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IIAUSAUER路JONES PRINTING CO MPA:o\Y B UFFALO, N.Y.


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IDriuity 1J uy 1913

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IDI1r 3Juu1or (!Hann of IDriuUy QJ:ollrgr ft;artfnrb. QJ:ouurrtirut MCMXII

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1ÂŁbitorial T HAS been our purpose this year to make the IVY as much of a Campus Book as possible. Of course, there is a certain amount of material that must be included; but wherever it has been found expedient, pictures and reading matter that reflect undergraduate thought and life have been preferred. We trust that this will meet the approval of our readers, and that it will give them something tangible by which to remember the year.

I

All those who have helped to make this book a success we hereby thank: Rosenbaum,'q.; Beij,'15; Peck,'15, and V. Young,'15. for their drawings; Lew,'13, and Bassford,'14, for photographs; and especially Doctor Arthur Adams for his kind assistance in proofreading, and Miss Harriet E. Beards of East Orange, N. ]., for her charming sketches. A short preface is generally appreciated; so we entrust to you this number of the IVY, and, if it pleases you at all, we have succeeded in our work .


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1Ebttor -tu-<!L4trf VVALTER STUART ~ARSDEN, jR.

Massachusetts

iblusiur.a.a .tltlauagrr New York

ALLAN BEHRENDS CooK

i\.a.at.ataut iblu.aiur.a.a g{auagrr New York

FRANCIS EARLE VVILLIAUS

lliitrrary 1Ebttor.a THO:ti!AS GILBERT BROW

Connecticut

joHN jAY VVmTEHEAD, jR.

Connecticut

i\t4lrtir 1Ebttor.a ~ARCUS THORTON ~CGEE

Connecticut

ETHELBERT TALBOT SJVIITH

New York

HENRY BEARDSLEY

vv ARNER

Connecticut

4


C!Jorporatiou THE PRESIDENT OF THE CoLLEGE, ex-officio PRESIDE T* H artf01路d THE RT. REv. WILLIAM W . NILES, D.D., LL.D., D.C.L. Concord, N. H . THE Ho r. WILLIAM HAMERSLEY, LL.D.* HartfOTd THE REv. FRANCIS GooDWIN, D.D .* Hartford THE Ho N. WILLIAM E. CuRTis, LL.D . N ew York J. PIERPONT MoRGAN, LL.D. New York JOHN H. S. QuicK, M.A. Chicago THE REv. WILLIAM H . VIBBERT, D.D. New York SYDNEY G . FISHER, L.H.D., LL.D. P hiladelphia JAMES J. GooD WI r, LL.D .* Hartford P. HENRY WooDWARD, M .A., Secretary* Hartford WILLIAM S. CoGSWELL. M.A. ] amaica, N. Y. THE RT. REv. CHAUNCEY B. BREWSTER, D.D . Hartford Hartford WILLIAlvi C . SKINNER, M.A.* New York AMBROSE SPENCER MuRRAY, ]R., M.A. THE Ho r . FRANK L. WILCOX, B.A.* B erlin Hartford THE REv. HENRY FERGUSON, LL.D. EDGAR F. WATERMAN, LL.B., Treasurer* Hartford Hartford EDWARD B. HATCH, EsQ. Hartford GEoRGE DAwsoN HowELL, B .A . . Cleveland WILLIAM GwiNN MATHER, M.A. N ew York RoBERT THORNE, LL.B.t Pittsburgh THE HoN. JosEPH BuFFINGTON, LL.D.t Boston CHARLES c. BARTON, ]R., LL.B.t *These mem bers of th e Corporation form th e Executive Committee. tEiected by the Alumni .

6


THE R EVEREND FLAVEL SwEETEN LuTHER,

President of Trinity College

Ph.

D., LL.D .


rBoar1l of 1J1rllotus Jrr.awrut THE PRESIDENT OF THE CoLLEGE, ex-officio

t;rutnr JJirllnw.a FREDERICK EvEREST HAIGHT, Ph.D. WALTER STANLEY ScHuTz, M.A., LL.B. ALEXANDER TAYLOR MAsoN, M.A., LL.B. CHARLES SmRAs MoRRis, B.S. WILLIAM STIMSON HuBBARD, M.D. E. KENT HuBBARD, B.S .

3Juutnr lJirllnw.a GEORGE EMERSON BEERS, M .A ., LL.B. THE REv. J. ELDRED BROWN, M .A . PERCY SHELLEY BRYANT, M .A. FRANK ELISHA JoHNSON, M .A. THE REv. JoHN TAYLOR Hu TTINGTON, M.A., D.D. THE REv. JoHN jAMES McCooK, M.A., D .D., LL.D.

1\ssortattou of t4r 1\lumut GEoRGE DAwso r HowELL, B.A . . GEORGE WILLIAM ELLIS, B.A. JoHN F . FoRWARD, B .S. . • CHARLES GuiLFORD WooDWARD, M.A.

President Vice-President Secretary Treasu1·er

.§tattllittg Qtnmmittrr

Tr-IE PRESIDENT THE TREASURER Tr-rE REv. SA:r-.IUEL HART, D.D., D.Can. L., LL.D . LAwsoN PuRDY, LL.D. JOHN M . BRAINERD) M .A. VICTOR PEDERSEN, M.D. jACOB H . GREENE JoHN P. ELTO , B .S . HENRY J. BLAKESLEE, B.S.

c.

8


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@]lo ooooooooooooooJ@J THE REv. FLAVEL Sw EETEN L u THER, Ph .D ., LL.D.

President, and Seabury Professor of M athematics and Astronomy I I 5 Vernon Street (Offi ce, IJ Seabury Hall) B. A., Trinity, 1870; Ph . D., 1896 ; LL. D., 190+; Professor of \1athematics and Astronomy at Racin e College, 1871- 188 1; P rofessor of \ 1athematics and Astronomy at Kenyon College, 1881-83; Professor at Trinity since 1883; President of Trinit)" College, 1904- ; \!ember of American Societ~路 of \lechanical Engineers; Senator from First District of Connecticut, 1907, 1909. il> B K, ~ T.

TH E REv. GEORGE WILLIAMSON SMITH , D.D. , LL.D.

Professor of M etaphysics, Emeritus B. A., H obart, 1857; D. D., 188o; D. D. , Columb ia; LL. D., Trinity, 1887. Ch aplain, United States Navy, 1864; Acting Professor of :\1athematics, United States laval Academy, Newpo-t, 1864-65; Chaplain at Annapolis, 1865-68; Rector in various places t ill 1883; President of Trinity, 1883- 1904. 8 J. X

9


CHARLES FREDERICK JoHNSON ,

L.H.D ., LL.D.

P rofessor of English Literature, Emeritus

69 Vernon Street B. A., Yale, 1855; :vi. A., 1863; L. H. D., 1895. Assistant Professor of Ylathematics, United States laval Academy, 186570; Professor at Trinity, 1883-; Author of "English Words"; "Three Englishmen and Three Americans"; "Elements of Literary Criticism"; " vVhat Can l Do For Brady?" and other poems ; "Outline History of English and American Literature"; "Forms of Verse"; "Shakespeare and His Critics," etc. \If 1'.

THE R Ev. JoHN j AMES McCooK, M.A.,

D.D., LL.D.

Professor of Modern Languages

396 Main Street B. A., Trinity, 1863; D. D., 190 1; LL. D ., 19 1o; studied at Jefferson College, New York College of Physicians and Surgeons, and Berkeley Divinity School; Second Lieutenant First Virginia Volunteer Infantry during the Civil War; Professor at Trinity since 1883; Rector of St. John's Church, East Hartford, since 1869. Author of reports on poor-law administration and prison reform; also of numerous magazine articles on vagabondage, political venality, pauperism, drink, etc. il> B K, 8 .6. X.

RoBERT BAIRD RI GGs,

Ph.D.

Scovill Professor of Chemistry

3 5 Forest Street B. A., Beloit College, Wisconsin, 1876; Ph. D., Gottingen, Chemist for United States Geological Survey, 1884-87; Professor of Chemist:y, National College of Pharmacy, 1885-87; Professor of Chemistry, National College of Pharmacy, 1885-87; Contributor to T he American Chemical Journal, The American journal of Science, and other journals . B 8 II .

10


FRANK CoLE BABBITT, Ph.D. Professor of the Greek Language and Literatut·e

65 Vernon Street B. A., Harvard, 1890; M.A., 1892; Ph. D., 1895; Fellow of the American School of Classical Studies at Athens, 1895-96. Instructor in Greek at Harvard, 1896-98; Professor at Trinity. 1899--; Member of the American Archaeological Institute; Member of the American Philological Association. Author of "Greek Grammar"; also papers in American j ournal of Archaeology, and in lf arvard Studies in Classical Philology. <I> B K , 8t>X.

vVrLBUR MARSHALL URBA 'Ph.D. Professor of Philosophy

71 Vernon Street A. B., Princeton, 1895; Ph. D. , Leipzig, 1897; studied also at Jena , and was R eader in Philosop hy in Princeton and Professor of Philosophy at Ursinus College. Member of American P sychological Association and American Philosophical Association. Author of "Valuation, Its Nature and Laws," 1909, and contributor to various philosophical journals and reviews.

'-

HENRY AucusTus PERKINS, M.A., E.E. Professor of Ph ysics

83 Gillett Street B. A., Yale, 1896; M. A., Columbia, 1899; E. E., Columbia , 1899. Member of American Physical Society; Societe Fran9aise de Physique; Associate Member of American Institute of Electrical Engineers. Author of "An Introduction to General Thermodynamics"; has published articles in American j ournal of Science, Scientific American, Electrical World, Comptes R endus, Lt Radium, and the Physical Review. 2: :=:, <I> B K, A 11 <1>.

II

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..

GusTAvus ADOLPHUS KLEENE,

Ph.D_.

Professor of Economics

90 Atwood Street A. B., Cniversity of :\1ich igan, 1891; studied at Berlin and Tubingen, at Columbia University, and the Cniversity of Pennsylvania, receiving his Ph. D. from the latter institution. For two winters with the Charity Organization Societ)' of New York City; Assiscant in Economics at the University of Wisco nsin; 1nstructor in Economics and Social Science at Swarthmore College, an d Lecturer at the University of Pennsylvani a. Contributor to the Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, American Statistical Association Publications, r ate Review, etc.

JosEPH DEVINE FLYNN, 1I.A.

Professor of Mathematics

73 Imlay Street B. A., Trinity, 1897; :\I. A., Tufts, 1908. Instructor in ~f athe颅 matics at Professor Stearns' School and at the Hartford Public High School; Assistant Professor of :\Iathematics at Trinity to 1907; Professo.- of :\Iathematics, 1907- . <t> B K, 4> r !!.. .

THE REV. CRANSTON BRENTON,

M.S.

Professor of the English Language and L iterature

73 Vernon Street B. S., Trinity, 1899; Graduate of the Berkeley Divinity School, 1901; :\I. S., Trinit~路 , 1902. Minister in Charge, and Rector of All Saints :\Iemorial Church, 1\ew :\1ilford, Connecticut, 190104; Assistant Professor of English, Trinity College, 1904-o6; from 路1906, Professor of the English Language and Literature at Trinity College. !> 'li'

12


CHARLES EDWIN R oGERs, C.E.

Professor of Civil Engineering IJ Vernon Street Rensselaer Polytechnic In stitute, 1896. Engineer and Contractor, 1 96-190 1; In structor Lehigh University, 190 1-o4; Professor of ~I athematics a nd Civil Engineering, Clarkson ~1 emorial School of Technology and General Engineering Practice, 1904-05; Professor of Civi l Engineering, Trinity, 1905- ; :\1ember of the Rensselaer Society of Engineers. ~ :::=.:

HoRACE CHENEY SwAN, M.D . Medical Director, and Director of the Gymnasium I I Lincoln Street

.\I. D., Tuft s College :\Ied ica l School, 1903. Inst ruc tor Hi stology, Han路a rd Summer School, 1903-05; Director of Gymnasium, Wesleyan University, 1903-os; ~1edica l Director and Instructor in Gymnasium, Trinity College, 1905-; Ph ysica l Director of Y. :\I. C. A., St. J o hn sb ur~路, \ 路t., 1896; Y. M. C. A., Newton, :\fass ., 1899; studied at Springfield Training School, 1897-99. :\fember of H artford :\fedical Association, and Conn ect icut Medical Associ a tion .

THE R Ev. ARTHUR AD A Ms,

Ph.D.

Professor of English Trinity College B. A., Rutgers, 1902; :\I. A., 1903 ; Ph. D., Yale, 1905; B . D., Berkeley Divinity School, 19 10. Instructor in English at the Cni,路ersity of Colorado, 1905-6; Ass istant Professor at Trinity , 19o6-o8; Associate P rofessor, 1908-19 11 ; Professor, 19 11- . l\Iember of the :\'lodern Language Association of AmPrica and of the Ameri ca n Philological Association. Author of S yntax of the Temporal Clau se in Old En glish Prose, coll aborato r on the Gray and Word sworth Conc-ordances, and au thor also of notes and reviews in .H odem l.angnage Note.<.

13


RAYMOND GARFIELD GETTELL, M.A. Northam Professor of History and Political Science

74 Vernon Street B. A. , Ursinu s, 1903; ~l. A., uni ve rsity of P enn sylva ni a . 1900. Inst ru ctor in History, U rsin us , 1:)02·05; P rofesso r of Hi story and Economics, Bates, 1900-07 ; No rth am P r:Jfessor of Hi stor~' and Political Science, Trinity, 1907- . M ember Am erican Academy of P olitical and Social Science, also Ameri ca n Politi ca l Science Associ ation. Contribu tor to the pu blications of th e Am eri can Academy of P oliti cal and Social Science and to th e American Political Science R eview. Author of " Introd uction t o P olitica l Science," 1910, and " Readin gs in Poli tical Science, " 19 11.

B. Sc., Ohio Stat F ellow and Assis Assistant, Depa structor Marine Assista~t, Unite N.Y. Member ciation for the mental Biolog)" <1> B K, 1: :0:, tl

W A LTER BENJAMIN BRIGGS

Librarian 72 South Main Street, West Hartford Su perintendent of R ead in g R oom, H arva rd U niversity Library, 1896-1904; R eference Librari an, B rookl r n ( . Y .), Public Libra ry, 1905-09; Libra ria n, Trini ty, ~ ~ -

JoHN GLANVILLE GrLL,

B. A., \Vas · Johns Hop Hopkins, I Instructor,

<t>B K, ~A

Ph.D.

Professor of R omance Languages 67 Brownell Avenue A. B., Ottawa University, 1896; studied in niversities of P a ris and Berlin, 1897-1900· Instructor in French and Spanish, Case School of Applied Science, Cleveland, Ohio, 19QH>4· M. A., Harvard, 1905. Instructor, Harvard, 19os-o6. Ph. D .. Harvard, 1900. In structor, Columbia University, 1900-{)8; Instructor, Harvard, 1908-09; Professor, Trinity, 1909"-· Member Modern Language Association of America; Editor of Valdes' " La Hermana San Sulpicio," 1912.

14

B.S.,


MAx WITHROW MoRsE, Ph.D. ]. Pierpont Morgan Professor of B iology 8o Washington Street

B. Sc., Ohio State, 1903; M.A., 1904; Ph. D.; Columbia, 1905; Fellow and Assistant, Ohio State; Fellow, Columbia University. Assistant, Department of Biochemistry, Cornell Medical; Instructor, Marine Biological Laboratory, Woods H ole; Scientific Assistant, United States Bureau of Fisheries; In structor, C. C. ~ - Y . Member American Society of Zoologists, American Association for the Advancement of Science, Society for Experimental Biology and :'.1edicine, Marine Biological Association. <I> B K, 2: S , t. T.

LE RoY CARR B A RRET, Ph.D. Professor of the Latin Language and Literature IS Seabury Hall

B. A., Washington and Lee niversity, 1897; M.A., 1898; P h. D., J ohns Hopkins University, 1903 . Instructor in Latin, J ohns Hopkins, 1903-07; Preceptor in Classics, Princeton, 1907-09; Instructor, Dartmouth, 1909-10; P rofessor, Trinity, 191o--. <I>

B K,

2:

A E.

ARCHER EBEN K NOWLTO N, B.S.

Instructor in Physics and in Mathematics

I9 Brownell Avenue <1> r t..

B. S., Trinity, 1910.

2

IS


WALTER LORING B ARROWS, ::VI.A.

Instructor in Geology 22

Jarvi s Hall

,\.B. , Princeton, 1907; :\I. A., Columbia, 19 10; Teaching-Fellow, Princeton, 1907-oB. ~ :=:.

JoHN \ iVI LLIAM HARRISON, B . S.

Assistant in Chemistry

14 Northam Tower B. S., Trinity, 19 r 1.

Ll. K E.

PAUL ALLERTON CusHMA"', S.B.

Instructor in Drawing and in Descriptive Geometry 8 I Washington Street S. B., ::\1assachusetts In stitute of Technology, 1911.

I6


EDGAR FRANCIS WATERMAN,

12

:.\I. ., LL.B.

Treasurer Seabury Hall

B. A., Trinity, 1898; .\I. .\ ., Trinity, 1901; LL. B ., Columbi a, 1901. Secretary Uni,路ersity Club of H artford "' T.

THE R Ev. HENRY FERGUSoN,

Lectm路e1路 in H is tory 123

Vernon Street

LL.D.


Trinity C'ollege,

1R75.


~rabuatr ~tubrntn FRED Do ALD CARPENTER, B.A., I9IO .

Middletown

H. E. Russe ll Fellow, University of Leipzig, German~路

GusTAVE ALEXANDER FEINGOLD, B.S., I9I I

Hartford

T erry Fellow, Havard Universitr, Ca mbridge, .M as .

J OHJ\' WILLIAM HARRISO ' B.S ., I 9I I

Torrington

14 N . T.

Non-~atrtrulatrb ~tubtnt.!I

GEORGE WILLIAM GILBERT

Montville

JOSEPH MoRRis LI NETT

Hartford

JOH N VALENTINE SPRAGUE

Rockaway B each, N. Y. ~ummary

Graduate Students Seniors . Juniors

3 37 38

Sophomores

ss

Freshmen

90 3

on-Matriculated Students

229

20


"CHIP"

CLASS CoLoRs

R ed and Blue

<!Lla.an 速ffirrr.a Qrqriatma.s Wrrm

President

WILLIAM HILL BLEECKER, JR.

Vice-President

PHILIP ALOYSIUS AHERN

Secretary- Treasurer

WILLIAM REDMOND CuRTIS

Historian

CHAPIN CARPE ITER

Wrhtity Wrrut

President

CHAPIN CARPENTER

Vice-President

OLIVER GILDERSLEEVE, JR.

Seaetary- Treasurer

THOMAS FRANCIS FLANAGAN

]oH

r

Historian

BooTH CLARK 21


1912 ~istnry

F

OR three years of his college life, spring denotes to the college man the coming of leisure, the pleasure season, lazy days and easy ones, soon to bring the freedom of summer and vacation. This pleasurable expectation lasts for three years of his college life, let it be said. For with the fourth and last year, there comes a change. The autumn passes quickly and actively, winter foLlows, and Junior week brings the realization of being really "out of" the affairs of college. The Senior has been separated from his fellows; now separated only tentatively; soon to be separated permanently. Spring brings to us who are about to leave the realization of the end of something that has been a long season of pleasure, and now we enter into a spring that is followed by a summer of much doubt and trepidation. We have been here four years. We have played the role of the average class in college. We have had our battles, outside of the classroom and, not infrequently, within the classroom, too . Now we are in that peculiar position of being on the verge of graduation. Here we make a retrospection, such as probably will not be made again. For the college man who thinks of his college days forgets the things that he ought to have done and the things that he left undone and the things that he ought not to have done and, with the growth of the past, the memories that stay are those of the pleasantest things. But there comes with graduation a summary, a companson of what we have done with what we have not done. Let it be said that "191 2" has done her best. Forget her faults, for they are really the faults of omission rather than of commission. We do not propose to review them. What we have done, the men in college know. What we intended to do, we know, and you have forgotten. So here we are with another springtime, and this is the springtime of good-bye. United we have stood for four years. United we go out together, and tomorrow we shall be scattered to the four winds, united with one thought: that of Trinity- now, yesterday, and tomorrow. Trinity , 1912, bids you farewell! Auf Wiedersehen! Banzai/

22


~tninr

PHILIP ALOYSIUS AHERN

O!lann i&nll

.

Hartford

Football Team (3) (4); Baseball Team (2) (3); Track Team ( I ) (2); Class Football Team ( I) (2); Class Baseball Team (I ) (2); Class Track Team (1) (2); The Medusa; A X P .

WILLIAM CHRISTY ANDREWS

Allentown, Pa.

l

GEORGE TuRNER BATES

Boston, Mass.

Class President (2, I st term); Sophomore Hop Committee; Track Team (2); Sophomore Dinin g Club; \]i T .

23


WILLIAM AuGUSTUS BIRD,

IV

. Bu.ffalo, N. Y.

President of Senate (4); Holland Prize (I) (3); Tripod Board (r); Managing Editor (2) (3); Editor-in-Chief (4); First Whitlock Prize (z); Second (3); Second Alumni English Prize (2); First (3); Press Club (4); Sophomore Dining Club; Editor-in-Chief 1912 IVY; Senate (3); The Medusa; <I> B K, A D. <I>.

WILLIAM HILL BLEECKER,

]R.

. Flushing, N. Y.

Track Team (r) (2) (3); Football Team (3) (4); Baseball Team (3); Hockey Team (3) (4); Senate (2); Class President (4, rst Term); Sophomore Dining Club; College Marshal (3); The Medusa;

A D. <I>.

HowARD RAY BRoCKETT ~

'lt.

Bristol


P ottsville, P a.

CHAPIN C A RPE TER

Freshman-Junior Banquet Committee; l\lland olin Club ( I); Tripod Boa rd ( r) (z ); Athletic Editor (3); Managing Editor (4); Tenni s Team (r) (z) (3) ; Class President (4, 2nd T erm); Sop homore Dining Club ; Sophomore Smoker Committee ; Secretary-Treasurer Junior Promenade Committee; I K A.

} AMES SHREWSBURY CRAIK

.

.

L ouisville, K y .

Sophomore Dining Club; Tripod Board (z ); Ass ignment Editor (3); Athletic Editor (4); Glee Club (r ) (3) (4); Track T ea m (2) (3); 'lt T.

WILLI AM R E DM OND CuRTIS .

Point Pleasant, N. ].

Golf Team (1); A D. ~-

25


SAMUEL HERBERT EvrsoN

.

Albany, N. Y .

Tripod Board (z); Circulation Manager (3); Glee Club (1) (z) (3) (4); Church School Prize in English (z); 'lt T.

THOMAS FRANCIS FLANAGAN

H artford

Assistant Advertising Manager Tripod (z) (3) (4); Business Manager 1912 IvY; Senate (4); Press Club (z) (4); A X P.

OLIVER GILDERSLEEVE, JR . .

Football Squad ( r) (z) (4); (z) (3) (4); President (3); Club; 'lt T.

z6

Gildersleeve

Musical Clubs ( r) Sophomore Dining


CARLOS SANFORD HoLCOMB

Entered Junior A X P.

Torrington

.

Class from

Yale University;

Hartford

CHARLES HuRD HowELL

Class President (1, 1st term); Football Team (1) (2) (3); Captain (3); Mandolin Club (1); Leader (2); Hockey Team (1) (2) (3); Manager (2); Baseball Squad (2); President Y. M. C. A. (2) (3);â&#x20AC;˘ The Medusa; A~ <I>.

JAMES HowARD HuMPHREY

.

Waterbur y

Assistant Manager Football Team (2); Manager (3); Glee Club (1) (2) (3) (4); Sophomore Dining Club; Junior Promenade Committee; ~ K E.


KILBOURN i-.IAXWELL KENDALL

Sophomore Dining Club;

LAURE

Framingham, Mass .

.6. '11.

CE HuTCHINSON McCLURE

Hat路tford

Class President (r, rst term); Freshman-Junior Banquet Committee; Sophomore Dining Club; Chairman Sophomore Hop Committee; Chairman Junior Promenade Com.m ittee; 1912 IvY Board; .6. K E.

RAYMOND jAY NEWTON

Holland Scholar (2). Second Alumni English Prize (4);

28

Gaylordsville <I> B K.


LEsLIE GILBERT O sBO R NE

New Milford

A X P.

CLARENCE IRVI NG PE NN

Sophomore Smoker Committee; Senate (4); <I> r 11.

ELLIOTT FIELDIN G PETTI G REW

Weehawken, N.]. I9I2 IvY

Board;

New York, N. Y.

Freshman-Junior Banquet Committee ; Assistant Manager Track Team (2) ; l\Ianager (3); Sophomore Dining Club; Sophomore Smoker Committee; Junior Promenade Committee; College Choir (4) ; A 11 <I>.


THOMAS }AMES QursH, }R.

South Manchester

Hartford Club.

. Hartford

RAYMOND HuBBARD SEGUR 1912

IvY Board;

WrLLIAM SHORT, }R.

~ 'lr.

.

St . Louis, Mo.

Sophomore Dining Club; Chairman Sophomore Smoker Committee; Advertising Manager Tripod (z) (3) (4); Secretary-Treasurer Athletic Association (z); Class President (3, 1st term); Senate (3) (4); Junior Promenade Committee; President Athletic Association (4); College Marshal (3) resigned; The Medusa; I K A.

30


Hartford

MAXIMILIAN SPORER

Sophomore Smoker Committee; :3 '1'.

Hartford

WILLIAM ERNEST STEVEN

Freshman-Junior Banquet Committee ; Promenad e Committee; <I> r D..

Norwich

ICHOLAS VINCENT WALSH

1912 IvY Board;

3

Junior

Hartford Club.

31


New Britain Track Team (I) (2) (3); Captain (4) ; of Connecticut State Championship, and World 's Y. M . C. A . Record for Pole Senate (4) ; Class President (3, 2nd Sophomore Dining Club; 11 K E.

CHARLES RICHARDSON WHIPPLE

.

Holder Indoor Vault; term) ;

Malo ne, N. Y.

Glee Club ( I) (3); Freshman-Junior Banquet Committee; Sophomore Hop Committee; Sophomore Smoke r Committee ; Sophomore Dining Club; Junior Promenade Com mittee; I9I2 IvY Board; Senate (4); 11 \li .


1Jn fllllrmoriam Baltrr

~rntt

3Jarnts

of tl}r <Ulass of 1g 12

1Jn fllllrmoriam JJol1n <Urompton i!;or.afall


1913 "CHARLIE"

CLAss CoLoRs

Green and Gray

(!Ua.a.a (@ffirrr.a <!!lfristmas IDtrtn

. President

JoHN BIGELOW MooRE

Vice-President

CHESTER DuDLEY WARD

Secretary- Treasurer

FRANCIS EARLE WILLIAMS

. Historian

DANIEL BYRON DAWLEY

wrinity wrrm

. President

CHARLES HENRY CoLLETT

Vice-President

DAKIEL BYRON D AWLEY RICHARD LAWTO

Secretary- Treasurer

DEPPEN

ETHELBERT TALBOT

Historian

SMITH

35


1913 i!;hltnry UIDED not at all by precedent established by former classes, "'13" refrains from taking this most excellent opportunity to declare itself the Alpha and Omega, or even a paragon of virtue . With dignity we don the mantle of upper-classmen, and with fond hopes for the future we mingle a bit of sadness in anticipation of our departure little more than a year hence ( ?) . As we entered Chapel on that afternoon of autumn, back in 1909, a beautiful rainbow arched the heavens . On that day Trinity jumped into fame and has been there ever since. Like woman, she speaks for herself. In fear of Sophomore savagery we came out from Chapel to begin a long list of victories which lasted until our ranks were so sadly depleted. During that fall we won both the baseball and football games . In the early winter, while the Sophomores were tripping the "light fantastic" in Alumni Hall, we stole away to ew Haven and held our memorable banquet which for the first time in history was unmolested . We even had some captives. It is with fondest recollections that we recall that happiest day of our history . Our next great achievement came in March when that fierce fight on Northam stairs occurred. After the smoke had cleared away, ten Sophomores had been freed from all care for the rest of the night. Who can recall that fight without imagmmg himself the hero of a feudal raid? The next morning we raised our banner successfully. As Sophomores we had a new and larger element to meet. We more than held our own in the rushes, and moreover won both baseball and basketball games. During this rather miserable period we endeavored to break up the banquet tendered the Juniors by the Freshmen and gave them one of the best runs for their money that they will care to have . During our early years we had been told that the Junior year was the pleasantest in college; this sounded too inviting to let slip without a test; so back we came. As a class we have suffered much from loss in numbers. We have had, however, many things for which we should be thankful. But more than our achievements on the gridiron and in the classroom, the men of 'I 3 prize the bonds of comradeship and fellowship that bind the class together. Proud as we .are of the gray and green-above all is the pride with which we proclaim ourselves sons of "dear old Trinity. "

G


3Juutnr Qtlass 1!tnll

LEONARD DAWSON ADKINS

.

Easton, Md.

Tripod Board (3); Holland Prize (2); Church School English Prize (2); Third Alumni English P rize (3); A D. <1>.

WILLIAM

PoND BARBER, JR.

Hartford

Holland Prize ( r ); Goodwin-Hoadley Scholarship; First Chemistry Prize (2); Sophomore Smoker Committee; Junior Promenade Committee; ~ \ft.

JosEPH

IoYES BARNETT

Junior Prom enade Committee; Team ( r) (2); A D. <1>.

Newtown Class Baseball

37


RAYMOND HART BENTLEY

THOMAS GILBERT BROW N

. Hartford

Norwich

Tripod Board (1) (2); Assignment Editor (3); 1913 IvY Board; Press Club (3); College Choir (1) (z); Senior Dramatics (1) (z); 'liT.

KEN N ETH BEARDSLEY CASE .

West Hartford

Tripod Board (2) (3); Circulation Manager (z) (3); Sophomore Dining Club; Sophomore Hop Committee; Sophomore Smoker Committee; Junior Promenade Committee; Mandolin Club (z); Glee Club (3); I K A.


CHAMBERS CHOW

CHARLES HENRY CoLLETT

H ankow, China

Dover, N. H.

Football Team (1) (2) (3); Captain-Elect (3); Track Team (I) (2); Secretary-Treasurer Athletic Association (3); Sophomore Dining Club; Sophomore Smoker Committee; Junior Promenade Committee; Glee Club (I) (2) (3); Mears Scholar; Class President (3, 2nd term); 'lt T.

ALLAN BEHRENDS CooK

Brooklyn, N. Y.

Tripod Board (1) (2) (3); Trea surer (2) (3); Business Manager 1913 IvY; Glee Club (3); Press Club (3); President (3); Senior Dramatics (z); A ~ <I>.

39


East Hartford

ANDREW JoHN CRICHTON

Hartford Club.

Providence, R. I.

DANIEL BYRON DAWLEY

Class Track Team (I); Mandolin Club (I); 11 K E.

RICHARD LAWTEN DEPPEN

0

Shamokin, Pa.

Sophomore Dining Club; Sophomore Smoker Committee; Assistant Manager Baseball Team (2); Manager (3); Class Baseball Team (I) (2); Class Football Team (I) (2); A 11 <I>.

E


. H artford

EvERETT MARBLE F A IRBANKS

Hartford Club; Senate (3).

Brooklyn, N. Y.

ALBERT HAITHWAITE, ]R.

Sophomore Smoker Committee; Team (r ); <t> r 11.

EDWARD WHITEHEAD JEWETT

Class Baseball T eam (r) (z);

Class Baseball

Norwichtown

I K A.


Shensi, China

MuNSEY LEw

Holland Prize (2);

:z

Second Chemistry Prize (2);

'lr.

ALFRED JOSEPH L'HEUREUX

Jewett City

Baseball Team (1) (2); Captain (3); Sophomore Hop Committee; Sophomore Smoker Committee; Class Baseball Team (1)(2); Class Football Team (2); <I> r 1:1.

MARcus THORNTON McGEE

1913 IvY Board;

:Z 'lr.

. Hartford


WALTER STUART MARSDEN, ]R.

Lenox, Mass.

Assistant Manager Track Team (2); 1\IIanager (3); Author Sophomore Dramatics (z); Editorin-Chief 1913 IvY; Press Club (3); I K A.

JoHN BIGELOW MooRE

Geneva, N. Y.

Sophomore Dining Club; Sophomore Hop Committee; Secretary-Treasurer Junior Promenade Committee; Senate (2) (3); Football Team (3); Basketball Team (2); Class Football Team (1) (z); Class Track Team (1); Class President (3, I st term); A t.. iP.

RussELL CuRTIS

OBLE

New Milford

Sophomore Dining Club; Sophomore Smoker Committee; Glee Club (2) (3); t.. '1'.

43


]R.

DELos ScHUYLER PuLFORD,

Tacoma, Wash.

Niandolin Club ( I ) (2) (3); Track Team (2); Tenni s Team (I ) (2) ; Manager (2); CaptainElect (3); Bu siness Manager I9I3 IvY resigned; Class Track Team ( I) (2); t.. 'lt.

H AROLD EvERETT S AWYE R

.

EuGENE GoonwrN SMEATHERS

Feeding Hills, Mass .

Cleveland, 0 .


ETHELBERT T ALBOT SMITH

.

New York , N. Y.

Junior Promenade Committee; I9I3 IvY Board; Glee Club (3); Class Football Team (2); Class Track Team ( I ) (z); Lemuel J. Curtis Scholar; First Alumni English Prize (3); A X P.

Wethersfie ld

RrcH ARD ::.IoRSE SMITH

SAMUEL SEDGEWICK SwiFT

.

Detroit, M ich .

Sophomore Dining Club; Track Team ( I ) (z); Mandolin Club ( I ) (z) (3); Manager l\Iu sical Clubs (z); President (3); Tripod Board (z) (3); Alumni Editor (3); !:.. 'l'.

45


RoBERT WRIGHT THOMAS

Centerville, Md.

CH

c

Baseball Squad ( r) (2); Class Baseball Team ( r) (2); Sophomore Dining Club; Class President (2, r st term); Sophomore Hop Committee;

0

t::.. --It.

H WILLIAM FRANCIS VAIL

.

Hartford

Hartford Club.

J ELIOT LEE WARD

New York, N. Y.

Class Football Team (r) (2); Class Track Team (2); Jun ior Promenade Committee; Basketball Team (2); t::.. K E.

4


CHESTER DuDLEY \VARD

New York, N. Y.

Chairman Junior Promenade Committee; Sophomore Smoker Committee; Class Football Team (2); Senior Dramatics (2); ~ K E.

HENRY BEARDSLEY \YAR!\ER

New Milford

Baseball Team (2); Chairman Sophomore Smoker Committee; 191 3 IvY Board; Class Baseball Team (r) (2); Class Track Team (1); ~ K E.

JoHx jAY WHITEHEAD, JR.

Waterbury

Glee Club (r) (2) (3); Leader (2) (3); FreshmanJunior Banquet Committee; Sophomore Hop Committee; Junior Promenade Committee; 1913 IvY Board; Soph omore Dining Club; College Choir (z) (3); ~ 'IJI.

47


FRANCIS EARLE WILLIAMS

Utica, N.Y.

Sophomore Dinin g Club; Sophomore H op Committee; Junior Prome nad e Committee; 1913 IvY Board; Class Football Team (z); <I> r 11.

RoBERT PRESTON WITHINGTON

Newton Center, Mass .

Sophomore Dining Club; Assistant Manager Football Team (3); Manager-Elect (3); Freshman-Junior Banquet Committee; Press Club (3); Class Football Team (z); Class Baseball Team ( r); Class Track T eam (1) (z); A 11 <I>.

vVA LTER CRANE H ATHAWAY

Brooklyn, N. Y.

Entered Junior Class from D artmouth;

<I>

r

11.


"JIM" CLASS CoLoRs

Maroon and White Qllass (@fficrrs <l!hri.atmas w.rrm

President

THEODORE FRANCIS WESSELS FRA!\'K GRENVILLE STADTMUELLER

Vice-President Secretary-Treasurer

HoRACE FoRT

Historian

ED\'\'ARD PINKNEY WROTH

airiuity airrm

President

jAMES AsnToN MooRE

Vice-President

EDGAR SoLoN LELAND

Secretary- Treasurer

RAYMOND HENRY DEXTER CHARLEs EwELL CRArK,

]R.

Historian 49


19 14 i!iistnry

• • • • • • • • MCMXIV

Here we are again, You've heard of us before, I

9 I

4

Rah-h-h-h-h Lemon Squeezer! (The 1914 History is hereby acknowledged as having been received on time.-En.)

so


~npqnmnrr MERRILL LEMUEL KELLoGG ALLEN, <1> FELIX EMIL BARIDON,

Q1la.a.a i&nll r

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ETHAN FROST BASSFORD, A jOHN PAUL BEGLEY

REGINALD METHERELL BLACHFORD VVALTER FREDERICK BoRcHERT,Ll KE

Ll >¥

KENNETH VVELLES BoYNTON,

GEORGE CoLLINSON BuRGWIN, JR.,

>¥ 1'

AAMAN CoHEN

I

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CHARLES EwELL CRAIK, JR. ,

>¥ 1'

CHARLES VVALLACE CooKE,

MoRTON STIMSON CREHORE, JR. RoBERT ELLIS CRoss, ~

HowARD JosEPH D ALEY, JR.

vvALLIS

THOMAS

DAVIS,

Ll K E

I

RAYMOND HENRY DEXTER,

K A

STEPHEN FRANCIS DuNN ARTHUR FoRD GEDDES EDGELow,

1OSEPH

HENRY EHLERS

GEORGE HowARD ELDER, A ARTHUR ALEXANDER

K A

Ll <I>

OEL FENOGLIO

FRANCIS STUART FITZPATRICK, HoRACE FoRT,

I

.

Ll K E

Ll K E

LESLIE RANKIN FREW Louis YuRuc GABERMAN Loms GoLDFIELD CHARLES

1OSEPH

. HAASER

URY ALBERT HICKS, A

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THEODORE CANFIELD HuDsoN, JR.,

>¥ 1'

RoBERT HENRY JOH NSON PETER PAuL LAwLoR, <1>

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.

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EDWIN MICHLET LAZARUS, A

EDGAR SoLON LELAND,Ll KE ABRAHAM LEVIN

vvOLCOTT

Ll <I> <I> r Ll J AMES AsHTON MooRE, A Ll <I> JOHN SHAPLEIGH MosEs, A Ll <I>

THOMAS

LITTLE, A

HowARD jEROME LIVERMORE,

EDWARD j EFFERSON MYERS,

I

K A

51

East Windsor Torrington Newark, N.]. . Hartford Caro, Mich. Newburgh, N. Y. New Milford Pittsburgh, Pa. . Hartford . Hartford Louisville, Ky . Cohasset, Mass. Norwich . Hartford Utica, N.Y. . Hartford Manchester Detroit, Mich. . Hartford Baltimore, Md. . Hartford Olean, N.Y. Ellicott City, Md. Thompsonville Hartford Hartford Hartford Hartford Paynesville, Minn. South Manchester Plymouth Mt. Carmel, Pa. Providence, R. /. Pittsfield, Mass. . Hartford Wnt Hartford Geneva, N. Y. Garden City, N. Y. Collinsville


Hartford Wethersfield Brookline, Mass. Plattsburg, N. Y. St. J ames, Md. New Rochelle, N. Y. Middletown West Hartford New London Toledo, Ohio Claremont, N.H. . Elmwood Hartford Claremont, N. H. Claremont, N. H. Lawrence, Mass. Portland Hartford Baltimore, Md.

LEo ]AMES NooNAN jAMES JEREMIAH O'CoNNOR PHILIP SuMNER PAGE,

t.. 'It

I K

BENJA.>.1IN Lours RAMSAY,

A

At..

LoUis ONDERDONK DE RoNGE,

<I>

'It T 'It T

WILLIAM LEvi RosENBAUM, HERBERT AcKLEY SAGE,

HENRY WHITING SELDEN, CHARLEs TIMOTHY SENAY,

<I> <I>

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ERNEST THEODORE SOMERVILLE, A

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WILLIAM BENJAMIN SPOFFORD,

FRANK GRENVILLE STADTMUELLER CYRus THoMAs STEVEN,

<I>

r t.. 'It T 'It T

ARCHIBALD WILSON WALKER, RrcHARD FoLsoM

v..rALKER,

LESLIE FREDERICK WALLACE THEODORE FRANCIS \ iVESSELS, RAYMo

'It T

D WEsT WooDWARD, ~'It

EDWARD Pr

KNEY WRoTH,

At..

<I>

52


Qllaas nf 19 15 CLASS CoLoRs

Orange and Black

<nla.s.s 速ffirrr.s <lr~ri.atutu.a

afrrm

P resident

HERBERT EDWAY R YERSON

Vice-President

R oNALD EARLE KINNEY

Secreta ry- Treasurer

ALFRED EDWARD D uNSFORD

Ilistorian

HAROLD Su1IMERFIELD OLAFSON

afriuity wrrm GEoRGE D AwsoN HowELL,

P resident

] R.

B ERTRAM L EoN BuRGOYNE S1IITH J AMES

Vice-President Secretary- Treasurer

OAH SLEE

Ilistorian

HAROLD Su IMERFIELD OLAFSON

53


1g 15

1!;istnry

TRmiTY CoLLEGE, HARTFORD. Date- -, 1912. FaiTest GwendoLyn:- ! have just brought to a state of completeness my preparations for the arduous duties of tomorrow, and in the interim I concluded to employ profitably the fleeting germs of time by penning you a few lines. Of course, you have been wondering and mentally soliloquizing upon my apparent apathy in corresponding. The only legitimate apology that I can offer is that it is wellnigh impossible for one to write standing up! \Vel!, here I am at the "Collegium Sanctissimae Trinitatis," and it is a wonderfully picturesque and charmingly situated nook. I am an atom in an organism of students the most marvelous in every respect that has ever invaded the hallowed walls and sacred precincts of the above-mentioned institution of erudition and indolence. You may rest assured that my every action, therefore, has been in perfect harmony and accord with路 its exalted pretensions and lofty ideals. It is perfectly obvious that the best of us must make enemies at some period of our transient existence. Our ).lost oble and Venerable Class of 19 r 5 has been superciliously appellated "Freshman, "and that Class whose position of regulating college affairs has been usurped by us is most veraciously termed "Sophomore," or "\Vise-Fool!" These fools (we may omit the prefix" wise" as men-路 dacious) are our inveterate foes, and examples of their maniacal employments may be observed in the following narrative. Gpon the afternoon of our first ).1onday at college, this mob displayed the audacity to cover the bulletin-board with their own persons, daring us to touch it within one minute! \\'as our honorable body to tolerate such a taunt flaunte-d in its face? Certainly not! Forthwith, we summoned several of our champions, hurled them against this "conglomeration of foolishness and wisdom," and the board was ours in a few seconds! That evening, by way of retaliation for their boldness, we tied up, hand and foot, twelve of their company, while they managed to ensnare but four of ours! After accomplishing this, noticing that our enemies did thirst, vve marched in solemn procession to a "wellknown watering trough" and did give them drink. This act of kindness was performed to soothe their feelings, overwhelmed by the indignities to which they had been subjected. As a reward to our sister Class-the Juniors, who were most loyal supporters during all our trials and tribulations-- vve tendered them a banquet on the evening of December 7, 1911. ~otwithstand颅 ing their former discomfitures, the Sophs endeavored to disrupt this proceeding; needless to state, they were unsuccessful in their attempts. Of that I shall write you later; enough to say that we had a most exciting and hilarious time. \Vork is pressing me, so I must needs close. With al l sorts of love, etc., etc., liAR OLD


1Jirrsqmatt o.tlass i!tnll K

BERTRAM BENEZETT BAILEY, 6 IRA ALLEN BALCH, A X p

Yantic Manchester Newtown Westmoreland, N. Y. Westmoreland, N. Y. New York, N. Y. Roxbury Station Hartford New Yo1路k, N. Y. Brandon, rt . Baltimore, M d. JI!It. Yernon, N. Y. Hartford I! m-tford II artford Manchester James/own, N. Y. New York, N. Y. Barrington, R. I. Kensington Dorchester, Alan. Niantic Newport, Pa. West Hartford London, England Minneapolis, Minn. !I artford Newtown II artford New York, N. Y. Westfield, Mass. Boston, Mass. Meriden Orange, N. }. New Bedford, Mass. Richmond !Jill, N. Y Danbury R1:dgejield Darien llartford Brooklyn, N. Y. New MilfoTd Putnam llartford Aubunr, N. 1". II artford South l'vl anchester ll artford

E

<P

\ VrLLIAM EDWARD BARNETT, A 6

XP

ARTHUR EvERETT BARNS, A JonN ARcHIE BARNS, A X P GEORGE BEACH, 6 ~ LEWIS GEORGE BEARDSLEY

KARL HILDING BEIJ, A X P RALPH HALM BENT, A X p RANDWICK ALBERT BISSELL, A D. <P CHARLES HERBERT BoEHM, A 6 <P HENRY LAWRENCE BRAINERD, \]1

T

SMART BRAND, ~ ~ \VrLLIAM WASHINGTON BRINKMAN JACOB BRODSKY ERNEST FREEMAN BROWN, A

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THOMAS CooK BRowN OGDEN DoREMUS BuDD, JR.,~ \\"ALCOTT CHAPIN, I K A EDWARD CPSON CowLEs FR ,\NCIS THOMAS CuRLEY, FREDERICK BoND DART, ~

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<P

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FREDERic GRIFFIN DoRWART, 6 ~ \\' ARD EvERETT DuFFY ALBERT EDWARD DUNSFORD, 6 DA

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SAMUEL HARMON EDSALL A 6 IEL HAROLD EvANS

HERBERT CuRTIS FERRIS,

AX P

~1AURICE LESTER FuRNIVALL ERNEST HARTCRAFT GEYER, HAROLD LESLIE GIBBS

6 K

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\VILLIAM THEODORE GRAY, JR., 6 \VALTER GIBSON GREGG EvERITT HEYWOOD HALL, 6 K E FRANK \VILLIAM HEALY HowARD RICE HrLL, 6 AusTIN EBER HoDGE CoLIN l\IoNTAIGUE I

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ADOLPH 'vYILLIAM LAWSON, A EDWARD \\' ILLIS LuDWIG

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JAMES SYLVESTER ~IcC,\BE, JR., \jJ THoMAS FRANCIS ::\IcCuE

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FELIX JEREMIAH :\IcEvtTT STANLEY :\[ERTON l\IERRILL,

A D. ll> 55


STANWOOD ADAMS MERRILL, ~ \ji HAROLD CoLTHURST MILLS, ~ \]i }AMES ARCHIBALD rvhTCHELL, ~ \ji

r

JAMEs PATRrcK rviuRRAY, <1> \lARK ELMO O'CONNELL

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HAROLD SuMMERFIELD OLAFSON, A WILLIAM BLACK ORR, A X p THEODORE ABBOTT PECK,

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JOliN RICHARD PERKINS, ~ \ji WoRCESTER PERKINS, ~ \]i PERCIVAL CAMP PLATT, I K A EDWARD LEARNED PoLLOCK, }R., \]iT WILLIAM BENFIELD PRESSEY, \ji OYES HoLMES REYNOLDS

T

~ \ji

LEWIS BRADFORD RIPLEY

..1 <I>

DAYTO KATHAN RIVAS, A LAWRENCE SMITH RoBERT

THOMAS HERBERT RoBINSON BENJAMIN TALBOT RoGERs, }R., ~ \)1 HERBERT EDWAY RYERSON, \ji T

\!f T

TEwELL RussELL SAGE,

RAYMOND LEEDS ScoFIELD, 2l K CHESTER RHOADES SEYMOUR .

E

ISAAC BATTIN SHELLEY, A~ <I> }AMES OAH SLEE, ~ K ALBERT LoRD SMITH, ~ \]i BERTRAM LEoN BuRGOYNE SMITH

E

RoBERT RoWAN SMITH, LEON SPITZ

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FRANCIS BELL STITES,~ \ji REvEL CooK STRATTON

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IsRAEL SuiSMAN PAuL MoNROE SwiFT, I

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PHILIP .JOHN YouNG, JR. \ ' ERTREES YouNG, A~ <I>

FRESHMAN CLASS CoLORs

Three Shades of Green

Walpole, Mas.r. Troy, N. Y. Centreville, Md. Norwich Town Wallingford Brooklyn, N. Y. Columbus, Ohio Washington Greenwich Greenwich Hawleyville Chicago, Ill. Ashton, R. I. Albany, N. Y. Glastonbury Schenectady, N. Y. Winter Park, Fla. Waterbury Fond du Lac, Wi;. North East, Pa. Middletown New /Iaven East Granby New York, N. Y. Yonkers, N. Y. Middletown Chicago, Ill. Danbur路y Hartford Morristown, N. ]. Louisville, Ky. J/artford Hartford Yarmouth port, Mass. East Providence, R. /. Hartford . Newton Center, Mass. Danbury Nutley, N.]. Oakmont, Pa.


Jqautnm 1!\n ll 19 12

X p

GEORGE LAWTON BARNES, A Bro

11 .P . BARRETT, 11 K.

Ansonia ] acksonville, Fla. Jerse y City, N.]. Richmond Hills, N . Y. Brooklyn, N. Y. Brooklyn, N. Y. . Hartford East Hartford Andover Springfield, Mass. New Britain Hoboken, N.]. Utica, N. Y. Brooklyn, N. Y. Rockville Hartford Hartford Tompkinsville, N. Y. Milwaukee, Wis. Wellesley Hills, Mass. Faribault, Minn. . Bayonne, N. ]. Torrington Bloomsburg, Pa. . Hartford Clairton, Pa. W est Hartford Watervliet, N. Y. New York, N. Y.

HALL BARNETT, A

ARTHUR SHIRLEY

E

DANIEL WEBSTER BATEMAN

11 K.

CHARLES EDWIN BLAKE,

E

11 ~ T

BARTLETT BRoOKE BoNNELL, FRA

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JAMES ANDREW BRENNEN

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RoBERT ERAsTus FooTE, A

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PAUL F AIRBA ' KS HERRICK, A

11 K.

JOHN CRoMPTON HoRSFALL, RoBERT INGLESO

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WILLIAM SAMUEL LINES,

GuY HuBBARD 1 EWHALL1 I FERGUS OLIVER, ~ ALFRED ERWI

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FRANCIS ALBERT LovELAND,

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JOHN FAR 'S LEY REDDICK, A

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RALPH HE N RY SALTSMAN,

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CHARLES BuNSEN SHAW

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1913 EDWARD SANFORD BARNEY, ~

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}AMES BENSON BAUMGARDNER, HowARD }AMES BuRGWIN,

MERRITT FowLER CRoMWELL, ~ HERBERT GRAY DANFORTH, HENRY BROWN DILLARD,

Springfield, Mass. Toledo , Ohio Pittsburgh, Pa. Dobbs Ferry, N. Y. Oldtown, Me. Huntsville, Ala.

~

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57


ALBERT jAMEs EMMANUEL DRAPER, <I>

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RoGER WILLIAMS GATEs, GEORGE GERMAINE, TuRPIN Hsi

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RoBERT MoNTAYNE FooT,

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At. ci> t. K E }AMES ELMER McCREERY, t. K E EDWARD EvERETT MoBERLY, ]R., t. '¥ ARTHUR FRANK PEASLEE, A X p JoHN PARKE LEAVENWORTH , STANLEY FIELD MARR,

joHN WoLcoTT RoBBINS

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HoBART jAMES RoBERTS, A

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CHARLES RoDGERS SANDSBURY

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jOHN WESLEY SARLES, I

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ARCHER PLATT SAYRES, A

CouRTLAND WHITEHEAD SAYREs, A

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HARRY GEORGE WooDBURY,'¥

New York, N. Y. Red Wing, Minn. . Hartford Waterbury Shanghai, China Winsted Waterville, Me. Fall River, MaJJ. New York, N. Y. . Hartford . Hartford Utica, N . Y. Cumberland, M d . Bridgeport Detroit, Mich. Detroit, Mich. Francestown, N. H .

191 4

t. ci>

JOSEPH WILLIAM ADAM, A

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WILLIAM HEWSON BALTZELL, MosEs AARoN BERMAN . LEON MARK BRUSSTAR

.

Lours SAMUEL CHAMBERS

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CHARLES JUDSON CHILD, A R oGERs DAY CLARK,

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EDWARD BRoDERICK DuFFEY THEODORE FRIEDHOF, JR., EDWARD IsAAc GLEZER

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WILLIAM RussELL LANGDON, LAURENCE LENNOX,

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ALFRED BROOKS LISTER, A PATRICK JosEPH McGUIRE

THOMAS HENRY MeN EIL, JR., OscAR ANDREWS MoNRAD, I HARRISON CRANE NOYES,

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JoHN RECCA . JOSEPH SHAPIRO LEVI FRANCIS SILVERSMITH THEODORE LEROY STORY,

t. '¥

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A

Dillon, Mont. Philadelphia, Pa. . Hartford New Haven New York, N. Y. Ansonia Clifton, MaJJ. Hartford Columbus, Neb. Hartford Smyrna, Asia Minor L ynn, MaJJ. Philadelphia, Pa. Manchester Chicago, Ill. East Hartford Norwich New York, N. Y. Hartford Hartford Norwich


-~:-- -::~;

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.

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1£oral 1J1ratrruity of 11. if(. A. Founded 1 8 29 at Trinity C o llege

.Artiut flllttmbtr.a

CHAPIN CARPENTER

WILLIAM SHORT,

]R.

1913 KENNETH BEARDSLEY CASE

EDWARD WHITEHEAD JEWETT

vVALTER STuART ~ARSDEN

1914 CHARLEs W A LLA CE CooKE

ARTHUR FoRD GEDDEs EDGE Low

RAYMOND HENRY DEXTER

EDWA RD ]EFFERSON BENJA MI N

~YERS

Lours RAMSAY

wALCOTT CH A PIN

PERCIVA L CAMP PLATT

THEODORE ABBOTT PECK

PAUL ~UNROE SwiFT ALLEN THOMAS UsHER

6o


lf. !(. A. JJfratrr.a in l!lrhr ARTHUR K. BROCKLESBY,'?O v .- ILLIAM

D.

\ VILLIAM

c. SKINNER, ' 76

EDWARD

MoRGAN,'72

IRVING

J.

R.

MANN,'04 KENYON,'07

H A ROLD G. HART, ' 07

ERNEST DEF. MIEL,'88

PAUL M. BuTTERWORTH ,'o

lREN US K. HAMILTON, '9 1

. RoBERTS K. SKrNNER,' Io

GEoRGE W. ELLrs,'94

BENJAMI '

DUDLEY C. GRAVES, '98

jAMES PoRTEus,'u

RoBERT W. GRA Y, '9

vVILLIAM

F. TuRNER,'ro

c.

SKI

NER,

JR.,' rr

(!lnrpnratinn President

WILLIAM CoNvERSE SKINNER

f/ ice-President

WILLI AM DENISON MoRGAN DuDLEY CHASE GRAVES

Secretary- T reasU1路er

JoHN HENRY STEVENS QuicK

HOBART WARREN THOMPSO

\\路 rLLIAM STERLING CoGGSWELL

ERNEST DEfREMERY MIEL

EDWARD MANSFIELD ScuDDER

ARTHUR CoLLINS GRAVES

]AMES STRATTON CARPENTER

lRENUS KITTEREDGE HAMILTON

GEORGE WATSON BEAC H

THOMAS McKEAN

CHARLES ERLING HoTCHKiss

CHARLES LUTHER BURNH AM


Wqt 111ratrrnity nf itlta Jnt Founded in 1847 at Columbia College and the University of New York

1!\nll nf C!Uraptrrs ALPHA DELTA

Columbia College niversity of Pennsylvania

EPSILON

Trinity College

LAMBDA

Williams College

PHI

University of Mississippi

UPSILON

University of Virginia

SIGMA

Sheffield Scientific School of Yale Univ.

TAU

Massachusetts Institute of Technology


~lsi

irltn

i\rtthr ftllrmbrr.a GRADUATES

CRANSTO

BRENTO

RoBERT HABERSHAM CoLEMAN FRANK JUDSON BRAINERD, JR .

ALFRED ELY PuLFORD

KILBOURN lVIAXWELL KENDALL

CHARLES RICHARDSON WHIPPLE

RussELL CuRTIS

ToBLE

SAMUEL SEDGWICK SwiFT

DE Los ScHUYLER PuLFORD,

]R.

JoHN

KENNETH vVELLES BoYNTON

GEORGE BEACH,

]R.

]AY

WHITEHEAD, JR.

PHIUP SuMNER PAGE

]AMES ARCHIBALD MITCHELL

FREDERICK GRIFFITH DoRWART \VILLIAM THEODORE GRAY,

RoBERT WRIGHT THOMAS, JR.

]R.

CoLIN MoNTAGUE INGERSOLL

BENJAMIN TALBOT RoGERS DALLAS SuMMERFIELD SQUIRE FRANCIS BELL STITES


Founded in 1832 at Hamilton College

mnu nf

<!l~ a.ptrr.a

HAMILTON

Hamilton College

1832

CoLUMBIA

Columbia College

1836

YALE

Yale University

1836

AMHERST

Amherst College

1836

BRUNONIAN

Brown

niversity

1836

HuDSON

Western Reserve University

1841

BowDOIN

Bowdoin College

1841

DARTMOUTH

Dartmouth College

1845

PENINSULAR

niversity of Michigan

1846

RocHESTER

University of Rochester

1850

WILLIAMS

Williams College

1851

MANHATTAN

College of the City of New York

1855

MIDDLETOWN

\Vesleyan University

1856

KENYON

Kenyon College

1858

UNION

Union College

1859

CORNELL

Cornell University

1869

PHI KAPPA

Trinity College

1877

]oH s HoPKINS

Johns Hopkins University

1889

MI NESOTA

University of Minnesota

1891

TORONTO

Toronto University

1893

CHICAGO

University of Chicago

1896

McGILL

McGill University

1897

WISCONSIN

niversity of \Visconsin

1902

CALIFORNIA

University of California

1908

ILLINOIS

University of Illinois

1911

68


Qtqaptrr J\lpqa irlta

Jqi Arttur •rmbrrs

vVILLIAM AuGUSTUS BIRD, IV

\VALTER MuRRAY FARROW

vVILLIAM HILL BLEECKER, JR .

CHARLES HuRD HowELL

WILLIAM REDMOND CuRTIS

ELLIOTT FIELDING PETTIGREW

LEONARD DAWSON ADKINS

RICHARD LAWTON DEPPEN

JosEPH

JOHN BIGELOW MooRE

OYES BARNETT

RoBERT PRESTO ' WITHINGTON

ALLAN BEHRENDS CooK

1914 JAMES AsHTON l\!IooRE

GEORGE HowARD ELDER

JOHN SHAPLEIGH MosEs

RY ALBERT HICKS

Lours ONDERDONK DERoNGE

THOMAS \ ¥oLCOTT LITTLE

EDWARD PINKNEY WROTH

1915 vVrLLIAM EDwARD BARNETT

STANLEY MERTO

RANDWICK ALBERT BISSELL

DAYTON KATHAN RIVAS

CHARLES HERBERT BoEHM

ISAAC BATTIN SHELLEY

SAMUEL HARMON EDSALL

CHARLES CooLIDGE WITHINGTON

GEoRGE DAwsoN HowELL, JR ..

VERTREES YouNG

71

MERRILL


l\lp~a

irlta

J~i

IJ1 rutrr.B itt l!lrbr ALLEN, A. vV., Yale, '04

HowELL, GEORGE D., Phi Kappa, '82

ALVORD, SAMUEL NI., Yale, '96

HuNT, E. M., Phi Kappa, 'o6

BASSETT, PRoF. A. B., Williams, '8 r

HuNTINGTON, REv .]. T., Phi Kappa,' so

BECKWITH, REv. I. T., Yale, '68

LAMPSON, E. R., M.D., Phi Kappa, '91

BENNETT, HoN. EDWARD B., Yale,'66

LAWRENCE, THOMAS F., Yale, '99

BRYANT, PERCY F., Phi Kappa, '70

MAERKLEIN, B. C., Phi Kappa, 'o6

BuNcE, CHARLES H ., Yale, '6o

MARVIN, L. P ., Yale,'92

CADY, GEORGE F., Middletown, '69

MEAD, C. B., Columbia, '09

CALDER, W. P., Middletown, '03

MoRSE, LEONARD, Amherst, '71

CALHOUN, DAVIDS., Yale,'48

NORTHAM, CHAS., JR., 1iddletown, '04

CHESTER, T. WESTON, M.D., Hamilton

PERKINS , HENRY A., Yale, '96

CLARK, WALTER H., Yale,'96

PHILLIPS, R ., Yale,' 12

DusTIN , E. F., Yale,'o6

RoBERTS, E. C., Yale,' ro

FRANCIS, C. W., Yale, '63

RoBERTs, ]. T., Yale, 'os

FuLLER, HoRACE S., M.D., Amherst, '58

RoBERTs, P ., Yale, ' ro

GARVIN, ]oH , Yale,'o2

ScHUTZ, RoBERT H., Phi Kappa, '89

GILLETT, REv. ARTHUR L., Amherst, '8o

ScHUTZ, WALTER S., Phi Kappa, '94

GooDwiN, CHARLEs A ., Yale, '98

SEYMOUR, MARLOR, Amherst,' 14

GooDwiN, F. S., Yale,'93 GooDwiN, H., Yale, 'o6

STARR, RosT. S., M.D., Phi Kappa, '97

ST. JOH N, SAMUEL B., M.D., Yale, '66

GooDwiN, jAMES L., Yale, 'o2

THOMPSON, ARTHUR R. , Yale, '96

GooDwiN, REv. } AMES, Phi Kappa, '86

TwiCHELL,]. H., Yale,'o6

GooDwiN, P. L., Yale,'97

VAN ScHAACK, DAviD, Phi Kappa, 'or

GooDwiN, WALTER L., Yale, '97

WILLIAMS, ARTHUR C., Yale, '98

GREENWOOD, A. H., Dartmouth , '99

WINANS, W. W., Middletown, '89

GRoss, CHARLES E., Yale, '69

\VoLFE, R. R., Phi Kappa,'o8

HATCH, EDWARD B., Phi Kappa,'86

vVRIGHT, A. B.,

ZwEIGART, H.]., Amherst, ' 1 I

nion, '90


ID4r 1J1rutrruity nf 1llrltu if(uppu 1.Ep.ailnu Founded in 1844 at Yale

PHI THETA

XI SIGMA GAMMA

Psi UPSILON BETA ETA KAPPA LAMBDA PI IoTA ALPHA ALPHA OMICRON EPSILON RHO TAU Mu Nu BETA PHI PHI CHI Psr PHI GAMMA PHI Psr OMEGA BETA CHI DELTA CHI PHI GAMMA GAMMA BETA THETA ZETA ALPHA CHI PHI EPSILON SIGMA TAu DELTA DELTA ALPHA PHI TAU LAMBDA DELTA KAPPA TAU ALPHA SIGMA RHo DELTA PI RHO DELTA

{

niversity

Yale University Bowdoin College Colby University Amherst College Vanderbilt University University of Alabama Brown University University of orth Carolina University of Virginia Miami University Kenyon College Dartmouth College Central University Middlebury College University of Michigan Williams College Lafayette College Hamilton College Colgate University College of the City of New York University of Rochester Rutgers College Depauw University Wesleyan University Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute Adelbert College Cornell University Syracuse niversity Columbia niversity University of California Trinity College University of Minnesota Massachusetts Institute of Technology University of Chicago University of Toronto Tulane University University of Pennsylvania McGill University Leland Stanford, Jr., University University of Illinois University of Wisconsin 73

1844 1844 1845 1846 1847 1847 r85o 185 I r852 1852 1852 1853 1853 1854 1855 1855 1855 1856 1856 1856 1856 r86r r866 1867 r867 r868 1870 1871 1874 1876 1879 1889 1890 1893 1898 1898 1899 1900 1902 1904 1906


irltu 1Kuppu 1£psilnn Arttur ftltrmhrr.s 1912 HoBART WELLS SMITH

Co~K

]AME~

*JoHN CROMPTON HoRSFALL

LAURE

HowARD HuMPHREY CE HuTCHINSO ' McCLURE

HARRY WESSELS

DANIEL BYRON DAWLEY

ELIOT LEE wARD

CHESTER DuDLEY WARD

HENRY BEARDSLEY WARNER

fELIX EMIL BARIDON

fRANCIS STUART fiTZPATRICK

WALTER fRA ' CIS BoRcHERT

HoRAcE foRT

THOMAS wALLIS DAVIS

EDGAR SoLON LELAND

BERTRAM BENEZETT BAILEY

EvERITT HEYWOOD HALL

OGDEN DoREMUS BuDD

HowARD RicE HILL

ALBERT EDWARD DuNSFORD

ARTHUR JOHNSON

ERNEST HARTCRAFT GEYER

RAYMOND LEEDS ScoFIELD

jAMES

OAH SLEE

*Deceased

74


Ev

FE fLY

FoR fRE

FRE GA1

Gor GRA


irlta 1Kappa 1.Epsilnu 1ffratrrs itt 1\trbr

J.

ALLEN, \V. B ., Yale, 'or

HARBISON,

AYRES, W . A., Yale, '64

HrNE, C. D., Yale, '71

BABCOCK, A. L., Colgate, '03

HowE, D. R ., Yale, '74

BENNETT, :tvL, Toscan, Yale, '98

HYDE, A. W., Yale,'o2

BoYD, H . C., Trinity, 'os

HYDE, vV.

BuLKELEY, M . G., JR., Yale,'o7

I GALLS, DR. P. H., Bowdoin, '77

CALL, A. D ., Brown, '96

KEITH, DR. A . R., Colby, '97

CAMP,

J.

S., Wesleyan, '78

LAKE, E .

J.

w.,

J.,

P., Trinity (H)

Yale,'?6

Harvard, '92

CASE, T. G., Trinity, 'oo

LoRD,

CLARK, C. H., Yale, '7 I

MATSON, W. L., Ya le, '62

W ., Trinity,'98

CoLE, F. W., Yale, 'o4

OLMSTED, H. B., Trinity, 'o8

CoLLINS, ATwooD, Yale, '73

PARKER, R Ev. E. P., Bowdoin, '56

CoNANT, G. A ., Amherst, '78

PATTISON, R Ev. H., R ochester,'92

CoNE,

J.

B., Yale,' 57

PHILBRICK, M. P ., Colby, '97

CooLEY, C. P ., Yale, '9 1

PIKE, C. S., Chicago, '96

.CooLEY, F. R ., Yale,'86

P o D, H. C., T rin ity, 'o8

DAY, A. P., Yale,'9o

Po D, D. C., Trinity, 'o8

DAY, E . M., Yale,'9o

PRATT, W. W., Adelbert, '85

DAvrs, F . W., Yale,'77

PR ENTICE, S. 0., Ya le, '73

EvANS, J . D. , Trinity, 'o r

Row LEY, DR. A. M ., Amherst, '95

FENN, E. HART, Yale, '65

SMILEY, E . H ., Colby, '75

FLYN , B. D., Trinity, ex-'os

SMITH, E. W., Yale, 'or

FOR REST, C. R., yale, '6s

SMITH, F. M., Y ale,'8o

FREEMAN, H. B., Yale, '62

STARR, DR. P. S., Yale, '6o

FREEMAN, H. B., JR., Yale, '92

ST. JoHN, W . H ., Yale,'91

GATES, A. F., Yale,'87

TAYLOR,

GoDARD, G. S., Wesleyan, '9 r

TRAVER, R Ev. H. R. , Colgate, '66

GRANT, R . M., 路wesleyan, '92

\VELCH, A. A., Yale, '82

J.

M., Williams,'67

\VENTWORTH, G. R ., Trinity, ex-'o8

77


Wqr 1J1ratrruity nf Jsi lltpsilnu Founded at Union College in I833

IUtll nf <U4nptrrs THETA DELTA

Union College ew York University

BETA

Yale University

SIGMA

Brown University

GAMMA

Amherst College

ZETA

Dartmouth College

LAMBDA

Columbia University

KAPPA

Bowdoin College

Psi

Hamilton College

XI

Wesleyan University

UPSILON

University of Rochester

IoTA

Kenyon College

PHI

University of Michigan

PI

Syracuse University

CHI

Cornell University

BETA BETA

Trinity College .

ETA

Lehigh

TAU

niversity

niversity of Pennsylvania

Mu

University of Minnesota

RHo

University of Wisconsin

OMEGA

University of Chicago

EPSILON

University of California

OMICRON

University of Illinois


Qlqaptrr

J.at l!psilnu

Arttur

~.rmbrrn

GEORGE TuRNER BATES

SAMUEL HERBERT EviSON

jAMES SHREWSBURY CRAIK

OLIVER GILDERSLEEVE, JR.

THOMAS GILBERT BROWN

CHARLES HENRY CoLLETT

GEoRGE CoLLINSON BuRGWIN, ]R.

HERBERT AcKLEY SAGE

CHARLES EwELL CRAIK, JR.

vVILLIAM BE

THEODORE CANFIELD HuDsoN, ]R.

ARCHIBALD WILSO

vVILLIAM RosENBAUM

RICHARD FoLsoM Vi' ALKER

JAMIN SPOFFORD Vil ALKER

THEODORE FRANCIS \ ;vESSELS

HENRY LAWRENCE BRAINERD

WILLIAM BENFIELD PRESSEY

FREDERICK BoND DART

HERBERT EDWAY RYERSON

jAMEs SYLVESTER McCABE, ]R. EDWARD LARNED PoLLOCK , ]R.

EWELL RussELL SAGE BERTRAM LEON BuRGOYNE SMITH


Jnt Upntlntt 1J1 ratrr!l tn litrbr ]. P. ANDREws, Beta,'77 E. S. BALLARD, Chi,'98 L. C. BARBOUR, Beta,'oo E. I . BEMENT, Delta,'67

]. MeA . J OHNSO , Beta Beta,'o3 'vV. MeA. J o HNSO N, Beta Beta,'98 l\11. S. LITTLE, Beta,'o7 A . T. McCooK, Beta Beta,'oz

M. B. BRAINARD, Beta,'oo

PRoF. A. R. MERRIAM, Beta,'n C. S. MoRRIS, Beta Beta, '96

N. C. BRAINARD, Beta,'oz RT. REv. C. B. BREWSTER, Beta,'68 ]. H. BucK, Beta,'9 1 ]. R. BucK, Xi ,'6z C. C. BuLKELY, Beta Beta,' 75 P. D. BuNcE, M.D., Beta,'88 C. W. BuRPEE, Beta,'83 W. S. CAsE, Beta,'Ss A. ST. C. CooK, Beta,'89 W. H . CoRBIN, Beta,'89 R. D. CuTLER, Beta,'o7 P. E. CuRTIS, Beta Beta,'o6 ]. H. K. DAVIS, Beta Beta,'99 G. P ~ DAVIS, M.D., Beta,'66 ]. C. DAY, Beta,'57 L. N. DENNISO , Xi,'oz L. A . ELLIS, Beta Beta,'98 c. E . FELLOWS, Beta,' s6 G. H. GILMAN , Beta,'90 L. E. GoRDON, Xi,'9o HoN. W. HAMERSLEY, Beta Be ta,' s 8 R. W. HuNTI GTON, Beta,'89 PRoF. C. F. JoHNsoN, Beta,'ss F. E. JoH soN, Beta Beta,'84

C. G. WooDWARD , Beta Beta,'98 P . S. NEY, Beta,'os F. P ARSON, Beta,'93 A. PERKINS, Beta,'87 Ho N. H. RoB ERTS, Beta,'77 H. S. RoBI NSON, Beta,'89 ]. T . RoBI NSON, Beta,'93 L. F . RoBI NsoN, Beta,'8s E . W . RoBI NSON, Beta Beta,'96 E. F . SANDERSON, Gamma,'96 G . H. SEYMS , Beta Beta,'72 H. P. ScHAUFFLER, Gamma,'93 F. SHEPHERD, Beta,'92 A . L. SHIPMAN, Beta,'86 T. E. V. SMITH, Beta,' n

I. E. STANTON, Beta,'ss F. H. TAYLOR, Xi ,'84 . ]. R. TRUMBULL, Beta,'92 R Ev.]. H. TwiCHELL, Beta,'59 E . F. WATERMAN, Beta Beta,'98 F. E. WATERMAN, Beta Beta,'oi L. S. WELCH, Beta,'89 H. H . WHAPLEs, Beta,'oz

82


Jqi ~amma itlta 111rattrutty Founded in r848 at Washington and Jefferson College

i&nll nf OJqaptrrn \V ashington and Jefferson College

ALPHA

'

Nu

Bethel College

LAMBDA

DePauw University

Xr

Gettysburg College

OMICRON

University of Virginia

Pr

Allegheny College

TAU

Hanover College

OMEGA

Columbia University

Psr

Wabash College

ALPHA DEUTERON

Illinois Wesleyan

THETA DEUTERON

Ohio Wesleyan

GAMMA DEUTERON

Knox College

ZETA DEUTERON

Washington and Lee University Indiana State

ZETA 0MICRO

DE UTERO

Ohio State

niversity niversity

niversity

niversity

Nu DEUTERON

Yale University

BETA CHAPTER

University of Pennsylvania

Pr DEUTERON

Kansas University

DELTA

Bucknell University

LAMBDA DEUTERO

Dennison

RHo DEUTERON

路wooster

SIGMA DEUTERON

Lafayette College

ZETA Prn

William Jewell College

niversity niversity

DELTA CHI

University of California

THETA Psr

Colgate University

BETA CHI

Lehigh

KAPPA Nu

Cornell University

niversity

KAPPA TAU

University of Tennessee


Jqi ~amma idta

lfl'ratrruity

Mu SIGMA

University of Minnesota

RHo CHI

Richmond College

GAMMA

PHI

CHAPTER

Pennsylvania State College

PI IoTA

Worcester Polytechnical Institute

CHI

Union College

ALPHA CHI

Amherst College

Nu EPSILON

New York University

TAU ALPHA

Trinity College

BETA Mu

Johns Hopkins University

Mu

University of Wisconsin

CHI IoTA

University of Illinois

SIGMA

Wittenberg College

DELTA Nu

Dartmouth College

PI RHo

Brown University

OMEGA Mu

Maine University

IoTA Mu

Massachusetts Institute of Technology

XI D EUTERON

Adelbert College

SIGMA Nu

Syracuse University

LAMBDA IoTA

Purdue

THETA

University of Alabama

CHI UPSILON

University of Chicago

ALPHA PHI

University of Michigan

ALPHA IoTA

Iowa State University

CHI Mu

University of Missouri

CHI SIGMA

Colorado College

LAMBDA Nu

University of Nebraska

TAU DEUTERON

University of Texas

LAMBDA SIGMA

Leland Stanford, Jr., University

SIGMA TAU

Washington State

ni ersity

niversity


J


illf7aptrr of

Jqt

~amma

irlta

Arttur .ttllrmbrr.a

WILLIAM CHRISTY ANDREWS

CLARENCE IRVING PENN

vVILLIAM ERNEST STEVEN

ALBERT HAITHWAITE

ALFRED JOSEPH L ' HEUREUX

WALTER CRANE HATHAWAY

FRANCIS EARLE WILLIAMS

MERRILL

J

L. K.

ALLEN

HENRY WHITING SELDEN

PETER PAUL LAWLOR

CHARLES TIMOTHY SENAY

HowARD JEROME LIVERMORE

CYRUS THOMAS STEVEN

FRANCIS THOMAS CuRLEY

]AMES PATRICK :MuRRAY

AusTIN EBER HoDGE

RoBERT RowAN SMITH

RONALD EARL KINNEY

CLIFTON WRIGHT


Jqi ~amma ielta JJrratrt.a itt lltrb.r BACKUS, H. S., '02 BARLOW, H. E., A X BoNNER, C. W., 'o8 BRAINERD, c. B., N ~ BuRDICK, V. G.,'rr CARPENTER, F. D.,'ro CAMPBELL, J. N. H., N CAWLEY, S., 'II CLAPP, R. J., rr CoNKLIN, W. E.,'97 CoRBETT, F. J., 'o8 CREEDON, A. W.,'og DuNHAM, D. A., 'o6 FALLow, E. S., 'o6 FLYNN, J. D., '97 FoRBEs, F. L., N ~ FosTER, E. 0., A X GREEN, H . C., 'ro GuNNING,]. W., '96 HI CHLIFFE, J. H., Q M ]ARMAN, F. T., N ~ KELLOGG, A. B., N E KNoWLTON, A. E ., 'ro LAKIN, W. F., 'og LESCHKE, A. H ., 'ro LOVELAND, F. A.,'I2 LINN, E. C., p McKoNE, C. W., 'o8 MASON, R. L.,'o8 MoRRow, C. E., 'og AEDELE, T. c., N ~ UCKOLS, H. c. OwENs, M. F., 'os PATTERSON, S. c., A X RoBBINs, H. E ., 'o8 SoMMER, K. L., 'r2 STITT, H. J. B., '03 STOKES, R. S., 8 '짜 TUTTLE, G. A., X ~

88

~

p p p

p


IDqr 1J1ratrrnity nf l\lpqa Q!qt 18qn Founded in 1895 at Trinity College

PHI Psi

Trinity College

PHI CHI

Polytechnic Institute of Brooklyn

PHi PHI

University of Pennsylvania

PHI OMEGA

Columbia University

PHI ALPHA

Lafayette College

PHI BETA

Dickinson College

PHI DELTA

Yale University

PHI EPSILO

Syracuse University

PHI ZETA

University of Virginia

PHI ETA

Washington and Lee

PHI THETA

Cornell University

PHI GAMMA

Wesleyan

niversity

niversity


ill4aptrr of

Artiur ilrmbrr.s

PHILIP ALOYSIUS AHER

CARLOS SANFORD HoLcOMB

THOMAS FRANCIS FLANAGAN

LESLIE GILBERT OsBORNE

19 13 ETHELBERT TALBOT SMITH

ETHAN FROST BASSFORD

ERNEST THEODORE SoMERVILLE

EDWARD MICHLET LAZARUS

JoHN VALE ' TINE SPRAGUE

IRA ALLEN BALCH

ER

ARTHUR EvERETT BARNS

HERBERT CuRTIS FERRIS

JOHN ARCHIE BARNS

THEODORE CHARLES KYLE

KARL HILDING BEIJ

ADOLPH WILLIAM LAWSON

RALPH HALM BENT

HAROLD SuMMERFIELD OLAFSON

EST FREEMAN BROWN

\VrLLIAM BLACK ORR

90


tll~l'.-1&.11'f

IIOJi

BY Tl1E FRATER NIH OF ALPMA(HI AliC


1Jfratr.r.a ttt 1ltrb.r BEACH, CARROLL, C., 1\II.D., Phi Psi,'96 HASTINGs, F. H., Phi Psi, '96 MoRGAN, V. F., Phi Psi, '99 ARNOTT, ALEXANDER, Phi Psi, 'oo PLIMPTON, R. E., Phi Chi, 'or LoRENz, E. H., Phi Psi, 'oz MoRBA, K. P., Phi Psi, 'oz BLAKESLEE, R. H., Phi Psi, 'os BRAINERD, C. C., Phi Psi, 'o6 BuTLER, L. P., Phi Beta, 'o6 ULRICH, W. L., Phi Delta, 'o6 LATTIN, R . B., Phi Delta, 'o7 MooDY, W. H ., Phi Psi, '07 BuTHs, L. S., Phi Psi, 'o8 OzoN, W. 'vV., Phi Psi, ex-'o8 SHERWOOD, C. S., Phi Psi, 'o8 CoNNOR, M . A., Phi Psi, '09 BARBER, L. L., Phi Delta, 'ro

93


11Jnral1J1ratrruity

nf ~tgma

J st

Artiur :tlrmbrrn ]oH

FRANCIS FoRWARD

HowARD RAY BROCKETT

MAXIMILIAN SPORER

RAYMOND HuBBARD SEGUR

PAuL HERBERT TAYLOR

JoHN VVALTER VVoESSNER

\\r" ILLIAM

PoND BARBER

MuNSEY LEw

RAYMOND HART BENTLEY

MARcus THORNTON McGEE

EuGENE GooDWIN SMEATHERS

RoBERT ELLIS CRoss

RAYMOND VVEsT VVooDWARD

SMART BRAND

] OHN RICHARD PERK! ' S

STANWOOD ADAMS MERRILL

VVoRCESTER PERKINs

HAROLD CoLTHURST MILLS

LEWIS BRADFORD RIPLEY

ALBERT LORD SMITH

94


7


_@,igma Jsi 1J1ratrr.a itt lltrbt ALLISON,

N. K., 'II

FRANCis, G. S., 'ro GEER, E. S., 'ro SMITH,

A. K., 'I I

SANFORD,

1

97

W. 0., ' r I


Chartered r845

速tlirrrn T.

REv. joHN

HuNTINGToN, M.A.,

D.D.,

President

'so

D.D., LL.D.,'63 D.D., LL.D. '66

Vice-President

REv. joHN j. McCooK, REv. SAMUEL HART, GEoRGE

L.

RAYMOND

J.

Secretary Treasurer

CooK, M.A., '7o

Assistant Secretary

NEWTON

WILLIAM A . BIRD,

IV,'12

Assistant Treasurer

mrmbrrn .i\bmtttrll itt 1g 11 GEORGE HENRY CoHEN,'II FRANK RICE PROUT, 'II ALFRED ERWIN RANKI ,'II WILLIAM AuGUSTUS BIRD, RAYMOND jAY NEWTON, '!2

IV, '12


ATHLETICS


Wriuity Qtnllrgr i\t4lrtir i\ssnriatinu 速ffirrrg WILLIAM SHORT,

]R.

President Secretary- Treasurer

CHARLEs H . CoLLETT

tE.xrruttur C!rnmmittrr WILLIAM SHORT,

]R.

. President A .A. Secretary- Treasurer A.A.

CHARLES H. CoLLETT

J.

Manager Football Team

HowARD HuMPHREY

RICHARD

w.

L.

Manager Baseball Team

DEPPEN

STUART ~ARSDEN,

]R.

Manager Track Team

C.

H. HowELL

Captain Football Team

A.

J.

Captain Baseball Team

L'HEUREUX

Captain Track Team

HARRY WESSELS

~rabuatr W.

E. A.

I. K.

Chairman

BuLKELEY,'8o

Secretary-Treasurer

HAMILTON,'9I

PROFESSOR HARVEY

1\butgnry C!rommiUrr

C.

J.

PROFESSOR ] . ]. ~cCooK,

D. FLY N,'97

PoND,'o8

PROFESSOR R. B. RIGGS

100

'63


C. H. HowELL,' 12

J.

H. HuMPHREY,'Iz R. P. WITHINGTO ,'13 PROFESSOR RAYMO JD G GETTELL 0

Captain Manager Assistant Manager Coach

C. H. HowELL,'I2, Right End G. D. HowELL, ]R.,'15, Left Tackle R. E. KINNEY,'15, Right Tackle P. A. AHERN,'IZ, Left End

J. A.

MooRE,'q., Right Guard H. W. S. CooK,'I2, Quarter Back W. H. BLEECKER, jR.,'12, Center P. P. LAWLOR,'I4, Left Half Back F. S. FITZPATRICK,'14, Center C. H. CoLLETT,'13, Right Half Back J. B. MooRE,'I3路, Left Guard T. C. HunsoN,'14, Full Back ~ubstitutrs

0. GILDERSLEEVE,'I2 E. s. LELAND,'I4 T . F. WESSELS,'I4

B. L. SMITH,'IS H . R. HILL,' I 5 A. E. DuNsFoRn,'IS

101


1Rrrnr~

nf ~amra

IJinntball October

at Hartford

Trinity 6

Worcester Tech.

0

at Hartford

Trinity I3

Amherst

0

October

7 I4 2I

at Utica, N. Y .

Trinity 9

Colgate

0

October

28

at Hartford

Trinity I4

Wesleyan

October

ovember

7 ovember II

at

.

13 ew York Univ. 0

ew York City Trinity o

at Hartford

Trinity 35

Massachusetts S.

6

November IS

at Haverford, Pa. Trinity 24

Haverford

6

November 25

at Providence, R. I. Trinity 6

Brown

6

~ummary

Trinity 107- 0pponents 3 I Won 6, Tied 2 Lost o

IJinrmrr C!laptatun '83 C. H. GIESY

'92 G. D. HARTLEY

'84 S. T. MILLER

'93

's 5 w. w. BARBER

'94 ]. STRAWBRIDGE

w. w. '87 w. w.

BARBER

'95 W .S.LANGFORD,J R. 'o5 ]. C. LANDEFELD

BARBER

'96 A. M. LANGFORD

'86

J. w.

EDGERTON

'o2 T. M. SYPHAX '03 W . B. ALLEN 'o4 0. MoRGAN 'o6 P. DouGHERTY

'88 E . McP. McCooK '97 A. S. WooDLE

'o7 E. ]. DoNKELL Y

'89 E. McP. McCooK '98 W. B . SuTTON

'o8 A. B. HENSHAW

w.

'90 T . P. THURSTON

'99

'9I W . C. HILL

'oo W. P. BRowN

'9 I H.

s. GRAVES

P. BROWN

'o1 ]. HEKDERSON 103

'09 A. B. HENSHAW '10

E. B. RAMSDELL


1!ruirm nf t4r 1J1nnthull ยงrunnn The foot b all season t his yea r was t he most su ccessful in t he annals of t he college. After ou r excellent showing last yea r we we re watched by m a ny of t he Eastern crit ics and coaches, who expected u s to t urn out a fast tea m that would t ake every possible a dvant age offered under the new rules . We did-we H owE LL H uM PHREY turned out an unbeatCap tai n en team. Manager Worcester Tech was our first opponent. In a ragged and uncertain game we won, but by a small score. It was evident that the team had not as yet hit its pace. We worked hard, for our next game was with Amherst. They expected a victory that day ; but the team was playing the game for all that was in them, and Amherst was lucky to escape with the score of only 13-o against her. The following week we met Colgate, who were looking for revenge for their last year's defeat; but before a large crowd they were defeated. The wet ground prevented much spectacular playing, but the team was working well. The game with Wesley an will ever remain in the minds of all who saw it as the most wonderful they ever beheld. The big Red and Black Team was unexpectedly strong and seemed to know all our plays . They scored two touchdowns and a field goal, while we were held to three points . Then, in the last period, with only six minu tes to play and the score 13-3 against us, something happened. The team swept down the field twice and scored two touchdowns, the second within the last ninety seconds of play. The rooters could scarcely believe their eyes, but when they came to realize what had happened, pandemonium reigned. On Election Day, Trinity played New York University a tie game, o-o, in New York. The game was a distinct disappointment to all of Trinity 's followers. We had the better team and should have 10 4


won the game without difficulty. However, the team took a slump on this occasion, and a tie was the result. Massachusetts Aggies were the next victims . The team redeemed its work of the preceding game by running up a big score. In this game we completed I I forward passes for a total of 225 yards . The Haverford game at Haverford was easy. The field was wet, so Trinity employed a successful kicking game. We closed the season at Providence, when Brown was tied, 6-6. Trinity scored in the first ten seconds of play when Collett made a touchdown, recovering the kick-off on the first bound, when it slipped through the arms of the Brown Half Back. Brown scored soon after on a long run by Sprackling. After this, the two teams played very evenly, and neither side was able to score again. Hudson, our big Full Back, was chosen by many of the cnt1cs for their All-American Team, and was placed on Walter Camp's third team. Many of our other men were favorably mentioned for such honor by New York newspapers. We cannot say too much for Professor Gettel!. Here is a History Professor who coaches and develops a successful football team as a side issue. He applies his classroom theories to the gridiron and, strange as it may seem, theywork out well. The onside kick he taught us last year was copied by Yale this past fall. During his time as Coach we have had a winning team, and we all hope he will continue for a longer time in that capacity.

Jlrrnrb in

~a.5t

1J1iur Jrar.5 POI ITS

WON .

TIE

LOST

TRINITY

OPPONENTS

6

0

2

223

34

I908

4

I

I27

6s

I90<)

6

2

3 I

I30

39

I9IO

7

0

I

I22

z6

I9II

6

2

0

I07

31

I907

105


BASEBALL ]. 0. A.

E. RA

R. L.

KIN,'I I

Manager

DEPPEN, 'I3

Assistant Manager

THOMAS

J.

PROFESSOR

F . ]. D .

CoN ERY

Coach

J.

Coach

D . FLY JN

BRAI JERD,'II,

C.

TuRNER, 'Iz,

]. F . HoRAN, 'I3,

]. 0.

Captain

CARROLL, 'I I

Second Base

Third Base

P. A. AHERN, '12,

A.].

Left Field

L'HEUREUX, 'I3,

Shortstop

C.

W. SAYRES, 'I3,

Right Field

H .

B.

CARROLL, 'I I,

A . B. LISTER,'I4,

First Base W .H.BLEECKER,]R.,'Iz,CenterField Catcher

Pitcher

WARNER,'I3,

Pitcher

_s,1tb.atuutr.a C. H . HowELL,'IZ

A . P. SAYREs,'13

I06

v.

A. HICKS, '14


1Rtrnr~

nf ~atttt!i

lla.arbull April April April April April April May May May May May May June June June June

I2 20 2I 22 25 29 6 I3 I8 20 24 30 3 IO I7 24

at Prov.idence, R. I. Trinity at Ithaca, N. Y . Trinity at Hamilton, . Y. Trinity at Schenectady, N. Y. Trinity at Cambridge, Mass. Trinity at Williamstown,Mass.Trinity at Hartford Trinity at West Point, .Y. Trinity at Medford, Mass. Trinity at Hartford Trinity at Hartford Trinity at Middletown Trinity at Hartford Trinity Trinity at New York at Hartford Trinity at Hartford Trinity

0

I 0 0

3 3 0 3 9 3 4 5

Brown 9 Cornell 9 Colgate 4 Union 7 Harvard 2 Williams 5 New York University 2 West Point I3 2 Tufts 2 "Mass. Aggies" Springfield T. S. 2 2 Wesleyan R.P.I. 0 Fordham 6 Wesleyan 3 Waseda 4

j;ttmmary Trinity 35, Opponents 72 Won 5, Lost I I

lJl'nrmrr QI.uptaitt.a '67 '68 '69 '70 '7I '72 '73 '74 '75 '76

'77 '78 '79 '8o '8I '82

E. R . BREVOORT

E. R. BREVOORT A. A. E. E. E.

BROCKLESBY BROCKLESBY B. WATTS B. WATTS B. WATTS c. E. CRAIK F. T . LINCOLN G. S. HEWITT W. E. RoGERS F . w. WHITE w. N. ELBERT W. J. RoGERS G. D. HowELL A. H. WRIGHT

'83 '84 's 5 '86 '87 '88 '89 '90 '91 '92 '93 '94 '95

C. M. KuRTZ F. E. JoHNSON '97 J. w. SHANNoN ' 98 J. w. SHANNON '99 J. W. SHANNON 'oo G. W. BRINLEY 'oi T. L. CHERITREE 'o2 R. McC. BRADY '03 H. s. GRAVES '04 H. S. GRAVES G. D. HARTLEY 'o5 J. J. PENROSE 'o6 H. R. DINGWELL '07 J. J. PENROSE 'o8 C. DuB. BROUGHTON'09 '96 A. J. WILLIAMS '10 108

M. H. CoGGESHALL D. C. GRAvEs D. c. GRAvEs J. H. K. DAVIS H. McK. GLAZEBROOK R. FisKE E. GooDRIDGE H. D. BRIGHAM E. J. MANN C. F. CLEMENT c. F. CLEMENT J. F. PowELL 0. w. BADGLEY I. L. XANDERS M. A. CoNNOR A.M. SMITH


1Rruirm nf tqr 1Banrhall

~rannn

The baseball season of 1911 proved to be one of the most unsatisfactory through which Trinity has ever passed, and this wa~ accentuated by the fact that the other branches of sports were so successful. The team, at the start, had many disadvantages to overCARROLL come, and the wonder RANKIN Captain is not that they did not M anager do better, but that the season had even that measure of success which it possessed. When the season opened, the positions- shortstop, first base, center field and left field were found to be open. Besides, Trinity had but one pitcher left from the season before, and new men had to be developed to fill these positions. Up to the date of the Brown game, the team was in the hands of a professional coach, but when his contract had come to an end the team was without that dash and confidence upon which he had insisted. The trip through New York State was taken without a coach, but when the team returned, Professor Flynn very kindly took up the work. It was because of his efforts that we took a brace, and to his influence more than to anything else is it due that the team began to play better ball. The holding of Harvard, 2 to o, and the defeat we handed Wesleyan were both creditable showings, as was also the 5- 4 victory over Waseda University, of Japan, during Commencement week. While these were showings to be proud of, there were others that were very disappointing. Many of the old and some of the new men showed marked natural baseball ability, but they lacked the dash and confidence necessary for a winning team. The team, as a whole, was sadly deficient in batting and base-running, and the "inside" work, both at bat and in the field was deplorable. The prospects for a winning team next year are extremely bright, even though we lost a number of men by graduation . There is a wealth of fine baseball material in the Freshman Class, and this with the help of a regular coach should assure us a victorious season.


I9I I PAuL E. F. W. S. W. J.

MAxoN,'II PETTIGREW, '12 MARSDE r, JR., '13 CoHOLAN .

Captain Manager Assistant Manager Coach

IDI]r IDram IOO-YARD DASH 220-YARD DASH 44o-YARD RuN HALF-MILE RuN MILE RuN Two-MILE RuN Izo-YARD HuRDLES 22o-YARD HuRDLES HIGH JuMP BROAD JuMP PoLE VAuLT SHoT PuT . HAMMER THROW DISCUS THROW

Collett, 'I3, Heater, '13, Hudson, 'I4. Collett, 'I3, Heater, 'I3, Maxon, 'I I. Buck,'II, Wessels,'I4, Baridon,'I4. Buck, 'I I, Wessels, 'I4, Bates, 'I2, Swift, 'I3. Buck, 'I I, Wessels, 'I4, Craik, 'I2. Spofford,'I4, Haight,'II, Craik,'I4. Nelson, 'I I, Daley, 'I4, Hudson, 'I4. Maxon,'u, Daley,'I4, Nelson,'II. Nelson, 'I I, Pulford, 'I3, DeRonge, 'I4 Nelson, 'r I, Hudson, 'I4, Humphrey, 'I2. Maxon,'II, Wessels,'I2, Pulford,'I3. Bleecker, 'I2, Clark, 'I I, Hudson, 'I4. Clark, 'II, Hudson, 'I4. Clark,'ri, Hudson,'I4, Dexter,'I4.

110


s


1Rrlrirw of tqr IDrark ยงra!Ion The track season proved to b e one of the best in recent y ears. The team had a big nucleu s of veterans, and there was some very good material in the Freshman Class . Our new coach was a thoroughly competent man, and he worked hard with his material. The first part of the MAXON season was spent in PETTIGREW Cap ta in training the men for :\1 a nage r their events; which proved very successful. Our first meet resulted disastrously for us, but, with less than two weeks of preparation, we could not complain. The Wesleyan meet was a big surprise to both institutions, inasmuch as the score was so close and as we made such a good showing against our old rival. Captain Paul Maxon proved one of the stars at the N. E. I. C. A . A. meet at Springfield. He cleared the bar at twelve feet, three quarters of an inch; breaking the old record by nearly three inches . Indeed his work throughout the entire season was of sterling character and his captaincy was singularly efficient and popular. At the moment of writing his chances to "make" the American Oly mpic Team look very good. The last meet of the season was with R. P. I., and resulted in a victory for us . The men deserved this victory, for they had been working hard the entire season and had displayed great enthusiasm. The team was a great deal better than the one of the year before, as can be seen by comparison of records. The team for the coming season should be one of the best in the history of the College. Most of the veterans are back and there is a lot of good material to work into the places of those who have left. We have an ambitious schedule, but the caliber of the men seems to justify it, and we should have a very successful season.

112


IDrintty 1\tqlrtir 1!trrnr1l Name

R ecord

E vent

Date

IO I-5 sec.

V. G. Burdick,'II

22 3-5 sec.

H. S. Graves,'92

440-YARD DASH 880-YARD RuN

5 I sec.

W. A. Sparks,'97 W.J. el son,'Io

I-MILE RuN

4 min. 44 2-5 sec. 10 min. 39 sec.

F. E. Waterman,'oi

I 897 I907 I90I

D. C. Pond,'o8

I906

12o-YARD HuRDLES

16 sec.

H. B. Olmsted,'o8

22o-YARD HuRDLES

26 I-5 sec. 6ft. I in.

H. C. Pond,'o8

1907 I906

I. K. Baxter,'99 H. C. Van Weelden,'o3

1897 1902

IOO-YARD DASH 220-YARD DASH

2 min. 7 sec.

2-MILE Run

HIGH JuMP

I909 I892

BROAD JuMP PoLE VAULT

22 ft. 5 1-4 in. I z ft. 3-4 in .

P. Maxon,'II

191 I

SHoT PuT

37ft. 7 I-2 in.

HAMMER THROW

136ft. 7 in. 103 ft. 6 in.

S. Carter,'94 T. C. Hudson,'14

1893 1912

T. C. Hudson,' I4

I9I2

DISCUS THROW

JJfnrmrr <!raptaht.a c.

'89 W. E. A. BuLKELEY

'oo G. BRINLEY 'oi F. R. STURTEVANT

' 90 R. H. HuTcHINS

'o2 G. D. RANKIN

'91 E. R. LAMPSON, JR.

'03 G. D. RANKIN

s. ALLEN

'o4 C. W . REMSEN

'88 M.

' 92 E. '93

c. A.

wARNER

'o5

LEWIS

'94 L. I. BELDEN '95 E. DE K. LEFFINGWELL

'o6 D. W. G ATESON 'o7 H. B. OLMSTED 'o8 H. B. OLMSTED

'96 W. A. SPARKS '97 w. A. SPARKS '98 C. w. HENRY '99

c.

c.

W. REMsEN A. R. GooDALE

'09 H. I. MAxsoN '10 C. B. JunGE

w. HENRY

113


On Alumni Day, the twenty-fourth of June, 1911, Trinity Field was the scene of perhaps the most thrilling and spectacular game of baseball recorded in Trinity history. For weeks the papers had been printing pictures and full column items about the famous team from faraway Japan-the Waseda University Nineand the management had seen to it that in every possible way this Oriental invasion of baseballists should not come and go unadvertised. "Sunny Jim" and the "Campbell Kids" proved long ago that advertising pays, and the gate receipts of the game were enough to show that the Japanese Flag, when flying over a ball team, would not only feed the curiosity bug of many Hartford people, but feed as well the little bug that carries away the admission money. The stands were filled to overflowing, and automobiles closely crowded together were lined up on either side of th,e diamond. At a rough estimate, 1500 people attended. The game itself was intensely interesting, for the J aps displayed a clever ability to play our national game. They threw, caught, batted and ran the bases in the real American way and to a degree of perfection that held Trinity without runs until the ninth inning. Meanwhile, the Japs themselves had gathered four to their credit. Two runs in the first inning, due to hits byYawata,Ogawa,and Oi and an .outfield fly by Hara, and again in the third inning Oi scored on his own three-bagger and Hara's safe hit. In the fourth, Fukunaga, after getting a base on balls, stole second and third, and scored on Omura's bunt. p to this time, Trinity had gotten but four scattered hits, and as a result had reached third base but once. Then, from the fourth on until the ninth, there were but few hits, both teams fielding remarkably well, but driving easy grounders to the infielders, which invariably resulted in outs at first. When the ninth inning started, Trinity found herself facing a four-run lead with slight hope of victory over their clever little opponents. When L'Heureux's grounder took a bad bound, hitting short stop Iseda in the eye, and causing him to retire in the eighth, Trinity little knew of the advantage gained in this bit of hard luck to the J aps. Omachi took Iseda's place in the ninth, and through this change Trinity gained. Turner, the first man up, drove a sharp grounder between third and short, and stole second. Horan hit to Hara, who tried to hold Turner at second; finally resulting in Turner's reaching third and Horan's safely resting at first. Then, Carroll, who h路a d already gathered three hits, grounded to the pitcher, Matsuda, for the first out, after Horan had stolen second. Brainerd hit to left field, scoring Turner and Horan, and reached second on the throw-in. Ahern then reached first on a hit to right field, but Brainerd was held at third. Lister then fouled out to Fukunaga, and Sayres was called upon to tie the score. This he did by a beautiful two-bagger, after two strikes had been called on him, and L'Heureux drove him in with the winning run, by hitting the ball through short stop. Trinity 5, Waseda 4路 During the entire last inning the bleachers creaked under the stamping of feet; and the cheers of the joy-crazed students, alumni, and friends filled the air. Trinity had snatched a victory from defeat, and here in this one final inning had displayed the spirit that throughout the season had been lacking. Fighting ability had been lost up to that time, but, when it was found, came 'Vaseda's downfall.

I 14


iliunr

;

~pnrtn


HOCKEY G. C. BuRGWIN T. w. LITTLE

E. F.

BASSFORD,'14,

Captain Manager

G. C.

Goal

BuRGWIN,'I4,

Rover

A. JoHNso ,'rs, Point

v\.

T.

C. H. HowELL,' 12, Right Wing

W. LITTLE,'14,

Cover Point

R. F.

WALKER,'14,

i . BLEECKER,'I2,

Left Wing

Center

i&rrnril December 9

Trinity vs. Williams

no tee

January

13

Trinity o

Amherst 3

at Amherst

January

20

Trinity

Mass. State 9

at Hartford

January

27

Trinity vs. S. T. S.

no tee

February

17

Trinity vs. Rensselaer

no tee

I

II6 }


1Rrnirm nf tqr

T

~ra.ann

HE weather conditions were most unfavorable for hockey this year, so that only two games of the schedule were played. While they were both defeats, the team deserves much credit. The College body is taking more interest in the game than ever before, and it seems very sure that hockey will soon hold a prominent place on our list of sports.

I I

7


Wrnnis 1\nsnriattnu R. M . NELSON,'! I

President

D. S. PuLFORD,'I3 Secretary-Treasurer

C. CARPENTER,'I2

Vice-President

A. E. PuLFORD,'I2

.

. Manager

1Rrprr.srntatiur.s at iGongwoo.b, 1g 11 D. S. PuLFORD,'I3

R. M. NELSON,'II

April April May May May May June

22 24

6 II 12 20 10

at Troy Trinity at Schenectady Trinity at Williamstown Trinity at Hartford Trinity at Hartford Trinity at Amherst Trinity at Hartford Trinity Record: Won 4, Tied r ,

R. M . NELSON,'rr, Captain A. E. PuL.FORn,'r r C. CARPENTER,'I2

G. C. BuRGWIN,'I4

6 3 0

5 5 0 2 Lost 2

R.P.I. Union Williams Mass. State Brown Amherst Wesleyan

0 3

6

6

D. S. PuLFORD,' I3 , Manager G. C. BuRGWIN,'I4

Annual lJTall wournamrnt Runner-up, D. S. PuLFORD,'!:>

Won by Burgwin,'r4 II 8


1!\ruirtu nf t4r wruuta ~rannu

T

RINITY'S tennis season was one of the most successful in the history of the College. Considering the caliber of our opponents, and the size of the institutions in comparison with ours, only praise is due the team. The prospects for a victorious team this coming season are good, as we have a nucleus of veterans back and some good material in the Freshman Class.

I

19


The George Sheldon McCook Cup- Presented by Professor J. J. McCook,'63, as a memorial to his son, G. S. McCook,'97; to be awarded to the student making the best record in athletics during the year.

J.

HE NDERSON,'o2 H. D. BRIGHAM,'03 w. B . ALLEN,'04 0. MoRGAN,'o6 E. B. RAMSDELL,' I I (present

P. DouGHERTY,'07 E . J. DoNNELLY,'o8 P. RoBERTS,'09 R. C. ABBEY,'Io holder)

The Record Cup- Presented by E. Brainerd Bulkeley,'9o, to be awarded to students who break college athletic records. ~rrsrnt ~nl~rrs

w. S.

EATON,'IO P. MAxo r,'I I H. ESSELS,' I 2 T . C. HuosoN,'I4

H. B. 0LMSTED,'o8 D . C. PoNo,'o8 H. C. PoNo,'o8 W.}. ELSON,'IO

w

The Underwood Cup- Presented by J. C. be competed for at each fall Underclass Meet.

nderwood,'96, to

I9I4 Batting Cup-Held by

J.

F. Horan,'I3

Interclass Track Trophies First, 1914

Second, I9I3

The Gymnasium, Leffingwell, and McCracken Cups were not competed for. 120


1J1ootball C. H. HowELL,'Iz, Captain

T. C. HunsoN,'14

]. H. HuMPHREY,'12, Managa

F . S. FITZPATRICK,'I4

H . W . S. CooK,'I2

P . P. LAWLOR,'I4

P. A . AHERN,'I2

]. A . MooRE,'I4

w.

G. D. HowELL, ]R.,'15

H. BLEECKER, ]R.,'I2

C. H. CoLLETT,'I3

R. E. KINNEY,'IS

]. B . MooRE,'I3

R. G. GETTELL, Honorary

ilasrball ]. 0. CARROLL,' I 1, Captain

D. C. TuR ' ER,'12

A. E. RANKIN,'I 1, Manager

]. F. BoRA ' ,'13

F. ]. BRAI ERD,'I I

A . ]. L'HEUREUX,'I3

A . L. GILDERSLEEVE,' I I

c. w. SAYRES,'I3

P. A . AHERN,"I2

H. B. WAR ER,'I3

w.

A. B. LISTER,'I4

H. BLEECKER, ]R.,'I2

Wrack PAUL MAXON,' 1 1, Captain

H. WESSELS,'I2

E. F. PETTIGREW,'12, Managa

C. H. CoLLETT,'I3

W. W. BucK,'I 1

D. S. PuLFORD,'I3

R. M. NELSON,'II

T. C. Hunso ','14

P. A. AHERN,'I2

T. F. WESSELS,'I4

w.

H. BLEECKER, ]R.,'I2 121


3Juuinr 1!lllttk Wl}urnllau. JJirbruary Btl} AFTERNOON

I K A Tea

EvENING

!:l 'lt

EvE INC

!:l

German

K E D ance

JJirtllau. JJirbruary !Ttl} AFTERNOON

A

EvEN ING

Ju nior German

!:l <I>

Tea

_s,aturllay, JJirbruary lntl} AFTERNOON

Coll ege Tea

EvENING

Junior Week Concert

_s,uullay. JJirbruary lltl} Vespers

AFTERNOON

i\lloullay. JJirbruary 12tl} Tea

AFTERNOON

'lt T

EvENING

Ju nior Promenade

1 25


3Juntnr 1ll!Jrrk OJnnrrrt Jr.ogram Jart I I.

"Hail to Thee, Trinity"

Davis GLEE CLUB

2.

(a) "Monstrat Viam"

A. E. joy W. Rolfe

(b) "Bashful Bumpkin" MANDOLIN CLUB

3路

Selected

Piano MR. McCABE

4路

(a) "The Elf Man" (b) "The Scissors Grinder"

Gibson jungst

GLEE CLUB

5.

Vocal Solo MR.

6.

c. E. CRAIK

"The Masqueraders" Waltzes MANDOLI

7.

Selected D. B. White

J

CLUB

" 'Neath the Elms"

Burgwin,'82 GLEE CLuB

Jart II

"The Pinker Lady"

J. J.

c

WHITEHEAD, ]R.,'I3

Persons Who Would Play

Rex, a King Dondidier, a Villain Tenor, a Hero The Pinker Lady

] W

J. J. J.

T. W . LITTLE,'I4 . B. SPOFFORD,'I4 H . HuMPHREY,'rz

WHITEHEAD, ]R. ,'13

Cho1路us Ladies, Cho1路us Gentlemen, Members of the Imperial " R ushing B allet," Etc. Accompanist, H. S . 0LAFSoN,'rs 126

9


3Juutor Jromruabr O!.ommtttrr Chairman Secretary- Treasurer

CHESTER D uDLEY WARD JOHN BIGELOW MooRE WILLIAM Po D BARBER, ]R. JOSEPH OYES BARNETT KE TNETH BEARDSLEY CASE CHARLES HENRY CoLLETT ETHELBERT TALBOT SMITH ELIOT LEE wARD ]01-1 jAY \VHITEHEAD, jR. FRANCIS EARLE WILLIAMS 9

127


ID~r

Jlrnm <£irl


8 0

~H 00 Mp

-o

l

R E

December 3,

I9IO

<!Lnmmtttrr GuY CARLTO HEATER, Chairman KENNETH BEARDSLEY CASE MERRITT FOWLER CROMWELL ALFRED JOSEPH L'HEUREUX STANLEY FIELD MARR JOHN B GELow MooRE HoBART ]AMES RoBERTS JoHN ]AY WHITEHEAD, ]R. FRANCIS EARLE WILLIAMS 129


~npqnmnrr ~mnkrr May 5,

1911

C!Lommittrr HENRY BEARDSLEY WARNER, Chairman WILLIAM P. BARBER, ]R. ALFRED J. L'HEUREUX KENNETH B . CASE RussEL C. OBLE CHARLES H. CoLLETT ARTHUR F. PEASLEE RICHARD L. DEPPEN HoBART J. RoBERTS ALBERT HAITHWAITE, ]R . c. D. WARD FARCE: "Dorothy Vernon of Jarvis Hall" By w. S. MARSDEN "Dick" Pierce L. D. ADKINS "Jack" Baker c. D. WARD "Auto" Cha路mers S. S. SwiFT "Chub" Ford A . B. CooK Dr. Calvin H. J. RoBERTS Dorothy Vernon J. J. WHITEHEAD, ]R. Students, Etc.


Presents

(A Nlusical Comedy in Three Acts) Book and Lyrics by REGINALD BuRBANK,' I I ::VIusic by PRoF . F.

J.

LIDDLE, of Pittsfield, Mass .

Alumni Hall, June 24, 191 I

orant Frank Price, love-sick and in need of money

J.

HowARD HuMPHREY,'I2

Patton Price, Frank's Uncle- a self-made man ALLAN B. CooK,'I3 Philip Morris, Frank's roommate, born with a cigarette in his mouth c. EDGAR SHERMAN,' I I Crispin Gruff, whose money Frank needs T. WoLCOTT LrTTLE,'I4 Shirley G1路uff, his daughter, in love with Frank THOMAS G. BROWN,I3 Ida Paine, Shirley's friend- a social light JoHN P . BEGLEY,'I4 Constant Krammer, a Phi Beta Kappa man FRANK R. PRouT,'I I jimmy Fleece, a sneak thief, alias Robin Cheatsky . WrLLIA:tvi B. SPOFFORD,'I4 Howland Tai1路e, an old actor, Frank's valet WrLLIA

1

A. BrRD, IV, '12

Flam Florette, a show-girl, wife of Howland Taire CHESTER D. wARD,' I 3 Robin Cheatsky , a Socialist lecturer, alias Fleece WILLIAM B. SPOFFORD,'I4 REGI TALD BuRBANK,' I I Shootum Orloff, also a Socialist College men, guests, etc. IJI


11frr5~mau-3Juutnr iiauqurt

1

1913 from 1915 The Marble Hall, Holyo ke, Mass. December 14, 191 r arommitt.r.r GEORGE DAWSON HowELL, ]R., Chairman F. B. STITES

]. VIZNER

w.

H. EvA rs

A. L. SMITH B. L. SMITH

T. A . PECK

R. R. SMITH

A.

H. E. R YERSON,

ORR

]OH NSON

ex路 officio moaats

G. D. Hm-YE LL ,

JR., To .75:rn:zster H. E . R YERso ,'rs R. E. KINNEY,'rs

"r9r3" Trinity Football Trinity Spirit

F. E. SnTEs,'rs

Trinity Girls

R. L. DEPPE N,'r3

'' r9r5"

] . B. MooRE,'IJ

IJ2


( /

..

"

11


1Juy Ianarb

ID4r IDriuity lfuy Established I

873

Ianarb of 1.Ebttnr!I \VALTER STUART MARSDEX, ALLAN BEHRENDS CooK

]R.

Editor-in-Chief Business Manager Assistant Business Manager

FRANCIS EARLE WILLIAMS . THOMAS GILBERT BROWK ]OHN ] AY WHITEHEAD, ]R. YLARcus THoRKTo r McGEE ) ETHELBERT TALBOT SMITH ' HEKRY BEARDsLEY vVARKER )

I

Literary Editors

I

Athletic Editors

134-

J


j

Wrtpo!l 1Soarb

ID~r

IDrtnity IDrtpn~ Established 1904

Published T uesdays and Fridays in each week of the college year

iaoar!l of 1.E!litor£1 Editor-in-Chief WrLLIA:-r AuGusTus BIRD,

IV,

'12

Managing Editor CHAPr:t\ CARPENTER,' I 2

Athletic Edito1·

Alumni Editor

]AMES SHREWSBURY CRAIK,'I2

SAMUEL SEDGWICK SwiFT,'I3

News Editor

Assignment Editor THOMAS GILBERT BROWN,'!}

LEONARD DAwsoN ADKI · s,'13

1iu£linr£1£1 IDrpartmrnt

J

Treasurer

Advatising Manager

ALLA~ BEHRENDS CooK,'I3

\\ ILLIA:-r SHoRT, ]R.,'12

A sst. Advertising Manager and Secretary THoP.rAs fRANCIS fLANAGAN,' r 2

Circulation Manager

KENNETH BEARDSLEY CAsE,'I3


~ruatr 1911-1912

WILLIAM AuGUSTUS BIRD, IV,'I2

President

WILLIAM BENJAMIN SPOFFORD,'I4

Secretary

EvERETT MARBLE FAIRBANKs,'13 THOMAS FRANCIS FLANAGAN,'Iz

WILLIAM SHORT, }R.,'12 TicHOLAS VINCENT WALSH,'Iz

JoHN BIGELow MooRE,'I3

HARRY WEsSELS,'1z

CLARENCE IRVING PENN,'I2

CHARLES RICHARDSON WHIPPLE,'I2

CHARLES HuRD HowELL,'12 (Fall Term) ALFRED JosEPH L'HEUREUX,'13 (Spring Term)


fllllu.atral Qtluh.a ®ffirrr.a SAMUEL S. SwiFT,'I3, President CHARLES H . CoLLETT,' 13 , Ma nager

WILLIAM L. R osENBAUM,' 14, Asst. Manager

~lrr

(!llub

J. J. WHITEHEAD, ]R.,' 13, Leader First Tenors Seco"nd Tenors F irst Basses Second Basses O.GILDERSLEEVE,' 12 K. B. CAsE,' I3 J. H. HuMPHREY,' rz J. S. CRAIK,'rz C. H. CoLLETT,' I3 A. B. CooK,' I3 S. H. EviSON,'rz J.W.WoESSN ER,' I2 A . W. WALKER,' I4 E. J. MYERS,'I4 J. B. MooRE,'I3 E. T. SMITH,'13 L. 0. DE RoNcE: ,' r4 R. C. NoBLE,'I3 J.J. WHITEHEAD,'I3 T. W. LrTTLE,' I4 E. P. WROTH, ' I4 K. vV. BoYNTO N,' I4 c. E. CRAIK,' I4 H . L. BRAI NE RD, ' I5 W. T. GRAY,'rs U. A. HicKs,'r4 W. B. SPoFFoRD,' I4 E. H. HALL,'rs D. s. SQuiRE,' rs N. R. SAcE,'rs W. B. PRESSEY,' rs R. L. ScoFIELD,' rs J. B. SHELLEY,' rs N.H . REYNOLDs,'rs S. A. MERRrLL,' IS A. L. SMrTH,' rs

•nnbnliu atluh F. E. BARIDON,' I4, Leader First Mandolins

S. S. SwiFT,'I3 D. S. PuLFORD,'I3 F. E. BARIDON,'I4 J. A. MooRE,'I4 G. D. HowELL, JR.,'rs

Guitar

Second Mandolins H. J. LIVERMORE,' I4 R . W. WooDWARD,'I4 E. H. HALL,'rs

137

w. LITTLE,' I4 Piano H. S. 0LAFSON,' I4

T.


I

-r路

/

/

T(t

-r-11 ,_,

(_

,,.J

_.1.

;

\

~rntor

1!1nnorary

~ortrty

Established I893

~ntiluatr ALLEN, EDWIN STANTON,'93 ALLEN, WALTER BEST,'04 AusTIN, WILLIAM MoRRis,'gS BACON, FRED . STANLEY,'99 BADGLEY, OLIVER \VARREN ,' 07 BARBOUR, HENRY GROSVENOR,'g6 BARTON, CHARLES CLARENCE,'93 BARTON, PHILIP LocKwooD,'oz BATES, RoBERT PEcK,'93 BEECROFT, EDGAR CHARLES,'97 BELLAMY, RoBERT BAYARD,'oi BowNE, GARRETT DENISE,'o6 BRIGHAM, HENRY DAY,'03 BRINES, MosEs J AMEs,'oo BRoUGHTON, CHARLES DuBois,'95

tltllrntbr.rs BROWN, WILLIAM PARNELL,'OI BRINLEY, GoDFREY,'oi BRYANT, PERCY CARLETON,'07 BucK, GEORGE SuMNER,'og BuLKELEY, JoHN CHARLES,'93 CAPEN, GEoRGE CLEVELAND,'Io CARPENTER, ]AMES STRATTON, ]R., 'cg CARROLL, JOSEPH OLIVER,' I I CARTER, J ULIA T STUART,'g8 C.-'IRTER, LAwsoN AvERILL,'93 CARTER, SHIRLEY,'94 CHURCHMAN, CLARKE,'93 CLEMENT, CHARLES FRANcrs,'os CoGGESHALL, MuRRAY HART,'g6 CoGswELL, GEoRGE EDwARD,'97

I39


~rabuatr

.£illrmhrr!i- <!runthmr11

CoLLINs, WILLIAM FRENCH,'93 CRoss, WILLIAM RicH,'o8 CULLEN, ]AMES, ]R.,'93 CuNNINGHAM, GERALD ARTHUR,'o7 DANKER, wALTON STOUTENBURGH,'97 DAvis, JoHN HENRY KELso,'99 DAvis, CAMERON JosiAH,'93 DINGWELL, BARRIE RENZ,'94 DouGHERTY, PHILIP,'o7 DoNNELLY, EDWIN JosEPH,'o8 DRAVO, MARIO STUART,'07 DuFFEE, EDwARD LLEWELLYN,'os EDGERTON, FRANCIS CRUGER,'94 EDGERTON, JoHN WARREN,'94 EDSALL, ]AMES KIRKLAND,'o8 ELLIS, GEORGE WILLIAM,'94 EwiNG, RoBERT MosBY,'os FARRow, MALcoLM CoLLI s,'os FISKE, REGINALD,'or FisKE, WILLIAM SYDNEY ALKER,'o6 GATESON, DA IEL WILMOT,'o6 GEORGE, EuGENE EvAN,'07 GILDERSLEEVE, ELSON HALL,'Io GLAZEBROOK, HASLETT McKIM,'oo GooDRIDGE, EDWARD, ]R.,'oz GosTENHOFER, CHARLEs EDWARD,'os GRAVES, DuDLEY CHASE,'98 GREENLY, HowARD TRESCOTT,'94 GRovEs, JosEPH,'Io HAIGHT, AusTIN DuNHAM,'o6 HAIGHT, SHERMAN PosT,' I r HAMLIN, EDWARD PERCY,'95 HARTLEY, GEORGE DERWENT,'93 HENDERSON, ]AMEs,'oz HILL, FREDERICK CHARLEs, J R.,'o6 HoRNOR, HARRY ARcHER,'oo HowELL, ALFRED,' I r HuDSON, ]AMES MosGROVE,'oi LANGFORD, ARCHIBALD MoRRISoN,'97 LANGFORD, \ VILLIAM SPAIGHT, JR . ,'96 LEWIS, ELTON GARDINER,'99 LoRD, ]AMES WATSON,'98 LocKwooD, LuKE VINCENT,'93 MACAULEY, RICHARD HENRY,'95 MANN, EDWARD ]AMES,'04 MAXON, PAUL,'II MAXSON, HARRY 1RL,'09 McCooK, GEORGE SHELDON,'97 McGINLEY, STEPHEN EssEx,'O<) MciLVAINE, JoHN GILBERT,'oo MEYER, HENRY Loms,' o 3 MoRGAN, SAMUEL ST . ] oHN,'o3

Vv

MoRGAN, 0wEN,'o6 MoRsE, BRYAN KILLIKELLY,'99 NicHoLs, JoHN WILLIAMs,'99 TILES, WILLIAM PoRTER,'93 OLCOTT, vVILLIAM TYLER,'96 OLMSTED, HoRAcE BIGELow,'o8 PAINE, OGLE TAYLOR,'96 PAIGE, JOHN HENRY, J R.,'97 PARSO ' S, EDGERTON,'96 PEARCE, REGINALD,'93 PECK, CARLOS CURTIS,'02 PEcK, RICHARD EuGENE,'oi PELTON, HENRY HUBBARD,'93 PE ROSE, JOHN JESSE, J R.,' 95 PLANT, WooDFORDE HAMILTON,'o9 PoND, HARVEY CLARK,'o8 PowELL, JoHN FRANKLIN,'o6 PRINCE, FREDERICK WELLEs,'oo RAMSDELL, EARL BLA CHARD,' I I RANKI , GEORGE DouGLAs,'o3 REMSEN, CoRNELius WAGSTAFF,'os REMSEN, HENRY RuTGERs,'98 REYNOLDS, LLOYD GILSON,'98 RICH, ERNEST ALBERT,'99 ScHUTZ, WALTER STANLEY,'94 ScHWARTZ, DAviD Loms, ]R.,'oo SHERMAN, CLARENCE EDGAR,' I I SMITH, ALBERT MARSTON,'ro SPARKS, WILLIAM ALBERT,'97 STRAWBRIDGE, JoHN,'9s SYPHAX, T. MINTON,'o3 TAYLOR, CHARLES EDWARD,'94 TAYLOR, MARTIN,'o8 THOMAS, EDMUND CRAWFORD,'03 TowNSEND, HERMAN EDWARD,'o4 TRuMBULL, CHARLES LAMB,'o8 VIBBERT, AuBREY DARRELL,'99 VIBBERT, WILLIAM WELCH,'94 WAINWRIGHT, JoNATHAN MAYHEw,'95 WEBSTER, JEROME PIERCE,'ro WEED, CHARLES FREDERICK,'94 WEIBEL, RICHARD ICKS,'02 WELLEs, PHILIP TuRNER,'os WHEELER, CHARLES HAWTHORNE,'02 WHEELER, vVILLIAM HARDIN,'oz WILSON,WILLIAM CRosswELL DoANE,'93 WILLIAMS, ALEXANDER ]OHN,'96 WILSON, GEORGE HEWSON,'93 WoFFENDE , RicHARD HENRY,'93 WooDLE, ALLEN SHELDON,'99 WRIGHT, R ICHARDSON LITTLE,'Io


President

WILLIAM SHORT, JR. WILLIAM HILL BLEECKER,

]R .

PHILIP ALOYSIUS AHERN

Secretary-Treasurer WILLIAM AuG u sTus BIRD,

CHARLES HuRD HowELL

IV


lllouu~dl

by tl1r (!ilaaa of 路gg ou lllrbrunry 15. 1897

Qkabuatr .flli{rmhrr.a ~I. H. BuFFINGTON,'04 H. BuRGWrN, ]R.,'o6 H. H. BuRG WI ','r 1 W. C. BuRWELL,'o6 P. :VI. BuTTERWORTH,'o8 G. C. CAPEN,'ro c. CARPENTER,'I2 ]. S. CARPENTER, J R.,'09 L. G. CARPENTER,'og ]. 0. CARROLL,' I I H. N. CHANDLER,'C9 S. T. CLAPP,'04 c. F. CLEMENT,'os ~1. w. CLEMENT,'OI A. C. CoBURN,'o7 R. G. CoGHLAN,'Io W. B. ALLE r ,'04 P. L. BARTo ','oz F. H. CoGGESHALL,'07 G. T. BATES,'I2 H. Vv. CooK,'ro ]. R. CooK, ]R. ,'ro W. A. BIRD,'I2 W. H . BLEECKER, ]R.,'Iz D. S. CoRSON,'99 ]. S. CRAIK,'rz H. C. BoYD,'os G . D. BowNE,'o6 A. W. CREEDON,'09 H. S. BRADFIELD,'oz \V. R. CRoss,'o8 ]. W. BRADIN,'oo G. A. CuNNINGHAM,'o7 P . H. BRADIN,'OJ R. Cu NINGHAM,'o7 . F. BREED,'I2 H. L. CuRTIN,'o7 H. D. BRIGHAM,'OJ T. C. CuRns,'o7 GILBERT BROWN,' 10 ]. H. K. D AV IS,'99 H. DE W. DE MAURIAC,'07 W . P. BROWN,'OI D. H. BROWNE,'OJ T. N. DENSLOW,'04 W. c. DEWEY,' I I T . P. BROWNE, ]R.,'OJ E. ]. DrBBLE,'o4 C. E. BRUCE, ]R.,'OJ E.]. DoNNELLY,'o8 P. C. BRYANT,'07 B. BuDD,'o8 M . S. DRAvo,'o7

142

W. H. EATON,'99

v-.,r. S. EATON,'ro

J. K. EDSALL,'o8 ]. D. EvANS,'or R. I. EwmG,'os R . FISKE,'OI W. S. W. FrsKE,'o6 R. H. Fox,'oo S. R . FuLLER, ] R.,'oo c. V. FERG SON,'07 D . W. GATEso ,'o6 E. E. GEORGE,'07 N.H. GrLDERSLEEVE,'ro 0. GILDERSLEEVE, ]R. ,' rz H. C. GooDRrcH,'09 C. E. GosTENHOFER,'os H. McK. GLAZEBROOK,'oo E. B. GoanRICH,'oz E . GooDRIDGE, J R.,'oz R.N. GRAHAM,'os W. T. GRANGE,'o6 H. D. GREEN,'99 H. W . GREER,'o8 JosEPH GRovEs,'ro M. G. HAIGHT,'oo P. HAIGHT,'! I STURGEs HARMON,'ro H. G. HART,'07 ]. c. HART,'09 L. G. HARRIMAN,'09 c. B. HEDRICK,'99 D. M. HE RY,'OJ A. B. HENSHAW,'ro

s.


C. H. HrLL,'oz W. C. HrLL,'oo G. S. HrNE,'o6 H. 0 . HrNKLE,'og H. A. HoRNOR,'oo A. HowELL,' I 1 G. W. HusBARn,'o8 J. M. HunsoN,'or J. H. HuMPHREY,'rz H. HuET,'o6 R. H. HuTCHINSON,'03 B. D. }EWETT,'oo J. MeA. JoHNSON,'03 C. B. JunGE,'IO G. T. KENDALL,'99 K. M. KENDALL,'I2 I. R. KENYON,'07 G. T. KEYES,' I I C. M. KoNVALINKA,'r r w. LARCHAR, J R.,'03 P. T. LIGHTBOURN,'04 E. G. LITTELL,'99 W . G. LrviNGSTON,'og H. F. MAcGuYER,'o8 L. H. McCLURE,'rz G. B. McCuNE,'o? W. F. McELROY,' 10 S. E. McGr LEY,'og H. R. MclLVAINE,'04 J. G. MclLVAINE,'oo P . L. McKEoN,'o4 W. J. McNErL,'or W. F. MADDEN,'o8 E . H. MADDOX,'04 J. H. MAGINNrs,'oz H. S. MARLOR,'ro

iO

H. I. lVIAxSoN,'og P. MAXON,'II F. c. MEREnrTH,'os H. L. G. MEYER,'OJ S. ST. J. MoRGAN,'OJ 0. :\tloRGAN,'06 J. 0. MoRRrs,'o8 B. K. MoRsE,'99 A. S. MuRRAY, III,' ro H. C. NEFF,'ro J. W. NrcHoLs,'gg H. B. 0LMSTEn,'o8 A. H. ONDERDO 'K,'99 H. C. 0wEN,'99 J. w. O'CoNNoR,'os C. C. PEcK,'oz R. E. PEcK,'o r E. F. PETTIGREw,'rz l\11. S. PHILLIPs,'o6 G. P. PrERCE,'o6 N. F. PrTTs,'rr H. C. PoNn,'o8 J. PoRTEus,'n A. L. POTTER,' IO F. vV. PRINCE,'oo E . B. RAMSDELL,' I I c. G. RANDLE,'os G. D. RANDALL,'o8 A. E. RANKIN ,' I I G . D. RANKIN ,'03 c. Vv. REMsE ' ,'os C. REEn,'o6 c. M. RHonEs,'os E. A. RrcH,'99 F. C. RrcH ,'og P. RosERTs,'og

143

H. H. R nn,'or D. L. ScHWARTz,'oo H. L. ScHWARTz,'o6 J. B. SHEARER,'og c. E. SHERMAN,' I I A. c. SHORT,'OJ W. SHORT, ]R.,'rz \V. c. SKINNER,' I I P. R. SMITH,'07 W. P. STEDMAN,'os E. K. STERLING,'99 F. STEVE s,'o8 G. w. STEWART,' I I W. B. SuTToN,'99 J.P. W. T AYLOR,'02 l\11. TAYLOR,'o8 H. E. Tow SEND,'o4 C. L. TRuMBULL,'o8 vv. s. TRuMsuLL,'oJ A. R . vAN DEWATER,'OI R. B. VAN TrNE,'04 A. D . VIBBERT,'99 J. M . w AL KER,'OI c. D. WARDLAW,'07 H. L. WATsoN,'os J. P. WEBSTER,'IO B. G. WEEKEs,'o6 R. . vVEIBEL,'oz P . T. WELLEs,'os H. \VESSELS,'I2 C. H. WHEELER,'OI c. R. WHIPPLE,'I2 H . R. WHITE,'oz H . D. 路wiLsoN, JR.,'or K. WrLLOUGHBY,'og c. B. WYNKooP,'os


J

l

~npqnmnr.r

lining Q1luh

Arttur fllllrntbrrs, 1913 EDWARD SA "FORD BARNEY

jOHN BIGELOW :MoORE

KEN

RussEL CuRTIS

ETH BEARDSLEY CASE

CHARLES HE

R Y CoLLETT

OBLE

SAMUEL SEDGWICK SwiFT

MERRIT FowLER CRoMWELL

RoBERT WRIGHT THOMAS

RICHARD LAWTON DEPPEN

joHN jAY WHITEHEAD, jR.

HENRY BRowN DILLARD

FRANcis EARLE vVILLIAMs

STA JLEY FIELD MARR

RoBERT PRESTON WrTHINGTO

HARRY GEoRGE WooDBURY

r


1!;urtfnrb Qtluh THOMAS JAMES QmsH; JR.

'

ANDREw JoHN CRICHTON,

NICHOLAS VINCENT WALSH

]R.

EvERETT NIARBLE FAIRBANKS

WILLIAM FRANCIS vAIL

CHARLES JOSEPH HAASER

JOHN PAUL BEGLEY HowARD JosEPH DALEY,

]R.

RoBERT HENRY JOHNSON

STEPHEN FRANCIS DuNNE

LEO }AMES

LESLIE RANKIN FREW

}AMES }EREMIAH O'CONNOR

EDwARD WILLIS LuDWIG

FELIX JEREMIAH McEviTT

145

OONAN


"Probability the Guide of Life" Founded in 1776 at Mary and Williams College

Alpqtt nf (!tnuurrttrut Chartered 1889 W.

c. T.

c.

R. WHIPPLE

w.

President Vice-President Secretary Treasurer

ANDREWS

G.

BATES R . CURTIS

i!inll nf (!Lqaptrr.a ALPHA OF GREAT BR ITAIN ALPHA OF IRELAND ALPHA OF FRANCE BETA OF FRANCE ALPHA OF MASSACHUSETTS BETA OF MASSACHUSETTS ALPHA oF CoNNECT ICUT BETA oF CoNNECTICUT

.

OMEGA oF CoNNECTICUT BETA OF NEw YoRK GAMMA O F NEW yORK

.

IoTA OF NEw YoRK ALPHA OF PENNSYLVAN I A BETA OF PE NNSY LVA N I A UPSILON OF GERM ANY ALPHA OF Russi A CHI CHI OF CHIN A Psi XI OF jAPAN ALPHA BETA GAMMA OF GREECE

Trinity College, Cambridge Trinity College, Du blin Ecole des Beaux Arts, Pari s Sourbun, Paris Smith 's College Wellesley College Trinity College Wesleya n University Jai l niversi ty Vassar College Cornhill niversity Sagamore Hill , Oys ter Bay Bry n Mawr Nowhereatall Heidelberg University of Mskovitchjski University of Shanghai Port Arthur College Stoic School, Athens

'


June, 191 1

Music Salutatory, vVith Address on "The Needs of Our Times" GusTAVE ALEXANDER FEINGOLD, Connecticut "The Greek Sense of Beauty"

GEORGE HARRY CoHEN, Connecticut

::VIus1c "The United States as a vVorld Power" HAROLD NELSON CoNOVER CHRISTIE,

-ew Jersey

"Political Independence and Party Loyalty" LEvi P.

"The Short Ballot"

NIORTON

HICKEY, Connecticut

ARTHUR CoRNWALLIS EATON, :\Iassachusetts

"The Utilitarian Trend in :\Iodern Education," with the Valedictory Addresses JoH N HowARD Ros EBAUGH, Pennsylvania

:\Iusic

147


(!tla!l6 lay 1£xrrrisrs Jrognun Musrc Aria from "The Pink Lady"

Caryll

J rts illt ttfs Allllrtss CLARENCE EDGAR SHERMAN, Massachusetts Musrc Song for Cornet- " All Alone" MR. CHESTER W. SMITH

<Hhtss f;is tory HowARD RosEBAUGH, Pennsylvania Musrc Selection- "The Chocolate Soldier"

von Tilzer

JoH

Strauss

<Hhtss J o.rm BLINN FRANCIS YATES, Illinois Music "Girl of My Dreams"

Hoschna ~tatistits

ARTHUR LLOYD GILDERSLEEVE, Connecticut Music Quartette from "Rigoletto"

f/erdi

Jrt.!il'tttation of Atl1ll'tit .Atuarlls "T" and "ATA" Certificates Gold Footballs and Gold Baseballs The George Sheldon McCook Trophy for Outdoor Sports Music Selection from "Alma"

Briquet

® ration LEvi P . MoRTON HICKEY, Connecticut Music Song- " In the Garden of My Heart"

Ball

<Hias s Jrop~tl HAROLD CLARENCE ]AQUITH, Connecticut Musrc "Spring Maid"

Reinhardt J rt.!ittttation REGINALD BuRBANK, Massachusetts Music '"Neath the Elms"

I


J1onorn

an~

Jrij!r!i for tqr frar 1910-1911

ii;nnor£i itt tltr (!Ha£i£i of 1911 Valedictory: Salutatory: Honor Oration: Honor Oration:

joHN HowARD RosEBAUGH GusTAVE ALEXANDER FEINGOLD HAROLD NELSON Co OVER CHRISTIE ARTHUR CoRNWALLIS EATO

THE CHEMICAL PRIZE First Prize: WILLIAM PoND BARBER, ]R.

secon d p rue . :

{ARTHUR FRANK PEASLEE MuNSEY LEw

TuTTLE PRIZE EssAY: (

ot awarded)

GooDWIN GREEK PRIZES: (

ot awarded)

PRIZES IN HISTORY A D PoLITICAL SciENCE: (Not awarded) ALuMNI PRIZES I ENGLISH CoMPOSITION First Prize: WILLIAM AuGUSTUS BIRD, IV Second Prize: LEVI P. MoRTON HicKEY Third Prize: ALEXANDER LEo TRACHTENBERG Committee of Award: THE R Ev. ARTHUR ]. GAMMACK, M .A. FRANK

w.

WHITLOCK PRIZES

First Prize: LEVI P. MoRTON HICKEY Second Prize: WILLIAM AuGUSTUS BIRD, IV Committee of Award: THE HoN. joHN C. BRINSMADE, THE HoN. CHARLES A . GooDWIN, AND THE HoN. THOMAS ]. SPELLACY DouGLAS PRIZE 'vVILLIAM AuGusTus BIRD, IV SuBJECT: The Significance of "Insurgency" in American Politics Committee of Award: THE HoN. FRANK B. WEEKS THE F. A. BROWN PRIZE GusTAVE ALEXANDER FEINGOLD Committee of Award: His ExcELLENCY, SIMEON EBEN BALDWIN, LL.D., Governor of Connecticut, THE HoN. FRANK L. WILcox, and MR. WILLIAM G. MATHER

I49


J

• • • • • •

MCMXIV

Jrr.srutrr

w.

H. BENJAMIN,'57

G. R. HALLAM,'59 W. H. vVEBSTER,'6r R. F. GooDMAN,'63 H. G. GARDNER,'6s F. L. NoRTON,'68

jACOB LEROY,'69 VVILLIAM DRAYTON,'? !

c.

E. WODMAN,'73

R. M. EDWARDS,'74

ltrrriurr '57 G. R . HALLAM,'59 '59 l nveniam viam aut faciam

\\". S. CocswELL,'6r

'6 1 Per aspera ad astra

·. B. DAYTON,'63

'63 Ne tentes aut perfice

C. W. MuNRo,'6s

'65 Facta non verba

RoBERT SHAw,'68

'68 Semper crescens

E. V . B. KISSAM,'69

'69 Numquam non paratus '?I NuLLa vestigia utrorsum

'73

D. P. CoTTON ,' ?• F. 0. GRANNIS,'73

c.

E. CRAIK,'74

'74 H. \ ·. R uTHERFO Ro ,'76 ISO

1


C. E. YlooRE,'76

'76 I nservit honori '78

]. D. HJLLS,'78

\Y.

c. BLACKMER,'78

D. L. FLEMJNc,'8o '8o

\V. R. LEAKEN,'8o

A. P. BuRGWIN,'82 A. D. NEELEv,'8s A. H. ANDERSON,'87 E. C. JoHNSO N, 2n,'88

T. A. CoNOVER,'9o

A. P. BuRGWJN,'82 '82 R espice finern '8s D uris non frangi '87 Multa in dies addiscentes '88 Per angus/a ad augusta '90 Semper agens aliquid '92

G. HALL,'92 ]. W. EnGERTON,'94 E. P. HAMLIN,'95

S. H. GJEsv,'85 G . S. WATERs,'87 E. C. JoH NSON, 2n,'88

E. i\1cP. McCooK,'90 I. D. R ussELL,'92

F. F. JoHNSON,'94 '94 A gere pro viribus '95 En avant! '9 7

'99 Fortiter, fide/iter, feliciter 'or Novus ordo saeclorurn '04 'o6 'o8 'IO 'I I

(Keepers of the Lemon Squeezer)

I)I

]. STRAWBRIDGE,'95 G. E. CocswELL,'97


JJfir.st Wrnur.s WROTH,' I 4

FoRT,' 14 "rcunb Wrnur.s

WHITEHEAD,' 13, Choirmaster PETTIGREW,'I2 SHELLEY,' I 5 JJfir.st ilu.sns HARRISON,' 1 1 , Organist BLACHFORD,' 14, Assistant

B ENT,' I S

BoY TON,' 14

&rcunb iln.s.sr.a WALKER,'I4

SPOFFORD,' I 4

PRESIDENT LuTHER, Chaplain VoLUNTARY (Sunday) OBLIGATORY Holy Communion, 8 :45 A. M . Morning Pr~yer, 8 :30 A. M. Sunday, 10:30 A. M.

EviSON,'Iz

MARSDEN,'I3


Wqt 14thrnry WALTER BENJAMIN BRIGGS,

Librarian

iGtbrary QLnmmtttrr THE PRESIDE

T

SYD ' EY GEORGE FISHER

THE LIBRARIAN

PROFESSOR RoBERT BAIRD RIGGS

~tulltnt 1\s!ii!itantn vVILLIAM AUGUSTUS BIRo, IV

HoRAcE FoRT

SAMUEL HERBERT EviSON

E. PINCKNEY WROTH

HowARD RicE HrLL

速pttmt SAMUEL HART,'66

GEoRGE Ons HoLBROOKE,'69

Lucrus WATERMAN,'?I

LEONARD Wooos RrcHARDSoN,'73

HIRAM BENJAMIN LooMis,'Ss

HERMAN LILIENTHAL,'86

WILLARD ScuooER,'89

HAROLD LooMIS CLEASBY,'99

FRANCIS RAYMOND STURTEVA T,'or

WILLIAM PERRY BENTLEY,'02

EDWARD HENRY LORENZ,'02

ANSON THEODORE McCooK,'oz

KARL PHILIP MoRBA,'oz

MARSHALL BowYER STEWART,'oz

EoMuNo SAMUEL CARR,'os

GusTAVE ALEXA

JoHN HowARD RosEBAUGH,'II

I

53

DER FEI ' GOLD,' I 1


Honorary President

PRoFESSOR joHN G. GILL

President .

ALLAN B. CooK,'IJ

w.

R ecorder

STUART MARSDEN,'I3

THOMAS G. BROWN,' I 3

Secretary

ERNEST T. SoMERVILLE,'I4

T1路easU1路er

w. A.

J. J.

BIRD, IV,'I2

WHITEHEAD, ]R.,'IJ

T. F. FLANAGAN,'I2

R.

C. CARPENTER,'I2

L. 0.

L. D.

E. P. WROTH,'I4

K.

ADKINS,'I3

P. WITHIKGTOK,'I3

0. D.

B. CAsE,' I 3

I)4

DE RoKGE,'I4

BuDD,'IS


,


(with apologies to the creator of Mr. Dooley)

"W

ELL, sir," said Mr. Dooley, "I see beth' pa-apers that there's

been some more high doin's up at that vin'rable an' illusthrees instichoochion iv larnin', Thrinity Colledge Bein' as they're jist ivryday stoojents, with ivryday intellecks, they must have their ca-apers ivry now an' thin, so's not to get too seeryous an' civvylized. Ca-apers constichoot a relief fr'm th' arjoos r-round iv colledge jooties an' th' rellijous atmosphere iv th' leccher rooms. They ar-re a forchnit lot, Hinnissy, an' I invy thim, ivry wan iv thim, an' all their injyements. What a wondherful thing is youth, an' espicially iddycated youth with all its impechusness . Ould fellows like ye'ersilf an' me have no romance about th' colledge. Y e don't hear us givin' nine long cheers f' r our almy rna tther. Y e don't see us postin' up pasthers in th' arly hours iv Saint Pathrick's Day (may God bliss his gr-reat soul) with all th' copp'rs afther us. We're a sad lot iv ould !a-ads takin' a postgrajate coorse in our cillybrated univarsity iv th' Wicked Wurruld . But, Hinnissy, 'tis a rale pleasure to see th' bright faced freshmen comin' in each year to waken th' echoes iv our grim walls with their young voices. "This here pa-aper says that this boonch iv down-throdden, pink-chaked fresh men is all r-right. Y e see, Hinnissy, they've jist won th' Saint Pathrick's Day scrap, an' it bein' as that is a gr-r-rand ca-aper at th' vin'rable colledge, an' it bein' a gloryous victhry f'r wanst over th' despicable sophymores whom th' freshmen hate with pizenous hathred, bein' as they're not in th'


laste conjaynial, ivrywan iv th' nineteen hundhred an' fiftheen men ar-re sort iv ixub'rant over it." "An' what might this scrap be all about?" asked Mr. Hennessy. "Divvle a thing cud I make out iv it," said Mr. Dooley," excipt what ye'er frind Hogan thold me about it. Th' pa-aper says they fought f'r th' supreemacy iv a tree: 'in dire conflict on th' green sward' it says, an' I thot that 'sward' was what they fought with . 'Tis prob'bly th' wan th' Irish saint himsilf killed th' snakes with, says I to mesilf-f'r he was an illigent swardsman. But Hogan says they fought with their fists, so I guess th' pa-aper's wr-rong . "Hogan tells me these freshmen have a flag they fly to th' breezes . But, mind ye, there ain't anny stars nor sthripes on it, an' divvil a harp, but they put a lot iv geeomethrical figgures on it, an' 'tis all done up in colors, et cethry. Thin wan iv thim sews it up in his shirrut all r-ready to get up this tree- th' wan they fight f'r th' supreemacy iv. Whirr 'tis up an' floatin' to th' zeph'rs tin minyits without molesthation, thin th' fight is over an' th' victhry IS won. "An' th' night befure, they have some intherestin' ca-apers, whirr they infuryate th' officers iv th' law with their manny riochous dissypations, an' keep th' whole onforchnit polis foorce agnized all night with their postin' iv pasthers all over creation. An' whirr they get tired iv this mild form iv amusement with th' paste-pots, some injanyous rascal with an illusthrees repytation f'r bein' nachrally bar'brous an' crool concocts sivral ex157


thry neefaryous schemes, jist f'r socyability's sake. An', be hivens, they acchally substichoot these new amusement schemes f'r th' ould wans, an' thry thim out immejately an' ver-ry thurly on th' prom'nent mimbers iv th' constablry. Ain't they th' little r-rascals though, Hinnissy? "Hogan says this toime they had a gr-reat expriss wagon, an' thravelled all over th' sthreets iv Hartf'rd an' stuck up their pasters on all th' finces an' sign-posts they cud find. But 'twas not all aisy wurruk . Th' emacyated baste who was propellin' th' cart-load iv three thousand pounds iv human flish, not to mintion th' paste-pot an' pasters, collapsed timp'rarily an' they had a perrylous toime out iv it. But jist as they were goin' to perform an autopsy on th' inconsid'rate baste, he came to consciousniss an' a ralization iv his jooties. "Thin later in th' avenin' an immense concoorse iv thim wint out to meet an undhergrajate who was coortin' his young la-ady, an' they tore him r-right out iv his swateheart's ar-rms an' dhragged him to their din, which was a gr-r- reat humilyation to him . An' sthill later in th' avenin' th' sophymores came pourin' down in gr-reat noomb'rs an' smothered th' pasters with fier-ry r-red paint, an' thin wint back to th' dormytories an' wint to bed. "They ain't got th' Irish blood in their veins, Hinnissy, but they ar- re sthrong on th' colledge spirit stuff. They must fight, bein' as 'tis thraditional, an' so they make it intherestin' while they're at it. They have a Sinit jist imitatin' iv Congriss, an' this Sinit promulghates a parcel iv rools- but iv coorse, bein' as they're normal, well-ordhered !a-ads, they nivver obey thim. They raise th' divvil with regular prescribed Sinit rools with th' same imperturbability that was wanst so charact'ristic iv me ould toime frind, Tiddy Rosenfelt. But Hogan tells me they were exciptionally tame this year,

s

1l


an' th' Hartf'rd cityzens har-rdly knew there had been such a gr-reat an' gloryous toime . Ye see, th' colledge docthor gin'rally has to do a little inspectin' iv heads an' limbs afther th' scrap, an' th' ambylances ar-re kept on th' r-run f'r a while. 'Tisn't dan g'rous, Hinnissy. 'Tis on'y a gloryous scrap-an' gin'rally there ar-re broken heads an' twisted necks afther a gloryous scrap . "Hogan says 'twas a muddy scrap, th' likes iv which was nivver seen before. They jist r-rolled ar-round in th' mud like a parcel iv pigs f'r twinty minyits, an' they were all minus their out'r accoutremints whin th' fight was over. "Ye see, Hinnissy, this is th' way they wint at it. Th' freshmen- th' bright-faced freshmen- woke up befure daylight, an' ate breakfast, an' thin thramped up to colledge, where th' sophymores were assimbled f'r their rayciption, a gr-reat concoo rse iv forty iv thim, in th' prisince iv a vast multichood iv bysthanders. An' th' freshmen, undaunted be th' jeers iv that plebeean crowd iv infeeryor r-rank, marched acrost th' front lawn- th' campus, they call it- in a gr-r-reat squadhron like an ar-rmy, singin' an 路a ppropriate song, an' ivrything looked propitious f'r thim. An' whin they got weary iv loitherin', they stharted r-runnin' on th' doable-quick. Well, Hinnissy, they sthruck th' sophymores who were agin th' covethed tree with an awful cr-rash that was heard f'r miles away- th' pa-aper says it was a 'sickenin' thud'. An' th' sophymores melted jist like a snowball wud melt in th' undherwurruld, an' thin wan iv th' inthrepid freshman give a tur-rible leap an' ascinded th' tree with incredoolous swiftness. An' thin th' rest iv thim scrapped desp'rately on th' ter-ra fir-rma practisin' half-Nelsons an' hamm'rlocks, an' fought like very divvils with each other, an' wallowed r-round in th' mud an' attimpted to sthrangle each other, all with th' kindest intintions in th' wurruld, while th' hero up in th' tree 11

I)9


held th' valyable little flag up to th' gintle breezes, an' th' ign'rant masses watched th' frivv'lous follies with contimchous stare. "An' so ivinchooly th' freshmen won th' tur-rble sthruggle, an' thin th' hero descinded fr'm th' tree, an' they took an invintory iv their dead disthributed ar-round. An' thin they wint to th' dormytories an' put some clothes on their bare anatomies an' thin wint in to discuss lithrachoor an ' larnin' with th' profissors. An' all th' ould torn clothin' undher th' tree was picked up an' sold to a mimber iv th' Hebrew race, later, f'r an imminse amount iv money. "Ye see, Hinni ssy, these scraps they have at th' cilly brated instithootion ar-re big affairs, an' will long be raymimb'red . Thi s mim'rable battle will go thundherin' down to immortality, an' th' hero will get his pitcher in th' pa-aper, which is more than ayether iv us can do with all our scraps. Don't ye invy thim all their gloryous fun , Hinnissy?"

r6o

1


1.

~nplJnutorr

Stmoltrr Jlay

A large number of students and Sub-Freshmen are looking at the stage. Cook rushes in, excitedly shouting, "I have an idea!" He is greeted with a shower of cigarette boxes. Goes through the door of Jarvis scenery. Immediately the sound of a heavy fall, and the scenery rocks suspiciously. He appears at a window. Jewett comes on stage. He looks thoroughly at ease, and says to Cook, "I hear the Bishop is going to leave college." The Ia tter replies, "Yes, he has his trunk on his hand." The hard-working college janitors make a resolution to see the author of dramatics after the show. But, speaking in the vernacular, he foils them. Cook takes the center of the stage, but the wrong cue, and the show halts. \iVh itehead , in leading female role, is paving the way for his later successes. C. D. \Vard has the same name, but not the same sweet, graceful actions . They immediately develop a romance, which makes the play a farce. R oberts, smoking a cigar in a certain well known way, struts in and out. The falling action of the play is rapid; so is the curtain. The whole cast manages to get a curtain call.

2.

1\n

i.~our

itt {g;ym

D octor Swan announces that the ballet class will now begin. He leads, in intricate figures, with E. T. Smith, Deppen , Cook, Case, Hudson; R osenbaum, and C. E. Craik following him. They rotate gracefully for ten minutes. Craik blows a kiss to th.e Doctor. Vail, C. D. Ward, and Whitehead take part in the next figure. They hop and kick for a time, when Ward leaves the class by request. Vail sneaks out with him. The Turkey Trot is now practised for a while with great abandon. Smith is shocked and has to leave. The class now does the back circle on the high bar and other work for ten minutes. Rosenbaum and Hudson are taken out on stretchers . A two-mile run for college record now takes place. Craik and Whitehead fall by the ways ide. A rope climb results in a hurried call for an ambulance for Deppen and Case. Cook does some tumbling stunts and gains a pound. He faints. Doctor Swan retires well satisfied.

161


3.

Jrrs.a QUub illllutiug fi.

In the Tripod room the President of the Press Club sits in massive dignity. Other members of the Club sit around in awe. Professor Gill arrives, smoking a cigar. The President introduces the speaker. Words of wisdom are heard, saying, "You must be wide awake," etc. Flanagan disgracefully falls asleep. The speaker ends by say ing, "Yo u must be energetic." Tumultuou s applause. Flanagan wakes up . The President says, "We all appreciate Professo r Gill's remarks." Business lags. Six new offices created for membe rs to hold . Business lags, and the one cigar in the room goes out. Everybody in uni so n says, "We must do somethi ng." On motion, the meeting adjourns, and all ru sh away to keep belated social engagements. 4.

1\lluirr to tl1r !Gourloru

Gentlemen, let me impress upon your minds that there is no open season for immorality. Modern dancing is not as graceful as the old-tim e steps . Your bunn yhugs and you r turkey trots-but I will not say what I was going to. If yo u want to do those things yo u had better go down to the running track. (Sawyer leaves the room. ) The love element is the greatest force in human life. If you do not think that the girl is the most beautiful creature in the world, there is something the matter, and yo u had better get someo ne else. I tell you there is a difference between the girl to whom you like to be engaged and the girl to whom you want to be married. You always want to kiss her, boys; kiss her, every time. Mr. Withington, who was Shakespeare? Oh, you fooled me that time. Well, time is up. I'm sorry I won't be able to meet you for a week. The lesson for next time is the same. 5.

1\u 1Juy i!lonrll illllrrtitt!J路

The Editor-in-Chief waits for some of the Board to come to the meeting. Finally, the Business ~tfanager appears. A quorum is now present and much weighty business is transacted. They decide to publish the book and make it a success. A literary editor comes in, is given an assignment, which he promptly forgets. The quorum decides to follow out the plan of the old book. An athletic editor calls up from the walk and says he cannot be present. He is not needed. The question of a dedication comes up. The editor and manager each get one vote. Professor Kleene and Instructor Cushman get half a vote each. One has to be economic when dealing with Woman Suffrage! The grind editor appears and pours oil on the troubled waters. The vote on the dedication is postponed until the candidates can see the literary editor. The unnecessary members now lea ve, and the important bu siness goes on. Finally the Board adjourns to "Stick's", and gets a glass of milk with a prune in it. 162

f

p h p

n s

tc p路


The scene opens with all windows shut, and the fell ows writing their weekly letters home. Suddenly a cry of " Heads Out " breaks upon them, and all the windows fl y open. A woman pushing a baby carriage goes past in silence. More silence, then another alarm. This time two beautiful young girl s go past amid loud salutations. Haithwaite recognize s old friend s and joins them. Silence again reign s, and then five go past back of the College. An exodus from the bedroo m windows follows. Then quiet for a long time, and a false alarm or two are sounded by some kids. Some chorus girls with Noble and Sage in tow go past. The fellows now all come out and go for strolls on the "rocks "-for the air. Ah, but in the spnng-

7.

ID~l' J;utfragl'ttl's

'Vhile "mere man," in the shape of a few students, lounged around the Campu s, an automobi le with some Suffragettes as pa ssengers rolls up to the College. In a militant manner they proceed to the bulletin board and put up a poster. The students look interested; indeed , they are so enthusiastic that they appropriate all the posters in the machine. The Suffragettes go to the College Office. Ala s, In structor Cu shman is not there! But Professor Kleene is delighted to see them and escorts them down the walk. With a parting "Grin" they speed away. The drawing courses can now be operated for the rest of the year, as the talented young in structor has hi s official seal- " Votes for Women. "

8.

i\ Jl'rilous i.Enroutttl'r

An innocent dog wanders into the French room and is very popular. Professor Gill attempts to coax him out, but the dog ha s a taste for learning. The Professor endeavors to eject 'W !lj but the howl of protest from the canine dismays him. The animal escapes a caress from the irate Professor. The latter is nonplussed. Barnett comes to the rescue . In spite of howl s he takes the brute by the neck, carries him triumphantly from the room and precipitates him down the sta irs. The Professor acknowledges it was a difficult position for him, but offe rs to tell any prospective teacher how to handle similar situations. The recitation proceeds tranquilly.


i.Gottrry IDirkrt.a from tqr ltubbrr t~ut of 1iqnibbum. tqr Qlqry.atnl ~tti!rr of Jibbi.aqn f4ouolulu

~ontrr

As translated by

3J zzy Jrtrofakt Jow-lilllom. 191 3 U nlimited Edition 77777 (N. B.-For the reader's convenience, the R oman numerals here have been made to correspond with those of the original P ortuguese text .)

I Wake! For the Alarm Clock scatters into flight The Slumbers each ha s 'joyed in this past ~ i ght; The Groans of man y greet the Sprin gtime Sun, Which strikes old Northam with a Shaft of Light.

II Befo re those at Breakfast were well suppli ed, Methought a Vo ice within the Chapel cried, "Whe n Harrison ha s rai sed hi s ghastly din, \Yhy nod the drowsy Worsh ippe r outside?"

III Th en to the ::vionitor, those who stood before The Chapel shouted- " Open tho u the D oor! Yo u know how little stud y time we have, And, chapel o'er, may stud y then no more."

IV Now the New T erm reviving old D es ires, The Student Soul to the Diam ond retires; T o Ass. Managersh ip hi s Thoughts now turn, And long before he meant to, he perspires .

VII Come, fill the Pail , and in these days of Spring To heated baseball players cool Water bring: T o the year's End 'tis but a little way, And when you're Nlanager, there' time to sing.

XII A Book of Logic underneath the Bough, A Pi ece of Cake, so me Wilbur's Buds- a nd Thou Beside me, Whitehead, singing so me sweet SongOh, Logic Book were comprehensib le now!


XIII Some for a charge account at Stick's; and some Sigh for the football Manager's income; Ah, take the Cash, and let the Credit goYou'll sure derive more Benefit therefrom.

XX Thi s College Fence beside the Campus green, Thi s ancient wooden Fence on which yo u leanAh, lean upon it lightly, for who knows When 'twi ll collapse and se nd yo u on yo ur Bean .

XXI Ah, Wesleyana, fill the Cup that clears To-day of past Defeat and future Fears: To-morrow- Why, To-morrow the same will be; You can't beat Trinity in Sev'n thousand Years!

XXII For some we loved, the loveliest and the best, Have spurned Admonition's strong behest, Have made a trip to 13 Seabury Hall, And one by one begun a Six Weeks' Rest.

XXIII And we that now make merry with the \Vines They left, at Harry Bond' s or at Heublein's, Ourselves must we to College sober go, Nor stop to meddle with the Street-Car Signs.

XXV Alike for those who for Football prepare, And those that 'round the Cinder Track must tear, A shrivelled Professor from the Class Room cries, "Fools! your Reward is neither There nor There!"

XXVII Myself in College often did frequent Tulin's and Stick's, and had great argument About Bills and Accounts : but evermore Came out in the same Rage wherein I went.

XXVIII With Profs the seed of 路wisdom did I sow, And with Athletics tried to make it grow; And this was all the Harvest that I reap'd"You've won you r 'T,' but flunked your Course-now go!' '


XXXI Running up Vernon through the College Gate, Across the Campus at a fearful rate, The Chapel I gained just in time to hear The Monitor's sad cry, "Too late! Too late!" XXXIII No one could answer; none knew where he'd gone; At 2 A. M. he returned forlorn; Nor spoke a Word, but all the Signs reveal'd Th' effect disastrous of a Night and Morn. XXXVII For I remember stopping by the way To watch a Fresh get paddled well one day: And with his all-obliterated Tongue The Freshman murmur'd- " Gently, Soph, I pray!" XXXVIII And has not such a Tale from days of Old Across collegiate generations roll'd Of such a Freshman, out of l?aser Earth Cast by the Sophomore into Human mould? XXXIX And not a single Water-Bag we throw From out our Windows, but may steal below To light the fire of Anger in some Eye There hidden- poor Fresh! alas! how could he know! XLIV Why, if the Soul can fling the Dust aside, Out on the Cinder Track with Heavenly stride, Were't not a Shame- were't not a Shame for him In Trinity College crippled to abide? LIII But if in vain, on yon Gymnasium floor, You run, or on the Flying Rings soar, And can't of Tumbling master every trick, Next year "Ducky" will see you once more. LIV \Vaste not your cash, to Spiegel give your suit, And when it is returned, commence dispute: Note the scattered wrinkles he has left in itOf course you do not pay-give him the Boot ! LVI For "Is" and "Is-Not" though with Rule and Line, And "Up-and-Down" by Logic I define, :..1y Tracks across the Snow will show that I \Vas deep in nothing else la st night but- Wine.

166


LXIII Oh, threats of Scudder and Sneers of U ndergrad !

(N. B.-The translator could get no meaning out of the rest of this verse. H e found something about the " Tripod" being "sad," but the sense was so utterly obscured by the confusion of incoherent profanity running through the whole thread of thought that he soon gave up hope of obtaining a lucid translation.- THE EDITOR.) LXV The History Theses of Devout and Learn'd Who passed before and oil at Midnight burn 'd, Are all much better written than our own, And so are copied, and to the Prof. returned . LXVI I sent my Soul through the Invisible, To inform the Tripod Board they couldn't spell; And by and by my Soul return'd and said, "That Tripod Room Itself is Heav ' n and Hell!" LXVII Heav'n but the Vision of Tripodal Desire, And Hell the Shadow from an Editor on fire Cast on the Pages of the Issues to come; Those who emerge now, next week will expire. LXVIII They are no other than a moving row Of Frenzied Journalists that come and go 'Round with Assignments and Proof-Sheets pre ared At Midnight in all Misery and vVoe. LXXXIII Maids of all Sorts and Sizes, great and small , That danced along the walk or hugged the wall; And so me loquacious damsels were; and some Danc'd much, perhaps, but never tark'd at all. LXXXIII Heads of all Sorts and Sizes, great and small, That leaned from windows up in Jarvi s Hall; And some loquaciou s students were; and some Flirted, perhaps, but never talk'd at all. XCIV Indeed, Repentance when a Sophomore I swore-but was I sober when I swore? And then came Spring, and baseball victories Yiy threadbare Penitence apieces tore.


XCV And much as Sleep has played the Infidel, And robb'd me of my Chapel Cuts- Ah, well, I wonder often what the I\1onitors buy One half so precious as the Sleep they sell. XCVI that Spring should vanish with the Rose! that Max should vanish with our Clothes! that Exams should vanish with our 'Noes! yet ah, yet ah again, who knows! XCV II Would but the unfolded R oll of Fate now yield One gli mpse-if dimly, yet indeed reveal'd, One glimpse of how we in the Spring shall fare, When Wesleyan we meet on track and field? Yet Yet Yet Yet

Ah, Ah, Ah, Ah,

XCVIII Would but some winged Angel ere too late Arrest the yet unfolded Exams we hate, And make the ste rn Professor otherwise Decline, or solve, or quite obliterate. XCIX Ah Love, could you and I with Prex conspire To grasp this sorry Scheme of Marks entire, Would not we shatter it to bits-and then Remould it so that we could all get our degrees without doing any studying? (N. B .- The translator 1路ealizes that the last sentence above is a detriment to the verse in respect to rhyme and meter, but he was unable to resurrect an "ire" that would convey the exact meaning.- EDITOR.)

r68


~rinitp

Cltollege

' artforb, <aonnrcttcut ,1,/o/:.iiiiiiiiiiiiiii;;- RINITY COLLEGE, und er the name of W ashington College, received its Charter in 1823. The present name was adopted in 1845. I ts chief found er was the Right R ev. Thomas Church Brownell, Bishop of Connecticut. Established by Episcopalians as a cont ribution to high er edu cation , it is not a Church in t it ution in t he sense of being directed by th e Church. Its advantages are placed at th e se r vice of t hose of every creed . The principal building, in t he English Secul ar Gothic style, 653 feet long, in cluding J arvi s and Seabury Halls and Northam Towers, is one of t he most imposing and admirably fitted educational edifices in t he ni ted States. It was in tended to form th e west ~ id e of a great quadr angl e. Outside of t he lines of this quad rangle at t he south are t he Observato ry, t he Boardman H a ll of Natural History, a nd t he J a rvis Laboratories for Chemistry and for Physics. T o t he north of it are t he Gymnasium , houses of t he President and of t he Professors, a nd Chapter Houses of t he Fraternities. Below t he College Campus to t he east and within t hree minu tes' walk is t he spacious Athletic Field. In beau ty of sit uation , healthfu l condi t ions of life, and equipment for its sp ecial work, the College is not surpas ed . The Faculty includes sixteen profes. or , four instru ctors, t he librarian a nd the medical director. Among t he E lective studies wi thin t he respective courses there is no impor tant subj ect for whi ch adeq uate provi ion is not made. The Library contains 60,000 volum es. Generous contributions of t he Alumni are making possible a rapid addi t ion to its resources. A R eference R eading Room is open every day a nd fiv e evenings of t he week. The J arvi Chemi cal and Physical Laboratori!'s ha ve an excellent equipment for Elemen tary and Advan ced work . The Hall of Jatural Histo ry co ntains t he Museum, Biological Laboratories, and t he P sychological Laboratory. In t he year 1903- 1904 a full techni cal course in C ivil Engineering was for t he first time made available for all qualified applicants. There are numerous schol ar hips providing pecuni ary assistance for deserv ing stud ents. The t hree H olland scholarships, yielding each $600 prr annum , are awarded to t he three best students in the t hree lower classes, respectively . The Russell Grad uate Fellowship of 500 i award ed biennially in the in terest of high er graduate study. The M ar y A. T erry G radu ate Fellowship of 550 is award ed annually. Prizes to t he a moun t of , 500 are a lso award ed to und ergrad uates for succe in t he work of t he various departments. Two examinations for ad mis ion are held at t he College each year, the first during t he days fo llowing the Annual Com mence ment, and the second in September, immediately befor e t he beginning of the Christmas term. For CataloguPs, Exami-nation Papers, or infor mation , apply to the P resident or to t he ecref:lry of the Faculty.

12


WILLIAMS Earl spends many weary hours in 38 Jarvis Hall, sharing the gloom of the Business Manager of this publication. His extra moments are spent either in deep revery or in story-telling. He can do the latter to perfection when he is in good spirits. E. L. WARD Right this way, ladies and gentlemen! In this cage we have the only original antediluvian aggravation ever exhibited before the public; it buds like a rose, develops like a film, and is the only living example of the Darwinian theory in existence. Not too near the cage, please! C. D. WARD Don't blame us for navigating such a craft on the social wave. Dartmouth cast all the responsibility on us; although "Chet" really came down to keep his brother under proper restraint. Chet is no mean gymnast, but he doesn't waste his good looks on a cold, unresponsive Gym. CASE "Hello! Is Kenneth there? you, Kenneth? How are you, yourself, won't you, Kenneth? Kenneth keeps pretty well. lation ( TTipod joke!).

Yes, if you please- Hello! Is that dear ?-That's good. Take care of Good-bye, dear." He takes long walks to get up circu-

12

171


Buy

And

at

You

This

Get

Big

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" Hartford's Shopping Center" Where everything in all desirable Merchandise can be found, where every want can be filled, every need supplied. fleadquarters for Everything

BROWN, THOMSON & CO. 172


WITHI GTO "Who is that intellectual looking chap on the side-lines, wearing a striped jersey and a worried look?" "Why, surely you do not mean Withington? Well, I would not call him intellectual, exactly. He is taking the hardest courses in college, you see, and to be really intellectual one must be a good society man, too." MOORE Our "Senator" is a very serious gent. They say he used to smile before he came to college. ] ust go the rounds of the college football teams and find out how many players would care to line up against him a second time . The sand makes up for the lack of fat, John. NOBLE "Buster" came to college to become prominent. In a way he succeeded; but his good looks hampered his greatest efforts along this line. His favorite pastime is running for office, but, unfortunately, he wasn't built for a track man . THOMAS "Laugh and we'll all laugh with you," Bob. Once upon a time there was a policeman in Meriden and he didn't like Bob's laugh, so he tried to stop it. But he missed Bob's laugh and hit his noseand so Bob is now President of the Maryland Club. Cops, beware!

Henry Kohn

~

Son

Geo. 0. Simons S uccessor to

Simons &. Fox 240 Asylum St.

Connecticut's Greatest jewelry Establishment

All kinds of Silk, Bunting and Felt

890 Main St. Hartford Factory, Newark, H. J.

F lags. Favors for Germans and Cotillions. 173

Official decorator for the Prom.


Insurance Company of North America '-----

--PHILADELPHIA, P A . - - - ---'

<:AMERICA'S OLDEST COMPANY F O UNDED 1792

Total Assets, January

$I6,9S3,774路00

I , 19 12

T otal Liabilities, January

8,649,873.00

I , I 9 I2

Surplus over all Liabilities, January

I, 1 912

$ 8,303,901.00

EUGE E L. ELLISO , President BENJAMIN R USH, First Vice-President JOHN 0. PLATT, Second Vice-President T. HOWARD WRIGHT, Secretary HENRY ''~" 路 FAR UM, Asst. Secretary

New England Department

Hartford, Conn.

Charle.s E. 'Parker ((f! Co. MA/VAGE"RS

SO State Street

First National BanK Building

Hartford, Conn.


FIDELITY TRUST CO. 49 PEARL STREET Bankers, JoH

Trustees,

Guardian

DIRECTORS: E. GRoss

l\1. HoLCOMBE

CHARLES

CHAS. G. WooDWARD

FRANKL. WILcox

WILLIAM

R ICHARD

c.

SKINNER

CHARLES

L.

l\1. BISSELL

or

Agent

WILLIAM B . CLARK

p. COOLEY D . H owELL

CHAS. GEo.

F. R om soN

BAR ETT Just see what a happ y countenance is catalogued under this name! " J oe" is a wonder! Just think of running off with the Chess Championship one m inu te and with the append icitis the next-and t hen emerging still und aunted. Ask J oe about the lantern and matches they used to hang out for him some five years ago . WARNER Our general, all-around mental telepathist and reservoir of wit and humor. He'd rather walk on car tracks than eat ice cream. Asid e from a little good-natured egotism about his baseball ability, "Harry" is a good scout. CRIGHTON This lanky chap is a very prominent and familiar figure on the Campus- he is seen as often as twice a month . He is the very same brave hero who offered to throw the conductor out and ring up fares himself after the Freshman-Junior Banquet at Holyoke had made him rather frisky and spirited. R. M. SMITH Beware of this walking phonograph, this traveling encyclopedia, this human interrogation point! Come within a radius of sixty ya rds, and he will talk you deaf, dumb, and blind.

A3TNA NATIONAL BANK NEXT DOOR TO HARTFORD PUBLIC LIBRARY AND MORGAN MEMORIAL

CHECKING ACCOUNTS INVITED TRAVELERS' CHEQUES MODERN SAFE DEPOSIT FACILITIES I75


SA a

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SAWYER See, children, here is a man. He is a good man, so he is called a "missionary man." This man has eyes, two noses and a pair of mouths . But he is not a regular man; he is a hero. He was won at a church fair. You may pat the good, missionary, irregular heroman, children, . but don't ruffie his hair. VAIL . Don't look for the photo. It was partly the photographer's fault. Vail is absolutely harmless. He has slowly gained the reputation of being a Shakespearean wit. That is partly his fault, also. A perfect lady ( ?) L'HEUREUX His hair is red and his name is pronounced with startling variations; the best combinations of euphoniousness being reached by baseball umpires. "Red" is the best Catcher Trinity has had in a month of Sundays, and he'll make a good Captain. The only fault we can find with him is his very great appreciation of Warner's humor. JEWETT "It's too hot!" "No, it's too cold!" "Say, 'Bones', shove on some more coal!" Never mind, "Bones", when we all depart this life, you'll have had your experience with fiery furnaces, and weHow Norwich Town ever survived the pranks of this youth is a dead mystery.

WM. H. POST CARPET CO.

Trinity College Barber Shop Manicuring by Lady Attendant

Decorators

J. G . MARCH, Hair Cutter

Carpets

Vibration Shampooing and Massaging, Electrical Facial Massage

Rugs Wall Paper and Upholstery

Room s 1 and 2 Connec ticut Mutual Bld ll . Phone Connection.

Entrances

219 Asylum Street HARTFORD, CONN,

\

177

7 8 3 Main St.

3& Pearl St.


"The L eading Fire Insurance Company of America" CONDITIO~

STATE:\1EXT OF THE

OF THE

tETNA INSURANCE COMPANY HARTFORD, CONN. On the 31st day of December, 1911

$5,000,000.00

Cash Capital, Reserve, Re-Insurance (Fire), Reserve, Re-Insurance (Marine), Reserve, Unpaid Losses (Fire), Reserve, Unpaid Losses (Marine), Other Claims,

Net Surplus, Total Assets, Surplus for Policy Holders,

7,506,351.40 430,03~ . 63

549,38~ .9 8

64,490.00 63~,937 .96

7,834,194.74 $22,017,389.71 $12,834,194.74

LOSSES PAID IN NINETY-THREE YEARS :

$128,003,578.89 WILLIAM B. CLARK, President

HENRY E. REES, Secretary Assistant Secretaries

A. N. WILLIAMS

E. J. SLOAN GUY E. BEARDSLEY

E. S. ALLEN

W. F. WHITTELSEY, Jr., Marine Secretary

f

WESTERN BRANCH, 29 So. La Salle St., Chicago, Ill. PACIFIC3~B~~~!:nia St., San Francisco, Cal. MARINE DEPARTMENT,

.

.

.

.

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THOMAS E. GALLAGHER, General Agent 1 L. 0. KOHTZ, Assistant General Agent l L. 0. KOHTZ, Marine General Agent E. C. MORRISON, General Agent { A. G. SANDERSON, Assistant General Agent CHICAGO, ILL., 29 So. La Salle St. NEW YORK, 63-65 Beaver St. ) BOSTON, 70 Kilby St. ( PHILADELPHIA, 226 Walnut St.

I

Agents in all the Principal Cities, Towns, and Villages of the United States and Canada 178


CHOW Chambers Chow, Chape l child, chaste from China. Hankownever produced better brains nor a happier disposition. Who brought him over? See Lew.

The Capitol City Lumber Company

LEW Munsey Lew, Chemistry shark, chaste from China. Shanghai never produced better brains nor a happier disposition . Who brought him over? See Chow. McGEE Marcus is a youth sober in more than one sense- be it said to his credit. He helps to maintain the dignity and the finances of the college bookstore, and is thus enabled to maintain his own .

115 Front Street

HARTFORD, CONN.

DEPPEN The big man with the high voice. He put in his thumb and he pulled out two plumsbaseball managership and popularity. "Dick" is a philosopher and an ora tor. Who could deny that, after hearing his speech on "Trinity Girls," at Marble Hall?

The Andrus & Naedle Co.

SWIFT "Sam" has never exhibited any traces of the velocity implied in his cognomen, even on the cinder track . He has run other things beside races, including musical clubs and girls, but never very fast. Easy-going, pleasure-loving, optimistic Sam!

ATHLETIC GOODS

Headquarters for

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HARTFORD, CONN.

179


J. P. MORGAN & CO. DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN BANKERS Wall Street, Corner of Broad

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Deposits received subject to Draft Securities bought and sold on Commission Interest allowed on Deposits Foreign Exchange, Commercial Credits Cable Transfers Circular Letters for Travelers, available in all parts of the world

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-

This Edition of The Trinity Ivy \Vas printed by us

Hausauer-Janes Printing Co. - - - - - - P R O DUCERS O F - - - - - -

il

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COOK "Crimus! How I love my Gym! Listen- I 'm a luminous literary light, with a lugubrious learned look and a lively love for loqu acity. I tip the scales at -hush, at Gym." The only thing in life Allan regrets is his inability to grow stout. D AWLEY _ Ask "Boone" about his glorious soap-bubble dreams in the brewery . We t hought we had lost this optimist for a while, but books finally got the call over bottles, and we consider 19 13 fortunate. MARSD E Behold our hard-worked "Editor-in-Cheese"! Is he good natured? He must be to hold that job! "Stew" may be seen any sp ring day trudging over the cinder path, with the weight of a dozen hurdles on his shoulders . And that's not the only weight on his shoulders-ever since they addressed that letter, "Trinity College, care of W. S. Marsden," he has been trying to find a well-fitting hat. BROW "Tom Brown at Trinity" would be a punni ng conceit. Prof. Brenton said that puns are not good form these days, 路but that there might be some one with the sense of humor who could rival Shakespeare. Tom looks fine when he is disguised . Do you remember his detective work last March?

Our Trinity of Attractions 1- Style 2 - Assortments 3- Value

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IT PAYS TO BUY OUR KIND

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MANTERNACH

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Illustrators and Engravers =========HARTFORD, CONN.=========


COLLETT "Baldy," otherwise known as "Fat," was elected to next year's football captaincy because he looked ferocious enough to do anything or anybody last fall, when he lost one of his prominent incisors. With his beauty marred he wouldn't smile even for the girls. We don't need to tell you that "Charlie" is popular- he is also a scholar of note. ADKI S We wouldn't have it noised about for the world , but the night before the "Eccy" exam- oh, but why bother with spilt milk? vVe all know "Len" is a very fine student, and a good friend to have. WHITEHEAD R ead, mark, learn! This subject is worth it. It is no other than the "Pinker Lady" who confronts you. Handsome, talented, charming. Can you blame the ladies for their ill-concealed admiration? If they could only hear "Jack" singing as often as we do- but, why say more- indeed, space forbids. BARBER He's a quiet chap, a little shaver. He minds his own business, and between times gets in a little stud ying on the sly. Holland scholars never did loaf very much, somehow.

R. S. Gladwin, Prop.

Telephone Charter 151

THE

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'7(

Hartford's

Quality FLOWER SHOP Choice Cut Flowers

POPULAR Barber Shop l(ELLJ) & LEAVITT

726 Main St. Wedding and Funeral Work a Specialty

722 Main St.

Hartford, Conn.

Special attention to Trinity Students


f>limpton MfB路 Co. 252-256 "Pearl Street. Hartford. Conn.

Stationery 'Printing Engra-uing Embo.s.sing Sample.s of Enara'()ina for all Social Occa.sion.s .sent anywhere on reque.st

P. II. BILLINGS MERCHANT TAILOR

9 Asy lum Street

Nartlord, Conn.

POPULAR PRICES

186 13


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Base Ball, Law n Tennis, Golf, Basket Ball, Track and Field Sports Shou ld insist upon those bearinll' the WRIGHT & DITSON Trade Mark Catalogue Free

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New York San Francisco Cambrid ge


DUNNE Official Photographer for the 1913 Ivy. . . .

PUI

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PULFORD "Skig" has gained notoriety through other mediums than his euphonious name. He plunged into prominence Freshman year by surreptitiously walking away with the Tennis Championship, to his brother's discomfiture. Since then, his work in Biology has cast his features into a more serious mold. He has got a head on his shoulders that is a head. FAIRBANKS The boy with the sunny disposition! Paraphrased, this is an indication of "the smile that won't come off." But it isn't a smile that aggravates, so no one would want to see it disappear. E. T. SMITH Rather effeminate pulchritude, don't you think? To look at the photo you'd hardly believe he was bibulously inclined-but it's a very gradual incline. He's a leader in Gym and in studi~s, and expects to dangle a <I> B K key with the same ease with which he dangles on the high bars. SMEATHERS A species having two characteristics not common to the regular college-bred species: a studious look and an aggressive way of smoking cigars. Recently unearthed records give authentic proof that "haud paratus" was the motto of this species.

Elastic Hose Knee Caps, Anklets, and路 Abdominal .. Belts for the路 support of Varicose Veins, Swelled Limbs, Weak J oints, Sprains, Etc.

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Calhoun Show Printers Big Type Printers

Calhoun Press Commercial Printers

UP-TO- DATE PRINTERS A t R easonable Prices

DIGNAM & WALSH Telephone

356 Asylum Street Charter 5121 HARTFORD 1 CONN.


******************************

** * ~ *~

Mill Work

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* :

ROBERT PORTEUS and General •

Hartford, eonn.

*** ~ *: :

*

** ** :

******************************* * FOR MANY YEARS OUR

COAL has given life and comfort to the halls of old Trinity and its splendid Fraternity Houses-

WE HANDLE THE FINEST GRADES OF COAL PRODUCED

GEO. W. NEWTON & SON OFFICE: 15 PEARL STREET

Richard Birch & Co.

Plumbing and Heating

G• 21 Church Street Telephon e connection


•' P0 Il S

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104 Asylum Street, Hartford, Conn.

~!~~!~~!9!~


The Berkeley Divinity School c:/WIDDLETOWNJ CONN. OU. DED in 1854, in continuation of a Theological department at Trinity College by- Bishop J ohn Williams. It offers to stud ents of Theology full instruction in the stud ies required of Candida tes for Orders, with various courses of Lectures and advanced work in the several departments. The degree of Bachelor of Divinity is conferred on an:- graduate who atta ins a high standard in examinations, shows a schola rl y acquaintance with Greek and Latin, a nd presents a satisfactory thesis .

F

The fifty-eighth Ordination will be held on the 5th of June , and the fifty-ninth year wi ll open on the 7th of Sept., 1912. Canaiaaies for a.amission should make application for rooms and (if necessary ) for scholarships, early. Aaaress all communications to the Dtan.

Compliments of

The Place to Take Your Pictures

The}. H. Grozier Co. Sa11nu <11nutrartnr11

(lle

Picture Frame Shop 71 ASYLUM STREET Room 1- Up One Flight Frames of all kinds made to order The Best Work

s PRICES RIGHT

125 Warrenton cA<venue HARTFORD, CONNECTICUT

C. E. JACQUITH

T Proprietor


HAITHWAITE "Yes, this is Mr. Haithwaite * * Who? * * Oh, is that you, Gertrude? * * Yes * * vVhy, what time shall I get there? * * No, make it earlier than that * * Oh, yes, please do! * * Why, you know I haven't seen you for nearly a whole day * * ow you're trying to show me a good time * * Bring another fellow? * * Is your friend pretty? * * Surely I'll bring- * * What, you don't like him? * * Well,- * * All right, I 'll see you at half past seven * * Goodbye. BENTLEY Our language shark. He has been in French for three yearseven after Prof. Gill made t hat remark, "Can I get something from nothing? Can I get an idea out of my head?" But R aymond was undismayed. He wears a haircut that is unique, almost a queue. It is hard at present to tell whether his genius is musical or literary . HATHAWAY A new arrival, direct from D artmouth, via Williams . An athlete of limitless ability, now shining on the diamond. Can be seen any day between four and six on this stage. The audience will kindly applaud . For further record see page 2 00 of this volume, or any other copy of the book. Cheer up, Walter, we hope for the best.

GOOD PRINTING AT

COMPLIME/'IITS 01"

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WltERE GOOD STYLES ltv MEN'S OUTFITTIIVGS ABOUND

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MONOTYPE COMPOSITION FOR THE TRADE

ASYLUM, AT TRUMBULL ST.

284 Asylum Street

ltARTFORD, COIVIV.

HARTFORD, CONN.

193


&D~~DD~~~D~~D~~&aaB&~~-~~~~-

Im

C. G. Bostwick

111

Im mJ I

Successor to Beseman and Bostwick

gj

MANUFACTURER OF

D

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m

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ROOFING

I I I

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COPPER

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950 Broad St.

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R. Cl


MORAN Hartford's representative for Kuppenheimer' s Young Men's Clothes

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Carry your money safely by using American Express Com p a n y ' s Travelers' Cheques or Letters of C r e d it. You can cash them anywhere.

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RALPH W. CUTLER. President CHAS. M. JOSLYN, Voce-President

195


~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ ~ ~ ~ Plain Painting Paper Hanging ~ ~ ~

I

= = = ~

~ ~

~

c. H. PIETSCH 速.

SON

Fresco Painters METAL AND CANVAS CEILINGS Shop, 1146-1154 Main Street Telephone

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Interior and Exterior Painting of All Kinds

Office, 1148 Main Street

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HARTFORD, CONN.

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HERBERT RANDALL

HARRY G. BLACKMORE

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RANDALL

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BLACKMORE

HIGH-CLASS PORTRAITURE

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11 Pratt Street

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Hartford, Connecticut ~

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Official Photographers to the 1912 Ivy

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Delamater, Akers, Bundy-Newell, Stuart, Lucas and Lloyd Negatives owned by this Studio. We make a specialty of copying Daguerreotypes and Paintings

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PLEASE MAKE APPOINTMENTS

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TELEPHONE

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Patronize Our Advertisers

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i!jarrnsn

MAX

LATER DEALER. IN

New and Second-Hand Clothing 35 FRONT STREET, HARTFOR.D,

CONN~

Paying highest cash prices for whatever cast-off clothing you may have to dispose of. Drop me a postal g iving you r add ress and I will call on you

197


C&l.rr (!Hub 1!tr4.rarsal Whitehead stands by the piano in graceful pose. He calls the roll with much solemnity. Evison is also present. " Jack" proposes to start the rehearsal. "Evy" takes exception. They finally agree to start. Jack tries to hit "G," but gets "A" flat. Evy again takes exception; so does t he rest of the Club, anywhe re from "D" to "C." They sing ensemble "Cuba nola Glide" and "Good Morning, Carrie"; Jack calls it good harmony . Evy takes exception. They then hum three of Beethoven's Sonatas. A telephone call from Short, asking permission to join the Club, breaks in on the dulcet melody. Jack is in favor of it; but Evy, thank goodness, takes exception. The plans for a concert at the Manhattan Opera House are discussed. Jack pro and Evy con. They finally decline, gracefully, but Evy has to take exception again, so Jack takes the honor. Jack now proudly announces that he is official barker for the "Misfit Clothing Co." Evy takes exception and the rehearsal breaks up.

:o;.rarll tn t4.r (!J.lass 1Rnnm PROFESSOR KLEE:\'E (calling roll)-Ward! WARD-Here! PROFESSOR K.- Wessels! W ESSELs- Hello! PROFESSOR GETTELL- Primitive men were governed in all their actions by custom . ow, men, why wou ld they, for instance, not ride bicycles on the sidewalk? BLEECKER-Because they didn't have bicycles! PROFESSOR GETTELL- The Portuguese in sailing along the coast of Africa found a place where the vegetation was green and the climate cool. What did they call it? BARNETT-Chili! PROFESSOR BRENTON- On the Eve of Saint Agnes how did the young knight get past the old serving-woman into his lady's bower? MARSDEN (in blissful ignorance of the lesson)-Slipped her some money! PROFESSOR BARRET-Newton, will you go on with the next selection? EWTON- Unprepared, sir!


Date Due AU, ~~-

Tf\

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r I.- TAKI=N

p;Qt~r.i =:

IRR.A-RV

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I ,.LIMO t:QUirWt:"T

au•:-.u Cat. No. 1090A

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Trillity Ivy

NOT TO BE TAKEN FROM LIBRARY


1913_complete  
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