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2F | Sunday, October 9, 2016 | The Topeka Capital-Journal


The Topeka Capital-Journal | Sunday, October 9, 2016 | 3F


4F | Sunday, October 9, 2016 | The Topeka Capital-Journal

Douglas County Senior Services looks to expand, remodel Agency also will change name in next few months By Phil Anderson

phil.anderson@cjonline.com

LAWRENCE — Douglas County Senior Services is many things to many people. For some, it’s transportation to the grocery store or doctor’s office. For others, it’s a warm, home-delivered meal. And for still others, it’s a place to socialize, play Scrabble or find support and information. Douglas County Senior Services — at 745 Vermont, a block west of Massachusetts Street in downtown Lawrence — is a not-for-profit organization that has been around for about 43 years. As its name would suggest, it serves all of Douglas County, including the towns of Baldwin City, Eudora and Lecompton, as well as points in between. The agency is funded through a variety of sources, including the city of Lawrence, city of Baldwin City and Douglas County. The rest is covered by donations and fees charged for some services. Marvel Williamson, executive director of Douglas County Senior Services, said the organization recently completed strategic planning that will result in some noticeable changes in the next few months. “We needed to freshen our image,” Williamson said. “We’ve realized that, so we’re going to go full force. “We will have a new mission, a new name, a new website, a new logo and

We will have a new mission, a new name, a new website, a new logo and new colors. We’re also going to be remodeling our building, which means we’ll have to move in order for that to happen. It will probably take up most of 2017.” Marvel Williamson

executive director of Douglas County Senior Services

new colors. We’re also going to be remodeling our building, which means we’ll have to move in order for that to happen. It will probably take up most of 2017.” The most significant change will

come with a new name for the organization — something that will be announced in November or December “at the latest,” Williamson said. For more than four decades, the center has established itself as a source for a wide range of services that cater to senior adults — changing and adapting to meet the needs as they arise. At present, a major focus is on helping seniors who have limited incomes and who also are limited in their ability to get around. “We provide services to seniors who are in the greatest need, not just financially but physically, as well, and that will continue,” Williamson said. The center’s transportation service, among its most used programs, is maxed out at present — offering more than 50 rides on average each day. The center has a f leet of a half-dozen cars and vans operating out of Lawrence and one van in Baldwin City. The transportation service asks $3 each way for seniors to go to a doctor’s office or grocery store or for other errands that need to be made. Williamson said many seniors in Douglas County depend on the center for transportation. Simply put, if not for the center and its reasonable transportation rates, some seniors might opt to miss doctor’s appointments because they couldn’t afford to get to them. “We’re at capacity,” Williamson said. “It’s definitely a growing need, because the population of seniors is growing. We wish we could do more, and maybe we will in the future.” The center provides 150 meals a day to homebound seniors, another vital service. It doesn’t duplicate the Meals on Wheels program in Lawrence, which

DOUGLAS COUNTY SENIOR SERVICES What: A not-for-profit organization that serves

older adults in Douglas County, including the towns of Baldwin City, Eudora and Lecompton Address: 745 Vermont, Lawrence Phone: (785) 842-0543; (877) 295-3277 Hours: 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday-Friday Website: www.dgcoseniorservices.org serves primarily people with disabilities, she said. “We also provide tax assistance and legal aid, and we help people get enrolled in Medicare,” she said. “It’s very complicated, and people may not even know the right questions to ask, so it’s a needed service.” The center offers an array of “fun things,” too — everything from activity classes to dances to a senior choir to math and Scrabble clubs. Caregiver support groups also are among the center’s offerings. However, under its new mission, the center will aim to expand its services to the broader senior community in Douglas County, becoming in essence a “one-stop” source for everyone in “the second-half of their life,” Williamson said. “The way we’re expanding, we want to do a better job of reaching the whole spectrum of seniors — not just those who are in the greatest need,” she said. “We want to become a clearinghouse for seniors as to what is out there for them in Douglas County.” Contact Phil Anderson at (785) 295-1195.


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6F | Sunday, October 9, 2016 | The Topeka Capital-Journal

Advisers share retirement investment, planning ideas Legal paperwork, 401(k) decisions need to be made By Michael Hooper

Special to The Capital-Journal

Brian Jacques, an attorney with the Sloan Law Firm since 2002, focuses on estate planning, tax planning, asset protection, probate, business and commercial law. Here are some of his thoughts on retirement Brian Jacques planning and living in a retirement community. How should I select a retirement community? I advise my older estate-planning clients to consider visiting multiple facilities, so that they have an idea of what options are out there. Accommodations can vary dramatically from place to place. When the need arises, there is often limited time to search for a retirement facility. It’s best to have an idea of what place best suits your lifestyle before a need arises. What legal paperwork should be completed? Many places require a health care and/ or financial power of attorney before moving into adult care facilities. It is important to have a contact person who can

make decisions on behalf of the resident in the event the resident is unable to do so. A living will deals with end-of-life decisions. Giving direction to your health care power of attorney can provide assurance that your wishes are being carried out. Having a will or a trust is important to direct the distribution of assets after your death. Is it possible to hire a fiduciary to manage my money and pay all my bills while I live in a nursing home? Yes. Selecting a fiduciary to be power of attorney or trustee to manage your assets is an important decision. Often, we see family members manage their loved one’s financial assets. Sometimes having a third party professionally manage those assets may be a good option. Consider hiring a local bank, independent trust company, brokerage firm or financial planner with institutional trust offices that can manage assets on behalf of clients. The fee for this service is typically 1 percent of assets under management, but may be more or less depending on the size of the account and the type of assets owned by the client. How do I get Medicaid to pay for my longterm care? Typically, an individual will have to exhaust much of his or her own resources in order to qualify for Medicaid. Married couples may be able to retain more assets for the noninstitutionalized spouse. The application process is fairly complicated, but legal counsel can assist you. Adult care facilities that accept Medicaid have social workers who can assist you in getting qualified. Many facilities require a certain period of time to be “private pay” in order to be admitted into a facility. •••

Ryan Gigous, a Topeka financial planner with Cordell Wealth Management, has about a decade of experience working in money management and financial planning. Here are some of his thoughts on Ryan Gigous retirement planning. What can I do now to make sure I have a successful retirement and not run out of money? There are several things to consider. First, one should manage their living expenses so as to not live beyond one’s needs, today and in the future. Second, do what you can to take care of your health. The costs associated with health care will continue to increase. Third, consider working until at least full retirement age, which is age 67 for someone born in 1961, to receive Social Security benefits. Retiring earlier may reduce a retirees’ Social Security payment for the rest of their lives. Keep in mind, delaying Social Security payments until age 70, will increase your benefits 8 percent annually. Fourth, invest as much as possible for as long as you can and diversify your investments according to your risk tolerance. It is very important to think long term, as your investments will provide for your needs for potentially another 20 years or longer after retirement. Finally, this world is complex. It is important to seek independent, professional advice from people who are qualified to

provide it and not trying to push a product. Should I pay off my house early? Depends. Paying 4-percent interest is near all-time lows for a mortgage. Compare this to the return one could expect from a long-term investment. For example, if one believes he could get 6 percent from an investment, it may make more sense to invest and not pay the mortgage off early. Are there certain investments a person can make before retirement that might help pay for living in a retirement home or nursing home? Should I consider buying nursing home insurance? Yes. Purchasing any product with longterm-care insurance (nursing home insurance) is an individual choice and should be carefully evaluated taking into consideration a variety of issues, including overall goals and objectives, one’s financial and health circumstances, and the details of the product being considered. Insurance companies offer hybrid products that are a combination of long-term-care insurance packaged with either life insurance or an annuity. The benefits of such a product provide the insured with life insurance or an investment if the long-term-care portion of the policy is not fully utilized. What should my portfolio of investments look like when I’m retired? What percentage should be in stocks? Bonds? Annuities? Cash? This is a unique decision for each person. Liquidity needs, cash flow, risk tolerance, goals and the objectives of the client must be taken into account in order to develop the proper plan. Of course, the plan will need to be flexible as circumstances change and, thus, need to be reviewed on a regular basis so as to meet the ongoing and everchanging needs of the individual. •••

Please see ADVISERS, Page 23F


The Topeka Capital-Journal | Sunday, October 9, 2016 | 7F

Support groups help caregivers cope with feelings, stress Respite services provide temporary relief By Jan Biles

jan.biles@cjonline.com

Being a caregiver for someone with physical and/or cognitive limitations can be an exhausting, round-the-clock responsibility. That’s why it’s important for caregivers to take steps to care for themselves, too. “It’s OK to ask for help,” said April Maddox, care management program manager at Jayhawk Area Agency on Aging Inc. Caregivers of older adults typically help with preparation of meals, bathing and dressing, grocery shopping, housecleaning, management of medications, arrangements April Maddox for services, transportation to doctor’s appointments and pay most of household bills.

Caregivers may become overwhelmed, especially if the loved one has cognitive issues or can no longer communicate effectively, said Tim Keogh, a social worker with the Program of All-Inclusive Care at Midland Care. “They take on the responsibility, but (the loved one) can’t communicate or give guidance,” Keogh said. “(It can lead to) frustration, stress and confusion.” Many times, caregivers also are balancing Tim Keogh a job and other family duties, creating additional physical and emotional stress. To help alleviate that stress, JAAA recommends caregivers: • Get sufficient sleep. • Eat a healthy diet. • Exercise and stay physically fit. • Schedule periodic health checkups. • Avoid abusing drugs or alcohol. • Socialize with friends and family. • Pursue their own interests. • Seek support from family, friends, professionals, religious advisers or peer

support groups. • Use appropriate in-home and community-based services, such as a respite care or adult day care program that watches over the older adult to give the caregiver a short period of relief. Keogh said it’s important for caregivers to be specific when asking for help. “Don’t expect people to read your mind about what you need,” he said. When caregiving becomes overwhelming, Maddox said, it might be helpful for the caregiver to talk to a professional counselor about their feelings or attend a support group where they can talk with other caregivers who are struggling with the same issues. As the loved one ages or grows sicker, the caregiver may no longer be able to provide adequately for their needs. Consequently, the loved one may need to move into an assisted living or skilled nursing facility. When that happens, the caregiver may experience a host of feelings. “The biggest emotion we see from the caregiver is guilt,” Maddox said. Many caregivers promise their loved ones they will take care of them in their homes, and then feel badly when they must break the promise. “They also go through a loss of their iden-

tity,” she said, explaining how the care facility will assume many of the responsibilities that had been done by the caregiver. “It’s hard for them to transition back to being the son or the daughter.” Keogh said caregivers also may have a sense of loneliness once their spouse or parent moves into a facility and may need to find activities to fill the void in their schedules. “It’s a lot like grief,” he said. “There’s a loss there. Be patient with yourself. You don’t have to rush and fill the void. Give yourselves time to adjust and be reassured they have done the best they could in the best interest of their loved one.” Again, participating in a support group or visiting with a counselor may help the caregiver cope with the changes they are facing. “(The groups) provide support to others … and acknowledge the feelings they have are OK,” Maddox said. “It helps put things in perspective.” Keogh agreed. “They are connecting with others who are going through a similar situation,” he said, explaining how that helps to “normalize” their feelings. “It’s reassuring for people to hear that.” Contact Jan Biles at (785) 295-1292.


8F | Sunday, October 9, 2016 | The Topeka Capital-Journal

Be proactive when considering senior living options Inform family members of decisions made By Celia Llopis-Jepsen

celia.llopisjepsen@cjonline.com

The line between independent living and assisted living isn’t hard and fast. A spectrum of services means individuals can search for the level of assistance that suits their needs and goals of living as independently as possible. The No. 1 tip that local experts in senior living offered in interviews on the topic was to plan ahead. Doing so can help one stay in one’s own home longer or retain more independence and control over housing and other decisions. “We often think, ‘This could never happen to me,’ and we always procrastinate,” said Jocelyn Lyons, executive director of the Jayhawk Area Agency on Aging. “You have to be proactive.” Being proactive can mean everything from downsizing one’s belongings sooner rather than later to exploring senior living options. The goal is to ensure such decisions aren’t made hastily later on, with little time for consideration and preparation. At the same time, it’s important to inform family members, such as one’s children, about these decisions and plans, Lyons said. Depending on where an individual lives in northeast Kansas, resources for remaining independent vary. Some areas have publicly funded and private for-pay transportation options, for example, and some have active networks of volunteers ready to assist those who no longer can drive. The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services also recommends planning ahead, for example by familiarizing oneself

THAD ALLTON/THE CAPITAL-JOURNAL

Access to transportation is one of the most important factors in staying independent when one grows older. A van takes residents of Atria Hearthstone on outings. with local transportation options before such services are needed. For individuals and families seeking answers to these and other questions, freeof-cost resources are available with the mission of providing information on local meal delivery, in-home services, transportation, home modification, legal planning and other needs. Services range from help with making one’s home more accessible or transitioning residences, to assistance with shopping, cooking, bathing and laundry. Just a few key northeast Kansas resources that are funded with public dollars, pri-

vate donations or a combination of the two include: • Jayhawk Area Agency on Aging, which can be reached at (785) 235-1367 or (800) 798-1366 and serves Shawnee, Jefferson and Douglas counties. Call with questions, schedule an appointment for in-person advice, or visit the organization’s website, jhawkaaa.org. The website includes county-by-county resource lists, including more than 20 in-home service providers for Shawnee County, for example. • North Central-Flint Hills Area Agency on Aging, which serves 18 north-central

Kansas counties and has offices in Manhattan, Salina and Emporia and resources for nutrition and in-home services, among other needs. This area agency on aging can be reached at (785) 776-9294. Its website is ncfhaaa.com. • Douglas County Senior Services can be reached at (785) 842-0543 or toll-free at (877) 295-3277 for those seeking local and rural transportation options, meal delivery and other assistance or referrals. Its website is dgcoseniorservices.org. • Riley County Seniors’ Service Center, (785) 537-4040 or seniorsservicecenter.org, offers meals and other services. Jami Ramsey, director at Riley County Seniors’ Service Center, notes that improving or prolonging one’s mobility and flexibility is a key part of staying independent. To that end, the Riley County center offers free strength training and other classes. Senior living complexes are another option for individuals seeking out such resources, whether they choose to live in independent living or assisted living apartments. In addition to dining and linen services, transportation and other daily chores or living needs that these facilities can help with, they sometimes connect residents with other groups and organizations. Atria Hearthstone, a senior living community in Topeka, can provide families with information on services to help with decluttering and downsizing. Community sales director Ed Roach says downsizing is often a key source of stress for seniors considering moving into apartments. “We try to make each step a little bit easier for them,” Roach said. Residents at Atria also have access to transportation to medical appointments, grocery stores and recreational destinations. Contact Celia Llopis-Jepsen at (785) 295-1285 or @Celia_LJ on Twitter.


The Topeka Capital-Journal | Sunday, October 9, 2016 | 9F

Visit assisted living facility before deciding to move in By Angela Deines

angela.deines@cjonline.com

The decision to move out of one’s home and into independent living or assisted living is one of the most difficult to make and typically is made after a series of events or observations, often by an adult child. Linda MowBray, director of the Kansas Center for Assisted Living, said adult children often see deficits with their parents when they come home for the holidays that aren’t as obvious when they’re just speaking on the phone. “The house isn’t kept quite as it used to be, or medications may be a little askew,” she said. “Lots of things will trigger that conversation of ‘Is it time to either get more help for mom or dad in their home?’ or ‘Is it time to move them to another setting where the care is coming to them?’” MowBray said assisted living fills the gap between the ability to stay at home and needing full-time, 24-hours-a-day nursing services at a nursing home. A physical impairment or a cognitive issue will determine what kind of facility is right for a parent or parents.

GETTING ANSWERS

Here are some questions to ask before signing a contract with an assisted living facility or skilled nursing home: When is a nurse on duty in the facility? Who pays for transportation for medical purposes? How much will it cost, including add-ons to the rent? Is there an extra cost for specially prepared meals or laundry services? A parking fee? What is the cost and policy on telephones/televisions and cable TV hook-ups? Are pets allowed? If so, is there an extra deposit? Will the home or facility accept Medicaid payment for service? Can the rent be based on the resident’s income? “Those are very different types of care and very different settings,” she said. When touring a facility, it’s imperative the adult child take into consideration what is important to his or her parent, not what is important to the adult child, MowBray said. It’s good to visit before moving into a facility to see if the physical, living space is comfortable, or in the case of a potential resident with a cognitive issue, if the social gathering spaces feel inviting.

Paying for care

Are there any restrictions on visitors or overnight guests? How are cleaning standards maintained? Does someone inspect the apartments? Are the inspections announced or unannounced? What is the policy on retaining the apartment if the resident needs to be hospitalized for a while? What are some situations that may cause an increase in the rent and services? What are the conditions under which the resident can leave the facility? Before signing a contract with an assisted living facility or skilled nursing home, read the contract thoroughly and fully understand its terms. Keep a copy and refer to it when questions arise. Source: “Explore Your Options: A Kansas Guide to Information and In-Home Services,” by the Kansas Department for Aging and Disability Services

One of the first questions that should be asked, MowBray said, is how the fees for the assisted living facility are going to be paid. “Medicare does not pay, because these (assisted living) homes are licensed by the state only,” she said. “They’re not federally licensed like the nursing homes, so Medicare is off the table for paying for room and board.”

Medicaid, the state’s KanCare program, also doesn’t pay for the room and board of a resident of an assisted living facility, MowBray said. However, KanCare can pay for assisted living through the Home and Community Based Services waiver program. “They can help pay for some of the nursing care or meal preparation or things like that,” she said, “but it’s very limited and

Please see VISIT, Page 22F


10F | Sunday, October 9, 2016 | The Topeka Capital-Journal

Retirement communities offer restaurant-style dining Staff also cater to special dietary needs of residents

COMMON EATING PROBLEMS OF OLDER ADULTS A person’s sense of taste and smell may change as one ages, and food may seem to lose flavor. Extra spices and herbs can add a little zest. Medicines also may change how food tastes, or cause a person to feel less hungry. Talk to your physician about these changes. Sometimes, chewing food becomes harder as a person ages. Perhaps dentures don’t fit as well as before, or your gums become sore. Eat foods that are softer and easier to chew. A dentist also may be able to help. Source: National Institute on Aging

By Katie Moore

katie.moore@cjonline.com

Many retirement communities are moving away from cafeteria- and buffet-style meals and opting for restaurant-style dining complete with servers that take orders from the table. At Atria Hearthstone, 3415 S.W. 6th Ave., meals are a culinary experience, said Thaddeus Studebaker, assistant executive director of the independent living and assisted living community. Many of the chefs have a background in hospitality services, having worked at hotels and restaurants. “We always look for experienced chefs with a good culinary background,” said Kirk Brooks, national operations specialist. Menus are developed by the community chef and a dietitian comes in quarterly. Typically, there are two specials every day and a full menu of other options. An “anytime cafe” also provides drinks and snacks, some of which are made in-house. Residents can take part in Food for Thought, a monthly opportunity for them to voice their likes and dislikes to the chef. “We’ve changed a lot of things based on residents’ preferences,” Brooks said. Decisions are “resident-driven,” Studebaker added. A favorite dish that doesn’t get phased out is chicken fried steak, Studebaker said. The meat is bought locally at Herman’s Meat & Smokehouse. The facility tries to source local ingredients as much as possible and incorporate fresh produce daily. It makes about 90 percent of its food from scratch.

THAD ALLTON/THE CAPITAL-JOURNAL

Residents at Atria Hearthstone visit with Hollie Blum, center, a culinary operations specialist at the facility. Blum and others make sure residents are offered healthy food choices. Staff can help those with dietary restrictions, such as a gluten allergy, to select foods, Brooks said. In addition to the regular dining spaces, Atria Hearthstone has a private dining room, which can be reserved when family members are in town or for events like birthday celebrations, Studebaker said. Residents also can take advantage of dinner outings to local restaurants, which are part of its engaged life and activities program. Studebaker said meals are an integral experience because they provide a chance for residents to socialize and be part of a community. Independent living residents at Thornton Place, 2901 S.W. Armstrong Ave., also have

sit-down dining service. There are a variety of choices, especially at lunch, which seems to be the “big meal for this age group,” said general manager Terry Gingrich. “They get an opportunity where they’re not stuck with just one choice,” he said. The community employs an executive chef who heads the kitchen, as well as a sous chef and an evening cook. In addition to providing three meals a day, Thornton Place also has a snack bar stocked with fruit, yogurt, baked goods and drinks that are available 24/7. “Residents don’t have to spend any money on groceries,” Gingrich said. They also have a chance to give feedback. Kiosks with iPads have been set up, and residents can fill out a survey on the

quality of food and service. The ratings and comments are anonymous. “It’s a good tool,” Gingrich said. “Really, their biggest complaint once they’ve been here a few months is that they’ve gained three or four pounds.” One challenge Gingrich has found is the changing health needs of individual residents. The facility tries to accommodate residents as much as possible by offering diabetic-friendly options and healthy options like fish. Brewster Place, 1205 S.W. 29th, which has dining rooms in its independent living, assisted living and health care center, also has restaurant-style dining. A dietitian develops meals, especially for the assisted living and health care center residents, said Claudia Larkin, chief operating officer. A majority of the food is made from scratch. They have two specials per day and a variety of other options on the menu. A bistro is a more casual option, offering sandwiches and other items that residents can order. Residents also enjoy special meals that involve outside grilling or sharing a meal with family and friends, Larkin added. Contact Katie Moore at (785) 295-1612.


The Topeka Capital-Journal | Sunday, October 9, 2016 | 11F

Activity after retirement important to well-being By Ann Marie Bush

Special to The Capital-Journal

You’ve worked hard for more than 40 years, scrimping and saving for your golden years. You have plans to see the world, spend time with family and relax. Sometimes, however, life after retirement doesn’t go the way people plan. “It is not what it used to be,” said Maren Turner, state director of AARP. “Retirement means different things to different people.” Some people phase into retirement by cutting back on work hours. Others stop working completely and enjoy leisure time, while others take on a part-time job. “It really depends on how you view retirement,” Turner said. One thing rings true for everyone, though. Staying active is important. Without staying active or getting involved in their communities, retirees may become depressed or feel as if they aren’t contributing to society. “There are a number of things you can do,” Turner said. Retirees can take free or low-cost classes at a local university, volunteer, become an advocate for change or perform community service. AARP offers numerous volunteer opportunities, such as becoming a tax aide or

teaching driver’s safety classes to people 50 and older, Turner said. Retirees also can volunteer at sporting or cultural events, which can allow someone on a budget to enjoy the event without having to buy a ticket. There are numerous clubs, too, such as quilting groups or bird-watching organizations. Then there are day-to-day activities, such as visiting the local zoo or museum. Turner encourages seniors to check their local newspaper to find out what events are taking place. Seniors can become advocates for change by talking to delegates or legislators about important senior issues. “You have to figure out what you really like to do,” she said. “What are you good at? What will you enjoy?” Studies show that being isolated and lonely can be just as detrimental to a person’s health as obesity, Turner said. Greta Kelsey, 86, of Topeka, found herself sitting in front of her computer or spending large amounts of time in her apartment after the death of her husband in 2000. But she discovered a love for walking and now spends time walking and hiking. In August, Kelsey and some of her family members walked a small portion of the Appalachian Trail. To celebrate Kelsey’s 85th birthday in May 2015, she and some of her family members walked more than 7 miles

around Lake Shawnee. “After the first walk, my daughter, Jeline, asked me what my next goal was going to be,” Kelsey said. “I had no idea, but said, ‘the Appalachian Trail,’ just to be funny.” Kelsey and her family members walked about 1 ½ hours on the trail. “Jeline posted pictures on Facebook and said they were glad they could get the trail off my bucket list,” she said. Getting out and being with people is also important to a senior’s health, Turner said. “Walking can help stave off the cognitive decline,” she said. The AARP website, www.aarp.org, offers an abundance of information for seniors and retirees, Turner said. For example, the Life Reimagined program can help seniors — or anyone — know what steps to take to lead a healthier, happier life. Some people may retire and decide they want to take a different path, such as a person who has spent his or her entire life as an attorney but upon retirement realizes that teaching may be an avenue to explore. “It’s a way of saying no matter what your age is, you can change your life,” Turner said. Ann Marie Bush is a freelance writer from Topeka. She can be reached at (785) 806-9614.

SUBMITTED

Greta Kelsey, 86, of Topeka, walks every day and in August took on the challenge of walking a portion of the Appalachian Trail. Experts say it’s important to stay active after retirement.


12F | Sunday, October 9, 2016 | The Topeka Capital-Journal

Medicare or Medicaid Staff gives medications Onsite medical facilities Emergency cord/pendant Additional services available Outdoor space Kitchens/refrigerators Private bathroom Furniture provided Meals provided Special diet accommodations Nonprofit Onsite pharmacy Beauty salon/barber shop Pets allowed Onsite banking Community computers Deaf/hearing impaired accommodations Elevators Onsite exercise facility Flexible lease terms Flexible scheduling for activities/meals Religious services Secure facility Transportation provided Wheelchair accessible Library Planned outings Planned social activities

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Via Christi Village in Manhattan

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Stoneybrook Retirement Community

Meadowlark Hills Retirement Community

Garden Grove Senior Apartments

• • • • • • • • • • •

Monterey Village

The Windsor of Lawrence

Vintage Park

• • •

Signal Ridge Villas

Lawrence Presbyterian Manor

Pioneer Ridge Health & Rehab

Neuvant House of Lawrence

• • • • • • • • • • • •

Meadowlark Estates

M A N H A T T A N

Home Instead Senior Care

• •

ComfortCare Homes of Baldwin City

Brandon Woods at Alvamar

Babcock Place

• •

Arbor Court Retirement Community at Alvamar

• • • • • • • • • • • •

Vintage Park at Holton

Topeka Presbyterian Manor

• •

Thornton Place

Tanglewood Health & Rehabilitation

• • • • • • • •

Rose Villa

Rolling Hills Assisted Living

L A W R E N C E

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• • • • • • •

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

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14F | Sunday, October 9, 2016 | The Topeka Capital-Journal

RETIREMENT DIRECTORY

TOPEKA

Monthly cost per apartment/room type: Starts at $3,000

Type of facility: Independent, assisted living Address: 7220 S.W. Asbury Drive Admissions contact: Kelly Stevenson Phone number: (785) 478-9440 Website: www.aldersgatevillage.org Email: info@aldersgatevillage.org Staff-to-resident ratio: Varies per unit No. of homes/beds: 196 skilled, 60 assisted living, 174 independent living Levels of care: All levels of care Admission waiting period: Depends on census Monthly cost per apartment/room type: Starts at $2,000 per month and up, depending on unit size; independent living studios and two- and three-bedroom units

Brewster Place

Aldersgate Village

Arbor Court Retirement Community at Topeka

Type of facility: Independent living Address: 4200 S.W. Drury Lane Admissions contact: Linda Clements Phone number: (785) 273-6847 Website: www.arborcourt-topeka.com Email: linda.clements@healthmarkgroup.com Staff-to-resident ratio: 13 staff to 60 residents (9-10 staff at a time) No. of homes/beds: 58 Levels of care: No medical staff, but do have a couple of nurses hired by residents, housekeeping, independent plus Admission waiting period: Openings, typically full Monthly cost per apartment/room type: Studios start at $1,500; one-bedroom unit starts at $1,700; two-bedroom unit starts at $1,975

Arbor Valley Senior Homes

Type of facility: Independent living Address: 1300 S.W. Pin Oak Parkway Admissions contact: Emillie Bervert Phone number: (785) 380-6812 Website: listings.mdiproperties.com/apartments/ ks/topeka/arbor-valley-senior-homes-0/index.aspx Email: arborvalley@mdiproperties.com Staff-to-resident ratio: N/A No. of homes/beds: 72 duplexes Levels of care: No medical staff Admission waiting period: Full, waiting list Monthly cost per apartment/room type: Twobedroom, $935; three-bedroom $1,235

Atria Hearthstone

Type of facility: Assisted living, independent living, memory care Address: 3415 S.W. 6th Ave. Admissions contact: Ed Roach Phone number: (785) 234-6225 Website: www.atriaseniorliving.com/retirementcommunities/atria-hearthstone-topeka-ks Staff-to-resident ratio: Varies No. of homes/beds: 239 apartments Levels of care: Independent living, assisted living, memory care Admission waiting period: 95 percent occupied

Type of facility: Independent living, catered living, assisted living, long-term care, rehabilitation services Address: 1205 S.W. 29th St. Admissions contact: Lifestyle counselors Phone number: (785) 274-3314 Website: www.brewsterliving.org Email: nancy.park@brewsterliving.org Staff-to-resident ratio: 325 staff to 400 residents No. of homes/beds: 354 apartments and beds Levels of care: Independent living, catered living, assisted living, long-term care Admission waiting period: Depending on waiting list Monthly cost per apartment/room type: Varies

Brookdale Topeka

Type of facility: Memory care Address: 5800 S.W. Drury Lane Admissions contact: Dava Jones Phone number: (785) 200-3445 Website: www.brookdale.com/en/communities/ brookdale-topeka.html Email: djones6@brookdale.com Staff-to-resident ratio: 1 staff to 7 residents No. of homes/beds: 35 apartments Levels of care: Specialized memory care Admission waiting period: 30 to 60 days Monthly cost per apartment/room type: Varies, contact representative

Brookside Retirement Community

Type of facility: Assisted living, nursing care, independent living Address: 700 W. 7th, Overbrook Admissions contact: Karen Peters Phone number: (785) 665-3246 Website: www.brooksideks.com Email: Kpeters@brooksideks.com Staff-to-resident ratio: Varies No. of homes/beds: 72 skilled nursing beds Levels of care: Assisted living, skilled nursing Admission waiting period: Depends on census Monthly cost per apartment/room type: $190 for private room per day; $170 for semi-private room per day

Fairlawn Heights Assisted Living

Type of facility: Assisted living, nursing care Address: 5400 S.W. 7th Ave. Admissions contact: Susan Jacobs Phone number: (785) 272-6880 Website: midwest-health.com/fairlawn-heights Email: susanjacobs@fairlwanheights.com Staff-to-resident ratio: 3 staff to 15 residents No. of homes/beds: 38 apartments, 45 beds Levels of care: Independent living, assisted living, hospice, home health Admission waiting period: Depends on census Monthly cost per apartment/room type: $3,250 to $3,875, less for shared rooms Retirement Directory continues on Page 15F


The Topeka Capital-Journal | Sunday, October 9, 2016 | 15F

RETIREMENT DIRECTORY The First Apartments (formerly First Christian Church Apartments)

Type of facility: Independent living Address: 3805 S.W. 18th St. Admissions contact: Amy Crow, Ashley Tolbert Phone number: (785) 272-6700 Website: www.thefirstapartments.org Email: fcaaoffice@fcctopeka.org Staff-to-resident ratio: N/A No. of homes/beds: 118 Levels of care: No medical care Admission waiting period: Openings Monthly cost per apartment/room type: Studios, $387; one-bedroom unit, $501; expanded one-bedroom unit, $581

Landmark Plaza Apartments

Type of facility: Retirement home Address: 1000 S. Kansas Ave. Admissions contact: Kimberley Gray Phone number: (785) 233-5769 Website: www.ymcorp.com/landmark-plaza Email: kgray@ymcorp.com Staff-to-resident ratio: N/A No. of homes/beds: 82 units Levels of care: N/A Admission waiting period: Waiting list Monthly cost per apartment/room type: One-bedroom unit, $677; efficiency rooms, $598; based on income; eight disabled-capable units

Legend at Capital Ridge

Type of facility: Assisted living Address: 1931 S.W. Arvonia Place Admissions contact: Lesa Duryea Phone number: (785) 272-9400 Website: www.legendseniorliving.com/location/ Legend%20at%20Capital%20Ridge lesa.duryeh@legendseniorliving.com Email: N/A No. of homes/beds: 66 (51 assisted living, 15 memory care) Levels of care: Assisted living, memory care Admission waiting period: Waiting list for memory care Monthly cost per apartment/room type: Memory care starts at $5,160; assisted living starts at $3,300, goes up based on floor plan/ level of care

Legacy on 10th Avenue

Type of facility: Long-term care Address: 2015 S.E. 10th Ave. Admissions contact: Heath Burt Phone number: (785) 215-8163 Website: N/A Email: N/A Staff-to-resident ratio: N/A No. of homes/beds: 82 Levels of care: Skilled nursing Admission waiting period: Openings Monthly cost per apartment/room type: N/A

Lexington Park Health & Rehab

Type of facility: Nursing care Address: 1031 S.W. Fleming Court Admissions contact: Michelle Hunter Phone number: (785) 440-0500 Website: www.midwest-health.com/lexingtonpark-health-rehab Email: mhunter@lexingtonparkcommunity.com Staff-to-resident ratio: 1 staff to 6-8 residents No. of homes/beds: 90 beds/60 long-term care Levels of care: Level II and III Admission waiting period: Varies depending on census Monthly cost per apartment/room type: Averages $283 per day for private room; $264 for semi-private room

Lexington Park Independent Living

Type of facility: Independent living Address: 1011 S.W. Fleming Court Admissions contact: Crystal Reuter Phone number: (785) 273-4545 Website: www.midwest-health.com Email: On website Staff-to-resident ratio: Varies No. of homes/beds: 60 Levels of care: N/A Admission waiting period: Depends on availability Monthly cost per apartment/room type: $1,975 to $3,275, from studio to two-bed deluxe

Lexington Park Assisted Living

Type of facility: Assisted living Address: 1021 S.W. Fleming Court Admissions contact: Ben Rigdon Phone number: (785) 440-0399 Website: www.midwest-health.com/lexington-park Email: brigdon@lexingtonparkcommunity.com Staff-to-resident ratio: 1 staff to 10 residents No. of homes/beds: 51 apartments Levels of care: Assisted living Admission waiting period: Varies depending on census Monthly cost per apartment/room type: Studio, one-bedroom and two-bedroom units, varies by level of care

ManorCare Health Services-Topeka

Type of facility: Nursing care Address: 2515 S.W. Wanamaker Road Admissions contact: Kacey Cattoor Phone number: (785) 271-6808 Website: www.heartland-manorcare.com/locations/manorcare-health-services-topeka Email: Topeka@manorcare.com Staff-to-resident ratio: Varies on census No. of homes/beds: 102 beds Levels of care: Acute rehabilitation, long-term care Admission waiting period: Less than 24 hours Monthly cost per apartment/room type: Varies, depending on room and services Retirement Directory continues on Page 16F


16F | Sunday, October 9, 2016 | The Topeka Capital-Journal

RETIREMENT DIRECTORY Martin Creek Place

Type of facility: Retirement community Address: 4950 S.W. Huntoon Admissions contact: Misty Edwards, Rose Kabriel Phone number: (785) 273-2944 Website: http://martincreek.net Email: misty@lutherplace.kscoxmail.com Staff-to-resident ratio: N/A No. of homes/beds: 41 apartments, 80 townhomes Levels of care: No medical staff Admission waiting period: Waiting list for six months Monthly cost per apartment/room type: Onebedroom apartment, $637; two-bedroom apartment, $727; one-bedroom townhome, $692; two-bedroom townhome, $792; electricity and gas not included

McCrite Plaza-Topeka

Type of facility: Independent living, assisted living, health care center, rehabilitation services Address: 1608-1610 S.W. 37th Admissions contact: Cindee Williams, Kelsie Dawson Phone number: (785) 267-2960 Website: www.mccriteplaza.com/communities/ mccrite-plaza-topeka Email: cwilliams@mccriteretirement.com Staff-to-resident ratio: Varies No. of homes/beds: 135 beds, 80 beds in health care center Levels of care: Independent living, assisted living, rehabilitation Admission waiting period: Waiting list Monthly cost per apartment/room type: Studio independent living, $1,888; goes up from there but includes housekeeping and activities

Plaza West Care Center

Type of facility: Nursing care Address: 1570 S.W. Westport Drive Admissions contact: David Taylor Phone number: (785) 271-6700 Website: http://plazawestcare.com Email: d_taylor@plazawestcare.com Staff-to-resident ratio: Varies on census No. of homes/beds: 151 beds Levels of care: Contact admissions director Admission waiting period: Varies Monthly cost per apartment/room type: Nursing facility hospital rooms/semi-private rooms, $206 per day; private rooms, $236 per day

Rolling Hills Assisted Living

Type of facility: Assisted living Address: 2410 S.W. Urish Road Admissions contact: Tammy Blake/Shannon Elliott Phone number: (785) 273-2202 Website: www.midwest-health.com/rolling-hills Email: tblake@rollinghills-health.com (or) selliott@ rollinghills-health.com Staff-to-resident ratio: 1 staff to 15 residents No. of homes/beds: 30 apartments

Levels of care: Services to meet individual needs Admission waiting period: Waiting list Monthly cost per apartment/room type: $3,800 to $4,600

long-term care, short-term rehabilitation Admission waiting period: Depends on availability Monthly cost per apartment/room type: Varies, contact marketing representative

Rose Villa

Vintage Park at Holton

Type of facility: Residential care for veterans Address: 2075 S.W. Fillmore St. Admissions contact: Jay Nichols Phone number: (785) 232-0671 Website: www.rosevilla.us Email: rosevilla@rosevillakansascoxmail.com Staff-to-resident ratio: 1 staff to 20 residents No. of homes/beds: 3 homes, 60 beds Levels of care: Assisted living Admission waiting period: 1 to 2 weeks Monthly cost per apartment/room type: $2,100 for semi-private room; $2,525 for private room

Tanglewood Health & Rehabilitation Type of facility: Nursing care, retirement home Address: 5015 S.W. 28th St. Admissions contact: Angelina Sterrett Phone number: (785) 217-1523 Website: www.tanglewoodhealthandrehabilitation.com Email: wm-administrator@healthmarkgroup.com Staff-to-resident ratio: 1 staff to 9 residents No. of homes/beds: 54 Levels of care: Skilled rehabilitation, long-term care Admission waiting period: Openings Monthly cost per apartment/room type: $5,000 to $6,000

Thornton Place

Type of facility: Independent living Address: 2901 S.W. Armstrong Ave. Admissions contact: Tabitha Petefish Phone number: (785) 228-0555 Website: www.holidaytouch.com/our-communities/ thornton-place#floorplans tabitha.petefish@holidaytouch.com Email: N/A No. of homes/beds: 112 Levels of care: N/A Admission waiting period: Immediate openings Monthly cost per apartment/room type: $1,449 to $3,400

Topeka Presbyterian Manor

Type of facility: Independent living, assisted living, long-term care, short-term rehabilitation Address: 4712 S.W. 6th Ave. Admissions contact: Jami Colson Phone number: (785) 256-0946 Website: www.topekapresbyterianmanor.org Email: jcolson@pma.org Staff-to-resident ratio: Varies No. of homes/beds: 51 independent living, 62 assisted living, 68 long-term care, 16 rehabilitation Levels of care: Independent living, assisted living,

Type of facility: Assisted living Address: 410 Juniper Drive, Holton Admissions contact: Jennifer Gould Phone number: (785) 364-5051 Website: www.vintageparkassistedliving.com/ communities/holton Email: info@vintageparksassistedliving.com Staff-to-resident ratio: 1 staff to 16 residents No. of homes/beds: 43 units Levels of care: Assisted living Admission waiting period: Depends on availability Monthly cost per apartment/room type: Vintage suite, $3,738.90; Heritage suite $3,960.35; Plaza suite $4,331.15; Companion suite $2,925.20

Lawrence

Arbor Court Retirement Community at Alvamar Type of facility: Independent living Address: 1510 St. Andrews Drive Admissions contact: Melissa Williams Phone number: (785) 813-8454 Website: www.arborcourt-lawrence.com Email: info@arborcourt.com Staff-to-resident ratio: N/A No. of homes/beds: 67 Levels of care: Independent living with visiting nurses Admission waiting period: Openings Monthly cost per apartment/room type: Studios start at $1,499; one-bedroom units start at $2,000; two-bedroom units start at $2,400

Babcock Place

Type of facility: Independent living Address: 1700 Massachusetts St. Admissions contact: Lori Dalrymple Phone number: (785) 842-8358 Website: ldcha.org/properties/babcock.html Email: l.dalrymple@ldcha.org Staff-to-resident ratio: N/A No. of homes/beds: 120 units Levels of care: Independent living Admission waiting period: Waiting list Monthly cost per apartment/room type: 30 percent of monthly gross income; studio, one-bedroom and two-bedroom units

Brandon Woods at Alvamar

Type of facility: Independent living, assisted living, nursing care, rehabilitation Address: 1501 Inverness Drive Admissions contact: Tom Pfeiler

Phone number: (785) 838-8000 Website: www.fivestarseniorliving.com/communities/ks/lawrence/brandon-woods-at-alvamar Email: On website Staff-to-resident ratio: N/A No. of homes/beds: 140 skilled nursing beds, 76 townhomes, 82 apartments, 37 assisted living Levels of care: Independent living, assisted living, memory care, skilled nursing care, rehabilitation Admission waiting period: Assisted living full, openings elsewhere Monthly cost per apartment/room type: Apartments, $2,423 to $3,930; assisted living, $3,727 to $5,066

ComfortCare Homes of Baldwin City

Type of facility: Nursing care Address: 813 8th St., Baldwin City Admissions contact: General office Phone number: (785) 594-2603 Website: www.comfortcarehomes.com/baldwincity.php Email: On website Staff-to-resident ratio: 1 staff to 5 residents No. of homes/beds: 22 Levels of care: Specialized memory care Admission waiting period: Varies depending on census Monthly cost per apartment/room type: Private and semi-private

Home Instead Senior Care

Type of facility: In-home care Address: 1201 Wakarusa Drive Admissions contact: Yvonne Trautman Phone number: (785) 856-8181 Website: www.homeinstead.com/584 Email: yvonne.trautman@homeinstead.com Staff-to-resident ratio: One-on-one service No. of homes/beds: Home care Levels of care: In-home nonmedical, memory care, companionship services, meal preparation, transportation, household duties, respite care, hospice care support services, 24-hour care Admission waiting period: N/A Monthly cost per apartment/room type: N/A

Meadowlark Estates

Type of facility: Retirement community Address: 4430 Bauer Farm Drive Admissions contact: Jeffrey and Sheila Natt Phone number: (785) 371-0314 Website: www.seniorlivinginstyle.com/retirement_ community/Lawrence_KS/zip_66049/hawthorn_retirement_group/4397 Email: On website Staff-to-resident ratio: Varies No. of homes/beds: 135 apartments Levels of care: No medical care Admission waiting period: Waiting period of 30 days Monthly cost per apartment/room type: Starts at $1,695 Retirement Directory continues on Page 17F


The Topeka Capital-Journal | Sunday, October 9, 2016 | 17F

RETIREMENT DIRECTORY Neuvant House of Lawrence

Type of Facility: Memory Care, Assisted Living Address: 1216 Biltmore Drive Admissions contact: Emily Hilding Phone number: (785) 856-7900 Website: www.neuvanthouse.com Email: admin@neuvanthouse.com Staff-to-resident Ratio: Appropriate staffing to meet resident needs No. of beds/apartments: 28 apartments total Levels of Care: Memory care, assisted living Admission waiting period: No wait Monthly cost per apartment/room: Varies based on type of care, private apartments available.

Pioneer Ridge Health & Rehab

Type of facility: Assisted living, long-term care, rehabilitation Address: 4851 Harvard Road Admissions contact: N/A Phone number: (785) 749-4200 Website: www.midwest-health.com/pioneer-ridgehealth-rehab Email: On website Staff-to-resident ratio: N/A No. of homes/beds: 60 Levels of care: Assisted living, rehabilitation, long-term care

Admission waiting period: Openings Monthly cost per apartment/room type: $4,000 to $6,500

Lawrence Presbyterian Manor

Type of facility: Independent living, assisted living, nursing care, rehabilitation Address: 1429 Kasold Drive Admissions contact: Angela Fonseca Phone number: (785) 371-0577 Website: www.lawrencepresbyterianmanor.org Email: afonseca@pmma.org Staff-to-resident ratio: 1 registered nurse and 1 certified nursing assistant every shift No. of homes/beds: 25 Levels of care: Independent living, assisted living, memory care, rehabilitation Admission waiting period: Varies Monthly cost per apartment/room type: Studios start at $4,048; one-bedrooms start at $4,353

Signal Ridge Villas

Type of facility: Independent living Address: 807 Deer Ridge Court, Baldwin City Admissions contact: Janelle Butts Phone number: (785) 594-3794 Website: N/A Email: janellebutts@yahoo.com Staff-to-resident ratio: N/A

No. of homes/beds: 32 units Levels of care: N/A Admission waiting period: N/A Monthly cost per apartment/room type: $510 to $600

Vintage Park

Type of facility: Assisted living Address: 2250 S. Elm St., Ottawa Admissions contact: Tina Caruthers Phone number: (785) 242-3715 Website: www.vintageparkassistedliving.com/ communities/ottawa Email: tcaruthers@vintageparkassistedliving.com Staff-to-resident ratio: Varies No. of homes/beds: 40 units Levels of care: N/A Admission waiting period: N/A Monthly cost per apartment/room type: $3,585 to $4,075

The Windsor of Lawrence

Type of facility: Assisted living, respite care Address: 3220 Peterson Road Admissions contact: Dee Shaffer Phone number: (785) 832-9900 Website: www.legendseniorliving.com/location/ The%20Windsor%20of%20Lawrence

Email: dee.shaffer@legendseniorliving.com Staff-to-resident ratio: Varies No. of homes/beds: Varies Levels of care: Assisted living, memory care Admission waiting period: None Monthly cost per apartment/room type: Cost varies; studios in memory care, one-bedroom rooms and Governor’s Suite apartments in assisted living

Monterey Village Address: 3901 Peterson Road Admissions contact: Diana Wood Phone number: (785) 371-9160 Website: www.americareusa.net Email: monterey@americareusa.net Staff-to-resident ratio: Varies No. of homes/beds: 30 assisted living, 22 memory care, 14 cottages, four duplexes, two triplexes Levels of care: Assisted living Admission waiting period: Will open Jan. 4 Monthly cost per apartment/room type: $140$180 per day for assisted living; $175-$225 per day for memory care; $2,500 for triplexes; $3,200 for two-bedroom duplex Retirement Directory continues on Page 18F


18F | Sunday, October 9, 2016 | The Topeka Capital-Journal

RETIREMENT DIRECTORY

Manhattan

Meadowlark Hills Retirement Community

Type of facility: Independent living, assisted living, nursing care Address: 2121 Meadowlark Road Admissions contact: Kinzie Jo Nelson Phone number: (785) 537-4610 Website: www.meadowlark.org Email: info@meadowlark.org Staff-to-resident ratio: N/A No. of homes/beds: 165 independent living units, 38 assisted living units Levels of care: Independent living, assisted living, skilled nursing, memory care, home health care Admission waiting period: N/A Monthly cost per apartment/room type: Cost varies

Stoneybrook Retirement Community

Type of facility: Nursing care, rehabilitation, assisted living Address: 2025 Little Kitten Ave. Admissions contact: Nick French Phone number: (785) 776-0065 Website: midwesthealth.com Email: nfrench@stoneybrook-retirement.com Staff-to-resident ratio: N/A No. of homes/beds: 78 Levels of care: Skilled nursing, rehabilitation Admission waiting period: Openings Monthly cost per apartment/room type: Semi-private unit, $210; small private rooms, $240 to $258; large rooms, $262 to $280 (all per night)

Via Christi Village in Manhattan

Type of facility: Independent living, assisted living, nursing care Address: 2800 Willow Grove Road Admissions contact: Brandan Rose

Phone number: (785) 410-4212 Website: www.viachristi.org/locations/seniors/manhattan Email: brandan.rose@villa-christi.org Staff-to-resident ratio: As required No. of homes/beds: 8 independent living villas, 3 assisted living, 93 licensed residential care beds Levels of care: Independent living, assisted living, skilled nursing, rehabilitation Admission waiting period: N/A Monthly cost per apartment/room type: Varies

Garden Grove Senior Apartments Type of facility: Independent living Address: 1119 Garden Way Ave. Admissions contact: Amanda Slate Phone number: (785) 776-2277 Website: http://websites.realtydatatrust.com/ Home/38703 Email: 0093@nationalchurchresidences.org Staff-to-resident ratio: N/A No. of homes/beds: 109 Levels of care: No medical care Admission waiting period: Openings Monthly cost per apartment/room type: Based on income, average is $200

Vintage Park at Wamego

Type of facility: Assisted living Address: 1607 4th St., Wamego Admissions contact: Jennifer Niles Phone number: (785) 456-8997 Website: www.vintageparkassistedliving.com/ communities/wamego Email: info@vintageparksassistedliving.com Staff-to-resident ratio: Varies No. of homes/beds: 29 apartments Levels of care: Assisted living Admission waiting period: Waiting list Monthly cost per apartment/room type: $3,355 for studio apartments

Conversations now can reduce stress of late-in-life moves Think about options of downsizing, selling home Preparing for a late-in-life move can be easier than you think, even though it may appear overwhelming and daunting at the onset. Because many families put off this difficult conversation until there is a medical crisis, an urgency for a move is created, where quick decisions need to be made and time is of the essence. This can cause undue stress for everyone and loss of muchCarol Ronnebaum needed money. Times have changed and so have senior communities, which are quickly becoming a rite of passage for older adults who look forward to joining fun activities with others of their age and sharing meals and conversations with like-minded people. Senior communities are places where you can enjoy life without the responsibilities of home maintenance, feeling alone or being concerned about a lack of assistance during medical emergencies. Simplify this process by putting together a plan of action. Downsize, move and sell your home. Start by sharing family treasures with loved ones. You might begin by asking your loved ones if there are items they want or simply by giving special keepsakes to family members or friends. Also, be sure to share the history of the item with the recipient.

Family history often is forgotten if the story hasn’t been told for many years. This is your legacy; you need to share it. Holidays, birthdays and special visits are good times to begin passing your treasures on to others to enjoy. Will your memories stay behind with your home? No, they will move with you. When moving, you may take currently owned furniture and treasures, or many times seniors start fresh with new furnishings. It’s up to you; it’s your new home. It may be time for a new family to love your home. Painting, new flooring, a new roof and other things may need to be attended to in your home. There are options in selling a home today. Whether you make repairs and updates or sell the home in its as-is condition, the most important thing to remember is to price your home according to its condition and location. Your home will sell much faster if priced correctly for the current local market value. Surround yourself with experts. A professional senior’s real estate specialist can offer resources to help navigate the issues seniors and their families often deal with when considering a late-in-life move. Many times, children aren’t able to help with this move because of time, their age and distance. A team of specialized, senior-friendly experts can help with such concerns as downsizing liquidators, packing and unpacking, moving, selling your home, organizing your new home, contractors, elder law, financial needs and more. Carol Ronnebaum, a senior’s real estate specialist who works at Coldwell Banker Griffith & Blair, can be reached at (785) 640-2685 or TopekaSeniorLiving.com. To find out more about Ronnebaum’s team of senior’s real estate specialists, email her at Carol@CarolRealtor.com.


The Topeka Capital-Journal | Sunday, October 9, 2016 | 19F

Adjusting to care facility can be hard for some seniors By Jan Biles

jan.biles@cjonline.com

As the baby boomer generation ages, more and more seniors will be moving from their homes into assisted or skilling nursing care facilities. The change can be traumatic for some older adults. Consequently, it’s important for family members and staff at the facilities to understand the losses new residents may be feeling, said April Maddox, care management program manager at Jayhawk Area Agency on Aging Inc. Individuals move into care facilities because they can no longer live at home due to physical or cognitive issues. They have to adjust to being dependent on others for meal preparation, medication administration, housekeeping, transportation and, sometimes, self-care. “The biggest feeling is loss of independence,” Maddox said, adding many individuals also face the fear of the unknown. “They’ve lived in their home, raised their children in the home. Their memories are there. They’re comfortable there, and the familiar surroundings make them feel safe there.”

To help with the transition, individuals may want to take a few favorite possessions from their homes to their new surroundings, said Tim Keogh, a social worker for the Program of All-Inclusive Care at Midland Care. “Bring in familiar items to bring the sense of a homelike environment to the new location,” Keogh said. Most of the time, transitioning from one’s home to an assisted living or skilled nursing facility is a lengthy process, allowing time for the individual and his or her family to visit before move-in day. “Take the consumer to the facility and let them be involved in the decision making and (asking of) questions,” Maddox said. Many individuals also feel a loss of relationships — perhaps the person played cards with friends each week, attended church services every Sunday or routinely socialized or dined out with family. “It’s extremely important — because people are still afraid they’ll be left in the facility (and never visited) — they need to feel a part of the outside, a part of the community and family,” she said. “They need to be involved in the things they did in the past. “It’s important for family to be around

to see what type of care they are receiving. They need to have someone advocating for them.” Maddox and Keogh said it’s important for facility staff to learn about the residents’ interests, too, and find opportunities to incorporate them into their daily routines. “(Family members) can help staff understand who they are as a whole person, not just the medical reasons (for being there),” Keogh said. It’s also important to recognize not all residents want to take part in activities that might be offered. “Not everyone is a social person,” Maddox said. The losses felt by individuals transitioning into care facilities may take an emotional toll. Residents may become angry and act out, or they may become withdrawn, sleep more, show disinterest in activities or express sadness. “Depression is a real problem,” Maddox said, adding those experiencing depression should be seen by a doctor or counselor. “They need someone to talk to.” Contact Jan Biles at (785) 295-1292.

PHOTO BY EARL RICHARDSON

Layla Sullivan, co-director of nursing at Brewster Health Care, talks to a resident at Brewster Place. It’s important for staff at independent living and assisted living facilities and skilled nursing homes to get to know the residents’ interests so they’re seen as more than just their health issues.


20F | Sunday, October 9, 2016 | The Topeka Capital-Journal

COMMUNITY RESOURCES GENERAL SERVICES

Kansas Department for Aging and Disability Services Fosters an environment that empowers older adults and individuals with disabilities to make choices about their lives, including providing information about Medicare and Senior Health Insurance Counseling of Kansas. (800) 432-3535; (785) 296-4986 www.kdads.ks.gov Kansas Advocates for Better Care Works to improve the quality of long-term care for the elderly at home and in nursing and assisted living facilities. (785) 842-3088; (800) 525-1782 www.kabc.org Kansas Elder Law Hotline/Kansas Legal Services Attorneys answer questions in civil cases for Kansans age 60 or older. (888) 353-5337 www.kansaslegalservices.org/node /1250/ services-seniors Kansas Long-Term Care Ombudsman Investigates and resolves complaints made by residents or on behalf of residents in long-termcare facilities; provides education regarding long-term-care issues; identifies concerns and advocates for needed changes in long-term-care policies, laws and regulations. (785) 296-3017; (877) 662-8362 http://ombudsman.ks.gov

Aging and Disability Resource Center Provides information about where people can go to obtain assistance in planning for their future long-term service and support needs. (855) 200-2372 http://www.kdads.ks.gov/commissions/commission-on-aging/aging-and-disability-resourcecenters Kansas Department of Health and Environment Provides information on KanCare and Medicaid. (785) 296-3512; (800) 792-4884 (for KanCare questions) www.kdheks.gov/hcf/default.htm; www.kancare. ks.gov Kansas Insurance Commission Provides information on Medicare and long-term care. (785) 296-3071; (800) 432-2484 www.ksinsurance.org Kansas Foundation for Medical Care Inc. Advocates for quality care for Medicare beneficiaries only. (785) 273-2552; (800) 432-0770 www.kfmc.org Eldercare Locator A public service of the U.S. Administration on Aging that connects individuals to services for older adults and their families. (800) 677-1116 www.eldercare.gov AARP — Kansas Office Fights for health care, employment and income security, and protection from financial abuse for

those age 50 and older. (866) 448-3619 http://states.aarp.org/region/kansas/ The Senior Citizens League National organization that protects and defends benefits for seniors. (800) 333-8725 www.seniorsleague.org U.S. Social Security Administration office Administers Social Security, a social insurance program consisting of retirement, disability and survivors’ benefits. (888) 327-1271, Topeka; (866) 698-2561, Lawrence; (877) 840-5741, Manhattan www.ssa.gov Kansas State Board of Mortuary Arts Offers a guide on pre-planning funeral arrangements and how to establish a memorial. (785) 296-3980 http://ksbma.ks.gov/ HealthWise 55 An organization sponsored by Stormont Vail Health for those 55 years of age and older who want to stay current on health information and health resources. (785) 354-6787 www.stormontvail.org/healthwise-55 Lawrence-Douglas County Health Department Project Lively A care coordination program that promotes the health, independence and well-being of older adults in Douglas County. (785) 856-5353

http://www.ldchealth.org/244/Support-for-OlderAdults Low Income Energy Assistance Program Helps eligible households pay a portion of their home energy costs by providing a one-time-peryear benefit. (913) 279-7171, Atchison, Douglas, Leavenworth and Wyandotte counties; (785) 296-2763, Brown, Coffey, Doniphan, Jackson, Jefferson, Marshall, Nemaha, Osage, Pottawatomie, Shawnee and Wabaunsee counties; (620) 272-5985, Dickinson, Lyon and Saline counties; (800) 432-0043 www.dcf.ks.gov/services/ees/Pages/Energy/EnergyAssistance.aspx

AREA AGENCIES ON AGING

Jayhawk Area Agency on Aging Administers and coordinates services for older adults in Shawnee, Jefferson and Douglas counties. (785) 235-1367; (800) 798-1366 www.jhawkaaa.org Wyandotte-Leavenworth Area Agency on Aging Administers and coordinates services for older adults in Wyandotte and Leavenworth counties. (913) 573-8531; (888) 661-1444 www.wycokck.org/aging/ East Central Kansas Aging and Disability Resource Center Administers and coordinates services for older adults in Anderson, Coffey, Franklin, Linn, Miami and Osage counties. (785) 242-7200 www.eckaaa.org Please see RESOURCES, Page 21F


The Topeka Capital-Journal | Sunday, October 9, 2016 | 21F

Resources Continued from Page 20F

North Central-Flint Hills Area Agency on Aging Administers and coordinates services for older adults in Jewell, Mitchell, Lincoln, Ellsworth, Republic, Cloud, Ottawa, Saline, Clay, Dickinson, Marion, Riley, Geary, Morris, Chase, Pottawatomie, Wabaunsee and Lyon counties. (785) 776-9294, Manhattan; (620) 340-8001, Emporia; (785) 823-1277, Salina; (800) 432-2703 www.ncfhaaa.com Northeast Kansas Area Agency on Aging Administers and coordinates services for older adults in Atchison, Brown, Doniphan, Jackson, Marshall, Nemaha and Washington counties. (785) 742-7152; (800) 883-2549 www.nekaaa.org

MEAL DELIVERY

Meals on Wheels of Shawnee and Jefferson Counties Inc. Delivers meals and provides safety checks to the homebound, seniors and disabled individuals in Shawnee and Jefferson counties. (785) 295-3980 www.mowks.org

Douglas County Senior Services Inc. Provides resources, information, opportunities and advocacy for older residents of Douglas County, including meal delivery, door-to-door transportation for medical, nutritional and personal purposes, and caregiver support group. (785) 842-0543; (877) 295-3277 www.dgcoseniorservices.org Meals on Wheels — Lawrence Delivers meals, including meals designed around specialized diets, to the homebound, seniors and disabled individuals in Lawrence. (785) 830-8844 www.lawrencemow.org Meals on Wheels — Manhattan Provides meals to homebound older adults in Manhattan. (785) 776-9294 www.ncfhaaa.com Ogden Friendship Meals Provides meals at noon Monday, Wednesday and Friday at Ogden Community Center and delivers meals to the homebound. (785) 537-0351 www.ogden-ks.gov/ogden-friendship-meals.htm

VETERANS ORGANIZATIONS

Kansas Commission on Veteran Affairs Meets the health care needs of veterans at two main facilities — in Topeka and Leavenworth — and

nine community-based outpatient clinics. (620) 342-3347, Emporia; (785) 238-4522, Junction City; (785) 843-5233, Lawrence; (913) 682-2000, Dwight D. Eisenhower VA Medical Center in Leavenworth; (785) 587-0373, Manhattan; (785) 296-3976, Topeka; (785) 350-3111, Colmery-O’Neil VA Medical Center in Topeka www.kcva.org; www.topeka.va.gov

DISEASE ADVOCACY ORGANIZATIONS Alzheimer’s Association — Northeast Kansas Regional Office Advances research to end Alzheimer’s and dementia while enhancing care for those living with the disease. (785) 271-1844; (800) 272-3900 www.alz.org/kansascity Arthritis Foundation — Topeka Helps conquer the everyday battles of arthritis through life-changing information and resources, access to optimal care, and advancements in science and community connections. (785) 272-8461; (800) 362-1108 http://www.arthritis.org/kansas/ Northeast Kansas Parkinson Association Provides information about Parkinson disease and works toward improving treatment options. (785) 478-9045; (785) 272-6397 www.nekpa.com

EDUCATION/CLASSES

City of Topeka Senior Adult Programs Offers classes in exercise, dance and bridge; sponsors Senior Olympics. (785) 368-3798 www.topeka.org/senior_services.shtml; http:// parks.snco.us/index.aspx?nid=90 Osher Lifelong Learning Institute Creates accessible and innovative learning environments throughout Kansas and the Greater Kansas City area, with special focus on participants age 50 and over, although anyone can participate. (785) 864-5823; (877) 404-5832 http://kupce.ku.edu/osher-home#

CAREGIVER INFORMATION

Caregiver Action Network National organization that works to improve the quality of life of Americans who care for loved ones with chronic conditions, disabilities, disease or the frailties of old age. (202) 454-3970 www.caregiveraction.org CaringInfo Provides free information and resources to help people make decisions about end-of-life care and services before a crisis. (800) 658-8898 www.caringinfo.org/i4a/pages/index. cfm?pageid=1


22F | Sunday, October 9, 2016 | The Topeka Capital-Journal

Visit: Ask questions about facility, staff prior to signing contract Continued from Page 9F not all assisted living (facilities) accept the HCBS program, the KanCare program.” MowBray said ways to cover the cost of living in an assisted living facility include: • Private money. • Long-term-care insurance. • Veterans Affairs’ Aid and Attendance. The cost of the care will depend on the model chosen by the individual or family, she said. Some of the models include an all-inclusive rate, and some have room and board costs with add-on charges. MowBray said an individual needs to ask how the facility prices their services and how often they have rate increases. “The state does require a 30-day notice when rates are going to change,” she added.

Looking critically at a facility

The key to evaluating an assisted living facility is to determine “what the facility isn’t” rather than what is currently there, MowBray said. She and KCAL staff talk to the organization’s members about ethical marketing and being honest about what services are available and which aren’t, which she calls the “deal breakers.” “The care that the person needs and the care

that they might need in the future — those are things you have to consider,” she said. Security is a key component of any facility, particularly if there are cognitive issues for the resident. MowBray said the following questions should be asked: • Is it a secure environment? • Is wandering an issue? • How will my loved one be kept safe? • How will other people who don’t have cognitive issues still be able to come and go and have access? It’s a good idea to ask the facility staff what they do with people with dementia who might be at risk for wandering. MowBray said they should be able to articulate their protocol for handling those types of situations or be able to say they aren’t a locked facility. “If cognition and wandering becomes too great of a risk for the individual, that’s a deal breaker,” she said. “That would be a time when we talk about moving to another location. Knowing that on the front end can help you.”

ment for Aging and Disability Services. “The regs are a framework to keep people safe and autonomous, but they’re not prescriptive,” she said. “Unlike a nursing home, there’s not a staffing ratio. The regulations say you have to have adequate staff to meet the needs of the people in your care.” If a complaint is filed against any one of the 212 assisted living facilities in Kansas, she said, there is a process that KDADS follows to respond to the complaint. Information and inspection reports are available on the KDADS website, www.kdads.ks.gov. Go to the “Adult Care Home Directory and Inspection Reports” link under “Quick Links.” While each facility is supposed to be inspected annually, they can be inspected more often if there’s a complaint or other issue. However, MowBray said, if a survey team “gets a little bit behind,” a particular facility may not get an inspection in a given year. “Right now, about 35 percent of all assisted livings are deficiency-free,” she said. “That’s a wonderful thing.”

Facility inspections

Inquire about staffing

MowBray said assisted living facilities in Kansas are regulated and are supposed to be surveyed annually by the Kansas Depart-

Questions about the longevity of upperlevel staff at a given facility are fair to ask. MowBray said a Core Q survey that is con-

ducted by the facility and assesses the satisfaction of residents and their loved ones should be available. “That Core Q program comes down to the basics of ‘Would you refer this facility to someone else?’” she said. “The facilities that have a high Core Q score, those are the ones your friends and neighbors … said, ‘Yes, I would feel comfortable telling you to put your loved one there.’” MowBray and other assisted living professionals indicate an industry-wide recommendation says it’s OK to visit a facility unannounced, even on a weekend or an evening. However, the administrator or upper-level management personnel likely won’t be there. “(They) should still have somebody there who is willing to show you around, give you a business card, give you a brochure,” she said. “Then call and make that appointment to come back in and talk business with the business people.” MowBray said the feel of a facility is important. “Different settings please us in different ways,” she said, adding that the buildings should be clean and well-kept. “But they don’t have to be the Taj Mahal.” Contact Angela Deines at (785) 295-1143.


The Topeka Capital-Journal | Sunday, October 9, 2016 | 23F

Advisers: What should you do with your 401(k) when you retire? Continued from Page 6F Penny Morgan, a registered Royal Alliance Associates Inc. representative who offers insurance and tax planning through Penny Morgan Financial Service, has more than 20 years experience Penny Morgan in financial services. Here are her thoughts on retirement, the stock market and how to handle your 401(k). I would like to use income from my investments to pay my living expenses in retirement. Is it possible to earn dividend and interest income in today’s environment? What are realistic yields?

It is possible for the interest and dividend payments from your investments to supplement your retirement income. Everyone’s income needs in retirement vary. Depending on how much you have saved over the years, what part is invested in dividend-paying stocks and how much is interest-based can help you determine if your investments will be a good source of retirement income. In this low CD rate market, bond yields and stock dividends have been seeing yields of 1 percent to 3.5 percent. There is a difference between yield and value. When investing in the market, you have fluctuation in values that occur on a daily basis. There are also different tax rules on interest income versus dividends. Currently, qualified dividends are taxed at tiered rates with a maximum taxation rate. Interest income is always taxed at your current income tax level. It is always wise to talk to your tax preparer and a financial adviser. The stock market reached all-time highs recently. Is it still a good time to invest in

stocks and bonds? Dollar cost averaging — investing on a regular basis, usually every month — levels out the extreme highs and lows in the market. An “all-time” high doesn’t mean that the market will never go any higher, and it doesn’t mean that the market might not fluctuate in a downward trend. But historically, we have seen the market increase over various periods of time. Company stocks that have historically paid dividends may still pay dividends even if their stock price drops. The payment of dividends is not guaranteed. Companies may reduce or eliminate the payment of dividends at any given time. If the stock price goes down, you can buy more shares for your dollar. The same happens with bonds. Bonds will continue to pay interest based on the payment schedule, and the value of the bond will change depending upon the current interest rates. Studies have shown that the longer you wait to get in the market, the less you participate in the growth and in-

come of it. In some cases, it’s not timing of the market, but time in the market. What should I do with my 401(k) after I retire? There are many options out there after you retire. Consider a rollover to a traditional IRA to consolidate your 401(k)s, if you have worked for several companies. Look at the costs and flexibility involved with leaving it with your employer. Other retirement assets, your age and year of retirement all should be taken into consideration before you do anything with your 401(k). If you are age 70 ½, you will have minimum mandatory distributions to you from your retirement accounts. Since each choice has its own implications, it is recommended that you discuss and compare all potential fees, expenses, commissions, taxes and legal ramifications with your qualified adviser before making a rollover decision. Michael Hooper is a freelance writer from Topeka. He can be reached at hoopervisor2@yahoo.com.


24F | Sunday, October 9, 2016 | The Topeka Capital-Journal

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A Retirement Special Section of the Topeka Capital-Journal. Learn more about the important decisions you'll face on your transition into ret...

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