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Kesley Jacob acquitted of manslaughter /5

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Police, firefighters make up bulk of top salaries /3

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Thursday, April 3, 2014

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L O C A L NEWS

LEITH DUNICK

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ON A STROLL: A woman walks her dog Monday on property adjacent to Lakehead Psychiatric Hospital.

Fines to come City says off-leash dogs could cost owners $5,000 THUNDER BAY

have the right to enforce dogs running at large back there.” It’s a matter of public safety, Bourret og owners who continue to use land said. On at least one occasion a dog on a leash behind the Lakehead Psychiatric Hospital as an impromptu off-leash dog was viciously attacked by a dog not on a leash. There was also a case of a man being park could wind up in court. If convicted, they could face a fine as mauled by an off-leash dog, which led to charges being laid. high as $5,000. Bourret said his bylaw enforcement Ron Bourret, the city’s manager of bylaw enforcement, on Monday said his depart- officers have embarked on an education ment intends to step up patrols in response campaign to let the public know they’re not allowed to run their dogs off to complaints about dogs running leash in the park, encouraging loose. them to use the city’s official offRegardless of who owns the property that’s against the rules, “We have the leash parks found throughout Thunder Bay. Bourret said. right to The message still doesn’t appear “People have had a misconcep- enforce dogs to be getting through. tion that because before it was running at A lunchtime check showed provincial property and the large back several dog owners walking their province wasn’t saying anything there.” pets without leashes. to them that they can run their One woman, who did not give dogs back there off-leash,” RON BOURRET her name, said she was not Bourret said. breaking the law. A quick check of the legalities “I have to run my dog every of the situation showed the dog day,” she said, miffed that media was there. owners are in the wrong. Bourret said with the education program “When you and I open our door and our dog runs out, the minute it leaves our coming to an end, it won’t be media the property, whether it runs on federal public should be worried about. “We are now going into more rigorous property or it runs on provincial property or municipal property, it is a dog running at enforcement. Rather than warnings, I directed the staff last week to start issuing large,” Bourret said. He added his officers have been told at tickets.” A first offence will net someone a ticket times they have no jurisdiction. “It’s the old-fashioned term of head for that will cost between $150 and $200. A Mexico, get across the border type of thing second offence will lead to a court appearand you’re safe. It does not exist ... We ance and a possbile fine of up to $5,000. By Leith Dunick – TB Source

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Thursday, April 3, 2014

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L O C A L NEWS

READ US ONLINE: w w w. t b n e w s w a t c h . c o m

City’s sunshine list ahead by a century T H U N D E R B AY

By Matt Vis – TB Source he city’s 100K club skyrocketed in 2013. Ontario’s Ministry of Finance on Friday released its annual public salary disclosure for 2013. The document, known to many as the sunshine list, makes the salaries of any public sector employee in the province public. The 2014 disclosure, which reports on salaries collected through 2013, shows the City of Thunder Bay had 249 employees earning more than $100,000. That’s slightly more than 2012 when the city had 244 employees, but is a significant jump from the 150 city employees who were on the list in 2013. The increase can mostly be attributed to Thunder Bay Fire Rescue, which had 106 members on the list. That rise, from 41 in 2012, is a result of a contract settlement reached in June of last year that gave firefighters back pay, similar to the list from two years ago. “The 249 number will shrink next year, I’m not sure what it will be but my sense is we’ll be well below 200 employees,” said city manager Tim Commisso. “It’s an anomaly similar to 2011.” There was also a slight increase in the number of members from the Thunder Bay Police Service on the list, which went from 66 on the 2013 list to 85 in the 2014 version. Commisso tops the municipal payroll with an annual salary of $229,608. Police chief J.P. Levesque made 209,748, while fire chief John Hay took home $168,267. St. Joseph Care Group physician advisor of mental health and addictions Lois Hutchinson was the

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WELL PAID: More than 100 firefighters made more than $100,000 in 2013. highest paid provincial employee last year with a salary of $405,190. St. Joseph Care Group CEO Tracy Buckler earned $315, 012. Thunder Bay Regional Health Sciences Centre CEO Andree Robichaud's salary totalled more than $385,000. Lakehead University president Brian Stevenson took home

$360,000 and Confederation College president Jim Madder made $226,921. Lakehead District School Board executive director Catherine Siemieniuk made $195,845 while Thunder Bay Catholic District School Board director Joan Powell had a salary of $172,081.

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Thursday, April 3, 2014

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L O C A L NEWS

POLITICS By Jodi Lundmark – TB Source orthern leaders are looking at the new minister of municipal affairs and housing as another ally in the region’s corner. The Northern Ontario Municipal Association is ecstatic about Premier Kathleen Wynne’s appointment of MPP Bill Mauro (Lib., Thunder BayAtikokan) as outgoing minister Linda Jeffery’s replacement.

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Pleased NOMA president and Kenora mayor David Canfield said the organization was abuzz with the news Wednesday morning. “NOMA is quite happy with the fact we now have two ministers,” he said, noting that with Thunder Bay-Superior North MPP Michael Gravelle at the

helm of Northern Development and Mines, the region’s lead ministry, and Mauro leading the main portfolio for municipalities, the region is in a win-win situation. “It’ll be a great opportunity to work with these gentlemen who have a passion for Northwestern Ontario and have a passion for their area to work even closer and hopefully make things happen even quicker,” said Canfield. The battle with the Municipal Property Assessment Corporation over industrial tax reassessments and ensuring the region has the energy it needs are the two biggest issues Northwestern Ontario is facing and Canfield said he looks forward to the new working relationship with both Mauro and Gravelle. “We plan on getting together as soon as possible and start getting things moving,” said Canfield. Mauro’s experience as a city coun-

cillor will be an asset, said Canfield, adding he’s excited to see the newly appointed minister search back into his previous life in municipal politics and use it as a tool.

Experienced Not only is Mauro’s council experience valuable, but so is his time as a housing manager for the Thunder Bay District Social Services Administrative Board, said DSSAB vice-chairman Aldo Ruberto. “We’re very, very happy that he’s there,” said Ruberto of Mauro’s new cabinet post. “I’m sure Bill is very aware of what our needs are in terms of housing,” he said, noting the city has brought the issue forward to the intergovernmental committee many times. The district’s biggest issue is the lack of affordable housing.

Ruberto said it’s expensive to build and not many people are going to build affordable housing units without government incentives. And while Ruberto knows Mauro has to work within the budget he’s given, he’s pleased the minister of municipal affairs and housing has experience in city politics. “He is very aware of our issues and he knows exactly what’s going on,” said Ruberto. Gravelle is thrilled for his colleague and said that the ministry of municipal affairs and housing is an important portfolio to hold. “It’s one that’s crucially important to certainly the municipal leadership here in Northern Ontario,” he said. Gravelle believes this will make the pair of MPPs an even stronger team now that they’ll both be sitting around the cabinet table.

FILE

Mauro seen as regional cabinet ally

NEW JOB: MPP Bill Mauro was named Minister of Municipal Affairs and Housing last week by Premier Kathleen Wynne.

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FREE MAN: Kesley Jacob, 35, was found not guilty by a jury last Thursday at the Superior Court of Justice.

Jacob not guilty

Summer Beaver man was facing manslaughter charge COURT

By Jodi Lundmark – TB Source

esley Jacob is a free man. The 35-year-old Summer Beaver First Nations man was found not guilty last Thursday by a jury on the charge of manslaughter in connection with the 2011 death of Barney Beaver, 53, at the Superior Court of Justice. The judge delivered the charge to the jury Thursday morning and by defence lawyer George Joseph’s count, it took one hour and 12 minutes for the jury to reach a verdict. “My client is probably a little too emotional for words right now but he is relieved that for the last two years - more than two years now he’s lived with this,” said Joseph shortly after the verdict was read. “He’s glad that it’s over and in his own words, he’s just happy to go back on with his life.” During the trial, Jacob testified a physical altercation happened

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between the two men after Jacob walked in on Beaver “violating” his wife. Jacob described Beaver as being a friend and like an uncle prior to the incident. The court heard how Jacob, along with his common-law wife, spent the evening of Dec. 16, 2011 with Beaver having drinks in his hotel room at the Victoria Inn before going down to Chicago Joe’s restaurant. After a few more drinks the group, which included one other man, returned to the hotel room. Jacob said he had gone outside to have a cigarette with one of the other members of the group, leaving his common-law spouse alone with Beaver. Both Beaver and Jacob’s wife were described as intoxicated at the time they were left in the hotel room. When Jacob returned, he saw his wife on the bed with her pants and underwear down around her ankles

with Beaver standing over top of her. That’s when the physical altercation between the two men occurred. When he left the room, Jacob said Beaver was attempting to stand up using support from furniture in the room. He said Beaver ordered them out of the room, threatening to call police if they didn’t leave. Beaver was found unconscious in the room the next morning and died in hospital nearly a week later. Jacob was originally charged with aggravated assault but it became a homicide case upon Beaver’s death. The trial was the last jury trial to be held at the Camelot Street courthouse. “This particular courthouse has a lot of history to it and I was glad to be part of that history and I’m glad everything worked out for Mr. Jacob,” said Joseph. – With files from Matt Vis.

23-year-old faces child-porn charges CRIME

By Leith Dunick – TB Source

23-year-old man is facing childpornography charges after two computers, flash drives and a series

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of SD cards were seized from a Hodder Avenue residence. Thunder Bay Police say Roger Constantin was charged with possession of child pornography and make available child pornog-

raphy following a peer-to-peer file sharing investigation. Constantin made a brief appearance in Thunder Bay court and will return to face the charges on April 22.

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JOHN ST. ROAD)

www.creekside.ca

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Thursday, April 3, 2014

Editorial EDITORIAL

Time for an election he time has come to call a provincial election. There are just too many questions facing the Liberal government of Premier Kathleen Wynne – albeit much of them at the feet of her predecessor Dalton McGuinty. Wynne might not have any say in the matter. With a budget expected no later than May 8, it would take a political miracle for the NDP and Conservatives not to bring down the government. Either that or unfavourable polling that tells the NDP they don’t stand a chance. Wynne wants to distance herself from the mistakes of the past, and repeatedly claims she wasn’t in charge when computers were allegedly wiped, when gas plants were cancelled or when the ORNGE scandal broke. While she may be right, the minority Liberal government she inherited was in the driver’s seat. The premier shouldn’t be bullied into making an election call by Conservative Leader Tim Hudak and his questionable tactics, accusing her of ordering government computers wiped clean with no proof to back up his statements. But Wynne should do what’s right for the voting public and give them a chance to accept or reject her mandate on their own terms. If the public believes her, she’ll be back in power. If not, it might be someone else’s turn at the helm.

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C O N TAC T U S : 87 North Hill Street, Thunder Bay, Ontario P7A 5V6 Ph: 807-346-2600 • Fax: 807-345-9923 Editor: Leith Dunick 346-2650 ldunick@dougallmedia.com Reporter: Jodi Lundmark 346-3558 jlundmark@dougallmedia.com Web Manager: Scott Paradis 346-2527 sparadis@dougallmedia.com Web Reporter: Jamie Smith 346-2591 jsmith@dougallmedia.com Web Reporter: Matt Vis 346-2622 mvis@dougallmedia.com Production: proddept@dougallmedia.com Pepper O’Connor 346-2598 Jennifer Chicoine 346-2599 Sales Manager: Kathy Harris 346-2510 kharris@dougallmedia.com Advertising Policy: Ad adjustment for error is limited to the cost of that portion of the ad where the error occurred. Member of: Canadian Community Newspaper Association & Ontario Community Newspaper Association. Thunder Bay Source is published every Friday by T.Bay Post Inc. © Copyright No. 343384.

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LETTERS TO THE EDITOR Keep dogs leashed To the editor: agree that dogs should be leashed any time they are off of your personal property and that owners should be charged especially when they are purposely running the dog off-leash. I’m not talking about a dog who happens to get loose and whose owner would not ordinarily allow it to run free. It is a matter of public safety. We've all heard of dogs attacking and mauling other dogs and people, too. My pet peeve is seeing owners run their dogs in school yards and playgrounds, especially when they don't clean up after their dogs. If dogs are running loose behind the psychiatric hospital, I'm quite sure the owners are not running behind them with doggy bags. We all need to be more responsible about pet ownership. Leashng your dog demonstrates common sense and courtesy towards others.

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Heather Norhaugen, Thunder Bay

Plebiscite push To the editor: or convenience we elect someone into office who we feel would best represent us. The present mayor ran on a platform that the proposed event centre would go to plebiscite. To put this delicately, was his father’s name Gepetto? The Concerned Taxpayers of Thunder Bay (CTTB) headed by Raymond Smith are asking council to consider putting the proposed event centre to plebiscite. While parliamentary democracy is convenient whereby our council should represent us, direct democracy is the surest way residents are represented, and that is by having residents themselves make the decision, with a direct vote or a plebiscite. Unfortunately nothing is on the radar showing that any member of Thunder Bay city council is willing to put a motion proposing to put a question on the ballot in the Oct. 27 municipal election. There is nothing on council’s agenda for Monday, April 7 of putting a question on the ballot. This is unfortunate, because when an individual at the March 27 Neebing Ward meeting, asked who wants a plebiscite on the proposed event centre, it looked like all the hands at that meeting went up except for the ward councillor. There were about 30 people at that meeting, so what part of we want a direct vote does that councillor not understand. This is why the CTTB is asking the public to attend a rally in front of city

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hall starting at 5:45 p.m. on April 7 to let council know that residents want a direct vote on this proposed event centre, especially if municipal funds are to be used to build and operate it. The last day that council sits and can put a notice out to the public of their intent to put a question on the ballot is April 14. We cannot force this city council to put a question on the ballot, but we can let them know that we would appreciate it if they did. This will only happen if the public outcry is loud enough to be heard by council. Plan to attend the rally in front of city hall, April 7 at 5:45 pm. If the weather is poor, there is a gathering place in city hall. If you cannot attend, call your mayor and let him know how you feel. Henry Wojak, Thunder Bay

Why no public vote? To the editor:  n Monday, March 17, 2014, I did a presentation at city hall to put forth a motion to have a plebiscite on the proposed multiplex event centre. I pointed out that during the last four

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elections, voter turnout increased 10 per cent on average when there was a plebiscite. Also, I cited other reasons why we should have a plebiscite on this issue. For instance, why are we spending millions of dollars on studies for something the majority of citizens may not want at this time? Wouldn’t a decisive vote for either side go a long way in eliminating the divisiveness our city has regarding this issue and allow us to move forward in a unified direction? A lot of questions were asked of many who did presentations that night, challenging them on what question should be asked and whether or not they read the studies. It’s interesting to note, I wasn’t challenged in this regard, nor were any of my claims challenged. Just for the record, I did my homework and read all the studies as well as attending as many presentations as I could. One must remember in these studies, “the hypotheses represent plausible circumstances, but need not be, and may not have been fully supported” (Reference: Page 99, Phase 2 Feasibility Study). At best, these studies provide nothing more than optimistic speculation that will hopefully come true, if

we continue down this road. All criticism aside, I will give the city credit for being more forthcoming with this project than the waterfront development project. They have done an excellent job in providing information online, by posting the results of all the studies and presentations done to date. I would request the city go further by providing the financial statements online for all the studies completed as well. Andy Wolff, Candidate, Current River Ward

Streets are frightening To the editor: here is so much crime in Thunder Bay, it’s scary to even walk the streets. When I see a group of our socalled young people coming my way, I get scared. There’s no point in taking an evening walk; those days are gone. Police should be helping with more important things than illegal cigarettes.

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Deb Menzel, Thunder Bay


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Perspective CRASH COURSE

The rise of the binge Binge watching complete series increasing in popularity By J.R. Shermack Special to TB Source nce upon a time a couch potato hooked up with a channel surfer and they produced a love child and that child’s name was binge watcher. This is one way of explaining how the simple rituals of TV have changed along with TV watchers themselves, the shows they watch and how and why they watch them. Binge watching is the practice of viewing repeated and numerous episodes of a TV show, either past or current, often the complete series from beginning to end. There is no set number of shows or hours you must watch to be called a binger (one who binges) but what was once a guilty pleasure has become an obsession for some. This has been facilitated by web services and Netflix and all those other wonderful little time-wasters we subscribe to. It used to be that our favourite shows could only be seen once a week and if we missed an episode the only hope was to catch it during reruns. Now entire seasons are available at once, on demand and if you want to watch all 202 episodes of The XFiles (don’t ask how I know) nobody can stop you. Recent surveys have revealed some interesting information about the viewing habits of Canadians. About 80 per cent of us have

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Viewers now have the ability to watched three or more consecutive episodes of our favourite show in immerse themselves into a story or plot line for hours or days at a time one sitting. That same percentage admits to gain a complete understanding losing sleep to television and 10 and make a solid emotional per cent will admit to TV viewing connection. Some compare the overall experiat work or even in the bathroom. A friend or acquaintance of yours ence to attending a professional could be binge watching Game of music concert or a theatre producThrones or House of Cards right tion, except you can participate in the comfort of your own home. now on your very own toilet. One woman binge watches with Television has suffered a bad her widowed father on the reputation for years. It’s other side of the country. been blamed for everyThey talk together on the thing from attention “A friend or phone while watching a few deficit disorder to that extra 20 pounds of fat acquaintance episodes of his favourite of yours shows. we all carry around. Binging, sadly even the And of course any could be bad types, is always more kind of binge is a bad binge enjoyable with family and thing and we associate watching friends and can provide a the word with excessive Game of much-needed distraction eating, drinking or Thrones or from loneliness and despair. wasteful government It is also a good way for spending. House of Canadians to hunker down It’s no surprise that Cards right and wait for spring while the television binging is now on your wind chills us, the snow seen by some as a very very own piles up and the temperature bad and unhealthy toilet.” drops without mercy. habit. It won’t cure cabin fever But TV ain’t like it but by the time you finish used to be and when approached mindfully and consci- the Lord of the Rings trilogy and entiously, watching a whole lot of binge a few hundred episodes of TV can be what psychologists call your favourite drama series spring will be much closer. a restorative experience. TV has many detractors but to At least that’s what the TV watchers tell us. It has been trans- paraphrase dedicated binger Homer formed into endless and effortlessly Simpson, “Television gives so fascinating entertainment and infor- much and asks so little.” We can taper off once the weather mation (documentaries can be improves. binged, too).

JAMIE SMITH

OPINION

RECONSTRUCTING THE SCENE: Last week more than a dozen Thunder Bay Police Service and OPP officers took part in a scene-level collision investigation course. On Thursday, the officers examined vehicles that had been in collisions at a local towing company.

HOW TO WRITE US:

Royal Edward Hotel he Royal Edward Hotel, a prime example of art deco architecture, was built in 1928, using the services of Hockenbury Systems Inc. Almost $500,000 was raised from hundreds of local donors to finance the hotel. This hotel, Fort William’s answer to the Prince Arthur Hotel, was truly a community enterprise.

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etters to the editor are most welcome. Those kept to 350 words or less have priority.

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The Thunder Bay Source reserves the right to edit submissions for content and clarity. All attempts will be made to preserve the core argument of the author.

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L O C A L NEWS IN BRIEF

Burn victim in hospital city man is said to be in “good-tofair” condition in the burn unit of a Toronto hospital after being transferred as a result of a Thunder Bay fire. The blaze broke out in a Strand Avenue home on Friday afternoon and the lone male occupant attempted to stop it both with an extinguisher borrowed from a neighbour as well as shovelling snow into the house. Thunder Bay Fire Rescue responded after receiving an emergency call from a neighbour seeing smoke coming through the windows. The man was transported to Thunder Bay Regional Health Sciences Centre before being moved to the burn unit at Toronto’s Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre. The Ontario Fire Marshal is investigating the cause.

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Cop heads to court ity police Const. Steven Oster has been committed to trial for assault following a recent preliminary hearing. The charge came following an alleged altercation with a 12-year-old boy in January 2013 at a local youth hockey tournament at Neebing Arena. In February 2013, the Greater Sudbury Police Service were called in to conduct an independent review of the complaint against the Thunder Bay Police Service officer. The trial will be held on May 5. Oster remains on administrative duty until the case is resolved. None of the accusations against the accused have been tested or proven in court.

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TTC orders more cars he Toronto Transit Commission has ordered another 60 Rocket cars from the Thunder Bay Bombardier plant. The contract is on top of the original contract for 420 Rocket cars already being built in the city and it will secure 180 jobs, said Bombardier Transportation spokesman Marc-Andre Lefebvre. “This new contract will represent continued work for our Rocket employees up until 2015,” he said. The $160 million contract represents the increase in demand in Toronto. Unifor Local 1075 president Dominic Pasqualino was pleased. “Without these additional 60 cars, probably by the end of the year we would have completed (the original order).”

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L O C A L NEWS

Health coalition rallies Group seeks extension to accord with federal government T H U N D E R B AY

By Jamie Smith – TB Source

n expiration date will cost the health care system billions of dollars a local health coalition says. About 50 people marched with the Thunder Bay Health Coalition Monday, part of a national rally to protest the expiration of the Health Accord March 31. The end of the 10-year agreement between the federal government and the provinces threatens the country’s public health system and could lead to deep service cuts coalition co-chair Jules Tupker said. It’s part of a slow erosion of federal support that will see it go from 50 per cent to 18. The federal government will keep transfer payments the same until 2017. After that, it will be tied to the county’s GDP. Without the accord, critics have argued the money will be given to provinces with no strings attached. “They decided to cut back on that funding slowly but surely,” he said before the group marched from city hall to MPP Bill Mauro’s office and

JAMIE SMITH

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MARCH: The Thunder Bay Health Coalition protested outside of city hall Monday.

Join us Sunday, April 20, 2014 for

then to MP John Rafferty’s. “Our health care is going to deteriorate. The provinces cannot keep up the health care services that they have with those cuts,” Tupker said. Coalition member Evelina Pan worries that without an accord,

EasterBrunch

there won’t be a national standard in place for health care. “With the death of the health accord we won’t have good health care,” she said. “If you don’t have standards how do you know how good the care is.”

at the

No charges in Dryden fatal crash DRYDEN

By TB Source staff highway collision that claimed the life of a Dryden man remains under investigation but at this point

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no charges will be laid. The OPP on Sunday said in a release they are continuing to examine the incident on March 27 that resulted in the death of 24-yearold Taylor Gardiner.

The vehicle driven by Gardiner was travelling westbound on Highway 17 just east of Aaron Provincial Park when it collided with an eastbound transport. The driver of the transport was not injured.

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Tuition hike hits students

LU classes will cost 3 per cent more EDUCATION

By Jodi Lundmark – TB Source he Lakehead University Student Union traded their protest signs for negotiation tactics after the university’s board of governors approved a tuition hike for the eighth consecutive year. LUSU executives decided to accept the three per cent increase, approved at Friday’s board meeting, and submit recommendations to the board asking for greater transparency in the university’s finances. Student union president Ian Kaufman said they changed their approach this year because after eight straight years of protests and tuition hikes that went ahead anyways, they saw it wasn’t working. “I think it’s a recognition the university is in a tough position with provincial underfunding and trying to be more effective in working with the university rather than against them because it hasn’t worked,” he said Monday. “If the university is cooperative and does provide transparency in terms of their finances and it comes out they really do have no choice, then we can stand beside the university to ask for a different funding framework provincially,” Kaufman added. LUSU provided their recommendations to the board last week and they include a third party review of Lakehead’s finances to ensure the money from tuition is going towards the core functions of the university - teaching and research. Kaufman said tuition has risen 40 per cent in the past eight years and they would also like to see improvements made to their IAN KAUFMAN educational experience; those improvements would include items like increased library hours and a greater focus on deferred maintenance.

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Taks start The student union has begun talks with administration on the recommendations and Kaufman said the university seems willing to listen. Board chairman Cameron Clark said he commends LUSU for their new approach and willingness to work on solutions rather than throwing their hands up and saying the government and university aren’t responsive. “I think working together to find the best way of addressing these issues is the way to do it,” said Clark, adding they want to meet with the student union and find common ground. The tuition hikes have been necessary to balance the best educational opportunities they can for students amidst rising costs. Clark said tuition covers about 50 per cent of revenue used for operating costs at LU and the other half comes from grants and funding from the province. “The only real flexibility we have to meet sort of fiscal challenges moving forward is through some measured, thoughtful raising of tuition,” he said. A three per cent rise translates to about $172 for an average undergraduate student and the increase will take effect starting in the fall. The board and administration are open to discussions with LUSU on their recommendations; university president Brian Stevenson met with the student union Monday morning. In response to LUSU’s request to have a third-party audit done of the university’s finances, Clark said the board has an independent audit done on the budget every year before it’s voted on.


Thursday, April 3, 2014

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L O C A L NEWS

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ROF negotiations set to start Matawa, province ink framework deal, call it a crucial step MINING

By Jamie Smith – TB Source

he table is now set for Ring of Fire negotiations to begin between Matawa and the province. A closed-door signing ceremony Wednesday with the nine Matawa chiefs, representing First Nations communities closest to the mineral-rich area, and Northern Development and Mines Minister Michael Gravelle makes a much-discussed regional framework agreement official. Bob Rae, lead negotiator for Matawa, and the province's Frank Iacobucci began discussions more than nine months ago to hammer out the framework, which lays out what will be discussed during negotiations, expected to begin in earnest sometime this summer. Gravelle called it an historic day and a crucial step that will now see the process move into the next phase. "This ensures that the First Nations will truly benefit from the Ring of Fire development," he said. "It will set up the principles and the objectives that will form the discussion." While the agreement itself wasn't made public, objectives include revenue sharing, infrastructure and enhanced

JAMIE SMITH

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SIGNED: Minister of Northern Development and Mines Michael Gravelle said last Wednesday’s closed-door meeting was focused on the future for First Nations. environmental monitoring. Marten Falls chief Eli Moonias said Matawa said the priorities have been the same all along. The agreement, which will now be taken back to Matawa communities by the chiefs, continues the process to ensure First Nations have direct involvement in Ring of Fire development. "Which means we'll be looking to be involved as partners in the development," he said.

Long-term he sees the day when his community members are working in mines, running businesses to support the project. The communities want to be fully aware of the environmental impacts on everything from infrastructure development to the mining itself to make the right decisions. It's the reason not so long ago Moonias and others blockaded development. First Nations needed to be accommo-

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dated and this agreement is part of that process he said. It's a new kind of intention and accommodation. And it's about the future of his and other Matawa communities. "This is an opportunity to get involved in the development and have our people be employed, be trained and employed and get ambition into the communities, instead of not seeing the future the way it's been for a long time," Moonias said. Gravelle described the meeting, held at the DaVinci Centre, as one very focused on the future for First Nations. "Emotions were very high in the best sense of the word and the warmth in the room was pretty wonderful as well," he said. An official celebration for the signing is expected early next month. Meanwhile Noront Resources, the only company currently in the Ring of Fire with a completed Environmental Assessment before the provincial and federal government for its Eagle's Nest Project, said it was pleased to hear the news. "We are encouraged that a framework agreement has now been signed by the Matawa First Nations and the Province of Ontario," Noront President and CEO Alan Coutts said in a media release "We've always felt that having the right conversations is essential for progress in the Ring of Fire, and we expect that development will now be able to move ahead in a timely fashion."

11

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(807) 355-1255 We offer fundraising & rental opportunity!!

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Thursday, April 3, 2014

12

For your daily news visit www.tbnewswatch.com

L O C A L NEWS

ADVERTISING FEATURE

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hen you want the best view of what’s on the market, turn to the realtor with the most comprehensive collection of local real estate listings. Contact one of our knowledgeable agents today and find out which properties are right for you.

efore you can move in to a newly built home, there is a critical first step that all Ontario buyers must take: the Pre-Delivery Inspection (PDI). Much more than just a quick tour, the PDI represents the first opportunity for buyers to view their home in its completed state and to thoroughly assess its condition. All builders in Ontario are required by law to conduct a PDI with their customers prior to the date of possession. This inspection is part of your new home warranty, provided by your builder and backed by Tarion Warranty Corporation. The PDI is your first opportunity to view your home in its entirety, learn about how to maintain it

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and take stock of anything that may be damaged, incomplete, missing, or not working properly. You may be excited to show it off to your friends and family, but now is not the time. The PDI is an important part of taking possession and deserves your full attention, say advisers in this field. If you are not able to attend yourself, you can ask someone you trust to be there on your behalf. During the PDI, you should carefully examine your home both inside and out. Look for things like chips in bathtubs and sinks, scratches on counter tops, damage to floors, walls, cabinetry (and other finishings) and look for doors and windows that are not secure or do not open and close easily. Outside, check things like the quality of brickwork and siding, whether window screens have been installed, and inspect the appearance of the driveway and landscaping. Your builder's representative will record it all on a PDI form. Review the form carefully to make sure it's complete. Once done, you will get a copy, which will become the official record of the condition of your home before you moved in. If at a later time, there is a disagreement between you and the builder (about damage before, or after possession) Tarion, which regulates new home builders and guarantees your warranty, may use your PDI form for reference.

MATT VIS

Learn how to inspect your new home before possession UNDER REVIEW: Minimum walking distance may be increased.

Sometimes, due to weather or other factors, you may not be able to inspect a certain item. If you are unable to assess something during the PDI, simply make note of it on the form. The PDI is also an excellent opportunity to ask questions and learn about how your home functions. Your builder will show you how to operate your home's systems, like heating, electrical, air conditioning, and plumbing, and provide you with operating manuals. Your new home warranty doesn't begin or end at the PDI – it all begins when you sign a purchase of sale agreement with your builder, and stays with the home for seven years. For more information about the PDI, and to access a detailed checklist, visit tarion.com. www.newscanada.com

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521 Memorial Ave. 343-9444 • www.jonesins.com

Students may walk farther Board to review bus requirements

E D U C AT I O N

By Leith Dunick – TB Source ome high school students in Thunder Bay might have to take a longer trek to get to class. At the request of trustees, the Lakehead District School Board is reviewing their policy on how far students have to walk before bus transportation is provided. Currently, the board has a minimum one-way walking distance of 1.6 kilometres, or one mile, before secondary school students are eligible for busing. Board superintendent David Wright said while the entire policy is under review, they are primarily focusing on secondary school students. “We’re reviewing this from an aspect of health. There is a potential for cost savings but that’s not the driver here. It’s about whether a 1.6 kilometre distance is suitable for students today,” Wright said on Monday at the board office. He would not speculate on what the new minimum distance would be set at if there were to be a change. He did say there are other school boards in the province that have further minimum distances. The board will be consulting with students and their parent involvement committee among others to gauge reactions. They want to help promote physical activity. “I think anecdotally a lot of people believe that children aren’t as active as they have been. We’ve seen a big push in the last little bit to promote a healthy and active lifestyle and I think trustees promote and support a healthy lifestyle,” he said. “This is just one way the trustees and the school board can help promote a healthy next generation.” Wright says the Student Transportation Services of Thunder Bay will be consulted to provide input on safety aspects such as traffic, construction and availability of sidewalks as well as climate factors, specifically during winter months. A report and recommendation on the issue will be presented to trustees in June.

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For your daily news visit www.tbnewswatch.com

Life

Thursday, April 3, 2014

13

TB Taking the plunge Polar Plunge raises $60K for Special Olympics athletes T H U N D E R B AY

By Matt Vis - TB Source

hen in Rome, do as the Romans do. Chris Oldham followed that logic with a Canadian slant by joining hundreds of other brave souls plunging into frigid Lake Superior waters on Saturday. The visitor from Britain took part in the fifth annual Ontario Law Enforcement Torch Run Polar Bear Plunge for the Special Olympics at Prince Arthur ’s Landing. When Oldham told his friends and family back home of his planned exploits, they thought he had gone completely bonkers. “To be honest, it’s pretty nuts,” he said. “I told everyone and their reactions were all the same, like you’re doing what. They just don’t get it but I’ll only get the

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one chance so I have to take it while it’s there.” When it came closer to time to jump, even Oldham was trying to search for sanity, reason and logic to justify his participation. He admitted that he woke up in the morning and instantly regretted the decision and added he was questioning it even more when watching those at the front of the line. Oldham said being immersed in the water is not comparable to anything else he had ever done and that he recommends it to anybody contemplating it in the future.. “It’s a sudden shock. You don’t really think anything,” he said. “When you first hit the water it’s something else.” There were multiple participants from law enforcement agencies and correctional services who braved the icy water. Thunder Bay Police Service Det. Const. Jeff Elvish took the plunge for the first time. There was only one way he could describe the sensation of

hitting the water. “Wow, the only word that came to my head was wow,” Elvish said. “You get in there and get out, climb on the side and get warm.” Wrandi McIver, who was on a team with co-workers at the Safeway location on Dawson Road, said her work with those being benefitted by the event made her want to take the plunge. “We were doing fundraising for the Special Olympics and I got to meet the athletes and they completely inspired me,” she said. “I just thought I had to do something a little bit crazy for them.” Those close to her agreed it was crazy with some jokingly bidding her farewell before her jump. Many of the participants were dressed in elaborate costumes and some particularly courageous ones sported beach attire despite the temperature hovering around the freezing mark. There were people of all ages representing groups, teams, organizations and schools. The event raised $60,000, well beyond their $40,000 goal.

MATT VIS

people health home food leisure

ICY DIP: Some brave souls took a dip in Lake Superior Saturday to raise money for Special Olympics


14

Thursday, April 3, 2014

For your daily news visit www.tbnewswatch.com

TB Life

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The tbSOURCE Classifieds are online, so it’s easier than ever to find exactly what you’re looking for.

JODI LUNDMARK

w w w. t b n e w s w a t c h . c o m

EUROPE BOUND: Lakehead University's Battlefield Tourism class, from the outdoor recreation, parks and tourism program, gathered at the Memorial Avenue park dedicated to First World War veterans.

Living history EDUCATION By Jodi Lundmark - TB Source arah Shruiff didn't know her greatgrandfather fought in the First World War until she discovered his Vimy Ridge pilgrimage passport. "I had no idea until Christmas when I was talking to my grandmother, about it" said the third-year Lakehead University outdoor recreation, parks and tourism student. Shruiff is one of 11 students heading to Europe April 25 for a 10-day tour of the battlefields of the First World War, and some Second World War sites as well. "I think this trip is an amazing opportunity because not only is it the centennial of the First World War, we're going to be taking part in a lot of different ceremonies," said Shruiff. In addition to visiting the Vimy Ridge site, the group will also attend one of the daily Last Post Ceremonies at the Menin Gate and they'll be in Amsterdam for the Liberation Day ceremony on May 5. Liberation Day, celebrated in the Netherlands, recognizes the end of the

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country's Nazi-occupation, largely accomplished by Canadian troops. "It's not often you get to take part in something like that," said Shruiff. The trip was inspired by outdoor recreation, parks and tourism associate professor Harvey Lemelin's own pilgrimage through Normandy and the western front. "I thought it would be a great opportunity to introduce students to what is being done for the centennial and see some of these sites like Vimy Ridge," he said. Many of the students also have family links to the battlefields; their ancestors participated in the wars. Lemelin said the trip helps to bring history to life. "I think that we've done a lot of reading," he said. "It truly needs to be experienced. Vimy Ridge is one of the most spectacular places I've seen. I understand the carnage that went on there, but it's a very spiritual place." The students will be conducting research on the trip, interviewing visitors to the Canadian National Vimy Memorial in France.


Thursday, April 3, 2014

For your daily news visit www.tbnewswatch.com

15

LIVE MONDAY, APRIL 7, 2014 7:30PM -11:00PM

Item #33

2013 Civic LX Coupe What Will You Bid?

Hosted by Val Mitchell and Brent Hawley

What Will You Bid? Get ready to take advantage of great savings on a wide variety of products and services from some of Thunder Bay’s finest retailers. Pre Bidding starts at Friday, April 4 Noon and ends at 4pm Monday, April 7. Live bidding starts on all items at 7:30pm. Monday, April 7, 2014. on Global Thunder Bay 6, 211, Bell 222, 1065, Tbaytel 222, 872, Shaw 6, 211 and Shaw Direct 314, 38, 52, 538.

Item #18

2013 Legend Genesis RE 20' Pontoon Boat/15 HP Mercury

What Will You Bid?

2 door coupe, 4 cylinder, black exterior, grey cloth interior, automatic, door remote, power locks, cd player, tilt, cruise, heated seats and more. Stock # 33082.

Gore Motors’ Retail Price ..........$22,015 Item #27

Kioti Mechron What Will You Bid?

Black and Beige. 15 HP Mercury - 4 Stroke, accessories included: bimini top, deluxe console with sink, AM/FM stereo with MP3 port - 2 speakers, table, Live well, rounded couches, removable tinted windscreen, oversized aluminum boarding ladder, 12 volt power outlet. Maximum 10 person capacity. Lifetime tube, deck and transom warranty. Three year motor warranty.

Tough. Reliable. And a heck of a lot of fun. There’s a reason the MECHRON® 2200 is called the Ultimate Transport Vehicle. CVT with 4WD. 12” ground clearance. Widest cargo bed in its class. 1,500 lbs payload capacity/1,300 lbs towing capacity. Front limited slip differential. Rear mechanical actuated differential lock. MacPherson strut type front suspension/Adjustable wishbone type rear suspension. Four wheel hydraulic disc brakes. Includes windshield, topper and sun canopy kit.

Norm’s Boating Centre’s Retail Price $14,164

Northern Turf Equipment’s Retail Price $13,999.00

Item #21

540 Hybrid Beach Comber Hot Tub

What Will You Bid?

Item #19

Hartford Spa 680 Series Sundance

What Will You Bid?

Walnut exterior/quartzite Interior, 70 x 86 x 38 inches (178 x 218 x 97 cm), dry filled – 600 pounds, 300 US gallons, flexjet system delivers up to 84 jets. Delivery and set-up not included.

Sahara interior/coastal exterior. Seats 6 – 7 adults, 350 US gallons, 42 jets – 5 different styles. Enhanced water filtration 7’ 4” x 7’ 4” x 36”. Installation and delivery not included.

Gordon Trailer’s Retail Price $12,500

Hot Tub Express’ Retail Price $10,860

Live 7:30pm • 345-3474 • 1-866-825-3474 Go to www.tbnewswatch.com for full details. Pre-Bid on line or by phone 346-2600 Friday, April 4 Noon to 4:00pm Monday, April 7.


16 Item #1

Thursday, April 3, 2014 Item Gift Certificate #2

Canada Games Complex

Gift Certificate

Item #3

Lockstone Yard & Patio

Travel Certificate for Transat

Item #4

Marlin Travel

For your daily news visit www.tbnewswatch.com Item Car Starter and #5 2014 Golf Membership Detailing Pkg (Car)

Auto Trenzz

City of Thunder Bay Golf

Used towards the purchase of any membership or program, including locker service, babysitting. No cash surrender value. More than an aquatic facility – it’s total fitness and recreation centre providing access for all ages. The complex offers the opportunity to participate in a variety of social, recreational, competitive, instructional and therapeutic activities in a unique, accessible, multipurpose community facility. Visit us on-line at www.gamescomplex.com

Use towards your purchase of paving stone or retaining wall by Miller Precast Ltd. Choose from the Holland Paver, Milan Paver or Windsor Stone. Standard colours. Expires December 31, 2014.

Valid on any Transat or Nolitours package holiday, cruise or European vacation. Booked with Marlin Travel.

1 x Auto start remote starter with two way remote. 1 x Solargard window tint, with lifetime guarantee. 1 x full clean VIP detail. All installation fees included.

Two courses comprising of 36 holes of golfing enthusiast to enjoy. Chapples and Strathcona golf courses - are structured to offer enjoyment for all levels of golfers. Both courses provide full pro-shop services including, club cart rentals. All club houses are licensed and offer light lunch and snack bar services.

Canada Games Complex’s Retail Price ..........$1000

Lockstone Yard & Patio’s Retail Price ..........$2,000

Marlin Travel’s Retail Price ........................$1,500

Auto Trenzz’s Retail Price............................$1,138

City of Thunder Bay Golf’s Retail Price ........$1,400

Opening bid ............................................$500

Opening bid ........................................$1,000

Opening bid ............................................$750

Opening bid ............................................$580

Opening bid ............................................$700

Item #11

Item #12

Item 2014 Unlimited Membership #13 W/ Power Cart

Item #14

Item #15

Gift Certificate

Wally’s Thunder Country Diving

Giant XTC 29er 2 Mountain Bike

Fresh Air Experience

Dragon Hills Golf Course

Gift Certificate

The Bodymind Centre

Gift Certificate

Balmoral Park Acura Thunder Bay Mitsubishi

Use this certificate towards your purchase of a dive package, dry or wet suit package or upgrading individual pieces. Wally’s is a full service dive center and can assist you with all your diving needs and they also have certified instructors to teach scuba courses. Visit us at www.thundercountrydiving.com

2013 model. Grey/red in colour, 1 year parts warranty, 2 year labor service warranty. Not redeemable for any other product.

2014 season unlimited Includes power cart rental.

For use towards services or products.

Use towards the purchase of any new 2014 vehicle at Balmoral Park Acura or Thunder Bay Mitsubishi! Choose from any vehicle in the entire Acura lineup including their award winning sedans like: ILX, TSX, TL and RLX or there award winning and newly redesigned SUV’s like RDX and MDX. Or choose any Mitsubishi in the lineup including Mirage (most fuel efficient gasoline powered car in Canada), Lancer, Lancer Ralliart, Lancer Evolution, RVR, or Outlander and get the best warranty in the business! Can be used in conjunction with financing.

Wally’s Thunder Country Diving’s Retail Price ....$1,500

Fresh Air Experience’s Retail Price ..............$1,489

Dragon Hills Golf Course’s Retail Price ........$1,242

The Bodymind Centre’s Retail Price ............$1,000

Balmoral Park Acura, Thunder Bay Mitsubishi’s Retail Price $10,000

Opening bid ............................................$750

Opening bid ............................................$750

Opening bid ............................................$620

Opening bid ............................................$500

Opening bid ........................................$5,000

Item #23

Item #24

Item #21

540 Hybrid Beach Comber Hot Tub

Gordon Trailer Sales

Item #22

Home Paint and Decorating Package

Superior Coatings

membership.

24 ft Dia. Above Ground Pool

Landale Pools

Yamaha TTR 125 CC Motorcycle

North Country Cycle & Sports

2014 Skimmer, filter & pump, solar blanket, filter sand, 50ft backwash hose, maintenance kit, leaf skimmer, vacuum head, pole & hose.

Item #25

Arctic Fox – Prestige Series Hot Tub

Coconut Bay Spas

Walnut exterior/quartzite Interior, 70 x 86 x 38 inches (178 x 218 x 97 cm), dry filled – 600 pounds, 300 US gallons, flexjet system delivers up to 84 jets. Delivery and set-up not included.

PPG-Manor Hall. Includes 2 hour in home consultation with an interior designer. Choice of colour.

2012 model. Blue and white in colour

A small, deep hot tub that can comfortably seat two to four people and still deliver great therapy. Ideal for locations where space is at a premium. Seats 4 adults, 7' 2" x 5' 9" x 3' 3" h, 1,300 liters (343 US gallons), (5) 5" single pulse jets, (9) 3" single pulse and directional jets. Two speed 4 HP white water spa pump with class 5 emg motor. Colour (to be confirmed).

Gordon Trailer Sales’ Retail Price ..............$12,500

Superior Coatings’ Retail Price....................$1,150

landale Rools’ Retail Price ..........................$2,799

North Country Cycle & Sports’ Retail Price ..$4,005

Coconut Bay’s Retail Price ..........................$7,500

Opening bid ........................................$6,300

Opening bid ............................................$575

Opening bid ........................................$1,400

Opening bid ........................................$2,000

Opening bid ........................................$3,750

Item #31

Item #32

Item #33

Item #34

Gift Certificate

Thunder Bay Custom Granite Inc.

Cub Cadet GTX 2000

2013 Civic LX Coupe

Rosslyn Service

Gore Motors

Hearthstone Bristol Gas Stove

Item Bose Lifestyle 135 Home Entertainment #35 System/ Panasonic TCL 65 E60 65”LED TV

Bob’s Woodburning & Fireplaces Ltd.

The Power Centre

Can be used towards purchase of custom granite counter tops or vanities. Choice of colour.

54" fabricated deck, 48" snowblower, chains, weights and brackets. Ohio steel dump 10 cu ft Trailer. Echo Pas 230. Trimmer Attachment, Face Shield.

2 door coupe, 4 cylinder, black exterior, grey cloth interior, automatic, door remote, power locks, cd player, tilt, cruise, heated seats and more. Stock # 33082.

2013 model. Bristol-brown enamel, brown in colour, sauna rocks included.

Bose® Lifestyle® 135 Home Entertainment System provides onscreen navigation to simplify system setup and everyday use. Easily connect and control up to 6 of your HD video and music sources, with video upscaling to 1080p. System sound customized to room size, shape and furnishings. Wireless Acoustimass® module for low-note performance. Dock for iPod® or iPhone®, AM/FM tuner. Panasonic TCL 65 E60 65”LED TV. My home screen swipe & share 2.0, voice guidance, slim design with super narrow bezel, 120Hz, 240 back light blinking technology, 1080p full HD resolution.

Thunder Bay Custom Granite’s Retail Price ..$3,500

Rosslyn Service’s Retail Price ....................$9,033

Gore Motors’ Retail Price ..........................$22,015

Bob’s Woodburners & Fireplaces Ltd’s Retail Price $3,499

The Power Centre’s Retail Price ..................$5,000

Opening bid ........................................$1,750

Opening bid ........................................$4,510

Opening bid ......................................$11,000

Opening bid ........................................$1,750

Opening bid ........................................$2,500

Item #41

Item 2014 Unlimited Membership #42 W/ Power Cart

Item #43

Item #44

Item #45

Gift Certificate

Thunder Bay Custom Granite Inc.

Dragon Hills Golf Course

Harvia KV6 Built in Electric Sauna Stove

Bob’s Woodburners & Fireplaces Ltd.

Gift Certificate for Steel Siding

Elements North Roofing & Exterior Solutions

Gift Certificate Northern Window

2013, silver & steel in colour. sauna rocks included.

Can be used towards purchase of custom granite counter tops or vanities. Choice of colour.

2014 season unlimited Includes power cart rental.

Thunder Bay Custom Granite’s Retail Price ..$3,000

Dragon Hills Golf Course’s Retail Price ........$1,242

Opening bid ........................................$1,500

Opening bid ............................................$620

PRE BID FRIDAY, APRIL 4 NOON

TO

For use towards purchase of Edco Lifetime Steel Siding with Entex Finish, Edco Entex Soffit/Fascia/Eavestrough.

Multi-Chamber design adds insulation & strength to our vinyl frames. Fusion welded corners. True warm edge spacer (duralite) between the glass combined with double & triple glazing, low emissive coating and argon gas allow you to have your windows built to suit your personal efficiency goals.

Bob’s Woodburners & Fireplaces Ltd’s Retail Price $1,313

Elements North’s Retail Price ......................$5,000

Northern Windows’ Retail Price ..................$2,000

Opening bid ..........................................$660

Opening bid ........................................$2,500

Opening bid ........................................$1,000

membership.

4:00PM MONDAY, APRIL 7 • 346-2600 • LIVE 7:30-PM - 11:00PM • 345-3474


For your daily news visit www.tbnewswatch.com Item Item Harvia 20 Pro Granite Gift Certificate #6 #7 Wood Sauna Stove

C&M Tile

Bob’s Woodburners & Fireplaces Ltd.

Item #8

Gift Certificate

Thunder Bay Custom Granite Inc. 2013 Black and Silver in colour. Sauna rocks included.

Item #9

Gift Certificate

17 Thursday, April 3, 2014 Item Gift Certificate #10

Ideal Kitchen Centre

Northern Window

Can be used towards purchase of custom granite counter tops or vanities. Choice of colour.

Gift certificate towards a new kitchen renovation.

Multi-Chamber design adds insulation & strength to our vinyl frames. Fusion welded corners. True warm edge spacer (duralite) between the glass combined with double & triple glazing, low emissive coating and argon gas allow you to have your windows built to suit your personal efficiency goals.

C&M Tile’s Retail Price ..............................$2,000

Bob’s Woodburners & Fireplaces Ltd’s Retail Price ....$1,162

Thunder Bay Custom Granite Inc.’s Retail Price $3,000

Ideal Kitchen Centre’s Retail Price ..............$3,000

Northern Windows’ Retail Price ....................$2,000

Opening bid ........................................$1,000

Opening bid ............................................$580

Opening bid ........................................$1,500

Opening bid ........................................$1,500

Opening bid ........................................$1,000

Item #16

Item #17

Item #18

Item #19

Item #20

Use for granite counter tops. Experience the luxurious look and feel of granite. With its high compressive strength and durability, granite is the hardest structural stone and makes an excellent choice for countertops, vanities and much more. Visit cmtile.ca

Green Goods Gift Certificate

Landale Gardens

Gift Certificate

Hartford Spa 680 Series Sundance

Jeld-Wen Windows/Doors

Norm’s Boating Centre

Hot Tub Express

Wanson Lumber

For use towards purchase of Edco Arrowline or Generations Metal Roof.

Black and beige, 15 HP Mercury - 4 stroke. Accessories included: bimini top, deluxe console with sink, AM/FM stereo with MP3 port - 2 speakers, table, Live well, rounded couches, removable tinted windscreen, oversized aluminum boarding ladder, 12 volt power outlet Maximum 10 person capacity. Lifetime tube, deck and transom warranty.Three year motor warranty.

Sahara interior/Coastal exterior. Seats 6 – 7 adults. 350 US Gallons, 42 jets – 5 different styles, enhanced water filtration 7’ 4” x 7’ 4” x 36”. Installation and delivery not included.

Use towards Jeld-wen windows or doors. Various sizes or models. Product can be ordered.

Landale Gardens’ Retail Price ....................$1,000

Elements North’s Retail Price ......................$5,000

Norm’s Boating Centre’s Retail Price ........$14,164

Hot Tub Express’ Retail Price ....................$10,860

Wanson Lumber’s Retail Price ....................$3,000

Opening bid ............................................$500

Opening bid ........................................$2,500

Opening bid ........................................$7,100

Opening bid ........................................$5,500

Opening bid ........................................$1,500

Item #26

Item #27

Item #28

Item #29

Item #30

For use towards all green goods, mulch, top soil, sod, plants and trees. Except precast concrete (i.e. Patio stones and statuaries).

Gas Furnace

Adduono’s Sheet Metal & Heating Ltd.

Elements North Roofing & Exterior Solutions

2013 Legend Genesis RE 20' Pontoon Boat/15 HP Mercury

Kioti Mechron

Granite Gift Certificate

Gift Certificate

Northern Turf Equipment

C&M Tile

Northern Window

Black Olive Pellet Grill

Thunder Bay Fireplaces

Model 95V. Armstrong High Efficiency Direct Vent 2 stage furnace with 60,000 BTUs, heavy duty 2 speed induced draft motor matches power vented to heating output. Fully insulated cabinet and blower compartment provides enhanced efficiency and quieter operation. Basic installation included. Adduono’s Heating/Cooling’s Retail Price ....$4,900

Tough. Reliable. And a heck of a lot of fun. There’s a reason the MECHRON® 2200 is called the Ultimate Transport Vehicle. Cvt with 4wd, 12” ground clearance. Widest cargo bed in its class. 1,500 lbs payload capacity. 1,300 lbs towing capacity. Front limited slip differential - Rear mechanical actuated differential lock. MacPherson strut type front suspension. Adjustable wishbone type rear suspension. Four wheel hydraulic disc brakes. Includes windshield, topper and sun canopy kit.

Use for granite counter tops. Experience the luxurious look and feel of granite. With its high compressive strength and durability, granite is the hardest structural stone and makes an excellent choice for countertops, vanities and much more. Visit cmtile.ca

Multi-Chamber design adds insulation & strength to our vinyl frames. Fusion welded corners. True warm edge spacer (duralite) between the glass combined with double & triple glazing, low emissive coating and argon gas allow you to have your windows built to suit your personal efficiency goals.

Northern Turf Equipment’s Retail Price ......$13,999

C&M Tile’s Retail Price ..............................$2,000

Northern Windows’ Retail Price ..................$2,000

Thunder Bay Fireplaces’ Retail Price ..........$1,975

Opening bid ........................................$2,450

Opening bid ........................................$7,000

Opening bid ........................................$1,000

Opening bid ........................................$1,000

Opening bid ........................................$1,000

Item #36

Item #37

Item #38

Item #39

Regency Plateau Island Table

Blaze Fireplaces

Gift Certificate

Ideal Kitchen Centre

“The Finn” Hybrid Extreme Sauna

Coconut Bay Spas

Shade-O-Matic Blind Package

Superior Coatings

Cast iron grille & 2 bags of pellets, pizza stone and Cover included.

Item #40

Yamaha TTR 125 CC Motorcycle

North Country Cycle & Sports

Natural gas or propane. Choice of glass crystals, wind shield glass surround. Choice of porcelain tile, electronic ignition. Sunset bronze hammered finish.

Gift certificate towards a new kitchen renovation.

Indoor/outdoor, includes full 3 year warranty powerful heating system of a traditional rock sauna with the background benefits of infrared technology. Horizontal clear red cedar planks with an added vapor barrier - roof overhang on all four sides, 6,000W heater, requires 230V 30A power supply. Made in Canada. Dual level seating for up to 5.

Blaze Fireplaces’ Retail Price......................$3,000

Ideal Kichen’s Retail Price ..........................$3,000

Coconut Bay Spas’ Retail Price ..................$6,000

Made of smooth woven polyester, our fabrics are extremely durable, anti-static and repel dust. Elegant, seamless beautyconcealed rout holes and cords provide a clean, sleek look. Available in sheer, semi-sheer, translucent and room darkening. Hi-Rise System – The continuous cord loop system. Cordless shades – This optional feature has a hidden control system which enables shades to be easily raised or lowered with the touch of a finger. Child Safety Kit – Every blind comes with a cord cleat and screw which can be installed on the wall to prevent puddling cords. Cellular construction provides energy efficient insulation and blocks up to 99% of harmful UV rays, with most of our fabrics. Cellular Vertical Application – available in ¾” single cell fabrics. Superior Coatings’ Retail Price....................$1,500

Opening bid ........................................$1,500

Opening bid ........................................$1,500

Opening bid ........................................$3,000

Opening bid ............................................$750

Opening bid ........................................$2,000

Item #46

Item #47

Item #48

Item #49

Item #50

Gift Certificate

True Energy Anneliese Mattress Set

Aqualeader 21’ Round Pool Package

Jeld-Wen Windows/Doors

2012 Model. Blue and white in colour. North Country Cycle & Sports’ Retail Price ..$4,005

Full Membership and Gift Card

Lockstone Yard & Patio

Reid’s Countrywide Home Furnishings

Craig Plumbing Centre

Wanson Lumber

The Bodymind Centre

Use towards your purchase of paving stone or retaining wall by Miller Precast Ltd. Choose from the Holland Paver, Milan Paver or Windsor Stone. Standard colours. Expires December 31, 2014.

Queen Size NuFlex Foundation from Beautyrest. Adjust the bed to your optimal sleeping position for pressure relief and clearer breathing or to the proper level for reading, watching TV, and gaming. Made exclusively for ComforPedic® from Beautyrest. Contouring comfort of AirCool® Memory Foam with the superior support of Beautyrest® Pocketed Coil® Technology. Delivery included within the city limits.

21’ round Liberty pool, frame and walls. Full print beaded liner. Hayward 21’ sand filter, 4 bags of silica sand. Hayward 1.5 HSP pool pump, vacuum head, telescopic pole and vacuum hose. Leaf skimmer, test strips, thermometer. 50” backwash hose. Wide mount skimmer. Resin desk ladder. Misc plumbing kit $100.00.

Use towards Jeld-wen windows or doors. Various sizes or models. Product can be ordered.

Full membership including unlimited drop ins, guest passes and more. $65 Gift Certificate for services.

Lockstone Yard & Patio’s Retail Price ..........$2,000

Reid’s Countrywide Furnishings’ Retail Price $4,130

Graig Plumbing Centre’s Retail Price ..........$3,999

Wanson Lumber’s Retail Price ....................$3,000

the Bodymind Centre’s Retail Price..............$1,000

Opening bid ........................................$1,000

Opening bid ........................................$2,070

Opening bid ........................................$2,000

Opening bid ........................................$1,500

Opening bid ............................................$500

PRE BID FRIDAY, APRIL 4 NOON

TO

4:00PM MONDAY, APRIL 7 • 346-2600 • LIVE 7:30-PM - 11:00PM • 345-3474


18 Item #51

For your daily news visit www.tbnewswatch.com

Thursday, April 3, 2013

Gift Certificate

Item #52

Green Goods Gift Certificate

Car Starter and Detailing Pkg (Truck)

Item #54

Auto Trenzz

Mallon’s Corporate Impressions

C&M Tile

1 x auto start remote starter with two way remote. 1 x solargard window tint, with lifetime guarantee. 1 x full clean VIP detail. All installation fees included.

For over 26 years Mallon’s continues to provide innovative and creative promotional products and clothing, exceptional and professional service. Use the gift certificates for regular price merchandise. Think bags, hats, jackets, pens and more. Visit mallons.com to check out the latest promotional items.

Use for granite counter tops. Experience the luxurious look and feel of granite. With its high compressive strength and durability, granite is the hardest structural stone and makes an excellent choice for countertops, vanities and much more. Visit cmtile.ca

Item #53

Landale Gardens

Wally’s Thunder Country Diving

Item #55

Gift Certificate

Granite Gift Certificate

Use this certificate towards your purchase of a dive package, dry or wet suit package or upgrading individual pieces. Wally’s is a full service dive center and can assist you with all your diving needs and they also have certified instructors to teach scuba courses. Visit us at www.thundercountrydiving.com

For use towards all green goods, mulch, top soil, sod, plants and trees. Except precast concrete(i.e. patio stones and statuaries.

Walley’s Thunder Country Diving’s Retail Price ..$1,500

Landale Gardens’ Retail Price ....................$1,000

Auto Trenzz’s Retail Price............................$1,138

Mallon’s Corporate Impressions’ Retail Price $1,000

C&M Tile’s Retail Price ..............................$2,000

Opening bid ............................................$750

Opening bid ............................................$500

Opening bid ............................................$570

Opening bid ............................................$500

Opening bid ........................................$1,000

Item #56

Item #57

Item #58

Item #59

Item #60

Eagle Electric Bike

Giant TCR Composite 1 Small Bicycle

Gift Certificate

Gift Certificate

Full Membership and Gift Card

Fresh Air Experience

Canada Games Complex

Blaze Fireplace and Stone

2013 Model. No gas, no license required, all you need is a helmet.

Built with many of the same design philosophies as bikes ridden by Giant pros, TCR Composite delivers sharp handling and snappy acceleration with just enough compliance for racing and long training days. The PowerCore bottom bracket area and asymmetrical chainstays produce maximum pedaling efficiency. The OverDrive steerer tube technology, which features a tapered, oversized design, adds front-end stiffness and steering precision. And the frame is RideSense-ready, for use with Giant’s ANT+ wireless data transmitter.

Used towards the purchase of any membership or program, including locker service, babysitting. No cash surrender value. More than an aquatic facility – it’s total fitness and recreation centre providing access for all ages. The complex offers the opportunity to participate in a variety of social, recreational, competitive, instructional and therapeutic activities in a unique, accessible, multipurpose community facility. Visit us on-line at www.gamescomplex.com

Gift certificate to be used towards in store purchase.

Full Membership including unlimited drop ins, guest passes and more. $65 Gift Certificate for services.

Auto One Car Care & Service Centre’s Retail Price..$1,895

Fresh Air Experience’s Retail Price ..............$2,799

Canada Games Complex’s Retail Price ........$1,000

Blaze Fireplace and Stone’s Retail Price......$2,000

The Bodymind Centre’s Retail Price ............$1,000

Opening bid ............................................$950

Opening bid ........................................$1,400

Opening bid ............................................$500

Opening bid ........................................$1,000

Opening bid ............................................$500

Auto One Car Care & Service Centre

Item #61

Gift Certificate

Item #62

Perfect Fit Lingerie

Travel Certificate for Transat

Valid on any Transat or Nolitours package holiday, cruise or European vacation. Booked with Marlin Travel.

Perfect Fit Lingerie’s Retail Price ................$1,000

Marlin Travel’s Retail Price ........................$1,500

Opening bid ............................................$500

Opening bid ............................................$750

Item #63

Item #64

2014 Golf Membership

City of Thunder Bay Golf

Gift Certificate

Lockstone Yard & Patio

Two courses comprising of 36 holes of golfing enthusiast to enjoy. Chapples and Strathcona golf courses - are structured to offer enjoyment for all levels of golfers. Both courses provide full pro-shop services including, club cart rentals. All club houses are licensed and offer light lunch and snack bar services.

Use towards your purchase of paving stone or retaining wall by Miller Precast Ltd. Choose from the Holland Paver, Milan Paver or Windsor Stone. Standard colours. Expires December 31, 2014.

City of Thunder Bay Golf’s Retail Price ........$1,400

Lockstone Yard & Patio’s Retail Price ..........$2,000

Opening bid ............................................$700

Opening bid ........................................$1,000

Item #65

Item #66

Gift Certificate

DeBruins Greenhouse

Fantastic deals on 66 items from local participating merchants.

Marlin Travel

Professional fitters. Beautiful bras from size A to JJ. Sports bras, swimwear, Sleepwear, Spanx Shapeware and Sympli clothing, made designed in Canada.

Gift Certificate

Mister Transmission

To be used towards annuals, perennials, flowering baskets etc. Excludes vegetables. For the 2014 Season.

Towards transmission: rebuild, overhaul or repair.

Debruins Greenhouse’s Retail Price ............$1,000

Mister Transmission’s Retail Price ..............$1,000

Opening bid ............................................$500

Opening bid ............................................$500

The Bodymind Centre

• All items can be previewed at www.tbnewswatch.com with a link to www.tbtauction.com or in the Flyer distributed in the March 27th and April 3rd issues of the Thunder Bay Source. Pre-bidding will begin on-line at Noon on Friday, April 4th, 2014 until 4 p.m. on Monday April 7th, 2014 with final bidding on ALL items taking place on Monday, April 7th, 2014 from 7:30 p.m. to 11:00 p.m. LIVE on Global Thunder Bay. These complete Rules and Regulations and Full Disclaimer are also available at Global Thunder Bay, 87 N. Hill Street by request. 1) PREVIEW • All items can be previewed at participating sponsor locations and at www.tbnewswatch.com with a link to www.tbtauction.com and in the Full Colour pull-out flyer distributed on March 27th and April 3rd editions of the Thunder Bay Source. Please take the time to visit par ticipating retailers to view Auction items in person. • Global Thunder Bay has endeavoured to list and describe accurately the product/services to be sold and cannot be held responsible for errors or omissions. 2) PRE-BID GUIDELINES – Pre-bidding may be done on-line at www.tbnewswatch.com by pre-registering compulsory information. Pre-bidding will take place between Noon on Friday, April 4th until 4 p.m. on Monday, April 7th. The pre-bids ending at 4:00 p.m. will begin the LIVE broadcast beginning at 7:30 p.m. on Global Thunder Bay. 3) ON-AIR AUCTION RULES – On the night of Auction 2014, to phone in your

bid locally – phone 345-3474. To phone in your bid long distance within the 807 area code – phone 1-866-8253474. • When phoning in your bid, give us the number of the item and what the item is. • Please give us your name, address & the phone number from where you are calling. If you are not home, give us the number where we can reach you, as all successful bidders will receive a confirming telephone call that night. At this point all sales are final. • Items will be sold throughout the LIVE broadcast. Items can be sold off the board at ANYTIME! So it's important to get your bids in early. • Listen carefully and watch for the description of each item. • Start your bidding and be prepared to call back quickly to change your bid. • All items must be sold - so bidding will be fast! Minimum bid increments of $10 to $100 will be determined by the Auctioneer. When an Auctioneer has called a "bids closing" on an item – that item may be sold at any time. • Once we have confirmed your winning bid, all sales are final - Judges' decisions are final. • All purchases will be subject to applicable HST unless the purchaser possesses a valid tax-exempt number, which must be shown at the time of purchase. The purchaser will receive a point of sale relief for the 8% provincial part of the HST and pay the 5% of the final bid price. • All Product/Service Certificates have no cash surrender value and cannot be applied to existing accounts • Pay by Visa or MasterCard over the

phone and we will mail out the necessary paperwork as stated in the Terms of Sale. • Bidding on any item indicates your acceptance of these terms. 3) TERMS OF SALE • All Winning Bidders will receive a confirming call on Monday night, April 7th, 2014. When bids are confirmed, SALES ARE FINAL! • In the event of a duplicate bid, the auctioneers’ decision will be final. • Merchandise must be paid for at 87 N. Hill Street (Global Thunder Bay) within 2 days of the Auction during regular business hours – 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. only. For convenience, when merchandise is paid by credit card, merchandise release forms & receipts and/or Gift Certificates will be couriered only within the city limits or outside of the city - mailed direct to you the next day. (Note: Purchaser of the Automobile will be advised at the time of contact of special payment procedures for their purchases). • Upon payment, you will receive a Merchandise Release Form to redeem for the product from the retailer supplying the product. • To receive your merchandise, present your Merchandise Release Form and/or the Gift Certificate to the retailer, within 5 days of the Auction. • Please be aware of the expiry dates on any product/service certificates. • Cash, certified cheque, MasterCard or Visa only will be accepted. • The successful bidder will be responsible for HST at time of payment. • All Product/Service Certificates have no cash surrender value and cannot be applied to existing accounts.


Thursday, April 3, 2014

For your daily news visit www.tbnewswatch.com

19

TB Life

This is supposedly spring? o this is spring and now April. No, get those veggie plants started – the ones requiring lots of growing time like don’t look out the window. Out here on our farm we still have lots tomatoes, broccoli and cauliflower. I mused out loud that the actual putting and lots of snow. So no daffs, no crocuses, nothing green as yet and into the ground will be much later this probably for a while, but I can dream, year. I recalled that last season we got the can’t I? An active part of that dreaming is the plants started, watered them faithfully planning of the veggie garden and seed cata- under grow lights, but the ground stayed frozen longer than in logues. Our garden was springs previous and much reduced last the wee plantlings summer. began to get spindly I was incapacitated FRED before the earth was as a result of some JONES warm enough to put urgent surgery and them into the ground. my wife Laura was RURAL ROOTS “We don’t want a trying to hold this repeat of that condiship together while tion this year, do we?” teaching, doing her So, what to do? Mas ters, running a horseback riding business, and dealing with an incapacitated husband (at least for the summer Always a gamble months). It is a gamble. It always has been ever Less than half of the garden got since agriculture was discovered – good planted. The major part of it went to seed crop years, bad crop years. due to my inability to use any heavy Unlike the ancients I don’t happen to equipment (doctor’s orders). have a Stonehenge or Averbury circle to I want to reclaim that wild patch that calculate when I should be planting. was garden but I recognize that I have I do have old-timers whom I can my work cut out for me. consult who have seen it all: “Remember I will have to cut the grasses that grew the summer of…?” and there is the to above my knee and then rototill over Farmer ’s Almanac that I haven’t yet and over again. Then I will ferry well- purchased for this year that might supply rotted manure and spread it across the some Delphic wisdom indicating when to surface before getting in there with the go ahead or to wait with the plantings. long-handled shovel to create raised There are technologies to which I can beds. subscribe. John Wilson was the head of Then I can plant. the Agriculture Canada Experimental Laura was talking the other day about Farm during my tenure as radio host on how she should be planting indoors to our local CBC Radio.

S

He used to be a regular guest and advocated covering the garden beds with black plastic mulch that would speed up the warming of the soil plus cut down on the amount of weeding. I tried it one year and true to his word, it worked. But the mulch eventually disintegrated and lazy me hasn’t bothered to purchase more. Perhaps this year. A green house would be an asset, I think. I remember visiting the grandmother of a cousin when I was about 10. She lived on a small estate near Coburg and her veggie garden as I recall, was huge. She started her flowers –the house was filled with flowers – and her vegetables in this large greenhouse that was covered in those days with glass. We were allowed in but under severe threats not to touch the glass or anything else as I remember. Like my grandparents who lived north of Toronto, they had to raise their own food since there were no supermarkets. There’s just something about eating a carrot, tomato, broccoli or potato you planted yourself. It always seems to taste sweeter. We are past the usual time of ordering new seeds but it is never too late and given the conditions outside, I don’t think we’ve missed the boat, as it were. So, bring up the box with leftover seeds to see what we need and then a little light perusing with pencil and seed catalogue in hand should do the trick. At least we’ll be thinking about green. You can contact Rural Roots by e-mail: fbljones@hotmail.com.

CHURCH

PRESBYTERIAN

Lakeview Presbyterian Church 278 Camelot Street (Across from the Court House) The Rev. Harold Hunt, Minister

Sunday Worship at 10:00 a.m. Sunday School & Nursery Provided

Phone:

345-8823

DIRECTORY UNITED

Current River United Church 333 Morse Street

Sunday Worship 10:30

Little Church: Big Heart! All Welcome!

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Call 346-2600 To Advertise In The Church Directory

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20

Thursday, April 3, 2014

For your daily news visit www.tbnewswatch.com

TB Life

Whatever floats your boat Recycling saves energy Recycling uses less space in landfills Recycling saves trees Recycling helps climate change Recycling reduces pollution Recycling creates jobs.

MICK BOHONIS OUTDOOR LIFE

t doesn’t matter whether it’s summer or winter, the old saying goes “you can always tell when a fisherman is lying, simply because his lips are moving.” As far back as man started to angle, whether it be offshore, in a boat or through the ice, fish tales of all sorts began relating to the size of the fish, the fight the fish put up, and how long it took to reel it in. It remains the same as it did 50 years ago. Anglers still stretch the truth and try to get every ounce and inch they can on the fish they catch. However, today’s technology makes the storytelling about that big fish a little more difficult with the equipment offered to anglers in the way of digital read-out scales and measuring devices that now stick right to the side of your boat or devices that can weigh your fish as soon as it comes out of that ice fishing hole. What would have been a six-pounder is now a real fourpounder. What about lures? If you take the time to open up a Bass Pro Shop or Cabela's catalogue there will be literally half the book dedicated just to fishing lures. Everything you could possibly offer a fish on the end of your line will be in these pages and it almost makes it difficult for the average angler to choose what he thinks may give him the upper edge. Lures that are scented, float, sink, suspend, dive, wobble, rattle, change colour, glow, and sidewind are now offered. What happened to the straight hook and minnow or the old faithful Little Joe spinner? Fishing for walleyes as a kid, all we used were Marabou jigs and worms or small minnows and we filled the boat, or had many fish laying on the ice during the hard water angling season. Simplicity was good, and although modern technology has made us safer, I believe it has made us lazier, too.

SUBMITTED

I

BIG TOYS: Wayne Cerven gets his 20-foot Ranger ready to launch at Lac Des Milles Lacs last summer. In the winter, Little Butler Lake (one of my favourite speckled trout lakes), Agimak Lake, Indian Lake, Raliegh Lake and many others we fished around the town of Ignace were the hot spots when I was growing up and it was all accomplished with simple and easy-to-use gear. Red willow branches were our rods and whatever mono-line was available at the time was used. There were no high-tech flashers or portable pop-up shelters. Nope, we endured the elements and that was it. Today’s recreational and tournament fishing has exploded into a multi-million dollar industry that keeps getting bigger and bigger. It doesn’t matter if it’s summer or winter there have been leaps and bounds made in both. There is now the professional tarpon circuit, the professional walleye tour, the professional redfish circuit, the bass masters, and many others. It’s crazy the amount of prize money and how many people try to make a living at this throughout North America. Just take a look on TV whether it be satellite or cable and see for yourself how many fishing shows there are, and then take a look at the amount of corporate advertising that coincides with these shows. It’s big bucks and some of the manufacturers hold nothing back when it

comes to making sure their product is out there. I am caught right in the middle of all the hype as I have boats, quads and snow machines outfitted with everything, and a tackle box that requires two men to move! It’s addicting and the simple fact that tackle does not cost a lot in comparison to boats, motors and snowmobiles, it can easily allow a guy to sneak in a few new lures every once in a while without breaking the bank. So why do anglers have to have two boats, a snowmobile, ATV, 12 rods, four tackle boxes, four stringers, three minnow pails, eight life jackets and five pairs of polarized sunglasses just for fishing? The cost of fishing has also risen tenfold in the last 15 years, and that is evident when venturing out to your favourite lake. By the time it’s said and done, it’s $150 for a day trip. Nuts you say? Yes maybe, but in comparison, what about the guy who spends $5,000 on a golf membership? Or $45,000 on a custom Harley-Davidson? When it comes to leisure, sports and entertainment, it’s all relative to your own passions, interests and bank account. We all work hard for our disposable income and time away from work is to enjoy ourselves in whatever manner we prefer.

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For your daily news visit www.tbnewswatch.com Intercity Mall

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HEARTBREAKING DECISIONS: Mirella Stroink, associate professor of community psychology at Lakehead University, said there are shortcomings in the developmental services field at a workshop held by the Thunder Bay Family Network on Monday.

Running out of options T H U N D E R B AY

which was hosted at the Thunder Bay Art Gallery, gave parents the opportunity to meet with experts in amilies trying to care for adults the field to discuss challenges and with developmental needs are possible solutions to improving often left with no options, say expe- developmental services care. The desire is there to inspire rienced field workers. When those families reach the change, particularly with younger point when they lose the ability to children who are currently in the provide their own care, they must school system. “We see a lot of families of often make a heartbreaking and children in the schools who are personally devastating decision Mirella Stroink, associate professor excited and passionate and concerned and want to see of community psychology they can have power in the at Lakehead University, says there are overloaded “When you’re system and be agents of looking at change for their loved wait lists and shortages of ones,” she said. resources. supporting “Families of children are “(Caregivers) are being someone in already exhausted from told that in order to access an having to advocate for their services for their loved one institutional loved one through the they’re going to have to way, it’s just education system. By the declare them homeless and the system will pick them not going to time they start to realize their child is a teenager and up,” Stroink said at a work.” getting to the end of incluworkshop the Thunder Bay MICHAEL HULL sive education and what’s Family Network held on next they realize the adult Monday. “How painful is that for a family to system is worse.” She added the developmental say my son or daughter is homeless and then the system will pick them services sector has a history of grassup? That’s unacceptable and it’s not roots movements inspiring change, that anybody is at fault but the pointing to the shift more than 50 system can’t respond quickly enough years ago from institutionalized treatment to a community living to meet the need that is out there.” The Own the Future workshop, approach. By Matt Vis - TB Source

F

Those that work in the field believe there is room to maximize the effectiveness of supports. Michael Hull, a past executive director of Community Living Dryden-Sioux Lookout, said the manner in which individuals receive support needs to be refined to each specific case. He said each individual has unique needs and responses and that a broad approach is not ideal. “Some people feel the way services are delivered is overly institutional. It doesn’t focus on the individual, it focuses more on the support needs of the individual and that’s what we’re trying to get away from,” Hull said. “When you’re looking at supporting someone in an institutional way it’s just not going to work. You’re going to have people complaining and resisting whatever you want them to do.” Using the example of having individuals physically capable of playing hockey being included in a group, he said it could not only enhance the people’s quality of life but it can free up as much as three hours of time where a paid support worker is not needed. If community inclusion can be increased on a wide scale, Hull said substantial savings could be created to reinvest into the system.

21


22

Thursday, April 3, 2014

For your daily news visit www.tbnewswatch.com

IN THE

bay

arts entertainment culture

Local productions highlighted FILM By Matt Vis - TB Source pportunities for local filmmakers to show their work on the big screen at home are fairly rare. That makes the chances they do have, such as the North of Superior Film Association's annual Northwest Film Fest, extra special. Prior to select screenings, the festival displayed short films written, produced and directed by area talent. “Seeing your work in front of a local audience is always a treat and feeding off their reaction is why you make the film, for an audience,” filmmaker Ryan La Via said on Sunday at the SilverCity cinemas. “Being from Thunder Bay it’s always nicest to sit and watch something you’ve made with the people you’ve grown up with and know.” Two of the shorts, one of them directed by La Via, were shown prior to the final couple of feature length films of the evening. That production, Sticky Money, chronicles one $20 bill spent and recycled throughout one distinct

MATT VIS

O

BOX OFFICE: Patrons purchase tickets to attend the North of Superior Film Association's Northwest Film Festival at SilverCity Theatres on Sunday. neighbourhood. With it being written by Richard Hiner and featuring Jari Sarka and Heather Esdon, who have all since passed, it was surreal to see on the screen.

It carries a simple concept that is easily relatable. “It’s recycling of the same money and the theme of it is that money spent locally stays locally,” he said. Another short that La Via was asso-

ciated with, Red Light, was shown last Sunday. That one, which he wrote, was in a competition at the London Screenwriters’ Festival earlier this year. He has received a substantial amount of positive feedback from community members. The shorts even play a role in increasing the overall attendance. “From what I’ve been told people have enjoyed them tremendously,” La Via said. “Some people are coming to these features just for the shorts and staying for the features. They’re catching the attention of local filmmakers.” Despite still having to analyze the numbers, North of Superior Film Association president Marty Mascarin believes the 21st annual showcase was a success. “In terms of being available anecdotally the response from patrons has been positive,” he said. While organizers may speculate, Mascarin said it is impossible to know exactly how a film will be received by audiences until it hits the screen. He identified the Danish romantic

comedy Love Is All You Need starring Pierce Brosnan as one in particular that attracted more moviegoers than anticipated. He added that Thursday evening’s screening of the Saudi Arabian film Wadjda was acclaimed by the majority of the audience. The final day of the festival was busy right from the start of the morning with a nearly full theatre for the 9:45 a.m. showing of Alan Partridge, an English comedy. The strong attendance continued through to the late afternoon. “On this final Sunday we’ve had very full audiences for an English drama called The Selfish Giant and a Beatles documentary Good Ol’ Freda and it was a packed house for that one,” Mascarin said. This year’s festival had a wider array of comedies than most years and Mascarin said most screenings of lighter fare have been well attended by members of the film association as well as the general public. “We were able to generally start the mornings light and end the day light,” he said.


Thursday, April 3, 2014

For your daily news visit www.tbnewswatch.com

23

I N   T H E   bay

Joke taken out of context in tweet

ecently, Stephen Colbert was lambasted for a joke he made about Asians during his show, The Colbert Report. The “Ching Chong Ding Dong Foundation for Sensitivity to Orientals or Whatever” was later tweeted out to the universe by someone claiming to

R

be Colbert. And people weren’t laughing at his hurtful words. But therein lay the problem. Or the multitude of problems. First, have you ever walked in on the punchline of a joke? It doesn’t make sense. You may not even know that a joke was made and misconstrue it as an actual statement. That’s what tweeting an editorial punchline does. It takes one statement out of context and ignores its original purpose. So why bother? It’s no longer funny or clever. Second, is Stephen Colbert responsible for the misuse of his television material? Most of us have at some point made a Freudian slip and said something unintentionally rude or sexual in nature. We’re forgiven because of the lack

of intent. And if someone tried to use charged to discuss in an open and frank manner. it against us, others would defend us. Heightened emotions cause people Colbert plays an ultra-conservative to stop listening to the other idiot on his show in order to side of the issue. Colbert make a point – that most also believes that despite offensive, racist, radical their actions, most people are idiots are just ill-informed. His intent is not to hurt but “His intent is inherently good. not to hurt So he takes those sensitive to invoke conversation and change. So when someone but to invoke subjects and expresses the takes his words and uses conversation idiot’s point of view in its them as a sword to inflict and change.” extreme, allowing us to stop approaching it from opposite damage, it’s like blaming directions and find common Sears for a belt that is used as ground … against him. a whip. Satire works because it’s Third, The Colbert Report is a satire. It creates humour while easier to change people’s minds if casting light on very unfunny realities they’re not put on the defensive. And for the purpose of discussion and they’re less defensive of their point of view if they’re able to laugh about it. change. But in a time when most can’t spell Some topics are just too emotionally

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and their thoughts don’t stretch beyond 140 Twitter characters and emoticons, satire may be a little too high-brow for some. They not only don’t expect it, they don’t get it. So for those who missed Colbert’s actual commentary, here it is in a nutshell. Dan Snyder, owner of the Washington Redskins, is making amends to Native Americans for his team’s politically incorrect name by starting a foundation with the same politically incorrect name. Colbert offered to do the same for Asians. Some say they got the joke. It just went too far. It did. Beyond the controlled boundary of the show and right into a lawless Twitter-land. The satire worked. It was the tweet that failed.


24

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25

Sports

local sports news information coverage

Stars, Rangers even Thunder Bay takes opener, but Minnesota storms back to tie best-of-seven set SIJHL

the Iron Rangers responded with a goal that took the wind out of Thunder Bay’s sails. From the half boards, Seth Chumley threw the puck towards the goal and it ricocheted in front to slide through Mann. From there, penalty troubles dashed any dreams the North Stars had of emerging victorious. Two penalties on one play created a Minnesota two-man advantage where Fazio finished off a pretty passing play with his second of the game. After Walsh was ejected with a checking from behind major, the Iron Rangers added insurance with Trevor Hoth scoring the club’s third power play goal of the match. Between Taylor and Walsh being lost for the game as well as stalwart rearguard Tim Cavar sitting for a 10 minute misconduct earlier in the contest, the North Stars’ defencemen were gassed by the mid-point of the third.

By Matt Vis – TB Source here are a lot of words that can describe the first two games of the semifinal series between the Thunder Bay North Stars and Minnesota Iron Rangers. Passive is not one of them. Minnesota evened the best-of-seven series with a 4-2 victory over the North Stars in a fierce Superior International Junior Hockey League playoff affair that saw the two teams combine to record 151 minutes in penalties. Don’t expect the intensity to be toned down on either side, says North Stars head coach Jeremy Adduono. Rather, he thinks it will only pick up as the series progresses. “You’ve got two really good hockey teams with guys who love to play the game and are playing hard and there’s a lot of pride on both sides,” Adduono said. “Both teams want to win the series equally and you want to be aggressive and initiate play.” That sentiment was echoed down the hall. “It was a crazy, crazy game,” said Iron Rangers head coach Chris Walby. “We’re so similar as far as the different dynamics, it’s a great matchup and it has been all year. You’re going to see great games like this all the way throughout.”

T

Tired

MATT VIS

Penalty-filled The bulk of those minutes were assessed to the North Stars, who received 110 of them including game misconducts to blueliners Jesse Taylor and Ryan Walsh. All of the infractions combined to provide Minnesota with nine power play opportunities through the course of the contest, and they converted on three of them. Adduono refused to say his team crossed a line but admitted there needed to be a little more discretion at times. “It’s a fine line. You want guys to be aggressive and on the body finishing checks but at the same time you want to be disciplined,” Adduono said. “It’s an emotional game. I want my guys playing with passion and I think

TIGHT SERIES: Minnesota’s Sam Mancini (right) battles Thunder Bay’s Kris Kellaway. they did that and I think both teams did that.” Minnesota opened the scoring in the first period, notching their first goal of the series. They capitalized with the man advantage with defenceman Thomas Fazio firing a shot from the top of the point that beat North Stars goaltender Eric Mann. The tally broke a nearly 70 minute shutout streak for Mann after he kept the Iron Rangers at bay in Game 1. Despite a flurry of chances on both sides, that marker held up as the lone goal until the second half of the

middle frame. Thunder Bay utilized the open ice of a four-on-four with Kris Kellaway leading a two-on-one rush and outwaiting his defender before sliding the puck across to Brandon Mihalus who beat Minnesota keeper Alex Reichle. Both squads stepped on the ice for the third period with the score deadlocked 1-1 but it was the home side that would strike first. On a delayed penalty, Brandon Wolframe finished the play with the goal for his first of the postseason. That lead lasted four minutes before

Adduono admitted fatigue might have been starting to set in as the game approached the final stages, especially in penalty killing situations. “I think at one point we had three defencemen in the box,” he said. “It’s definitely tough when you get down to four or five defencemen so it was probably a factor.” With the series shifting to south of the border, it was a lost opportunity for the North Stars to maintain their momentum against a squad that won six of their 11 regular season meetings. Now that things are all even, Walby likes his team’s chances coming home for what now becomes a bestof-five series. “The crucial game, the numbers are out there that whoever wins Game 2 goes on to win the series,” he said. “This one was huge. If we had gone down 2-0 it would have been tough to climb out of.” Star gazing: The North Stars top line of Matthias Gardiman, Zach Grzelewski and Daniel Del Paggio remains pointless in their four playoff games. Gardiman said even though it might be frustrating, they are encouraged to have been generating chances.

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Thursday, April 3, 2014

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sports

NEWS

Wilkins, Thiel named LU’s top athletes Skier Jennifer Jackson, hockey’s Cody Alcock take rookie honours THUNDER BAY

By Matt Vis – TB Source ndrew Wilkins says he will never forget the five years he spent at Lakehead University. The Thunderwolves hockey forward received a fitting parting gift, being named the university’s male athlete of the year in his final stint in Thunder Bay.

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“It’s very humbling and something I wasn’t expecting,” Wilkins said after the school’s annual athletic awards celebration, held on Saturday in the Patterson Auditorium in the Lakehead Faculty of Law building. “I honestly think when you look at guys on the ski team and (basketball player) Dwayne Harvey and what they accomplished they probably deserved the award but it’s an honour to win it with that kind of company.” Wilkins, the Thunderwolves captain, finished second on the team in regular season scoring with 26 points. His contributions, however, extended far beyond the stat sheet. The 25-year-old from Pickering had proven himself as one of the elite penalty killers in the OUA throughout

his Thunderwolves tenure and established himself as one of the team’s top defensive forwards. He led a squad that had some significant question marks at the beginning of the season to coming one win short of qualifying for the CIS University Cup national championships for the first time since 2010. Acknowledging the hurdles the group had to overcome with many new faces under first year head coach Bill McDonald, Wilkins said the honour is a testament to every member of the locker room and is shared by the whole team. “These are team awards and I’m just the beneficiary of that. It means a lot to our team,” he said. “This year was a good year. I think a lot of people doubted us and our abili-

ties, not only in Thunder Bay but in the league.” Fourth-year runner Danielle Thiel claimed the female athlete of the year award after a banner campaign that netted her recognition at the national level. The product of Regina excelled throughout the cross-country season and capped it off by earning second team All-Canadian honours with a share of 14th place at the national championships. The manner in which she accomplished the feat is something that she will always remember. “About 100 metres into the race I lost my shoe and ran six kilometres without it and it came down to a photo finish with myself and a girl from Manitoba

and they ended up awarding it to both of us,” she said. “It was quite a way to go out on my cross-country career.” Thiel also holds the Lakehead school records in the 3000m and 5000m distances on the indoor track. Nordic skier Jennifer Jackson was named the female rookie of the year after a pair of dominating performances en route to winning the national individual title. She was also an OUA all-star and All-Canadian. The hockey program’s Cody Alcock was named the male rookie of the year after leading the club in regular season goals scored with 14. Alcock caught fire in the playoffs, recording six goals and 13 points in only six postseason contests.

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Thursday, April 3, 2014

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sports

27

NEWS

Tigers, Dodgers should be strong By Leith Dunick – TB Source

anadian baseball fans were all but planning the Blue Jays’ victory parade. How’d that work out, Toronto? Actually, with the Leafs making the playoffs last year, the Jays stumble drew a little less attention than it might have in a normal year. They won’t have that luxury this year. Mired in the American League East, the Jays failed to land the starting pitching they needed to inspire much confidence in prognosticators. Can their offence carry them past the likes of Boston, Tampa Bay and the retooled New York Yankees? CKPR's Jeff Andreas thinks they still have a chance at the post-season. The rest of of us at 87 Hill Street North -- not so much. After last year’s hits and misses (anyone remember Bryan Wyatt’s now infamous-in-our-newsroom Danny Espinosa NL MVP prediction), baseball diehards at Dougall Media thought we’d peer into our crystal baseballs once again and present our thoughts on 2014. The panel includes Thunder Bay Source editor Leith Dunick, TB Newswatch reporters Jamie Smith and Matt Vis and CKPR’s Bryan Wyatt and Jeff Andreas.

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Leith Dunick Editor, Thunder Bay Source  NL East: Atlanta Braves  NL Central: St. Louis Cardinals  NL West: Los Angeles Dodgers  NL wild-cards: Washington Nationals, Pittsburgh Pirates

 AL East: New York Yankees  AL Central: Detroit Tigers  AL West: Los Angeles Angels  AL wild-cards: Tampa Bay Rays, Boston Red Sox  World Series: Los Angeles Dodgers over New York Yankees  NL MVP: Paul Goldschmidt, Arizona Diamondbacks  NL Cy Young: Clayton Kershaw, Los Angeles Dodgers  AL MVP: Mike Trout, Los Angeles Angels  AL Cy Young: Justin Verlander, Detroit Tigers

Bryan Wyatt News director, CKPR  NL East: Washington Nationals  NL Central: Pittsburgh Pirates  NL West: Los Angeles Dodgers  NL wild-cards: St. Louis Cardinals, Atlanta Braves  AL East: Boston Red Sox  AL Central: Detroit Tigers  AL West: Oakland Athletics  AL wild-cards: Cleveland Indians, Seattle Mariners  World Series: Detroit Tigers over Los Angeles Dodgers  NL MVP: Adrian Gonzalez, Los Angeles Dodgers  NL Cy Young: Stephen Strasburg, Washington Nationals  AL MVP: Miguel Cabrera, Detroit Tigers  AL Cy Young: Justin Verlander, Detroit Tigers Jamie Smith Reporter, TB Newswatch  NL East: Atlanta Braves  NL Central: St. Louis Cardinals  NL West: Los Angeles Dodgers

Jeff Andreas, Reporter, CKPR  NL East: Washington Nationals  NL Central: Pittsburgh Pirates  NL West: Los Angeles Dodgers  NL wild-cards: Cincinnati Reds, Atlanta Braves  AL East: Boston Red Sox  AL Central: Detroit Tigers  AL West: Los Angeles Angels  AL wild-cards: Toronto Blue Jays, Texas Rangers  World Series: Pittsburgh Pirates over Detroit Tigers  NL MVP: Andrew McCutchen, Pittsburgh Pirates  NL Cy Young: Stephen Strasburg, Washington Nationals  AL MVP: Mike Trout, Los Angeles Angels  AL Cy Young: Yu Darvish, Texas Rangers

LEITH DUNICK

BASEBALL

NEW CLOSER: CKPR`s Bryan Wyatt thinks Joe Nathan can put the Tigers over the top.  NL wild-cards: Pittsburgh Pirates, Washington Nationals  AL East: Tampa Bay Rays  AL Central: Detroit Tigers  AL West: Oakland Athletics  AL wild-cards: Kansas City Royals, New York Yankees  World Series: St. Louis Cardinals over Detroit Tigers

 NL MVP: Freddie Freeman, Atlanta Braves  AL MVP: Mike Trout, Los Angeles Angels  NL Cy Young: Jose Fernandez, Miami Marlins  AL Cy Young: Yu Darvish, Texas Rangers

Matt Vis, Reporter, TB Newswatch  NL East: Washington Nationals  NL Central: St. Louis Cardinals  NL West: Los Angeles Dodgers  NL wild-cards: Pittsburgh Pirates, Atlanta Braves  AL East: Tampa Bay Rays  AL Central: Detroit Tigers  AL West: Texas Rangers  AL wild-cards: Kansas City Royals, Los Angeles Angels  World Series: Los Angeles Dodgers over Tampa Bay Rays  NL MVP: Yadier Molina, St. Louis Cardinals  NL Cy Young: Jordan Zimmerman, Washington  AL MVP: Evan Longoria, Tampa Bay Rays  AL Cy Young: Yu Darvish, Texas

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Thursday, April 3, 2014

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K C I CL ON . S U The tbSOURCE Classifieds are online, so it’s easier than ever to sell those unwanted items.

w w w. t b n e w s w a t c h . c o m

NEWS

Missing my Expos Baseball hasn’t been the same since they bolted for Washington t was a week to celebrate everything Expos. Ten Raines and Tim Wallach, and pitchers like Scott years after Major League Baseball left Youppi Sanderson and Bill Gullickson, the Expos would be homeless, abandoning Montreal after 36 seasons, a champions for years to come. It never happened. trip to the 1981 National League Championship They famously went for it in 1989, trading Randy Series and the bitter memories of what might have been in the strike-cancelled 1994 season, baseball Johnson for Mark Langston in a bid to get back to the playoffs. They came up short. was back at the Big O. Then there was 1994, the year they were leading the It felt right. It felt like it should happen again and again and pack when the owners shut the season down, leading to two decades of what might have been. again. Ten years later, in the blink of a Pedro Martinez For me, the Expos are the greatest team of all time. Sure, they never really won anything, but the sport fastball, the team left for Washington. I’ve tried to like the Nationals, even went to has never been the same since they their park to see them play. fled to Washington, D.C. I try to root I couldn’t do it. for the Toronto Blue Jays, who last LEITH I want my Expos back. weekend brought baseball back to DUNICK Montreal with a two-game exhibition series against the New York Beloved everywhere SPORTS SHOTS Mets. I wear my powder-blue Expos It’s not the same. shirt with pride wherever I go. In Yeah, the Jays had Joe Carter and his famous home- San Francisco, watching the Giants and Padres last run, a couple of World Series championships and September, I was stopped half-a-dozen times while close calls in several other years. sporting it at AT&T Park. At the Bonnaroo music But for me, they were always Canada’s other team. festival in Tennessee in June 2102, hipsters and hippies all wanted to talk baseball because of the shirt. Frustrating as the team was at times, they were my How it began In 1978, as a nine-year-old, I spent the summer team, an underdog fighting an uphill battle. Sometimes sleeping in the basement of our St. Jean, Que. home, they won; more often than not it was wait-until-nextquietly listening to Dave Van Horne call their games. year. Sometimes that chant began in May. Other times East coast, west coast, it didn’t matter. My parents they made us wait until the final weekend of the regular season, only to lose out to the likes of Mike thought I was asleep. Schmidt and the Philadelphia Phillies, or the Willie Nope. I couldn’t get enough that summer, introduced to Stargell-led Pittsburgh Pirates. This summer, I think I’ll cheer for the Cincinnati Gary Carter – my all-time favourite player – Andre Dawson, Steve Rogers and that magical 20-win Reds and speedster Billy Hamilton, who struck out four times on Opening Day. season produced by Ross Grimsley, of all people. But I’ll really be cheering for Warren Cromartie and That love affair with the Expos followed me to the Montreal Baseball Project, a group trying their best Halifax later that summer. The Expos came close in 1979 and 1980, even to bring the Expos back to Montreal. Only then will baseball truly matter to me again. closer in the strike-interrupted 1981 season when P.S. If you haven’t already, pick up Jonah Keri’s Up, Rick Monday blasted a Rogers pitch over the fence to send the Dodgers into the World Series and a champi- Up, & Away, a terrific and definitive history of the Expos, written from the perspective of a lifelong fan. It onship win over the New York Yankees. I consoled myself that with the arrival of Tim was worth every penny.

I

Murray honoured by OHL strong playoff performance is netting Matt Murray some recognition. The Thunder Bay netminder was named the Ontario Hockey League’s player of the week after compiling a 30 mark en route to leading the Sault Ste. Marie Greyhounds to a five game series win over the Owen Sound Attack. The 19-year-old Pittsburgh Penguins draft pick recorded one shutout to go along with a .957 save percentage and a paltry 1.33 goals against average. The Greyhounds, the regular season West Division champs, advance to meet the Erie Otters in the Western Conference semifinals. Murray had six shutouts in the regular season to tie for the league lead while sporting a 32-11-1-5 record. The 32 wins was the second-most by an OHL goaltender this season.

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Diaz recalled by Jays

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ose Reyes' inability to stay healthy has landed former Thunder Bay Border Cats shortstop

Jonathan Diaz back in the big leagues. The Toronto Blue Jays on Monday purchased Diaz's contract from Triple-A Buffalo, recalling the second-year infielder after Reyes went down with a hamstring injury after a single at bat in the team's opening-day loss to Tampa Bay. Diaz had three hits in 24 spring-training at bats with the Blue Jays, scoring seven times. He saw his first taste of major league action last season with the Boston Red Sox, scoring two runs while going hitless in four at bats. Diaz, who won a Northwoods League championship with the Cats in 2005, turned pro in 2006. The oft-injured Reyes was placed on the 15-day disabled list. He missed 69 games due to injury in 2013, his first season with Toronto. The Blue Jays lost their home opener on Monday, falling 9-2 to the heavily favoured Tampa Bay Rays on the road. The Jays and Rays continue their four-game set through Thursday.


Thursday, April 3, 2014

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25 Gallon Aquarium/stand and accessories $150, antique Remington Typewriter $25, Solid dark wood buffet/hutch with table and 4 chairs $800, Solid wood older style headboard $35, Natural Country oak solid wood hardwood flooring (3 boxes) 22/sq ft per box 3 1/4 x 3/4 $200, Green ceiling Fan $50. Call 577-8309.

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SPRING TEA! Ladies Auxillary Royal Canadian Legion Polish Branch #149, 730 Simpson St. Sunday April 6, 2014 from 1:00pm-3:30pm. Penny auction, bake table, deli, and MORE! Thank-you for your support. Tickets are $5.00 available at the Main Office.

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EXTEND THE LIFE OF YOUR GARMENTS. For all your tailoring needs. Alterations, zippers, hemming, etc. Reasonable rates, prompt service. Home Visits For Seniors Only!! 767-1705.

G.P. CONTRACTING. Painting, Drywall, Renovations, Flooring and Finishing. 20 Years experience. Committed to Quality and Customer Satisfaction. Call George at 621-2709.

NO FRIDGE’S, NO FREEZERS. No TV’s. Free pick-up of washers, dryers, dishwashers, stoves, BBQ’s, microwaves, misc. scrap. Call for pick up 939-1469. Leave message.

G4 MECHANICAL SERVICES - Plumbing, hot water heating, back flow preventers installed and tested. Licenced and insured. Call Gerry @ 807-628-6980

Smart Learning Centre. Tutoring services for math and science, grades 1-12. Special discounts for 10/20/30 hour packages, and group lessons. Call 6838265 Spring is on the way! WHISK AWAY residential cleaning and organizational service. Help with all your domestic needs. Call 807-251-3857 TREE REMOVAL SERVICES From cutting to clean up. If you have any trees to be removed, we can take care of it. FREE ESTIMATE 807-632-7000

Inbound Customer Service Representatives “We don’t call you, you call us” Have you heard what’s happening at Teleperformance?! Teleperformance is looking for Inbound CSR’s, you know, those people that you call when you need assistance with your products and services! What are you waiting for? Your new career is waiting for you at 251 Red River Rd or www. Teleperformance.com

54. HOME IMPROVEMENTS # CWR CONTRACTING. Framing and Renovation including customized cabinets. Exterior work includes all roofing work, landscaping, Bobcat services, Skidsteer and, excavator. Stone/cement/brick, driveway, land levelling, decks, fences, weeping tile, foundations, and repairs. Additions and garages. Work all expertly completed and proudly provide references. Call for Five Star Service: 577-0068. Quality workmanship guaranteed. DSI Contracting. complete renovations: framing, insulating, drywall, taping, painting, electrical, plumbing, concrete work, weeping tile, basement leaks. call 345-0676

Handyman-Carpenter-Finisher for rent. No job too big or small, will do it all. Phone Allan 630-0076. Jerry’s Painting. Interior, exterior, mud work, cement repair. 631-9294. PENSIONED PAINTERS looking to stay active. Very reasonable rates. Neat, fast working, former housing authority professional painters. Also drywall repairs & small renovations. 626-6926 Vivid Grey Design Studio offers Interior Design Services, Custom Closets, Closet doors, Storage Solutions, Kitchens and bathrooms. Call 252- 5539.

57. HELP WANTED WANTED LIVE-IN HOUSEKEEPER. Central, seems like country. Any age, pets ok. Mail resume/cover letter with references to Box #69, 87 N Hill st. Thunder Bay, ON P7A5V6.

63. COMING EVENTS NWO Paint Horse Club Tack Sale. Rosslyn Community Centre, Sunday April 6th, 9am-4pm. Rental tables $20. Call Lorraine 939-2291.

65. CRAFT & FLEA MARKETS Big Flea Market/Craft Show, CLE Coliseum, Saturday April 12th, 10am-3pm. Huge variety of items! Table rentals at 767-5488 345-9735.

Requirements: • A stats freak. We strive for the best stats every day, and measure everything we do to ensure we’re doubling down on what works, and pivoting where things aren’t working. Strong measurement is the key indicator of which direction we go. See your success rewarded with prizes and recognition!

• A team player. Goes without saying, but this person will operate on a team of 15-20 other representatives and needs to know how to share learning's and collaborate with this rockin’ group.

• Being a social connector and influencer. You likely have a lot of Facebook friends and people turn to you when

Want to Sell?

they’re looking for ideas of where to apply for a new career – a referral will earn you some extra cash.

• Customer Service Guru – you day dream about how to make someone smile, how to perfect their day, you are always seeking the next opportunity to spread the Teleperformance values and passion.

• Wage & Benefits – We offer a competitive wage as well as excellent benefits and an amazing bonus! • Well-Spoken/Written - Solid communication - both written and verbal will assist you in advancing your Teleperformance career, both locally and globally. We fill 90% of our positions internally.

• Flexible - both in schedule and attitude. Schedule – We can’t promise you the world, but we will do our very best to help you balance work and whatever else you have going on in your life. Attitude - Things change quickly in our world, and someone who can pivot and acclimate quickly does well.

• Positive - We like coming to work, and we want people who like to come to work every day to work with amazing, positive, happy people. Your attitude is key to your success.

In Addition! As well as your customer service skills, you will have a high school diploma, clear criminal backcheck and some programs require a credit check.

APPLY NOW: www.teleperformance.com or Erik.Hjorth@teleperformance.com

K C I CL ON . S U The tbSOURCE Classifieds are online, so it’s easier than ever to sell those unwanted items.

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Thursday, April 3, 2014

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CLICK ON US. The tbSOURCE Classifieds are online, so it’s easier than ever to find exactly what you’re looking for.

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For your daily news visit www.tbnewswatch.com

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