IB Curriculum Guide 2021-23

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IB DIPLOMA COURSE GUIDE 2022-2024

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CONTENTS WELCOME TO OUR SCHOOL

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PART 1 - THE INTERNATIONAL BACCALAUREATE

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An Introduction The IB Learner Profile A Note to Students Subject Choices Assessment Requirements From IB to University

PART 2 - CURRICULUM SUBJECTS

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GROUP 1

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Language A - Literature (English Or Polish or SSST - School Supported Self Taught) Language A - Language and Literature (English)

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GROUP 2 Language B - English, French, German, Spanish Language ab initio - French, German, Russian, Spanish

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GROUP 3 History Geography Economics Psychology Business and Management

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GROUP 4 Biology Chemistry Physics Computer Science Sports, Exercise and Health Science

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GROUP 5 Mathematics Applications and Interpretations AI Mathematics Analysis and Approaches AA

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GROUP 6 Visual Arts Music

PART 3 - IBDP CORE

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Theory of Knowledge (TOK) The Extended Essay Creativity, Activity and Service (CAS)

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WELCOME TO THE BRITISH SCHOOL WARSAW The British School Warsaw was the first international school established by Nord Anglia Education; we opened our doors in 1992 with a total of 35 pupils. Today our school community has over 1,000 students representing more than 60 different nationalities.

Programme develops students to think critically, independently, and creatively, giving them the skills they need to thrive at university. We are proud of the achievements of our students who gained excellent IB results in the May 2021 examination session with 22% of the students scoring 40 points or above, and one student achieving the maximum score of 45 points. Our IB average score of 35 points and our subject average 5.5 were far above World Average of 33 points and subject average of 5.3. It is, therefore, hardly surprising that students in possession of an IB Diploma from TBS Warsaw are highly successful in their applications to the world’s top universities.

Our mission is to provide a caring, academic and international environment to ensure that each student is intellectually stimulated, grows in confidence and responsibility, and develops respect for themselves and others, inspiring them to become active world citizens. We follow the principles of the English National Curriculum, adapted to the needs of our international student community. Our approach ensures that each student reaches their full potential, and that they grow to be confident in everything they do.

With over 20 years of IBDP experience and a track record of success, we firmly believe that studying the IB Diploma at The British School Warsaw provides students with outstanding learning opportunities paving the way for their success and high achievement at university and beyond.

We have been running the International Baccalaureate Diploma Programme since 2001. It is an excellent programme to follow in preparation for entry to universities, worldwide. Whether you want to study in the UK, USA, Australia, Poland or anywhere else, we believe that the IB Diploma is the best entry qualification you could hope to achieve. The IB Diploma

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AN INTRODUCTION The International Baccalaureate Diploma Programme (IBDP) is widely regarded as the best pre-university programme offered in the world.

No other qualification or diploma is recognised by so many institutions in so many countries. No other programme gives a better preparation for university education and beyond. This guide has been written to make students and parents aware of the various aspects of the IBDP and to help students in making their best choices in selecting IB courses.

Graduates of the IB Diploma are well-known for their maturity towards learning, their ability to question , well-honed research skills, critical thinking, communication and their time-management abilities. The aim of the Programme is to help develop knowledgeable and caring young people who help to create a better and more peaceful world through intercultural understanding and respect. The IB Diploma is a broad programme with its depth of study across the various subject areas.

At The British School Warsaw, students are offered a wide selection of subjects. We offer the highest quality of teaching by experienced teachers, many of them IB examiners, moderators and workshop leaders. Our sole intention is to provide our students with as much support as possible to enable them to achieve success in the IB Diploma Programme.

We look forward to sharing our expertise in the IBDP with our students and watching them flourish and grow in maturity and independence over the next two years. These two years will stimulate and develop their work ethic, enjoyment of learning, passion and enthusiasm to contribute to school life as well as their drive to succeed; all vital elements for life during and after the IB. Please do not hesitate to contact me if you have any further questions.

Students choose six subjects best suited to their strengths and interests; within the six different subject groups. In addition to the six subjects, students will complete a 4000-word Extended Essay. They will study Theory of Knowledge (TOK), and complete a variety of projects within Core: the Creativity, Activity, Service (CAS) element of the course. The IB Diploma Programme is highly regarded by universities worldwide as they recognise its rigour and challenge.

Neeraj Prabhu Head of IBDP

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IB LEARNER PROFILE The IB Learner Profile outlines ten attributes that are invaluable in developing our students to go beyond academic success. All aspects of the IB Diploma Programme are committed to the development of our students according to the IB Learner Profile qualities; giving them valuable skills to use after graduating from TBS Warsaw.

INQUIRERS

COMMUNICATORS

IB Students develop their natural curiosity. They acquire the skills necessary to conduct inquiry and research and show independence in learning. University faculties regularly note IB students’ passion for discovery.

IB Students understand and express ideas and information confidently and creatively, in more than one language and through a variety of modes of communication. They regularly deliver stimulating presentations and demonstrate excellence in group assignments.

KNOWLEDGEABLE

PRINCIPLED

IB Students explore concepts, ideas and issues that have localand global significance. In so doing,

IB Students act with integrity and honesty, with a strong sense of fairness and justice. They take responsibility for their own actions and the consequences that accompany them. They are well-versed with the academic integrity that is a fundamental value of academics at universities and colleges.

they acquire in-depth knowledge and develop understanding across a broad and balanced range of disciplines. They are extraordinarily well prepared for the academic requirements of university coursework.

THINKERS

OPEN-MINDED

IB Students exercise initiative in applying thinking skills critically and creatively to recognise and approach complex problems, and make reasoned, ethical decisions. IB students do not shy away from challenging questions and, once they know the answer, follow up by asking ‘why?’

IB Students understand and appreciate their own cultures and personal histories, and are open to the perspectives, values and traditions of other individuals and communities. They have a deep understanding of various cultures and views, bringing an appreciation of new views to both their academic study. Their international mindedness complements the missions of the best tertiary institutions.

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CARING

BALANCED

IB Students show empathy, compassion and respect towards the needs and feelings of others. They have a per- sonal commitment to service, and act to make a positive difference to the lives of others and to the environment. They tell us they bring this commitment to commu- nity and others to their activities and leadership roles at university and carry it throughout their lives.

Students understand the importance of intellectual, physical and emotional balance to achieve personal well-being for themselves and others. IB students are active participants in a wide range of as- pects of campus life, as well as focusing on their academic development.

REFLECTIVE

RISK-TAKERS

Students give thoughtful consideration to their own learn- ing and experience. They are able to assess and under- stand their strengths and limitations in order to support their learning and personal development. IB students have developed an ability to reflect on their learning and to articulate critically how they learned.

IB Students approach unfamiliar situations and uncertainty with courage and forethought, and have the independence of spirit to explore new roles, ideas and strategies. They transition well to challenging university settings and show resilience and determination in their work. In academics, they have the confidence to approach new or unfamiliar subjects or material.

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A NOTE TO STUDENTS

PERSONAL RESPONSIBILITY

At the beginning of each academic year, you and your parents will sign a ‘student regulations agreement’. We will expect you to follow it. This agreement sets out your right to learn in the best possible manner that we can provide. This is not meant to put you under pressure. On the contrary. It is about asking you to recognise that you have to be committed to your own learning and work with us in order to be successful in the course.

You will be in a different situation at school as an IBDP student. The programme requires that you take responsibility for your own learning, so that the two years you spend on the IBDP prepare you effectively for independent life at university and beyond. There are some important areas where we will ask you to take on personal responsibility. Three of the most important areas are academic integrity; compliance with the school regulations and, remaining focused on your studies.

Some study periods will be built into your programme. We will not dictate how you use this time. You will find that the IBDP is a demanding course and you will discover that you will need to use some, if not all, of your study periods to make sure you keep on top of your work. The IB Learning Centre will provide an excellent working environment and we will help by encouraging you to make good use of your time. You will learn to manage your time effectively and this will be a skill that helps you a great deal after leaving school.

ACADEMIC INTEGRITY Academic integrity is infused throughout all of , especially given the opportunities, ambiguities and temptations that research using the internet provides. You will spend a lot of time researching work as part of the IBDP and we will teach you how to reference and acknowledge sources correctly. We will make sure that you avoid the common pitfalls, so that you are prepared for the kind of research work that you will be asked to carry out at university.

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SUBJECT CHOICES The IBDP Curriculum Model is often shown as a circle – portioned equally to represent the six groups of subjects that must be studied by participants of the full diploma programme.

The curriculum of the IBDP consists of six subject groups. These are studied concurrently and students are expected to study one subject from each group. Diploma candidates must select one subject from each of the six groups, although a second subject from Groups 2, 3 or 5 may be substituted for a Group 6 subject. Students must select three subjects at higher level (HL), and three at standard level (SL). HL courses represent approximately 240 teaching hours. SL courses cover 150 hours. Some students may choose to study four at HL to begin with and then reduce this to three.

Students are able to explore some subjects in depth and others more broadly, a deliberate compromise between early specialisation found in some national systems and the breadth found in others. The science-oriented student is challenged to learn a foreign language and the natural linguist becomes familiar with laboratory procedures. The subjects are continually reviewed and revised to meet contemporary needs. Students should consider their strengths and interests when making their choices as well as considering university requirements.

DP model, source: www.ibo.org

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Group 1

Group 4

STUDIES IN LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE

SCIENCES

• • • •

In science, we offer Biology, Chemistry, Physics, Computer Science, Environmental Science or Sport, Exercise and Health Science. Practical laboratory skills are developed and collaborative learning is encouraged through an interdisciplinary Group 4 project taken at the end of the first year. All subjects are offered at Higher and Standard Level.

A comprehensive suite of courses for a wide range of students. The Literature course remains centred on the formal study of literary texts, and includes a broad range of text types Language and Literature allows students to analyse the ways in which context impacts on the meaning of a text All Group 1 courses are designed to be accessible to students with diverse language backgrounds.

Group 5 MATHEMATICS

At TBSW, students will be offered a choice of English or Polish Language A on a taught basis. Other languages can be chosen for self-supported study. In such cases, students will need to find their own tutor to assist with their study of the language and cover any consequential costs incurred.

There are two Mathematics courses being offered: 1. Mathematics: Analysis and Approaches, offered at both HL and SL levels; 2. Mathematics: Applications and Interpretation, offered at SL level. Mathematics: analysis and approaches This course recognises the need for analytical expertise in a world where innovation is increasingly dependent on a deep understanding of mathematics. This course includes topics that are both traditionally part of a preuniversity mathematics course (for example, functions, trigonometry, calculus) as well as topics that are amenable to investigation, conjecture and proof, for instance the study of sequences and series at both SL and HL, and proof by induction at HL.

Group 2 LANGUAGE ACQUISITION All IBDP candidates are required to take a second language. Several options accommodate second language learners with previous experience of learning the language as well as complete beginners. The principle aim for the subjects in Group 2 is to enable students to use the language in a range of contexts and for many purposes. For students with two or more years studying a foreign language, we offer courses in English B, Spanish B, French B and German B. Language B courses are offered at Higher and Standard Level. For those wishing to start a new language from scratch, we offer French, German, Spanish, Russian for beginners (ab initio). Ab initio languages can only be taken at Standard Level.

Mathematics: applications and interpretation This course recognizes the increasing role that mathematics and technology play in a diverse range of fields in a data-rich world. As such, it emphasises the meaning of mathematics in context by focusing on topics that are often used as applications or in mathematical modelling. To give this understanding a firm base, this course also includes topics that are traditionally part of a pre-university mathematics course such as calculus and statistics.

Group 6 ARTS AND ELECTIVES

Group 3

This includes Visual Arts and Music with emphasis placed on practical production by the student and exploration of a range of creative work in a global context. As an alternative to this, students may choose a subject from another group. Students can complete the requirements of Group 6 by choosing an additional sciences, individuals and societies, or languages course, instead of a course in the arts.

INDIVIDUALS AND SOCIETIES We offer a choice from History, Geography, Economics, Psychology or Business Management within Group 3. All subjects are offered at Higher or Standard Level.

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ASSESSMENT REQUIREMENTS The IB have clear regulations relating to the requirements for the IB Diploma. ▶ Candidates must complete a course of study from each of the six subject groups. ▶ Three of the six subjects must be at higher level and three at standard level. ▶ Achieve a minimum total of 24 points out of a maximum total of 45, having also met a number of other criteria, including at least 12 points at HL. ▶ Submit a passing Extended Essay in one of the subjects of the IB Curriculum or in World Studies. ▶ Complete a course in Theory of Knowledge. ▶ Complete all CAS (Creativity, Activity and Service) requirements. Assessment Each of the six subjects is graded on a scale of 1 (minimum) to 7 (maximum). Grades reflect attainment of knowledge and skills relative to stan-

dards applied equally to all schools. Top grades are not, for example, awarded to a fixed percentage of students. A range of assessment methods are used to value both the content and the process of academic achievement and to take into account different learning styles and cultural patterns. Assessment of learning is both internal and external. All subject teachers are trained by the International Baccalaureate (IB) to administer and mark internally assessed tasks (IAs). These internal assessments are sent to the IB and moderated by external assessors. Internal assessments include essays, mathematical explorations, oral language presentations, fieldwork assignments and practical/investigative work. External examinations include oral and written examinations, long and short responses, data-based ques-

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tions, essays and multiple choice questions. Responsibility for all academic judgements about the quality of candidates’ work rests with the IB examiners around the world, led by chief examiners with international authority.

RIGOUR Each year approximately 80% of candidates worldwide succeed in earning their IB Diploma. At The British School Warsaw, we pride ourselves on our significantly higher success rate. While the IB Diploma is academically rigorous, it is not an elitist course designed only for high achievers. It is academically challenging but it also rewards hard work. All TBSW students can obtain the IB Diploma, provided they are conscientious, manage their time well and engage fully with the programme.


FROM IB TO UNIVERSITY The IB Diploma graduates gain admission to selective universities throughout the world. These include top-ranking European and American institutions such as Oxford, Cambridge, Yale and the Sorbonne in addition to prestigious universities in Latin America and the Asia/ Pacific region. Formal agreements exist between the IB and many ministries of education and private institutions. Some colleges and universities may offer advanced standing or course credit to students with strong IB results. It is important that individual students ascertain precisely the requirements of their chosen univer-

sity with regard to the IB Diploma as soon as possible. Subject choice and level of study must be chosen with university requirements in mind, taking into account the strengths of the student. SStudents who study only a part of the Diploma Programme, without covering the requirements of the full Diploma Programme, will be awarded subject “Certificates”. These may still allow students to obtain a place at some universities.

Our students have been accepted into top universities including: University of Cambridge University of Oxford Imperial College London London School of Economics University of the Arts London University College London Kings College London University of Bath University of Birmingham, University of Bristol Durham University University of Edinburgh University of Glasgow Kent University Loughborough University University of Manchester

University of St Andrews University of Warwick Princeton University Columbia University Cornell University Boston University New York University, Parsons School of Design, University of Southern California Washington University University of British Columbia McGill University University of Toronto University of Vienna École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne

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University of Leiden University of Maastricht University of Utrecht Eindhoven University of Technology University of Barcelona, University of Sydney Cape Town University University of Hong Kong University of Warsaw Warsaw Medical University Warsaw School of Economics Jagiellonian University.


CURRICULUM SUBJECTS

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GROUP 1

Language A: Literature (English, Polish or School Supported Self-Taught) AIMS

ASSESSMENT

In the Language A: Literature course students will learn about the various manifestations of literature as a powerful mode of writing across cultures and throughout history. They will explore and develop an understanding of factors that contribute to the production and reception of literature, such as:

ASSESSMENT OBJECTIVES Know, understand and interpret a range of texts and critically evaluate the contexts in which they are written. Analyse and evaluate the use of language and meaning and the relationships among different texts

▶ The creativity of writers and readers. ▶ The nature of the interaction with the writers’ and readers’ respective contexts and with the literary tradition. ▶ The ways in which language can give rise to meaning and/or effect. ▶ The performative and transformative potential of literary creation and response.

Communicate ideas in a clear, logical and persuasiveway. ASSESSMENT Assessment is both oral and written, with the latter involving both formal examination and coursework.

CONTENT

STANDARD LEVEL

Students will learn to understand the aesthetic nature of literature and come to see that literary texts are a powerful means to express individual thoughts and feelings, and that their own perspectives as experienced readers are integral to the effect of a literary text.

▶ Paper 1 - 35% Guided literary analysis 1 hour and 15 minutes ▶ Paper 2 - 35% Comparative essay

RECOMMENDED ENTRY REQUIREMENTS

1 hour and 45 minutes ▶ Internal Assessment - 30% Individual oral

The reading demands of the course are high and students should have a genuine interest in literature along with an enjoyment of reading and a desire to do so across a range of different texts. Ideally, students joining this course will have studied English Literature at GCSE or IGCSE level, whilst those wishing to undertake the course at the Higher Level should have attained at least a ‘B’ grade pass at IGCSE. Students choosing to study a different language must prove fluency in this language, that they have studied the language at school recently, and that they found a tutor to help them in their studies.

15 minutes Language A: Literature SSST is available at SL level only HIGHER LEVEL (not available for SSST languages) ▶ Paper 1 - 35% Guided literary analysis 2 hours and 15 minutes ▶ Paper 2 - 25% Comparative essay 1 hour and 45 minutes ▶ Higher Level Essay – 20% (on one literary text) ▶ Internal Assessment – 20% Individual oral 15 minutes

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GROUP 1

Language A: Language and Literature (English) AIMS

ASSESSMENT

In the Language A: Language and Literature course students will: ▶ Engage with a range of texts, in a variety of media and forms, from different periods, styles and cultures. ▶ Develop skills in listening, speaking, reading, writing, viewing, presenting and performing. ▶ Develop skills in interpretation, analysis and evaluation. ▶ Develop sensitivity to the formal and aesthetic qualities of texts and an appreciation of how they contribute to diverse responses and open up multiple meanings. ▶ Develop an understanding of the relationships between studies in language and literature and other disciplines. ▶ Communicate and collaborate in a confident and creative way. ▶ Foster a lifelong interest in enjoyment of language and literature.

ASSESSMENT OBJECTIVES Know, understand and interpret a Students will demonstrate that they know, understand and interpret a range of texts and critically evaluate the contexts in which they are written. They will analyse and evaluate the use of language and meaning and the relationships among different texts. They will communicate ideas in a clear, logical and persuasive way. ASSESSMENT Assessment is both oral and written, with the latter involving both formal examination and coursework. STANDARD LEVEL ▶ Paper 1 - 35%

CONTENT

Guided literary analysis 1 hour and 15 minutes

Students will focus exclusively on literary texts, adopting a variety of approaches to textual criticism. Students explore the nature of literature, the aesthetic function of literary language and textuality, and the relationship between literature and the world.

▶ Paper 2 - 35% Comparative essay 1 hour and 45 minutes ▶ Internal Assessment - 30% Individual oral

RECOMMENDED ENTRY REQUIREMENTS

15 minutes

The reading demands of the course are high and students should have a genuine interest in literature along with an enjoyment of reading and a desire to do so across a range of different texts. Ideally, students joining this course will have studied English Literature at GCSE or IGCSE level, whilst those wishing to undertake the course at the Higher Level should have attained at least a ‘B’ grade pass at IGCSE.

HIGHER LEVEL (not available for SSST languages) ▶ Paper 1 - 35% Guided literary analysis 2 hours and 15 minutes ▶ Paper 2 - 25% Comparative essay 1 hour and 45 minutes ▶ Higher Level Essay – 20% (on one literary text) ▶ Internal Assessment – 20% Individual oral 15 minutes

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GROUP 2

Language B: English, French, German, Spanish AIMS

ASSESSMENT

The aims of the language B programme are to: ▶ Enable students to understand and use the language they have studied in a range of contexts and for a variety of purposes. ▶ Enable students to use the language appropriately. Provide a linguistic base for further study, work and leisure. ▶ Offer insights into the culture where the studied language is used. ▶ Develop awareness of the role of language in relation to other areas of knowledge. ▶ Provide the opportunity for enjoyment, creativity and intellectual stimulation through knowledge of a language.

ASSESSMENT OBJECTIVES Students will demonstrate that they know, understand and interpret a range of texts and critically evaluate the contexts in which they are written. They will analyse and evaluate the use of language and meaning and the relationships among different texts. Students will demonstrate that they are able to communicate ideas in a clear, logical and persuasive way. ASSESSMENT Assessment is both oral and written, with the latter involving both formal examination and coursework.

CONTENT Language B is a foreign language-learning programme designed for study at Higher or Standard Level by students with previous experience of learning the language. The main focus of the programme is on language acquisition and development. Students will be assessed on their ability to:

STANDARD LEVEL ▶ Paper 1 - 25% Productive skills 1 hour and 15 minutes ▶ Paper 2 - 50% Receptive skills 1 hour and 45 minutes ▶ Internal Assessment - 25%

▶ Communicate clearly and effectively in a range of situations, demonstrating linguistic competence and intercultural understanding. ▶ Use language appropriate to a range of interpersonal and/or cultural contexts.

Individual oral 15 minutes

▶ Understand and use language to express and respond to a range of ideas with accuracy and fluency.

HIGHER LEVEL

▶ Understand, analyse, and respond to a range of written and spoken texts.

(not available for SSST languages) ▶ Paper 1 - 25% Productive skills

RECOMMENDED ENTRY REQUIREMENTS

1 hour and 15 minutes ▶ Paper 2 - 50% Receptive skills

The programme meets the needs of students who have already studied French, German or Spanish for between two and five years immediately prior to the beginning of their IB course. Students with limited learning experience of these languages or those with no previous learning experience, but who speak the language may be able to follow the Language B course at Standard level. We would recommend that pupils who have gained a B grade or above at IGCSE follo this course

1 hour and 45 minutes ▶ Internal Assessment - 25% Individual oral 15 minutes

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GROUP 2

English, French, German, Spanish, Russian - Ab Initio AIMS

ASSESSMENT

Ab Initio is a Latin phrase that means “from the beginning”. This is the study of a language for students with no prior knowledge. By the end of the Ab Initio course, students will be able to communicate in a variety of everyday situations. They will be able to understand and use the essential spoken and written forms of the language in a limited range of situations, and become aware of elements of the cultures to which the language belongs.

ASSESSMENT OBJECTIVES Students will demonstrate that they know, understand and interpret a range of texts and critically evaluate the contexts in which they are written. They will analyse and evaluate the use of language and meaning and the relationships among different texts. Students will demonstrate that they are able to communicate ideas in a clear, logical and persuasive way.

▶ To study a new foreign language in two years in order to be able to communicate with those who speak that language.

ASSESSMENT Assessment is both oral and written, with the latter involving both formal examination and coursework.

▶ To learn how to read and write and communicate in the new language in order to cope with every day, practical situations relating to work, holidays and social life.

STANDARD LEVEL ▶ Paper 1 - 25% Productive skills Completing a range of written tasks to demonstrate the ability to understand written language (four written texts) 1 hour and 15 minutes ▶ Paper 2 - 50% Receptive skills Demonstrating an ability to write by filling in forms, responding to advertisements, writing messages and short letters – two compulsory writing exercises. 1 hour and 45 minutes ▶ Internal Assessment - 25% Individual oral Presentation of visual stimulus followed by questions on the stimulus, a written assignment and a general conversation. 15 minutes

▶ To gain insight into countries where the language studied is spoken.

CONTENT Topics studied include: Topics studied include: The Individual, education, transport, communication, shopping, food and drink, leisure, environment, and emergencies. Areas covered include the lexical and grammatical areas necessary to communicate.

RECOMMENDED ENTRY REQUIREMENTS Ab Initio is a Latin phrase that means “from the beginning”. Students will study a language at this level if they have very little or no formal teaching in the language. Students will not have an IGCSE or any other similar qualification in this language. This option is designed to allow students to take up a new language.

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GROUP 3

History AIMS

ASSESSMENT

The aims of the history course at standard level and higher level are to enable students to: ▶ The acquisition and understanding of historical knowledge in breadth and in depth and from different cultures. ▶ A developing appreciation and understanding of history as a discipline, including the nature and diversity of its sources, methods and interpretations. ▶ International awareness and understanding of people living in a variety of places at different times. ▶ A better understanding of the present through an understanding of the past. ▶ An ability to use and communicate historical knowledge and understanding. ▶ A lasting interest in history.

ASSESSMENT OBJECTIVES Students will be assessed in their knowledge and understanding, applications and analysis, and synthesis and evaluation as well as their use and application of historical skills. Across their examination papers and internal assessment they will need to demonstrate their ability to use sources in the manner of an historian. ASSESSMENT Assessment is both oral and written, with the latter involving both formal examination and coursework.

Higher Level Options

STANDARD LEVEL ▶ Paper 1 - 30% Source based Paper 1 hour ▶ Paper 2 - 45% Essay paper based on two of the 12 World History topics 1 hour 30 minutes. ▶ Internal Assessment - 25% Students complete a historical investigation into a topic of their choice.

▶ European states in the inter-war years (1918-1939) Imperial Russia, revolution and the establishment of the Soviet Union (1855-1924)

HIGHER LEVEL (not available for SSST languages)

CONTENT Topics studied include: ▶ The move to global war - military expansionism in Japan, Germany and Italy 1931-1941 ▶ 20th Century World History ▶ Authoritarian states (20th century) The Cold War: Superpower tensions and rivalries (20th century)

▶ The Soviet Union and post-Soviet Russia (1924-2000)

▶ Paper 1 - 20%

▶ Regional Option Historical Investigation: Individual Student Choice

Source based Paper 1 hour ▶ Paper 2 - 25%

RECOMMENDED ENTRY REQUIREMENTS

Essay paper based on two of the 12 World History topics

Students should have a love of History, an ability to write in a structured and fluent fashion, be capable of conducting independent research and skilled in the evaluation and interpretation of source material.

▶ Paper 3 - 35%

1 hour 30 minutes. Essay paper- students select and answer 3 questions. 2 hours 30 minutes. ▶ Internal Assessment - 20% Students complete a historical investigation into a topic of their choice.

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GROUP 3

Geography AIMS

ASSESSMENT

The aims of the geography course at standard level and higher level are to enable students to: ▶ Develop an understanding of the dynamic interrelationships between people, places, spaces and the environment at different scales. ▶ Develop a critical awareness and consider complexity thinking in the context of the nexus of geographic issues. ▶ Understand and evaluate the need for planning and sustainable development through the management of resources at varying scales.

ASSESSMENT OBJECTIVES Students will be assessed on demonstrating knowledge and understanding of specified content, demonstrating application and analysis of knowledge and understanding, demonstrating synthesis and evaluation, and in selecting, using and applying a variety of appropriate skills and techniques. ASSESSMENT Students will be assessed during the course when researching and writing a piece of fieldwork, and in sitting end of course examinations.

CONTENT Topics studied include: Changing Populations; Global Climate – Vulnerability and Resilience; Global Resource Consumption and Security. Additional higher level topics studied are: Power, Places and Networks; Human Development and Diversity; Global Risks and Resilience. Optional topics studied (two at standard level, three at higher level): Freshwater – Drainage Basins; Oceans and Coastal Margins; Extreme Environments; Geophysical

STANDARD LEVEL Candidates sit two end of course external examinations: ▶ Paper 1 - 35% “Geographic Themes” - The ‘Options’ Paper (SL students study two topics) ▶ Paper 2 - 40% “Geographic Perspectives – global change” The ‘Core’ paper (SL study Units 1, 2, 3) ▶ Internal assessment - 25% Students undertake one investigation related to a specific theme through fieldwork. students

Hazards; Leisure; tourism and sport; The Geography of Food and Health; Urban Environments.

RECOMMENDED ENTRY REQUIREMENTS The normal preparation for this IB course is IGCSE geography. However, it is more important that candidates have a genuine interest in the subject and are keen to develop as geographers.

HIGHER LEVEL Candidates sit three end of course external examinations ▶ Paper 1 - 35% “Geographic Themes” - The Options Paper (HL students study three topics): worth 35% ▶ Paper 2 - 25% “Geographic Perspectives – global change” – The ‘Core paper’ (Units 1, 2, 3) ▶ Paper 3 - 20% “Geographic Perspectives – global interactions” – The ‘Higher Core paper’ (Units 4, 5, 6)’ ▶ Internal assessment - 20% Internal assessment is an integral part of the geography course. Students undertake one investigation related to a specific theme through fieldwork.

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GROUP 3

Economics AIMS

ASSESSMENT

The aims of the economics course at SL and HL are to enable students to: ▶ Develop a critical understanding of a range of economic theories, models, ideas and tools in the areas of microeconomics, macroeconomics and the global economy. ▶ Apply economic theories, models, ideas and tools and analyse economic data to understand and engage with real-world economic issues and problems facing individuals and societies. ▶ Develop a conceptual understanding of individuals’ and societies’ economic choices, interactions, challenges and consequences of economic decisionmaking.

ASSESSMENT OBJECTIVES Students will be assessed on demonstrating knowledge and understanding of specified content, demonstrating application and analysis of knowledge and understanding, demonstrating synthesis and evaluation, and in selecting, using and applying a variety of appropriate skills and techniques. ASSESSMENT Students will be assessed during the course when researching and writing portfolio of commentaries and in sitting end of course examinations.

CONTENT

STANDARD LEVEL ▶ Paper 1 - 30% An extended response paper 1 hour 15 minutes ▶ Paper 2- 40% A data response paper 1 hour 45 minutes ▶ Internal Assessment - 30% Students produce a portfolio of three commentaries, based on different units of the syllabus and on published extracts from the news media. Each of the three commentaries should use a different key concept as a lens through which to analyse the published extracts.

There are nine key concepts in the new course: scarcity, choice, efficiency, equity, economic well-being, sustainability, change, independence and intervention. Integrated subtopics of Economics of the environment, Economics of inequality and poverty help to bring to light the main global challenges facing planet today and how these can be addressed using Economics lens. Economics is studies through the four topics of: 1. Introduction to Economics 2. Microeconomics 3. Macroeconomics 4. Global economy

HIGHER LEVEL

RECOMMENDED ENTRY REQUIREMENTS

▶ Paper 1 - 20% An extended response paper

No prior experience or study of Economics is required. A good IGCSE grade in English and Mathematics is required, along with a keen interest in global issues.

1 hour 15 minutes ▶ Paper 2 - 30% A data response paper 1 hour 45 minutes ▶ Paper 3 - 30% A policy paper including both quantitative and qualitative questions. 1 hour 45 minutes ▶ Internal Assessment - 20% Students produce a portfolio of three commentaries, based on different units of the syllabus and on published extracts from the news media. Each of the three commentaries should use a different key concept as a lens through which to analyse the published extracts.

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GROUP 3

Psychology AIMS

ASSESSMENT

The aims of the geography course at standard level and higher level are to enable students to: ▶ Develop an understanding of the biological, cognitive and sociocultural factors affecting mental processes and behaviour. ▶ Apply an understanding of the biological, cognitive and sociocultural factors affecting mental processes and behaviour to at least one applied area of study. ▶ Understand diverse methods of inquiry. ▶ Understand the importance of ethical practice in psychological research in general and observe ethical practice in their own inquiries. ▶ Ensure that ethical practices are upheld in all psychological inquiry and discussion. ▶ Develop an awareness of how psychological research can be applied to address real-world problems and promote positive change.

ASSESSMENT OBJECTIVES Students will be assessed on demonstrating knowledge and understanding of specified content, demonstrating application and analysis of knowledge and understanding, demonstrating synthesis and evaluation, and in selecting, using and applying a variety of appropriate skills and techniques ASSESSMENT Students will be assessed during the course when researching and writing a report on an experimental study undertaken by the student, and in sitting end of course examinations. STANDARD LEVEL Candidates sit two end of course external examinations: ▶ Paper 1 - 50% Three short-answer questions on the core approaches to psychology plus one essay from a choice of three on the biological, cognitive and sociocultural approaches to behaviour. 2 hours ▶ Paper 2 - 25% One question from a choice of three on one option 1 hour ▶ Internal assessment - 25% Experimental study: A report on an experimental study undertaken by the student.

CONTENT Students will learn: The biological approach to understanding behaviour; The cognitive approach to understanding behaviour; The sociocultural approach to understanding behaviour. Students will choose from the following options to deepen their knowledge of the Psychology concepts: Abnormal psychology; Developmental psychology; Health psychology; Psychology of human relations.

RECOMMENDED ENTRY REQUIREMENTS No prior experience or study of psychology is required; good IGCSE attainment in English and Mathematics is desirable along with a keen interest in psychology.

HIGHER LEVEL Candidates sit three end of course external examinations ▶ Paper 1 - 40% Three short-answer questions on the core approaches to psychology and one essay from a choice of three on the biological, cognitive and sociocultural approaches to behaviour. 2 hours ▶ Paper 2 - 20% Two questions; one from a choice of three on each of two options 2 hours ▶ Paper 3 - 20% Three short-answer questions from a list of six questions on approaches to research 1 hour ▶ Internal Assessment - 20% Experimental study: A report on an experimental study undertaken by the student.

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GROUP 3

Business Management AIMS

ASSESSMENT

The aims of the economics course at SL and HL are to enable students to: ▶ Encourage a holistic view of the world of business. ▶ Empower students to think critically and strategically about individual and organizational behaviour. ▶ Promote the importance of exploring business issues from different cultural perspectives. ▶ Enable the student to appreciate the nature and significance of change in a local, regional, and global context. ▶ Promote awareness of the importance of environmental, social and ethical factors in the actions of individuals and organizations. ▶ Develop an understanding of the importance of innovation in a business environment.

ASSESSMENT OBJECTIVES Students will be assessed on demonstrating knowledge and understanding of specified content, demonstrating application and analysis of knowledge and understanding, demonstrating synthesis and evaluation, and in selecting, using and applying a variety of appropriate skills and techniques. ASSESSMENT The students are assessed on end of year examinations and an internal assessment comprising of an all written commentary for standard level, or a research project for higher level

CONTENT

STANDARD LEVEL ▶ Paper 1 - 35% An extended response paper 1 hour 15 minutes ▶ Paper 2- 35% A data response paper 1 hour 45 minutes ▶ Internal Assessment - 30% Students produce a portfolio of three commentaries, based on different units of the syllabus and on published extracts from the news media. Each of the three commentaries should use a different key concept as a lens through which to analyse the published extracts.

Students will study: Business Organisation and Environment; Human Resource Management; Finance and Accounts; Marketing; Operations Management. Key concepts that underpin the course are: Change; Culture; Ethics; Globalisation; Innovation and Strategy.

RECOMMENDED ENTRY REQUIREMENTS No prior experience or study of business is required; good IGCSE attainment in English and Mathematics is desirable along with a keen interest in the world of business.

HIGHER LEVEL ▶ Paper 1 - 25% Based on a pre-released statement that specifies the context and background for the unseen case study. 1 hours 30 minutes ▶ Paper 2 - 30% Based on unseen stimulus material with a quantitative focus. 1 hours 45 minutes ▶ Paper 3 - 25% Based on unseen stimulus material about a social Enterprise. ▶ Internal Assessment - 20% Students produce a research project about a real business issue or problem facing a particular organization using a conceptual lens.

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GROUP 4

Biology AIMS

ASSESSMENT

Biologists investigate the living world at all levels using many different approaches and techniques. The aims of this course is to: ▶ Introduced the opportunity for scientific study and creativity within global contexts to stimulate and challenge students. ▶ Enable students to apply and use a body of knowledge and methods/techniques which characterise science and technology. ▶ Develop an ability to analyse, evaluate and synthesise scientific information. ▶ Engender an awareness of the need for, and the value of effective collaboration and communication during scientific activities. ▶ Develop experimental and investigative scientific skills. ▶ Raise awareness of the moral, ethical, social, economic and environmental implications of using science and technology. ▶ Develop and apply information and communication technology skills in the study of science. ▶ Develop an appreciation of the possibilities and limitations associated with science and scientists. ▶ Encourage an understanding of the relationships between scientific disciplines and the overarching nature of the scientific method.

ASSESSMENT OBJECTIVES The assessment objectives centre upon the nature of science. Assessment requires students to demonstrate knowledge, understanding, and application of facts, concepts, and terminology; methodologies and techniques and communicating scientific information. Students are required to analyse and evaluate scientific methodologies, techniques, hypotheses, data, and explanations; and demonstrate appropriate research, experimental, and personal skills necessary to carry out insightful and ethical investigations. STANDARD LEVEL ▶ Paper 1 - 20% Multiple-choice questions on core material. 45 minutes 2 hours ▶ Paper 2 - 45% Data-based question plus short-answer and extended- response questions on core material. 1hour 15 minutes ▶ Paper 3 - 20% Questions based on experimental skills and techniques, analysis, and evaluation, using unseen data plus short- answer and extended-response questions from option 1 hour ▶ Internal assessment - 20% Laboratory practical /secondary data collection and analysis.

CONTENT During the first year of the course, students learn about cells, metabolism, molecular genetics, inheritance, ecology and photosynthesis. Students are introduced to the Internal Assessment, which can be a laboratory practical or secondary data analysis of their choosing.

HIGHER LEVEL Candidates sit three end of course external examinations ▶ Paper 1 - 20% Multiple-choice questions on core and HL material 1 hour ▶ Paper 2 - 36% Data-based question plus short-answer and extended- response questions on AHL material. 2hours 15 minutes ▶ Paper 3 - 24% Short-answer questions based on experimental skills and techniques, analysis, and evaluation, using unseen data linked to the core and AHL material plus short- answer and extended-response questions from one option. 1 hour 15 minutes

In the second year of the course, students learn about plant biology, evolution and biodiversity, human physiology, animal physiology plus an optional topic which might be one of several including neurobiology, biotechnology, ecology or human physiology. Some of these topics are covered by all students, some are Higher Level only and some are Standard Level only. Many are part of the Subject Specific Core while others are specific to HL studies.

RECOMMENDED ENTRY REQUIREMENTS A grade ‘B’ in IGCSE Coordinated Science, IGCSE Biology or the equivalent alongside a grade ‘B’ in mathematics IGCSE.

26


GROUP 4

Chemistry ASSESSMENT ASSESSMENT OBJECTIVES Assessment requires students to demonstrate knowledge, understanding, and application of facts, concepts, and terminology; methodologies and techniques and communicating scientific information. Students are required to analyse and evaluate scientific methodologies, techniques, hypotheses, data, and explanations; and demonstrate appropriate research, experimental, and personal skills necessary to carry out insightful and ethical investigations.

AIMS Through the overarching theme of the nature of science, the aims of the DP chemistry course enable students to: ▶ Appreciate scientific study and creativity within a global context through stimulating and challenging opportunities . ▶ Acquire a body of knowledge, methods and techniques that characterize science and technology. ▶ Apply and use a body of knowledge, methods and techniques that characterize science and technology. ▶ Develop an ability to analyze, evaluate and synthesize scientific information. ▶ Develop a critical awareness of the need for, and the value of, effective collaboration and communication during scientific activities. ▶ Develop experimental and investigative scientific skills including the use of current technologies. ▶ Develop and apply 21st century communication skills in the study of science (including digital literacy). ▶ Become critically aware, as global citizens, of the ethical implications of using science and technology. ▶ Develop an appreciation of the possibilities and limitations of science and technology. ▶ Develop an understanding of the relationships between scientific disciplines and their influence on other areas of knowledge.

ASSESSMENT Students are assessed through end of year exams in year 13, as well as through a student led laboratory practical /secondary data collection, and analysis. STANDARD LEVEL ▶ Paper 1 - 20% Multiple-choice questions on core material 45 minutes ▶ Paper 2 - 40% Data-based question plus short-answer and extended-response questions on core material. 1 hour 15 minutes ▶ Paper 3- 20% Questions based on experimental skills and techniques, analysis, and evaluation, using unseen data plus short-answer and extended-response questions from option. 1 hour ▶ Internal Assessment - 20% Laboratory practical /secondary data collection and analysis.

CONTENT During the first year of the course, students learn about stoichiometric relationships, atomic structure, periodicity, chemical bonding & structure, thermochemistry, chemical kinetics, acids and bases (SL only) redox (SL only), organic chemistry (SL only), experimental techniques, measurement and data processing and Internal assessment. Students

HIGHER LEVEL

are introduced to the Internal Assessment, which can be a laboratory practical or secondary data analysis of their choosing.

▶ Paper 1 - 20% Multiple-choice questions on core and HL material

In the second year of the course, students learn about chemical equilibrium, acids and bases (HL only), redox processes (HL only), organic chemistry (HL only), measurement & analysis and experimental techniques

1 hour ▶ Paper 2 - 36% Data-based question plus short-answer and extended-response questions on AHL material. 2 hours 15 minutes

RECOMMENDED ENTRY REQUIREMENTS

▶ Paper 3 - 24% Short-answer questions based on experimental skills and techniques, analysis, and evaluation, using unseen data linked to the core and AHL material plus short-answer and extended-response questions from one option.

A grade ‘B’ in IGCSE Coordinated Science, IGCSE Chemistry or the equivalent alongside a grade ‘B’ in mathematics IGCSE.

▶ Internal Assessment - 20% Laboratory practical/secondary data collection and analysis.

27


GROUP 4

Physics ASSESSMENT ASSESSMENT OBJECTIVES The assessment objectives centre upon the nature of science. Assessment requires students to demonstrate knowledge, understanding, and application of facts, concepts, and terminology; methodologies and techniques and communicating scientific information. Students are required to analyse and evaluate scientific methodologies, techniques, hypotheses, data, and explanations; and demonstrate appropriate research, experimental, and personal skills necessary to carry out insightful and ethical investigations.

AIMS Through studying Physics, students become familiar of the ways that scientists work and communicate with each other. There is the emphasis on a practical approach through experimental work. The aims of this course is to: ▶ Introduce the opportunity for scientific study and creativity within global contexts to stimulate and challenge students. ▶ Enable students to apply and use a body of knowledge and methods/techniques which characterise science and technology. ▶ Develop an ability to analyse, evaluate and synthesise scientific information. ▶ Engender an awareness of the need for, and the value of effective collaboration and communication during scientific activities. ▶ Develop experimental and investigative scientific skills. ▶ Raise awareness of the moral, ethical, social, economic and environmental implications of using science and technology. ▶ Develop and apply information and communication technology skills in the study of science. ▶ Develop an appreciation of the possibilities and limitations associated with science and scientists. ▶ Encourage an understanding of the relationships between scientific disciplines and the overarching nature of the scientific method.

STANDARD LEVEL ▶ Paper 1 - 20% Multiple-choice questions on core material 45 minutes ▶ Paper 2 - 40% Data-based question plus short-answer and extended- response questions on core material. 1 hour 15 minutes ▶ Paper 3 - 20% Questions based on experimental skills and techniques, analysis, and evaluation, using unseen data plus short- answer and extended-response questions from option 1 hour ▶ Internal assessment - 20% This paper will have questions on core and SL option material. 1 hour

CONTENT Students learn the following topics: Measurements and uncertainties; Mechanics; Thermal physics; Waves; Electricity and magnetism; Circular motion and gravitation; Atomic, Nuclear and particle physics; Energy production; Wave phenomena; Fields; Electromagnetic induction; Quantum and nuclear physics; Astrophysics.

HIGHER LEVEL Candidates sit three end of course external examinations ▶ Paper 1 - 20% Multiple-choice questions on core and HL material 1 hour ▶ Paper 2 - 36% Data-based question plus short-answer and extended- response questions on AHL material. 2hours 15 minutes ▶ Paper 3 - 24% Short-answer questions based on experimental skills and techniques, analysis, and evaluation, using unseen data linked to the core and AHL material plus short-answer and extended-response questions from one option. 1 hour 15 minutes

RECOMMENDED ENTRY REQUIREMENTS A grade ‘B’ in IGCSE Coordinated Science, IGCSE Physics or the equivalent alongside a grade ‘B’ in mathematics IGCSE.

▶ Internal Assessment - 20% Laboratory practical/secondary data collection and analysis.

28


GROUP 4

Computer Science

ASSESSMENT ASSESSMENT OBJECTIVES The assessment objectives centre upon the nature of science. Assessment requires students to demonstrate knowledge, understanding, and application of facts, concepts, and terminology; methodologies and techniques and communicating scientific information. Students are required to analyse and evaluate scientific methodologies, techniques, hypotheses, data, and explanations; and demonstrate appropriate research, experimental, and personal skills necessary to carry out insightful and ethical investigations.

AIMS The aims of the Computer Science course are to: ▶ Provide opportunities for study and creativity within a global context that will stimulate and challenge students developing the skills necessary for independent and lifelong learning. ▶ Provide a body of knowledge, methods and techniques that characterize Computer Science. ▶ Enable students to apply and use a body of knowledge, methods and techniques that characterize Computer Science. ▶ Demonstrate initiative in applying thinking skills critically to identify and resolve complex problems. ▶ Engender an awareness of the need for, and the value of, effective collaboration and communication in resolving complex problems. ▶ Develop logical and critical thinking as well as experimental, investigative and problem-solving skills. ▶ Develop and apply the students’ information and communication technology skills in the study of Computer Science to communicate information confidently and effectively.

ASSESSMENT Students are assessed through end of year exams in year 13, as well as through a student led solution for an identified problem demonstrating skills learned during the course. STANDARD LEVEL ▶ Paper 1 - 45% Computer Science Theory 1 hour 30 minutes ▶ Paper 2 - 25% Object Oriented Programming 1 hour ▶ Internal assessment - 25% Solution: Students should undertake a challenging task using appropriate techniques to showcase their algorithmic thinking and organisational skills.

CONTENT The SL course focuses on four fundamental topics: project management, hardware, networking and programming. The HL course has three additional components: data structures, operating systems and control systems. HL students must also sit a case study paper. Java is the main programming language used in the course.

HIGHER LEVEL ▶ Paper 1 - 40% Computer Science Theory 1 hour 30 minutes ▶ Paper 2 - 20% Object Oriented Programming 1 hour 20 minutes ▶ Paper 3 - 20% Case study 1 hour

RECOMMENDED ENTRY REQUIREMENTS Previous study of Computer Science is not essential, but programming experience is an advantage. The study of Computer Science at Higher Level demands a high level of problem solving skills and the ability to understand and manipulate abstract concepts. Grade ‘B’ or above in mathematics IGCSE is strongly recommended

▶ Internal Assessment - 20% Solution: Students should undertake a challenging task using appropriate techniques to showcase their algorithmic thinking and organisational skills.

29


GROUP 4

Sport, Exercise and Health Science

ASSESSMENT ASSESSMENT OBJECTIVES The assessment objectives centre upon the nature of science related to sport. Assessment requires students to demonstrate knowledge, understanding, and application of facts, concepts, and terminology; methodologies and techniques and communicating scientific information. Students are required to analyse and evaluate scientific methodologies, techniques, hypotheses, data, and explanations; and demonstrate appropriate research, experimental, and personal skills necessary to carry out insightful and ethical investigations.

AIMS The Diploma Programme course in Sports, Exercise and Health Science involves the study of the science that underpins physical performance and provides the opportunity to apply these principles. This is a GROUP 4 course and incorporates the traditional disciplines of anatomy and physiology, biomechanics, psychology, and nutrition, which are studied in the context of sport, exercise, and health. Students will cover a range of core and option topics and carry out practical (experimental) investigations in both laboratory and field settings. This will provide an opportunity to acquire the knowledge and understanding necessary to apply scientific principles and critically analyse human performance. Where relevant, the course will address issues of international dimension and ethics by considering sport, exercise, and health relative to the individual and in a global context.

ASSESSMENT Students are assessed through end of year exams in year 13, as well as through a student led practical or secondary data collection, and analysis. STANDARD LEVEL ▶ Paper 1 - 20% Multiple choice paper on the 6 compulsory units 45 minutes ▶ Paper 2 - 35% Long answer questions on the 6 compulsory units of the course 1 hour 15 minutes ▶ Paper 3- 25% Long answer questions based on the 2 optional units 1 hour ▶ Internal Assessment - 20% Individual investigation including data collection and analysis.

CONTENT Students study six compulsory components at standard and higher level: Anatomy; Exercise Physiology; Energy Systems; Movement Analysis; Skill in Sport; Measurement and Evaluation of Human Performance. Standard level students study two of several optional components: Optimizing Physiological Performance; Exercise and Health. Students study a further seven components at higher level: Optimizing Physiological Performance; Further Anatomy; The Endocrine System; Fatigue; Friction and Drag; Skill Acquisition and Analysis; Genetics and Athletic Performance; Exercise and Immunity. Higher level students study two of several optional components: Optimizing Physiological Performance; Exercise and Health.

HIGHER LEVEL

RECOMMENDED ENTRY REQUIREMENTS

▶ Paper 1 - 20% Multiple choice paper on the 13 compulsory units of the course

A grade ‘B’ in IGCSE Coordinated Science, IGCSE Chemistry or the equivalent alongside a grade ‘B’ in mathematics IGCSE.

1 hour ▶ Paper 2 - 35% Long answer questions on the 13 compulsory units of the course 2 hours 15 minutes ▶ Paper 3 - 25% Long answer questions based on the 2 optional units 1 hour 15 minutes ▶ Internal Assessment - 20% Individual investigation including data collection

30


GROUP 5

Mathematics: Applications and Interpretations AIMS

ASSESSMENT

It is the intention of the Diploma Programme Maths A and I course that students achieve the following objectives.

ASSESSMENT OBJECTIVES

▶ Enjoy mathematics, developing an appreciation of the elegance and power of mathematics.

Students will be assessed in their knowledge and understanding, problem solving, communication and interpretation, use of technology, reasoning, and inquiry approaches.

▶ Develop an understanding of the principles and nature of the subject.

ASSESSMENT

▶ Communicate clearly and confidently in a variety of contexts.

Assessment of students’ learning includes a mathematical exploration, and end of year examinations where students are required to answer questions using their calculators.

▶ Develop logical, critical and creative thinking, and patience and persistence in problem- solving. ▶ Employ and refine the power of abstraction and generalization.

STANDARD LEVEL ▶ Paper 1 - 40% Technology (calculator) required, short-response questions. 1 hour 30 minutes ▶ Paper 2 - 40% Technology (calculator) required, extended-response questions. 1 hour 30 minutes ▶ Internal assessment - 20% Mathematical exploration investigating an area of mathematics.

▶ Apply and transfer skills to alternative situations and other areas of knowledge. ▶ Appreciate how developments in technology and mathematics have influenced each other. ▶ Appreciate the moral, social and ethical implications arising from the application of mathematics. ▶ Appreciate the international dimension in mathematics through an awareness of the universality of mathematics and its multicultural and historical perspectives. ▶ Appreciate the contribution of mathematics to other disciplines, and as a particular area of knowledge in the TOK course.

CONTENT Students will learn the following topics over the two year programme: Number and Algebra; Descriptive Statistics; Logic, Sets and Probability; Statistical Applications; Geometry and Trigonometry; Mathematical Models; Introductory Differential Calculus.

RECOMMENDED ENTRY REQUIREMENTS Students should have a good understanding of mathematical concepts demonstrated with a minimum grade C or 4 at IGCSE or equivalent.

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GROUP 5

Mathematics: Analysis and Approaches AIMS

ASSESSMENT

It is the intention of the Diploma Programme Maths A and A course that students achieve the following objectives.

ASSESSMENT OBJECTIVES

▶ Enjoy mathematics, developing an appreciation of the elegance and power of mathematics. ▶ Develop an understanding of the principles and nature of the subject. ▶ Communicate clearly and confidently in a variety of contexts. ▶ Develop logical, critical and creative thinking, and patience and persistence in problem-solving. ▶ Employ and refine the power of abstraction and generalization. ▶ Apply and transfer skills to alternative situations and other areas of knowledge. ▶ Appreciate how developments in technology and mathematics have influenced each other. ▶ Appreciate the moral, social and ethical implications arising from the application of mathematics. ▶ Appreciate the international dimension in mathematics through an awareness of the universality of mathematics and its multicultural and historical perspectives. ▶ Appreciate the contribution of mathematics to other disciplines, and as a particular area of knowledge in the TOK course.

CONTENT Students will learn the following topics over the two year programme: Number; Algebra; Functions and Equations; Circular Functions and Trigonometry; Vectors; Statistics and Probability; Calculus. Additional higher level topics studied are: Complex numbers; Proof by induction; Further trigonometry ratios; Vectors; Bayes Theorem; Further differentiation including L’Hopitals rule and Maclaurin Series.

RECOMMENDED ENTRY REQUIREMENTS Students should have a good understanding of mathematical concepts demonstrated with a minimum grade A or 7 at IGCSE for Maths SL, and a grade A* or grade 9 at IGCSE or for higher level.

Problem solving is central to learning mathematics and involves the acquisition of mathematical skills and concepts in a wide range of situations, including nonroutine, open-ended and real-world problems. Having followed a DP mathematics course, students will be expected to recall, select and use their knowledge of mathematical facts, concepts and techniques in a variety of familiar and unfamiliar contexts. They will need to recall, select and use their knowledge of mathematical skills, results and models in both abstract and real-world contexts to solve problems. Students will transform common realistic contexts into mathematics, use technology accurately, appropriately and efficiently both to explore new ideas and to solve problems, construct mathematical arguments through use of precise statements, logical deduction and inference and by the manipulation of mathematical expressions, and investigate unfamiliar situations. ASSESSMENT Assessment of students’ learning includes a mathematical exploration, and end of year examinations where students are required to answer questions using their calculators. STANDARD LEVEL ▶ Paper 1 - 40% No technology (calculator) permitted, short-response and extended-response questions. 1 hour 30 minutes ▶ Paper 2 - 40% Technology (calculator) required, short-response and extended-response questions. 1 hour 30 minutes ▶ Internal assessment - 20% Mathematical exploration investigating an area of mathematics. HIGHER LEVEL ▶ Paper 1 - 30% No technology (calculator) permitted, short-response and extended-response questions. 2 hours ▶ Paper 2 - 30% Technology (calculator) required, short-response and extended-response questions, 2 hours ▶ Paper 3 - 20% Technology (calculator) required, extended-response problem solving questions., 1 hour ▶ Internal Assessment - 20% Mathematical exploration investigating an area of mathematics.

32


GROUP 6

Visual Arts AIMS

ASSESSMENT

IB Visual Arts embraces a wide variety of expressive approaches. Students learn to investigate deeply and locate themselves within a historical/cultural context and to extendtheir use of materials and concepts beyond traditional boundaries. Both intellectual and emotional learning are developed through the study of Visual Art. While students are introduced to advanced processes and materials, the media they choose to use throughout the two years of the course is at their discretion. Through the investigation and experimental phases students discover the most appropriate media and approach. The course rapidly becomes very personal.

ASSESSMENT OBJECTIVES Assessment Objectives for each component: ▶ Comparative study: •

Identification and analysis of formal Qualities

Analysis and Understanding of function and purpose

Analysis and Evaluations of Cultural Significance

Making comparisons and connections

Presentation and Subject Specific Language

▶ Process Portfolio:

CONTENT The course encompasses a wide range of activities designed to encourage students to explore and discover new possibilities in the visual arts. Students develop ideas and themes for their studio work and refine their skills in the investigation workbook. New art processes and concepts, the use of media, and learning research techniques that yield many possibilities for studio works are the driving force for work in the investigation journal. Gallery visits, drawings, experiments with materials and approaches, and historical and critical analysis are included. Divergent and convergent strategies are employed.

Skills, techniques and processes

Critical Investigation, Communication of ideas and intentions

Reviewing, refining and reflecting

Presentation and subject specific language

▶ Exhibition:

In the studio, students develop an exciting and highly personal portfolio of work in preparation for their exam/ show. The portfolio of work serves a second purpose for those who choose to attend post- secondary education in the visual arts: it is their university admissions portfolio.

Coherent body of work

Technical Competence

Conceptual Qualities

Curatorial Practice

STANDARD & HIGHER LEVEL ▶ Process Portfolio - 40% Digital sketchbook where ideas, processes, developments, reflections and realizations are documented. ▶ Comparative Study- 20% An in depth study into artworks and artists from three different cultures and how their artwork and ideas compare to each other. ▶ Exhibition - 40% Studio pieces created for an exhibition that will comprise all artwork made over two year course

RECOMMENDED ENTRY REQUIREMENTS Completion of IGCSE Art and Design course is helpful although not required. Assessment of artistic skills is required.

33


GROUP 6

Music AIMS

ASSESSMENT

The aims of the Music course at standard level and higher level are to enable students to:

ASSESSMENT OBJECTIVES Students will be assessed to identify information from academic and practical inquiry. They will present ideas, discoveries and learning in personalised and authentic ways by way of research, composition and performance.

▶ To experience and develop musical horizons through music from wide-ranging personal and cultural musical backgrounds, including the community around them. ▶ Evaluate and develop critical perspectives on their own music and the work of others. ▶ Explore a range of musical contexts and make links to, and between, different musical practices, conventions and forms of expression

ASSESSMENT Students will complete a variety of assessment pieces over the two years from their engagement with:

▶ Engage with music technology. ▶ Connect theoretical studies to practical work to gain a deeper understanding of the music they engage with.

Music for sociocultural and political expression

▶ Develop collaborative skills through the planning, preparation, performance and reflection of a muti media project (HL only)

Music for listening and performance

Music for dramatic impact, movement and entertainment

Music technology in the digital age.

STANDARD LEVEL ▶ Exploration Portfolio - 30% Written work to demonstrate engagement with, and understanding of, diverse musical material, along with practical exercises in creating and performing. ▶ Experimentation Report - 30% Rationale and commentary to support practical musical evidence of experimentation in creating and performing. ▶ Presenting Music - 40% Finished works in creating and performing, supported by programme notes.

CONTENT Students will explore music in context and learn how to engage with a diverse range of music. They will develop skills as researchers, creators and performers, students will learn to experiment with a range of musical material and stimuli from the areas of inquiry across local and global contexts. Students will have the opportunity to participate and engage in masterclasses and European Music festival. They will also collaborate with expert musicians from Juilliard and attend concerts multimedia performances.

RECOMMENDED ENTRY REQUIREMENTS

HIGHER LEVEL ▶ Exploration Portfolio - 20% Written work to demonstrate engagement with, and understanding of, diverse musical material, along with practical exercises in creating and performing. ▶ Experimentation Report - 20% Rationale and commentary to support practical musical evidence of experimentation in creating and performing. ▶ Presenting Music - 30% Finished works in creating and performing, supported by programme notes. ▶ Multimedia Presentation - 30% Students document a real-life project, including the project proposal, process and evaluation, and the realised project.

Students should have a good understanding of musical concepts demonstrated with a minimum grade C at IGCSE or equivalent for standard level, and a grade B at IGCSE orequivalent for higher level. Students without IGCSE may study Music IB if they are enthusiastic about the subject and can play a musical instrument or sing. A minimum standard in musical performance will be required and assessed by the IB Music teacher.

34


IBDP CORE

Theory of Knowledge (TOK) AIMS

ASSESSMENT

Theory of Knowledge is an interdisciplinary course intended to stimulate critical reflection on the knowledge and experience gained inside and outside the classroom. ▶ To encourage students to reflect on the central question, “How do we know that?”, and to recognize the value of asking that question ▶ To expose students to ambiguity, uncertainty and questions with multiple plausible answers ▶ To equip students to effectively navigate and make sense of the world, and help prepare them to encounter novel and complex situations ▶ To encourage students to be more aware of their own perspectives and to reflect critically on their own beliefs and assumptions ▶ To engage students with multiple perspectives, foster open-mindedness and develop intercultural understanding ▶ To encourage students to make connections between academic disciplines by exploring underlying concepts and by identifying similarities and differences in the methods of inquiry used in different areas of knowledge ▶ To prompt students to consider the importance of values, responsibilities and ethical concerns relating to the production, acquisition, application, and communication of knowledge.

ASSESSMENT OBJECTIVES Assessment Objectives for each component: ▶ Having completed the TOK course, students should be able to: ▶ Demonstrate TOK thinking through the critical examination of knowledge questions. ▶ Identify and explore links between knowledge questions and the world around us. ▶ Identify and explore links between knowledge questions and areas of knowledge. ▶ Develop relevant, clear, and coherent arguments. ▶ Use examples and evidence effectively to support a discussion. ▶ Demonstrate awareness and evaluation of different points of view. ▶ Consider the implications of arguments and conclusions. ASSESSMENT There are two assessment tasks in the TOK course. 1. The TOK exhibition assesses the ability of the student to show how TOK manifests in the world around us. The exhibition is an internal assessment component; it is marked by the teacher and is externally moderated by the IB.

CONTENT The TOK course, a flagship element in the Diploma Programme, encourages critical thinking about knowledge to try to help young people make sense of what they encounter. Its core content poses questions such as: What counts as knowledge? How does it grow? What are its limits? Who owns knowledge? What is the value of knowledge? What are the implications of having, or not having, knowledge?

2. The TOK essay engages students in a more formal and sustained piece of writing in response to a title focused on the areas of knowledge. The essay is an external assessment component; it is marked by IB examiners. The essay must be a maximum of 1,600 words and must be on one of the six prescribed titles issued by the IB for each examination session.

What makes TOK unique and different from standard academic disciplines is its process? At the centre of the course is the student as knower.

STANDARD & HIGHER LEVEL ▶ Part 1 - External Assessment: 67% Essay on a Prescribed Title (1200 – 1600 words) ▶ Part 2 - Internal Assessment: 33% TOK Exhibition - (knowledge-based description of three objects, 950 words in total)

In TOK, students have the opportunity to step back from the relentless acquisition of new knowledge in order to consider knowledge questions. The course encourages students to share ideas with others and to listen to and learn from what others think. In this process, students’ thinking and their understanding of knowledge as a human construction are shaped, enriched and deepened.

RECOMMENDED ENTRY REQUIREMENTS Every IB Diploma candidate must study TOK.

35


IBDP CORE

Extended Essay AIMS

RECOMMENDED ENTRY REQUIREMENTS

Every IB Diploma candidate must submit an Extended Essay. This is defined as an in-depth study of a limited topic within a subject. The essay should be 4000 words in length and offers the student an opportunity to investigate a topic of special interest. The essay acquaints students with the independent research and writing skills expected at university.

Every IB Diploma candidate must submit an Extended Essay.

ASSESSMENT All Extended Essays are externally assessed by examiners appointed by the IB. Essays are graded according to how well candidates manage aspects of the process: their knowledge and understanding (of the topic, research question, subject area, research areas and approaches), application and analysis (of appropriate research and its effective, focused analysis), synthesis and evaluation (in the clear, reasoned expression of the overall arguments presented and to evaluate these and the research conducted) and the ability to present it all in an appropriate academic format.

CONTENT Students can choose a topic from one of the six subject groups or World Studies. Students at The British School Warsaw are directed to choose one of their higher level subjects where they have been studied skills and knowledge in their chosen subject at a great depth. Candidates should base their choice of subject on the level of personal interest that they have in that subject. Students are taken through the process of their Extended Essay early in their Diploma Prog ramme where they are introduced to different tools and databases with which they can research, as well as workshops in academic integrity and writing.

The assessment criteria are organised thus: ▶ Focus and Method ▶ Knowledge and understanding ▶ Critical thinking ▶ Presentation ▶ Engagement

Each student has an Extended Essay supervisor – usually a teacher with knowledge or a special interest in that area. Supervisors may provide support with defining a suitable topic; formulating a precise research question; access to appropriate resources; techniques of gathering and analysing information/ evidence/data and documentation methods for acknowledging sources.

The results from Theory of Knowledge and Extended Essay are combined and points awarded using the following matrix:

EXTENDED ESSAY

THEORY OF KNOWLEDGE GRADE AWARDED

A

B

C

D

E OR N

A

3

3

2

2

FAILING CONDITION

B

3

2

2

1

C

2

2

1

0 FAILING CONDITION

D E OR N

2

1

0

FAILING CONDITION 36

0


IBDP CORE

Creativity, Activity and Service (CAS) AIMS

ASSESSMENT

The CAS element of the IB Diploma places importance on life outside the world of scholarship, providing a counterbalance to the academic curriculum. The creative, physical, and social development of people can be shaped by their own experiences. Participation in CAS encourages students to share their energies and special talents while developing awareness, concern, and the ability to work cooperatively with others. The IB’s goal of educating the whole person and fostering more caring and socially responsible attitudes comes alive with CAS. Not only is the CAS portfolio a requirement for the IB Diploma, but it is an excellent discussion point for university applications.

Students are expected to complete all CAS activities throughout the 18 months of their whole IB Diploma. This will include completing a CAS project, and covering the eight learning outcomes: 1. Undertake new challenges. 2. Plan and initiate activities. 3. Work collaboratively with others. 4. Engage with issues and commitment in activity. 5. Engage with issues of global importance. 6. Consider the ethical implications of actions. 7. Develop new skills.

COMPONENTS OF CAS

Students reflect on their learning on an ongoing basis using ManageBac as a communication tool. In addition to written reflections, students also complete a CAS review during an official interview.

Creativity should be interpreted as imaginatively as possible to cover the widest range of arts and other activities and to include creativity by the individual student in organising and executing service projects. Activity can involve expeditions, sports or physical training, in addition to any action involved in carrying out service work. Service can involve social service in addition to environmental and international projects.

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