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SAT U R D AY, A P R I L 16, 2011

PROGRAM Teachers College, Columbia University 525 West 120th Street New York, NY 10025 www.tc.edu


Welcome to the third annual Academic Festival at Teachers College, Columbia University, a celebration of the remarkable work by our TC community to improve education and promote a healthier, more prosperous and vibrant society. Our theme this year is “Learn to Live Well: Bringing Education to the Table.” We will kick off the day with newly appointed Chancellor to the New York City Public Schools, Dennis Walcott, who will deliver the Kossoff Lecture on Education & Policy. The day will also feature a keynote address by Dr. Ian K. Smith ’93, national expert on health and nutrition and this year’s recipient of the President’s Medal of Excellence. We have assembled an exciting line up of speakers and panel discussions that showcase an incredible group of TC faculty, alumni and students who are shaping how we think about education and health across the world. Throughout the day we will also honor exemplary alumni for the leadership they have exhibited since graduating from Teachers College. We will award Janna Spark ’79, Associate Fellow of the British Psychological Society, with the President’s Award of High Distinction. During our Distinguished Alumni Award Luncheon, the Alumni Council will recognize Samuel Peabody ’59, educator and philanthropist; Violeta Petroska-Beshka ’83, Professor of Psychology at Ss. Cyril and Methodius University in Skopje; Diane Ravitch ’75, historian and former U.S. Assistant Secretary of Education; Ruth Christ Sullivan ’53, the first autism lobbyist in the U.S. Congress; and Samuel Totten ’82, Professor of Curriculum and Instruction at the University of Arkansas. Rising star and education attorney, Paul O’Neill ’01, will receive the Early Career Award. Academic Festival promises to be a full day of celebration and intellectual stimulation. It is a pleasure to have you back on this special occasion. Susan Fuhrman ’77 President of Teachers College, Columbia University


TABLE OF CONTENTS Academic Festival Program........................................................................4 Opening Ceremony Program......................................................................7 Distinguished Alumni Award Luncheon Program.......................................9 Distinguished Alumni Biographies.............................................................11 Keynote Address & Awards Ceremony Program......................................16 President’s Awards Recipient Biographies................................................17 Concurrent Session Descriptions..............................................................20 Speaker Biographies.................................................................................24 Notes.........................................................................................................33


S AT U R D AY, A P R I L 1 6 , 2 0 11

PROGRAM 8:30 – 9:30 a.m.

Academic Festival Registration & Check-in Joyce Berger Cowin Conference Center

8:30 – 9:30 a.m.

Continental Breakfast, Everett Lounge

9:30 – 11:00 a.m.

Academic Festival Opening Ceremony Joyce Berger Cowin Conference Center The Kossoff Lecture on Education & Policy: Dennis M. Walcott Chancellor, New York City Public Schools

11:00 – 11:15 a.m. Morning Break, Session Rooms 11:15 – 12:15 p.m. Concurrent Sessions I HBO’s MASTERCLASS: Designing Educational Activities in Support of Creativity, Imagination, and Mastery Milbank Chapel Facilitator: Margaret Crocco, Professor and Social Studies Chair of Department of Arts and Humanities Hal Abeles, Professor of Music Education Gary Natriello, Ruth L. Gottesman Professor of Educational Research

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Urban Health Partnerships: Essential Ingredients for Building a Healthy Community Grace Dodge Hall 281 Moderator: Pam Koch ’98, TC Adjunct Faculty and Executive Director, Center for Food & Environment Kristen Mancinelli ’08, City Harvest Laurie M. Tisch, TC Trustee Sharon Wong, Community Development Manager, NYC Food and Fitness Partnership Dr. Ruth’s Guide to Sexual Health Grace Dodge Hall 285 Dr. Ruth Westheimer ’70, renowned sex therapist The Suffering Doesn’t End Once the Killing Has Stopped: The Plight of Those Who Survived the 1994 Rwandan Genocide Grace Dodge Hall 277 Sam Totten ’85, Professor, University of Arkansas and coauthor of We Cannot Forget: Interviews with Survivors of the 1994 Genocide Combating Microaggressions and Bullying Horace Mann 138 Laura Smith, Assistant Professor of Psychology and Education David Rivera, TC Doctoral Candidate ’11 Nicole Watkins, TC Doctoral Candidate ’11 12:15 – 2:15 p.m. Distinguished Alumni Awards Luncheon Grace Dodge Dining Hall 2:30 – 3:45 p.m.

Keynote Address & Awards Ceremony Program Joyce Berger Cowin Conference Center

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Keynote Address: “Food for Thought” Dr. Ian Smith ’93 3:45 – 4:00 p.m.

Afternoon Break, Session Rooms

4:00 – 5:00 p.m.

Concurrent Sessions II Social Media: Tools for Learning – Really! Horace Mann 152 Nabeel Ahmad ’09, Adjunct Assistant Professor and Mobile Learning Thought Leader, IBM Learning Building Blocks for Healthy Eating Habits: From the Garden to the Table Earth Friends Center, Horace Mann 50 Pam Koch ’98, TC Adjunct Faculty and Executive Director of the Center for Food & Environment Christiane Baker, Director, Edible Schoolyard NYC The Art of Aging Starts Early Horace Mann 138 Judy Burton, Professor of Art Education Joan Jeffri, Director, Research Center for Arts and Culture WeBop! Horace Mann 519 Patrice Turner ’06, Jazz at Lincoln Center in collaboration with Teachers College

5:00 – 6:00 p.m.

Closing Reception Zankel Building – Main Hall Music provided by TC Chamber Music Program

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OPENING CEREMONY Joyce Berger Cowin Conference Center 9:30 a.m. Welcome and Introduction Susan Fuhrman ’77, President, Teachers College Video: “Weighing In on Wellness” A conversation about TC’s nearly 125-year-long history influencing wellness through education with stars from the past, present and future Annual Phyllis L. Kossoff Lecture on Education & Policy Dennis M. Walcott Chancellor of the New York City Public Schools Question and Answer Session: President Susan Fuhrman Dennis M. Walcott Closing Remarks

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PHYLLIS L. KOSOFF LECTURE ON EDUCATION & POLICY Dennis M. Walcott is the newly appointed Chancellor of the New York City Public schools. He was formerly the Deputy Mayor for Education and Community Development under Mayor Michael Bloomberg. Prior, Walcott served as President and Chief Executive Officer of the New York City Urban League, as a member of the New York City Board of Education, as the Executive Director of the Harlem Dowling Westside Center, as a kindergarten teacher, and as an adjunct professor of social work at CUNY’s York College. Since 2002, as deputy mayor, Walcott has been part of key educational policy decisions: helping to champion mayoral control; ending social promotion; developing the capital program; overseeing the opening of 474 new schools; and supporting the establishment of 109 charter schools. Walcott is a graduate of the New York City public schools and the University of Bridgeport, Connecticut, where he earned a B.A. and master’s in education. He earned a master’s degree in social work from Fordham University. Walcott and his wife Denise have four children and two grandsons. About the Phyllis L. Kosoff Lecture on Education & Policy Teachers College has a rich tradition in shaping policy through research and practice and dialogue. In addition to TC’s distinguished faculty, the College is also proud to acknowledge Phyllis L. Kossoff ’48, a distinguished alumna, scholarship supporter and member of the President’s Advisory Council, for helping to make TC the nation’s premier address for debate on education policy. Through her generosity in establishing the Phyllis L. Kossoff Lecture, the College has hosted key figures such as U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan; Merryl Tisch, Chancellor of the New York State Board of Regents; and David Steiner, New York State Commissioner of Education. Teachers College is most grateful to Phyllis Kossoff for creating this forum for educational leaders to share their vision as well as advancing the College’s role and reputation in the policy field. 8


DISTINGUISHED ALUMNI AWARD LUNCHEON Grace Dodge Dining Hall 12:15 – 2:15 p.m. Welcome Robert Weintraub ’98, President, Teachers College Alumni Council Introductory Remarks Susan Fuhrman ’77, President, Teachers College Distinguished Alumni Awards Presentation Samuel Peabody ’59 Educator, Philanthropist Citation read by Craig Richards, Professor of Education Violeta Petroska-Beshka ’83 Professor of Psychology, Ss. Cyril and Methodius University in Skopje Citation read by Laura Smith, Assistant Professor of Psychology and Education Diane Ravitch ’75 Historian and former U.S. Assistant Secretary of Education Citation read by Jeff Henig, Professor of Political Science and Education Accepted on her behalf by her son, Michael Ravitch 9


Ruth Christ Sullivan ’53 Founder and Executive Director, Autism Services Center, Huntington, WV Citation read by Dr. Kathleen O’Connell, Isabel Maitland Stewart Professor of Nursing Education Samuel Totten ’85 Professor of Curriculum and Instruction, University of Arkansas Citation read by Margaret Crocco, Chair, Arts & Humanities Department Early Career Award Presentation Paul O’Neill ’01 Education Attorney Citation read by Thomas James, Dean and Provost Closing Remarks Robert Weintraub ’98

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2011 DISTINGUISHED ALUMNI AWARD RECIPIENTS Samuel P. Peabody ’59 received his M.Ed. from Teachers College in 1959. He spent the early part of his career as a teacher in New York City and eventually became the lower school head at Rye Country Day. He later founded Reality House, a drug rehabilitation center in northern Manhattan. After he left Reality House, he became the director of Broad Jump, a nonprofit which hired teachers at sites around the city to work on weekends and during the summer with students at risk for dropping out of high school. While there, he helped found Prep for Prep, a program that places promising students of color in independent schools throughout the Northeast and helps support them through to college. Eventually, he used his talents to become chair of the Citizen’s Committee for Children, which advocates for children’s and family issues and amasses research to help legislators in Albany at budget time to restore funds to key social

Violeta Petroska-Beshka ’83 is a professor of psychology at the Ss. Cyril and Methodius University in Skopje, Republic of Macedonia. She is a co-founder and co-director of the Center for Human Rights and Conflict Resolution, a training and research center dedicated to promoting human rights and advancing diversity education and conflict resolution in multicultural settings. She works closely with UNICEF and USAID funded organizations as a leading player in efforts to reform the education system throughout the country. Petroska-Beshka has written curricula development guides for working with students in ethnically integrated classes and trained teachers in areas such as life skills, conflict resolution, peace and multicultural education, and school based assessment. Her research includes topics on interactions, stereotypes, and identity of the ethnic communities in the Republic of Macedonia. Petroska-Beshka served as a senior fellow at the Jennings Randolph Program for International Peace, US Institute of Peace, Washington, DC (2000-2001), working on a project on Education 11


for Interculturalism: Learning to Live in a Multicultural Society. She is a member of the Women Waging Peace Network of the Institute for Inclusive Security, Cambridge, MA. A former Fulbright fellow, she holds an M.A. from Teachers College, Columbia University (1983) and a Ph.D. in psychology from the University of Belgrade (1989). She received additional training in collaborative negotiation and mediation from the TC’s International Center for Cooperation and Conflict Resolution.

Diane Ravitch ’75 is Research Professor of Education at New York University and a historian of education. In addition, she is a nonresident senior fellow at the Brookings Institution in Washington, D.C. She shares a blog called Bridging Differences with Deborah Meier, hosted by Education Week. She also blogs for Politico.com/arena and the Huffington Post. Her articles have appeared in many newspapers and magazines. From 1991 to 1993, she was Assistant Secretary of Education and Counselor to Secretary of Education Lamar Alexander in the administration of President George H.W. Bush. Responsible for the Office of Educational Research and Improvement in the U.S. Department of Education, Ravitch led the federal effort to promote the creation of voluntary state and national academic standards. From 1997 to 2004, she was a member of the National Assessment Governing Board, which oversees the National Assessment of Educational Progress, the federal testing program. She was appointed by the Clinton administration’s Secretary of Education Richard Riley in 1997 and reappointed by him in 2001. From 1995 until 2005, she held the Brown Chair in Education Studies at the Brookings Institution and edited Brookings Papers on Education Policy. Before entering government service, she was Adjunct Professor of History and Education at Teachers College. She is the author of 10 books. In addition, she has edited 14 books, including The American Reader (1991); The English Reader (with Michael 12


Ravitch) [2006]; The Democracy Reader (with Abigail Thernstrom) [1992]; Forgotten Heroes of American Education (with Wesley Null) [2007]; Learning from the Past (with Maris Vinovskis) [1995]; and New Schools for a New Century (with Joseph Viteritti) [1997]. She has written more than 500 articles and reviews for scholarly and popular publications.

Ruth Christ Sullivan ’53, Ph.D. is the founder of Autism Services Center (ASC), one of the few agencies in the United States offering comprehensive, autism-specific, lifespan (including residential) services in a community-integrated setting. Though retired in 2007, she continues to serve as President of the ASC Board of Directors. A professional in the field of autism for 50 years, she was the first elected president of the Autism Society of America (ASA) and now serves on their Panel of Professional Advisors and Honorary Board. She has lectured throughout the United States and around the globe. She has authored books, book chapters, forewords, articles, and for years wrote a column for the Journal of Autism and Developmental Disabilities. She was a consultant for the movie, “Rain Man,” and her son, Joseph, was one of the two major autistic models for the character of Raymond. Its first public showing was in Huntington, WV as a benefit for ASC. Dustin Hoffman, Barry Levinson, their wives and members of the staff were present for the gala. She has produced and/or been involved in several award-winning documentaries on autism. In 2001, she founded the National Association of Residential Providers for Adults with Autism (NARPAA), the only one of its kind in the U.S., for agencies who choose to specialize in autism services. In November 2003, she was one of six invited speakers at the first-ever Autism Summit Conference in Washington, D.C., sponsored by the U.S. Department of Education and the U.S. Department of Health and Human Resources. 13


In January, 2008, she received a Citation of Honor from the House of Delegates of the WV Legislature for her lifetime of service. Before her autism career, she received an R.N. from Charity Hospital School of Nursing in New Orleans and served in the U.S. Army Nurse Corps during WWII. Afterwards she did public health nursing in SW Louisiana, her home state. She received a B.S. and an M.A. from Teachers College, Columbia University, and a Ph.D. from Ohio University. Her late husband was William P. Sullivan, Ph.D., Columbia (1961). They have seven children.

Samuel Totten ’85 is Professor of Curriculum and Instruction at the University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, where he has taught since 1987. Totten’s research interests are the prevention and intervention of genocide. In 2004, he served as one of 24 investigators with the U.S. State Department’s Atrocities Documentation Project, interviewing black African refugees along the Chad/Sudan border to ascertain whether genocide had been perpetrated in Darfur. As a Fulbright Scholar in Rwanda at the National University of Rwanda from January 2008 to July 2008, he developed the first master’s degree in genocide studies to be offered on the continent of Africa. It is currently offered by the National University of Rwanda. Totten is co-founding editor and co-editor of Genocide Studies and Prevention: An International Journal (University of Toronto Press). Among Totten’s publications are: An Oral and Historical Documentation of the Darfur Genocide (Praeger Security International, 2010); Century of Genocide: Critical Essays and Eyewitness Accounts (Praeger, 2009); Teaching About Genocide (Information Age Publishers, 2004); Genocide in Darfur: Investigating Atrocities in the Sudan (Routledge, 2006). He is also the co-editor of numerous books, most recently Educating About Social Issues in the 20th and 21st Centuries: A Critical Annotated Bibliography (forthcoming, Information Age Publishers); and Teaching and Studying 14


Social Issues: Major Programs and Approaches (Information Age Publishers, 2010). Totten earned a master’s degree and a doctoral degree at Teachers College, Columbia University, where he studied under Dr. Maxine Greene, Dr. Ann Lieberman, Dr. Dwayne Huebner, Dr. Lawrence Cremin, and Dr. Karen Zumwalt.

Paul O’Neill ’01 is an education attorney, author and professor. After spending nearly a decade as a corporate litigator, he walked away from Dewey Ballantine and into Newgrange, a non-profit educational outreach center and school for children with learning disabilities in New Jersey. Mr. O’Neill has struggled with learning disabilities throughout his life and the fit was a good one. Seeking a stronger grounding in education policy and law, he then enrolled at Teachers College, attending classes at night while taking a job at another corporate firm to pay the bills. Graduating with an M.Ed. in Educational Leadership in 2001, he began a new career as an education attorney and also began service on the adjunct faculty of Teachers College that same year. Since graduating from Teachers College, Mr.O’Neill has held lead attorney positions in government, boutique education law firms, a non-profit organization, and the private sector. He is currently President of Tugboat Education Services, which advises education reform organizations on regulatory and strategic matters, and a Principal in the boutique education law practice group of Cohen Schneider LLP. Mr. O’Neill lectures nationally on education issues and is the author of numerous books and articles on education law, especially with regard to special education and school choice. At Teachers College, he regularly teaches “Designing Charter Schools” and “Introduction to Special Education Law and Policy.” He has helped found charter schools in New York City and in New Orleans after Hurricane Katrina. Mr. O’Neill lives in New Jersey with his wife Margaret and their three children, Katie, Tom and Jack. 15


KEYNOTE ADDRESS & AWARDS CEREMONY Joyce Berger Cowin Conference Center 2:30 p.m. Welcome Susan Fuhrman ’77, President, Teachers College Presentation of Awards Susan Fuhrman ’77, President, Teachers College Thomas James, Dean and Provost, Teachers College President’s Award of High Distinction Janna Spark ’79 Associate Fellow of the British Psychological Society Accepted on her behalf by Professor Linda Hickson, Director, Center for Opportunities and Outcomes for People with Disabilities President’s Medal of Excellence and Keynote Address: “Food for Thought” Dr. Ian Smith ’93 National Health & Nutrition Expert Question and Answer Session: John Allegrante, Deputy Provost, Teachers College Dr. Ian Smith ’93 Closing Remarks John Allegrante, Deputy Provost 16


Recipient of the 2011 President’s Award of High Distinction Janna Spark ’79 is an Associate Fellow of the British Psychological Society. Since 1979 Janna has been living in London where she established her private practice for children. Parents throughout the UK, EU and from many other countries seek to be guided by her wide and varied educational and psychological services and to have their children helped by her unique intervention programs and methods, mostly of her own creation yet based on solid theory, direct clinical experience and what we have learned about learning. Janna’s multi-sensory literacy program, Brain Train, and musical fairytale Back to Chooper Park, published in 1993 by Simon & Schuster, enabled her methods to become available to other professionals in the field. Her area of expertise has been particularly concerned with the well-being of children and teenagers, the psychology of learning, and the impact of music on cognition and learning difficulties, a field in which she has made considerable inroads both in her private practice and in the wider fields of her charity work, book writing and consulting activities. Her interests have been with the arts and music and the creative powers they can unleash which ‘open the pathways’ and provide more efficient, easier access in the learning process. Her educational model and methods were an integral part of the summer school she founded and directed for several years in Gstaad, Switzerland. Among her many voluntary contributions to the local community, Janna acted as director of children’s programs for the Young Friends of the British Museum and for the Chelsea Arts Festival. On national and international levels, Janna has been advising teachers and parents, presenting at schools and universities, including the TC Mind and Body in Autism conference in April, 2010, and she conceived and compiled a book entitled Hug O’ War, published in 2000 by Quartet Books, the proceeds and royalties of which were donated to help children harmed by war. 17


Since 2002 Janna has been a member of TC’s President’s Advisory Council. More recently her talents have been called upon to participate in the creation of innovative educational programs in the Middle East to help ‘level the playing field’. She has also been appointed chief consultant to help establish the Aspergers Syndrome centers in Malaysia as part of the Sultan’s Temonggong Initiative. In addition to composing and orchestrating original musical stories and songs for children, Janna devotes time to research and writing. Her first novel, GOO$E, was published in 2009 by Quartet Books.

Recipient of the 2011 President’s Medal of Excellence Dr. Ian Smith ’93 has served as the medical/diet expert for six seasons on VH1’s highly-rated “Celebrity Fit Club,” the creator and founder of The 50 Million Pound Challenge and The Makeover Mile, and a medical contributor on the nationally syndicated television show “Rachael Ray.” Dr. Smith is also the host of his own nationally syndicated radio show “HealthWatch” on American Urban Radio Networks. He is the former medical correspondent for NBC News network and for NewsChannel 4 where he filed reports for NBC’s “Nightly News” and the “Today” show as well as WNBC’s various news broadcasts. He has appeared extensively on various broadcasts including “The Oprah Show,” “The View,” “The Tyra Banks Show,” “Larry King Live,” “Anderson Cooper 360,” and “Showbiz Tonight.” Dr. Smith has recently been appointed by President Obama to the President’s Council on Fitness, Sports, and Nutrition. He has written for various publications including Time, Newsweek, Men’s Health, and the New York Daily News, and has been featured in several other publications including, People, Essence, Ebony, University of Chicago Medicine on the Midway, Cosmopolitan, and Black Enterprise. A highly-sought after speaker, Dr. Smith’s work has been honored by 18


several organizations, including the National Academy of Television Arts & Sciences for his coverage on the momentous events beginning on September 11, 2001. Dr. Smith is very active in charitable causes. He is currently a national advisory board member for The Maya Angelou Center for Health Equity. He has also served on the boards of the American Council on Exercise, the New York Mission Society, the Prevent Cancer Foundation and the New York Council for the Humanities. Dr. Smith graduated from Harvard College with an AB (class of ‘91) and received a master’s in science education from Teachers College, Columbia University. He attended Dartmouth Medical School and completed the last two years of his medical education and graduated from the University of Chicago Pritzker School of Medicine. Dr. Smith is also the author of eight books, the #1 New York Times Bestseller Extreme Fat Smash Diet, the #1 New York Times Bestseller The Fat Smash Diet, the New York Times Bestseller The 4 Day Diet, the critically acclaimed The Blackbird Papers (2005 BCALA fiction Honor Book Award winner), Happy, Dr. Ian Smith’s Guide to Medical Websites, and The Take-Control Diet. His eighth book, Eat, is now available.

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SESSION DESCRIPTIONS Concurrent Sessions I, 11:15 – 12:15 p.m. HBO’S MASTERCLASS: Designing Educational Activities in Support of Creativity, Imagination, and Mastery – a talk featuring TC Professors Margaret Crocco, Professor and Social Studies Chair of Department of Arts and Humanities; Hal Abeles, Professor of Music Education; and Gary Natriello, Ruth L. Gottesman Professor of Educational Research Educational reform over the last decade has emphasized literacy, numeracy, science and technology. These emphases have led to a narrowing of the curriculum, which has marginalized the arts and humanities. The Young Arts Educational Foundation has forged a partnership with Teachers College in order to promote interdisciplinary investigations related to the HBO television series MASTERCLASS. Professors Abeles, Crocco, and Natriello will discuss the goals and methods of this unique curriculum and website design project, which uses the concept of mastery in the arts to consider mastery in all school subjects and other educational activities. Urban Health Partnerships – Essential Ingredients for Building a Healthy Community – a panel moderated by Pam Koch ’98, TC Adjunct Faculty and Executive Director of the Center for Food & Environment; Kristen Mancinelli ’08, City Harvest; TC Trustee Laurie M. Tisch; and Sharon Wong, Community Development Manager at NYC Food and Fitness Partnership It takes a village to raise a child, especially one that is healthy and well20


fed. New York City has stepped up to this challenge through FoodWorks, a comprehensive plan that sets a bold vision for a more sustainable “ground-to-garbage” food system, unprecedented in the history of our city, launched by Christine Quinn in 2010. This session will review this plan and discuss how city government, not-profit agencies and academia worked together to create federal child nutrition policy. Also, learn how GreenCarts are increasing access to fruits and vegetables in neighborhoods with historically low access. Finally, find out how the New York City Food and Fitness Partnership is engaging youth in policy and system change work that makes healthy choices the easy choices. Dr. Ruth’s Guide to Sexual Health Renowned sex therapist, Dr. Ruth Westheimer ’70 will share some tips for building deeper relationships and a rewarding sex life. Dr. Ruth will discuss the facts of sex in her friendly, authoritative way debunking myths and discussing new therapies and much more. The Suffering Doesn’t End Once the Killing has Stopped: The Plight of Those Who Survived the 1994 Rwandan Genocide – led by Sam Totten ’85, 2011 Distinguished Alumnus Sam Totten, a recent Fulbright Scholar at the Centre for Conflict Management at the National University of Rwanda, and co-author of We Cannot Forget: Interviews with Survivors of the 1994 Genocide (Rutgers University Press, 2011), will speak about the many challenges that continue to be faced by the survivors of the 1994 genocide in Rwanda: harrowing memories, flashbacks and depression; a lack of adequate psychological assistance/mental care; a lack of adequate housing; a lack of educational opportunities; and a life bereft of loved ones. Combating MicroAggressions and Bullying – a discussion with Assistant Professor Laura Smith and TC Doctoral Candidates David Rivera ’11 and Nicole Watkins ’11

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Microaggressions cause major offense. These everyday verbal and nonverbal snubs and insults, whether intentional or unintentional communicate hostile, derogatory or negative messages to targets from marginalized groups. Smith, Rivera and Watkins will discuss cutting edge research and perspectives on the manifestation, psychological dynamics, and impact of microaggressions on the well-being of these groups. They will discuss strategies for overcoming these slights on an individual, institutional, societal and cultural level.

Concurrent Sessions II, 4:00 – 5:00 p.m. Social Media: Tools for Learning — Really! by Nabeel Ahmad ’09, Adjunct Assistant Professor and Mobile Learning Thought Leader, IBM Learning Social media (think Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn) is now the most popular activity on the Internet. TC even teaches a class on how to use social media for learning. Come learn how social media is being used for education and leave with best practice approaches on how you can effectively use it. Building Blocks for Healthy Eating Habits – From the Garden to the Table – led by Pam Koch ’98, TC Adjunct Faculty and Executive Director of the Center for Food & Environment & Christiane Baker, TC master’s student and Director of Edible Schoolyard NYC From Apples to Zucchini - growing and preparing your own healthy foods may be easier than you thought. Have you ever wondered where does my food come from? Or how do I make healthy foods taste great? Healthy eating habits should start early - and school curricula are now teaching students the fundamentals of whole foods with programs like schoolyard gardens and kitchen classrooms. Christiane Baker will share how adopting these lessons in school can carry over to the home and help to instill a 22


healthy appetite, while Pam Koch performs a cooking demonstration and shares tips for incorporating local, fresh fruits, veggies and whole grains into your family’s daily diets. Tasting is encouraged! Appropriate for ages 8 and up. The Art of Aging Starts Early – a discussion led by TC faculty Judy Burton, Professor of Art Education and Joan Jeffri, Director, Research Center for Arts and Culture From blank canvas to masterpiece - our lives can go from black and white to Technicolor through the positive benefits of the arts. Judy Burton will explore how exposure to the arts can benefit all young people, while Joan Jeffri explains how aging artists are often the picture of good health. WeBop! Patrice Turner ’06, in collaboration with TC by Jazz at Lincoln Center WeBop is an early-childhood jazz education program for children and their parents/caregivers. Learn about jazz’s improvisation, creative process, instruments, styles and great performers. This session provides a creative outlet for parents and children to explore jazz as a tool to educate and express themselves together. Pianists Romain Collin will accompany Patrice. Appropriate for ages 8 months to 5 years old.

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SPEAKER BIOGRAPHIES Dr. Harold Abeles, Professor of Music and Music Education, has been at Teachers College for 28 years. His research has focused on the evaluation of community-based arts organizations, the assessment of instrumental instruction, the sex-stereotyping of music instruments, the evaluation of applied music instructors, the evaluation of ensemble directors, technology-based music instruction, and verbal communication in studio instruction. Dr. Abeles has contributed numerous articles, chapters and books to the field of music education. He is the co-author of the Foundations of Music Education and the co-editor of Critical Issues in Music Education: Contemporary Theory and Practice. Recent chapters by him have appeared in the Handbook of Music Psychology and the New Handbook of Research on Music Teaching and Learning. He was the founding editor of The Music Researchers Exchange, an international music research newsletter begun in 1974. He served as a member of the Executive Committee of the Society for Research in Music Education and has served on the editorial boards of several journals including the Journal of Research in Music Education, Psychomusicology, Dialogue in Instrumental Music Education, and Update. He received his bachelor’s and master’s degrees in music education from the University of Connecticut and his Ph.D. from the University of Maryland.

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Nabeel Ahmad ’09 is the mobile learning thought leader for IBM Learning and an avid communicator. Nabeel holds a Doctorate in Educational Technology from Teachers College, Columbia University, a Master of Science from Carnegie Mellon University’s School of Computer Science, and a Business degree from the University of Oklahoma. He is an Associate Adjunct Professor, teaching a mobile phone learning course at Teachers College. He has published on mobile learning topics and has a keen interest in educational technology for growth markets. And, yes, he has given many (mostly good) presentations and sat in on more bad ones. Christiane Baker is the Executive Director of Edible Schoolyard NYC, a non-profit organization that partners with public schools to create gardens and kitchen classrooms to engage children in hands-on education that cultivates the knowledge, skills and environment required to change the way they eat for life. Throughout her career Ms. Baker has been dedicated to helping improve the way children eat in the U.S. through media, advocacy and education. As a trained cook, farm owner and manager, and tireless advocate of organic farming and school food reform, Ms. Baker envisions a world where all children have access to fresh, healthy, organically grown food. A graduate of Barnard College, she is currently completing a M.S. in Nutrition and Public Health at Teachers College, Columbia University. Ms. Baker is the proud parent of a NYC public school student and resides in Brooklyn, New York. Judith Burton is Professor and Director of Art and Art Education, at Teachers College. Prior she was Chair of Art Education of Boston University and taught at the Massachusetts College of Art. She received her Ed. D. from Harvard University in 1980. Her research focuses on the artistic-aesthetic development of children and adolescents and the implications this has for teaching and learning. In 1995, she co-founded the Center for Research in Arts Education at Teachers College, and in 1996, she founded the Heritage School, a comprehensive high school featuring the arts in Harlem, NY. She is author of numerous articles and chapters and currently has three books in process of publication. She 25


received the Manuel Barkan Award for excellence in research writing, and the Lowenfeld Award for lifetime achievement in art education from NAEA. Dr. Burton is a Fellow of the Royal Society for the Arts in Great Britain, a Distinguished Fellow of the NAEA, and serves as Distinguished Visiting Professor at the Central Academy of Fine Arts Beijing, China. She is also a Trustee of the Maryland Institute College of Art, Baltimore, MD. Margaret Smith Crocco is Coordinator of the Program in Social Studies and Professor of Social Studies and Education. Professor Crocco received her bachelor’s degree in philosophy from Georgetown University and her M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in American Civilization from the University of Pennsylvania. She has taught American Studies at the University of Maryland, American and Women’s History at Drew, Montclair State, and William Paterson Universities, and within the Texas community college system. She joined the Teachers College faculty in 1993 after having spent eight years teaching and administering at a high school in Summit, New Jersey. Professor Crocco is the recipient of numerous grants related to women’s history, African American history, and inclusive curriculum. Most recently, she has served as editor and project leader for the Teaching The Levees curriculum, funded by the Rockefeller Foundation and based on Spike Lee’s award-winning film, When the Levees Broke: A Requiem in Four Acts. Joan Jeffri is the Director of the Program in Arts Administration at Teachers College, and Director of the Research Center for Arts and Culture. She is the past president of the Association of Art Administration Educators. From 1981-1990, she served as an executive director of The Journal of Arts Management and Law. She is author of Arts Money: Raising It, Saving It, Earning It (1989); The Emerging Arts: Management, Survival and Growth (1990), and editor of Artisthelp: The Artist’s Guide to Work-Related Human and Social Services (1990); and The Actor Speaks, The Painter Speaks, and The Craftsperson Speaks (Greenwood Press, 1994, 1993, 1992), as well as numerous studies on artists, including “Information on Artists I and II” and “The Artists Training and 26


Career Project.” Her first careers were as a poet, with Louis Untermeyer as her mentor, and an actress, appearing in the national tour of The Homecoming, in the Boston Company of The Effect of Gamma Rays on Man-in-the-Moon Marigolds, and with the Lincoln Center Repertory Company in New York City. Pamela Koch ’98 is Executive Director of the Center for Food & Environment at Teachers College, a national leader in the areas of food, food systems, and the diet-health connection. From 1994 to 1997, she was a curriculum developer for “EarthFriends: The Whole Story of Food” a supplemental education program at Teachers College that teaches children, teachers and parents about food choices that are good for them and the earth. She was a part of the team that evaluated the first version of Cookshop™, a curriculum now taught in 500 New York City public school kindergarten through second grade classrooms through the Food Bank of New York City/Food Change. In the classroom, students prepare and eat the exact vegetable and grain recipes that are being served in the cafeteria. In 1997, Pam became the Project Coordinator of LiFE (Linking Food and the Environment) curriculum project, an inquiry-based curriculum series for upper-elementary and middle school students, carefully designed to meet national science education standards. The LiFE Curriculum Series has been published by National Gardening Association, Growing Food (2007), Farm to Table & Beyond (2008) and Choice, Control & Change: Using Science to Make Food and Activity Decisions (early 2009). The results of the evaluations of the LiFE curriculum indicate that it improves students’ conceptual understandings about science and nutrition, their attitudes toward science, health and nature, and their food choices. Kristen Mancinelli ’08 is Senior Manager of Policy and Government Relations at City Harvest, where she advocates for programs and policies at the city, state, and federal levels to promote community food security 27


and improve access to healthy and affordable food for low-income New Yorkers. Kristen manages City Harvest’s partnership with the NYC Office of SchoolFood, and participates in city and national networks to advocate for improvements to school meals. From March 2009 to Dec 2010, Kristen led the NYC Alliance for CNR campaign to give New Yorkers a voice in the federal Reauthorization of child nutrition programs. A Registered Dietician, she holds a master’s in nutrition and public health from Teachers College, Columbia University. She is a proud native New Yorker. Gary Natriello is the Gottesman Professor of Educational Research and Professor of Sociology and Education in the Department of Human Development at Teachers College, Columbia University. He teaches graduate courses in the social organization of schools and classrooms, the social dimensions of assessment processes, the sociology of online learning, and research methods. He is also the Director of the Teachers College EdLab, a design and development unit devoted to creating new educational possibilities for the information age. He is also the executive editor of the Teachers College Record and the Director of the Gottesman Libraries at Teachers College. Dr. Natriello’s research interests include school organization, evaluation, at-risk youth, and the sociology of online learning. He is the author of several books, including Schooling Disadvantaged Children: Racing Against Catastrophe (with E.L. McDill and A.M. Pallas) and From Cashbox to Classroom (with W. Firestone and M. Goertz). Recent articles include: “The History and Promise of Assessment and Accountability in Title I” (with E.L. McDill), “Vouchers, Privatization and the Poor, Title I: From Funding Mechanism to Educational Program” (with E.L. McDill), and “The Development and Impact of High Stakes Testing” (with A.M. Pallas). Dr. Natriello holds an A.B. (English) from Princeton University, an A.M. (sociology) from Stanford University, and a Ph.D. (sociology of education) from Stanford University.

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David P. Rivera ’11, M.S., is a doctoral candidate in counseling psychology at Teachers College, Columbia University. He holds degrees in psychology and counseling from Johns Hopkins University and the University of Wyoming. His research focuses on issues impacting the marginalization and health of people of color and sexual minorities. David’s research has been published in The Counseling Psychologist, Cultural Diversity and Ethnic Minority Psychology, and The Journal of Counseling and Development. His therapeutic interests include working with college students and people with substance abuse issues. Along with his advisor, Derald Wing Sue, Ph.D., he hosts a blog on Psychology Today’s website entitled, “Microaggressions in Everyday Life.” He has received multiple recognitions for his work, including national honors from the American Psychological Association and the American College Counseling Association. Laura Smith, Assistant Professor of Psychology and Education at Teachers College, was trained as a counseling psychologist and spent the first part of her career in college counseling centers, first as an internship training director at Pace University and then as the Director of Counseling Services at Barnard College. Focusing on her community-level interests, she then became the director of psychological services at the West Farms Career Center in the Bronx, when it was a multifaceted community-based organization offering a wide array of services to Bronx residents. There she came to realize how her conventional psychological training had not prepared her for work in a poor urban community and became interested in studying the field’s general neglect of issues of poverty, social class and classism. Smith now teaches a variety of applied and experiential courses within the counseling psychology curriculum, including Group Counseling, Consultation to Community Agencies, Racial-Cultural Counseling Lab, the Basic Doctoral Counseling Practicum and School Counseling. In the fall of 2010, Smith published Psychology, Poverty, and the End of Social Exclusion: Putting Our Practice to Work in book and DVD formats.

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Laurie M. Tisch joined the TC Board of Trustees in 1998 and, is Vice Chair of the Board of Trustees at Teachers College. She is the Founder and President of the Laurie M. Tisch Illumination Fund, a foundation established in 2007 to advance a broad mission of increasing access and opportunity for all New Yorkers. Tisch is the founding chair of the Center for Arts Education and led the Children’s Museum of Manhattan for many years. In addition, she is a Vice Chair of Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts and a Trustee of the Whitney Museum of American Art. Tisch is a recognized leader and has received numerous public service awards. She earned a B.A. in Elementary Education with honors from the University of Michigan in 1973. Samuel Totten ’85 is Professor of Curriculum and Instruction at the University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, where he has taught since 1987. Totten’s research interests are the prevention and intervention of genocide. In 2004, he served as one of the 24 investigators with the U.S. State Department’s Atrocities Documentation Project, interviewing black African refugees along the Chad/Sudan border to ascertain whether genocide had been perpetrated in Darfur. As a Fulbright Scholar in Rwanda at the National University of Rwanda from January 2008 to July 2008, he developed the first master’s degree in genocide studies to be offered on the continent of Africa. It is currently offered by the National University of Rwanda. Totten is co-founding editor and co-editor of Genocide Studies and Prevention: An International Journal (University of Toronto Press). Among his publications are: An Oral and Historical Documentation of the Darfur Genocide (Praeger Security International, 2010); Century of Genocide: Critical Essays and Eyewitness Accounts (Praeger, 2009); and Teaching About Genocide (Information Age Publishers, 2004). He is also the co-editor of various books, recently Educating About Social Issues in the 20th and 21st Centuries: A Critical Annotated Bibliography (forthcoming, Information Age Publishers); and Teaching and Studying Social Issues: Major Programs and Approaches (Information Age Publishers, 2010). 30


Totten earned a master’s degree and a doctoral degree at Teachers College, Columbia University, where he studied under Dr. Maxine Greene, Dr. Ann Lieberman, Dr. Dwayne Huebner, Dr. Lawrence Cremin, and Dr. Karen Zumwalt. Nicole Watkins ’11 is a multicultural researcher, therapist, academic advisor, graduate hall director, and doctoral candidate in the psychological counseling program at Teachers College, Columbia University. She has earned degrees from the Pennsylvania State University and New York University. Her emphasis is in student development, academic advisement, and multicultural psychology. Dr. Ruth Westheimer ’70 is a psychosexual therapist who helped pioneer the field of Media Psychology with her radio program “Sexually Speaking” which began in September, 1980 as a 15 minute taped show that aired in New York. Today, “Sexually Speaking” can be heard across the country and is part of a communications network that distributes Dr. Ruth Westheimer’s expertise via television, books, newspapers, games, home video and computer software. Born in Germany in 1928, Dr. Ruth Westheimer was sent to a school in Switzerland at the age of 10, which became an orphanage for most of the German-Jewish students sent there. At 16 she went to Israel where she fought for that country’s independence as member of the Haganah. She then moved to Paris where she studied psychology at the Sorbonne and taught kindergarten. Ruth Westheimer immigrated to the U.S. in 1956, where she obtained her master’s degree in sociology and her Ph.D. in education from Teachers College, Columbia University. She studied human sexuality with Dr. Helen Singer Kaplan at New York Hospital Cornell University Medical Center. Dr. Ruth Westheimer is a pioneer in spreading what she has labeled “sexual literacy.” She has been twice named “College Lecturer of the Year.” Her television program, “The Dr. Ruth Show,” aired on Lifetime 31


has been syndicated nationally and internationally. The National Mother’s Day Committee has honored Dr. Westheimer as “Mother of the Year.” Dr. Westheimer has two children and resides with her husband in NYC. Sharon Wong is the Community Development Manager at the NYC Food and Fitness Partnership, working with community organizations and agencies to develop policy and system changes in accessing healthy food and creating safe environments for residents in Central Brooklyn. She has over 10 years experience leading non-profit programs that focus on youth development and environmental justice. In 2003, Wong began leading New Settlement Apartment’s Bronx Helpers Program, an award winning afterschool, youth leadership and community service program in the South Bronx. During this time, she began taking teens to upstate New York farms to learn abour local regional foods and basic farming practices. She also enrolled them to volunteer on urban farms and city community gardens to foster their interest in growing food. Wong also serves as the project director of Turf, an Open Space Institute Project focused on improving the quality of food available in Parkchester. Wong is a graduate of Smith College, Union Theological Seminary, and Coro Leadership New York. She is a member of Food Systems Network NYC’s Leadership Committee and Black Urban Growers.

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SAT U R D AY, A P R I L 16, 2011

PROGRAM Teachers College, Columbia University 525 West 120th Street New York, NY 10025 www.tc.edu


Academic Festival 2011 Program