Page 1


JAMES .S. NEILL, JR. Editor-in-Chief

PALMER J. McCLOSKEY, JR. Busines s Manager of th e SIXTY-FIFTH VOLUME


THE NINETEEN FORTY

TRINITY

PUBLISHED BY THE

JUNIOR CLASS

TRINITY HARTFORD

COLLEGE •

CONNECTICUT


HONORING To

CoLONEL

JOHN

KELSO DAVIS,

HENRY

M.A., of the

Class of 1899, who, as a member of the Board of Trustees and of several committees vitally important to Trinity, has served the college with unswerving loyalty and quiet devotion, this volume of the IVY is gratefully dedicated.


CoLONEL JoHN HENRY KELso DAvis,

Class of 1899

M.A.


CONTENTS Serratus Academicus, Faculty, Classes.

I

NTELLECT •

V

Varsity and Freshman Athletics, Intramural Sports

ICTORIES •

y

Q ;~:er~ities, Societie , Clubs


INTELLECT


the opportunity once again to demonstrate what Trinity students can do in an emergency, Dr. Ogilby took control last fall when, for the second time, Hartford wa s visited by a flood, the aftermath of a hurricane. Relief worke rs were sent off to the R ed Cross headqua rte rs, men were sent to Colt's Dike, and others were distributed around the city at va riou s relief center s. Dr. Og ilby himself showed that those in authority were not too hi gh up when he went to the dike and put in several hours work fillin g and placing sand bags .

H

AVING

But it is not only in hi s g reat work durin g the hurrican e and flood era that the Pres ident is to be r emembered. Durin g the yea r th e campus and grounds have been imp roved , steps h ave been taken to eliminate the destructi ve " Bottle Night," and best of all, Dr. Edouard B enes, former presid ent of Czecho-Slovakia, is coming to g ive the principal a ddress a t the Commencement. Thi s yea r p roduced the bigge t enrollment that Trinity has ever had. Ever mindfu l of the n eeds of a small college, Dr. Og ilby has realized that with a new dormitory, the college co uld h ave even higher st a nda rd s than the present on es . But mindful also of the need to keep a small college small , the enrollment will continue to b e the same.

Remsen Brinckerho~ Ogilby

Ten


SENATUS ACADEMICUS CORPO RAT IO N THE PRESIDENT OF THE CoLLEGE THE R oN. JosEPH BuFFINGTON, LL.D. 'VILLIAM GwiNN MATHER, LL.D. JoHN PRINCE ELTON, B.S . CHARLES G. WooDWARD, M.A. SAMUEL FERGUSON, M.A. SIDNEY T . M ILLER, LL.D. NEWTON C . BRA INARD, B.A. JAMES GuTHRIE HARBORD, LL.D. THE RoN. PI-nLIP JAMES McCooK, M.A., LL.D. CHARLES ERLING HoTCHKiss, LL.B. JAMES L. GooDWIN, B .A. WILLIAM HANMER EATON, B .S. MARTIN WITH INGTON CLEMENT, SC.D. ,JoHN HENRY KELso DAvis, M .A. LAwsoN PuRDY, LL.D. RoBERT BARNARD O 'CoNNOR, M.F.A. RICHARDSON WRIGHT, M .A . GEORGES. STEVENSON, B.A. FREDERIC C. wALCOTT, C.D. ALLEN ORTHEY JONES, M .A. LYMAN BusHNELL BRAINERD, JR., B .A. SYDNEY DILLINGHAM PINNEY, B.S. BERN B uDD, B.A. CHARLES FREDERI CK WEED, M.A.

Ha r tford Philadelphia Cleveland Wate rbu r y Hartford Hartford D e troit Hartford K e w Yo rk New Yo rk New Yo rk Hartford Pittsfield Ph il adelphia H a rtford New York ~ e w York ~ e w York Hartford ~or folk ?\ e w York W es t H a rtford W eth e rs fi eld X ew York Boston

ADVISORY BOARD THE RT . REv. ERNEST f. STIRE S, D .D . EDGAR F. WATERMAN, LL.B. TH E RT. R Ev. CHAUNCEY B. BREWSTER, D .D. GRENVILLE KANE, L.H.D . THOMAS WRIGHT R us ELL, B.A. THE HoN. FRANKL. WILcox, B .A . JAMES L. THOMSON, PH.B .

Garden City H a rtford Hartford X ew York H a rtford B e rlin H a rtford

BOARD OF FELLOWS

Senior Fellows PA uL M cM ILL AN B uTTERWORTH, B .S. RoBERT H uTCHIN ScHuTz, B .A. ADRIAN HoLM ES ONDER DONK, M .A. RoBERT SEYMOUR :MoRRis, M.S. FREDERICK CHARLES HINK EL, JR., B.S. THOMAS FRANCIS FLANAGAN

W es t H a rtford H a rtford St. James West H a rtford X ew York X ew York

Junior Fellows GLOVER J 01-!NSON' B .A. I.ISP ENARD BA CHE PHISTER, B.A. JEROME PI ERCE 'VEBSTER, M.D . RoNALD EARL KINN EY GEORGE CLEVELAND CAPEN, B.A. JOHN ANDREW MASON' B .A .

~ ew

York Bosto n Riv erdale Philadelphia H a rtford Boston Eleven


FACU LTY* THE REv. REMSEN BRINCKERHOFF OmLBY, B.D ., LL.D. , LITT.D.

President

Jarvis Pro fesso r of Physics

HENRY AuG US TUS PERKIN s, SC.D. GusTAV ADOLPH KLEENE , PH . D .

Professor of Economics, Emeritus

CHARLES EDWIN RoGERs, M.C.E.

Professor of Civil Engineering

HoRACE CHENEY SwAN, M.D.t

Professor of Ph,ysiolog,y and Hygiene; M edical Director Professor of English, Librarian and R egistrar

ARTHUR ADAMS, PH . D.

LERoY CARR BARRET, PH.D.t

Iiobart Professor of the Latin Language and Lit erature EDwARD FRANK HuMPHREY, PH.D .

Northam Professor of History and Political Science Jam es J. Goodwin Pro fe ssor of English Literature

ODELL SHEPARD, PH.D. , LJTT.D .

HARO U T UNE M uGU RDICH DADOURIAN, PH . D.

EDWARD LEFFI

Seabury Professor of Math ematics and Natural Philosophy Professor of Geology

GWELL TRoX EL L, PH.D.t

VERNON KRIEBEL KRIEBLE, PH.D. HARRY ToDD CosTELLo, PH.D.

Brownell Professor of Philosophy Director of Physical Education

RAY OosTING, M.ED. THoMA

Scovill Professor of Chemistry

HuME BrssoNNETTE , PH.D .

ARCHIE RoY BA 'GS, PH.D. RoBERT Br 'ES WooDWARD H uTT, PH.D. THURMAN LassoN HooD, PH . D .

J . Pierpont Morgan Professor of Biology Professor of Germanic Languages Professor of Psychology D ean and Associate Professor of English

:M oRsE SHEPARD ALLEN, PH.D.

Associate Pro fessor of English; Secretary of the Faculty Associate Professor of Romance Languages

Lours HA TINGS NAYLOR, PH.D. STERLING BisHoP SMITH, PH.D.

ARTHUR PEHR Ro BERT WADL UND, PH . D . JosEPH CoR. ELIUS CLARKE, B.P.E. CARL LEWI S ALTMAIER, PH.D. 路wiLLIAM CLARK HELMBOLD, PH.D . ALFRED K1

G MITCHELL, PH.D.

DANIEL EDwARD J E SEE, M.A. CLARENCE EvERETT WATTERS, ~LMu . PHILIP ELBERT TAYLOR, PH.D . CHARLES EDGAR CuNINGHAM, B.A.

Associate Pro fessor of Chemistry Associate Professor of Physics Assistant Director of Phy sical Education Assistant Professor of Psychology Assistant Professor of Greelc and Latin Assistant Professor of Mathematics Assistant D irector of Physical Education Organist and Assistant Professor of Music Assistant Professor of Economics Assistant Professor of History

*Arranged, with the exception of the President, in each group in order of seniority. tOn leave of absence for the year 1938-39. +On leave of ab ence, Trinity Term, 1938- 39.

Twelv e


EDWARD DELos MYERs, PH . D.

Assistant Professor of Linguistics

B LANCHARD WILLIAM MEAN S, PH.D.

Assistant Professor of Philosophy Assistant Professor of German

ARTHUR HowARD HuGHEs, PH.D. IRwiN ALFRED BuELL, PH.D.

Vof ALTER

Director of E :vtension and of Summ er School and Instructor in Philosophy Instructor in Physical Education

EDWIN McCLouD, M.A.

HowAHD DANIEL DooLITTLE, PH.D.

Instructor in Physics

J. WE 'DELL BuRGER, PH.D.

Instructor in Biology

JAMES ANASTASIO

Instructor in Greeh

NoTOPOULos, M.A. ( oxoN.)

Instructor in Chemistry

RoBERT LEMMON BuRWELL, JR., PH.D. THOMAS LuTHER DowNs, JR., PH.D.

Instructor in Math ematics

JOHN FRANKLIN WYCKOFF, M.A.

Instructor in Mathematics

WILLIAM

0

Instructor in History

GOOD AYDELOTTE, PH.D.

Instructor in Physical Education

RALPH W. ERICKSON, M.ED. MICHAEL LINDSAY HoFFMAN, B.A.

Instructor in Economics

WARREN CRAIG LoTHROP, PH . D.

Instructor

m

Chemistry

Instructor in English

JAcK TREVITHICK, M . A. WILLIAM GREENOUGH vVENDELL , B.A.

Instructor in Romance Languages

JoHN RoDNEY WILLIAMS, M.A .

Instructor in Romance Languages Instructor in Draw ing

HowARD CARTER WILEY

Instructor in Fin e Arts

A. EvERETT Au TIN, JR., B.A. HowARD GRE E NLEY, M . A. , F.A.I.A . DANIEL BoND RISDON

Instructor in Fin e Arts and in French

B.A .

EDWARD CoLTON, B.S. Do 'ALD ALBERT DuMONT, B.S. WILLIAM JoHN McCARTHY, JR., B . S. JOSEPH GRAFTON MERRIAM, B.A.

Assistant in English Assistant in Chemistry Assistant in English Assistant in Ch emistry Assistant in English

CoRNING CHI SHOLM, B.A.

Pa.rt-time Instructor m German

EDWARD TuDOR LAMP ON, B.A.

Part-time Instructor zn Histor.IJ

RoGER RICHMOND EATMAN , B . A . THE REv. HAROLD CLARE N CE JAQ U ITH , LL . D . THOMA S SMITH WADLOW, B.A .

Acting Treasurer Pro vost Alumni S ecretar.IJ

Thirteen


STUDENT LEADERS THE SENATE

D

the past year, as in previous years, the S enate has taken an active and helpful part in college affairs. The most important thing that they have done was to initiate, under th e l eade rship of Robe rt Muir, a fund for th e new Field House. Speaking in Chapel on a W edn esday morning, Muir stated that it would be a simple job if everyone got behind the S enate in its drive for funds. $500 was to be raised by Commencement. Th e most important thing that the S enate has done in activities outside the college was to help out th e city of Hartford in its annual campaign for mon ey for the Community Chest. And, as with the R ed Cross Drive, boxes were distributed in the frate rnity houses and on campus, and a substantial sum was raised for both ve r y worthy causes . S eve ral Senate dances were held thi s year, the first one a ft er the Coast Guard football game. Others were h eld from time to time, with the two held for raising money for the Field House actually making money. Freshman rul es we re once again in order this yea r, until aboli shed by the S enate just be for e Thanksgiving. A new mascot, " Thurman," and a student band for football g ames were two of th e other noteworth y projects carried through by the S enate. URING

Fourteen


With that remarkable quality that all S enators seem to be endowed with, this year's Senat e handled all matte rs of finance with a keen presence of mind, dealing out the money wisel y and well to th e IVY , J esters, Glee Club, and Dance Committee . THE MEDUSA A year ago four new membe rs were add ed to the M edusa, th e Senior Honora ry Society, charged with maintaining discipline and tradition s at Trinity. This year's members include those who h ave been most outstanding on the Hill during their fir st three years at Trinity. Robert M. Muir, Jr. was President of the Senate, a four-y ear lette rman in swimming, member of the I vy Board, a J ester, and Presid ent of th e Inte rfraternity Council. Ethan F. Bassford was Secretary of th e Senate, Sec ret a ry of the Interfraternity Council, Editor-in -Chi ef of the 1939 Ivy, and a member of th e Political S cien ce Club. ''Villiam l\L Gorman was Treasurer of th e Senate, a member of th e I vy Board, and Editor-in-Chi ef of the Tripod. Edward L. Morris was a letterman in football baskf'tball, and baseball for three years. PHI BETA KAPPA The Beta of Connecticut, the Trinity Chapter of Phi B eta Ka ppa, was ch a rter ed by t he Y ale Chapter, the Connecticut Alpha, on June 16, 1845, a nd is the eighth in Fifteen


orde r of foundation. To satisfy the scholastic requirements, . a student must have attained at least the grade of A in at least ten courses, and a grade of B (or better) in ten additional courses. The members chosen in 1938 were: FnANK BAHNEs, '39 RuDoLPH VICTOR 0BLOM, '39 BEHNAHD GALE BonDEN, '39 SEYMOUR PoDoRow KY, '38 CAHL EDWAHD LuNDIN, '38 BENJAMIN SACKTER, '39 SuMNER BARNES Twiss, '39 HONORS AND PRIZES FOR THE YEAR 1937-38 HoNORS IN THE CLASS oF 1938 EDWARD RoBERT BARLow, Valedictorian

WILLIAM JosEPH LAHEY, Salutatorian

PRIZES THE TUTTLE PRIZE DuDLEY JEWELL CLAPP, JR. THE GOODWI ~ GREEK PRIZES First Prize : BENJAMIN SACKTER Second Prize: JOSEPH ANTHONY CLAP IS THE FERGUSO PRIZES IN HISTORY AND POLITICAL SCIENCE First Prize : CARL EDwARD L uNDIN, JR. S econd Prize: EDWARD RoBERT BARLOW THE ALUMNI PRIZES I r ENGLISH COMPOSITION First Prize : JOHN BARD Me I ULTY Second Prize : CHARLES RoBERT CRABBE Third Prize : NoT AwARDED THE FRANK W. WHITLOCK PRIZES FOR PUBLIC SPEAK! G First Prize : HENRY MoRRIS KAPLAN Second Prize : 'iVESLEY ADOLPHUS CARCAUD THE F. A. BROWN PRIZE FOR PUBLIC SPEAKING CLEMENT GILE MoTTEN THE PHI GAMMA DELTA PRIZES IN MATHEMATICS FOR FRESHMEN First Prize : EDwARD BRoNSTEIN Second Prize: CHARLES BAYER Third Prize: GEORGE JOSEPH PRENDERGAST, II THE CHARLES CHRISTOPHER TROWBRIDGE MEMORIAL PRIZE IN PHYSICS FOR FRESHMEN JoHN WILLIAM HARHI S THE VA ZILE POETRY PRIZE JoHN DAVIS ScRANTON THE OBERLANDER TRUST PRIZE IN BIOLOGY EDWARD CHARLES HORN

Sixteen


SENIOR CLASS HISTORY

N

o

ONE can predi ct with any ass urance of accuracy which of th e many characteristics or accomplishments of a college g raduating class will distingui sh it from those annual groups that have gone before in th e procession of high er lea rnin g at Trinity College, but certainly the present student body thinks of its seniors as men who have ha d the courage and the initiative to introduce substantial changes at this college so hallowed with tradition.

The college, in its one-hundred and fifteenth yea r as a cha rtered institution has witnessed th e revival Qf a college literary magazine, Th e Trinity R eview. That traditional collegiate extra-curricular activity, forensic comba t, has been reborn am id much enthusiasm. An active drive by th e students for a field house was started by the college student body h ead, Robert Muir, in hope that with the aid of the alumni this dream may at last be r ealized. Y early contests of fraternity singing will get under way this spring. And certainly no one deni es that their spirit of crusading has helped to make the Soph Hop and the J este rs' production, in conjunction with tbe Wig and Candle. of the Connecticut College for Wom en, of Sidney Howard's " The ! .ate Christopher B ean," great_ successes; ocially, artistically, and, most of all, financially. Time and time again during the last four yea rs figur es from th e preceding classes have copped the headlines . In fact, th e members of th e Class of 1939 might well have f ear ed that th e lustre of th eir outwardly more prosaic band would be dimmed in th e glamor and clamor s urrounding th e nationally-known athl etes, andwhat's more-the optimi of recent years, but now as the final count is taken l et it ~e known that this cla ss of personalities ha s l eft an indelible mark in the annals of Trinity.

Seventeen


• • JOl-IN CLAIR ALEXAND~R, JR.

Philadelphia, Pa. Major ubj ect: Economics; Class President (3, 4); Senior Ball Committee; Political Science Club; Senate; Glee Club ( 3) ; Freshman Football; Football (2, 3, 4); Captain (4); Varsity Club; Baseball ( 1, 2); Track (3, 4); ~ Prepared at Franlclin High School

Luoww ANDERSON Hartford, Conn. Major ubj ect: English; Choir ( 1, 2, 3, 4); Glee Club ( 1, 2); Assistant Manager (3), President (4); IVY Board ;

RICHARD FRANKLIN AMES

West Hartford, Conn. Major Subject: Economics; Political Science Club; J esters ( 3) ; Cercle Franc;ai ( 1 ). Prepared at Mount H ermon

WALLACE

~N.

Prepared at Bullceley High School

FRANK BARNE S

Bloomfield, Conn. Major Subject: History; Glee Club (4); Political Science Club (3, 4); J esters (4); rrrM. Prepared at Bloomfield High School

• •

, Eighteen


• • • JoHN BARNEWELL Brooklyn, N . Y. Major Subject: History; Athenaeum ( 1, 2, 3); L e Cercle Fran<;ais; Political Science Club; Freshman Football ; Football (2, 3, 4); Baseball ( 1, 2, 3, 4). Pre11ared at Broolclyn Friends School

EDWARD CoRNELIUs BARRETT West Barrington, R. I. Major Subj ect: English; Glee Club; Seabury Society ; Political Science Club; Cheerleader; Freshman Football; Track. Prepared at Mount H ermon School

STEPHEN R ussE LL BARTLETT, JR. Hingham, Mass. Major Subj ect: Premedical; ·Glee Club ( 1); Converse Scholarship ; J esters ( 1, 2, 3) ; Athletic Traine r ( 1, 2, 3, 4);

ETHAN FROST BASSFORD Nutley, N. J. Major Subj ect: History; Medusa; ecr etary Senate; Editor-in-Chief IVY; Political Scien ce Club; Athenaeum; Tripod ( 1, 2); Baseball Manage r (3);

'PY.

rrrM; AXP. Prepared at Nutley H igh School

Prepared at L enox School

• • •

, Ninet een


• 0

WARD P E NDLETON BATE

LLOYD GRAHAM BATI'S

W est 1-lart f ord, Conn. faj or Subj ect: History; Political Science Club; Socce r ( 2, 3, 4 ) ; Basket ball ( 1, 2) ; Squasl1 ( 2, 3) , Captain ( 4 ) ; Tenni s ( 2, 3, 4 ) . Prepared at William Hall High S chool

W est Hartford, Conn . Major Subj ect: Engli sh; Tripod ( 2, 3) ; J esters ( :2); Business Manager ( 3 ) ; L e Cercle Fran<;ais ( 2, 3) ; Assistant l\lanage r of Football ( 2, 3), Manager ( 4 ) ; Junior Varsity Swimming ( 1) ; '-JfY . Prepared at Kings wood School

BENJAMIN SEWALL BLAKE, JR.

"fVeston, Mass. Major Subj ect: History; Yacht Club ( 3, 4 ) ; Political Sci ence Club ; Squash ( 2, 3, 4 ); KB<l>; ~'-Jf. Prepared at Noble and Greenough S chool

:\IILTO-" B u DIN

Hartford, Conn. Major Subj ect: History; Tripod ( 1) ; IVY ( 3 ) ; Political Sci ence Club;

rrnvr. Prepared at Bulkeley High S chool

• • •

'l'u;enty


• •

• RoBER1.' B. BuTLER

JosEPH CLEMENT BuTHS

West I-I art ford, Conn. Major Subject: Economics; Tripod Circulation Manager (2, 3), Business 1anager (3, 4); IVY Board (3); InterFraternity Council; ~<l?. Prepared at Kingswood School

Collinsville, Conn. Major Subj ects: History and Economics; Political Sci ence Club; <l?. Prepared at Canton High School

ARTHUR H . CAMPBELL

West Hartford, Conn. Major Subject: Economics; Senate; Political Science Club; Sophomore Din ing Club; Varsity Club; Junior Varsity Swimming (1); Varsity wimming (2, 3, 4); Track (1). Prepared at William Hall High School Transferred frorn Connecticut State College

RICHARD HAROLD CLOW

Geneva, New York Major Subjects: History and Economics; Political Science Club; J esters (2, 3) ; Tripod ( 1) ; Assistant Manager, Varsity Basketball (2); A <l?. Prepared at Geneva High School

• •

Twenty-one


• • • AuoLEY WILLIAM CoLE

Long B each, Long Island Major Subj ects: Economics and History; G erman Club ( 1) ; Political Science Club; ~N . Prepared at Long B each H igh School

CHESTER WINTHROP CoLLIER

W es t Hartford, Conn. Major Subj ect: History; Political Science Club; Varsity Club; Football (3); Track ( 3, 4); ~N. Transferred from Washington and L ee Prepared at William Hall High School

HAROLD BRADFORD CoLTON, JR.

Flushing, Long I sland Major Subj ect : Classics; Glee Club (3); J esters (3, 4) ; French Club (3); President ~ e wman Club (4) ; Spring Dan ce Commi ttee; L'l<I>. Prepared at McBurn ey School

W A LTER GILMORE CoucH, JR .

Hart ford, Conn. Major Subj ect: Philosophy ; Political Science Club; IIrM. Prepared at Bullceley H ·igh School

• • •

, Twenty-two


• •

• J OSIAS

JENKINS CROMWELL

Baltimore, Md. Major Subj ect: Civil Engineering; Tripod ( 1, 2), Assignment Editor ( 3) ; IVY Board; J esters (2, 3) ; Political Science Club; Freshman Football; 11'¥; Editor, Trinity R eview . Prepared at McDonagh School

DANIEL JOl-IN CR US ON

Bridgeport, Conn . Major Subj ect: Predental; T.C.C. Prepared at Central High School

ALRED wALDO DRIGG S, DAVID DAVIDSON

Hartford, Conn. Major Subjects: Chemistry and Physic ; Secretary Radio Club; Executive Committee Sci ence Club; Executive Committee Chemistry Club. Prepared at Bulkeley H igh School

JR.

East Har tford, Conr,. Major Subj ect: History; P olitical Science Club; Junior-Senior Dance Com mittee; Interfraternity C ~ un c il ( 3 ), Treasurer ( 4) ; Freshman F ootball ; Football ( 2, 3, 4) ; Track ( 1, 4 ) ; LN. Prepared at Loomis S chool

• •

, Twenty-three


• • • JOHN KEviN D u NE Hartford, Conn. Major Subj ect: English; ~KE. Prepared at BuU.:eley High School

JA CK Lov ELL FoLLANSBEE Mamaron eclc, N. Y. Major Subject: English; J esters ( 1, 2,

3); 'l'Y. Prepared at Rye N eclc High School

EARL HARPER FLYNN Hartford, Conn. Major Subj ect: Engineering; Soccer ( 1), Manager (3) ; Science Club. Prepared at Bullceley High School

JOl-IN GRIFFITH FRAN COMBE Grosse Pointe, Mich. Major Subj ect: History; L e Cercle Fran<;ais; Il Circolo Dante; Political Science Club; Squash. Prepared at Grosse Pointe School

Twenty-four


• •

• GREGORY ARMAND GABOURY

New York, N . Y. Major Subj ect: Mathematics; Glee Club; L e Cercle Franr;ais; Soccer ( 1, 2,3,4); ~N. Prepared at Classical High School

LEo GILMAN

Hartford, Conn. Major Subj ects: Philosophy and History; J esters; Political Science Club; Freshman Football; Football (2); Track. Prepared at Hartford Public High School

GEORGE DANA GREE WrLL I AM HENRY GoRMAN

II

Baltimore, Md. Major Subj ect: Classics; Medusa; Treasurer Senate; Tripod ( 1, 2), Editor (3); IVY Board; Trinity Review; Class Vice-President (4); IIrM; l'l'¥. Prepared at St. Jam es School

LEAF

Hartford, Conn. Major Subj ects: Mathematics and Phys ics; J esters (1, 2); Newman Club; Science Club; Assistant Manager of Basketball (2, 3); Track ( 1, 2, 3), Manager (4); ~N. Prepared at Bullo:eley High School

• •

Twenty-five


• • • MicHAEL VINCENT GuALTIERI T¥ aterbury, Conn. Major Subject: Premedical; Le Cercle Fran~ais; Il Circolo Dante; ewman Club. Prepared at Crosby High School

GEORGE VICTOR HAMILTON, JR. Stamford, Conn. Major Subject: History; Class President (1, 2), Vice-president (3); Political Science Club; Sophomore Hop Committee; Senior Ball Committee; Chairman Sophomore Dining Club; IVY Board; Captain Freshman Football; Football (2, 3, 4); ~'I'. Prepared at Brunswiclc School

H ERBERT JOSEPH HALL East Hartford, Conn. Major Subjects: Phy ics and Mathematics; President of Radio Club (1, 2, 3, 4); ewman Club; Business Board Tripod; Executive Committ ee Science Club; Fencing (3). Prepared at East Hartford High School

DAN PHILIP BAs ETTE HANsoN North Newington, Conn. Major Subject: Modern Languages; IVY Board; Choir ( 1, 2); Le Cercle Fran~ais (2, 3, 4); Glee Club (1, 2, 3, 4), Assistant Director ( 4) ; ~N. Prepared at Classical High School

• • •

Twenty-six


• •

• RoBERT JAMES HARRIS

PAuL ScHULER HARRI S

Philadelphia, Pa. Major Subject: History; Athenaeum (3); Political Science Club; Varsity Club; Freshman Football; Football (2, 3, 4); Baseball ( I , 2, 3); ~ . Prepared at Franlcfort High School

Hartford, Conn. Major Subj ects: English and Philosophy; J ester s; Vice-president Trinity R eviezv. Prepared at Weaver High School

PHILLIPS HAWKINS

West Hartford, Conn. Major Subj ect: Philosophy; Sophomore Dining Club; Engineering Club; Varsity Club; Cross-country; Track;

rrrM; 'VY. Prepared at Lenox School

HENRY HoYT HAYDEN

Tolland, Conn. Major Subject: English; Track ( I , 2); Glee Club (2, 3, 4), Manager (4); Trinity Review;~ . Prepared at Rockvill e H igh School

• •

Twenty-seven


• • • JAME S WALTER HELLYAR

THOMAS DEMP TER HEATH

Hartford, Conn. Major Subj ects: Chemistry and Mathematics; Chemistry Club; Science Club; T.C.C. Prepared at Bttlkeley High School

W est Hartford, Conn. Major Subj ect : English. Prepared at William Hall High School

RI CHAR D JAMES HILL

RAYMOND PATRICK HICKEY

Hartford, Conn. Major Subject : Mathematics and Physics; Science Club; Newman Club; J esters (I, 2, 3, 4); Track ( I , 2, 3, 4);

ATK. Prepared at Bullceley High School

Hart ford, Conn. Major Subj ect : Civil Engineering; Engineering Club; Radio Club; Varsity Club; Chairman of the Junior-Senior Dance Committee; K ewman Club; Science Club; Swimming ( I , 2, 3, 4); T.C .C. Prepared at William Hall High School

Twe11ly-eight


• • • TR UMAN MARTIN H uFFMAN, JR.

FRANCIS JosEPH HoPE

Wethersfield, Conn. Major Subj ect : Mathematics; Newman Club; Glee Club ( 4); Soccer ( 1, 2, 3), Captain (4); Golf ( I , 2). Prepared at Wethers field High S chool

Hartford, Conn. Major Subj ect : Economics; Political Science Club ( I , 2, 3, 4), President (4); Newman Club; ITrM, T .C.C. Prepared at Bulkeley H igh School

LYMAN L ucms JOHN oN

PAUL JASPERSOHN

Netr; Hav en, Conn. Major Subj ect: Philosophy; Senate; Interfraternity Council; Baseball ( I , 3, 4); .1<P. Prepared at Branford H igh School

Hartford, Conn. Major Subj ect: Chemistry; Chemistry Club; Science Club; Assistant Manager of Soccer (3); ATK. Prepared at Bulkeley H igh School

• • •

Twenty-nine


• • • J 0!-INSON Hartford, Conn. Major Subj ect: Chemistry; ~N . Prepared at Bull.:eley High School WILLIAM HERBERT

HENRY HASTON KEAN E

Hartford, Conn. :Major Subject: History; Junior-Senior D ance Committee; Junior Varsity Basketball ( 1, 2); Basketball (3) ; Track ( I , 2, 3, 4); ATK. Prepared at William Hall High School

DAVID K EAT ING

Lee, Mass. Major Subject: Economics; Glee Club (3, 4), Librarian (4) ; Science Club; T ennis (4) ; T.C.C. Prepared at L ee High School

MoRRIS KL E IN

Hartford, Conn. Major Subjects: History and Philosophy; Political Science Club; D ebating Society; Junior Varsity Basketball ( 1). Prepared at Weaver High School

• •

Thi1·ty


• •

• RICHARD ALEXANDER LEGGETT

W ethers field, Conn. Major Subj ect: Mathematic Glee Club ( 4 ) ; Jesters ( I, 2 ) ; Manager of Basketball ( 4) ; Soccer ( I, 2, 3) ; ~N . Prepared at W eth ers field High School.

RoBERT L E oNARD MADOR KY

Springfield, Mass. Major Subj ect : Mathemat:cs; ExecutiYe Committee of Sci ence Club. Prepared at Central High School

EDwARD GuiLD MANN

Bloomfield, Conn. Major Subj ect: Economics; Glee Club (3, 4) ; Political Science Club (3, 4) ; Golf ( 2) ; IIrM, T.C.C. Prepared at Bloomfield High School

SH E RWOOD V E TT MARTIN

East Hartford, Conn. Major Subj ects : Physics and 'lathematics ; Science Club. Prepared at East Hartford High S chool

• •

Thirty-one


• • • NEWTON H EN RY MASON

Scarsdale, N. Y. i\'Iajor Subj ect: P remedical; J est er s ( I , 2, 3, 4); Rifle Club ( I ) ; KE. Prepared at S carsdale High S chool

FRANK EuGENE McCARTHY

Hartford, Conn . Major Subj ects: History and Economics ; Glee Club; Political Science Club. Prepared at Bullceley H igh School

G u Y B u RNHAM MAYNARD, JR.

L exington, Mass. Major Subj ect: Premedical; J esters ( I, 2, 3, 4) ; Trinity Troubadours ( 1, 2,

3); KB<I>, 'VY. Prepared at Phillips Exeter Academy

L ES LIE VVILLIAM McWILLIAMS

East Hartford, Conn. Major Subj ects: Math ematics and Economics ; Political Science Club; Radio Club; J est ers; ~KE. Prepared at East Hart for d High School

• • •

Thirty-two


• •

• CLARENCE BuRTON MoRGAN, Jn. Plainville, Conn. Major Subj ect: Premedical; L e Cercle Fran\!ais; Manager T ennis ( 4) ; Freshman Football; ATK. Prepared at Plainville High School

'VILLIAM SILSBY MoRGAN West Hart ford, Conn. 'lajor Subj ect: French;~\¥. Transferr ed from Princeton University Prepared at K ingswood School and Phillips Academy

EDWARD Lou1s MoRRIS 1Vindsor, Conn . Major Subj ects: History and Economics; M edusa; Sophomore Dining Club ; Political Science Club, Vice-president ( 4); Sophomore Hop Committee; Business Board of IVY ; Varsity Club; Freshman Football; Varsity Football ( 2, 3, 4 ); Basketball ( 1, 2, 3); Baseball ( I , 2, 3), Captain (4); ~ . Prepared at John Fitch High School

RoBERT MuRRAY Mum, JR. Grosse Pointe, Mich. Major Subj ect: English; Medusa; Pres ident of th e S enate ; Interfrate rnity Council (3), President (4) ; Class Secretary-Treasurer (1, 3, 4); Chairman Sophomore Hop; Sophomore Dining Club; J es ter s ( I, 2, 3, 4); Seabury Soci ety (2, 3); Athletic Advisory Council ; Swimming ( I, 2, 3, 4); 'l'Y. Prepared at Grosse Pointe H igh School

• • •

Thirty-three


• •

• CARLTON GILBERT NELSON

Hart ford, Conn . Major Subjects: Chemistry and Physics; Le Cercle Frano;ais; Camera Club; Glee Club; Science Club; Chemistry Club. Prepared at Bull•eley High School

LAWRENCE JoHNSON NEWHALL

Philadelphia, Pa. Major Subjects: History and English; Manager of the Union ( 4) ; Jesters ( 1, 2, 3) , President (4); '¥. Prepared at South Kent School

JAMES EuGENE O ' BRIEN

RuooLPH VI c ToR OnLoM

Forestville, Conn . Major Subj ect: G erman; Holland Schola r; Mary A. T erry F ellow; <[)BK. Prepared at Bristol High S chool

Kensington, Conn. Major Subj ect: Classics. Prepared at N ew Britain Senior H igh School and St. Thomas Seminary

• •

Thirty -f ou r


• • BoRI S WILLIAM PAcELlA

ARTHUR CLARENCE OLSON

W es t Hartford, Conn. Major Subj ect: Economics; Junior Varsity Swimming (1, 2); AXP. Prepared at William Hall High School

Hartford, Conn. Major Subj ect : Chemistry; Chemistry Club; Varsity Club; Freshman Football; Varsity Football (3, 4); Track ( I, 2, 3), Captain (4); ~N. Prepared at Bulkeley High School

GEORGE BRADFORD pATTERSON

Gw;ljnedd, Pa. Major Subj ect: English; Tripod ( 1, 2), Managing Editor (3, 4); IVY Board; T ennis ( I, 2); Freshman Football; J est ers (2, 3); A~<l?. Prepared at St. Andrew's School

'v ILLIAM

FmTH

Pi c KLEs

Buckland, Conn. Major Subj ect s: History and Economics; Glee Club (3); AXP. Prepared at Bul/;;eley High School

• • •

Thi,·ty-five


• • JOHN BARTEL REINHEIMER Rochester, N. Y. Major Subj ect: English; S enior Ball Committee; J esters (1); Tripod (1, 2, 3); Trinity Troubadours (2, 3, 4); Freshman Football; Football (2, 3, 4); Baseball (2) ; Golf (3), Manager (4);

BENJAMIN DAviD RoHowsKY Hartford, Conn. Major Subjects: Chemistry and Biology; Debating Club; T ennis (1, 2, 3), Captain ( 4). Prepared at Hartford Public High School

WY. Prepared at L enox School

ALBERT ADAM SABAT Hartford, Conn. Major Subj ect: Premedical. Prepared at Hartford Public School

BENJAMIN SACKTER Hart ford, Conn. Major Subject: Classics; Holland Scholarship; Goodwin Greek Prize;

H igh

<I>BK. Prepared at Weaver High School

• •

Thirty-sillJ


• • • KEITH HE TRY ScHONROCK

RoGER CuRRIE ScHMUCK

Laramie, Wyo. Major Subject: Philosophy; ~<I>. Prepared at University Training School of University of Wyoming

East Hartford, Conn. Major Subject: English; IVY Board; Jesters; Assistant Manager of Football (2); Political Science Club; AXP. Prepared at East Hartford High School

THOMAS JOSEPH SKELLEY, JR. GEoRGE RoBERT ScHRECK

West Hartford, Conn. Major Subject: History; Political Science Club; Glee Club (2, 3, 4); Newman Society; Le Cercle Fran~ais (1); Freshman Football; Freshman Swimming; AXP. Prepared at Bullceley High School

Hartford, Conn. iajor Subject: History; Political Science Club; Newman Club; Forum (3); Le Cercle Fran~ais (I) ; Freshman Football; Junior Varsity Basketball (I); AXP. Prepared at Hartford Public High School

• •

Thirty-seven


• e

• JoHN EDwARD SLoWIK Hart f ord, Conn. Major Subj ect: Civil Engineering; Sophomore Dining Club; Engineering Club; Science Club; Varsity Club; Swimming ( I , 2, 3), Captain (4). Prepared at Hartford Public High School

GEORGE WILLIAM SMITH, JR. Hart ford, Conn . M a jor Subj ect s: English and Philosophy; Senate ; D ebating Society, Vi cepresident ( 4 ); Seabury Societ y (2, 3), President ( 4) ; IVY Board ; Ass ista nt Manager Socce r ( 2), Treasurer (3), Vice-presid ent (4), T .C.C. Prepared at Hart ford Public High School

EDWARD LAWRENCE SMITH Hartford, Conn. Major Subj ect: History; Senate; Newman Club; Political Club; Sophomore Hop Committee; Junior-Senior Dance Committee (3, 4); Junior Varsity Swimming ( I ); Soccer ( I , 2, 3, 4); J esters ( 2, 3); AM>. Prepared at Bullceley High School

FREDERICK R EYNOLDS SPITZER Tol edo, 0. l\I a jor Subj ect: English; Glee Club ( l ) ; Il Circolo Dante (2, 3, 4); J este rs (3, 4); M a nager of Freshman Football;

KB<I> ; 'l'Y. Prepared at R ectory School, GranAriz ona brooke School, Southern chool

• •

Thirty- eig ht


• • GEORGE wALLACE BAILEY STARKEY Hartford, Conn. Major Subject: Premedical; Class Vicepresident ( 2, 4); Sophomore Hop Committee ; Junior-S enior Dance Committee ; Executive Committee of Science Club; Political Sci ence Club; Le Cercle Franc;ais; Freshman Football; Junior Varsity Swimming ( 1, 2). Prepared at Bulkeley High School

FRANCIS ALEXANDER STOCKWELL, JR. Hartford, Conn. Iajor Subj ect: Economics; Glee Club (2, 3, 4) ; Political Science Club; Tripod Business Board (2, 3), Circulation Manager ( 4); Freshman Football; Track (1, 2); T.C.C. Prepared at Bullceley High School

RoB ERT Jo sEPH STERBENS Hartford, Conn. Major Subj ect: Premedical; Freshman Football; ATIC Prepared at Bullceley H igh School

R uDOLPH LoRBACHER TALBOT Hingham, Mass . Major Subj ect: Philosophy; Sophomore Dining Club; Freshman Football; Football ( 2 ) ; Track ( 1) ; '¥. Prepared at Noble and Greenough School

• • •

Thirty-nine


• • • SuMNER BARNES Twiss Hartford, Conn. Major Subject: Chemistry; Athenaeum (2); Chemistry Club, Secretary (3, 4); Science Club; T.C.C. Prepared at Weaver High School

ARNOLD VVATERMAN Hartford, Conn. Major Subject: Physics; Glee Club; Physics Laboratory Assistant ( 4) ; T .C.C. Prepared at Hartford Public H igh School and Th e Storm K ing School

JoHN EDWARD UPHAM, Ja. Waban, Mass. Major Subject: Chemistry; Chemistry Club; Science Club; IVY Business Board; Jesters (I); Intramural Athletic Association; Freshman Football; Football (2); Baseball (I); Squash (3, 4) ; Le Cercle Franc;ais (I). Prepared at L enox School

ARTHUR CHARLES VVEBB Wethersfield, Conn. Major Subjects: Mathematics and Physics; Glee Club; Freshman Football; Football (2, 3, 4). Prepared at Quincy High School

• •

Forty


• JOHN K ENNET H W E RN ER

JOHN WARREN WEISSHEIM E R

Eagle Pass, T ex. Major Subj ect: Premedical; Business Manager of IVY; Tripod ( 1, 2, 3); Sophomore Hop Committee; JuniorSenior Dance Committee; L e Cercle Franr;:ais ( 1, 2, 3, 4) ; Glee Club; Intramural Athletic Council, Secr etary (3); Soccer ( I, 2, 3, 4); Junior Varsity Swimming ( 1, 2); T.C.C. Prepared at T exas Military Inst itute

New Britain, Conn. Major Subject: Premedical. Prepared at New Britain Senior H igh School

• •

• WILLIAM BRYAR WHITE, JR.

Saratoga Springs, N. Y. Major Subject: English; IVY Board; Rifle Club ( 1); Swimming (3); AXP. Prepared at K ent School Forty-one


• • • JoHN THOMA S vVILCOX

TVeth ersfield, Conn. Major Subj ect: History; Class Secretary-Treas ure r (3) ; Sophomore Dining Club; Glee Club; J esters (2, 3); Sophomore Hop Committee; Junior-Senior Dance Committee (3, 4); Trinity Yacht Club (3); Manager Swimming T eam (4) ; Freshman Football; Football (2, 3, 4); AXP . Prepared at Monson Academy

THURST ON WRIGHT, JR .

Pittsburgh, Pa. Major Subj ect: History; IVY Board; Tripod (3); Intramural fanager (3); Political Science Club ( I , 2, 3, 4); Freshman Football; 1'1 'I'. Prepared at The Hill School

• • • WILLIAM HowARD YATES

Hartford, Conn. Major Subjects: Chemistry, Mathematics, and Physics; Political Science Club; Newman Club; Chemistry Club; Science Club; Freshman Football; J unior Varsity Basketball ( 1) ; Basketball ( 3) ; AXP. Prepared at Hartford Public High School Forty-two


HISTORY OF THE CLASS OF 1940

S

one hundred and eighty-odd bewildered freshmen arrived on the campus on a hot September day to take up for four years the pursuit of learning. After tussling with trunks and other articles, we walked over to the fain Office, had tuition and other monies extracted from us, and started in the round of parties, dates, bull sessions over profs and courses, and e\路erything else that goes to make up a rushing season. Two weeks later fifty-five of us helped to close the season officially by pledging one of the eight fraternities. Coaches Bill Orrick and Tom Wadlow had had their charges out for a week by the time rushing was over. A squad of forty-five men had reported the first day, although after a week or so this was pared down to about twenty-five. The season, though devoid of any actual victories, was not an unsuccessful one. After we had been taken over by Choate by a score of 26-0, we returned to the Trinity Field to hold Wesl eyan to a 7-7 tie. The next week we journeyed to Connecticut State for the third and final game. Ending in a scoreless tie, the game was noteworthy from a Trinity standpoint, since not one substitution was made. Outstanding on the team were Alexander, Dimling, Hopkins, Lindne r, Randall, and Captain Kelly, all of whom played varsity football later on. Came our first college dance, th e Sophomore Hop und er the guidance of Bob Muir. Red Carino's orchestra furnished the music. The J esters' also perform ed that week-end, presenting "Seven Keys to B a ldpate." At th e first class election Johnny Dim ling was elected to lead us, Jim ~ eill elected Vice-President, and Jimmy Lathrop the Secretary-Treasurer. After the Ch ri stmas vacation the mid-yea r examinations came along to bother us. Some t en or twenty familiar faces wer e missing after th e first hurdles of our collegiate career. With the second term basketball and swimming also arrived to brighten up the more academic side of college life. Spik Manice, Jimmy Lathrop, and "Axie" Aksomitas made things brighter for Joe Clarke, "Axie" establishing a n ew pool record for the 200-yard breaststroke. A few weeks after the mid-year exam inations about twenty of us who had survived th e mid-yea rs well enough were put through our paces during the annual "Hell Week." The small number created a good bit of comment on wheth er or not the fraternities were on th eir way out, but succeeding years have proved otherwise. Spring sports arrived on th e campus and found Stan Alexander, P ete Rihl , Bill Kelly, and Rafe Shelly doing th eir bit for Dan J essee's baseball nine, while W' hite, Riley, McLaughlin, Moran, Bud Smith, Pankratz, and Lindn er puffed around the track for Ray Oosting. The Senior Ball, that cure-all for lazin ess, came with Count Basie strutting his stuff at th e Hartford club ea rly in May. "Bottle Night," the tradition that sprang OME

up in two years, found a good many of us h elping the maids to clear our rooms of a good bit of otherwise unmanagea bl e junk. The college truck was forced to make four trips before th e campus was presentable. Soon after final s arrived to close out our first year "' eath the Elms." As sophomores we watch ed Captain H erb Vinick lead his t eam through an interesting though mediocre season. K elly, Carey, Dimling, and Rihl we re awarded Forty-three


their varsity l etters for their outstanding play. Our class elections were held, this time amidst th e shout of "dirty politics. " Rafe Sh elly ascended to the pres idency, Tommy McLaughlin became Vice-Presid ent, and AI Hopkins took over the thankless job of Treasure r (even though the S enate had abolished class dues, the Treasurer must carry on) . A week afte r the J este rs had colla borated with Vassar in putting on " Th e Warrior's Husband," with several members of our class helping out in the production, we staged our first class dance. Under th e able guidance of Chairman Don Smith and his large committee, the affair was a great social success, though Don had some explaining to do about why th e dance was not financially successful. Once again the p eriod after midyears found us missing a f ew more of th e familiar faces, so many in fact that our class had been whittled down to 路 ninety-one. But still the wheat was with us. Carey, Lindner, and F erguson represented us on the basketball t eam, Carey being el ected the captain for the n ext year. And as befo re Aksomitas, Don Smith, and Gus H eusser carried the flag for 1940 on the swimming t eam. "Dirty politics" was once aga in the cry as the "machine" machined its candidates through th e class elections, the previous officers being re-elected . Thi s yea r was th e fir st that we we re permitted to have beer at our election celebrations. The ball team again had Shelly and Kelly to help it through many a tough spot, with P ete Rihl on hand with his "Aha-Aha," and Capobianco helping out at short. Th e combination Junior-S enior Ball with Mal Hallett proved to be just F01路ty-{our


what we n eeded to wake us up to the fact that finals were almost upon us. Returning in 1938 eighty-fiv e strong, we helped Dan and his grid machine by having Dimling, Alexander, Carey, Hopkins, Randall, and Rihl on the team. Once again in the fall elections the Old Guard tri ed its utmost to get organized, but the strength of the "machine" was just too much for them. W e attended the Sophomore Hop at the Hartford Club early in D ecember and the n ext night took in th e J esters' n ew show. Collaborating with the Wig and Candle of Connecticut College for Women, the th espians actually made some money. Mid-yea rs again roll ed around, and again the class shrank. Our champion breaststroker, Aksomitas, helped out fr emendously with the swimming. H e has yet to lose a race in dual inte rcollegiate competition. A f ew weeks after the season closed "Axie" came through with a fifth in the Intercollegiates held at ew Haven. The basketball t eam turned in a fin e season with only three losses out of twelve games. F erguson, Lindner, and Randall all played well with Di ck Lindner being elected captain for next year. The Senior Ball this year featured two orchestras, B enny Meroff's and Erskine Hawkins '. Following th e dance, the J est ers obliged us with a presentation of Robert Sherriff's " Journ ey's End." And so as we go to press ( late, as always, but later than usual ), we find the ball team losing most of its games, the track team completing a fair season, and the tennis doing the same. The fin als a re on us. Five exams in four days a re too much.

Forty-five


CLASS ELECTIONS Done Most for Trinity-LINDNER, Done T rinity for Most-CAREY, Most Popular-LINDNER,

BILKA.

SHELLY, K ELLY, B uRNHAM.

LINDNER.

Most Brilliant-WoLF,

McCARTHY.

Most L ikely to Succeed-SHELLY, Handsom est- DIMLING,

LINDNER, ~ EILL, BuRNHAM.

LINDNER .

Best Natured-ANDERSON, Most Conceited-HEATH,

DIMLING . SMITH.

B est Dressed-HEATH ,

"\V AT,KER.

Greatest Social

HEATH , SMITH.

Light-

Biggest Bluffer-G I ARDI, Class PoliticianClass

and Rmr..

SHELLY.

1'11.ost Versatile-LINDNER, Best Athlete-CAREY,

NEILL, B uRNHAM, SHELLY

SHAPIRO.

E ILL, SHELLY, HoPKINS.

Grind-SHAPIRo, "\VoLF.

Biggest Loafer-CAREY,

GIARDT.

FACULTY ELECTIONS ]'Jost P opular-MEAN,

J AYLOR, T AYLOR.

Least Appreciated-KAYLOR, Best Lecturer-TAYLOR,

MEANs, PERK I NS.

Most Ilardhearted-TROXELL, ll1ost Scholarly-SI-IEPARD, Hardest to

TRoXELL, SHEPARD.

WADLUND, DADOURIAN.

PERKINS, BARRET.

Blujf-WADLUND, HELMBOLD, HooD , Bi ssoNETTE .

Most Sarcastic-HooD, Faculty Sheik-MEA

DADOURJAN, H ELMBOLD.

s, AYDELLOTTE, DowNs, B uRWELL .

Forty-seven


CLASS FAVORITES Greatest Honor at Trinity- MEDUSA, Favorite Course-BIOLOGY,

PI-II BETA KAPPA, PRESIDENT oF SENATE.

HISTORY, F INE ARTS, ENGLISH, FRENCH.

Favorite Sport ( to play)-TENN ls,

SQ uAsH, FooTBALL, BAsEBALL .

Favorit e Sport ( t.o watch)-FooTBALL, Amusement-,VoMEN, Author-K ENNETH Orchestra-ARTIE Magazine-LIFE, Actress- B ETTE Actor-J A~1E

B ASKETBALL, Sw i MM I NG.

R EAD I NG, HIKI NG .

RoB E RT s, MARGARET HALSEY.

SHAW, To MMY DoRSE Y, B ENNY GooDMAN, CHARLIE BARNET.

EsQUIRE, TIME , FoRTUNE .

DAvis, CLAUDETTE CoLBERT.

CAGNEY, CARY GRANT, LEw AYRES, RICHARD B ARTHELMESS.

B es t Boolc of 1938-TH E

C i TADEL, WITH MALICE TowARDS SoME.

Top ic of Conversation-WoMEN,

O uT DOOR LIFE , FuTURE JoBs.

B es t Motion Picture of 1938-You

CAN'T TAKE

IT

B es t College (m ale) outside of Trinit:IJ- WESLEYA , Favorite Girls' College-SMITH, M-r. Campus Character-PoP,

P sE

College Grievance-R ISING

4, PHIL. 1 AND 2.

AnT s 1 , PHIL . l 4 .

ORGANI C CHEMISTRY.

Trinity's Greatest Need-FIELD

Forty-eight

HoLYOKE, VASSAR.

TuiTION , CuT SYSTEM.

Hardest Course-PHYS ICS I ,

HARVARD, YALE.

Do-NE LLIE, RED MIK E.

Most I nteresting Course--G RE EK Easiest Course-FINE

WITH You.

Hou sE.


HowARD STANLEY ALEXANDER Philadelphia, Pa. Major Subject: History; Political Science Club; Freshman Football; Football (2, 3); Varsity Club; Baseball (1, 2, 3); LN. Prepared at Franli:lin High School

ALBERT AKSOMITAS Hartford, Conn. Major Subject: M echanical Engineering; Sophomore Dining Club; Varsity Club; Junior Varsity Swimming ( 1) ; Swimming (2, 3), Captain (4). Prepared at Hart ford Public High School

RoBERT ERNEST ANDERSON New Britain, Conn. Major Subject: Chemistry; Chemistry Club; Science Club; T.C.C. Prepared at N ew Britain High School

ERNEST LEONARD BENGSTON, JR. Manch ester, Conn. Major Subj ect: History; French Club (3); Jesters (3) . Prepared at Manch ester High School

Porty-nille

â&#x20AC;˘


HERBERT REMINGTON BLAND

pAUL JOSEPH BILKA

New Yorlc, N. r. Major Subj ect: Premedical; Atheneum ( I ) ; Political Sci ence Club ( I ) ; Newman Society (3) . Prepa.red at B enj amin Franlclin High School

West Hartford, Conn. Major Subj ect: Philosophy; Class S ecretary-Treasurer ( I) ; Sophomore Hop Committee; Tripod ( I ), Assistant Busin ess Manager (2), Business Manager (3); Cross-Country Manager (3);

AXP. Prepared at William Hall High School

WALTER EINAR BoRIN

A. BoDKIN, JR. Maplewood, n. J. Major Subject: English; J esters; Political Science Club; A~<I>. Prepa1路ed at St. Jam es' School RoBERT

Fifty

Hartford, Conn. Major Subj ect : Chemistry; Chemistry Club (2, 3); French Club (2); Glee Club (2, 3); Science Club (3) ; T.C.C. Prepared at Bull.路eley High School


EDWARD LuTHER BuRNHAM

STEPHAN A u ausTus BRENNAN

East Hartford, Conn. Major Subj ect : English; Newman Club; Junior Varsity Basketball ( 1) ; Track ( 2) . Prepared at East Hartford High School

STEPHEN HART BuRRALL

Wat erbury, Conn. Major Subject: Biology. Transferred from Williams College Prepared at Loomis School and Roxbury Academy

North Windham, Conn. Subj ect: Classics; Tripod ( 1, 2), Editor ( 3); J est ers (1, 2), President (3); Le Cercle Fran<;ais; IVY Board; KE. Prepared at W indham High School ~Iajor

THOMA S ELTON CANF I ELD

W est Hartford, Conn. Major Subj ect: E conomics ; Political Science Club ( 2) ; Tripod (2) ; IVY Busine s Board; Assistant Manager Track (2, 3) ; ~KE.

Fi{ty-o11e


JoHN HENRY CAREY, JR.

West Hartford, Conn. Major Subject: History; Class Vicepresident (2); Political Science Club; Junior Varsity Basketball ( I ); Basketball (2), Captain (3) ; Football (2, 3); ~N.

EDWIN ARTHUR CHARLES

Broo!.lyn, N. Y. Major Subject : Greek; Intramural Athletic Council; Tripod Managing Editor (3); IVY Board; Track ( I, 2, 3); Cross-Country (I, 2, 3); T.C.C. Prepared at Erasmus Hall School

Prepared at William Hall High School

JAMES FRANCIS CoLLINS

Hart ford, Conn. Major Subj ect: History; Treasurer (3); Varsity Varsity Basketball ( I) ; 3); T ennis ( I, 2, 3). Prepared at Hartford School

Fifty-two

TIMOTHY RoBERT CoNNELLY

Newman Club, Club; Junior Basketball (2,

Public High

Hartford, Conn. Major Subj ect: Economics; Political Science Club (2, 3); Newman Society (3); Freshman Football (I); Soccer (2, 3). Prepared at Bullr.eley H igh School


CHARLES RoBERT CRABBE Wethers field, Conn. Major Subject: English; Jesters (2); Trinity Review ( 3). Prepared at Franklin Day School and Wethers field High School

JoHN VoLz DIMLING Baltimore, Md. Major Subject: History; Class President ( 1) ; Sophomore Dining Club; IVY Board; Sophomore Hop Committee ; Glee Club (I, 2, 3, 4); Choir (1, 2, 3, 4); Freshman Football; Football (2,

3). Prepared at McDonagh School

• OTTO ERNEST DuENNEBIER Hartford, Conn. Major Subject: Philosophy; Tennis (1, 2, 3); ATK. Prepared at Hartford Public High School

RoBERT BoLICH ELY Albany, N. Y. Major Subject: History; Political Science Club (3); Baseball ( 1, 2); Assistant Manager Football (2, 3); AXP. Prepared at Milne H igh School

Fifty-tltl·ee


ARVID 'VILLI AM ENGEL H artf01路d, Conn. Major Subj ect: Economics; Glee Club ( 1, 2, 3) ; Political Science Club ( 3) . Prepared at Hartford Public H igh School

RAYMOND JAMES FERGUSON, J It. Hm路t f ord, Conn. Major Subj ect: English: Sophomore Dining Club; Sophomore Hop Committee ; Political Sci ence Club ( I, 2, 3 ) ; J esters ( 1, 2, 3) ; IVY Board; Varsity Club; Fres hman Football; Basketball ( I , 2, 3); Track ( I ) ; Soccer ( 2, 3) ; Baseball ( 2 ) . Prepared at Loomis School

F 路i ft y - f our

ERNE

MosEs EssEx Bristol, R.I . Ma jor Subject: Math ematics; Choir ( 3) ; Glee Club ( I, 2, 3) . Prepared at Mount H ermon School T

JoHN ALovsrus Fox Hartford, Conn . Major Subj ect: Cla sic . Prepared at Saint Thomas S eminary


LEo PAUL GIARD!

Hartford, Conn. Major Subj ects: Economics and Math ematics; Il Circolo Dante ( 1, 2, 3) ; Football (3) . Prepared at Hartford Public High School

CLARE~CE BERTRAM GRANDAHL

Hartford, Conn. ~Iajor Subject: Philosophy; Glee Club (2, 3); Soccer (2), Assistant Manager (3); LN. Prepared at Bulkeley High School

PAuL ALLE~ GooDWIN

T ilton, N . H. Major Subj ect: Chemistry; Chemistry Club (2), Executive Committee (3); Science Club (3); Radio Club, Vicepresident ( 1, 2, 3); T.C.C . Prepared at Tilton School

'iVILFRED FARRAR GREENWOOD

Windsor, Conn. Major Subj ect: Physics; Sci ence Club (3); Radio Club, Treasu rer ( 1, 2, 3); Krow Krutch and Keg Club; Fre hman Football; Track AXP.

Fifty-five


WILLIAM BEIJ HARRISON Hart ford, Conn. Major Subj ect: Philosophy; Radio Club ( 1); AXP. Prepared at William Hall High School and Bulkele;tj High School

ERNEST H ENRY H EATH, JR. Summit, N. J. Major Subject: English; Cross-Country ( 1, 2, 3); Jesters; ~KE. PreparPd at Berkshire School

..

Fifty-six

JoHN FRANKLIN HAZEN, JR. Newington, Conn. Major Subj ect: English; Glee Club (2, 3); Choir (2, 3); Fre hman Football; Swimming (2). Prepared at Hartford Public High School

ALVIN CHARLES HoPKINs Philadelphia, Pa. Major Subj ects: Economics and History; Class Secretary-Treasurer (2); Sophomore Dining Club; Political Science Club; Freshman Football; Football (2, 3); Junior Varsity Basketball (1); Basketball (2) ; ~N. Prepared at Simon Grat::: High School


WALL.ACE HENRY HowE New Britain, Conn. Major Subj ects : Economics and Hi tory; Sophomore Hop Committee; Political Science Club; Freshman Football; Junior Varsity Baseball ( I ) ; T.C.C. Prepared at New Britain H igh School

ALEXANDER J ACY Hartford, Conn. Major Subj ect: Chemistry; Freshman Football; Football ( 2, 3). Prepared at Hart for d Public H igh School

WAYNE LEONARD JoHN oN D e Sm et, S . D. Iajor Subj ect: Classics. Prepared at D e Smet Public High School

JAMES FRANKLYN Jo ES Danielson, Conn . Major Subj ect: Premedical; Track ( I, 2); T.C.C. Prepared at Killingly Iligh School

F'ifty-seven


GEORGE KAZARI.AN

Hartford, Conn. Major Subj ect: History; Political cience Club; Junior Varsity Baseball ( I); Baseball (2, 3); Football ( 2 ). Prepared at Bulkeley H-igh School

, VILLIAJ\1 FRANCIS KELLY

Hartford, Conn . Major Subject: History; Sophomore Dining Club; Varsity Club; Newman Club (3) ; Political Science Club (2, 3); Freshman Football, Captain; Football (2, 3); Baseball (I, 2, 3) . Prepared at Bulkeley High School

EnwAnD FRANCIS LAPAC

RonEnT SHAW KEnn

Newport, R. I. Major Subj ect: Philosophy; Seabury Society; T .C.C. Prepared at Rogers High School

P;fty-eight

Hartford, Conn. Major Subj ects: Mathematics, Chemistry, and Physics; Varsity Club; Baseball (2, 3); Soccer (2, 3). Prepared at Hartford Public H igh School


CARMINE RoB E RT LAVI E RI

Winstead, Conn. Major Subj ect: French J est ers (2, 3); Glee Club (3) ; L e Cercle Franc;ais (2, 3); Track (2). Prepared at Gilbert School

RICH AR D DRAKE LINDNER

Hartford, Conn. Major Subj ects: Economics and Mathematics; Class Secr etary-Treas urer (3); Sophomore Dining Club, Chairman; Varsity Club; Intramural Athletic Committee; IVY Board; Political Scien ce Club; Freshman Football; Junior Varity Basketball ( I ); Track ( I , 2); Football (2, 3); Basketball (2, 3); Glee Club (3) ; ~N. Prepared at Bullceley High School

ANTHONY CHAN DL E R Lo scALZO

New Y orlc, N. Y. Major Subject : History; Political Science Club (2, 3); J esters (2, 3); IVY Board ; Freshman Football; Junior Varsity Baseball ( I ) . Prepared at Newtown High School

RoBERT CLINTON MADD EN

Newton, Mass. Major Subj ect: English; Trinity Yacht Club ; ~'Jf.

Fifty-nine


WILLIAM JosE PH McCARTHY Hart fo rd, Conn. Major Subj ects: Mathematics and Physics; Newman Club. Prepared at Bulkeley High School

PHILIP BRowN McCooK New York, N. Y. Major Subject: Philosophy; Glee Club ( I ); Freshman Football; Junior Varsity Baseball ( I ); Football (2); T ennis (3). Prep ared at Choa te School

PALMER JENKIN McCLoSKEY, JR. Arlington, Va. Major Subj ect: History ; J es.t ers ( I, 2, 3); Tripod (2); D ebating Society, Pres ident (3) ; Bu siness Manager IVY; Freshman Football; Assistant Swimming Manage r (2, 3); A~<I>. Prepared at Brent School

THOMA McLAUGHLIN Bristol, Conn. Major Subj ects : Mathematics and Physics; Sophomore Dining Club; Interfraternity Council; Sophomore Hop Committee; Freshman Cross-Country; Cross-Country (2); Track ( I, 2, 3);

ATIC Prepared at Bristol High School


THEODORE EDWARD :METHENY Windsor, Conn . Major Subject: Civil Engineering. Prepared at John Fitch H igh School

DAviD WooDs MosER Rocky Hill, Conn. Major Subjects: Biology and Premedical. Transferred from Bates College Prepared at Hartford Public High School

NoRMAN CLINTON MILLER Wethersfield, Conn. Major Subj ect: English; Science Club . Prepared at Wethersfield High School

JAMES STUART NE ILL, JR. Manchest er, Conn . Major Subj ects : French and German; Class Vice-President ( 1); Tripod ( 1, 2, 3) ; IVY Editor-in-Chief; L e Cercle Franc;ais ( 1, 2, 3); Sophomore Hop Committee; Jesters ( 1, 2, 3) ; Inte rfraternity Council (3); Freshman Football; Football, Assistant Manager (3);

tpy Prepared at Lenox School

Si.rty-one


HARRY R E MK E

I CK E L

Fargo, N.D. 1ajor Subj ect s : Economics and History ; IVY Board; Freshman Cro Country ; occer ( 2, 3) ; L I. Prepared at Fargo High S chool

H E RB E RT H EN RY pAN KRATZ

Bristol, Conn . Major Subj ects : Math ematics and Civil Engineering ; Class Vice-President ( 3) ; Sophomore Dining Club ; Varsity Club ; Track ( 1 2, 3) ; Cros -Country ( I, 2, 3) ; ATK. Prepared at Bristol H igh School

JoH N RoB E RT RANDALL

THoMA S Ro BE RT PY E, JR.

Hart f ord, Conn. Major Subj ect s : Math ematics and Physics ; Politi cal Scien ce Club; Glee Club ; S cience Club; T .C.C. Prepared at Bullceley H igh School

Sixty-two

Y onlcers, N . Y. Major Subj ect : Philosophy; J est ers; Freshman Football; Fresl1man Basketball; Football ( 2, 3) ; Basketball ( 2, 3) ;

AXP . Prepared at George Wa shington High School


J OSE PH LEROY RIHL

.

~

Philadelphia, Pa . Major Subj ect: History; Sophomore Dining Club; Varsity Club; Political Science Club; Freshman Football; Football (2, 3); Baseball ( 1, 2, 3); :LN. Prepared at Franl~:ford H igh School

STEPHEN MICHAEL RIL EY

Hartford, Conn. Major Subj ect: Mathematics ; K ewman Club; Freshman Cross-Country; CrossCountry (2, 3) 路Track (1, 2, 3); AXP. Prepared at TV eaver High School

JoHN LEoNARD RITTER

ARTH

R MIDDLETO ' RIN EHA RT

Baltimore, Md. Major Subj ect: Premedical; AXP. Prepared at McDonagh School

West Hartford, Conn. Major Subj ect s: Physics and Mathematics; Science Club; Tripod ( 1) ; IVY Board; Assistant Football Manager (2, 3) . P repared at Kings wood School

Sixty-three


MILTON EDMONDS SA U L

Pazvtuclcet, R. I. Major Subj ect: English; Glee Club (2, 3); J esters ( I, 2, 3); LN. Pre]Jared at Paw tucket H igh School

JACOB JAY SHAPIRO

Hart ford, Conn. Major Subj ects: Chemistry and Premedical; Chemistry Club (2, 3). Prepared at Weaver H igh School

RALPH RoTH EN B E RGER SH E LLY

Swarthmore, Pa. Major Subj ect: Chemistry; Class Presid ent ( I, 2, 3); Athletic Ad visory Council Secretary; Interfraternity Co un cil; Science Club; Varsity Club; Baseball ( I, 2, 3); B asketball (3); Freshman Football ; Football (2, 3); AXP. Prepared at Swarthmore High School

Sixty-fou•·

JOH N RoB ERT SIEGAL

. Erie, Pa. Major Subj ect: Philosophy; J esters ( I, 2, 3) ; Freshman Football; Golf ( I ) ;

MCE. PrezJared at Strong Vinc ent High School


HERBERT NORMAN SLATE Hartford, Conn. Major Subject: Civil Engin eering; Choir ( I , 2, 3); Glee Club ( I, 2, 3 ) ; Football (3). Prepared at W eaver H igh School

SANDFORD CoRTELYOU SMITH N ew York, N. Y. Major Subj ect: History; I nte rfrater nity _council; Political Scien ce Club; L e Cercle Fran~ a is; Squash; Hockey; Freshman Cross-Country; Freshman Track; Cross-Country; Track; Ll'짜. Prepared at Hotchkiss S chool

DoNALD JOHN SMITH Hartford, Conn. Major Subj ect: Chemistry; Chairman Sophomore Hop Committee ; Science Club ( 3) ; Chemistry Club ( 2, 3); Freshman Football; Junior Var ity Swimming ( I ) ; Swimming ( 2, 3) ; Vars ity Club; Track ( I , 2 ) ; LN. Prepared at Loomis S chool

B ERNARD CoRN ELIUS SoLvN, JR. Hartford, Conn. Major Subj ect: Philosophy; L e Cercle Fran~ais ( I ) ; President ( 2, 3) ; N ewman Club ; Gl ee Club; J ester s ( 2 ) . Prepared at K ingst(!}ood S chool

Sixty-five


II Baltimore, Md . Major Subject: Premedical; AXP. Prepared at McDonagh School

WILLIAM GEORGE SPEED,

II St. Louis, Mo.

CHARLES CLAUDE SPINK,

1ajor Subj ect: English; ~ '짜. Prepared at St. Louis Country Day

CHARLES EDWARDS STARR

South Windsor, Conn. Major Subj ect: History; J esters; Political Science Club; Freshman Soccer; A <I>. Prepared at L enox School

Sixty-six

GEORGE R EM INGTON STUBBS

Danbury, Conn. fajor Subject: English; J esters (3); L e Cercle Franc;ais; T.C.C. Prepared at th e Ridgefield School


ALFRED AYRES TAYLOR

Hartford, Conn. Major Subj ects: Chemistry, Mathematics and Physics; Chemistry Club (2, 3); Science Club; T ennis ( I, 2); T.C.C. Prepared at Bullceley High School

LESTER TIBBALS, JR .

Milford, Conn. Major Subj ects: Economics and History; J esters ( 1, 2, 3); IVY Board; Varsity Club; Yacht Club (3); Hockey (2); Freshman Football; Track ( I , 2); Cross-Country (2); Swimming ( I , 2, 3); 'l'Y. Prepared at Milford High School

ALBERT WIENCKE VAND UZE R

B eachwood, N. J. Major Subject: Philosophy; Tripod ( I, 2), Circulation Manager ( 3) ; Baseball Manager ( 3) ; Seabury Society; IVY Board; T.C.C. Prepared at Toms River High School

RicHARD Louis VoGEL

New Britain, Conn. Major Subj ect: Economics. Prepared at New Britain High School

Si:cty-seven


CHARLES DoosLEY WALKER

Glen R idge, N. J. Major Subj ect: French; L e Cercle Fran<;ais (I , 2, 3); Glee Club Accompanist ( 1, 2, 3 ) ; Student Organist (2, 3) . Prepared at Trinity School

KEITH IvAN WATSON

Hartford, Conn. Major Subj ects: Physics and Mathematics; Science Club. Prepared at Bulkeley High School

HAROLD BENNET WEBBER

W est Hart f ord, Conn. Major Subj ect: Philosophy; Glee Club. Trans fe rred f rom Colgat e University Prepared at W illiam Hall H igh S chool

Six ty-eight

JACK SMITH WHIT E

W est Hart ford, Conn. Major Subj ect: English; Golf; .1KE. P repared at Catons ville High School


WILLIAM JoHN WoLF

Hartford, Conn. Major Subject: Classics; Le Cercle Fran<;ais (I); Seabury Society (2, 3); Trinity Review Board; T. C. C. Prepared at Weaver High School

CHARLES DuNCAN YETMAN

Hartford, Conn. Major Subj ects: Modern Languages; L e Cercle Fran<;ais ( 3); T.C.C. Prepared at Bulkeley High School

DoNALD RoBERT ZITo MAX SIDNEY ZARETSKY

Hartford, Conn. Major Subjects: Economics and History. Prepared at Bullceley High School

Hartford, Conn. Major Subj ects: Premedical and Philosophy; Forum (2); Chemistry Club

(2, 3). Prepared at Bulkeley High School

Sixty-nine


GusTAVE W . ANDRIAN Hartford, Connecticut fajor Subj ect: French; SecretaryTreasurer, French Club (3); Political Science Club ( 3). Prepared at Bulkeley High School

HENRY

w.

HASLACH

Richmond Hill, N. Y. Major Subj ect: Biology; Freshman Football, J est ers, IVY Board. Prepared at Boys' H igh, Brooklyn

RoBERT MAxWELL CooPER

Newington, Connecticut Major Subj ect: English. Prepared at New Britain H igh School

Seventy


CLASS OF NINETEEN FORTY-ONE S E PTE MBER oF 1937, a group of fr eshmen invaded the Trinity campus . This group became the class of 1941 , and the upper-clas smen had taken it upon themselves to make sure of its identity by placing upon the innocent h eads of its members, small blue caps. Rumors of previous fr eedom from such humiliation sti rred up a resentment among th e more " dignified " and "assertive," and there were quite a few of these afte r th e fir st few days of rushing, of the newly arrived. Time showed these men that Trinity was kind to its fr eshm en and treated th em with an equality many of th em did not deserve.

I

N

The ne utrals drove D exter into th e Presidency by clever, not altogether " clean" politics. The meeting was the one red spot in the class history. The n eutrals were unexpectedly prepared for the fraternit y offen sive. Experience matured these untried practices. In th e second year of its exist ence, with the usual bartering of offices, Conway took over the executive position , and the wheels of th e machin e were well oiled and turning smoothly. In athletics the class has afforded th e college good material, p a rticularly in swimming and bask etball. In intellectual pursuits, it has run the gamut of marks, and the gamut of character. Unlike some other classes, it has not been too heavily slaughtered at th e fatal p eriods of ex am s, and has hung on with remarkable t enacity. The class has been well represented in ex tra-curricula r activities, on college publications and in the club s. Wbat is the futur e of th e class? Who dares prophecy? But we might suggest a hopeful one in all field s of endeavor while it yet r emain s in college. It has the potentialities to be a good adver tisement for Trinity in the outside world. When it breaks through the cloi ste red mist of its Alma M a ter , it will not be daunted by the brilliance of the glow of realism, nor will its identity be lost in th e overwhelming number s it must fac e.

Seventy-one


KENNETH ADAMS (s) RoBERT ALLEN ADAMS ( s) JAMES BAwo (s) CHARLES BAYER ( s) IvAN FRANK BENNETT (s) RICHARD TILLSON BLAISDELL (s) RoBERT AL EXAN DER BoDKIN ( A) CHARLES ALLEN BoDWELL (s) JACOB BoRNSTEIN ( s) MoRRIS Lo u rs BoRSTEIN (s) RicHARD EDMUND BRAINARD (s) EDwiN GRENIER BRAINERD (s) RoBERT ERNEST BRoATCH, JR. (s) Louis ERNEST BucK (s) GEORGE FoRREST BuTTERWORTH III (s) JAME MoRAN CAFFREY, JR. (s) OLIVER ALL EN CAMPBELL, JR. ( s) PHILIP ANTHONY CAPOBIANCO (s) JoHN TAGGARD CARPENTER (A) HERBERT IRviNG CHAUSER (s) TH EoDon E M cCAUS LAND CHILD (A) JOSEPH ANTHONY CLAP IS (A) JoHN LYoNs CLARKE (s) WARREN EMERY CLoUGH (s) FRANK WILSON CL~w (s) GEoHGE ST EDMAN CoMsTocK III (s) EDWARD JosEPH CoNWAY (s) JosE PH R EM I CoRMIER ( s) DAviD HARV EY CuNNINGHAM (s) DoNALD JEw ETT DAY (s) PROSPERO D EBONA, JR. (A) MARTIN JoHN DEsMOND (s) WILLIAM BnYCE DEXTER (s) ERNEST I EWTON DICKINSON (A) FnANCIS Jo sE PH DoNAH UE (A) JoH N H ENRY EwiNG (A) 路wALTER PHILLIP FAY, JR. (s) ALLEN FLANAGAN (s) WALTEH Lo u FLANDERs, JR. (A) EDWARD MATTHEW FoLEY (s) JoHN ALoYsiUs Fox (A)

Longmeadow, Mass. Hartford Baltimore, Md. New York, N.Y. Hartford West Hartford Maple wood, N. J. W es t Hartford Hartford Hartford Windsor W est Hartford Milford East Hartford Rye, N.Y. Hartford East Norwich, N.Y. Hartford Burlington, Vt. Hartford Hartford Hartford Hartford Tolland G en eva, N. Y . B e thleh em, Pa. Hartford Hartford Hartford Hartford Hartford Hartford Rocky Hill Mystic H a rtford New York, N.Y. Hartford Harrison , N. Y. Mayville, N. Y . Hamden Hartford

Q uENT IN PERSHING GALLAGH ER (s)

H a rtford

ALFRED EMANUEL GAvERT (s)

Hartford

RoY FRANCES GILLEY, JR. ( s) CHARLES B ANC HOFT GooDRICH (s)

Hartford W es t Hartford

ALBEHT GoHMAN, JR. (s)

Baltimore, Md.

RALPH S coTT GROVER (s)

Brookly n, N. Y . .

Seventy-two


RoDN EY D ENNis HALL, JR. (s) WILLIAM FRANCIS HARRIGAN (A) JoHN WILLIAM HARRIS (s) RoBERT PIPER HARRIS (s) STEPHEN D AV ID HART ( s) WILLIAM ANDREW HAsKELL (s) HAROLD . ALsToN H EAP (s) WILLIAM JAMES HoFMANN (s) SETH P oME ROY HoL COMBE (A) WILLIAM EDwARD HowARD (s) CHARLES RAYMOND H uMPHRE YSON (A) H ERBERT EuGENE H uNGERFO RD, JR. (s) EDwARD J uDAH H uRwiTZ (s) RICHARD WALLACE INSLEY ( S) THADDEUS FRANK J ESIONOWSKI ( S) ALDEN VERNER JOHNSON ( S) ARTHUR VERNER JOHN SON ( S) H ARRY WILLIAM JoHNsoN ( ) H ENRY MoRRIS KAPLA N (s) JoH N JosEPH KARP (s) THoMAS ARTHUR K EENAN (s) FRANCIS ALoYsiUs K ELLY (s) K ENNETH JosEPH K ELLY (s) JoHN CoLEMAN KIL EY, JR. (s) Ro NALD EARL KI NNEY, JR. (A) OGDEN K NAPP (s) EDWARD THADDEUS KN UREK (s) ADRIAN KIN GSBURY LANE (s) JosEPH L EONARD LAviERI (A) EDw iN PAuL LE PAK (s) IRWIN T ucK MANCALL (s) LAwRENCE B ERTRAM MARSHALL (s) LEo CARL MAZOTAS (s) Ro NALD RAYMOND MERRIMAN (s) PAuL EDWARD MoLUMPHv (s) H ARRY RICHARDSON MooDY (s) Ri cHARD KNOWL ES MoRRIS (A) FRANCIS WILLIAM MuLcAHY (A) MARSHALL NEAD (A) RoBERT REA NE ILL (s) RicHARD ALYIN KoLF (s) WALTER JAMES PEDICORD, JR. ( S) PHILIP JosEPH FRANCIS PiccoLA (s) GEORGE JOSEPH PRENDERGAST, JR. ( S) ALAN DouGLAS RANDALL ( A) RoBERT JosEPH REBMA GEORGE REESE (A)

(A)

Flushing, L. I ., "N. Y. Bristol Boston, Mass. W est Hartford Hartford Newton Centre, Mass. Adams, Mass. East Hartford Hartford H empstead, L. I., N. Y. Poughkeepsie, . Y. H a rtford Hartford orth East, Md. Hartford W est Hartford Hartford Pine Plains, N. Y. Hartford Suffield East Hartford W est Hartford Hartford Boston, Mass. Upper Darby, Pa. Glen Ridge, N.J. Hartford Ioank Winsted Hartford Hartford Hartford Hartford H a rtford H a rtford Brooklyn , N. Y. Centerbrook W eth ers field orwood, Mass. Manchester H a rtford Philadelphi a, P a. H a rtford Hartford H a rtford Torrington D etroit, Mich. Seventy-three


JosEPH

TICHOLAS Russo (s)

WILLIAM Jo sE PH RYAN, JR. ( >) PHILIP TRACY SEHL (s) LEw is BuRLEIGH SHEEN (A) EDwARD ARTHUR SMITH (s) EDwiN SHELDON SMITH (s) FRANK KINGSTON SMITH (A) PHILIP CRANE ANTHONY SMITH (s) JoHN LuTHER SPANGLER, JR. (s) .JAMES CLARK SPENCER (s) NELSON PHILIP STEITZ (s) JAMES GoRDoN STERLING ( s) GEORGE KENT STODDARD, JR . (A) JOSEPH ANTHONY TEDESCO ( S)

Hartford Hartford W e th e rsfield Springfield Gardens, N. Y . W eth e rsfield Yalesville Phila d e lphia, Pa. Hartford D evon , Pa . Wethersfield Warehous e Point West Hartford Philadelphia, Pa. East Hartford

RAYMOND EARL THoMSEN (s) ADRIAN Jo sE PH TYLER, JR. (R)

Hartford Rocky Hill

CouRT LANDT VAN VooRHI S (A)

Boston, Mass.

WILLIAM BREWSTER VAN WY cK (A) ALTON JOSEPH WALLACE ( S) WILLIAM CHILDS \짜1LEY (s) RAYMOND WALKLEY WILLIAMSON (A)

Seventy-four

Hartford Southington Hartford Forestville


CLASS OF NINETEEN FORTY-T\(lQ

O

Moth er Nature conspired with the college officials and the fraternities to give the Class of 1942 a rousing welcome to Trinity. From fifteen diffe rent states its members ventured onto th e campus, one hundred and eighty-two timid freshmen, to be g reeted by a hurrican e, a flood, a back-slapping, band-pumping throng of prosp ective broth ers, a nd a new cut syst em. Off to a stormy start, th e class is still pursu:ng a rou gh co urse, veerin g perilously between intellectualism and athleticism. LD

Bringing a ne w e ra in athletics to Trinity, this class produced an unbeat en football t eam and a fi g hting basketball team which lost only three of its twelve games. Kram er and Mugford easily stole th e football honors ; while Carey and Fresher piled up th e most points for the basketball team. Although th e swimming team had only a fair season, Orfitelli, Earle, and Madigan set several new reco rds . The baseball team was promising . Viering, W ebb, Ford, Mugford, and Bi edler, a ll boasted batting ave rages ove r three hundred. Scully was a very good pitcher . Th e Soph Hop proved a g reat attraction to th e ladies' men of 1942, while " The Late Christopher B ean ," ably presented by th e Jesters, pleased the freshman devotees of drama. The dreaded mid-years came and went, and in spite of the D ea n' s g rim proph ecies most of the class returned to pay th e bills for the Trinity term and to look forward to the Easter vacation. "Hell W eek," with all its accompanying tortures, took the starch out of a number , but before long they wer e up and about again, fifty-two strong. Little campaigning was done for th e second election, but questionable politics were in evidence. Tommy ' Vood was elect ed President ; Arthur M cKibbin, VicePres id ent; and Marty ood, S ecretary-Treasurer .

';y

,

Seventy-five


GEORGE SHELDON ADAMS, JR. (A) KENNETH IRWIN ALBRECHT (A) GusTAVE WALTER ANDERSON (s) ETI-IAN AYER (A) JoHN RANDOLPH BARBER (A) RICHARD HoLLAND BARNES (s) ARTHUR HARTT BAT CHELDER (s) BEE CHER McCLELLAN B EATY (A) JosEPH BENJAMIN BEIDLER (s) RoBERT BooN E B ERTOLETTE (s) RICHARD CRASE BEsToR (s) MATTHEW THOMAS BIRMINGHAM ( ) JosEPH CHAMBERS BLACJ{MAN (s) JoHN KNoWL ES BLAKE (s) JoHN AvERY BoND (s) JosEPH JOHN BoNSIGNORE (A) ALBERT HALL BowMAN (A) FRANK JAMES BRAZEL (A) FRANK SPALDING BuRNHAM (s) RussELL B uRRAGE, JR. (A) JosEPH HuLME CAHILL (s) RALPH ORLANDO CALACETo (s) DAviD ETHELBERT CALLAGHAN ( ) JAMES MILTON CANNON (s) GEORGE LEIGHTON CAREY, JR. (s) JoHN MERWIN CAREY (s) JoHN ALvoRD CHuRCH ILL (s) HoRACE GILLETTE CLEVELAND (s) SHERwooD CA SE CoBURN (s) Mrci-IAEL OLCOTT CoLTON (A) CHARLES TRACY CooK (A) WILLIAM DoNALD CoTTER (s) JoHN ARTHUR CRICHTON (s) JoHN FRANKLIN CRoCKETT (s) JAMES DIRICKSON CuMMINs, JR. ( s) JAc ALLERTON CusHMAN (s) LEo JOSEPH CzARNOTA ( s) 路wiLL IA M JENNINGS DEBERRY (s) DANIEL WILLIAM DEMBRow (s) "\VrLLIAM DrcK (s) FREDERICK SToEVER DicKSON III (s) JosEPH ORLANDo DIGANGI (s) RoBERT BLACKWELL DILTS (s) JoHN Loms DowN (s) RAYMOND JosEPH DuNN, JR. (s) RoBERT EDwARD JoHN DuPuis (s) LYoN HooPER EARLE, JR. (s) MoRRIS RILEY EDDY (s) FRANCIS ALLEN EISENMAN (s) RoBERT MERRIAM ELRICK (s) JuLIUS EuGENE EPSTEIN (s)

Seventy-six

Yankton, S. Dak. Hartford Hartford South Hamilton, Mass. Windsor Placentia, Cal. New Haven Providence, R. I. Runnemede, N. J. West Hartford West Hartford New Haven Llanerch, Pa. Dedham, Mass. Lakefield, Minn. East Hartford New York, N . Y. West Hartford South Windsor B everly Farms, Mass. River Forest, Ill. Brooklyn, N. Y. Brooklyn, N. Y. Wethers fi eld Winnetka, Ill. Hartford Mt. Lebanon, Pa. Darien Hartford Flushing, N. Y. Kingston, N. J. Hartford ewpo rt, Vt. New York, N.Y. Swampscott, Mass. New York, N.Y. Hartford West Haven West Hartford Islip, L. I., I . Y. Washington, D. C. Hartford Philadelphia, Pa. Windsor Hartford Hartford Hamden Chicago, Ill. Bridgeport Hartford Hartford


,

FRANK FRANCIS FAsi (s) 0RRA ANDREWS FERGUSON ( s) CHARLES HERBERT FISHER ( A) JOHN GERALD FITZGERALD ( s) RoBERT D u RR FLEISCH ER (s) THoMAS PATRICK FoRD (s) Rocco ANTHONY FRANCHI (s) CHARLES NORBERT FRESHER ( ) JoHN RIDGELY GARDNER (s) LEON ALB ERT GENDREAU ( A) H ENRY BERNARD GETZ ( A) H ERB ERT RATENB ERG GILMAN (s) JoHN RicHARD GLYNN, JR. (s) ALviN RAYMOND GoEBEL (s) LE E GooDMAN (s) ALPHONSE PETER GRANATEK (s) CHARLES GREEN ( s) MILTON GRoss (s) MAXWELL ERNEST HAGEDORN (A) JoHN LAwRENCE HAMBLI N (s) NORMAN HAPGOOD ( s) RICHARD SEYMO UR HART, JR. (s) HE RY WEHRMAN HASLACH (s) RoBERT HoRACE HINCKLEY (A) JOSEPH WASH INGTON HOT CH KISS ( S) 'iVILLIAM PARKER H uNNE WELL ( A) FREDERI CK LYMAN JAcoBs (s) GEORGE McCALL JACOB SE (s) WILB UR FREDRICK J EHL (s) CLAYTON EvERETT J ENSEN ( s) 'iVALTER CLARKE J EROME (s) CHARLES O ' HARA JoHNSON (s) HAROLD GILMOUR JoHNSON (s) WILLIAM WooLSEY JoHN SON (s) ALEXANDER OGDEN JON ES, JR. ( s) PAu L CoNVILLE JORDAN ( s) wALTER KLOSS ( s) ' iVILLIAM KRAM ER (s) STANLEY JOSEPH KR ULIKOSKI ( s) CHARL ES AuGuST K uEHN (s) FRANCIS DAVID LAD NER (A) JOHN D ELAFIEL D LA lENT ( s) JoHN HATHEWAY LA NCASTER II (s) TRUMAN GATES LATIMER, JR. (s) STANLEY ARTHUR LIGHT FOOT (s) FRANCIS LINENDOLL (s) JoHN McCLuNEN LouTREL (s) SETH Low, JR. (A) RoBERT RAYMOND MADAMA ( s) THoMAS FRANCIS MADIGA N (s) RI CHARD KEITH MADISON (s)

Hartford Rutland, Vt. New York, N.Y. Hartford Maplewood, N . J. Hartford Hartford East Hartford St. Louis, Mo. Hartford Philadelphia, Pa. Manch est e r N ew Haven Elmsford, N. Y. Newton Centre, Mass. Hartford Jamaica, r . Y. Hartford East Hartford Windsor New York, . Y . Utica, N. Y. Richmond Hill, N. Y . W est H a rtford East River Boston, Mass. Warehouse Point Hartford Clifton, N.J. Hartford W ethers field Andove r Hartford Andover Coop erstown, N. Y . W est H a rtford Thomaston Philadelphia, P a . Hartford W est Hartford Watertown, Mass. Wayne, Pa . Litchfield Bloomfield 路warehouse Point Bristol South Orange, I . J. Armonk Vill age, N. Y. Hartford Harrison, N. Y. H artford Seventy-seven


THoMAS JAMES MALL EY (s) RoBERT STEPHEN MANION (s) RAYMOND ALAN MANNING (s) JAMES WARD MARLOR (A) JoHN PETER MAYNARD (A) RoBERT DANIEL McBRIEN (s) GEoRGE BRucE McCLELLAND (s) JoHN FRANCIS McGEE (s) THoRNTON CLEMONS McGEE (s) ARTHUR DoNALD McKmmN (A) RrcHARD RrsLEY McKINNEY (s) IAN HoTCHKISS McLAREN (s) GEORGE EMERY MERWIN (s) ARcHIE MESHENUK (s) WILLIAM THEOPI-IILus lVfiDDLEBROOK (s) SIDNEY ALvoRD MrLLS (s) JAMES DAVID lVIIRADILE (A) STANLEY FRENCH MooRE (A) RoGER FRANCIS MoRHARDT (A) RoBERT TH u RLow MoRRIS (s) ERNEST JoHN MosHER (s) NICHOLAS MARIU 3 MoTTO ( s) WALTER FREDERICK MuGFORD (s) LERoY MILTON MuRRAY (s) RoDERICK JoHN MuRRAY (s) RoBERT PA u L NrcHoLs (-<~. ) HARVEY MARTIN NILSON (s) DANIEL FREDERICK NORTH (A) WILLIAM GEORGE OLIV ER, JR. (A) CLAYTON EDwARD OLSEN (s) ORLANDO PETER 0RFITELLI (s) RICHARD PADDON (A) JoHN HowARD PAYNE, JR. (A) VERNON LAWRENCE PETERSEN (s) FRITZ PHILLIP PETERSON (s) RoBERT KrNSEY PILLSBURY (A) PAuL SALVATORE Przzo (s) CHARLES Ho uG HTON PRATT (s) NoRBERT JosE PH PRo uLx (s) ALDo MARTIN P uL ITO (s) MARK RAINSFORD ( s) WILMOT BEN REcToR (s) MILFORD FosTER RHINES (A) RoBERT BROADWAY RicHARDSON (A) HENRY JOHN RoBALEW SKI ( s) CHARLE CuLLEN RoBERTs, JR. ( s) RAYMOND PATRICK RoDGERS (A) FRANK CLEELAND RoMAINE (s) EowARD GEoRGE RosEN (s) RoBERT RosENTHAL ( s) WILLIAM RoBERT Ross (s) Seventy-eight

Thompsonville West Hartford South Windsor Naugatuck Poughquag, N. Y. G ermantown , Pa. Hartford W es t Hartford Windsor Garden City, N.Y. Hartford Hartford Monroe, N. Y. West Hartford Northfield, Vt. West Hartford Thompsonville Mancheste r , N. H. Hartford Pate rson, J _ J. South Dartmouth, Mass. Hartford W est Orange, N.J. Cedarhurst, N.Y. Hartford H erkim er, N. Y. Rocky Hill New Britain Pittsfield, Mass. Newington Manchest er North W es t Rive r , Labrador Newport, R. I. Newton, Mass. Branford Wayzata, Minn. Hartford Detroit, Mich. Hartford Hartford Rye, N.Y. Windsor Hartford Jackson, Mich. Hartford West Hartford Philadelphia, Pa. Somers, Mont. Hartford Hartford Roch ester, N. Y.


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HENRY GEoRGE RoTHAUSER (s) THEODORE RYDER (A) MELVIN HowARD ST. CvR (A) THOMAS SALA ( s) RoBERT HowELL ScHUMAN (A) PHILIP WADswoRTH ScHWARTZ (A) 'VILLI AM FRANCIS ScuLLY, JR. (s) ADoLPH SIEGEL (s) RoBERT OxNER SIMPSON (A) RoBERT H ENDERSON SMELLIE ( s) GEORGE LAWRENCE HoPKINs SMITH (s) THOMAS JAMES CAMPBELL SMYTH (A) WILLIAM JosEPH SMYTH (s) JAMES TAYLOR SouTTER III (A) ARTHUR EDwARD SPAULDING (s) OTTo ALFRED STAEHR (s) WILLIAM KELLER STAYER (s) RoBERT WHEELER STEVENS, JR. (s) FRA c1s H ENRY STITES (s) GEORGE DwiGHT 0TTY STOUGHTON (s) PETER VAN CoRTLANDT STOUGHTON ( ) JoHN FRANCIS STREMPFER, JR. (s) JoHN LoNGWORTH Swn路T ( s) EARLE MALCOLM TABER, JR. (A) STANDISH Bo uRNE TABER (s) THoMAs HENRY TAMO EY (s) THEODORE HERBERT TAYLOR (s) WALTER STARK TAYLOR (s) C HARLEs ELLIOTT THEN EBE (s) RoBERT STEPHEN To ussi (s) NICHOLAS NoLAN TuRLEY (s) DoNALD SEYMOUR TuTTLE, JR. (s) ARTHUR URBANO (s) DoNALD JosEPH VIERING (s) DoNALD ScoTT VINCENT (s) EDWARD DoNALD 'VALSH (A) JoHN H uNTER vVAMSLEY (s) WALLACE MERRILL 'VEnB (s) ANDREW GRAY \V EEKS (s) RoBERT CRA IG WHIT ITT (A) ALBERT KoBER WILL (s) JoN MILTON WILSON (s) MARTIN D EMAREST 'VooD (s) THOMAS BAILIE vVooD ( ) 'VILLIAM FRANKLIN WooD (s) RoBERT EM ELY Y AJWER (s) RoBERT EDWARD YouNG (s)

Hartford W es t Hartford Mansfield, Mass. Warehous e Point Wake fi eld , Mass. Suffield Hartford Hartford White Plains, . Y. Hartford New York, N. Y. Troy, N.Y . Hartford Boston, Mass. Windsor, Vt. Hartford Fort Riley, Kan. Hamden Wayland, Mass. West Hartford West Hartford Hartford Madison East Orange, N. J. New B edford, Mass. W est Hartford Frederick, Md. Brighton, . Y. West H a rtford Hartford Hartford Middlebury Brooklyn, . Y. Collinsville Whitesboro, N. Y . vVaterbury N ew Roch elle, N. Y. Wethers field Brookline, Mass. Hartford Philadelphia, Pa. New York, r . Y. Old Greenwich Westwood, N. J . West Hartford We t Hartford H ar tford

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. Y. Seventy-nine


VICTORIES


VARSITY CLUB ALBEHT AKSOMI'l'AS

pAUL S.

HowAHD S. ALEXANDER

PHILLIP

HARRIS HAWKINS

JOHN

C. ALEXANDER

RICHARD J.

JOHN

BARNEWALL

ALviN C.

ETI-!AN F. WAHD P.

BASSFORD

HILL

HoPKINS

HENRY H.

BATES

KEANE

WILLIAM F. KELLY

BEEKMAN BuDD

RICHARD D. LINDNER

ARTHUR H. CAMPBELL

THoMAS :McLAuGHLIN

PI-IILIP CAPOBIANCO

EDWARD

L.

JOHN H.

RoBERT

l\I.

CAREY

MoRRIS Mum,

JR.

CHESTER CoLLIER

HERBERT PANKRATZ

JAMES F. CoLLIN

RoBERT J. RANDALL

EDWARD CoNWAY JOHN

v.

J 0 EPH

DIMLING

L.

RALPH R.

RIHL SHELLY

RAYMOND J. FERGUSON

DoNALD J. SMITH

GEORGE GREENLEAF

SANFORD

GEORGE

V.

HAMILTON

SMITH

JoHN E. SLoWIK

RoBERT PIPER HARRis

RuDOLPH L. JoHN WILcox

Eighty-two

c.

TALBOT


V ARSITY FOOTBALL HE well-drilled but unlucky football team garnered the poorest record for six seasons this year, winning two, tieing one and losing three games. In spite of the size of the college this is considered a poor showing for an eleven coached by Dan Jesse. The principal fault of the Blue and Gold warriors was their lack of scoring punch; they could almost always gain yardage, but they had trouble making touchdowns when they were n eeded. On Labor Day a comparatively large but not too promising squad assembled and was sent outside for conditioning. Bad luck in th e form of injuries and sickness soon appeared. By th e time for the first game W eeks and Moran were out for th e season, Lindner, a letter-man at guard last year, was crippled so that he could only play in the final game of the season, and Walsh could not play for a month. The opening game was scheduled to be at Vermont, but it was called on account of wet weather. That was the week-end after the hurricane had played th e flood, and the roads were so impassable that the only way to get to the enemy camp was by plane. The team was not ready for that game anyway because many of the squad had spent Friday night at the dike saving Hartford from the rampaging river. Coming from behind in the last quarter, the J essemen opened their season by defeating a scrappy Union eleven nineteen to thirteen by virtue of a thirty-five yard touchdown pass from Rihl to Kelly. Ed Morris was the running star, while Jack Carey shone def ensively at his new center position. Trinity showed a good offense both through the air and along the ground, but th e poor pass defense helped th e opponents complete seven out of ten aerials. In the first half the Blue and Gold scored twice on long marches down the field. Then as half-time approached the Union offense went into action. Hamm erstrom completed three passes to Patrie starting from midfield and finishing in the end

T

,

Eighty-three


zone. In the n ext half, after a Trin drive fail ed, the visitors marched to their second score, adding the point to go into th e lead. Trinity swept back, however, and scored the winning touchdown promptly. Afte r this auspicious beginning th e warriors journeyed to Worcester Tech. wh ere th ey lost twelve to six. An early epidemic of fumbles on th e part of the visitors and the excellence of Forkey's play ing created a d eficit too great to be overcome by Trinity's late passing attack. Th e engin eer s scored twice in the fir st t en minutes on two blocked kicks. After these two thrust s both offenses failed to function for a sustained drive until midway throug h th e final period wh en Trin ' passes clicked for a touchdown. Although at the time it seemed tha t, if Trinity had played its best, the team could have won, Worcest er completed its schedule without a defeat a nd was considered one of the l eading small college squads in New England. Again away from home the gridders were held to a six to six ti e by a fighting Hobart eleven. Although visitors outgained them considerably and threat ened to score often, the scoring punch was lacking. It remained for D eed Harris, a Sophomore who took the sick Ed Morris's place, to cross the opponents ' goal on an intercepted pass. Late in the third quarter, after all the Blue and Gold thrusts had failed, and when Hobart was threatening, this fleet-footed back picked the ball from the air and hurried eighty yards for the counter. Hobart scored fiv e running play s after r eceiving the opening kickoff. Thinking th e Trinity lin e easy to crack, they tried to rush the point after touchdown. B ecause of a Trin offside they had two chances, but even then they could not push the ball over. Trinity threatened twice during the remainder of the half, but th e home team held. Most of the third quarte r Trinity was pushed close to their own goal line until Harris's score. Throughout th e las t quarter the visitors advanced close to the end zone but could not reach it. R eturning for th eir second home game the players defeat ed Coast Guard twentysix to six. Running and passing to scores in ever y p eriod, the Blue and Gold ran up th e highest tally of th e campaign while halting the Coast Guard passing attack successfull y when ever it approached th e goal. In addition to th e score this game was notable for the first appearance of a n a nnouncing system at Trinity . It worked very well. Befo re th e game its powerful voice re-echoed over the campus: "Testing-Can you hear me?" and la t er, with somewh at reduced volume, "Morris goes over for a touchdown " or " H e was tackled by Carey." Another conspicuous n ewcomer was Thurman, th e handsome but unlucky mascot. This was the white rooster 's only taste of victory for th e seas on . A drop-kick was the marg in of defeat when Trinity visited W esl eyan a nd lost seven to six, but the Blue and Gold went down fi g hting . The first quarter of this traditional match con sist ed mostly of a punting duel with Rihl having a decided edge. B y th e sta rt of the second qua rter his kicks had forced Wesleyan inside their twenty ya rd lin e so that after the retu rn kick Trin's offen se could open up arou nd mid-field. After some minor adva nces Ca rey decided he really wanted t o sco re and gave the ball to Ed Morris seven times in succession . The latter counted from th e fifteen ya rd line on hi s seventh try on an "in-and-out" play, a pet sco ring play of Coach J e$se. Although the con ver sion was missed , it was not deemed important because, at the time, the visi tors were playing th e Cardinals off their feet. The Wesmen came back with a rush, however, and using a tricky sp read formation frequently wer e threatening. Runnin g more than expected from this formation, they penetrated deeply; but Trinity's valiant el even staved them off for a moment. Unluckily they came back again . Near the twen t y-five ya rd line the Cardinal and Black team tried a sp read play from which D a dda ri o passed for the score to Cagney who was on his Eighty-four


knees just inside the end zone. Captain Daddario then kicked the point after touchdown, and the scoring was over for the day. For the rest of the half Trinity's passes were unable to combine with a running attack long enough for a sustained advance. The second half found the Blue and Gold fighting desperately to overcome this little l ead; but every time they got into scoring t erritory, th e opposing defense stiffened and stalled the attack. Once Kelly recovered a punt accidentally touched by a Cardinal on their forty yard line, but Trin was unable to gain from ther e. Later, in the fourth p eriod, after a pass had brought the ball to the enemy forty-three, Morris journeyed off-tackle until brought down by the ubiquitous Daddario on the six. From th ere Trin lost ten yards in four downs to give up its last scoring opportunity. In this hard but clean game the outstanding players, in addition to Morris and Daddario, were Jack Carey and Jack Wilcox, who we re both bulwarks on defense when they backed-up J esse's five man line, and Challis and Ali brio of the opposition. D espite outgaining the Little Three champions twelve first downs to seven, Trinity closed its season with a nineteen to nothing loss to Amherst and its captain, Jack Joys. This twisting wraith r eturned two punts for touchdowns, one for seventy yards, the other for sixty. For good measure he also threw a forty yard touchdown pass for the visitors' other score. Jack Wilcox, the sterling guard, could not play, Sid Mills had a knee injury, Jack Carey was held together by tape and braces, and Captain Alexander was suffering from a charlie-horse. To add to these, early in th e first period Ed Morris, the hard-running halfback, fell and dislocated his shoulder so that he had to end his illustrious football career in civilian clothes on the bench. His powerhouse running was sorely missed the rest of the afternoon. Although twice returned too fast, P ete Rihl's punts were exceptionally good; and he carried the ball for one of the few times this season when he recovered the ball after one of his kicks was blocked and ran it for a first down. From the Hilltoppers' standpoint one of the most prominent features of th e game was the Trinity band. This snappy swing outfit cheered the stands and gave a much needed topic of conversation as Joys went past. A few plays after the opening of th e game Captain Alexander blocked a punt which was r ecovered by the Blue and Gold on the eighteen yard line. Trinity moved it to the twelve ; but th ere Morris left the game and the offense bogged down. This was the deep est p en etration by either t eam until late in the game; Amherst scoring on three long gains all in the first half. Th e second half was principally a punting battle with Rihl, as usual, having a bit th e better of it. The game ended with S enior Alfie Driggs, the lightest man on the squad, doing some inspiration al runnin g to move the ball down to the fifteen yard stripe. A few moments before, passes had worked th e ball to the visitors' four yard marker, but the scoring punch continued to elude Trinity even to the last. Although the t eam was well coach ed and able, it seemed never quite to live up to its capabilities. Nevertheless, congratulations in particular should be given to Captain John Alexander, who led the t eam in every game in spite of painful injuries, to Jark Carey, th e captain-elect, who was a power 路on defense all yea r, and to P ete Rihl, the sixty minute blocking back who had to stay in ever y game because h e had no substitute. As for n ext year, Capta in Carey can look forward hopefully b ecause he will miss only four regulars from the lineup, John Alexander at end, Wilcox at guard, Morris at halfback, and Pacelia at fullback. Some l1 elp should also come from this season's undefeat ed fr eshman t eam. Eighty-five


BASKETBALL HE 1939 edition of the Trinity basketball t eam, whil e it possibly could not be called the best t eam ever to r ep resent the college, was at least the "fightingest." The squad, incomplete at the beginning of th e season due to the absence of captainelect Jack Carey because of injuries, consisted entirely of juniors and sophomores, four of whom we re l etter men. The team was faced with its stiffest schedule in years but came through gallantly, winning nine and losing but three, to be r ecognized as the top ranking team in Connecticut, and sixth in Jew England college ratings. Basketball practice was begun soon after the conclusion of the football season in preparation for the opening game against Arnold on th e ninth of D ecember. Trinity started the year rath er dismally losing tl1is game 42- 38, and a disastrous season was predjcted by all. The n ext week was to tell th e story, however, for in that time Trinity was to play three of its hardest games. The first was against M.I.T. at Boston just after that t eam had beaten Harvard. By dint of sheer aggressiveness and some fin e shooting by Ray Ferg1,1son, Trinity was able to overcome a four point deficit and th en to put on a scoring burst to win 33- 29. Two evenings later Trinity played host to a powerful Vermont team which was still gloating over a hard-ea rned victory over Dartmouth. B ehind at the half the boys of the Blue and Gold staged a thrilling rally and won on a last-second basket by Don Wal sh. This was one of the most exciting games of th e yea r as can be well imagined by the 37- 36 final score. As a so rt of anticlimax Trinity visited New London on Saturday of th e same week to take on the boys from Coast Guard . Th e opposition was a lot stronger than

T

Eighty-six


anticipated, and the team was forced into an overtime period before eking out a win 39- 37. By this time Coach Ray Oosting's hair was turning a little gray from the worry over such close games. R eturning from the Christmas vacation Trinity traveled to Worcester to engage this tall, rangy, high-scoring outfit. The boys of Worcest er Tech were too tall and too good, and so Trin went down to its worst defeat, 59-41. This was the best team faced all year, and it scored more points than had ever previously been made against a Blue and Gold team. On January t enth Trinity again took the road, this time for just a short trip to Middletown to try their luck on the W esleyan baskets. W esleyan, the traditional rival, was a h eavy favorite because of a r ecent victory over Yale. Once again Coach Oosting's fighting men came through. B ehind at the half they came back to score twelve points in th e first three minutes on the second half, playing the Cardinals completely off their feet. Trinity won anoth er upset victory, 43-35. Returning to th e Hopkins Street Gym on J anuary fourteenth, Trinity found Haverford a soft touch after such stiff opposition and won as it pleased, 53- 26. After a slight interruption caused by mid-year exams, Trin once more visited the city of Worcest er, this time to take on Clark University. In the style customary this season, this was another thriller. The boys from Hartford managed to squeeze out a 37- 36 win on a basket by Bob Randall in the second overtime p eriod. On F ebruary eighteenth the t eam met Boston University on the home court and lost for the last time of th e season. The t eam had been pointing for this game as the climax to a successful year and tried so hard during the first half that they scored only nine points. After the intermission the players w ere more r elaxed, but the damage had been done and Trinity could not quite catch up, losing 35- 31. The highlight of the game was th e fin e work of Dick Lindner in holding the high-scoring Solly echtem to but one field basket in the last half. A week late r Trinity met an inferior Norwich team and ran up its highest score, to win easily, 66- 31. Trinity played host to its most important rival, W esleyan, on F ebruary twentyeighth. The Blue and Gold team, mainly because of some sensational shooting by Ray Thompsen, was far superior: beating the Cardinals, who ultimately won the Little Three championship, by a 63- 57 score. This was the highest total of points scored against any W esleyan in the history of the college. The final game of the yea r was played on March fourth , at Troy, against R.P.I. Trinity finished the season strongly. Tied with but four minutes to play, the t eam went on a scoring spree and made seventeen points befor e the final whistle blew. One of the outstanding features of the 56- 39 victory was the play of Jack Crockett who improved steadily from the start of the yea r . The season was one of the most successful that a Trinity basketball team has ever had, and the prospects for n ext year are even brighter. The squad will be back in its entirety and will be r e-enforced by some very promising freshmen. As a sort of a reward for the good showing of th e t eam, Coach Oosting has been able to secure a game against Yale for n ext year.

Eighty-seven


VARSITY SWIMMING

A

starting out the season with four wins out of the fir st four starts, the 1938- 39 edition of the Trinity Swimming team ran into a slump a nd dropped the n ext five meets to wind up the season with a reco rd below .500. Losing Al Secchiaroli through g rades and Bob Broat.ch throug h injuries undoubtedly told the story for it was in the dives and the sp rints that Joe n eed ed men the most. Th e opening meet of the yea r was at New London with the Coast Guard. Ed Conway, stellar sophomore backstroker, opened hi s varsity ca reer by setting a n ew pool record of 1.41 in the 140 ya rd backstroke. Had it been in a 25-yard pool it would have been a new college r eco rd . Axsomitas a lso set a new record in th e breaststroke and these two teamed up with Don Smith to esta bli sh a new reco rd in the medley r elay. Th e final score was 42- 33. The next meet with Union turned out to be a 40-31 victory for Joe Clarke's men. Conway kept on hi s winning fo rm by equaling the pool record, while Johnny Slowik chugged on to a win in the 22 0, a nd "Axie" took th e breaststroke by ten ya rds. Th e M.I.T. nata tors were the n ext ones to be humbled by the Blue and Gold squad, losing 44- 3 1. Bob Muir and Johnn y Slowik took fir sts in the 220 and 100, while Conway and Aksomita s won their events as usual. Th e fourth and la st ta st e of victory for the Trinmen came in the Boston Unive rsity meet. As in the Coast Guard match, Conway a nd Aksomitas won their events FTER

Eighty-eight


handily and th en t eamed up with Don Smith to t a ke the medley relay . Slowik won the 100-yard swim, and he and Bobby Muir finish ed second and third in th e 220. The first loss of th e season was sustained when th e high -riding Springfield College outfit came to Trowbridge pool and ducked the Hilltoppers by a scor e of 46- 29. Conway finally broke the pool and college record in the backstroke, setting up a n ew mark of I :43.8, while Rawstrom, an all-Ameri can swimmer, set a n ew pool record of 2:20.6 in the 220-yard event. Rawstrom also won the I 00. William s College n ext invaded Trowbridge Pool and gave the Trinm en a 57- I7 annihilation. Presenting a t eam balanced in all depa rtments, the Ephmen were easily able to outdistance Trinity. The 400-yard relay qua rtet of the visitors whipped through th e water to set a n ew record of 3 :47 a nd Creede took the IOO, equaling the pool mark of 54. 7. Th e visitors medley rel ay team also splash ed through to a new record, slicing four -tenth s of a second off th e old mark held by Slowik, Aksomitas, and Campbell. Ed Conway came through with th e only record-breaking p erform ance for the Hilltopper s, lowering his own time in th e backstroke to 1 :42.1. The annual meet with W esleyan r esulted in a 44- 3 I victory for the Ca rdinals, as they presented a more balanced t eam tha n Trin . The highli gh t of th e evening was th e breast -stroke race between "Axie" a nd W esl eyan's outstanding swimmer, " Rog" P etit. Aksomitas finall y won, pulling up to victory afte r being behind in th e fir t lap. Th e season was brought to a close with a 46-49 shell acking abso rbed from the Colga te varsity. Again the l ack of good men in the dashes and di,路es spelled defeat for Trin, as th e Colgate men took fir st in the 50, 100, and 220-yard races . Th e f eature of the evening was Ed Conway, who, after taking hi s I 50-yard dorsal event, and a l eg on th e winning medl ey combination, backstroked to a second place in th e 440ya rd freestyle. Captain "Seal" Slowik, Bobby Muir, and "Soup" Campbell will be th e three seniors who will be missing on n ext year 's aggregation. Joe Clarke will have Aksomitas back for anothe r year, along with Bud Tibbal s, Don Smith and Ed Conway, and a host of record-breakin g freshmen, who will inaug ura te th eir varsity ca reers

Eighty-nin e


BASEBALL

D

JESSEE's boys, although hampe red by an acute lack of reserves, turned in the record of four victories in an abbreviated ten game schedule. Of the six defeats administered to the lads in blue, three were lost by a one run margin. The season's high spots included the opening with Yale in which the Elimen were fortunate enough to gain a fiv e to three victory to atone for the defeat which the 1937 squad administered Joe Wood's t eam, th e Williams game which Trin took on an overtime session, and an even split in the home and home series with W esleyan. Due to the lack of reserves, it became commonplace to see outfielders pulled in to the pitching mound, pitchers sent to the infield, and infielders patrolling th e outfield. The Blue and Gold team was a scrappy outfit on the fi eld and showed sporadic flashes of form that might be an omen for the next season, as eight of the nine r egulars playing the closing game will r eturn, and but two lettermen will be lost by graduation . The J esseemen opened the season on th ei r home grounds, but carried the role of host too far by allowing the Yale squad to gain a fiv e to three victory. The game was featur ed by th e p erformances of Sch ell, the Eli hurler, and Ed Mo rri s; Ed showing up ve ry well by allowing but six hits while getting ten strike outs as compared to the seven hit pitching of Schell. P ete Rihl poled a home run over the left-field f ence in the ea rly innings, but th e Yale men were not to be denied, and came back to win the game led by the hitting of Alter and Collins. AN

Ninety


The following week Dan Jessee's charges took their first game of the year behind the air-tight pitching of Ed Morris, who let the opposing Clark batters down with but four hits, while watching thirteen batters swing vainly at the third strike. Shelly, Lapac, and Captain Bob O 'Malley led the Trinity hitting attack with two hits each. Victory was soon followed by defeat as the Colby White Mules journeyed down from Maine to administer an eleven to four beating to our boys despite the valiant efforts of Bill Kelly who hit two doubles. Trinity invaded Middletown the next week and r eturned with a ten to eight win over the Cardinals. Ed Morris tied up the w路 esleyan batters, allowing but four hits in seven innings. In th e last two innings th e W esmen started a belated attack that could not quite overcome the lead set up in the early innings by Trin. Lapac got the second home run of the season with Rihl getting four hits in as many times at bat, and Shelly and Kelly two hits each to build up th e margin of victory. The Saturday following the Senior Ball the J esseemen played a game which clearly showed th e effects of th e late hours. They managed to squeeze out a five to four win over the Coast Guardsmen in a game fraught with errors. Bill Kelly took over the pitching assignment for the afternoon a nd turned in a nice job by scattering the Guardsmen's eight hits, while Trin bunched their six. Shelly and Morris led the parade with two hits apiece to take the game. Kelly again took over the pitching assignment at Worcester, but the Engineers reached him for twel ve hits to take th e game by a five to one count. The Blue and Goldmen reached their season's peak in the Williams game when they snatched an extra inning win away from the Ephmen in th e tenth frame. Shelly and Kelly were the co-stars for Trinity by virtue of their tie-breaking efforts which produced th e winning tally. Shelly on first as a r esult of a free pass stole second and rode home on Kelly's single to end the drawn out battle that last ed two and three-quarter hours. Next on th e schedule was a trip north to Vermont to meet the men from Norwich Academy and Vermont University. Rain and th e Vermont catamount combined to keep the invasion from being a success. Th e Norwich game was called off becaus e of rain, while th e Vermont Catamounts defeat ed our boys three to four ( which was th e first of three successive losses by the same count). Ed Morris a nd Budzyna drew the starting pitching assignments and proceeded to stage a pitcher's dueL Budzyna finally took the game by holding our side to five hits, Shelley's double and single and O'Malley's two blows going for naught. The yea r's hostilities were wound up the following week with two home games against W esleyan a nd Massachusetts State, both games were lost by th e score of four to three. B ehind the four hit hurling of Cotter, the Cardinals bunched their hits to sneak over the winning run in their half of the seventh to even th e count for the year. The followin<r Saturday the Baystater s displayed some more fin e pitching with Franny Riel paired off against Ed Morris. The visitors took the game from Ed in the eighth on t.he safe smashes of Cooper, Tappin, and Steff. Rihl and Captain Bob O' Malley starred for Trin, P ete getting another hom e run over the left fiel.d f ence, whil e O'Malley got two hits to close the career of on e of the best ball players who ever appeared in a Trinity uniform.

NinelJt-one


TRA CK seven able seniors leading the way, the Trinity track squad turned in the second best reco rd of th e year for a major spo rt as it nosed its way above the fiv e hundred p er cent mark to take three of its fiv e meets, while losing th e last one to Tufts in as thrilling a track meet as eve r was staged on the home fi eld. One r ecord was broken when Tommy McLaughlin b roke hi s previous year's mark in the half mile, and one reco rd was equalled when Co-captain " Ace" Brennan stepped off th e century in ten and one tenth seconds to equal the mark of Steve Truex . The loss of Truex due to an injury susta ined in football was k eenly felt, as Steve averaged three first places a meet . Co-captain Motten was the high scorer in individual points for th e season; oth ers who l ed th e team in the scoring column include Bori s Pacelia, Chotkowski, Schmid, and Hogdon . Not only was Capta in-elect Truex's loss keenl y felt, but a lso Joe Astma n, st a r pole-vaulter, wa s in active most of th e season due to a kn ee injury incurred in football. In th e opening meet of th e yea r held on the Trinity track, the Blue a nd Gold outdistanced the visiting Massachu setts State squad and took th e meet by a 76 to 50 count. Clem l\fotten with fir sts in the high and low hurdl es and Bori s Pacelia with first places in the broad jump a nd pole yault led the Hilltoppers to a n easy victory. The following week the Oostingmen continued on th eir victory way by eclipsing th e ew Brita in State T each e rs squa d 107 Y3 to 17 7"). In thi s meet Tommy McLaughlin broke hi s own r eco rd in th e half mil e a nd established the new mark a t 2.01.1. Chotkowski with firsts in th e shot and di scus, and Pacelia with firsts in the pole vault and broad jump were also notably outstanding for the home team.

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Ninety-two


A week later on th e Cardinal's home field, Andrus Field, the Blue and Gold tracksters met defeat for the first time as the Wesmen completely routed the Hilltoppers 83 Y3 to 42 )'; . The only firsts scored by Trinity men were those by Motten in the pole vault, Collier in the low hurdles, and Ernie Schmid in the mile. Schmid ran a thrilling race a h e came from third place in th e last hundred yards to nip the leading Cardinal milers. The most spectacula r event of the afternoon was the half-duel staged between Tommy McLaughlin and H a rry H eermans, the W es ace. Tommy took the pole a nd the l ead all the way around until the last fifty yards, when H eermans stepped from behind to the front a nd beat Tommy to the tape by a scant five feet. M cLa ughlin was unofficially clocked at 1.59.1 which was well under his record set in the State T eacher's meet. The following Saturday the Trinmen went northwards to Worceste r to participate in the Eastern Intercollegiates, and scored a total of thirteen points to place sixth in a field of nin e squads. The individual point scorers were: H erb Pankratz, who, when placing fourth in the quarte r mile, unofficially broke th e Trinity College record of 51 seconds for th e event by at least a tenth of a second; Pacelia, a tie for first in th e pole vault, Motten , a tie for third in th e pole vault plus a second in the low hurdles; and Chotkowski, a fourth in the javelin. The Hilltoppe rs took their third victory from the Trojans on the R ensselaer track at Troy by a 72 Y3 to 48)'3 tally. Brennan equa lled the existing college reco rd in the hundred, and Motten ti ed for first in the low hurdl es setting a n ew R ensselaer record. Other outstanding performances included McLaughlin's firsts in the quarter and half, Pacelia's firsts in the broad jump and pole vault, and Ernie Schmid's first in the mile, chalking up his fourth straight victory in th e event. The Blue and Gold track squad closed its season the following Saturday when it staged a thrilling duel with the Tuft's Jumbos on Trinity Field only to lose the meet in the very last event as th e Jumbo broadj umpe rs swept the first two places in th e event. Running neck and neck in the race for the victory garlands throughout the greater part of th e meet, the Jumbo distance men turn ed the tide of victory as they swept th e half, and the two mile for those deciding points and the meet 60 to 66. The outstanding men in Blue and Gold were Chotkowski, who took first in both the javelin and discus, and Brennan, who took both of th e dash es. Brennan turned in his bes t time in his collegiate career in the 220 yard dash as did Motten in the low hurdles. Twelve men earned their l etters: Co-captains Motten and Brennan, Hogdon, Schmid, Perry, Pacelia, J. Alexander, Collier, McLaughlin, H eusser, Pankratz, and Chotkowski.

Ninety-three


SOCCER by the loss of six letter men, insufficiency of experienced Juniors and Sophomores for replacements, and a great deal of bad breaks at the hand of Fate, the third Hilltop soccer team to be recognized as carrying the colors of Trinity was unable to gain a single victory. Though often outplaying their opponent and keeping the ball in the opponent's territory most of the time in several games, McCloud's men, because of the lack of an opportunist on the front line, did not taste of victory. At no tim e, however, did th e team become disheartened and each time as th ey faced a n ew opponent th ey went out on the fi eld feeling that they had just as much claim to glory as tbe foe. Through out the season the general play in defense was outstanding. In fact, Coach Mac said that n ever had h e had a better d efen sive department. Opening the season against Worcster T ech after only a few days of preparation the boys got their first setback. The engineers, who had played several contests in advance, won, but only Trinity had held a 1-0 lead for the first half hour. It was no disgrace to bow to this team which gave one of the best displays of passing seen by several of the old veterans in several years. As a team th ey proved to be one of the most powerful in New England. Confident of victory Mac and his men with th e educated toes left th e Elms and traveled to Clark. Up until the last minute and a half of play neither team was able to put the sphere through the goal. Time and time again th e Trinity men had

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AMPERED

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chances to score, but always someone muffed it. The inexperience of the team was a glaring fact. Just as the coaches had agreed to have an extra period to settle things, a Clark hooter took aim and put one through the upper corner and the game was over. In the n ext attempt of Blue and Gold soccer eleven to bring home a victory, Mac said that all rose above themselves to give a display of kicking which held him without words . Up until the last four minutes of the game they were leading by the count of 1- 0. But then Amherst scored on a p enalty kick and befor e the boys could get over this the Lord Jeffs put through another. Facing Yale the n ext week for the first aame which the Hill toppers bad played on their new field, once again they fell to the tun e of 1- 0. The wind which was blowing caused the t eam which was opposing it to play almost entirely on the defensive. In the second quarte r the sons of Eli made their tally and the rest of the game was just a desp erate fight on the part of the Blue and Gold eleven to overcome this lead. As is usually the case the game with W esleyan was p erha ps the best game of the season. Though the men from Middletown built up a lead of two points in the first quarter which the local hooter s were never able to overcome, at no time did th e firing cease. Mass. State had things h er own way the n ext week as Mac's men at last were beginning to f eel the di scouragement of no victories. But in th e Bard game they were once again confident of victory, but th e loss of Gaboury at the goal because of illness made too big a gap in the defence and they ended the season without a victory. Th e seniors, who wer e playing their last game, Smith, Bates, and Hope rose to great heights, but once again the lack of opportunists cost Trinity its chances of winning. F eeling that that great teacher, "experience," has been at work and seeing several promising player s in the freshman team, Mac has bright hopes for a better season n ext year. This year's team h e said had been a pleasure to him for it was the most aggressive t eam that he has ever had.

Ninety-five


VARSITY CROSS-COUNTRY HE cross-country season this year was by no means bright, for out of six meets th e Blue and Gold harrier s failed to bring home one blue-ribbon . No one factor was blamed for the poor showing, but rathe r a combination of inexp erience, injuries and ailments. However, with a large numb er of sophomores a nd juniors on the squad, the ha r rie rs should make a better showing n ext yea r . Th e season opened with the powerful Worceste r T ech Engineers. Th e hardrunning Engineers, out for revenge, captured fi ve of the fir st seven places to take the meet handil y. The B a rd match was cancelled, and Springfield came n ext on the list. Owen took first p lace over a four -mile course with an exceptionally fast time. Jim Caffrey was the fir st Tr inity man to fin ish, Owen barely beating him out at th e tape. Against th e superior running of Captain H eerman s and his t eammat es of W esleyan, the Hilltoppers were b adly beaten in their third meet. W esleyan 's fast t eam captured first, second, fourth, fifth, a nd sixth places to rout the Hilltopper s. Caffrey again came through with th e only t elling sco re for Trin, third place. In the Conn ecticut Valley meet Trinity was again outclassed by its opponents, placing even th in a field of seven. H eerman s of ~r esleyan took individual honors of the day, while Connecticut State's outfit breezed home with first place in the t eam showing. In th e Amherst meet Trinity showed some improvement, but it was not quite enough to win from the h eavily favored Lord J effs. Picard and M aye r romped home in fir st and second to give th e Sabrinas a 26- 29 victory. Charles and Caffrey starred for the home tea m, t aking third and fifth resp ecti vely. The closing contes t was h eld at New London with the Coast Guard. Trinity men placed third, seventh, eighth, and ninth, to give the Cadets a 22- 33 win. With no seniors on the t eam this yea r, Coach Oost ing is hoping for a better season than the dismal one turned in this yea r.

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Ninety-six


TENNIS TEAM HE varsity tennis team had a fai rl y successful season, completing six matches, winning four and losing two, while being rained out in the seventh, after leading 3 to 2. With several lette rmen in its ranks, the squad started practice ea rly in preparation for its first match with Tufts on April 23. Th e superior powe r of th e Jumbos triumph ed 8-1. The Clark match was rain ed out after fiv e matches had been completed. The Trinity racqueteers dropped the ir next contest, on May 7, to Williams by an 8-1 score. Th e next four matches we re taken rath er eas ily by tl1 e Blue and Gold, the t eam winning over Springfield, University of Ve rmont, and Assumption of Worcester by 8-1 scores, and 0\路er Worcester T ech by a 5- 1 score. The team also competed in th e New England Intercollegiates which we re held at Trinity for the first time in many years, but th ey were unable to get beyond the second round in the quest for the championship which was won by Dartmouth. Captain Jack Parsons, B en Rowhowsky, Whitey Dodge, and Charlie Harris were outstanding on th e first string and will provide Coach Altmaier with much material for the next season.

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Ninety-seven


FRESHMAN FOOTBALL ITH one of th e largest squads ever to come out for freshman football at Trinity, Coach Ralph Erickson, in his second yea r at directing the yearling gridsters, predicted great things for th e team. Facing a three-game schedule including Choate, unbeat en in prep school and college freshman competition in three years, and with a half a dozen ex-prep and high school captains on th e squad, the group settled down for hard work in preparation for its initial encounter, on October 29, with Choate. The game played at 路w allingford was extremel y close, with the ball see-sawing back and forth for three quarter as n eith er team threatened. In the fourth quarte r Mugford took the ball around his own right end for twenty yards, and what proved to be the only sco re of the contest. Bill Kramer, ace fullback, place-kicked the ball for the conversion, and the game ended with the scor e in favor of Trinity, 7-0. The second game of the season, against Marianapolis College of Thompsonville, proved to be a walkaway for the freshmen. Th e Marianapolis team arrived late, and darkness prevented the playing of the second half. Trinity had little difficulty in winning, scoring almost at will to pile up a total of twenty-seven points against the visitors' seven. Kramer, Mugford, and Fresher excelled in the backfield, while B eidler, Will, and Rodger s were outstanding in the line. With Mugford and Kramer leading the attack in the third game, this time against Suffield, th e freshman gridsters ran wild to pile up their highest score of the year, 41-0. Mugford, Spaulding, Fasi, Kramer, and Kaiser scored the touchdowns, Mugford running forty yards for one of his scores. The blocking and tackling of the line, and th e superb running of th e backs stood out throughout the afternoon.

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Ninety-eight


Dan Jessee will have plenty of use for many of the freshm en. All of them were good, but Mugford, Kramer, Will, and Beidler perhaps should be singled out for special mention.

FRESHMAN FOOTBALL TEAM L. M. Murray W. S. Taylor C. 0. Johnson vV. J. Kaiser 0. P. Orfitelli A. Siegal P. V. Stoughton J. A. Weisman R. 0. Calaceto J. L. Hamblin W. W. Johnson R. W. Stevens

J . B. Beidler F. A. Eisenman F. F. Fasi C. . Fresh er W. Kramer W. F. Mugford W. R. Ross R. P. Rodgers A. E . Spaulding D . J. Viering A. K. Will (Capt. ) J . H. Cahill W. M. W ebb

Ralph W. Erickson

Coach

T. J. C. Smyth

Manager

Th e Stt1mnar.IJ

Trinity

7

Choate

0

Trinity

27

Marianapolis

7

Trinity

41

Suffield

0

7!')

7

Nin ety-nine


FRESHMAN SOCCER

C

OA CH W ALT McCLoun's Freshman team emulated their big brothers, the va rsity team, this year, when they failed to score a victory in the season 's schedule. W'ith very few experienced men on the squad, Walt h ad very little to work with , but by th e end of the year th e frosh s howed th a t they could definitely be reckon ed as a factor in developing next year's va r sity t eam. Starting out with Morse Bu siness College, the frosh were defeated by a 3-1 score. Clever defen sive work by th e halfbacks a nd fullbacks prevented a higher score, whil e poor passing and tea mwork on the defense held down the score of the yea rlings . Th e fledgling hooter s n ext faced Wethersfield High, producer of many of the Trinity soccer g reat s. Th e freshmen had many scoring opportunities in thi s game, but they failed to take advantage of them. " Break s" of th e game also played a la rge part in this match, the 3- 1 count against the frosh being settled by the penalty kicks. The Kin gswood game was also lost by the frosh. In experience in playing together as a team caused the loss of thi s game, though the frosh were playing over th eir heads and putting a lot of fi ght into the match. Many of the freshmen will prove valuable additions to Coach Mac's va rs ity team for nex t yea r . Captain Dick Bestor was one of the most outstanding players, a nd cla sed along with him were Dunn, Jordan, Gilman, Jones, Wood, a nd Burrage. One Hun clrrd


FRESHMAN CROSS-COUNTRY frosh cross-country team, like th e varsity, fini shed the year with a single t aste of victory. F aced with a squad tha t lack ed experien ce and balance fo r the most part, Coach Ra y Oosting concentra ted on building up men for n ext season's va r sity. The four meets held, with Springfield, W esleyan, Amh erst fr eshmen, and Bristol High School, proved to be f airly close. Ed Rosen, Bob Smelli e, and Bob Elrick, all potential va r sity ma terial, were the most con sist ent point-gathe rer s for the Blue and Gold, a nd will provide Coach Oosting with some fin e runner s n ext season.

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HE

One H undred One


FRESHMAN SWIMMING the many r ecords that were broken by th e Hilltopper fr eshmen, the season's r ecord indicated three wins and three losses. The opening meet of the year, with H a rtford High, was lost 5 1- 24, the Hartford boys showing too much power for the Frosh. The high spot of the afternoon came in the 200-yard relay race, with E a rle, Orfitelli, Morhardt, and Madigan splashing through to a n ew Hilltopper fr eshma n record of 1 :47.6. The Ca nterbury meet, the n ext on the books, was lost by the close score of 34- 32, althoug h the fr eshmen set three n ew r ecords. E a rle took the 220 in 2:42 ; Madigan won the century in 57. 9; and the relay team lowe red their previous record to 1 :45. 7. Down at Bristol the n ext week th e Blue a nd Gold proved too much and the frosh went on to win 46- 20. On S a turday of the same week the fro sh splashed to a win ove r Hopkins Grammar S chool, 36-30, setting two more n ew r ecords. Orfitelli took the fifty-yard dash in 26.4, a nd for the third time the relay team lower ed the record, this time establishing it at 1 :45.3 . The third loss of the season was on March first against a powerful W esleyan fr eshman aggregation. Even with Orfitelli and Morha rdt coming through to take their events, the frosh we re complet el y outswum and lost 54- 21. The season wound up on M a rch seventh with a victory ove r Suffield.

D

ESPIT E

One Hundred Two

'


FRESHMAN BASKETBALL HE fr eshman basketball tea m followed up an excellent football season with a good court r ecord: Successful in nin e of their twelve games, the 1942 hoopsters dropped close games to the w路 orcester and W esleyan Jay vees and to Monson Academy. Outstandjng on the team wer e G eorge Carey, Charlie Fresher, and George Adams. Along with the r est of the squad they will provide Ray Oosting with some good fi rst-string and reserve material for n ext season . The record: Opponen ts Trinity 14 34 MORSE 18 32 LOOMIS 42 38 WOR. JAYVEES 33 23 WES. JAYVEES 15 33 KINGSWOOD 25 35 CLARK JAYVEES 31 32 WEAVER ALUM I 31 36 SUFFIELD 42 37 MONSON 17 54 HOPKINS 28 29 WES . FRESHMEN 28 36 ST. THOMAS

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One Hund1路 ed Th1路 ee


FRESHMAN BASEBALL

T

first Freshman Baseball team ever to represent the Blue and Gold won ten out of twelve games and scored 102 runs to 48 for their opponents. Th e season opened with a game which was poorly played by both sides, but Loomis could not match the yearlings barrage and bowed 10- 5. Conceded but little chance in the following game against a powerful Choate nine, Coach Erickson's charges turn ed in a thrilling 9- 5 victory and gave promise of futur e wins. B etween April 29 and May 25 the Frosh team played their twelve games so it was n ecessa ry that Erickson develop a number of pitchers. Gordon and Strang took most of the heavy work while Harris and Steers did well in between times. Fresh from their startling defeat of Choate, th e yearlings went out on the field three days later and hamm ered a Mor e pitcher for 23 runs, allowing only 3 to be scored against th em. Then in the n ext two games they ran over LaSal ette and Morse, both to a 12- 1 extent. In th e middle of Ma y Coach Erickson took his boys to Middletown to engage the Frosh th ere. Imagin e hi s surprise wh en the hosts scored four runs in the first inning. But that was more than the Trinity lads could stand and they l et them know it by scoring nine runs and keeping W esleyan from scorin g for the rest of th e game. After sever al practice games with Kingswood, the Freshmen finally got a chance to play them in an official capacity on the eighteenth of the month. Th e Kingswood HE

One Huncl1路 ed Four


pitcher had on th e ball just what the Frosh did not like, and after scoring a t least three times in every g ame up to this on e, th ey were now held down to on e, while their fo es made three circuits. Milford was th e n ext team that they played. Th e Freshmen 's pride had been burt and th ey were determined not to lose. They didn't. Three da ys la ter W esleyan came down and thi s tim e the Trin Frosh scored seven run s in th e first inning. After this th ere was no doubt as to the winner, and th e game ended with the score at 10- 3 . After winning t en out of the last eleven games it was awfully tough that the Hilltopper s had to lose their last game and, most of all, b y the score of 8- 2. Once again the Blu e and Gold sluggers just could not get hold of th e balls served up to them. Main stays in th e Frosh team in the d epartment of hitting were Roberts, Walsh, Thomsen, l\Iulcahy, and Stra ng. H a rris and Borst ein kept the d efen e bulwa rks in shape, as Strang and Gordon served in the delive ry d ep a rtment.

SQUASH fo r th e future in hope that squash, the only sport in college in which inter-collegiate contest s a r e held tha t is not recognized b y the Trinity Athletic Association, should gain more prominen ce on th e campus and fin ally be supported by the college as an official sport, Coach D an J essee h as concentra ted his efforts on those juniors and under-classmen who gave promise of b ecoming outsta nding playe rs in the next yea r or so. Hampered by the fa ct tha t few of th e candida tes have played squash befor e entering college and by the fa ct that ther e is a shortage of t ennis men , D an h as set out to develop a sy stem a t Trinity which will g ive him a steady supply of mat erial which he can mold into a team which will win matches. For th e fir st time this year, squash is being taught on an organized basi s. More than twenty m en r eported for practice and each da y they were g iven individual instruction in the fin e p oints of this highly skillful game. As has been the case so often in the p ast , several seniors improved g reatly during the year and by th e end of the year wer e capable players, but of what avail ? Anoth er thing whi ch occurred thi s yea r whi ch bas occurred often in the past , was the losing of several of th ~ fir st string men afte r mid-year s because of flunk s. There was no one to take their p lace and th e t eam h ad to go through the yea r ill-balanced. In the futur e J essee sees in Cleveland, Cunningh am, R ector, and F isher poss ibilities of well r ounded squash p laye rs. However, until Trinit y has teams which have a good chan ce of winning D an intends th at his men should p lay mor e of the local club s a nd smaller colleges . With hi s nose t o th e g rindston e and his eye to the futur e Coach J essee works on. Lloyd B at es, Capta in of the t eam, won th e Newton C. Bra ina rd Trophy in the yea rly individual tournament.

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U ILDIN G

One H und1路edFivo


INTRAMURAL SPORTS

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HE INTRAMURAL ATHLETI C Co u NCIL, composed of a r epresenta tiv e from each of the frat ernities, th e Commons Club, a nd the three ne utral bodies and under the direction of Mr. Joseph C. Cla rke of the Ph ysical E duca tion D ep a rtment, is responsible for all intramural athl eti c comp etition. It is the duty of each representative to en courage a thletic activity on th e p a rt of th e students who a re in his g roup and to superintend th e orga niza tion a nd p a rticipa tion of the t eams. As a bod y it is their job to formula te th e rules n ecessa ry for th e adm inistra tion of a successful intramural prog ram. Anyon e who has p ot r eceived his lette r in tha t sport in which he wish es t o p a rticipa te, or seems to th e Ph ysical Education D epa rtment to be a likely candidat e for a letter in th at sport, is allowed to play. Th at a la rge p ercentage of those students n ot p a rticipating in intercollegiat e competition take p a rt in these campus games is shown by the fact that mo r e than 14 0 contestants took p a rt in th e basketball t ournament. The sports in which intra mural contest s a re held a re: W a ter B aseball, B asketball, Swimming, Squas h, Sof tball, Track, and T enni s. To the f rat ernity or g roup a massing th e highest number of points throughout the year goes the Alumni Trophy. During the eight yea rs th a t the troph y h as b een competed for, th e Sigma N u 's h a ve h ad it on their mantel for fi ve a nd a half yea rs. L ast yea r St. Anthony won it f or the fir st time. P si Up silon won possession in 1935 and ATK h ad it f or a h alf-year when they tied with Sigma u. The othe r trophies for purely Trinity competition are th e ewton C. Brainard Trophy for individual squash r acquet s, th e Alexander Og ilb y Trophy for swimming, the L yman Ogilby Trophy for cross-country, the Edward R . L a mpson Trophy for track, the Sidney T . Miller Troph y for squash racquets, the P et er Ogilby Trophy for basketball, Godfrey M. Brinley Trophy f or t ennis, the Physical E ducation D epartment Trophy for individual t ennis, and the Gold M edal Winner for individual cross-country. wATER BASEBALL. Much interest wa s shown this yea r in thi s water sport. vVith a powerful, well coach ed team Sigma I u ea rly made known its intention s in regard to the L yman Ogilby Trophy. Now, more fa milia r with this game of the soggy sphere beca use of its three year presen ce a t Trinity as an intramural sport and because of the games conducted in Physical Education p eriods, the games this year took on a more learned air. P si Upsilon who ended up in second place, St. Anthony who carried off the honors of third place, and Alpha D elta Phi, last yea r' s champions wer e all ve ry evenly matcl1ed, but the power and stra tegy of the Sigma N u won them first place. B AS KETBALL. Early in M a rch th e Alpha Tau Kappa quintet edged out the Alpha Chi Rho fi ve on th e gym floor to win p erman ent possession of the P eter Ogilby Trophy and to add twenty p oints to their score in th e a nnual campus competition . Sigma Nu won a close b a ttle f rom the Neutral Gold r epresentatives for third place. In the pl ay-off for fir st place, with but fi ve minutes to play, Ka iser put two quick basket s throug h th e hoop to put th e men from the Crow Hou se in th e lead . Immedia tely Johnson came back with two for th e ATK's which put them out in the lead again and won them the ball game. All the f ra ternities and g roups were represented with a number of sub stitutes on One H o.n dred Six


most t eams. early one-hundred and fifty students played during th e tournament. SQUASH. Th e rivalry for the squash championship of the campus was very intense as the P si U's, the D elta P si's, the D ek es, and the Crows turned out in large numbers for their matches. D etermin ed that St. Anthon y should no more monopolize squash, the B eta B et a Chapter of Psi Upsilon fought ha rd and shrewdly, but the consistent playing of " the men from the top of th e hill" swung the match in the la tte r's favor. R einheimer defeated Blak e of the D elta P si's, and Upham b eat Cleveland, but Bill Dick took the measure of Maynard of the B eta B eta Chapter and Hamilton and S. Smith in winning th eir matches from the Neill brothers dealt th e death blow. SwiMMING. With Steve B a rtlett winning more points for his fraternity than any other man, Psi Upsilon splash ed its way to anoth er triumph in the annual swimming meet. Largely because of th e efforts of Jack Carey Sigma u took second place and because of a large rep resentation St. Anthony took third. This is th e third con secutive year that P si Upsilon has won the cup. Throug hout the trials and the finals the times were exceedin gly low. It gave Joe Clarke a chance to see who amo ng th e students might d evelop into aqua tic stars if he got th em to come out. SoFT-BALL. Putting on the sp ring dri ve th at netted them the Alumni Troph y the brotl1 ers of St. Anthony walked off with the soft-ball competition . Alpha T au Kappa came in second with Alpha Chi Rho in the consola tion place. T ENN IS. The " boys from th e top of the hill," as in squas h had to down a fighting Psi Upsilon team in order to win the Godfrey M. Brinley Trophy . However, in th e play-off, the members of Alpha Chi Rho got even with the D ekes for th e defeat handed them in th e squash tournament, by taking third place. TRA CK . In the track meet Sigma Nu congregated a total of eighty and a h alf points. Th e n ext in line was P si Upsilon with thirty-on e, and th en St. Anthony with twenty-eight. It is no cause of wonder tha t Stan Alexander, Gus Peterson, a nd D a n North, a ll Sigm a Nu's, were the three top sco rer s.

One Hundred Seven


YouTH

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INTERFRATERNITY COUNCIL HE lNT~~ n .F RATERNITY CouNCIL meets, usually twice a month, to discuss any interfraternity problems which might arise. Rushing rules are outlined by it each yea r, as well as rules and procedure for all interfraternity competition. This past year new rules regarding rushing, girls in the several houses, and the Interf rate rnity Sing were formulated. Each fraternity is allowed two rep resentatives on th e council.

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Pres ident: Rob ert M. Muir, Jr. Secretary: Ethan F. Bassford, Jr. Treasurer: Alfred W. Driggs, Jr. Faculty Adviser: Dr. Robert B. W. Hutt.


DELTA PSI A. LTHOUGH already strong in numbers, th e house on the top of the hill pledged f i thirteen at the end of th e rushing p eriod. While football was still on the tongue of nearly everyone, three men of the class of '4 1 took the secret oath. At the annual winter initiation, four freshmen and a senior were taken into th e brotherhood. Under the able direction of Cromwell, the idea of a college literary organ was at last transformed into a r eality, Th e Trinity R eview. For the first half of the college year it was Editor Gorman who scratched his head as the printing deadline of the Tripod approached while inches of copy were still missing. Gorman was also elected Vice-President of the graduating class. Dimling represented the Alpha Chapter on th e gridiron. One of the big surprises on the campus thi s year was the discovery of a quartet in the Hall that had rhythm and harmony aplenty. This group has sung at several college functions and has given rep eated p erformances over the air. Last Fall the chapter was the proud recipient of the Alumni Intramural Trophy. In winning this cup, the chapter also won the right to reta in the t ennis, squash, and soft ball cup s for the year. Class of 1939: B enjamin S. Blake, Josias J enkins Cromwell, William H. Gorman, G. Victor Hamilton, Lawrence J. N ewhall, Charl es 0 . Spink, Rudolph L. Talbot, Thurston Wright, Jr., William S. Morgan. Class of 191,.0: Olive r A. Campbell, John V. Dimling, Ogden Knapp, Robert C. Madden, Sanford C. Smith. Class of 191,.1 : G eorge S. Comstock, Charles C. Cook, William Dick, John H. Ewing, Albert Gorman, Jr., Rodney D. Hall, Jr., J olm C. Kiley, Jr. Class of 19.i2: John K. Blake, Russell Burrage, Morris R. Eddy, C. H erbert Fisher, Philip N. Schwartz, Joseph W. Hotchkiss, H. Gillette Cleveland, Thomas Madigan, James W. Marlor, Andrew C. W eek s, DonaldS. Tuttle, John McC. Loutrel.


ALPHA DELTA PHI

I

one hundred and sixty-second year as a chapter in the national Alpha Delta Phi Fraternity, the Phi Kappa Chapter maintained its usual active place in campus activities. Among the brothe rs could be found the Managing Editor of the Tripod, the Busin ess Manager of th e I vy, the President of the D ebating Society, a member of the basketball team, and over half of the soccer team . The high scholastic standard of the large pledge group of eleven men made possible the admission of nin e of them into th e bond s of brotherhood. Those admitted were.: N IT

Class of 191,.0 : Charles Edward Starr. Class of 191,.1: Richard Edmund Brainard, John Hatheway Lancast er II, Robert Kinsey Pillsbury. Class of 191,.2 : B eeche r McClellan B eaty, George L eighton Carey, Jr., Frederick Stoever Dickson III, William Parker Hunnewell, James Taylor Souter III.

Trinity's own Knights of Trinity furnish ed the music for th e dance after the Amherst game, and there was a second house-party on th e week-end of the JuniorSenior dance. Class of 1039 : Richard Harold Clow, G eorge Bradford Patterson, Edward Lawrence Smith . Class of 191,.0 : Robert Alexande r Bodkin, Raymond James F erguson, Palmer Jenkins McCloskey, Richard Latrobe Onde rdonk, Cl~arles Edward Starr. Class of 191,.1: Richard Edmund Brainard, John Taggard Ca rpenter, Richard Wallace Insley, John H atheway Lancaster II, Robert Kinsey Pillsbury, Charles Cullen Roberts. Class of 191,.2 : Beecher McCl ellan Beaty, Alb ert Hall Bowman, George L eighton Carey, Jr., Frederick Stoever Dickson III, William Parke r Hunnewell, James Taylor Souter III, Theodore H erbert Taylor.


DELTA KAPPA EPSILON comparatively f ew numerically, the Dekes were actiYe both in and out of th e classroom. Burnham headed th e staff of th e Tripod, while Crockett gave out the assignments. Th e J este rs wer e led by Burnham as well. The scholastic standing of th e house was good also, for it was a close second in the race for the Hartford Alumni Scholarship Cup. Of the fiv e men pledged at th e beginning of th e school year, four we re admitted within the portals on th e evening of F ebruary eighteenth. They were: ALTHOUGH

.1"""1..

Class of 191,.2 : Robert B. B e rtolette, Richard Cummins, William G. Oliver, and Charles E. Theneb e. Socially th e D ek es held a formal dance after the Amh erst football game and tried to forget Trinity's d efeat as th ey k ept time with R ed Sully 's Swing Band. On the fifth of May many alumni returned to th e Hilltop and th e Hall of Alpha Chi to join in the banquet and corporate communion in celebration af the sixtieth anniversary of th e founding of this chapter. Class of 1939: B eekman Budd, J. Kevin Dunne, N ewton H. Mason, Leslie McWilliams, John Parsons. Class of 1940: Edward L. Burnham, Thomas E. Canfield, Ernest H. H eath, Jr., Jack S. WJtite. Class of 194.1 : G eorge F. Butterworth III , John F . Crockett, H. Richardson Moody, William K. Stayer. Class of 194.2 : Robert B. B e rtolette, Richard Cummins, William G . Oliver, John Robert Siegal, Charles E. Th en eb e.


PSI UPSILON ITH th e pledging of on e of the largest delegation s in the history of Trinity Fraternities and with the presence in th e house of the h ead of the student body and the Editor in Chief of the I vy, the B eta B eta Chapter of P si Upsilon this year, its fifty-ninth on the Hilltop, has b een outstanding. Owing its origin to a g roup of men at U nion College who obj ected to the confining moti ve of such purely scholastic societies as the Phi B eta Kappa and the then existing liter a ry societies, the P si Upsilon fr a ternity bas been run on a broader and more liberal pla n in which th e social motive is the prevailing one. That the Beta B eta Chapter ha s b een true to this tradition is evidenced by th e highly succes sful dances held at the house during the Amh er st week-end, the Sophomore Hop, and the Junior-Senior Ball week-end. An innovation thi s year, were several roller-skating parties which have become so popula r among the students. On the other hand, th e fa ct tha t only two of the m en who were pledged in the fall, were unable to receive th e secret word because of scholastic pitfalls, sp eaks well of the attitude of the house towa rds scholarship . . . . Continuing its policy of fri endl y relations with the W esleyan Ch apter contests between th e two fri endly rivals were held in squash and soft-b all. Afte r th e vigor of the games, song and ba nqueting we re joined in by all.

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Class of 1 939 : W a rd P. B a tes, Stephen R. Bartlett, Jr., Phillips H a wkin s, Gu) B . Maynard, Jr., Robert M. Muir, Jr ., John B. R einheimer, Frederick R . Spitzer, John E . Upham, Jr., John Follansbee. Class of 191,_0 : Phillip B. M cCook, James S . Neill, Jr., L ester Tibbals, Jr. C lass of 1 91,_1 : William A. H askell , R onald E . Kinney, Jr., Robert R . Neill, Frank K. Smith. Class of 1 91,2 : G eorge S. Ada ms, Ethan Aye r, Richard C. Bestor, Joseph C. Blackman, Matthew T. Birmingha m, Jac A. Cushman, Raymond J . Dunn, Lyon H. Earle, John Gardner, William W . Johnson, Charles 0 . Johnson, A. Ogden Jones, Seth Low, Jr., Robert M cBrien , William T . Middlebrook, Richard P addon, Robert 0 . Simp son, John L. Swift, Thomas H . Tamoney.


ALPHA CHI RHO HE Phi Psi Chapter of Alpha Chi Rho returned to college minus several familiar faces, but when the smoke and fury of th e last season of off-campus rushing had cleared, the "C rows" had once again consolidated th eir position on campus with a good delegation. Extra-curricular activities have taken up a good group from the house. Jack Wilcox was outstanding on Dan J essee's grid machine, whil e Bob Ely helped out as an assistant manager. "Mike" Bass ford , outstanding man in the house, was Secretary of the 1939 Senate, a member of th e Medusa, manager of the baseball team, and a good scholar. Ralph Shelley has been elected President of th e Senate and Pres ident of the Interfraternity Council for the year 1939- 40. Socially, the chapter has been active, entertaining with housepa rties on th e weekends of the Soph Hop and Senior Ball. Dances have been held at various times throughout th e year, and exchange parties have been held with the Wesleyan Alpha Chi Rho House.

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Class of 1939 : Ethan Bassford, Clarence Olson, William Pickles, Brayton Porter, Keith Schronrock, Robert Schreck, Thomas Skelley, William White, John Wilcox, William Yates. Class of 1940: H erbert Bland, Robert Ely, Wilfred Greenwood, \Villiam Harrison, Anthony Loscalzo, Robert Randall, Stephen Riley, Middleton Rineha rt, Ralph Shelley, William Speed. Class of 1941: Richard Blaisdell, Allen Flanagan, Sidney Mills, Walter P edicord, Mark Rainsford, Robert Harris, Donald Walsh. Class of 194f2: Arthur McKibben, Robert Dilts, William Kaiser, Robert Fleisch er, P eter Stoughton, G eorge Stoughton, Richard Barnes, Robert Morris.


SIGMA NU

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ELTA CHI CHAPTER OF SI GMA N u has an active membership of twenty-four brother s and fourteen pledges. The year has been unu sually successful under the l eadership of Commander Al Dri ggs. Th e boarding club und er the direction of Greg Gaboury, finan cial wizard of Sigma N u, made a large profit as twenty-two regularly gathered a round th e festive board to partake of the culinary products of Millie M edia, traditional figur e in the Sigma N u house. Athletica lly Sigma ~ u wa s exceedingly outstanding with eight varsity l ettermen on the football team. Pl edge Carey was elected captain for next yea r. H e also held the basketball captaincy this past year . Other captain s in th e house include Boris P acelia, track; Dick Lindner, basketball captain-elect; Al Axsomitas, swimming cap tain-elect; and Ed Morris, baseball. Six pledges we re initia ted on F eb ruar y 18, following which there wa s a ban~ quet at the University Club under th e a ble g uidan ce of Don Smith. Broth er Russell Z. Johnston, newl y elected Judge of Probate for H a rtford, was the speake r of the evening. Event of th e year was th e dressing down of the old blue living quarters in a new coat of flashy yellow this Spring. Of a Spring evening the casual pedestrian could hea r mellow strains coming forth from the house as th e Sigma N u Glee Club prepared for the Spring Inte rfraternity Sing.

Class of 1939: John Alexander, Alfred Driggs, H enry Hayden, Paul Harris, Richard L eggett, Chester Collier, Gregory Gaboury, William Johnson, G eorge Greenleaf, Edward Morris, Richard Ames, W'allace Anderson, Dan Hanson, and Boris Pacelia. Class of 1940: Richard Lindn e r, Alvin Hopkins, Donald Smith, Harry Nickel, Stanley Alexander, Quentin Gallaghe r, John Fox, Loui s Buck, Milton Saul, Jam es Collins, Clarence Grandahl, and Al Axsomitas. Class of 1941: Raymond Williamson and Lawrence Marshall. Class of 1942: Alvin Goebel, Albert Will, Raymond Rodgers, Joseph Beidler, William Kramer, Rob ert Manion, Edward Brain erd, John Churchill, John Barber. Frank Stites, Wilbur J egl, Thomas Wood, and Strak Taylor . .


DELTA PHI

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the usual two-weeks rushing campaign, th e Sigma Chapter of D elta Phi had nine new pledges, the third largest delegation on th e campus. The social season this year has been a more than usually active one. On November 5, the weekend of the Amherst Game, the annual fall l1ouse dance was largely attended and entirely successful. Throughout the autumn the Connecticut College girls of the cast of th e joint college production of "The Late Christopher Bean" were often ente rtained. A ga la Sophomore Hop House Party, with a r ecord dance after the Jester's production, in which the cast was ente rtained, proved to be a memorable occasion. In March and April r ecord dances were held a t th e Chapter House. Throughout the late fall, winte r and ea rly spring we entertain ed various members of th e faculty at dinner. Th e crowning event of th e social season is, of course, Th e Spring Dance, at which time it is the custom to hold a house party. 路with the exception of one of the members being on a varsity squad, th e house is not athletically inclin ed. Several of the members belong to the Jesters, the Glee Club, the Tripod, and various other student organizations. FTER

Class of 1939: Joseph Clement Buths, Robert Bri stol Butler, Harold Bradford Colton, Paul J aspersohn, Roger Currie Schmuck. Class of 1040 : H enry W ehrman Haslach . Class of 1941: David Ethelbert Callaghan, Edward Matthew Foley, William Edward Howard, Theodore Ryder, Lewis Burleigh Sheen, John Luther Spangler, Jr. Class of 1942: Joseph Hulm ~ Cahill, Jr. , Michael Olcott Colton, Robert Paul Nichols, M elvin Howard St. Cyr, Earle Malcolm Tabe r, Jr., Standish Bourne Taber, Donald Joseph Viering, Martin D emarest Wood.


ALPHA TAU KAPPA

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LPHA TAu KAPPA is the only local fr a ternity on campus. At the opening of the school yea r in September the Hartford Alumni Association Cup was awarded to this frat ernity for attaining the highest academic standing during the preceding year. During the winter season the intramural basketball championship was won by Alpha Tau Kappa with the cup's p ermanent possession as a r eward. Other intramural sports were ente red enthusiastically. Along social lines the fraternity has been very active. Three socials were held and the Spring Dance week-end was very successful. The final social event of th e year will be the Alumni Supper which is h eld during the month of June. It has been the policy of the frat ernity not to enter much into the competition at the beginning of the year , but to observe for a longer period and their men prove themselves worthy of becoming a brother. With L yman L. John son as head of the house this policy has continued and only four men have b een admitted. Class of 1939: Raymond Hickey, H enry Kean e, L yman L. John son, Clarence Morgan, Robert Ste rben . Class of 191,.0: Otto Duennebi er, Thomas McLaughlin, H erbert Pankratz. Class of 191,.1 : John Cla:.:k, William Harrigan, Harry W. Johnson. Class of 191,.2: Paul Jordan, Walter Kloss, Stanley Lightfoot, Francis Linen-

doll.


THE COMMONS CLUB

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HE TRINITY CoMMONS CLuB reached its eig hth birthday this year and has definitely established itself as one of tl1 e permanent undergraduate clubs. It is not a fraternity with Greek letter s nor does it entertain any notion of changing its status. Its purpose, however, is fraternal in that it provides an opportunity for members of the neutral body to become acquainted with each other in activities and f ellowship. It also exist s as a group in which members of th e faculty may meet their students in an atmosphere other than academic. Th e Trinity Commons Club engages in intramural athletic competition. Since its origin in a nucl eus of students dining in th e College Commons it has made a practice of havin g dinner in the Cafeteria followed by a social meeting in the Lounge on 路w edn esday evenings. This traditional place of meeting will always be proudly kept as symbolizing the spirit in which the organization began. During the past year, as in previous years, there was a Thea te r Party and a Christmas Party at one of the downtown restaurants followed by a musical ente rtainment presented by th e pledges . One of th e innovations this year was a Wesleyan-Trinity Weekend Dance which was so successful that it bids fair to become an annual event. :Many alumni of the club attended. In accordance with a campaign to form an active alumni body an alumni secretary has been appointed. Another distinct contribution to college life was made in the promotion of a program of outdoor activity. So much enthusiasm for hiking and skiing has been aroused not only in the members of the club, but in the members of fraternities and faculty as well, who have attended the outings, that it is hoped Trinity may soon boast an Outing Club independent of any guiding organization. R esults have been seen in an offer of cooperation from the Association of Maine College Outing Clubs. Dr. Jacquith, Prof. Dadourian, Prof. Naylor, and Mr. Williams arc among the speakers entertained by the club. Dr. J acquith gave an analys is of the Palestine situation. Prof. Dadourian talked on the Peace of Munich and its probable consequences. Prof. Naylor showed slides of B elgium as h e found it in his work with the Belgian Relief Commission. Mr. Williams told of personal adventures in Europe and of teaching conditions in French secondary schools. Outside speakers number ed Mr. Rob ert Drew-B ea r, President of the New England Theosophical Societies, with an address and demonstration of Yoga; and Mr. Payson ewton, ski expert, who showed ski pictures of the Austrian Alps and criticized technique. Mr. Motten, a former president of the club, showed colored movies of his Youth Hostel Bicycle Tour through northern Europe-especially Finland. One of the annual events is a faculty t ea which is rapidly becoming a tradition, pleasing to the faculty and th e students alike. Class of 1939: Daniel J. Cruson, Thomas D. H eath, Richard J. Hill, Truman


M. Huffmann, Jr., Robert N. M cCafferty, Edward E. M ann, David Keating, George Smith, Jr ., Francis A. Stockwell, Jr., Sumner B . Twiss, J. Warren '楼eissl1eimer. Class of 1940: Robert E. Anderson, Walter Borin, Edwin A. Charles, Paul A. Goodwin, R alph S. Grover, Wallace H. Howe, James F. Jones, Robert S . Kerr, Thomas R. P ye, Jr., George R . Stubbs, Albert W. VanDuser, William John Wolf, Charles D. Y etman . Class of 1941 : Rob ert A. Adams, Warren E. Clough, William B . D exter, Jolm William Harris, Harold H eap , Adrian K. Lan e, George Merwin, Ri chard K. Morris, Marshall N ead . Class of 1942 : H enry B. Getz, Thomas J. Smyth.

IVY BOARD

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previous policies, thi s yea r th e IVY Boa rd has attempted to present th e college with a word and pictorial showing of the previous year at Trinity . Certain extinct groups, as th e Rifle Club and Kappa Beta Phi, have been eliminated, and certain "Joe College" bits of writing have been done away with . The whole book ha s been toned down to a more formal , more r eadable t ype. The arrangement this yea r, with its threefold IVY lea f, has introduced an idea that we hope will please the student body. Some time was put in on this idea with the Engraver 's r epresentative. The type this year h as been changed to a more fo rceful, brighter one. The Editorial Boa rd: James S. Neill, Jr., Editor-in-Chief; John L. Ritter, Edward L. Burnham, Richard D . Lindner , Edwin A. Charles, Anthony Loscalzo, Ralph R. Sh elly. The Business Board: Palme r J . McCloskey, Bu siness Manage r ; R aymond J. F erguson, H enry W. Haslach, Thomas J . Canfield, Robert Bodkin. OLLOWING

One H und1路ed Twenty


THE TRIPOD annual elections held in January, Edward L. Burnham, Edwin A. Cha rles, and John F . Crockett became the n ew editors. The business management was banded ove r to H erbert R. Bland, Albert W. VanDuze r, a nd John H. Ewing. D espite th e handicaps under which th e entire staff is forc ed to labor, and in spite of the inconveniences of th eir present quarte rs in the bas ement of Cook, the editors have attempted to make the TRIPOD more newsy a nd lively by innumerable personal interviews with noted p ersons and occasional "scoops" of national importance. Continuing th e policy initiated by the preceding board, th e taff has succeeded in obtaining interviews during the course of th e yea r from such prominent p ersons as H erbert Hooyer, Edna St. Vincent Millay, Lawrence Tibbett, the Andrews Sisters, and George M. Cohan. Among th e "scoops" of th e year were th e announcement of Professo r Shepard's latest book, Connecticut Past And Prnent, in the 10-page Alumni Issue of March 7 and the publication of th e fir st red ew of thi s book on May 3G-two days before the publication date of June I , and also th e announcement on March 14 that Dr. Eduard Benes, former president of the R epubli c of Czechoslovakia, had been secured to give the Outdoor S er vice on th e campus th e Sunday of Commencement week-end. Tlnoughout th e year the editors have endea ,路ored to improve th e general makeup by careful selection of balanced headlines and an increased numb er of pictures. Also an attempt was made to present the written material inte restingly and correctly.

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One Hund1路ed Twenty-one


THE JESTERS year has been one of the most successful seasons in the history of the J esters, th e Trinity dramatic organization. The group presented "The Late Ch ristopher Bean" in cooperation with Th e Wig and Candle of Connecticut College fo r Women. There were three performances of th e play; two in N ew London on D ecember 2- 3, and one in Hartford on the t enth of the month of D ecembe r. This was the most unique pre entation of any play in J este r Hi story which dates from 1923. Th e play was given on a center stage, an idea not n ew in the world 's history, but ce rtainly new to Hartford and to Trinity College. Th e Stage was a raised platfo rm near the center of th e ballroom floor ; the audience sat around the stage, l eaving an a isle for the actors to enter.

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HIS

The plot of th e play concerned th e paintings of Christopher B ean and their 路discovery to the world ten years after his death. The Haggett family, which had cared for th e poor tubercular patient during his short life, tri ed to carry off the paintings and sell them secretly after discovering th eir true value. During th e course of the play one of the Haggett girls, the youngest and prettiest, discovers her love for one of Chri 's pupils, a village hou epainte r. She runs away with him and they are mar ried. Th e rest of the family , too involved to know of the affair, continl!es its desperate attempts to gain possession of the pictures . The play is climaxed by the disclosure of the marriage of Chris B ean and the Haggett household maid Abby. Many words of praise we re spoken by the critics both for th e excellent acting done by the whol e group and for the staging and directing done by Mrs. Josephine Hunter Ray of Connecticut College. Dr. Haggett, played by Bob Harris, r eceived One Hunclred Tw enty-two


special commendation by the critics. Much of the success of the club must go to President Larry Newhall for his strong and energetic role as director of affairs. Overwhelmed by his many activities, Larry was forced to resign. At the next election Edward Burnham was named president and Bob Harris, secretary. The club soon b egan active work for Robert Sherriff's outstanding play, " Journey's End," which was produced at the Spring Dance week-end, with Bob Harris, L ew Sheen, Jim Soutter, and Bob Pill sbu ry in the out tanding roles. Directed by Jack \Villiams, Instructor in Romance Languages, the production once again was t ermed an artistic and financial success.

One Hundred Twenty-three


PO LITICAL SCIENCE CLUB

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to keep abreast of the tide of current events, local, national, and international, the members of th e Political Science Club gather one night a month to listen to various authorities on vital questions. It has, since its founding by its present spon sor, th e History D epa rtment of the coll ege, been one of the largest organizations on the campus.

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N ORDER

A large number of men, old members and n ew, turned out for th e first meeting of the club in October. Plan s we re for the forthcoming year which we re to be a continuation of th e policy outlined wh en the organization had its constitution remodeled last year. The men to whom the reins of th e club were entru sted we re as fol lows: Truman M. Huffman , Jr., President; Edward L. Morris, Vice-President; Frank Barnes, Secretary; L eo Gilman, Treasurer. Professor Humphrey, H ead of the History D epartment, is th e faculty advisor. After the elections were over, Dr. Aydelotte, a former Rhod es Scholar and an a uthority on German Diplomacy, gave a ta lk in which he defended Chamberlain's Munich Agreement and general European policy. At the n ext meeting, Dr. Taylor, H ead of the Economics Department, discussed the cooperative movement. As is th e case at all meetings, questions were asked the speaker and a gen eral di scussion followed. Just before Christmas, Rob e rt B y rnes, political editor of the Courant, analyzed the results of the November election s. H e could find no general opposition to any One Hundred Twenty-four


of the Kew Deal measures, but thought the decline in its popularity was due to local issues. Prince Loewenstein, who had just come from Europe to tour the United States, gave his impressions of the r esults of the Munich Agreement, at the next meeting. His wife, Princess Loewenstein, took an active part in th e discussion that followed and n ever seemed to b e without someone to ask h er questions. While trying to forg et th e exams, tb ~ members of th e group listened to Walter Stwinn, editorial write r on the Courant talk on " The D efen se of D emocracy," a subj ect now often on the lips of Pres ident Roos evelt.

One Hundred Twenty-five


TRINITY COLLEGE GLEE CLUB

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an expanding tendency that has seen the Trinity Glee Club increase in number s every year and extend its schedule, this year witnessed an initial enrollment of over seventy men. This ph enom enal number was the r esult of an extended search for first and second tenors during the first few weeks of college when Mr. Watter s realized that h e only had a mere handful of melody-carriers left over from last yea r. All fall was spent in preparing this large and unwieldy group for the Spring Concert Se ries. As u sual the main repertoire consists of Bach Chorals, American Negro Spirituals, Madrigals, and early church music. The club is especially fortunate in having Dan Hanson '39 as baritone soloist and Frank Barnes '39 as violin soloist to add variety and color to the concert programs. LIMAXING

The very first concert of the year was given in D ecember to a small audience at the Hartford R etreat. This was followed by a dance with the nurses. H ere first signs of the potentiality of the large club were seen in its stirring power in th e Bach Choral Christmas Oratorio; also ominous signs that seventy men would not always follow Ir. Watter s accurately. Launching the Spring season with a joint concert with the Hartford Hospital Training School Glee Club under the direction of Moshe Paranov, the Glee Club appeared to have balance and unity. Frank Barnes added much to this concert with his splendid violin solos. The following night, March 11 , the Club travelled to Waterbury to give a guest concert for St. Margaret's School. Dan Hanson and Frank Barnes again came through with sterling p erformances as Trinity presented a well-balanced program. Following the concert a very enjoyabl e dance was held with St. Margaret's girls. On Tuesday evening the Trinity College Glee Club was h eard over WDRC in One Hundred Twenty-si<V


a broadcast. On March 25 the Club presented a half hour program over WTIC. Dan Hanson was the soloist. Continuing the season after Spring vacation the Glee Club schedule has fulfilled the following engagements: April 14-A concert at the Wethersfield High School under the auspices of the Fellowcraft Club. April 21-Guest concert at Briarcliff Manor; Edgewood Park Junior College. April 28-J oint Concert with St. Joseph's College Glee Club at St. Joseph's Auditorium in West Hartford. The season closed with a trip to Hollis, Long Island, to sing a guest concert at Woodhull Private School on May 5. The following day the Glee Club made a final broadcast from WOR in New York City.

One Hundred Twenty-seven


NEWMAN CLUB HIS year has seen another organization take its place among the numerous clubs of Trinity College. On October 31, 1938, the first meeting of th e Trinity College Newman Club was h eld. The purpose of this society is the furthering of the religious and intellectual life of the Catholic students at the college. It is an institution which is fast becom ing an integral part of the universities and colleges all over th e country. It aims to supply in some small way th e religious education which, th e Church realizes, is unable to be given in non-Catholic educational institutions. Most R ev. Maurice F. McAuliffe, Bishop of Hartford, granted permission for Mas s to b e celebrated in the Crypt of the College Chapel. On November 10, R ev. B ernard M. Donnelly, pastor of the n eighboring Church of the Immaculate Conception, celebrated th e first l\Ias s to be held at Trinity College. Doctor Ogilby invited the members of the club to breakfast with him in the College Dining Room after :Mass. On D ecember 8 another Mass was celebrated in honor of the Immaculate Conception. Meetings were held on th e first and third Monday evenings of each month. At these meetings, members of th e club路 presented pap ers and general discussions were held. Two visiting speake rs lectured for the societ y : vVm. E. Buckley of the Hartford High School on Church Architecture, and R ev. J olm S. Kennedy, Associate Editor of th e Catholic Transcript on " The Modern World Looks at the Church." Th e Chaplain of th e club is R ev. Anthony J. Murphy of St. Thomas' Seminary. Dr. Wm . G. H elmbold and Mr. Joseph G. Merriam acted as faculty advisers. Th e officers were: 1938-39 1939- 40 President- Bradford Colton Stephen Riley Vice -President-J . J. Cromwell Wm. J. McCarthy Secretar.y-Robert R ebman Olcott Colton Treasurer-Jam es Collins Charles Johnson

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One Hund1路ed Twenty-eight


THE SOPHOMORE DINING CLUB T THE end of the winter sports schedule, those Sophmores who have been outstanding in extracurricular activities and give promise of becoming future college l eader s, are elected to th e Sophmore Dining Club. The Societ y was founded by the Class of '99 in 1897 as a group whose duty it would be to act as hosts of th e college. It is the custom for the n ewly el ected men to give th e Junior and S enior member a banquet at th e H eublein Hotel, long a place for student gatherings of Trinity for wine, food, and song, at which time the old members turn over their responsibilities

A

to the new hosts. The Class of 1939, unde r th e leadership of Richard Lindner, followed this long establish ed tradition and gave a banquet the pleasures of which will not soon be forgotten. Th e 191,.0 D elegation: Richard D. Lindner, Chairman, Albert Akomitas, John V. Dimling, Raymond J. Ferguson, Alvin C. Hopkins, William F. Kelly, Thomas ~fcLaughlin , H e rbe rt H. Pankratz, Joseph L. Rihl, Ralph R. Shelly.

One IIundred Twenty-nine


SEABURY SOCIETY

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HE SEABURY SociETY was founded in October, 1936, to unite students with similar interests in religious and social work and to develop and further spiritual life at Trinity College. Members have also helped the Episcopal Church in and near Hartford by serving as Sunday School teachers, boys' club directors, and social service workers. Its activities are modeled along the lines of missionary societies which have existed in the past at Trinity. The society is nonsectarian and holds regular services for the benefit of its members. Officers of the Seabury Society for 1938-39 are: President, George W. Smith, Jr.; Vice-President, Albert W. VanDuzer; Secretary-Treasurer, William J. Wolf; Program Director, George Reese.

One Hundred Thirty


RADIO CLUB HE TRINITY CoLLEGE RADIO CLuB was organized in February, 1936. Since that date the Club has steadily increased its membership. It has set up its own college amateur radio station, W1JUD, and has broadcast the college over the world. The 100-watt input transmitter, which operate on three major amateur wave bands, has established communication with five out of six continents, and with every state in the Union. The club has participated in various contests and parties held by the American Amateur Relay League and many of the members own and operate

T

transmitters in their homes. One of the many useful purposes which the club serves is that of transmitting messages for men at the college who have no other way of communicating with their families. Labrador and Washington are among the two communities thus served. The officers for 1938-39 are: President, Herbert J. Hall; Vice-President, Paul A. Goodwin; Secretary, David Davidson; Treasurer, Wilfred F. Greenwood.

One Hundred Thirty-one


THE SOPHOMORE HOP

D

URING the week- end of D ecemb er 10, 1938, th e Sophomore Class held its annual dan ce, one of th e two major social events of th e year. As ove r one hundred couples reluctantly l eft the floor a ft er swino-ing a nd swaying for fi ve hours to the smooth , danceable mu sic of R ay Keating in th e B all Room of th e H a rtf ord Club, Trinity College men wer e aware that a dance could be both a social and fin ancial success. The P si Upsilon, Alpha Chi Rho, and D elta Phi F ra ternities held house parti es and most of th e other houses ha d f orma l dinn ers or cockta il p a rties. On the night followin g the dan ce th e J este rs presented S ydn ey H owa rd's "The L at e Chri stoph er B ean" in conjunction with the Wig a nd Candle Drama tic Societ y of Conn ecticut College for Women on a centra l stage a t the H a rtford Club. This, also for th e fir st time in late years, was a finan cial success . Under the a ble l eader ship of C ha irman P edico rd, th e d ance had received liberal publi city and the coopera tion of th e frate rnities in having house p a rti es a nd th e J esters in presenting their annual fa ll production a t thi s tim e. All helped to make the week-end a tremendous s uccess . Th e Commi tt ee : W alter J. P edicord, Jr. Chairm an, G eorge S . Comstock III, John T. Carpenter, H. Ri cha rd M oody, Richa rd T. Bla isd ell, w 路illiam J . R yan , D avid E . Callagh a n, Ron ald E. Kinney, Jr., William F. H a rriga n, R ob ert R. Broatch, Jr.

One Hundred T h-irty-two


SPRING DANCE HE SPRING DAN CE h eld on F riday, May 12, was th e second since the establishment of the custom of combining Junior and S enior Proms into one mammoth affair. And this year's dan ce was a gala one with the bands of Erskine H a wkin and B enn y M eroff fillin g the H a rtford Club with dan ceable strains. Richa rd J. Hill was the Chairman of the Spring D a nce Committee, the memb ers of which were John C. Alexande r, H a rold B . Colton, Jr ., J. Kevin Dunne, G eorge V. Hamilton, Jr., H enry Vv. K eane, John B . R einh eim er, Edwa rd L. Smith, Alb ert VanDuzer, and John T . Wilcox. The J ester s' play on the next evening, "J ourn ey's E nd," follow ed by da nces a t each of the fr at ernities climaxed the f esti vities of th e week-end.

T

One H u n d red Th irty-three


LES AMIS DE MARIANE th e guiding hand of its advisor, Mr. John Williams, Trinity this year has witnessed a n ew birth in the French club, even to the extent of its n ew nam e, L es Amis de Mariane. Mr. Williams, r ecently r eturn ed from a year's study in France, has instilled a k een spirit among the members. Not only does the increased attendance testify to this, but also the eagerness with which the students offer their assistance in preparing the program . At every meeting which is held informally the club members join in singing French songs; entertainment is always provided, and, above all. refreshments are n ever lacking. The high-spot of the yea r 's activity to da te has been a novel radio broadcast of a play written in French by one of the members, Norman Hapgood. An amplifying system sent the dramatic sketch r esounding over the campus. For its finale, the club plans to have a joint meeting with L e Cercle Franc;ais of Mount Saint Joseph Academy. Th e officers and m embers : B ernard C. Solyn, Jr., President; Gustave W. Andrian, S ecretary-Treasurer ; W. R ebman, C. Vvalker, J. L avieri, J . Ewing, E. Burnham, J. Neill, S. Low, N. Hapgood, R. Grover, C. Yetman, E. Bengston, J. Carey, G. Stubbs, N . Motto, W. Cotter, G. Smith, A. Ferguson, A. Bowman, J. Proulx.

U

NDER

One Hundre<l Thirty-four


DEBATING CLUB Trinity Debating Club, the first for ensic group on the Trinity campus in several years, bas gone through a fairly successful first season. Informal debates among the club members and with several n earby coll eges have formed the major part of the meetings. The club was also addressed by Professor H. M. Dadourian

T

HE

and by Dr. J acquith, Provost. The officers of the club are: Palmer J. McCloskey, President; G eorge Smith, Vice-President ; Richard Insley, Secretary-Treasurer; and John Karp, Manager.

One H1mdr ed Thirty-five


SCIENCE CLUB group organized on the camp us thi s past yea r is th e S cience Club. Holding monthly meetings at which p a p ers are read and di scussed, the Club was also r epresented at the ew England Science Parley held a t William s. Two Trinity men, William J. McCarthy and Sumner Twiss, r ead papers on the preparation of acids . The group consists of men from each branch of science taught at Trinity. The fi ve officers, one man r ep resenting each scientific branch are Richard J. Hill, George W. Starkey, Robert Madorsky, David Davidson, and H erbert J. Hall. Professor H. M. D adourian is th e Faculty Advi sor.

A

NEW

One Hundred Thirty-six


CHEtv\ISTRY CLUB GROUP of Seniors organized the Chemistry Club in December, 1937. Its general purpose was to unite students inte rested in chemistry and to furnish them with the opportunity to do more than the regular classwork. Its aims are to take up aspects of chemistry not covered in the college courses, to promote closer relations with the chemistry students of other colleges, and to allow members of the club an opportunity for self-expression. R egular and special meetings hav e been held, with papers being giYen by various members of the club, including one by John Upham, who had had practical experience on this topic through working in a chemical plant the previous summer. Representatives were also sent to th e Connecticut Valley Stud ent Scientific Conference, wh ere papers wer e given by 路w illiam McCarthy and Erik Hoegberg, graduate students and members of th e club.

A

011e Tfmulred 'l'hirty-seven


PI GAMMA MU

0

of the principal aims of Pi Gamma 1\lu, national honorary Social Science fraternity, is to bring closer together students and faculty members who are particularly inte rested in history and economics. It is hoped that as a result students' interest in social and political problems of the day will be stimulated, that students will r ealize the importance of a logical , scientific approach to those problems, and that the faculty members will be stimulated by the student interest and enthusiasm. F eeling that the social sciences are potentially a tremendous force for the good of the world, but a force often underrated and ignored, the Pi Gamma Mu Fraternity has chosen as its task the arousing of n ew enthusiasm and the securing of intelligent research in order that th e Social Sciences may occupy an important place in the world of thought. The Connecticut Alpha Chapter of Pi Gamma Mu was founded at Trinity four years ago by Professor Edward E. Humphrey, Northam Professor of History and Political Science, and its subsequent growth is due, in l a rge part, to his efforts. Two formal m eetings have been held this year; a third was scheduled for May. At the first meeting, in D ecember , at Professo r Humphrey's home, Edward Mann, Paul Harris. and William Gorman II wer e initiated. Frank Barnes was elect ed President, William Gorman, Vice-President, and Professo r Cunningham, Secreta ry. Professor Troxell spoke on "Geology and th e \Vate rways of Connecticut," illustrating his talk with beautifully-colored slides. In February, the society met at the home of Professor Cunningham. Milton Budin, Truman Huffman, Phillips Hawkins, and Arthur Campbell we re initiated NE

One Hnndred Thirty-eight


and Robert Whitaker, former director of the budget for th e State, l ed a discussion on government finance. Any officer, instructor, alumnus, graduate student, Senior or Junior, of the college may be elected to membership. If an undergraduate, he must have pursued studies in the social sciences for twenty semester hours and have r eceived " B" grades or better.

TRINITY REVIEW

F

oR THE first time in a good many years Trinity once again had a literary magazine. Shortly after college opened, it was announced that J osias J . Cromwell, '39, Editor-in-Chief of the new publication, The Trinity R eview, would receive manuscripts for the magazine. The writers in th e college got to work and an excellent issue was published in January. This was follow ed in May by a second, even better issue. Over one hundred and sixty manuscripts were submitted to the editors, William Gorman, Robert Harris, Sumner Twiss, H enry Hayden, William Wolf, and Richard Morris. An appropriation was received from the S enate and the Faculty l ent financial , as well as moral support, thus avoiding the necessity for the en cumbrance of advertisements. The Senate has increased the appropriation for n ext year, and togethe r with the subscriptions that will be sold when the college reopens, this should place the magazine on a sound financial basis. Richard Morris has been chosen the n ew Editor-inChief. with William J. Wolf as the new Associate Editor.

One Hundred Thirty-nin e


ACKNOWLEDGMENTS I , the editor-in-chief of th e 1940 IVY, hereby a ssume full r espon sibility f or the laten ess of this IVY and apologiz e to all those concern ed .

The 1940 IVY wishes to make the following

acknowledgments :

The

Hartford

Courant, for sport pictures ; Ray Oosting, for pictures of the varsity t eams ; and J olm Ritter, for valuable help in composition.

One H undred Forty


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~be ~rtnttp ~r tpob TRINITY COLLEGE, H artford , Conn. Published twenty-six times during the year. 193 8

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One Hundred Forty-three


To future businessmen ... One of these days, when you're a man of busi ne ss, our officers will welcome the privilege of discussing your banking need s. You'll find here complete banking service and a progressive policy. HARTFORD-CONNECTICUT TRUST COMPANY Hartford, Connecticut Tune in to our program "Voices of Yesterday" every Thursday, at 7:15P.M. over WDRC

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One Hundred Fm路ty-four

Hartford, Conn.

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Hartford, Conn.


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One H1mdred Forty-five


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One Ilundred Fm·ty-six


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One Hundred Forty-seven


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One H undred Forty-nine


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