A. And it features the best grub that you can shoot, gig or hook in these parts. From memory, last year, like the several years before, I dined on gator, snake, frog, dove, quail, snipe, boar sausage, venison, and snook, most of which are wrapped in bacon and grilled. The part that isn’t is deep-fried. We natives do love our native game and fish. That, along with sides and yummy desserts provided by the less adventurous guests, and an ugly mashup of homemade southern blues and softer Florida-style guitar tunes, makes the Beast Feast one of the best indigenous dining events of the year in Indian River County.

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Having grown up here in Vero Beach, and having lived back in town now for many years, I’m lucky to have a lot of old buddies. By and large we all play the part of adults fairly well. We built house, airplanes, water-treatment plants. We fill cavities, respond to emergencies, move money, and handle lawsuits. Heck, we even help raise little humans. But scratch the surface of any one of us, and you’ll find an 18-year-old boy who’s dumber than dirt. Take my friend Dr. John Paige. On the outside he’s a respected entomologist, and a loving husband and father. But give him a day off and things can go south quick. This past February, JP decided it was a good idea to set off on his own to go snipe hunting way, way out in the woods. With his dog “Kasey” and his .410 shotgun in tow, he trailered his boat to the St. John’s River in Orange County. There he crossed the waterway and hiked another hour farther into the swamp, bagging four birds along the way. It was then, however, that the pain started. “A strong pressure in my chest began to radiate out to between my shoulder blades and then up to my left ear,” JP reported in an e-mail to family and friends. OK. Fair enough so far. But there’s more. “The pain became more severe the longer I hunted,” he went on to say.

He . . . kept . . . on . . . hunting. The story continues that it took him three hours to cover the ground back to the boat, stopping often to catch his breath on one knee. Then he crossed back over the river, drinking Gatorade and chewing Bayer aspirin. He trailered his boat and drove all the way back to his home in Central Beach. Still in pain, he fed Kasey, swabbed the .410, cleaned the snipe, and took a shower. At that point, he decided that a nap was a good idea. “I still never even thought about heart attack,” he wrote. “You know the left arm didn’t hurt.” This from Doctor John Paige. OK, he’s a bug doctor, but still . . . . Finally, it dawned on JP that something may not be right. So naturally he drove himself to the hospital. Once there, JP reports, they admitted him tout de suite. As I hope you have anticipated from my tone, JP bounced right back, and he’s alive and well, though not appreciably smarter. He indeed had a heart at-

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Community Calendar Through May 1: The Riverside Theatre presents the popular musical, Buddy: The Buddy Holly Story on the Main Stage. A golden oldies filled tribute to the life of the musical legend who was a bright star of the fifties rock ’n roll revolution. Riverside Theatre, located in Riverside Park, Vero Beach. Tickets $36-$65, 772-231-6990 Through May 22: The Vero Beach Museum of Art presents “American Masterworks: 150 Years of Painting” from the Butler Institute of Art. Also on exhibit through May 22 is “Impressions: Selections from the Manoogian Collection.” (Admission to general exhibitions and education wing exhibitions is free. For some special exhibitions, a variable admission fee will apply. Members and young people 17 years of age and under attend all exhibitions free of charge. Donations are welcome). 772-231-0707. Through June 11: The Vero Beach Museum of Art presents “Celebrating 25 Years: Sculpture from the Permanent Collection.” (Admission to general exhibitions and education wing exhibitions is free. For some special exhibitions, a variable admission fee will apply. Members and young people 17 years of age and under attend all exhibitions free of charge. Donations are welcome.) 772-231-0707. April 20-24: Cirque Dreams illumination will perform at the Kravis Center, Wed-Fri, 8 pm; Sat at 2 & 8 pm and Sunday at 7 pm. An explosion of dance, music and brilliant illumination. Tickets begin at $25. Go to www.Kravis.org or call 800-572-8471 April 21-May 1: The Riverside Theatre presents Cobb, a one-act by Lee Blessing about Ty Cobb, one of the best baseball players of all time. Riverside THURSDAY, APRIL 21

Theatre located in Riverside Park, Vero Beach. Tickets $36-$65, 772-231-6990. April 21: Vero Beach Art Club’s 75th Anniversary Celebration held at the Vero Beach Museum of Art, Holmes Great Hall, 5-7 pm. Wine, refreshments and catered hors d’oeuvres, music by Stringsations Quartet. Proclamation by Mayor Jay Kramer at 6 pm. Tickets are limited, $10 per person, call 772-231-0303. April 21: Jamie & Bobby Deen, sons of famous HGTV southern cooking chef, Paula Deen, will be autographing their book, “The Deen Brothers Get Fired Up” at the Vero Beach Book Center at 5 pm. Tickets to be in autograph line will be issued with books purchased at the Book Center. 722-569-2050 April 21: The Emerson Center Humanities Series, sponsored by Marine Bank & Trust, concludes the 2010-2011 FREE six-performance series on Thursday, April 21, at 7 p.m. Jeff Klinkenberg, a master Florida storyteller who writes about Florida culture and the people who make the state unique, will talk about “Pilgrims In The Land of Alligators,” The Role Of The Alligator In Florida Culture. April 22: “Around the World with Wine” to benefit lifelong learning institute at IRSC. 3-5 p.m. Richardson Center, Vero Beach. $30 per person per month. 772-462-7880. April 23: Most recently seen on NBC’s “The Sing Off 2” last season and the world’s oldest and best-known collegiate a cappella group, the Yale Whiffenpoofs perform at the King Center, 3865 N Wickham Rd, Melbourne, 7 pm, $17.50-$22. Go to www.kingcenter.com for tickets. April 23: Habitrot to Higher Education 5K Run/Walk to benefit Indian River Habitat for Humanity. South Beach

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Park, Vero Beach April24: Easter at McKee Botanical Gardens. 350 US Hwy. 1, Vero Beach, 2 p.m. April 26: #1 NY Times Best Seller, Debbie Macomber will hold a signing of her new book, “A Turn in the Road”, at the Vero Beach Book Center. Tickets to be in autograph line will be issued with books purchased at the Book Center. 772-5692050 www.VeroBeachBookCenter.com. April 26: Master’s Academy will host a Spring Open House for students entering PreK age 3 through 12th grade for the 2011-2012 school year. Parents and students are welcome to join us Tuesday, April 26 at 6:45 p.m. The philosophy of Master’s Academy is based upon a Biblical worldview and their objective is to partner with parents in educating each child to realize his full potential in Christ. Master’s Academy is located on the corner of 12th Street and 58th Avenue. Call 772-794-4655 or visit www. mastersvb.org to learn more. April 30: American Red Cross Inaugural Bed Race and Firefighter Auction to benefit American Red Cross North Treasure Coast. 2-5 p.m. Digital Domain Park, Port St. Lucie. Free. 772-878-7007. April 30: Children’s Art Festival, Riverside Park, 30th Annual children’s art event will be held in Riverside Park from 10 am to 4 pm. Presented by the Vero Beach Museum of Art. Youth art and fun activities will go on throughout the day plus three puppet show performances of Jack and the Beanstalk. Free to the public. 772-231-0707 April 30: Education Foundation Charity Shoot at Windsor’s private gun club in Fellsmere from 9:30 am to 1 pm. Participants pay $150 and receive loaner guns & shells plus ear protection

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and includes breakfast and lunch. If you would like to enjoy the shoot from the sidelines, lunch plus a view will cost $35. 772-564-0034 April 30-May 1: Relay for Life of North Indian River/Sebastian to benefit American Cancer Society. Sebastian River High School Stadium. 772-5622272 ext. 2403. April 30: Martin County March for Babies to benefit March of Dimes. Registration at 7:30 a.m., walk begins at 8:30 a.m. Memorial Park, Stuart. $25 minimum donation. 772-287-6632 April 30: 6th Annual Spring Swing Golf Tournament to benefit charities supported by FGWC Vero Beach Woman’s Club. 8.a.m. Shotgun start. Sandridge, Vero Beach. $85 per golfer. 772-562-6854, ext 215. April 30: 3rd Annual “Cinco de Mayo” to benefit St. Francis Manor. 4-8 p.m. Festivities include Mariachi band, authentic Mexican food, open bar, dancing, prizes and more. St. Francis Manor, Vero Beach. $25 per adult, $10 per child 12 and under. 772-562-8575. April 30: 6th Annual Golf Tournament to benefit Hope Center for Autism. 7:30 a.m. Registration, 8:30 a.m. Shotgun start. Includes award reception, lunch and auction. Monarch Country Club, Palm City. $125 per person. 772-334-3288. May 1: May Pops at Windsor to benefit Indian River Medical Center features the Brevard Symphony Orchestra. Gates open at 3:30 p.m. and the concert will begin at 5:30 p.m.. Lawn tickets are available for $25 ($30 at the gate) and VIP tickets are $200, which includes preferred parking and a cocktail reception prior to the concert catered by Quail Valley River Club.

TUESDAY, APRIL 26

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 27

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Obituaries

A P R I L

Marilyn R. Sommerville, 61, of Vero Beach, FL, died April 9, 2011 at Indian River Medical Center, Vero Beach. Born in Richmond, VA, she had been a resident of Vero Beach for seven years coming from Olympia, WA. Survivors include her Husband of twenty-one years, David W. Sommerville of Vero Beach; one son, Samuel R. Sommerville of Jacksonville, FL; one brother, Rob Flora of Jacksonville, FL; two sisters, Christie R. McLean of Eagle River, AK, and Gail C. Rogers of Mechanicsville, VA; and one grandson, Jacob. Contributions as a Memorial may be made to the Local Chapter of the American Cancer Society, 3375 20th Street, Vero Beach, FL 32960. Strunk Funeral Home and Crematory of Vero Beach.

Edward J. Gunn Edward J. Gunn, 90, died April 10,

Forrest James Lane Sr. Forrest James Lane Sr., 90, died April 10, 2011, at his granddaughter’s home in Winter Garden. He was born in Mason City, Iowa, and lived in Vero Beach for 46 years, coming from Jacksonville. Survivors include his sons, Forest J. “Jim” Lane Jr., D.O. of Dublin, Ga., and John F. Lane of Vero Beach; daughters, Louise Roberts of Vero Beach and Linda DuBose of Newnan, Ga.; brother, Glenn Lane of Seattle, Wash.; nine grandchildren; and 10 great-grandchildren. He was preceded in death by his wife of 63 years, Lomey Elizabeth Lane. Strunk Funeral Home, Vero Beach.

Rebecca McCloud Rebecca McCloud, 89, died April 6, 2011, in Miami. She was born in Millen, Ga., and lived in Indian River County for 68 years, coming from her birthplace. Survivors include sons, Elijah McCloud and Wesley McCloud, both of Vero Beach; daughter, Annie Spencer of Miami; brother, Mark Bell of Pompano Beach; sister, Rhunette James of Jacksonville; 10 grandchildren; 14 great-grandchildren; and one great-great-grandchild. Arrangements are by Hortense/Mills Funeral Home.

George W. Potter George W. Potter, 71, died April 13, 2011, at Lawnwood Regional Hospital in Fort Pierce. He was born in New York, and lived in Vero Beach for 12 years, coming from Fulton, Md. Survivors include his wife of 45 years, Elizabeth; daughters, Tina PotterGibbins of Myrtle Beach, S.C., Karen Potter-Johnson of Vero Beach; sons,

Richard Wagner, 83, died April 12, 2011. He was born in Hillsdale, Mich., and lived in Vero Beach for 28 years, coming from Fort Wayne, Ind. He was a sales manager for Mid Western United Life Insurance Co. in Fort Wayne, retiring in 1982. Survivors include his wife of 59 years, Georgia Wagner of Vero Beach; sons, Rick Wagner of Roanoke, Ind., and Dan Wagner of Vero Beach; daughters, Vicki Wagner and Lisa Keller, both of Vero Beach; sister, Shirley Fisher of Ormond Beach; five grandchildren and one great-grandchild. Memorial contributions may be made to Visiting Nurse Association & Hospice Foundation, 1110 35th Lane, Vero Beach, FL 32960. Arrangements are by Strunk Funeral Home and Crematory Vero Beach.

Alan Francis Bartol Alan Francis Bartol, 68, of Vero Beach, FL died Wednesday, April 13, 2011 at the Indian River Medical Center in Vero Beach. Mr. Bartol was born in Towanda, PA and moved to Vero Beach in 1994 from Miami, FL where he had spent most of his life. He is survived by a daughter Alexa Kalino of Los Angeles, CA.Arrangements are under the direction Cox-Gifford-Seawinds Funeral Home & Crematory, Vero Beach, FL.

Margo Rose Donadio Margo Rose Donadio, 55, of Vero Beach, Florida, died Tuesday, April 12, 2011. She was born August 10, 1955 in Niles, Ohio. She was a resident of Vero Beach since 1989 coming from Fort Pierce where she lived for 10 years. She was a member of St. John of the Cross Catholic Church, Vero Beach. She is survived by her husband; Anthony

N E W S W E E K L Y

Marilyn R. Sommerville

Richard Wagner

B E A C H

Mrs. Luisa Gutierrez, 65, died April 9, 2011 at VNA Hospice House, Vero Beach. She was born in Metztiplan, Hidalgo, Mexico and lived in Vero Beach for 15 years coming from Veracruz, Mexico. Mrs. Gutierrez was a member of The Vero Beach Seventh-Day Adventist Church. Survivors include her husband of 52 years, Anastacio Gutierrez of Vero Beach; sons, Gaudencio Gutierrez of Veracruz, Mexico, David Gutierrez of Palm Bay, Martin Gutierrez, Lazaro Gutierrez and Anastacio Gutierrez all of Vero Beach; daughters, Magdalena Gutierrez, Sara Gutierrez, Hines Gutierrez and Angelica Gutierrez all of Vero Beach; sister, Irene Sanchez of Hidalgo, Mexico; 22 grandchildren and 11 great-grandchildren. Arrangements by Strunk Funeral Home.

John Humphries of Frederick, Md., Ronald Humphries of Laurel, Md., Lionel Humphries of Fairfax, Va., and Karl Potter of Rockville, Md.; 13 grandchildren; and 13 great-grandchildren. Cox-Gifford-Seawinds Funeral Home in Vero Beach.

V E R O

Lillian “Lil” Sullivan, 94, of Vero Beach, FL died Tuesday, April 12, 2011 at her home. Mrs. Sullivan was born February 6, 1917 in Elizabeth, NJ and had been a seasonal resident of Vero Beach from 1972-1978 before moving here as a full time resident in 1978 from Idle Hour in Oakdale, NY. She was a member of St. Helen Catholic Church in Vero Beach and CSEA/AFSCME. Survivors include her son William (Kathleen) Savino of Oakdale, NY; son Thomas W. (Joan) Savino of Irvine, CA; daughter Lilyan (Chris) Savino Sievernich of Los Angeles, CA; son Joseph Savino of Henderson, NV; sisters Helen (Hartman) Wyckoff of Hamilton, NJ and Olga (Vincent) Farozic of Berlin, MD; eight grandchildren and seven greatgrandchildren. She was preceded in death by her first husband Joseph J. Savino in 1975, her second husband John Sullivan in 2004 and a daughter JoAnn Fogg in 2004. She was also predeceased by her siblings William Pawlyk, John Pawlyk, Walter Pawlyk, Thomas Pawlyk and Dorothy Hurley. Memorial contributions may be made to the JoAnn Fogg Service Cent-

Luisa Gutierrez

2011, at the VNA Hospice House of Vero Beach. He lived in Vero Beach for 30 years, coming from Poughkeepsie, N.Y. Survivors include his wife of 39 years, Maria A. Gumbinger Gunn; five sons; eight daughters; two stepsons; two brothers; and many grandchildren and great-grandchildren.

!

Lillian ‘Lil’ Sullivan

er, Girl Scouts of NE Texas, Attn: Diane Michaels, 6001 Summerside Drive, Dallas, TX 75252. Arrangements are under the care of Cox-Gifford-Seawinds Funeral Home & Crematory.

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Harold C. Weiss, 95, of Vero Beach, FL, died April 9, 2011 at the Indian River Estates Medical Center, Vero BeachBorn in West Allis, WI, he had been a resident of Vero Beach for thirty-three years, coming from Racine, WI. He was a member of Holy Cross Catholic Church in Vero Beach. Survivors include his wife of sixty-nine years, Elizabeth J. Weiss of Vero Beach; two sons, James M. Weiss of Concord, MA, and Thomas B.Weiss of Racine, WI; twin daughters, Lindy Sue Weiss Block of Wauwatosa, WI, and Laurel Ann Weiss McDaniel of Milwaukee, WI; four grandchildren; nine greatgrandchildren. He was predeceased by his infant son, Harold John Weiss, his sister, Gertrude Rowold, and his brother, Victor Weiss. Arrangements by Strunk Funeral Home and Crematory of Vero Beach.

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Harold C. Weiss


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N E W S W E E K L Y

B E A C H

V E R O

OBITUARIES J. Donadio of Vero Beach, FL; 3 sons; Anthony M. Donadio, Michael J. Donadio and Mark W. Donadio all of Vero Beach, Fl; mother,  Evelyn Jennings of Port St. Lucie, FL; 2 brothers  Mark J. Jennings of Lancaster, Ohio and William Jennings of Port St. Lucie, FL; sister,  Joy Jennings of Sebastian, FL. She is predeceased by her father Mark P. Jennings. Arrangements are under the direction of Thomas S. Lowther Funeral Home & Crematory, Vero Beach.

Dennis A. LeBlanc Dennis A. LeBlanc, 51, of Vero Beach, FL died Monday, April 11, 2011 at the Indian River Medical Center in Vero Beach, FL. Mr. LeBlanc was born October 31, 1959 in Worcester, MA and moved to Vero Beach 25 years ago from Uxbridge, MA. Survivors include his two daughters Katy and Amy LeBlanc of Vero Beach; his longtime companion Debra Manning of Vero Beach; a brother Wayne (Cheryl) LeBlanc of Shewsbury, MA; two nephews and numerous aunts and uncles. He was preceded in death by his wife Kathy LeBlanc and his parents. Arrangements are under the direction Cox-Gifford-Seawinds Funeral Home & Crematory, Vero Beach, FL.

Elaine Stein Elaine Stein, 87, died April 12, 2011 at Palm Garden of Vero Beach. She was born in Mexico, Maine and lived in Vero Beach area for 23 years coming from Windsor, CT. She was a member of First Presbyterian Church. Survivors include her husband of 67 years, Sidney Stein of Vero Beach, son, Neal Stein of Port St. Lucie, daughters, Rachel Gragg of Fairfax, VA, Peggy Sharlow of Ridgefield, CT, Lisa Stein of Bremerton, WA, brother, William Andrews of Roanoke, VA, sister, Francis DeFilipp of Mexico, ME, 7 grandchildren, 7 great-grandchildren. She was predeceased by sons, Andrew and Harry, daughter, Cynthia and brother Richard Andrews. Arrangements by Strunk Funeral Home and Crematory Vero Beach, Florida.

Roman ‘Ray’ Donofrio Roman “Ray” Donofrio, 87, died March 30, 2011, at the Indian River

Medical Center, Vero Beach. He was born in Bristol, Pa., and lived in Vero Beach for 33 years, coming from Levittown, Pa. He served in the Army during World War II. He was a member of St. John of the Cross Catholic Church, Vero Beach, Polish American Club and Knights of Columbus. Survivors include his sisters, Yolanda Bachstein of Bristol and Gioella Castor of Levittown. He was preceded in death by his wife, Elizabeth Donofrio; and sisters, Rose Paglione, Mary Rinaldi and Pierina Caruso. Arrangements are by Strunk Funeral Home and Crematory, Vero Beach.

Demetria ‘Mekey’ Drisdom Demetria “Mekey” Drisdom, 26, died April 4, 2011, at Indian River Medical Center, Vero Beach. She was born in Vero Beach. Survivors include her parents, Samuel and Eula Thomas of Sebastian; daughters, Lakeria Leonard and Khiyone Drisdom-Thomas of Vero Beach; sons, Jaheim Drisdom and Timothy Burson of Vero Beach; sister, Samantha Thomas of Vero Beach; grandparents, Helen and Mark Drisdom of Vero Beach; and grandmother, Viola Thomas of Vero Beach. Hortense/Mills Memorial Funeral Home.

Sara Jane Knaisch Sara Jane “Sally” Knaisch, 75, died April 13, 2011. She was born in Coatesville, Pa., and lived in Vero Beach since 2000, coming from her birthplace. Survivors include her husband of 55 years, Barry Knaisch of Vero Beach; son, Michael Knaisch of Denver; daughter, Saundra Weddle of Springfield, Mo.; brother, William Froelich of Coatesville; four grandchildren; and one great-grandchild. She was preceded in death by her brother, Robert Froelich. Arrangements are by Cox-Gifford-Seawinds Funeral Home & Crematory, Vero Beach.

Roger Kroeger of Melbourne; brothers, John Henry Kroeger Jr. of Delray Beach and Bob Kroeger of New Jersey; sister, Eleanor Reinbold of New Jersey; two grandchildren; and one great-grandchild. Arrangements are by Strunk Funeral Home and Crematory, Sebastian.

Maurice Benyon Maurice Benyon, 81, died Sunday, April 10, 2011 at the VNA Hospice House in Vero Beach, FL. He was born April 11, 1929 in Motherwell, Scotland. He has been a resident of Vero Beach for 13 years coming from Chesapeake, VA. Survivors include his wife of 60 years, Margaret; son, Trevor Benyon of Melbourne, FL; daughter, Lesley Benyon of Vero Beach, FL; brother, David Benyon of Ottawa, Canada; and four grandchildren. No services are planned at this time. Memorial contributions may be made to the VNA Hospice House. Arrangements are under the direction of Cox-Gifford-Seawinds Funeral Home and Crematory, Vero Beach, Florida.

Helen Hackett Sposa Helen Hackett Sposa, 75, died April 10, 2011 at her home in Indian River Shores. She was born in Jasper Alabama, and lived in Indian River Shores for 13 years, coming from Ft. Lauderdale via Westport CT. She is survived by her husband of 42 years Louis D. Sposa, her brother and sister in law, Mr. and Mrs. Charlie J, Hackett of Vero Beach, her brother in law and sister in law, Mr. and Mrs. Robert F. Rosa of Sebastian, and her devoted God child Lauren McBride Russell of Naples FL. No services have been scheduled at this time. Arrangements are under the direction of Thomas S. Lowther Funeral Home & Crematory, Vero Beach.

Charles F. Belmont Warren George Kroeger Warren George Kroeger Sr., 90, died April 13, 2011, at Palm Garden of Vero Beach. He was born in Carlstadt, N.J., and lived in Vero Beach for four years, coming from Boulder City, Nev. Survivors include his wife of 64 years, Mary Kroeger of Vero Beach; sons, Warren G. Kroeger Jr. of Australia and Glen

Charles F. Belmont, 91, died April 9, 2011, at Water’s Edge in Palm City. He was born in New York City and lived in Palm City since 2001, coming from Vero Beach, Ridgewood, N.J., and Chatham, Mass. He was a vice president of Hunt Chemical Co. before retirement. He was a member of Peace Presbyterian Church in Stuart. Survi-

vors include his wife of 65 years, Ann B. Belmont of Palm City; son, Peter B. Belmont of St. Petersburg; daughter, Susan B. Powell of Vero Beach; and one grandchild. He was preceded in death by two sisters. Arrangements are by Forest Hills Funeral Homes, Palm City Chapel.

Franklin Nathaniel Mills Franklin Nathaniel Mills, 64, died April 6, 2011, at the Indian River Medial Center in Vero Beach. He was born in St. Kitts, West Indies, and lived in Vero Beach for 30 years, coming from St. Croix, Virgin Islands. He was a cook and chef for several private clubs, including John’s Island, Windsor and Hurricane Harbor. He was a member of the Kingdom Hall of Jehovah’s Witnesses in Vero Beach. Survivors include his wife of 19 years, Philis Mills of Vero Beach; sons, Franklin Mills Jr. and Michael Mills, both of Orlando, Fitzroy Mills of St. Croix and Tyrone Mills, Kyle Mills, Troy Mills and Joseph Mills, all of Vero Beach; mother, Pearline Mills of St. Kitts; nine brothers; 11 sisters; and 11 grandchildren. Cox-Gifford-Seawinds Funeral Home in Vero Beach

Margaret Capparelli Margaret “ Marge” Capparelli, 95, died April 7, 2011, at Palm Garden Nursing Home in Vero Beach. She was born in Syracuse, N.Y., and lived in Vero Beach for 35 years. She was a former member of the Vero Beach Women’s Club and a communicate of the St. John of the Cross Catholic Church in Vero Beach. Survivors include many nieces and nephews and cousins. She was preceded in death by her husband, Edmond Capparelli, in 1996. No services are planned at this time. Arrangements are by All County Funeral Home & Crematory Treasure Coast Chapel.

Anthony Coco Dr. Anthony S. Coco, 83, died March 31, 2011. He was born in Hollis, Queens, N.Y., and lived in Vero Beach. Before retirement, he was a high school teacher in Long Beach, N.Y., and in 1958 opened a private chiropractic office in Commack, N.Y., and in 1972


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Shirley Montgomery, 74, died April 14, 2011, at VNA Hospice. She was born in Caldwell, Mo., and lived in Vero Beach for 18 years, coming from Springfield, Mo. Before retirement, she was a personal caregiver for many years. Survivors include her mother, Bernice Allen of Vero Beach; sons, Billy Jack Montgomery and Mark Montgomery, both of Vero Beach; daughters, Karen Ayers of Roanoke, Va., and Loree Winters of Seymour, Tenn.; sisters, Verna Champ of Vero Beach and Janice Toye of Springfield, Mo.; four grandchildren; and two great-grandchildren. Memorial contributions may be made to VNA Hospice, 901 37th St., Vero Beach, FL 32960. Arrangements are by Aycock Funeral Home in Fort Pierce.

V E R O

Dorothy L. Kelly, 89, died April 12, 2011, at Indian River Estates Medical Center, Vero Beach. She was born

Juanita Winifred “Nita” McKnight, 86, died April 4, 2011, at Palm Garden of Vero Beach. Memorial contributions may be made to the Florida United Methodist Children’s Home, 51 Chil-

Shirley Montgomery

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Dorothy L. Kelly

Juanita McKnight

dren’s Way, Enterprise, FL 32725. Interment will be in the Memorial Garden at First United Methodist Church, Vero Beach. Arrangements are by Strunk Funeral Home and Crematory Vero Beach.

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Christopher Glen Hill, 39, died April 13, 2011. He was born in Tampa and lived in Vero Beach for 25 years, coming from his birthplace. He was the owner of Intrepid Web Design and a professional

in Norristown, Pa., and lived in Vero Beach for 20 years, coming from her birthplace. She was a member of St. John of the Cross Catholic Church, Vero Beach Bridge Club and Vero Beach Country Club and a former member of the Moorings Club, Vero Beach. Survivors include her sons, Charles Kelly of Brant Rock, Mass., and Philip F. Kelly of Gulf Shores, Ala., six grandchildren; and two great-grandchildren. She was preceded in death by her husband of 61 years, Frank P. Kelly, in 2006; and sister, Virginia Fleming. Memorial contributions may be made to Visiting Nurse Association & Hospice Foundation, 1110 35th Lane, Vero Beach, FL 32960. Arrangements by Strunk Funeral Home and Crematory, Vero Beach, Florida.

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Christopher Glen Hill

bass angler. He was a Marine Corps veteran who served from 1991 to 1995, including Operation Restore Hope in Somalia. He graduated from Maranatha Christian School in 1990. Survivors include his daughter, Samantha Renee Hill of Vero Beach; son, Shea Austin Hill of Vero Beach; sister, Jennifer Schirard of Vero Beach; mother, Nora L. “Bambi” Maeglin of Vero Beach; stepfather, Jerry Maeglin of Vero Beach; and maternal grandmother, Lenora Fosco of Cincinnati. He was preceded in death by his father, Glen Roy Hill, in 1996; brother, Steven Scott Hill, in 2010; and paternal grandmother, Virginia Taylor, in 2010. Memorial contributions may be to the Chris Hill Memorial Fund at any RBC Bank, account No. 7683179944. Arrangements are by Thomas S. Lowther Funeral Home and Crematory in Vero Beach.

A P R I L

moved to Florida to open practices in Boynton Beach, Fort Pierce and Vero Beach. He graduated from Jamaica High School in 1948, earned his bachelor of arts in psychology degree from Hofstra University in Hempstead, N.Y., in 1952, attended College of the City of New York for four years of post-graduate work and earned his doctorate in 1958 at New York Chiropractic College in New York City. He also attended the American University of the Caribbean School of Medicine. Survivors include his daughter, Annmarie Rose Wise of Orlando. Memorial contributions may be made to National University of Health Sciences Tribute Fund, 200 E. Roosevelt Road, Lombard, IL 60148; 630-889-6701. Arrangements are by Orlando Direct Cremation.


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Real Estate

V E R O

B E A C H

N E W S W E E K L Y

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A P R I L

Barrier Island Real Estate Sales – April 7-April 13

Address 1125 Governors Way 2700 Ocean Drive, #306 716 Hibiscus Lane 656 Fiddlewood Road 1951 Sand Dollar Lane W 5601 Highway A1A, #104 S 5601 Highway A1A, #211 N

Address: Subdivision: List Date: List Price: Sell Date: Sell Price: Listing Broker: Selling Broker:

160 Anchor Drive Anchor The Moorings 3/7/2007 $2,350,000 4/7/2011 $1,900,000 Dale Sorensen Real Estate Inc. Phoenix Acquisitions

Address: Subdivision: List Date: List Price: Sell Date: Sell Price: Listing Broker: Selling Broker:

181 Camelia Court S Sea Forest Court 3/3/2008 $1,875,000 4/7/2011 $1,650,000 Premier Estate Properties Premier Estate Properties

Address: Subdivision: List Date: List Price: Sell Date: Sell Price: Listing Broker: Selling Broker:

712 Grove Place Orchid Island 2/24/2011 $1,150,000 4/8/2011 $1,035,000 Orchid Island Realty, Inc. Orchid Island Realty, Inc.

Address: Subdivision: List Date: List Price: Sell Date: Sell Price: Listing Broker: Selling Broker:

200 Sea Colony Drive E PH-B Sea Colony 5/17/2010 $1,200,000 4/7/2011 $1,025,000 Norris & Company Premier Estate Properties

Address: Subdivision: List Date: List Price: Sell Date: Sell Price: Listing Broker: Selling Broker:

2039 Club Drive Riomar 8/1/2010 $1,100,000 4/8/2011 $975,000 Dale Sorensen Real Estate Inc. Premier Estate Properties

Address: Subdivision: List Date: List Price: Sell Date: Sell Price: Listing Broker: Selling Broker:

5680 Highway A1A, #213 Victoria Condo 11/23/2009 $589,000 4/8/2011 $551,000 Norris & Company Dale Sorensen Real Estate, Inc.

Address: Subdivision: List Date: List Price: Sell Date: Sell Price: Listing Broker: Selling Broker:

74 Cache Cay Drive Cache Cay 7/20/2010 $495,000 4/7/2011 $450,000 Alex MacWilliam, Inc. Alex MacWilliam, Inc.

Address: Subdivision: List Date: List Price: Sell Date: Sell Price: Listing Broker: Selling Broker:

937 Turtle Cove Lane Ocean Drive S Beachhouses 2/15/2011 $499,000 4/13/2011 $450,000 Ron Rennick Auctions, REALTORS Ron Rennick Auctions, REALTORS

Subdivision Bermuda Club Gables of Vero Beach Orange Park Estates Veromar Summerplace Robles Del Mar Robles Del Mar

List Date 1/10/2011 7/19/2010 1/15/2011 2/7/2011 3/9/2011 9/1/2009 10/11/2010

List Price $449,000 $350,000 $300,000 $275,000 $149,900 $144,500 $139,000

Sell Date 4/8/2011 4/13/2011 4/13/2011 4/8/2011 4/7/2011 4/8/2011 4/7/2011

Sell Price $420,000 $311,000 $285,000 $250,000 $149,900 $144,500 $139,000

Listing Broker Norris & Company Alex MacWilliam, Inc. Dale Sorensen Real Estate Inc. Dale Sorensen Real Estate Inc. Coldwell Banker Ed Schlitt VB Norris & Company Dale Sorensen Real Estate Inc.

Selling Broker Treasure Coast Sotheby’s Phoenix Acquisitions Dale Sorensen Real Estate, Inc. The Land Corp. of Florida Coldwell Banker Ed Schlitt VB Norris & Company Alex MacWilliam, Inc.

Mainland Real Estate Sales – April 7-April 13 Address: Subdivision: List Date: List Price: Sell Date: Sell Price: Listing Broker: Selling Broker:

Address: Subdivision: List Date: List Price: Sell Date: Sell Price: Listing Broker: Selling Broker:

2190 Falls Circle Falls at Grand Harbor 7/10/2009 $399,228 4/8/2011 $390,000 Alex MacWilliam, Inc. Grand Harbor Real Estate

1666 Victoria Circle Victoria Island Grand H 10/31/2009 $295,000 4/11/2011 $280,000 Alex MacWilliam, Inc. Dale Sorensen Real Estate, Inc.

Address

Subdivision

List Date

List Price

Sell Date

Sell Price

Listing Broker

859 26th Street

Royal Park

11/8/2010

$250,000

4/8/2011

$252,500

Ron Rennick Auctions, REALTORS Alex MacWilliam, Inc.

Selling Broker


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