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Casino countdown United Way event sets up annual fundraising campaignPage 14

From soup to bucks Soup tureens are sold to help Samaritan Center fight hunger Page 21

STAFF PHOTO

Charter High School actors perform “Going Baroque” written by sophomore Annalise Miller

Charter High goes for baroque

 Students step back in time Page 3

 Complete Vero Beach election wrap up Page 3

Start to season A special weekend at The Moorings highlights outdoor fun Page 19

FORUM 12 20  CALENDAR  ENTERTAINMENT 25

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Local News

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Vero voters turn out, tuned in to election IAN LOVE FOR VERO BEACH NEWSWEEKLY

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Bobbie Winger and newly elected Councilman Richard Winger.

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N E W S W E E K L Y

VERO BEACH — One in three registered voters in Vero Beach cast a ballot this past Tuesday and the results moved the city closer to selling its power plant to Florida Power & Light. But it was a split result with voters overwhelmingly giving City Council the authority to lease the land the plant sits on by a 2,073 to 1,075 majority. At this point the Council does not have to come back to voters once the lease is fully negotiated. Returned to office was Tracy Carroll, who ran on selling the power plant and passing the referendum with 1,782 (29.56 percent) of the votes cast. Newcomer Dick Winger, who favored holding the referendum once all the lease details were known, earned the second open Council seat with 1,613

(26.75 percent) of the votes cast. Carroll and Winger join Mayor Jay Kramer, Vice Mayor Pilar Turner and Craig Fletcher on the Council that will have as one of its major duties determining the terms of an electric deal with FP&L. Voters turned out Brian Heady after one term on the Council as he gained 1,492 of the ballots cast (24.75 percent). Former Council member Ken Daige received 1,141 of the votes cast (18.92 percent). The 3,148 votes cast out of 10,030 registered voters (31 percent) indicated an engaged electorate despite there being no state or national elections. Supervisor of Elections Leslie Swan said last week that based on past off-year elections she was expecting between 16 to 20 percent turnout of Vero Beach’s registered voters.


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Voters throw support Carroll, Winger post decisive Council victories behind electric referendum

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BY BARBARA YORESH FOR VERO BEACH NEWSWEEKLY

VERO BEACH – They might call it splitting the difference, but the decisive victories Tuesday evening by incumbent Councilwoman Tracy Carroll and newcomer Dick Winger gave all interested city voters cause for celebration. Two City Council incumbents faced by two challengers vied for two seats in a hotly-contested election that centered on whether the city should get out of the electric utility business. When the final votes were tallied, incumbent Brian Heady – with 1,492 votes - was ousted while his fellow incumbent Tracy Carroll was returned for a full, two-year term after serving a one-year stint following former city Councilman Charlie Wilson’s remov-

al from office for not meeting a city residency requirement. Former councilman Ken Daige finished fourth with 1,141 votes. Carroll – the top vote getter -- and Winger ran a neck-and-neck race right down to the finish line and ended with Carroll tallying 1,782 votes to Winger’s 1,613. Following his victory, Winger pledged to “do my very best” for the city and its residents. “We have a lot of coming together that needs to be done in Vero Beach,” Winger said. Heady and Carroll – vocal proponents of a plan to sell the city power plant to Florida Power & Light – were challenged by Daige and Winger, who served as vice chairman of the city’s

BY BARBARA YORESH FOR VERO BEACH NEWSWEEKLY

VERO BEACH -- In the end, a 65-word referendum question asking voters to approve a lease of cityowned land at the power plant site to facilitate a sale of that utility to Florida Power & Light was given an overwhelming go-ahead by city residents anxious to see Vero get out of the electric business. Voters cast 2,073 votes to approve the referendum compared to 1,075 votes against the lease plan. Proponents of the referendum believe approval will facilitate negotiations between the city and FP&L for a sale of the power utility. The ballot question – written by Vice Mayor Pilar Turner and apCONTINUES ON PAGE 5 proved by Council – was a summation of the longer, legally required ordinance which specifically lists the provisions of proposed land lease, according to Acting City Attorney Wayne Coment. The proposed sale of the city’s electric utility had become a hot-button “Comprehensive Care, issue for those who have long critiUncompromising Service” cized the city’s electric rates which CALL NOW have traditionally been higher than FOR OUR $97 NEW those charged by FP&L. However, the PATIENT SPECIAL! city’s power utility also generates millions in revenue transfers to the city’s 0% INTEREST FINANCING AVAILABLE general fund to provide services and Don’t let fear of the dentist keep you from achieving your dental keeps city taxes low. The issue gave rise to a political goals. At Beachside Dental we are pleased to offer the latest in committee founded by Glenn Heran, IV CONSCIOUS SEDATION during your dental treatment. Find a critic of the city utility. Citizens for a comfort that goes beyond a “pill”. Brighter Future raised nearly $10,000 and purchased signs and other poAsk us about our services litical advertisements urging refer• IV SEDATION • EMERGENCY CARE endum approval. Contributions to • Veneers • Crowns and Bridges the committee were made by all five • Cosmetic Dentistry • Children’s Dentistry Indian River County commissioners • Dental Implants • Extractions as well as by Vero Beach City Council • In-office Whitening • Denture Repair members Brian Heady, Tracy Carroll, • Root Canals • TMD & Chronic Pain Craig Fletcher and Turner. Matthew J. Henry, DDS The referendum issue’s sticking point for those opposing it was a lack 772-234-5353 | www.beachsidedental.com | 5070 N A1A, of any written and formally submit-

Indian River Shores, In the Oak Point Building next to CVS

ted lease provisions from FP&L to the city. Referendum approval also authorized the city council to proceed to complete a lease and sale agreement without being required to seek further voter approval. During an Oct. 25 Special Call meeting of City Council initially requested by Heady to give the public an additional opportunity to ask questions about the lease referendum and utility sale, FP&L spokesman Ryan Fair verbally outlined proposed lease provisions. Fair said that the lease term was expected to be less than five years; the city would be paid $1 million annually to lease the power plant property; the city would be paid $6 million to move the substation from that property; FP&L would pay for the removal (dismantling) of the power plant and the city would retain ownership of the property. Whether or not those stated lease terms from FP&L will find their way into a written lease form remains to be seen. Mayor Jay Kramer, who did not favor passage of the referendum without lease details spelled out, believed residents needed more information and input on the power plant issue. “It’s an exercise of power with disregard to the public. It consolidates power to three members of council. This is the biggest issue we’ll deal with for years and it has a huge impact on taxes. The power system belongs to the people. “It’s obvious who’s pulling the strings. Look at the council people (incumbents seeking re-election) and look up their supporters who financed their campaigns. They’re county people and they want to get Vero Beach people out of the way so the county can get this (sale) done. The plan is to jam a contingency sales contract through in December and I hope peoCONTINUES ON PAGE 5


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ple have seen the light on this,” said Kramer just before polls closed. Apparently the light they wish to see is illumination provided by FP&L, if the referendum results are any indication. After the results were tallied, Kramer said he viewed the referendum outcome as a sign that “people want us to continue negotiations (with FP&L). That’s what I will interpret it as.” Nonetheless he believes that poli-

tics rather than logic prevails and if the power plant is sold without first figuring out where to plug the “holes” resulting from a shortfall of revenue or what the specific terms of the lease actually are, then serious mistakes will have been made. “We’re going to play a political game instead of fi nding an engineered solution. People make political decisions and then wonder why their taxes are so high. It will be interesting to see how this moves forward,” Kramer said.

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FROM PAGE 4

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Finance Commission. Daige and Winger both favored an electric plant sale, but wanted more facts on the table before consummating a deal. Though there was no clear-cut mandate to be found in the council seat races, it was evident in the 2-1 margin of votes cast in support of the referendum to lease the city owned power plant site to FP&L and proceed with a sale of the electric utility if council members deem it would be beneficial to the city. Early voting among the city’s 10,030 registered voters was up since the last election, according to county Elections Supervisor Leslie Swan, but below her expectations considering the level of public interest and discussion regarding the referendum which is tied to the electric plant sale negotiations. “I thought there’d be a lot more (early) voting,” Swan said less than a week before the election. Swan reported that “everything is proceeding as planned” during Election Day and there had been no reports of voter confusion or glitches due to polling place changes. By noon, 949 votes had been cast in Vero Beach with particularly heavy activity at the Christ-by-the Sea United Methodist Church polling place on the barrier island where 483 voters cast ballots. Some eleventh-hour negative campaigning was hurled with a “We Can’t Afford Dick Winger” paid political advertisement by “Independents for

Carroll and Heady independent of any candidate” which appeared in Sunday’s edition of the Press Journal. That political committee was founded by Wilson. The ad, which included a partial quote made by Winger at the Indian River Tea Party candidates’ forum, featured a circled strike through of Winger’s picture and the charge that “Dick Winger and Ken Daige’s opposition (to the referendum) could sentence residents to a lifetime of higher electric bills and cost our community $20 million dollars a year. We can’t afford Dick Winger and Ken Daige on the Vero Beach City Council.” The ad quoted Winger as saying “I am willing to walk away from the sale of Vero electric to FP&L all day.” On Election Day morning, a letter to the editor of the Press Journal from Winger alleged that the ad was “a total lie” which both misquoted his remarks and took them out of context, in what Winger termed an effort to “try to mislead and fool the public.” Winger clarified the statement he made at the candidates’ forum and stated that he said he would walk away from the deal if it meant “putting the city at risk of financial default” and by not referencing his remark in its entirety, said the quote in the ad was “completely false.” “Everyone knows that I am for the sale of the electric (plant) and a fair price to protect our city. We do not need dirty politics/politicians in our fair city,” Winger wrote.

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COUNCIL FROM PAGE 4

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M. Nasir Rizwi, M.D., FACC to Indian River Medical Associates

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Indian River Medical Center welcomes

M. Nasir Rizwi, M.D., FACC Board Certified in Cardiovascular Diseases, Internal Medicine

M. Nasir Rizwi, M.D., FACC

• Pulmonary Medicine • Internal Medicine • Cardiology

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Pulmonary Medicine • Internal Medicine • Cardiology

Dr. Rizwi received his medical degree from the University of Karachi Dow Medical College. He completed his internal medicine internship at St. Francis Hospital in Trenton, NJ, and served his internal medicine residency at Hahnemann University affiliated hospitals in Philadelphia. Following residency, Dr. Rizwi taught residents and medical students at Hahnemann Medical College and the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia, as Chief Resident in Internal Medicine. He subsequently completed a pulmonary medicine fellowship at Mt. Sinai Medical Center in Miami, FL, working under Dr. Marvin Sackner and Dr. Adam Wanner, who at that time were hailed internationally as leading lung specialists and authors of many books and research literature. With a strong interest in cardiovascular disease, Dr. Rizwi completed a second fellowship—a cardiovascular fellowship at Mt. Sinai Medical Center in Milwaukee, WI, training under Dr. Dudley Johnson, a pioneer of coronary bypass surgery, as well as leaders in interventional cardiology and electrophysiology. Dr. Rizwi specializes in pulmonary medicine, internal medicine and cardiovascular diseases. He was an early proponent of using thrombolytic (clot buster) therapy for heart attack patients in emergency rooms. Board certified in internal medicine in 1997 and in cardiovascular diseases in 2002, Dr. Rizwi has been practicing medicine in Sebastian since 1983 and a member of IRMC’s medical staff since 2000. He will continue to practice at both current locations; in his office and at his Cardiac Diagnostic Center. Medical Office

Cardiac Diagnostic Center

13885 U.S. Hwy 1 Sebastian, FL 32958

13060 U.S. Hwy 1 Sebastian, FL 32958

Most insurance accepted. Now accepting new patients. Call 772.589.6844 to schedule an appointment. The Right Care Right Here

Police Chief Dappen announces his retirement effective November 30 VERO BEACH -- Vero Beach Police Chief Don Dappen has told City Manager Jim O’Connor he will retire at the end of the month. Dappen was put on administrative leave last Friday by O’Connor as part of the process to remove him from his post. Dappen stood to lose a significant amount of money if he was terminated rather than retiring. By retiring, he will be entitled to receive a payout of $50,904 for accumulated sick pay and about $25,028 for accumulated vacation time. If he was terminated, he would have not been entitled to the accumulated sick pay, according to Human Resource Director Robert Anderson. Dappen will receive a pension of $8,848.86 per month, Anderson said. O’Connor said his decision to release Dappen was based on differences in management philosophy. He cited a couple of examples where he felt communications were sent out that he believed should have been first reviewed by him. Dappen will retain the title of police chief, but O’Connor said he had not decided whether or not to have Dappen actively serve in that capacity for the next few weeks. After placing Dappen on administrative leave, O’Connor appointed Assistant Chief Dave Currey to serve as interim chief.

Black market fish sales sting hits two Vero Beach restaurants VERO BEACH — Two restaurants in Vero Beach were nabbed by state officials for purchasing black market fish in an undercover operation. The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission charged Felix Fajardo, 40, of Felix’s Place in the 2600 block of Aviation Boulevard with four counts of purchasing from an unlicensed dealer and one count of purchasing snook. State officials said Fajardo pleaded guilty to all the charges and is awaiting sentencing. At Szechuan Palace in the 1900 block of 43rd Avenue, Yang Fu Liang, 62, was charged with purchasing from an unlicensed dealer and purchasing freshwater fish. The violations were part of a six-month operation in Indian River and Brevard counties targeting black market sales of fish and wildlife. Undercover FWC officers approached the owners or employees of 44 restaurants and offered them fish and wildlife species that are either illegal to purchase or require a permit.

St. Edward’s School returns former elementary school property to bank VERO BEACH — St. Edward’s School has transferred its former elementary school property to its lender to avoid foreclosure. St. Edward’s signed a warranty deed dated Oct. 15 transferring its former lower school site at 2225 Club Drive to the undisclosed bank, according to Indian River County Property Appraiser’s records. Ron Edwards, chairman of the school’s board of trustees, cited a non-disclosure agreement that prevented either party from discussing the terms of the exchange. The property appraiser’s office listed a sale price of $3.5 million for the 5.57-acre site in the Riomar neighborhood. That’s about $1.4 million less than the $4.9 million asking price listed with Weichert Realtors, according to the company’s website. In 2009, school officials announced plans to sell its Riomar property and consolidate its lower- and upper-school campuses and unveiled a five-year plan to stabilize enrollment. CONTINUES ON PAGE 7


GREAT TEAMWORK = GREAT RESULTS 7

GHO Homes set for construction in three Vero Beach communities

THE ESTUARY 118 Estuary Dr: Short Sale! Premier lake front 5/5.5/2. Private courtyard, pool, 2 story cabana. $695,000 MLS#119967

VILLAGE WALK 552 9th Pl: 3/2.5/2 open floor plan, wood floors, great private garden view,close to shopping,beach. $116,000 MLS#119577

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BARRIER ISLAND FINANCIAL DISTRICT 570 Beachland Blvd: Executive Commercial Strategically Between Wells Fargo and Raymond James. Private entrance, elevator, offices . $5,500,000 MLS#72373

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Sunday, November 20 at 2:30 p.m. “An Afternoon with Basie, Ellington & Friends” Advance tickets – $20 Tickets at the door – $25 Students 18 years of age and under (with identification) – FREE To Purchase Tickets Visit: www.TheEmersonCenter.org or Call (772) 778-5249

RT. 60 COMMERCIAL CORRIDOR 1965 25th Ave, 4400+ sq. ft Commercial building, separate entrances, executive showrooms, Close to 1-95, municipal airport. $350,000 MLS#77582

NEAR GRAND HARBOR 7350 US Hwy 1: Vacant Commercial 1.01 acres. Abuts plaza with med. home health care, area of great comm. and residential expansion. $109,000 MLS#110751

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3402 Ocean Drive | Vero Beach, FL 32963

N E W S W E E K L Y

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Piper announces improved deliveries for the third quarter INDIAN RIVER COUNTY — Third-quarter numbers released this week showed Piper Aircraft delivered 34 aircraft and took in $35.3 mil-

OPEN SUNDAY

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VERO BEACH — Work is underway on a nearly $2.5 million county-funded project to build four softball/youth baseball fields on the old Dodgertown property that is said to be crucial to the long-term business model of Minor League Baseball. Construction of the cloverleaf of fields, which will include restrooms, a concession stand and press box, is expected to be completed by April 2. Also included in the project are plans for batting cages, dugouts, lighting, landscaping, scoreboards, bleachers and picnic shelters. Plans also call for 132 new parking spaces. MiLB, which currently is leasing the property which has been re-named Vero Beach Sports Village, said it needed the fields to attract girls’ softball tournaments and youth baseball in the 9-and-under to 12-and-under age divisions.

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New ball fields at Vero Beach Sports Village expected to be completed by April 2

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INDIAN RIVER COUNTY -- Sand sucked into the Sebastian Inlet during recent years will soon be dredged onto a nearby public beach in a $1.3 million effort to replenish beaches south of the inlet. The Sebastian Inlet District commissioners voted unanimously last week to pay Dickerson Florida Inc. of Fort Pierce to dredge 148,000 cubic yards of sand out of the inlet and the boat channel that connects it to the Intracoastal Waterway. The cost will be split between the state and the district, which collects taxes from Brevard County and part of Indian River County. The sand will be placed just south of the inlet on 1,700 feet of beaches that scientists say are depleted by the inlet’s tendency to interrupt the natural north-south flow of sand along Florida’s east coast.

Barbara du Pont Cell: 772-913-3333

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Sand trapped by Sebastian Inlet to be pumped on local beach

lion in revenue. During that same period last year, the company delivered 32 aircraft for $28.1 million in revenue. Deliveries of the company’s most expensive planes, the Meridian, Mirage and Matrix, were up overall from 17 to 21 planes in the third quarter this year. The General Aviation Manufacturers Association reported that overall deliveries of general aviation airplanes in the first nine months of 2011 dropped 9.8 percent compared with the same period last year, to a total of 1,227 planes. Industry billings, or revenue, fell 10.2 percent, from $13.5 billion to $12.1 billion. In comparison, Piper’s revenue for the first nine months of the year was $92.5 million, almost 20 percent ahead of where it was the first three quarters of 2010.

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INDIAN RIVER COUNTY — Bill Handler, who bought back GHO Homes from the Utah development company he sold it to six years ago, announced he has re-launched the company and will be building new homes in the communities of Fieldstone Ranch, Trillium and Stoney Brook. GHO Homes are offered at a number of price points which Handler says allows him to offer customized solutions to buyers. In addition, GHO Homes offers “a year to close,” where buyers can lock in on a price and move into their homes a year later. Handler said this is especially helpful to people who know they will be retiring in a year. GHO Homes has bought the remaining lots in Lake Tangelo and Cambridge Park and has interest in several other Vero Beach communities.

Melissa Mittag, ABR Cell: 772-538-9086

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Program to make reading champs out of early learners A small but influential gathering at Dodgertown Elementary School last week heralded a new era of literacy in Indian River County. The School District of Indian River County, in partnership with the nonprofit Learning Alliance, has set in motion an aggressive reading program in all 13 of the district’s elementary schools. The goal is to have 90 percent literacy throughout the district by third grade. The national literacy rate is about 68 percent, explained Barbara Hammond, one of three co-founders of

Learning Alliance, which provides funding, teacher support and supplies for an innovative reading program aimed at children from kindergarten through third grade. “This program gets rid of a lot of the teacher chit-chat that drains a student’s attention,” said Lisa Hurley, another of the organization’s cofounders. Learning Alliance was established by three mothers in Indian River County; Liz Woody, Hurley and Hammond, who were familiar with the problems that arise from children who face reading challenges. Although they had the means to

provide the necessary tutoring for their own children, they turned their effort to the greater good and elicited support from the McCabe Foundation, the Indian River Community Foundation, Indian River State College, Scripps and many others to launch a veritable literacy movement. Representatives from each of those organizations were at the Dodgertown session, including Lenora Ritchie, Kerry Bartlett, Bob Brunjes and Alma Lee Loy, along with others who are committed to eradicating illiteracy in the county by introducing an effective curriculum. According to the Learning Alli-

ance’s website, “24 percent of thirdgraders and 43 percent of eighthgraders in Indian River County are failing to pass the reading portion of the Florida Comprehensive Assessment Test (“FCAT”). “ In one of its first initiatives, the organization partnered with the Education Foundation to test the eyesight of all students in the district. As it turned out, about 20 percent of the students needed glasses and didn’t know it. Learning Alliance also helped get almost 200 pairs of glasses to those in need. “You’ve got to be able to see the book to read it,” said Hammond.

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Learning Alliance leaders, Fran Adams, Barbara Hammond, Ray Oglethorpe, Takeisha Harris, Liz Woody and Lisa Hurley.


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Reading Challenge

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First grade teacher Judy Forgham works with students at Dodgertown Elementary on their reading skills.

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One of the most basic determinants of a person’s literacy is the literacy level of the parents. While Learning Alliance focuses on literacy levels in children, Literacy Services of Indian River County focuses on literacy levels in adults. It is estimated that one out of every five adults, or 20 percent, is functionally illiterate. Literacy Services uses computerized reading programs and one-on-one tutoring methods to teach adults to read. A dedicated corps of volunteer tutors is at the heart of this organization. In an attempt to make reading a fun familyoriented event, Literacy Services is conducting a campaign encouraging adults to read to children in their home. Beginning on Dec. 4 and lasting for 15 weeks, participants are asked to commit to five minutes of reading aloud every day. Registrants are eligible to win prizes. For more information about the reading challenge, call 778-2223 or visit them online at www.literacyservicesirc.org.

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by way of anecdote, illustrating the range of children on which the reading program is making an impact, including the exceptional student population. As students move through the reading program, there are increased opportunities to have individualized and group reading sessions. The typical 25 percent loss of knowledge every summer is being mitigated by partnerships with summer youth programs in the community. The organization is now working with the concept of creating a “passport” program of handbooks pertaining to each division of the Learning Alliance model. With that in place they can fit this proven reading method to almost any school’s curriculum. “We want to be known as the literacy capital of the country,” said Fran Adams, Schools Superintendant of Indian River County.

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last week. “The difference with Learning Alliance was in the coaching.” Teachers are provided with reading mentors with whom they can discuss challenges, obstacles and concerns. This program is different than No Child Left Behind, said Ray Oglethorpe, former president of AOL and the current board chair for Learning Alliance. “That program aimed at 100 percent of the students, which is not realistic. This program has a goal everyone can get behind.” The Sonday reading program employs a holistic approach, engaging the student in gross motor and small motor skills, ways to diagram words and letters in a structured, repetitive pattern. The students begin to take responsibility for their reading objectives by first taking responsibility for the reading tools, including a dry erase board and personal markers. “The kids are very serious about their reading program,” said Harris

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Advocates of the program hope to have discovered the missing link in the literacy equation, ultimately breaking the cycle of illiteracy and poverty. Recent successes at Dodgertown Elementary, a Title I school giving it additional resources to address the needs of its economically challenged population, have been promising. Using the “Fundations” reading method and a remedial accompaniment called “Sonday,” Dodgertown has improved 40 percent over other schools in the district using the same method. The difference, according to those at last week’s presentation, has been the level of commitment from the top down, frequent and repetitive learning and consistent, long-term support for the educators themselves. “We didn’t need another program at Dodgertown Elementary,” Principal Takeisha Harris said at the gathering


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World War II veterans unknowingly cross paths Vero Beach Newsweekly article finds unlikely connection between Vero Beach residents BY MILT THOMAS VERO BEACH NEWSWEEKLY

Consider this – during the four years America fought in World War II, 17 million Americans served in the United States Armed Forces, half a million died and another 700,000 were wounded. What are the odds that two soldiers in different branches of the service, from totally different backgrounds, would mirror each others’ path through the war and both end up in Vero Beach? If you can even follow that progression, then you will appreciate the story of Bill Johnson and Sal Giammanco. This story begins when Sal, who was the subject of a July 21st feature about his role in the battle for Guam, asked us to commemorate the battle for Bougainville. The Guam feature appeared on the 67th anniversary of that battle. The 68th anniversary of Bougainville was on November 1st. Meanwhile, we heard from another World War II veteran, Bill Johnson, and found that their lives intersected at almost every turn, yet they had never met. Sal Giammanco was born in Italy almost 87 years ago, immigrated to America and settled in Brooklyn where he lived with his family until joining the service. Bill Johnson, 90 years old, grew up not far away in Valley Stream, Long Island, where he lived until going to Notre Dame. “I was a sophomore when the Japanese attacked Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941,” he said. “I changed direction a bit and went through the government’s V-7 program, taking courses in naval training. After finishing up my Commerce degree, I went across campus into Midshipmen’s School.

Sal Giammanco, right, firing a machine gun on the front lines in the Battle of Bougainville.

Ninety days later I was in the service and off to Miami where I spent two months in anti-submarine school. From there, I shipped out to New Caledonia in the South Pacific and boarded Sub Chaser #1326 for the next year and a half.” That is where Bill and Sal unknowingly crossed paths. Sal followed a different course to get there. “I was in high school when they bombed Pearl Harbor and joined the Marines in 1942,” he said. “I ended up in New Caledonia with a brand new outfit, the 2nd Marine Raiders, forerunner of the Green Berets in Vietnam.” From there, Bill Johnson escorted ships participating in seven different invasions as American troops took islands back from the Japanese one by one. He would cross paths with Sal on three of them. Their first stop

Bill Johnson, on the deck on a destroyer escort ship.

was the largest island in the Solomon chain, Bougainville. The invasion began on November 1, 1943. Bill Johnson escorted ships to that area for the invasion, but Sal and his fellow marines were first to come ashore. Of course, the marines were almost always the first into battle. “It was considered the forgotten campaign,” says Sal, “but those of us who were there will never forget. It was at the start of the rainy season and we spent days in water-soaked positions filled with rats, crocodiles and every kind of bug your can think of.” The campaign lasted about three months, but it succeeded in pushing the Japanese out of the South Pacific. From there, Bill went on to Kwajalein and Saipan, while Sal went to

Emirau, a little known island nowadays, but a Japanese base back then. Sal was part of a 4,000-marine landing force in March, 1944, but never fired a shot. “When we arrived, they must have just left because there was food on the table and torpedoes poorly buried in haste. The highlight was when we captured a Japanese miniature sub that docked there and didn’t realize we had taken over. It was the first time Americans saw a miniature first hand.” Both Bill Johnson and Sal Giammanco took part in the battle for Guam. Bill says, “Our escort ships lined up about 1,000-1,500 feet offshore, 100 yards apart. We controlled every boat that came through. My sub chaser was close to the airport and we came under mortar fire. I was manning the bow gun when a mortar


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retail business, ending up with Grand Union supermarkets for 20 years.

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There were snipers though, and one of them shot me right in the chest, close to my heart. The bullet punctured my lung and came out my left side. That was the end of the war for me.” Sal Giammanco was actually the very first American casualty of the battle for Okinawa. Both Sal and Bill were shipped back to the U.S. after Okinawa. For Sal, his future seemed limited with a 100 percent disability. But thanks to special government schooling for disabled vets, Sal completed a four year course in electronics – “I did it in two years” – and enjoyed a 40-year career in the New York radio business before retiring to Vero Beach. He met his wife, Josephine, through work and they have been married 61 years. Meanwhile, Bill went on a 30-day leave, then was assigned as executive officer on a destroyer escort in the Atlantic. “During my leave, I went to a Brooklyn-Pittsburgh ball game at Ebbets Field and during the fifth inning, they announced that the atom bomb had been dropped on Hiroshima.” After the service, Bill worked in the

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Among the medals Sal Giammanco earned was the Purple Heart and Bronze Star.

They went bankrupt and in 1967 he joined a start-up motel chain, Susse Chalet, developing properties, and ended up owning four of them in New England. After 20 years he retired. “We had friends in The Moorings, but eventually bought a place in Sea Oaks.” Bill met his wife, Dorothy, at Atlantic Beach on Long Island while vacationing there with his family. She had been recently widowed with three young children. “I was Bachelor of the Year one year and Father of the Year the next.” Like most World War II veterans, they don’t talk much about their accomplishments. Both of them earned Purple Hearts and Bronze Star medals. Bill was involved in seven invasions and Sal in four battles, but as Sal says, “The only heroes were the ones killed in action, not the ones who lived.” But for those of us who have prospered in an America kept free of tyranny, they were all heroes.

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hit us. Four of my men were killed and I received shrapnel wounds. In fact, I still have one piece of shrapnel in my side. It’s probably rusty by now.” Sal Giammanco’s experience was even more intense. “We landed on the beach and a huge force of Japanese soldiers charged us. We repelled them and killed about 500 in the process. Several days later I was hit by debris during a shelling and I was bleeding all over, but nothing serious enough to leave my post. Many of my fellow Marines died though during that invasion. After the first week we only had 66 men left out of 232 in our company. I also contracted dengue fever while we were there.” Guam was an American possession before the war, and retaking the island kicked Japan off its only foray onto American soil. For Bill, his next destination was Iwo Jima, probably the most famous battle of World War II. “One thing about the Navy is that they did a lot of training prior to each invasion,” he said. “Again, my ship was part of the escort, but this was a terrible fight. Iwo Jima was a small island and the Japanese defenders were in caves high above the beach where they could shell at will.” The last major battle of World War II was fought on the island of Okinawa. Bill Johnson’s sub chaser was part of that battle.” “We pretended to mount an amphibious assault on the southeastern coast to force a commitment of Japanese troops there while the real attack took place elsewhere. Our forces closed in on the beach, then stopped and turned around. But by then the main assault had taken place. I do remember the onslaught of Japanese planes torpedoing and crashing into our ships. It was the first major kamikaze attack and I think it involved about 1,000 planes.” For Sal, the Okinawa campaign was a short one. He was among the first Marine troops to go ashore on April 1, 1945, but they met little resistance. “We didn’t realize that the Japanese had yielded the beaches and moved inland to better defend themselves.


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Vero to roll out the red carpet for veterans this holiday FOR VERO BEACH NEWSWEEKLY

Vero Beach will say thank you to soldiers young and old this Veterans Day with solemn ceremonies, a chance to revisit the camaraderie of fellow soldiers and even some ice cream. Veterans and their friends and families will gather at Veterans Memorial Island Sanctuary at 9 a.m. on Nov. 11 to hear Vietnam veteran and Purple Heart recipient John Darling. He was wounded in action during the Tet Offensive in 1968 and has been a Vero Beach resident since 1973. For those with a literary bent, the beachside shop Shells & Things will be hosting veterans that are also authors on Nov. 11-12 from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. each day. Shells and Things owners, Lisa and Ron Davidson, with help from local author and veteran Robert Lynch,

contacted several other soldier-writers about the event. Over the two days visitors can meet and speak with Lynch, author of “A Letter Marked Free,” Bruce Bew, author of “Hanging by a Thread,” John Cammalleri author of the “Ibex Trophy,” Earle Kirkbride author of “Letters Home,” Peter Genero author of “Reminiscences of the 20th Century,” Malcom Mahr author of “The Riyadh Conspiracy,” Bill Walker, author of “The French Teacher,” and Robert Morrissey, author of “Four Young Soldiers and Sergeant Doyle.” “We’re just so excited to have a venue where the public can interact with these authors and heroes,” Ron Davidson said. All current enlisted and retired military personnel will also receive a 10 percent discount through the weekend at the store. For additional information, contact Lisa or Ron David-

son at 772-234-4790. Also on the beach, Kilwins Ice Cream Shoppe will “salute the troops with a free scoop” on Veterans Day. All veterans and active duty military personnel will receive a free scoop of ice cream courtesy of owners Jef & Julie Denning. “Both of our Dads proudly served our country and we wanted to create an event to show our appreciation to both veterans and those currently serving and preserving our freedom,” Julie said. The Dennings will also donate part of the proceeds from a special “Red White & Blue” sundae they have created to the Military Moms Prayer Group of Vero Beach. Members of the Military Moms Prayer Group will also be at Kilwins on Veterans Day, distributing special flat-rate postal boxes that can be

packed and shipped for Christmas to the troops serving in Iraq, Afghanistan and other hot spots around the world. “These men and women are our heroes,” said Pam Proctor, president of the Military Moms Prayer Group, Inc. “We’re aiming for 2,000 boxes to go out from Indian River County for the holidays to give them a taste of home and show our support for their sacrifices.” Kilwins is located at 3001 Ocean Drive in Vero Beach. For more information call 772-584-3281. On Saturday evening, The Elks Club, 1350 26th St., will hold a Veterans Ball. Social hour begins at 5:30 p.m. with a buffet dinner and entertainment to follow. For advance tickets call (772) 562-8794; for more information on Veterans Day ceremonies, call (772) 569-9533.

Kilwins Salutes the Troops with a

FREE SCOOP! Free single scoop ice cream cones will be served to all veterans and active duty military personnel on Veteran’s Day, Friday, November 11th 10 am to 10 pm

3001 Ocean Drive Across from Humiston Park Playground · Vero Beachside (772)584-3281


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EDITORIAL

Visit us on the web at www.VeroBeachNewsweekly.com Mail may be sent to Vero Beach Newsweekly, 1801 U.S. Hwy. 1, Vero Beach, FL, 32960

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LETTERS WELCOME Vero Beach Newsweekly invites you to send Letters to the Editor on topics of interest pertaining to Indian River County. Letters should be 250-300 words and may be edited for length. We encourage an open dialogue, but reserve the right to refuse publication of letters that do not meet our editorial standards. E-mails may be sent to verobeachnewsweekly@gmail.com or by regular mail to Letter to the Editor, Vero Beach Newsweekly, 1801 U.S. 1, Vero Beach, FL 32960.

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Mark Schumann, Publisher 978-2246 Mark.Schumann@scripps.com

Because voters declined to return incumbent Brian Heady to office, any council members aspiring to re-election might do well to see in Heady’s defeat a cautionary lesson. Heady deserves credit for doing his homework on the issues, for being accessible and for wanting to do what is best for the city. What voters may have tired of, though, were Heady’s contentiousness and his tendency to be a contrarian on practically any and all matters that came before the Council. By not re-electing Heady, voters may be saying that they want to see the city’s business conducted more efficiently and with greater civility. In her campaign literature Tracy Carroll promised to “enforce civility.” We would respectfully suggest that it is much more effective to be a model of civility than to attempt to “enforce” it. We hope that each member of the Council can agree to disagree agreeably. And we would hope their positive example might influence columnists, pundits, bloggers, as well as citizens who bring their concerns before the Council. While we may all collectively lament the decline of civility in public discourse, a return to politeness and courtesy has to begin with each of us individually.

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tion -- absent utility transfers -- for funding city government. There will be staff reductions, possible tax increases and perhaps reductions in the level of services the city can afford to provide once it is no longer relying on utility transfers to subsidize the general fund. A smaller city government is exactly the result some want out of a sale of the electric utility and that is almost surely what they will get. There are two ways of becoming discontent. Not getting what you want is one. Getting what you want is the other. Hopefully, those who want to see city government shrunk to the bare minimum will not be discontent with the results. After all, initiating change is one thing, while skillfully orchestrating change so that it does not degenerate into chaos is quite another. Given his extensive experience leading organizations through change, Winger brings valuable skills to the Council. Sometimes just one subtle shift is all that is needed to set a new course, to alter the debate or to change the atmosphere in a room. We are quite hopeful that Winger’s participation on the City Council can shift both the direction and the tone of its discussions.

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able. At the same time, the election of Winger is at least partly a message to the Council that voters are concerned with the process as well as the results, and they are not looking to give away the city’s electric utility, but rather are prepared to sell it at a fair price. Winger has supported holding a second referendum once negotiations with FP&L are concluded. His election can hardly be seen, then, as a rejection of that idea. In fact, given that politicking for the referendum led many voters to believe there will be a second referendum once a deal with FP&L is finally negotiated, and given that the Nov. 8 referendum will likely face a legal challenge, the City Council would be wise to pass a resolution in support of a second referendum. In electing Winger, voters may also have expressed a desire to see the reins of the city taken up by steadier, more experienced hands. Regaining its equilibrium is just what the Council needs as it proceeds with divesting the city of its electric utility and as it either sells or reorganizes its water and sewer system for greater efficiencies. Beyond these two pressing issues, the Council will face other important decisions as it develops a new equa-

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While a variety of explanations can be offered as to why Vero Beach voters elected two City Council candidates who are in some ways polar opposites, it could simply be that the collective judgment of the majority is a call for nothing more or less than balanced leadership from City Hall. Moreover, this “split decision” is a rejection of the notion that this was a single-issue election, one in which voters would supposedly narrow their focus exclusively on the sale of the city’s electric utility. That did not happen. In choosing two candidates with opposing views on the power referendum, and on how to proceed in negotiations with Florida Power & Light, clearly the electorate is not suffering from a collective case of myopia. Neither incumbent Tracy Carroll and her allies, nor newly elected Councilman Richard Winger and his supporters can safely interpret the results of this week’s election as a mandate for anything other than a balanced approach to guiding the city though momentous changes. Indeed, neither candidate received even 30 percent of the ballots cast. With the passage of the power referendum, the mandate to sell the city’s electric system can be described as overwhelming and unquestion-

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I’m all for new technology, but enough is enough BY MILT THOMAS

There was a time in my youth that we all waited with anxious anticipation for the new automobile model year. An air of mystery surrounded it. Car-carrying semis delivered the new models hidden under canvas so no one could see the sleek new lines, the shiny chrome, futuristic tail fins and other innovations. The TV and magazine ads featured nothing more than the car logo and date of unveiling. Ah, those were the good old days when our economy was based on automobile sales and 96 percent of them were domestically manufactured. I don’t think we ever considered that introducing new models every year was a clever ploy to sell more cars invented by Alfred Sloan, first president of General Motors. Today, most cars are foreign made and even domestic brands are put together with foreign components, our 96 percent market share is now

less than half of all sales, and new models look remarkably like old models or another m a n u f a c t u r e r ’s models. It doesn’t matter though, because today our economy runs on MILT THOMAS technology. The latest Apple iPhone 4s sold four million units in its first two weeks on the market. It replaces the iPhone 4G, which replaced the iPhone 3Gs, which replaced the…you get the picture. Then there’s the iPad2, which replaced the iPad, which is really just an iPhone with a glandular condition. Motorola is preparing to re-introduce the Razr, once the hottest gadget in the industry until the iPhone came along. I guess the bottom line of all this is that our economy was once based on products we drove around in to

get from point A to point B. Now our economy is based on fancy telephones, TV sets and of course, computers. The economies of most “developing” countries, once known as “third world” countries, are based on food. The success of those economies depend on growing enough food to feed themselves and hopefully growing enough extra to sell to other countries and earn hard cash so they can in turn buy iPhones. My own journey through technology started with a Day Timer when I worked for the Chamber of Commerce. I replaced my Day Timer with a Palm Pilot. You remember those? It worked fine until I lost it. I was prepared to upgrade to a newer Palm Pilot, but when I went to buy a replacement, guess what? They didn’t make Palm Pilots anymore. I had to upgrade to a “smart” phone, which I didn’t need because I already had a cell phone. Now, Alfred

Sloan was smart by introducing new models every year, but he didn’t just stop making cars one year and replace them with airplanes. Next to a worldwide famine, the worst thing that could happen in today’s world is that no one invents a new version of the iPhone. People would have to save money instead of spending every last dollar on new technology. iPhones might be replaced with eye to eye contact. People might rediscover the attributes of adding machines, Rolodexes and Day Timers. Of course, that will never happen, not with excitement building for the iPhone 5. I plan to be first in line at Best Buy when it comes out. Milt Thomas is a Vero Beach resident and an experienced freelance writer/ author with a 20-year background in the music industry. He currently writes biographies, blogs, lectures, travels extensively and is an active member of the National Press Club.

Learning to move creatively with new realities BY REVEREND SCOTT ALEXANDER

My nearly 40 years in the ministry has led me to believe that adaptability is one of the most important spiritual possessions a human being can have.   Adaptability is the quality of being able to move creatively with new information about your life, even when that new information is not welcome, easy or pleasant. All of us hope to skate through our life without difficulty, upset, complication, or disability.   But that, of course, is not the way life works. When I lived in Washington DC, almost every day I was out cycling on the bike trail which runs along the Potomac River, I would see another cyclist with a rather unique bicycle.  It was a specially-equipped recumbent bike – one in which the rider sits low to the ground – and instead of having the crank and chain operated by the

legs and feet, his was up front on the bike, driven by the hands and arms.   You see the rider was a paraplegic who had absolutely no use of his lower extremities. So, if he was going to exercise outdoors and power a bike, REVEREND it would have to be SCOTT ALEXANDER through his hands and arms, the only working means of locomotion he had at his disposal. This cyclist had gone to the trouble of having a special bike built for him and his unique and limited situation, and every day he moved down the trail at remarkable speed.   The other remarkable thing about this cyclist was the big, broad smile he always wore across his face as he pedaled with his hands.  I was always

inspired by the pluck and adaptability of this avid cyclist, he simply was not going to let the absence of working legs stop him from enjoying his sport, and the beauty of that trail along the river. He was a true inspiration to me. Over our lifetimes, all of us will similarly experience what author Judith Viorst called necessary losses -- unwelcomed realities that come into our lives and threaten to diminish our lives and choices.  Whether it is a marriage that fails, a career that stalls, a child that disappoints, a job that evaporates, a friendship that collapses, or a body that fails us in some significant way -- all of us eventually face circumstances that oblige us to live in new and unwelcomed ways.   The key question is whether we will find the internal resources to adapt to new realities – like my paraplegic cyclist friend who pedaled his bike with

his hands. Being an adapter does not mean you simply and passively “roll with life’s punches.”   Being an adapter means that when you face life’s inevitable and necessary losses, rather than focus on what you have lost, you shift your spiritual attention to what is still possible.   Albert Camus once said, “Yes, there are deprivations, there are the deprivations which give rise to our worst sorrows, but what does it truly matter what we have lost, when what we have lost is not yet used up.”     It’s the adapters in this life who make it through with grace and satisfaction, pure and simple. Rev. Scott W. Alexander is the minister of the Unitarian Universalist Fellowship of Vero Beach, and has been a minister, author, and educator for almost 40 years. He is an avid cyclist and outdoor enthusiast who loves living in Vero Beach.


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BY CHRISTINA TASCON VERO BEACH NEWSWEEKLY

the slot machines and played blackjack, craps and roulette with a portion of each chip or token going to United Way.   Campaign chairs Don and Chris

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Sponsor Tony Donadio with his sons Anthony & Michael and Danielle Sharkey

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Elise Mahovlich, Kristine Klose and Curtis & Sabrina Carpenter

Loftus were excited by this year’s dollar goal, but even more so by the strategy this year to widen their scope by getting more people involved.   Chris Loftus said, “We are not just reaching out to the community which regularly donates, but we want to build our awareness through some out-of-the box types of participation.  We have held several events already with some unique concepts.” Loftus is referring to events like Jawbones vs. Sawbones, a softball game pitting lawyers against doctors at Holman Stadium and the Caddyshack Classic Movie showing at Majestic Theatre where guests came garbed in their tackiest golf attire. “We want to find ways to encourage participation from everyone in an event or way that we have not thought about previously,” Loftus said. The Casino Royale was sponsored by Tony Donadio in memory of his wife Margo who passed away earlier this year. The Loftus’s said they were having lunch with Donadio and talking about having a dress up event where everyone could have fun and he said immediately that this was the kind of thing his wife would have loved.   Margo Donadio’s father ran many events like the Casino Royale and he felt it would be a “lovely tribute” to her. As Chris and Don introduced Donadio, he received a standing donation in a touching recognition of his gift to the United Way and in honor of Margo who had been much loved by many in the room.   Donadio gave his thanks to the people in the room for their support of him and his two sons, Anthony and Michael, when Margo passed

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raising goal at the high-rolling Casino Royale. Set up as a sparkling Vegas casino, guests enjoyed cocktails and hors d’oeuvres as they poured tokens into

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United Way campaign starts at Casino Royale


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Randy & Michelle Knight, Jim Davis and Cyn Delee Dalton

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away. Also on hand was Louise Kenny from Worldwide United Way.   Kenny said she was “thrilled about what Indian River County and the Loftus’s were doing to think outside of the box to bring in donations and volunteers.” Finally, they lined up all the campaign heads on the dance floor with oversized playing cards and turned over their new goal for this year, drum roll please… $2.5 million. Quite a lofty goal but Bob Solari, one of the campaign chairs, said they would rather strive for a higher goal and stretch for it than to complacently settle for a lower easily attainable amount.   The Casino Royale event was a successful kickoff to United Way’s season and Vero will have to watch to see if the United Way hits its goal on the “temperature” boards placed around town again this year.

Michael & Louise Garavaglia play blackjack with United Way Worldwide’s Louise Kenny


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Karen Mechling, Michelle Malyn and Chuck Mechling

Campaign chairs Bob & Jackie Solari with Event Chairs Chris & Don Loftus

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Chad Morrison, Debrah Hoover and Freddie Woolfork

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Buffy Payne, Jackie Savell and Debbie & Kyle Morgan

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Don & Chris Loftus reveal this yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s goal with the help of their Campaign Committee


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The Moorings welcomes returning members With snowbirds starting to make their annual trek south, the Moorings treated members to a whirlwind of activities this past weekend, topped by an exhibition by tennis great Ivan Lendl. The Moorings’ homecoming weekend offered an anglers outing, a fitness center open house, cruise brunch, golf tournament, formal dinner dance and the exhibition

by eight-time Grand Slam winner Lendl. Access to deep water has always drawn the yachting crowd and Realtor and retired oral surgeon Bob Dewaters says such amenities make the community easy to market.  “Where else can you dock your boat in your backyard?” he asked. Daina Bertrand said, “My parents have been here for 30 years, I learned to ride my bike and drive a

car on these streets and it always feels special coming here.” “Our members are wonderful and they treat our staff like family. That is why we say ‘Welcome Home’ on their return,” said General Manager Craig Lopes. On the final night, members relaxed with a casual cocktail reception to announce the winners of the golf tournament (Blue Team) as they settled in for the season in Vero Beach.

Gene & Phil Corso

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PHOTOS BY CHRISTINA TASCON

Mike & Terry McConnell with Mike and Daina Bertrand

Philadephians Ann & Walter Vethte and Joe & Ellin Paquette

Nancy Gallery, Nancy Tubbs and Brian Gallery

Dr. Bob & Bonnie DeWaters and Ann & John Tharpe


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SOCIAL | LIFESTYLE

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Talulah’s Boutique was the site for a unique shopping event that was all for a good cause. “The Diva Gets a Modern Makeover at Talulah’s Boutique” offered an after-hours shopping extravaganza with proceeds to benefit the Children’s Home Society. Among the events were ambush makeovers to some of the ladies in attendance. All those on hand enjoyed champagne and treats and a

night out with friends. Faith, Hope and Chocolate, the Cork Wine Bar and Havana Cigar Club also participated in the event. The Children’s Home Society seeks to break the cycle of child abuse and provide children and young adults with the opportunity to be safe, healthy and prepared for life. All the stores are located on Indian River Boulevard in the Modern One Plaza.

Reliable and Effective Prayer

National Philanthropy Day 2011 Presented by George E. Warren Corporation

Tuesday, November 15, 2011, 5:30 P.M. Riverside Theatre | $30 per Guest Recognition Ceremony followed by a Cocktail Celebration Hosted by the Association of Fundraising Professionals Indian River Chapter EVENT SPONSORS

So many people today are interested in discovering more about the healing effect of prayer. Mark Swinney will present a talk titled,

Leigh Jewelers | Marine Bank & Trust Company Publix Super Markets Charities, Inc.

“The healing effect of your prayers”

Explore the possibilities

Venue Sponsor - Riverside Theatre

International speaker, Mark Swinney, is a practitioner and teacher of Christian Science healing and a member of the Christian Science Board of Lectureship.

Media Sponsors -

Monday November 14th, 7:00pm, Free Admission

The Heritage Center, 2140 14th Ave Vero Beach

For more information visit afpindianriver.afpnet.org or contact Jennifer Jones at 772-234-0992 or Monique Walker at 772-462-7242

Child care will be provided Given by, First Church of Christ Scientist

Vero Beach • (772) 567-3656

TCN2628700

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Some divas get a modern makeover


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Community Calendar Every Friday: Farmer’s Market from 3-6 pm in downtown Vero at the corner of 14th Ave. & 21st St. 772-480-8353. Every Saturday: Oceanside Business Association’s Farmer’s Market, 8 amnoon. Ocean Dr. & Flamevine Ln. www. VeroBeachOBA.com, 772-532-2455. Nov 10: Chimps Kitchen: A Celebrity Chef Tasting Event to Benefit Save the Chimps, 6-9 p.m. at Cobalt Room at the Vero Beach Hotel and Spa, $75, 772-429-2225 or events@ savethechimps.org. Nov 10: “Southern Heartbeat” by Sean Sexton Opening Reception, 6 pm, Intrepid Art Gallery, 4807 N A1A, 772-913-1122. Nov 10: Cynthia Hurst Book Signing, “The Platinum Project: Men in the 21st Century.” Vero Beach Book Center, 2145 Indian River Blvd., 7 pm. 772-569-2050, theverobeachbookcenter.com Nov 10: Full Moon Celebration, 6 pm, Rock City Gardens, 9080 US1, dinner & dancing, for Indian Land Trust. $175, 772-794-0701. Nov 11 & 18: Master of the King of the Hill Tennis Tournament, The Boulevard & Tennis Club, 1620 Boulevard Village Ln., $8, 5:00 & 6:30 pm. Tennis tournament, raffles, cash bar and dinner. For Youth Guidance. 772-770-5040, ircyouth.com Nov 11: Veteran’s Memorial Island Sanctuary Veteran’s Day Salute, Speaker John Darling, 9 am, hosted by the Indian River County Veteran’s Council. 772-569-9533. Nov 11-12: Firefighters’ Chili & Salsa Cookoff, 5-9 pm. Friday PreParty and Jr. Firefighters Challenge and Saturday Chili Cookoff and Contest. Fun family events, entertainment and great food and drink both THURSDAY, NOV. 10

STAFF PHOTO

If you’d like to see one of your photographs published in Vero Beach Newsweekly, please send them to us at verobeachnewsweekly@gmail.com. Photos need to be at least 200 dpi and in jpeg format. nights. www.ircffa.org. Nov 12: Veteran’s Ball at The Elks Club, 1350 26th St., social hour starts at 5:30 pm with a buffet dinner & entertainment to follow ceremony. $25 per person. For advance tickets, 772562-8794. Nov 12: Oceanside Business Association Free Concert Series - 5:308:30 pm, music by “Other People”, Christmas toy drive, vendors. 772532-7983. Nov 13: McKee Botanical Gardens 10th Anniversary Celebration with $1 admission, 350 US1, 11 am-4 pm, live music, animals, stilt walker and more, 772-794-0601, mckeegarden.org. Nov 13: Treasure Coast Chorale “Here Comes the Bride” at First Baptist Church, 2206 16th Ave., 7 pm, offering taken. 772-231-3498, treasurecoastchorale.org. Nov 13: Bowl-A-thon, 2-5 pm, $15,

FRIDAY, NOV. 11

at Vero Bowl to benefit Vero Beach Christian Business Association charities. No reservations. Nov 18: Sue Grafton Book Signing, “V is for Vengeance.” Vero Beach Book Center, 2145 Indian River Blvd., 5 pm. 772-569-2050, theverobeachbookcenter.com Nov 18-20: Festival of Trees, Riverside Children’s Theatre, 3250 Riverside Park Dr., Friday 6:30-10:30 pm Gala Preview, Saturday 4 pm Academy Orchestra playing music from Manheim Steamroller, Sunday 8 & 11 am Breakfast with Santa, 772-2316990, riversidetheatre.com. Nov 19: “The Game” brunch at Quail Valley. Harvard/Yale football rivalry party to view game, 11 am brunch, noon game time. $30, 772562-5015. Nov 19: Gate Lodge Hanley Center “Celebrate Hope Dance,” 7-11 pm, $50,

Appetizers & Entertainment, Costa d’este, 3244 Ocean Dr., 772-617-1721. Nov 19: Red, White & Blue Gala, 6 pm, Grand Harbor, 4985 Club Terrace, benefit Republican Women of IRC. Speaker, Lt. Gov. Jennifer Carroll; dinner & dancing. $125, 772770-2309, bbcraun@bellsouth.net. Nov 19-20: Fall Boat Show at Riverside Park, 3001 Riverside Park Dr., 10 am-5 pm. 772-562-7922, verobeachboatshow.com. Nov 20: Art in the Park, Vero Beach Art Club members outdoor art exhibit, Humiston Park, 3000 Ocean Dr., 10 am-4 pm. 772-231-0303, VeroBeachArtClub.org. Nov 24: Treasure Coast Turkey Trot Against Hunger, 5K run to benefit Harvest Food & Outreach, Riverside Park. Register at 6:30 am; advance reserve at trotagainsthunger.org or Runner’s Depot, 436 21st St., 772-569-7364. Nov 26: Vero Beach Book Center Holiday Open House, pictures with Santa, 2145 Indian River Blvd., 11 am-1 pm. 772-569-2050, theverobeachbookcenter.com Nov 26 & 27: Art for Animals by Humane Society, 6230 77th St., art show to benefit shelter animals. 10-5 Saturday and 10-4 on Sunday, free admission. 772-388-3331. Nov 30: Camp Holly Airboat Ride Eco-tour, 11 am-12 pm. Optional lunch. $25-$30, reservations required. Harbor Branch, 5600 US1 North, Ft. Pierce. 772-242-2293, hboi.fau.edu Dec 3: 5th Annual Art Trail, tour of 10 artists’ studios/homes around Vero, $25, tickets at Vero Beach Art Club office, 772-231-0303 or Artist Guild Gallery, 772-299-1234. www. VeroBeachArtClub.org. To submit your calendar listing please email: verobeachnewsweekly@gmail.com

SATURDAY, NOV. 12

SUNDAY, NOV. 13

MONDAY, NOV. 14

TUESDAY, NOV. 15

WEDNESDAY, NOV. 16

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Winds: ESE 10 mph Chance of Rain 20%

Winds: SE 11 mph Chance of Rain 10%


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BY CHRISTINA TASCON VERO BEACH NEWSWEEKLY

• Performances are held on Saturdays at 4 p.m. and 7 p.m. Single tickets for $65 each go on sale December 1, 2011

Arianna Huffington

Joe Scarborough on ys eT ss ra eG D l ei N s an Mark Shield rmer Florida Congressmst il DeGrasse Tyson’s Fo

-ho nist Astrophysicist Neearch includes star Joe Scarborough is co Joe tionally known colum ng res Na l rni na Mo sio C’s fes an NB is pro n MS of gto rk Arianna Huffin and commentator Ma The formation, exploding stars, dwarf g author which The New Yorker e of our international best-sellin ields is referred to, by Sh r-in laxies, and the structurPresident ito ga ed d scribes as “appallingly an de r the de as un l, -fo rna co and the d Wall Street Jou analyst Milky Way. Appointed by ate dic tertaining.” It features syn en lly na tio na chief of the “wittiest political NASA, he served on d an sh tly Bu en erviews with top rec int st, r Po n The Huffingto und.” He is a regula , commissions studying the future aro llar do n kers and politicians llio ma mi purchased in a multi- one of the panelist on Inside Washington of the Aerospace Industry and its newsin-depth analysis of the with deal by AOL. Known as“n in media,” seen on both ABC and PBS. new space vision. day’s biggest stories. most influential womeblic radio’s ' 2 * ! ) 1 # # $ ' $ + 1 2 2 ) pu sts she also co-ho Left, Right and Center.

Bob Woodward

Bob Woodward is the associate editor of The s Washington Post and ha authored or co-authored nal eleven nonfiction nationearly n bestsellers. He has wo lism Handicapped seating available at every American Journalitzer 7 p.m. performances only. award and several Pu for his All seats offer unrestricted views. Prizes. He is well-known To see our seating chart and for more information coverage of Watergate.

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1590 27th Avenue, Vero Beach, FL 32960

• For reservations visit www.TheEmersonCenter.org or call the Emerson Center box office

(On the SE corner of 16th Street & 27th Avenue at the Unitarian Universalist Fellowship of Vero Beach)

(772) 778-5249

on our exciting Celebrated Speakers Series, visit www.TheEmersonCenter.org.

Reserve Now for the Best Seats at the Best Time!

N E W S W E E K L Y

February 4, 2012

March 10, 2012

Series Ticket Buyers Have The Following Options: The First Four Speakers for $220 or The Entire Series of Five for $275

B E A C H

January 14, 2012

February 25, 2012

March 31, 2012

V E R O

Sponsored by

Without a Doubt... Our Most Exciting Year to Date!

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CONTINUES ON PAGE 22

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PHOTOS BY CHRISTINA TASCON

Carlton Watson, D.L. Watson, Gaby Olivares, Betty Wolk and Edgardo Abello at Gallery 14

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Downtown’s Dine & Design art stroll packed galleries and businesses with the highlight a drawing for six magnificent soup tureens at Tiger Lily Studio as part of a Samaritan Center fundraiser. Co-chairs Shotsie LaJoie and Heather Dean were both pleased with the turnout for the raffle with the proceeds helping support the Samaritan Center. There were many other such events around the county in which soup and artisan crafted bowls were sold. Samaritan Center’s Executive Director, Tracie Segal said, “In past years, the event brought in an aver-

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Record crowds at gallery stroll featuring Samaritan Center drawing


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GALLERY STROLL

Shelley Adelle, Cory Howell and Louise Zimmerman at Tiger Lily

age of $40,000 for us and we hope to match or exceed that this year.” Heather Dean estimated over 400 volunteers were involved in the Samaritan Center Soup Bowl fundraiser. Lajoie said “Soup Bowl began 19 years ago when a group of people got together and chose to have a luncheon at home rather than to go out. The idea was to donate the money which they would have spent, to Samaritan House. “It grew to church groups, businesses and hundreds of private par-

ties throughout the month,” said LaJoie. “Three years ago Renee Donars who is on our board suggested we add the soup tureens in a culminating raffle and it has been very successful.” The artists are handpicked, by invitation only and are well known in the community. This year’s tureens were crafted by Lisa Lugo, Sean Clinton, Eric Olson, Richard Ramirez, Walford Campbell and Ramayana Baba. Susan Boyd was “totally thrilled” to win her choice by Sean Clinton. She said Clinton was a friend so she was excited to take her bowl home. “I actually watched Sean’s bowl in

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FROM PAGE 21

Barbara Landry, Melissa Mittag and Paul Landry

Co Chair and one of the founders of Samaritan Soup Bowl Shotsi LaJoie and Executive Director Tracie Segal

Glenda Taylor, Chris Adams John, Paul Genko and Carol Rodgers at Tiger Lilly wait for tureens to be raffled


ARTS|ENTERTAINMENT

23 ! N O V E M B E R 1 0 , 2 0 1 1 ! V E R O B E A C H

Soup Tureens by Lisa Lugo, Sean Clinton, Walford Campbell, Richard Ramirez, Eric Olson and Ramayana Baba

Artist Lisa Lugo pulls out a raffle ticket for her soup tureen as Shotsi LaJoie assists

N E W S W E E K L Y

different stages of production as it was being made. It is so magnificent and I put all twelve of my tickets in to win but never dreamed I would.” Although the Soup Bowl drawing was one of the biggest events on the Art Stroll this month, all the galleries were packed with shoppers and art lovers. Scott Kelly’s Gallery of Hope held a charity event called “Food for Thought” which was going to support Sarah’s Kitchen. Sarah’s Kitchen is a sit down community kitchen run by Bob Carey where Kelly volunteers. Flametree Clay Gallery was beginning the holidays early with a show called “Deck the Halls” which featured small, hanging art pieces, and MSVB Studios, the Artist Guild Gallery, Darby’s Fine Art, Tropic Art & Frame, Lighthouse Frame & Gallery and Gallery 14 were equally filled with patrons all through the night.


ARTS|ENTERTAINMENT

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Murder, intrigue and humor in ‘Going Baroque’

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FOR VERO BEACH NEWSWEEKLY

STAFF PHOTOS

Students, faculty and friends of the Vero Beach Charter High School gathered last Wednesday, Thursday and Friday evenings under a large tent which turned the school’s courtyard into a temporary dinner theatre. There the students from the VBCHS School of Visual and Performing Arts put on an original production of “Going Baroque,” a play set in 17th century Europe and written by VBCHS sophomore Annalise Miller. Though not exactly a comedy, Miller’s play is a murder mystery, full of intrigue and humor. The production featured song and dance, orchestra music, and several choral pieces. More than 100 students helped in the production of “Going Baroque,” including set designers, musicians, singers, dancers and actors. The students also designed, planned and served the meal to guests seated at tables sponsored by a dozen local businesses. VBCHS announced it has commissioned sculptor, James Liccione, to create the “Wall of the Wolf Pack,” which will honor the school’s donors. Having received an initial pledge of $400,000, officials also announced they are raising money to build or acquire their own venue for performing arts.


ARTS | ENTERTAINMENT

VERO BEACH THEATRE GUILD 772-562-8300 2020 San Juan Ave verobeachtheatreguild.com Nov 10 - 27: The 1940’s Radio Hour, $20$22, Walton Jones 1940’s play about a radio broadcast.

SPONSORED BY '2*!

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1590 27th Avenue, Vero Beach (772)778-5249 www.TheEmersonCenter.org

ent styles actually blend well together. The third part of the series cuts across all of Jazz and adds in guitar and a guest singer. It will be held on Sunday, March 11, 2012 as “Blues, Boogie, Be-Bop and Beyond.” All shows begin at 2:30 p.m. and advance tickets of $20 may be purchased online at www.TheEmersonCenter.org, or by calling the box office at 772-778-5249. Tickets at the door are an additional $5. Students 18 years of age and under are admitted free. The shows are sponsored by CenterState Bank. The Emerson Center, at the Unitarian Universalist Fellowship of Vero Beach, is located at 1590 27th Avenue, on the SE corner of 16th Street and 27th Avenue and has more than 300 parking spaces. The auditorium seats over 800 people in comfortable padded seating with a raised stage offering unrestricted views along with state-ofthe-art sound and lighting systems.

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SPACE COAST SYMPHONY Trinity Episcopal Church

VERO BEACH OPERA GUILD 772-569-6993 Box Office: 772-564-5537 verobeachopera.org Nov 19: Live at the Met: Phillip Glass’s, Satyagraha, noon, Majestic Theatre, 772-770-0774

VERO BEACH -- The Emerson Center will host the first of its three themed Jazz on Sunday musical events on Nov. 20 featuring ‘An Afternoon with Basie, Ellington, & Friends.’ Music will be performed by the Space Coast Jazz Orchestra, which is associated with the Space Coast Symphony Orchestra. This series will be the inaugural appearance for the Jazz Orchestra and will include 18 seasoned Jazz musicians handpicked from the Central Florida area. The first concert, which starts at 2:30 p.m., is traditional big band, showcasing the styles of music by jazz artists who were the backbone of some of the musical heritage in America and Europe. The second event will be “A Stan Kenton Merry Christmas & Duke Ellington’s Nutcracker” on Sunday Dec. 18. The concert combines Stan Kenton Christmas music in the same program with the Duke Ellington’s Nutcracker. The completely differ-

B E A C H

RIVERSIDE THEATER 3250 Riverside Park Drive 772-231-6990 riversidetheatre.com Children’s Theatre: Nov 12-13: “I Didn’t Know That” Musical Review, 1:30 pm, $8 Dec 9 - 18: Nutcracker In Swingtime!, $12-$18   Stark Main Stage:   Oct 27 - Nov 13: Boeing-Boeing, 2 pm, 7:30 pm and 8 pm, $57-$73 Second Stage: Dec 9-10: Comedy Zone, Mike Siscoe and Derrick Tennant, 7:30 & 9:30 pm, $15

VERO BEACH CHORAL SOCIETY Trinity Episcopal Church 2365 Pine Avenue 772-569-8165 Dec 9 & Dec 11: Winter 2011 Concert, “Tidings of Joy: Sounds of the Season,” at Dec 9 at 7:30 pm and Dec 11 at 3 pm

Emerson Center will again host Jazz on Sundays

V E R O

OCEANSIDE BUSINESS ASSOCIATION Beach Concert Series Ocean Drive in front of Humiston Park VeroBeachOBA.com Second Saturday of every month Free concert, 6:30-9:30 pm, food & drink vendors. No coolers allowed, bring your own chair or blanket.

TREASURE COAST SYMPHONY Emerson Center at the Unitarian Universalist Fellowship 1590 27th Avenue 772-778-5249 TheEmersonCenter.org Nov 13: Featured solo by cellist Aziz Sapaev, 3 pm, $15-$20.

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Community Church 1901 23rd Street 772-469-2317 irsavero.org Nov 20: Brevard Symphony Orchestra, 7:30 pm $50 each, season tickets $260-$290

TREASURE COAST CHORALE First Baptist Church 2206 16th Avenue 772-567-4341 Nov 13: “Here Comes the Bride” wedding music, 7 pm, free with offering taken

ally-renowned Cuban drummer and percussionist Daniel de los Reyes, (Sting, Sheryl Crow, Jennifer Lopez, Shakira). Benise won an Emmy Benise with his 2006 production “Nights of Fire,” which aired on public broadcasting stations throughout the country. For more information call the Sunrise Box office at (772) 461-4775.

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INDIAN RIVER SYMPHONIC ASSOCIATION

SUNRISE THEATRE 116 South 2nd Street Fort Pierce 772-461-4775 sunrisetheatre.com Nov 12:  L.A. Hardy, Comedy Corner, 8:30 pm, $15 Nov 13: Benise, The Spanish Guitar, 7 pm, $39/$45 Nov 18: The Fab Four, The Ultimate Tribute, 8 pm, $39/$45 Nov 19: Michelle Shocked, 8 pm, $20 advance, $25 at door

FORT PIERCE -- American recording star Benise will make a return to the Sunrise Theatre on Nov. 13 with his acclaimed production of “The Spanish Guitar.” Benise grew up in Nebraska with dreams of becoming a Rock star. He switched to classical guitar after hearing Flamenco music on the radio. His latest show features a full cast and explores Spanish Flamenco, Cuban Salsa, Brazilian Samba, Argentine Tango, Indian Bollywood, Parisian Waltz, and African drumming, among other genres. The band is made up of such worldclass musicians as Karen Briggs (who has played with Yanni) and internation-

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EMERSON CENTER at the Unitarian Universalist Fellowship 1590 27th Avenue 772-778-5249 TheEmersonCenter.org Nov 11: Corinna Sowers Adler, “Songs from the Heart,” 8 pm, $15.   Nov 20:  “An Afternoon with Basie, Ellington, & Friends,” Jazz on Sundays, Space Coast Symphony, $20-$25/Students, Free.  2:30 pm Dec 8: “The Ashley Gang,” Florida Humanities Series, 7 pm, Free.

2365 Pine Avenue 321-536-8580 SpaceCoastSymphony.org Nov 11 & 12: “Out of This World” 7 pm, $20-$25, free for students under 18

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COMMUNITY CONCERT SERIES

Community Church 1901 23rd Street 772-469-2317 communityconcertseries.org Nov 18: Atlantic Ringers, 7:30 pm, free with suggested $5-$15 donation

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Flamenco guitarist Benise Entertainment Calendar returns to Sunrise Theatre

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Osceola Bistro, fine dining at its freshest

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BY MARK JOSEPH

Arriving at the newly opened Osceola Bistro in downtown Vero Beach, we discovered there were no tables available, which we took as a good sign the restaurant was already booked for the evening. We were offered seating at a small table in a cozy area of the bar with a nice view of the lovely garden patio that has made this location so popular in the past. The former Greenhouse Cafe has been transformed into a European bistro, inspired by a French cafe from the travels of the Chef-owner, Christopher Bireley, who is also a Vero Beach native. Just above the front door of the main dining room hangs a bicycle with basket; evocative of those seen at the open air markets of the French countryside. We were told the bicycle is a fond memory of Chef Bireley’s French culinary tour of duty. This simple but quaint adornment demonstrates the Chef ’s attention to detail in bringing a touch of France to downtown Vero Beach. Open just a few weeks, Osceola Bistro’s simple but elegant setting and glorious garden patio largely resemble the previous establishment. With that welcoming backdrop in place, Chef Bireley focuses his attention on creating a menu consisting of the freshest ingredients, including locally grown vegetables and freshly caught seafood. Once seated, a friendly and attentive waiter arrived for our drink order. Our choice was a Jester Cabernet; a very smooth wine and, priced at $30, it was a very good value. The

server’s detailed description of ingredients of the soups that were offered made our selections much easier. A short wait for bread was worthwhile upon the arrival of a heaping basket of several crusty selections. Before ordering soups, we decided to share three appetizers: Dirty Oysters, Mushrooms with Grits and the House Salad. All were delicious in their own right. It was nice to taste grits prepared in the traditional southern style and highlighted with flavorful sautéed fresh mushrooms. The Dirty Oysters appetizer was imaginative; it came delicately fried in a light batter then topped with bits of black caviar and garnished with crunchy shoe-string potatoes. The oysters were tender and tasty and the caviar was a nice unexpected touch. Osceola Bistro’s simple House Salad ordered that evening tasted as if the greens were harvested fresh from a private garden that same morning and when the dining manager stopped by to check on us, he confirmed the tender greens were, in fact, from a local grower. To compliment our appetizers, we chose the two featured soups for the evening: a Vegetarian Parmesan Soup and a Redfish Chowder. The Parmesan Soup was a light, clear, lightly-seasoned broth with vegetables. The Redfish Chowder was thick and included small chunks of delicate fish, and, like the Parmesan Soup, was very light in seasonings. A generous offering of freshly ground pepper helped to bring out the subtle flavors of both the soup and chowder. Our entree selections included Crispy Skin-On Salmon, Mangrove Snapper and Ahi Tuna. The Snapper was expertly prepared in a light mango sauce and included fresh slices of sautéed mango, thin, julienne slices of red pepper and onion and all served on a bed of white rice.

The Ahi Tuna was sushi quality and included a generous portion that was perfectly cooked. The Crispy SkinOn Salmon was also prepared as ordered and was accompanied by a side of tasty black lentils and tender asparagus spears. All three dishes arrived beautifully presented and carefully arranged. Osceola Bistro’s commitment to use only the freshest ingredients held true this evening. Three of us ordered three different fish selections and all tasted as if the catch had been hauled right off the boats that afternoon. Dessert selections included a rich and incredibly light carrot cake with raisins and airy flour-less chocolate cake. Both were delicious and wonderfully decadent, rounding off a very enjoyable meal. Osceola Bistro’s menu is still being developed as it has only been open a few weeks. The dining room manager explained they are still working on

fine tuning the menu and soon hope to be offering nightly specials. We’re anxious to see the how this wonderful garden bistro continues to evolve and we look forward to dining at this beautiful restaurant again. Perhaps next time we’ll call ahead for reservations. Dinner for three before tip: $130 Wine Selection: $30

OSCEOLA BISTRO Restaurant with full bar and wine 2045 13th Avenue, Downtown Vero Beach FL 32960 Ph: 772-569-1299 Hours: Monday through Saturday, 5:30-9:30 Reservations suggested especially on weekends


Simple, Savory, Seaside

Thanksgiving by the Sea

Adults $29.95 Children $12.95 Under 3 years Free

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BY LISA RYMER VERO BEACH NEWSWEEKLY

VERO BEACH -- Since her arrival on the Vero Beach scene, Carolyn Redfield has weathered many storms, from hurricanes to hemlines. Now, the New York transplant who owns Pineapples, a woman’s apparel store on Ocean Drive directly across from the famed Costa d’Este Resort, is ready for the tides to turn on this economy. Nestled between a wide assortment of upscale boutiques and what-notshops, Pineapples has been around since 1999. Before that, Redfield owned a Christmas store on the beach and Charlotte’s Web, another woman’s clothing store in the early 90s.

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No matter what the economy, Redfield says, people want “quality and value for the dollar. Something that looks good, holds up and will remain in style for a long time.” She says she has never wavered in her lifelong belief in “giving people what they want.” As a buyer for Jones of New York and Christian Dior, Redfield learned to choose clothes based on what her customers – the woman of the world – would wear, not what the fashion trends dictated on the runway. Redfield carries a range of casual and dressy attire, but two designers CONTINUES ON PAGE 28

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3244 Ocean Drive | Vero Beach | 32963 772.410.0100 | costadeste.com Facebook.com/costadestebeachresort

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Featuring seasonal favorites, and fresh local produce, with a dash of creative coastal flair!

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Brunch Buffet 10:30 am - 2:30 pm

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in particular seem to reel in a loyal customer base, as well as first-time visitors to town. If you like designer Josef Ribkoff, he of celebrated lady lumps and understated whimsy, Pineapples carries a large selection of his seasonal collection. A slinky brown velour top, its asymmetrical collar just left of center, seems like a perfect fit for wintry nights. And for the active lady who’s not afraid to show some leg, Jude Connally dresses, which fall just above the knee, are a favorite for fabric, design, and ease of care. Made from the same materials as some athletic gear, Jude Connally’s dresses make you feel as good as you look. The moisture wicking ability of the fabric makes these tunics, tops and sundresses a favorite for all occasions in Florida. Brightly colored and modestly cut, the dresses are machine washable, wrinkle resistant and travel beautifully. Redfield says that Vero Beach women have divergent considerations for fashion. Casual and colorful may be appropriate for Florida, but does it blend in when traveling to Chicago? Pineapples carries something for everyone.

PINEAPPLES 3241 Ocean Drive, Vero Beach 231-1511

The fall and winter collection by Jude Connally

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Sports

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Connery races to F2000 series Rookie of the Year

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BY MICHAEL BIELECKI FOR VERO BEACH NEWSWEEKLY

VERO BEACH -- From the days when his dad let him sit in is race car when he was a baby, to his days racing dirt ovals, there was never a question Vero Beach’s Kyle Connery would be a racer. “My love for racing came before I could even walk,” said the 20-yearold Connery. “My father, who used to let me sit in his Super-Vee when I was little, has been the driving force behind this whole team. He is the leader of our team, and not just from a financial standpoint. He has always found a way to sacrifice enough so that we can go racing.” Connery raced on local dirt oval tracks for several years before racing ICC Supercart. It was in that series that he earned the 2008 state championship, rookie of the year, while at the same

time winning over half his races. By 2010 he needed to advance again, ultimately deciding to go after the F2000 Championship Series -- the first step of the Mazda Road to Indy ladder. The cost of outfitting a team and buying a car for the series hovers around $100,000 “It was more of a dream than anything,” Connery confessed. “We purchased our car, a Van Deimen from ZSports Midwest. From there we tried to get with certain engineering teams and things fell through. We contacted James Lee out of Miami, who had actually raced against my dad in the 80’s in Formula Ford. They had an enormous amount of respect for each other, and I for him.” Respect was paramount in Connery’s decision to hire Lee as the CC Motorsports race engineer, as every race in a high-powered, open wheel car could potentially be his last. Connery and

Connery plans to race another year in the F2000 series, but his ultimate goal is the IndyCar series.

Lee proved to be a potent team, with Connery winning his first two races at Road Atlanta. In his first year racing professionally, he won more races (six) than any driver on his circuit, placed third in points, and was named F2000 series Rookie of the Year. Connery also won four poles on the

year, something he says should be important to every race car driver. “A race car driver should never be happy with second, and if they are they should hang up their helmet,” Connery said. “I’m very competitive in the F2000 series. Unless we are up front

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CONTINUES ON PAGE 30

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PHOTOS SUPPLIED

Kyle Connery collected six victories in his first year on the F2000 circuit.


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Sponsors keep the ball rolling for Soccer Association BY MICHAEL BIELECKI FOR VERO BEACH NEWSWEEKLY

INDIAN RIVER COUNTY - Built on 25 years of hard work by past presidents like Charlie Garrett and Alan Campbell, the Indian River Soccer Association has put together one of the premier soccer venues in the area. To be sure, the soccer fields did not build themselves. Complete with stadium quality lights for night play, the Indian River Soccer Association spent $500,000 constructing the fields at Hobart Park and spends another $60,000 annually on upkeep. Further, the organization has full-time staff in Director of Coaching Ian Bryce, who played soccer professionally in Europe before coming to the United States to coach. The Indian River Soccer Association is not a county-subsidized athletic program, so other than player fees -- coming from over 400 players per semester -- where does the money come from? Sponsors like Dyer Auto Group and Gould, Cooksey and Fennell help the Indian River Soccer Association provide top-notch instruction to soccer players through sponsoring clinics, help to some families for the cost to play and even with the construction of the fields themselves. “Gould, Cooksey, and Fennell’s history with IRSA started back in the

CONNERY FROM PAGE 29

winning, I always see the situation as something I need to improve on.” All season long, Connery was able to compete at a very high level on tracks he had never driven on -- in real life. By using the iRacing.com simulator, Connery was able to simulate -- as do thousands or gamers each day -- racing at Road Atlanta, Watkins Glen, and Mosport Raceway. “It was a daunting challenge for us as a team because we didn’t have a bunch of track time,” Connery said. “In the F2000 series you have to roll off the trailer and be fast. I-racing is the

PHOTO BY MIKE BIELECKI

Sponsors have helped to make Hobart Field one of the best soccer facilities in the area. ‘90’s with Eugene O’Neill when his kids went with the system,” said Dick Aldrich, one of IRSA’s longtime volunteers. “When David Carter and Todd Fennell joined the firm, they identified that within the county, most of the sports organizations are run by volunteers who provide the marketing and wherewithal to get it done.” “I have a special place in my heart for youth sports,” said Fennell.  “IRSA is one of the biggest programs in Indian River County. All three of my

kids played in it, and I still have two playing on excellent competition soccer teams. I think sports make a great positive difference in many young peoples’ development.” Around Vero Beach, Fennell is known for his heroics at the Citrus Bowl some three decades ago, when he and teammate David Carter were key players on Vero Beach High School’s 1981 state championship football team. Today, the former teammates partner up outside of

simulator I use to test these tracks. The physics of the simulator are tremendous, and it has helped me get ready for these very difficult tracks.” Sim Sport, a Boca Raton-based company which produces real race car components, makes the iRacing experience as detailed and authentic as possible. Compared to the expenses of fuel, tires, track time, travel, and everything else that goes along with what it takes to practice on a live race track, Connery can practice in a virtual setting for pennies on the dollar. Connery will return to the F2000 series next season with his sights set on the championship, and will make a run

at racing on the Firestone Indy Lights Series after that. He knows very well of the money it takes to compete on the next level, which is the level before the Izod IndyCar Series -- the pinnacle of open wheel racing. “We’ve been approached by a few Indy Lights teams about our plans for next year,” Connery said. “We can’t race at that level without a tremendous amount of support from corporations and businesses. Hopefully, sponsors will see that racing in the Firestone Indy Lights Series will come with a tremendous amount of exposure, being that we race on the same weekend as the IndyCar Series.”

work for youth sports. “Todd has been passionate about IRSA in particular,” Carter said. “We made it a point to support as many youth athletic causes as possible. (Sports) made such a difference in our own lives and in our own kids. We feel it is a very good way to contribute in terms of a philanthropic focus.” When the Indian River Soccer Association was building the fields at Hobart Park, there was a big push to elevate the status of soccer in the county. Fennell liked their plans and decided to help with the costs of building out the soccer fields. “It was a multi-leveled approach, where they wanted to make (Hobart Park) a real venue,” Fennell said. “Vero would make money on it from restaurants and hotels.” The law firm has no plans to cut back on its commitment to youth sports. “We are continuing the club sponsorship of two competitive teams, and we pledged for a multi-year commitment,” Fennell said. “It is personal passion for me, seeing kids succeed in sports. It makes a difference for them going on to college and later on, getting a job—I believe in it strongly.” Dyer Auto Group feels much the same way about youth sports in Indian River County, as they awarded the Indian River Soccer Association with the Dyer Difference Award this past February along with a check for $3,000. “From my involvement with IRSA, they do a really good job,” said Tatiana Dyer, who with husband Will, owns Dyer Auto Group.   “For the size of our county, it is a very vibrant group and organization.”   Dyer also promoted the Indian River Soccer Association to Chevrolet and helped to draw one of the company-sponsored soccer clinics to Hobart Park that helped over 200 soccer players. In fact, the Sept. 24 clinic in Vero Beach drew more soccer players than the same clinic did in West Palm Beach, which speaks to the area’s interest in and support of soccer.


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Cory Christiano (top) and Jason Berchtold (bottom) provide some offense for Edward Murphy M.D. Surgery in their win against Precision Cuts Services in Menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Recreation League Softball action.

PHOTOS BY MIKE BIELECKI

The Ace Plumbing Patriots faced the Norris and Company Real Estate Vikings in Recreation League football this week.


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Obituaries John M. Winters John M. Winters, 89, died Oct. 27, 2011, at his home. He was born in Quincy, Ill., and lived in Vero Beach for 25 years, coming from his birthplace. A veteran, he served in the Army in the United States and European Theater, attaining the rank of captain. After the war, he joined his father and twin brother in the family firm, J.M. Winters and Son, a general insurance agency, retiring in 1985 as president. In 1988, he and his wife, along with nine others, founded St. Mark’s Anglican Church in Vero Beach, where he was a member. Survivors include his wife of 60 years, Jane S. Winters of Vero Beach. Memorial contributions may be made to St. Mark’s Anglican Church, P.O. Box 6994, Vero Beach, FL 329616994. A guestbook is available at www.strunkfuneralhome.com.

Kenneth George Beittenmiller Kenneth George Beittenmiller, 87, died Oct. 31, 2011, at the Indian River Medical Center, Vero Beach. He was born in Philadelphia and lived in Vero Beach for 20 years, coming from Tampa. He owned taverns in Pennsylvania for more than 30 years. He served in the Navy during World War II, where he received a Purple Heart. He was a member of the Veterans of Foreign Wars and the American Legion. Survivors include his wife of 65 years, Marie; daughters, Janis Mattos and Lynne Wise; son, Kenneth Beittenmiller; four grandchildren; and three great-grandchildren. A guestbook is available at www.coxgiffordseawinds.com.

Bernice Blackburn Bernice Blackburn, 92, died Oct. 27, 2011, at VNA Hospice House in Vero Beach. She was born in Chester, Pa., and lived in Vero Beach for 30 years, coming from Hialeah. She was an Avon representative for 25 years. Survivors include her daughters,

Star Blackburn of Vero Beach and Roye Auld of Deltona; seven grandchildren; 13 great-grandchildren; and four great-great grandchildren. Memorial contributions may be made to VNA Hospice House, 901 37th St., Vero Beach, FL 32960.

Betty L. Campbell Betty L. Campbell, 79, died Oct. 29, 2011, at Palm Garden of Vero Beach. She was born in Summerfield and lived in Vero Beach since 1955, coming from Weirsdale. She worked for Indian River Federal in Vero Beach before serving as secretary at Vero Fruit Co. She was of the Baptist faith. Survivors include her husband of 62 years, Daniel A. Campbell of Vero Beach; son, Kenneth D. Campbell of Vero Beach; daughter, Karla Hall of Sebastian; sisters, Edwina Bazemore of Pensacola and Linda Darley of Silver Springs; six grandchildren; and eight great-grandchildren. Memorial contributions may be sent to the VNA/Hospice Foundation, 1110 35th Lane, Vero Beach, FL 32960. A guestbook is available at www.coxgiffordseawinds.com.

Virginia M. Colleary Virginia M. Colleary, 85, died Oct. 31, 2011, at Palm Garden of Vero Beach. She was born in Wallington, N.J., and lived in Vero Beach since 1979, coming from Indianapolis. She was a laboratory supervisor in the Harkness Pavilion in Columbia Presbyterian Medical Center in New York City. She was a member of the Holy Cross Catholic Church. Survivors include her son, William III of Thornton, Colo.; sister, Gladys Baldwin of Vero Beach; and brother, Russell Vanacek of Stratton Mountain, Vt. A guestbook is available at www.coxgiffordseawinds.com.

Edith Milita “Dee Dee” Durant Edith Milita “Dee Dee” Durant, 78, died Oct. 31, 2011, at VNA Hospice House, Vero Beach. She was born in Berlin, Germany, and lived in Vero

Beach for four years, coming from Huntsville, Ala. Survivors include her husband, Henry John Durant of Vero Beach; sons, Stephen Leda of Seattle, Wash., and Michiel Leda of Bradenton; daughter, Darlene Campbell of Huntsville, Ala.; stepson, Mark N. Durant of Centre, Ala.; stepdaughter, Tonya D. Areans of Tampa; and four grandchildren. Memorial contributions may be made to Visiting Nurse Association & Hospice Foundation, 1110 35th Lane, Vero Beach, FL 32960. A guestbook is available at www.strunkfuneralhome.com.

Deborah B. Ellison Deborah B. Ellison, 61, died Oct. 29, 2011, at VNA Hospice House in Vero Beach. She was born in Fort Wayne, Ind., and lived in Vero Beach for more than 40 years, coming from her birthplace. She was an accountant. She was a supporter of the Humane Society. She was a graduate of Survivors include her son, Christopher M. Ellison of Vero Beach; daughter, Robin M. Ellison of Longmont, Colo; and sister, Cathy Knowles of Sebastian. Memorial contributions may be made to the Visiting Nurse Association & Hospice Foundation, 1110 35th Lane, Vero Beach, FL 32960. Arrangements are by Strunk Funeral Home and Crematory of Vero Beach. A guestbook is available at www.strunkfuneralhome.com.

Marshall Holtz Jr. Marshall H. Holtz Jr., 85, died Oct. 30, 2011, at the Indian River Medical Center, Vero Beach. He was born in Hackensack, N.J., and lived in Vero Beach since 1999, coming from Fort Myers Beach. Before retirement, he was a real estate broker. He was a member of St. John of the Cross Catholic Church in Vero Beach. Survivors include his wife of 63 years, Mary Louise Holtz of Vero Beach; son, Thomas Holtz of Fort Myers; daughter, Susan Holtz of Waianae, Hawaii; one grandchild; and one greatgrandchild. A guestbook is available at www.coxgiffordseawinds.com.

Edward David Llerena Jr. Edward David Llerena Jr., 91, died Oct. 13, 2011. He was born in Rochester, N.Y., and lived in Vero Beach since 1981. He worked in the International Division of Eastman Kodak Co. for 40 years in Panama, South America and Washington, D.C. He worked on Vero Beach’s Planning and Zoning Board, Civic Association, Visiting Nurses Board and Taxpayers Association. He attended Christ Church, was a member of the Riomar Country Club and a past commodore of the Vero Beach Yacht Club. Survivors include his daughter, Nancy Kraft of Nashville, Tenn.; son, Richard Lee Llerena of Englewood; five grandchildren; and nine greatgrandchildren.

George A. Martin George A. Martin, Jr., 86, died Oct. 30, 2011, at Indian River Medical Center, Vero Beach. He was born in Evanston, Ill., and lived Vero Beach for 13 years, coming from Lake Forest, Ill. He was chairman of the Board of L.J. Sheridan & Co., a real estate management company in Chicago until he retired 1993. He was a parishioner of Holy Cross Catholic Church in Vero Beach and a member of Bent Pine Golf Club in Vero Beach. Survivors include his wife of 18 years, Ann O. Martin of Vero Beach; sons, George Martin of Gurnee Ill., and James Martin of Kent, Wash.; daughters, Irene Tiffany and Deborah Martin, both of Lake Bluff, Ill., Annette Moore of Lake Forest, Collette Gillies of Rockford, Ill.; and 14 grandchildren. Memorial contributions may be made to American Cancer Society , 3375 20th St., Vero Beach, FL 32960. A guestbook is available at www.strunkfuneralhome.com.

Annabelle d’Arche McCarthy Annabelle d’Arche McCarthy, 93, died Oct. 28, 2011, at Indian River Medical Center, Vero Beach. She was born in Hartford, Conn., and lived


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Patricia N. Savage, 74, died Oct. 29, 2011, at her summer home in DeRuyter Lake, N.Y. She was born in Norwood, N.Y., and lived in Vero Beach. She retired as an elementary school teacher in the Onondaga Central School District. Survivors include her husband, William of Vero Beach; daughter, Lauren Cutler of Grand River, N.Y., sons, Mark of Syracuse, N.Y., John of Orlando and Michael of Rowley, Mass.; brother, Leonard Anable of Salinas, Calif.; and five grandchildren. Memorial contributions may be made to the American Cancer Society , 6725 Lyons St., East Syracuse, N.Y. 13057.

Leo A. Laycock, 85, died Nov. 5, 2011. He was born in Ionia, Mich., and moved to Florida in 1952, coming from Michigan. He settled in Vero Beach in 1965. Prior to retirement, he worked as a forest ranger for more than 26 years, often portraying Smokey Bear. Survivors include his wife of 59 years, Norma Laycock; sons, Jerry Michael Laycock of Anchorage, Alaska, Larry Albert Laycock of Orange City, Carry Earl Laycock of Spartanburg, S.C., and Perry Leo Laycock of Tallahassee; daughters, Tresa Ann Laycock-Royals Fitzgerald, Ga., and Judy Lee Zeh of Vero Beach; 16 grandchildren; 31 great-grandchildren; and 2 great-great-grandchildren. Memorial contributions may be made to Cornerstone Christian Church’s Building Fund, 5950 12th St., Vero Beach, FL 32966. A guestbook is available at www.aycock-hillcrest.com.

Lois Elaine Petty Lois Elaine Petty, 84, died Oct. 29, 2011, at VNA Hospice House, Vero Beach. She was born in Detroit and moved to Vero Beach two months ago, coming from Greenacres. Survivors include her daughters, Christina A. Krauz of Grand Marais, Minn., and Deborah L. Wood of Vero Beach; son, Thomas E. Petty of Clinton, Mich.; five grandchildren; and 12

Patricia A. Rotunda Patricia A. Rotunda, 49, died Oct. 27, 2011, at Sebastian River Medical Center, Roseland. She was born in Vero Beach and lived in Sebastian for 20 years, coming from Vero Beach. She was a pastry chef and former owner of Quiznos subs in Vero Beach. Survivors include her life partner, Richard Cromer of Sebastian; three stepsons, Matthew Cromer, Ricky Cromer and Josh Hernandez, all of Sebastian; foster child, Anna Marie Gruszauskas; and two grandchildren. A guestbook is available at www. seawindsfh.com/obituaries.php.

Walter Schreiber Walter Schreiber, 68, died Nov. 2, 2011, at Sebastian River Medical Center, Roseland. He was born in Baldwin, N.Y., and lived in Fellsmere for nine years, coming from East Hampton, N.Y. Survivors include his wife of 20 years, Georgann Schreiber; daughters, Sandra Carbaugh of Southhampton, N.Y., and Melissa Schreiber and Summer Evans, both of Vero Beach; sons, Kevin Schreiber of Townville, S.C., Wayne Schreiber of New York, Jonathan Young of Ocala and Justin Young of Sebastian; 18 grandchildren; and one great-grandchild.

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Andrea George Billeci, 77, died Nov. 1, 2011, at home. He was born in New York City and lived in Vero Beach for nine years, coming from Punta Gorda. He was an Air Force veteran. He was a highly recognized glass artist. He was a designer and consultant for Steuben Glass, Mary McFadden Inc., and the Royal College of Art in Britain. He worked as a research consultant for the Corning Museum of Glass. His commission work included pieces for Penn Mutual Life and E.I. Dupont de Nemours.

Patricia Savage

Leo A. Laycock

Nona June Hess, 82, died Nov. 1, 2011, at VNA/Hospice House in Vero Beach. She was born in Norfolk, Va., and lived in Roseland for 20 years, coming from Nags Head, N.C. She was a nurse and worked as a visiting nurse. Survivors include her husband of eight years, Morris Jordan of Roseland; sons, Harvey K. Hess Jr. of Kitty Hawk, N.C., John R. Hess of North Carolina, Stephen F. Hess of the Philippines and Gary M. Hess of Sebastian; brothers, Vernon Neigenfind of California and Kenny Neigenfind of Virginia Beach, Va.; seven grandchildren; and two great-grandchildren. Services: A guestbook is available at www.seawindsfh.com/obituaries.php.

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Andrea Billeci

Scott Donald “Tiny” Lewis, 30, died Nov. 1, 2011. He was born in Nyack, N.Y., and lived in Vero Beach for one year, coming from South Florida. He was a plumber by trade and was tattoo artist and owner of “Tiny Bit of Ink” Tattoos. Survivors include his fiance, Ashley Michele Trimble of Vero Beach; parents, Robert and Donna Lewis of Vero Beach; sister, Ann Tate; brother, Robbie S. Lewis of Syracuse, N.Y.; maternal grandfather and maternal stepgrandmother, Donald and Patricia Hastings of Jefferson, Maine; and paternal grandparents, James and Myrtle Lewis of Harrodsburg, Ky. Arrangements are by Lowther Funeral Home in Vero Beach.

Nona Hess

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Kenneth R. Murphy, Jr., 52, died Oct. 30, 2011, at Indian River Medical Center. He was born in Keene, N.H., and moved to Vero Beach 37 years ago, coming from Tennessee. He worked 26 years with Kmart in Vero Beach. He volunteered with Toys for Tots during the holiday season. Survivors included his mother and stepfather, Sarah M. and Gordon Mills of Vero Beach; and sisters, Cindi Murphy, Sandy Daniels, Julie Greer and Susan Mills all of Vero Beach. Memorial contributions may be made to Toys for Tots, 760 Eighth Court No. 8, Vero Beach, FL 32962. A guestbook is available at www. lowtherfuneralhome.com.

Scott Lewis

great-grandchildren. A guestbook is available at www.lowtherfuneralhome.com.

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Kenneth R. Murphy Jr.

Mary Ligammari, 92, died Nov. 2, 2011, at Consulate of Vero Beach. She was born in Macon, Mo., and lived in Vero Beach for 34 years, coming from River Grove, Ill. Before retirement, she worked for TRW for 28 years in Chicago. Survivors include her daughter, Phyllis Marshall of West Palm Beach; stepdaughter, Carol Ryan of Lyons, Ill.; stepson, Sam Ligammari of Park Ridge, Ill.; four grandchildren; two stepgrandchildren; and numerous great-grandchildren. Memorial contributions may be made to the VNA Hospice at 901 37th St., Vero Beach, FL 32960. A guestbook is available at www.aycock-hillcrest.com.

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Salvatore A. Mirabito, 80, died Oct. 29, 2011, at his home. He was born in Brookyln, N.Y., and lived in Vero Beach for 11 years, coming from Deer Park, N.Y. Survivors include his wife of 56 years, Dorothy of Deer Park; son, Kevin Mirabito of Deer Park; and one grandchild. A guestbook is available at www.coxgiffordseawinds.com.

Mary Ligammari

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He was consulted for UNICEF in Afghanistan in 1993 and for the International Executive Service Corp. in Guatemala in 1988, Honduras in 1989 and Zimbabwe in 1996. He is extensively published and is represented in many prestigious international collections. Survivors include his wife of 55 years, Carol; sons, Andrew Billeci of Pauma Valley, Calif., and John Billeci of New York City; and brother, S. Daniel Billeci of Pleasant Valley, N.Y. Memorial contributions may be made to the VNA/Hospice Service, 1110 35th Lane, Vero Beach, FL 32960. A guestbook is available at www.coxgiffordseawinds.com.

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in Vero Beach for two years, coming from Fort Lauderdale. Survivors include her daughter, Lee Albro of Vero Beach; four grandchildren; and five great-grandchildren. Memorial contributions may be made to Humane Society of Broward County, 2070 Griffin Road, Fort Lauderdale, FL 33312. An online guestbook is available at www.strunkfuneralhome.com.


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Barrier Island Real Estate Sales – October 27-November 2

Address 246 Holly Rd. 1026 Flamevine Ln., #201 2135 Windward Way, #307 131 Park Shores Cr., #14E 1385 Winding Oaks Cr. W, #708

Address: Subdivision: List Date: List Price: Sell Date: Sell Price: Listing Broker: Listing Agent: Selling Broker: Selling Agent:

1986 Windward Way Moorings 06/13/2011 $950,000 11/01/2011 $929,000 The Moorings Realty Sales Co. Terri McConnell Dale Sorensen Real Estate Inc. Michelle Kantzler

Address: Subdivision: List Date: List Price: Sell Date: Sell Price: Listing Broker: Listing Agent: Selling Broker: Selling Agent:

1985 Windward Way Moorings 12/01/2010 $799,000 11/01/2011 $650,000 Dale Sorensen Real Estate Inc. Scott Reynolds Weichert (Hallmark) Realtors Lorry Gartner

Address: Subdivision: List Date: List Price: Sell Date: Sell Price: Listing Broker: Listing Agent: Selling Broker: Selling Agent:

1501 Club Dr. Indian Bay 09/01/2011 $500,000 10/28/2011 $500,000 Dale Sorensen Real Estate Inc. Karen Lloyd Dale Sorensen Real Estate Inc. Karen Lloyd

Address: Subdivision: List Date: List Price: Sell Date: Sell Price: Listing Broker: Listing Agent: Selling Broker: Selling Agent:

551 Shores Dr. Shores 01/09/2011 $575,000 10/28/2011 $492,000 Peters, Cook & Company RE Rita Curry Shamrock Real Estate Corp. Christine McLaughlin

Address: Subdivision: List Date: List Price: Sell Date: Sell Price: Listing Broker: Listing Agent: Selling Broker: Selling Agent:

9600 Maiden Ct. E Old Orchid 07/29/2011 $379,995 11/01/2011 $355,000 Re/Max Classic Kelly Fischer Dale Sorensen Real Estate Inc. Darrow Jackson

Address: Subdivision: List Date: List Price: Sell Date: Sell Price: Listing Broker: Listing Agent: Selling Broker: Selling Agent:

1635 Cherrystone Way Oyster Bay 08/30/2011 $375,000 11/01/2011 $347,500 Dale Sorensen Real Estate Inc. Elizabeth Sorensen Norris & Company Brenda Dwight

Subdivision Vero Beach Spindrift Condo Harbor Inn Park Shores SEA OAKS

List Date 10/11/2010 07/01/2011 08/14/2009 09/29/2011 07/20/2011

List Price $395,000 $350,000 $225,000 $159,000 149,900

Sell Date 10/27/2011 10/28/2011 11/01/2011 10/28/2011 10/31/2011

Sell Price $335,000 $300,000 $190,000 $150,000 124,000

Listing Broker/Agent Dale Sorensen Real Estate Inc./Joan Cook Dale Sorensen Real Estate Inc./Christine Hughes The Moorings Realty Sales Co./Erika Ross Dale Sorensen Real Estate Inc./Christine Hughes Dale Sorensen Real Estate Inc./Polly Miller

Selling Broker/Agent The Lafferty Group Real Estate/Victoria Boss Dale Sorensen Real Estate Inc./Tripp Hernandez The Moorings Realty Sales, Co./Judy Hargarten Dale Sorensen Real Estate Inc./Christine Hughes Treasure Coast Sotheby’s Intl. Realty/Fran Smyrk

Mainland Real Estate Sales – October 27-November 2

Address 580 Cross Creek Cr. 2065 Albany Terr. SW 3368 Westford Cr. SW 5136 St. Davids Dr.

Address: Subdivision: List Date: List Price: Sell Date: Sell Price: Listing Broker: Listing Agent: Selling Broker: Selling Agent:

22 Sailfish Rd. Vero Isles 03/16/2011 $925,000 11/01/2011 $875,000 Dale Sorensen Real Estate Inc. Sally Woods Dale Sorensen Real Estate Inc. Polly Miller

Address: Subdivision: List Date: List Price: Sell Date: Sell Price: Listing Broker: Listing Agent: Selling Broker: Selling Agent:

880 Carolina Cr. SW Indian River Club 09/10/2011 $475,000 10/31/2011 $450,000 Norris & Company Beth Livers Norris & Company Beth Livers

Address: Subdivision: List Date: List Price: Sell Date: Sell Price: Listing Broker: Listing Agent: Selling Broker: Selling Agent:

4875 Coventry Ct. Coventry Island 09/17/2010 $449,000 10/31/2011 $425,000 Treasure Coast Sotheby’s Intl. Realty Claudia Johnson Dale Sorensen Real Estate Inc. Sally Baskin

Address: Subdivision: List Date: List Price: Sell Date: Sell Price: Listing Broker: Listing Agent: Selling Broker: Selling Agent:

4460 6th Pl. SW Arbor Trace 04/01/2010 $399,000 10/28/2011 $335,000 RE/MAX Crown Realty Pat Burklew NMLS NMLS AGENT

Subdivision San Sebastian Spring Millstone Landing Millstone Landing Grand Harbor St Davids

List Date 09/19/2011 01/08/2011 01/18/2011 08/12/2011

List Price $247,000 $235,000 $259,000 $259,000

Sell Date 11/01/2011 11/02/2011 10/28/2011 11/01/2011

Sell Price $240,000 $235,000 $235,000 $225,000

Listing Broker/Agent Real Living All Florida Realty/Jim Goldsmith Real Living All Florida Realty/Jim Goldsmith Real Living All Florida Realty/Bob Lewis Alex MacWilliam, Inc./Stacey Clawson

Selling Broker/Agent Dale Sorensen Real Estate Inc./Chanda Mundy Real Living All Florida Realty/Jim Goldsmith NMLS/NMLS AGENT Vero Coastal Homes/Allan Grieve


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