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The Times of

smiThTown

Fort salonga east • kings park • smithtown • nesconset • st james • head oF the harbor • nissequogue • hauppauge • commack Vol. 30, No. 46

January 11, 2018

$1.00

What’s inside

Step forward on Lake Ave revitalization A4 Bellone signs new law to protect LI waters A5 Cuomo delivers State of the State address A8

Smithtown East girls hoops falls to Blue Devils A9

The photography of John Spoltore

Also: ‘Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle’ reviewed, Photo of the Week, Sensory-friendly shows at Theatre Three, SBU Sports

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Second chance Conservative candidate Tom Lohmann appointed to town board despite loss in Nov. 7 election — A3

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PAGE A2 • TIMES OF SMITHTOWN • JANUARY 11, 2018

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Those brave enough to dive into the icy waters of Long Island Sound for charity will have a second chance this weekend. The Smithtown Historical Society has rescheduled its annual Polar Bear Plunge to 10 a.m., Jan. 14 at Long Beach in Smithtown. The event is supported by both the Smithtown Parks department and Nissequogue Fire Department. The organization was forced to postpone the fundraiser, which was originally scheduled for Jan. 7, due to “inclement weather,”

according to press statements. Other similar events scheduled for Northport and Centerport were also postponed due to a buildup of ice on beach fronts during the cold snap. Registration for the event is $25. All proceeds will be used to support educational programs run by Smithtown Historical Society. Those interested in participating can register by visiting the historical society’s Facebook page. — SaRa-Megan WaLSh

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JANUARY 11, 2018 • TIMES OF SMITHTOWN • PAGE A3

TOWN

Lohmann appointed to fill Wehrheim’s empty seat By Kevin Redding kevin@tbrnewsmedia.com In Smithtown, a new year brings with it new chances. Almost two months after Tom Lohmann (C) was trounced in the race for Smithtown Town Board, the former New York City Police Department member was sworn in to fill the vacant council seat left by new supervisor, Ed Wehrheim (R). Lohmann, 60, a special investigator for the Suffolk district attorney, came in sixth place receiving 9.31 percent of the votes as candidate on the Conservative ticket Nov. 7. He was appointed councilman at the Jan. 9 town board meeting. His appointment officially took effect Jan. 10, and he will serve through Dec. 31. Lohmann will need to campaign in November if he wishes to fill the remaining year of Wehrheim’s term through December 2019. “I wasn’t expecting this,” Lohmann said of his appointment by Wehrheim, rumblings of which were heard at the end of December. “It’s a big privilege and I’m honored that the board saw fit to give me this opportunity. Over the next 11 months, the people in this town will see the type of person that I am — my word is my bond and I look forward to working for the people in this community.” Lohmann said he intends to make good on his campaign promises to revise and update

Smithtown’s “antiquated” code and redevelop a comprehensive master plan to include all hamlets, in consultation with civic groups and local businesses, to create a better, more transparent government. During the campaign, he said he would like to start up quarterly community meetings in different hamlets so town officials could sit with residents to gauge their concerns and get feedback. He will also be the only town councilmember from Smithtown as the others reside in St. James and Kings Park. During the meeting, three members of the board — Wehrheim, Lisa Inzerillo (R) and Thomas McCarthy (R) — voted to appoint Lohmann with councilman Lynn Nowick (R) abstaining. Nowick said she wanted an opportunity to vet all the interested parties for the position and hear community input before making her decision. The town board had about four résumés for the council seat to review, Wehrheim said. “I would like to have had a longer, more thorough vetting process,” Nowick said. “I wanted to first hear the public possibly at this meeting or the second meeting this month, because I answer to them. But I have no problem with Mr. Lohmann. We’ll work together fine.” Many residents took to the podium to confront Wehrheim and the rest of the board about their decision to appoint Lohmann instead of Democratic candidate Amy Fortunato. Fortunato placed third in the general election, behind the two

incumbents in the election with 17.60 percent of the votes. “Amy received almost double the amount of votes as Mr. Lohmann,” said Maria LaMalfa, a Smithtown resident of 33 years. “We have 23,000 Democrats, 35,000 Republicans and 2,000 minor party registered voters and we all want the same things in our town. I think the way to accomplish what we want is to work together as a coalition. We have not had that in all the years I’ve lived here.” Another resident, Elizabeth Isabella, echoed these concerns. “I hope in the future we can dialogue across party lines and I want you to know I do congratulate you, but I am very disappointed that Amy’s votes were not taken into consideration,” Isabella said. “And I do wonder what the conversation was as you made your decision.” Wehrheim pointed out that two major appointments made to the Conservation Board made earlier in the meeting were given to Democrats. “We do intend to work across party lines,” Wehrheim responded. Following the meeting, the new supervisor further defended his decision to bring Lohmann aboard, claiming he was a perfect fit for the board. “We needed to find someone who is thinking the way we’re thinking moving forward so the government can be cohesive

File photo by Johnny Cirillow

Tom Lohmann was appointed to serve on Smithtown Town Board Jan. 9. and all on the same page,” Wehrheim said. “I also believe there’s a distinct advantage of having someone on this board with a law enforcement background. I think he’ll be an asset when it comes to interacting with [police] and dealing with the opioid epidemic.”

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PAGE A4 • TIMES OF SMITHTOWN • JANUARY 11, 2018

TOWN Phase one of St. James revitalization set for May BY KEVIN REDDING KEVIN@TBRNEWSMEDIA.COM With an eye toward a renovated downtown St. James by the end of the year, the Smithtown board recently issued a bond for $2.3 million to begin phase one of the project this May — replacing the hamlet’s decadesold water mains. The bond set forth by the St. James Water District was unanimously approved by town council members during its board of water commissioners meeting Jan. 9. It is the first step toward the reconstruction of the St. James business district — a project spearheaded by councilman Tom McCarthy (R) that was approved in May 2017. The project aims to revitalize approximately 4,300 feet of the Lake Avenue business district, from Moriches Road to Woodlawn Avenue. McCarthy said once the water mains are completed, hopefully in July, construction on the business corridor will start up. The plans call for the restoration of sidewalks and installation of new street trees and lights, curbs, concrete gutters and crosswalks, driveway aprons, asphalt, benches and other decorative amenities. This second phase will cost roughly $2.4 million, which the councilman said will be pulled from Smithtown’s general budget. A bid will be awarded to an outside construction company in the next 90 days.

Left photo by Kevin Redding, above rendering from Smithtown Planning

Mario Mattera, of St. James pictured at left, thanks Smithtown officials for issuing a bond for St. James revitalization. “Everything’s coming along perfectly,” McCarthy said. The councilman, who is working with the town’s traffic, engineering, highway and planning departments, said he hopes to turn Lake Avenue into a vibrant, focal point of the St. James community by improving business activity in the downtown area and encouraging private investment in adjacent properties. “It’s about time we step up to the plate, swing the bat and make St. James village and all our other villages the light of Suffolk County,” McCarthy said during a May 2017 work session where the project was adopted in a 3-2 vote. “I think we have to lead the way

for the community to fix our infrastructure that’s aged and decrepit and if we don’t, then shame on us.” While the process has been moving along slowly but surely, according to Councilwoman Lynne Nowick (R), the town has spent the months leading up to this meeting coordinating with engineers. They have already evaluated the existing water mains along the Lake Avenue business corridor and ultimately decided they needed to be replaced. “We didn’t want to break up the street, repave it and then find the water main just to have to break it up again,” Nowick said. “This is the real start.”

Mario Mattera, a St. James resident and Suffolk County Water Authority board member, thanked Supervisor Ed Wehrheim (R) and the rest of the council for kicking off the revitalization. “This is so very important after all these years,” Mattera said. “St. James is so dear to my heart and needs to be done the proper way going forward. Whatever we do, we need to make sure this is done the right way so we have foot traffic and that businesses are going to come in that want to be here. This way, we can finally go down and walk our beautiful town of St. James instead of seeing all these vacant stores. I appreciate that this is moving forward.” Wehrheim said the new and improved St. James is “going to look sharp” and is hopeful the project can address the severe lack of parking in the hamlet, which he said is only hurting local businesses. He also wants to obtain county funds or grants to conduct a market analysis to receive professional input to help determine what kind of businesses belong, and can thrive, there. “Because I don’t think a mom-and-pop shoe store is going to cut it,” Wehrheim said. The supervisor said he’s looking to pluck ideas from Kings Park, which has diverse shops including a butcher, a bakery, ice cream and bagel cafes, restaurants and a performing arts theater.

STATE

NY launches drug take-back program for pharmacies BY KEVIN REDDING KEVIN@TBRNEWSMEDIA.COM With the recent launch of the first statewide pharmaceutical take-back initiative, New York residents are encouraged to be more careful, and environmentally friendly, when it comes to getting rid of their old and unwanted medications. On Dec. 28, the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation announced that 80 retail pharmacies, hospitals and long-term care facilities across the state will be the first to participate in its $2 million pilot pharmaceutical take-back program, and encouraged more to get on board. This program allows residents to safely dispose any unused and potentially harmful pills into a drop box at these locations beginning in April, when the boxes are slated for installation. Once collected, the drugs will be weighed, tracked and incinerated. The free, volunteer public service, funded by the state Environmental Protection Fund, is modeled after a successful safe disposal program started at King Kullen in 2014 — which, in the past three years, has safely disposed more than 7,600 pounds of pharmaceutical drugs — and aims to improve the region’s drinking water, which has become increasingly contaminated by people flushing medications down the toilet and pouring them down the sink. Flushed pharmaceutical drugs have been found in state lakes, rivers and streams, negatively affecting the waterways and the wildlife

Photo from Adrianne Esposito

A demonstration is done at the King Kullen in Patchogue, showing how to use the drug take-back drop box. that inhabit them. Roughly 40 percent of groundwater samples have trace amounts of pharmaceutical drugs, with the most common being antibiotics and anticonvulsants, according to Adrienne Esposito, executive director of Citizens Campaign for the Environment. “Prescription drugs should come from our pharmacists — not from our faucets,” said Esposito, whose Farmingdale-based organization founded the King Kullen program and lobbied the state to provide funding in its budget in 2016 for the DEC to create the pilot program. “Pharmaceutical drugs are considered an ‘emerging contaminant’ in our drinking water and the flushing of unwanted drugs is one contributor to this growing problem. Safe disposal programs [like this] are critical in combating this health risk. The goal really is to pro-

vide people with an easy, safe and convenient option to dispose of their drugs. We can get ahead of this problem now rather than wait until it becomes a bigger problem later.” The pilot program is currently open and is accepting applications, according to the DEC website, which also outlines that the $2 million will be used to cover the full cost of purchasing U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration-compliant medication drop boxes, as well as the cost of pickup, transport and destruction of collected waste pharmaceuticals for a two-year period. Esposito said the program also serves to prevent accidental exposure or intentional misuse of prescription drugs. “This is a service that all pharmacies should be providing their customers,” she said. “Not only does it protect the environment, it will

keep drugs out of the hands of people who shouldn’t have them.” While there aren’t many participants so far in Suffolk — among six volunteers are Huntington’s Country Village Chemists, St. James Rehabilitation & Healthcare Center and Stony Brook Student Health Services — many local pharmacy owners said they were interested in enrolling, while others have already been offering something similar. At Heritage Chemists Pharmacy & Boutique in Mount Sinai, owner Frank Bosio said he offered a take-back box for more than two years, but funding ended. “It was a great program and the community loved it,” said Bosio with interest in enrolling in the new pilot program. “I definitely want to get on board with this.” Manager of Echo Pharmacy in Miller Place, Beth Mango, said her store has a disposal box system in place that complies with Drug Enforcement Administration requirements. “We had a lot of customers asking us what they could do with their old medications,” Mango said. “We wanted to do something for the community. We’re trying to save our Earth for our children and for future generations — this is one way we know is safe.” Esposito made clear that most disposal systems outside of the launched program aren’t authorized by the DEC or other agencies, and hopes the list for this particular effort will grow. Retail pharmacies, hospitals and long-term care facilities can enroll to participate in the pilot pharmaceutical take-back program on the DEC’s website at www.dec.ny.gov/.


JANUARY 11, 2018 • TIMES OF SMITHTOWN • PAGE A5

COUNTY

Photo from Suffolk County Executive Steve Bellone’s office

Suffolk County Executive Steve Bellone, center, displays the new county law banning the updating or instillation of primitive cesspools and the technology associated with them, as he’s surrounded by local leaders and environmental group organizers during a press conference.

Bellone takes step toward protecting LI’s water New law closes loophole to permanently ban replacement of old, primitive cesspool technology to reduce nitrogen levels in water BY DESIRÉE KEEGAN DESIREE@TBRNEWSMEDIA.COM

when a requirement for the addition of a septic tank was added, but the county sanitary code did not require that homeowners add a Repairing old cesspools is now a thing of septic tank when replacing an existing cessthe past in Suffolk County. pool, making it legal to install a new cesspool As part of an ongoing effort to improve to replace an existing one. By now closing water quality on Long Island, Suffolk County this loophole, it will advance the water qualExecutive Steve Bellone (D) ity efforts undertaken by the signed into law a ban on county and set the stage for installing new cesspools, the evolution away from the ending the practice of use of nonperforming cessgrandfathering inadequate pools and septic systems to sanitary system fixes with the the use of new, state-of-thenow-primitive technology. art technologies that reduce “It marks another historic nitrogen in residential wastestep forward in our ongoing water by up to 70 percent, effort to reverse decades of according to Bellone. nitrogen pollution that has “With this action, I would degraded water quality in like to say that we, as a counour lakes, bays and harbors, ty, have adopted the policies and it is a step that is long necessary to adequately adoverdue,” Bellone said. “It is dress our region’s nitrogen fairly unusual for the local pollution problems, but in governments, environmental reality, this gets us closer to groups and the region’s largwhere we should have been est builders group to agree on in the decades following the importance of tightening 1973,” said county Legislaup outdated regulations to tor Kara Hahn (D-Setauket), protect water quality, but that a co-sponsor of the Article 6 is exactly what happened in revisions and chairwoman this instance. This inclusive, of the Suffolk County Legiscollaborative approach is lature’s Environment, Plan— Steve Bellone ning and Agriculture Commaking a huge difference in our efforts to reduce decades mittee. “I look forward to of nitrogen pollution.” continuing the process of fiCesspools have been identified as pri- nally bringing Suffolk County’s sanitary code mary sources of nitrogen pollution that into the 21st century.” have degraded water quality throughout In addition to banning the installation of Suffolk County, contributing to harmful al- new cesspools, the law approved by the Sufgae blooms, beach closures and fish kills. folk County Legislature Dec. 5 requires the The use of cesspools in new construction wastewater industry to provide data regarding has been banned in the county since 1973, system replacement and pumping activities to

‘This inclusive, collaborative approach is making a huge difference in our efforts to reduce decades of nitrogen pollution.’

the Department of Health Services beginning July 1, 2018. It also mandates permits for replacement of existing systems effective July 1, 2019, and requires business properties with grandfathered nonconforming wastewater flows to install nitrogen-reducing advanced systems if making significant changes to the use of the property. Adrienne Esposito, executive director of Citizens Campaign for the Environment, joined forces with other environmental group leaders in thanking the county for what was a necessary step in eliminating nitrogen from groundwater. “We can no longer allow inadequately treated sewage to mix with our sole source of drinking water,” she said. “Modernizing our health codes is a commonsense action that is critically needed for water protection.” Richard Amper, executive director of the Long Island Pine Barrens Society, said he was overjoyed by the “huge step,” ending pollution by what he called Suffolk’s No. 1 threat to clean water. “Now, we’re not just complaining,” he said. “We’re doing something about it.” For the past three years, Suffolk’s Legislature has instituted a pilot program to test the new technologies, using a lottery system to select homeowners willing to have a donated system installed to demonstrate system performance. Under the pilot program, a total of 14 different technologies have been installed at 39 homes throughout the county. Four have been provisionally approved for use after demonstrating six months of acceptable operating data. As part of continued efforts, a voluntary Septic Improvement Program, the first of its kind in the state, was launched in July 2017 to provide grants and low-interest financing to make the replacement of cesspools and septic systems with new innovative/alternative technologies affordable for homeowners who choose to upgrade their systems. Over the first five months, nearly 850 homeowners have registered for the program, 228

Video: Cesspool ban signed into law

have completed applications and 160 have been awarded grants and are moving toward installation of the new systems. Suffolk County was the first in the state to apply for funding from New York State’s newly created $75 million Septic System Replacement Fund and will use the funding to expand its efforts to see the new technologies installed throughout the county. The changes are the first in what is expected to be a series of updates to the county sanitary code over the next several years as county officials consider whether to put in place policies that require new nitrogenreducing systems in new construction projects, require installation of the new systems when a cesspool or septic system fails and needs to be replaced, or upon sale of a property. For now, all parties involved are on the same page moving forward, including both a working group comprised of county legislators, town planners and engineers with members of environmental organizations, as well as the Long Island Builders Institute. “There is more work to do,” said Kevin McDonald, conservation finance and policy director for The Nature Conservancy on Long Island. “But passage of this bill means less nitrogen pollution in our water, and more resilient, healthy bays and people for generations to come.”


PAGE A6 • TIMES OF SMITHTOWN • JANUARY 11, 2018

POLICE

POLICE BLOttEr Incidents and arrests Dec. 26–Jan. 7

No prescription

Mexican eatery sink stolen

Suffolk County Crime Stoppers and 4th Precinct Crime Section officers are seeking the public’s help to identify and locate the man who stole a sink from a Smithtown restaurant. A man stole a sink, valued at approximately $250, from the rear of Azulejos, located on Route 25, Dec. 11 at approximately 10 p.m. Suffolk County Crime Stoppers offers a cash reward of up to $5,000 for information that leads to an arrest. Anyone with information about this crime is asked to call Crime Stoppers anonymously at 800-220TIPS(8477). All calls will be kept confidential. — Sara-Megan WalSh

LEGALS

Notice of formation of M. Joy Photography, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with the Secretary of State of the State of New York (SSNY) on 12/4/17. Office located: Suffolk County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of the process to the LLC: 24 Asbury Drive Smithtown New York 11787. Purpose: Photography Services.

Graffiti artist

Photos from SCPD

Police said the above-pictured man allegedly stole a sink from a restaurant using the truck, pictured at top.

and 1306877 for beer, liquor and wine has been applied for by 281 West Main Corp. to sell beer, liquor and wine at retail in a Bar/Tavern under the Alcoholic Beverage Control Law at 281A W. Main St., Smithtown, NY 11787 for on premises consumption. Elizabeth Pyros 281 West Main Corp dba The Rail

day, September 4, 2018 at 7:00 p.m. at the Main Firehouse of the Smithtown Fire District, 100 Elm Avenue, Smithtown, New York. Dated: Smithtown, New York January 3, 2018 THOMAS A. BUFFA District Secretary Smithtown Fire District 100 Elm Avenue Smithtown, New York 11787

982 1/11 2x ts

910 12/14 6x ts

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NOTICE OF REGULAR MEETINGS OF THE BOARD OF FIRE COMMISSIONERS OF THE SMITHTOWN FIRE DISTRICT FOR 2018

Notice of formation of Zero Cruel, LLC. Arts of Org filed with the SSNY on 11/06/17. Office location: Suffolk County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to 3 Adrienne Ct. Hauppauge, NY 11788. Purpose: totally lawful purposes.

Notice of formation of 319 HOLDINGS LLC. Articles of Organization filed with the Secretary of State of New York SSNY on 12/29/2017. Office located in Suffolk County. SSNY is designated for service of process. SSNY shall mail copy of any process served against the LLC 155 4TH ST,ST JAMES,NY,11780. Purpose: any lawful purpose.

The regular meetings of the Board of Fire Commissioners of the Smithtown Fire District for 2018, will be held on the first Monday and the third Tuesday of every month at 7:00 P.M., at the Main Firehouse of the Smithtown Fire District, 100 Elm Avenue, Smithtown, New York. with the exception of the September meeting to be held on Tues-

909 12/14 6x ts Notice is hereby given that a license, number 1306876

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Police said a 27-year-old Commack woman was found allegedly attempting to sell various prescription narcotics Jan. 3 at around 5:10 p.m. at the Radisson Hotel on Motor Parkway in Hauppauge. Police officers determined she was wanted in connection with other recent drug sales including at the Central Islip LIRR train station. She was arrested and charged with four counts of third-degree criminal sale of a controlled substance.

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A 73-year-old woman from East Northport was arrested by police Jan. 5 at roughly 2:15 p.m. for allegedly spray painting a fence at a home on Willow Ridge Drive in Smithtown. She was charged with third-degree criminal mischief resulting in property damage valued at more than $250.

Hit and run

At approximately 1:50 a.m. Dec. 31, police arrested a 26-year-old Bay Shore man who was driving a 2001 Mercury westbound along Route 25A in Nesconset and allegedly crashed into a 2012 Hyundai, then fled. He was charged with leaving the scene of an accident.

Attempted break-in

Metal doors were severely damaged by unknown persons at Tuttnauer, a manufacturing firm, located on Power Drive in Hauppauge at approximately 7 p.m. Jan. 3, according to police.

Five-finger discount

Police arrested a 66-year-old Patchogue woman for allegedly stealing a handbag, shirts, shoes and bracelet from Sears in Smith Haven Mall in Lake Grove at approximately 2:41 p.m. Jan. 6. She was charged with petit larceny.

Drunk driver

Police said a 47-year-old man from Central Islip was driving a 2002 Honda at approximately 2 a.m. Jan. 1, when he allegedly drove across the front lawn of a home on Mount Pleasant Road in Smithtown, hit a vehicle parked in the driveway, then fled the scene. He was arrested and charged with first-offense driving while intoxicated and leaving the scene of an accident.

Broken fences

At approximately 9 p.m. Jan. 5, police said that an unknown person broke several fence slats of a Bedford Avenue home in Islandia. The incident was reported Jan. 6. Police said at approximately 11 p.m. Jan. 7 a Hauppauge homeowner on Cornwall Lane reported several white PVC fence panels were damaged by an unknown person.

Not for sale

An unknown person broke into a 2015 Toyota Camry at Smithtown Toyota, located on Middle Country Road in Smithtown, and stole a set of golf clubs, boxing gloves, assorted hats and boots at approximately 5:30 p.m. Dec. 26, police said. — Compiled by Sara-Megan Walsh

Fake money found in Commack Suffolk County Crime Stoppers and 4th Squad detectives are seeking the public’s help to identify and locate the person who used counterfeit currency at a Commack store in November. A woman used a counterfeit $100 bill to purchase jewelry at Popi’s Place, located on Jericho Turnpike, Nov. 29 at approximately 3:50 p.m. The suspect is described as white or Hispanic, with a thin build and dyed red hair. Suffolk County Crime Stoppers offers a cash reward of up to $5,000 for information that leads to an arrest. Anyone with information about this crime is asked to call Crime Stoppers anonymously at 800-220-TIPS (8477). All calls will be kept confidential. — Sara-Megan WalSh

Photo from SCPD

Police said the above-pictured woman purchased goods in Commack with counterfeit cash.


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PAGE A8 • TIMES OF SMITHTOWN • JANUARY 11, 2018

STATE

Cuomo delivers State of the State address BY SABRINA PETROSKI Although chatter is starting to pick up that he might be a candidate for president on the Democratic ticket in 2020, for now Gov. Andrew Cuomo (D) is still in a New York state of mind. On Jan. 3 Cuomo gave his State of the State address, in which he explained his agenda for the coming year. He began by touting some quality of life issues in New York state that are improving. “Crime is down statewide, we have a cleaner environment, we have a fairer criminal justice system, we have more high school graduates who are attending colleges,” Cuomo said.

“We have preserved more land than ever before, enacted a more progressive tax code, and launched the most ambitious building program in the country.” Cuomo split the problems he believes the state is facing and his speech into three sections: the challenges of old discrimination and sexism within society, safety threats and the new federal and economic challenges “we have never experienced before.” He referred to the challenges he plans to address in the coming year as “a three front war.” First, Cuomo pitched a reform on how the state deals with sexual assault and harassment claims in the workplace for employees paid by tax dollars.

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“Policies should be binding on all state employees in all authorities, in all agencies and on local governments,” he said. His suggested reforms would include a uniform code of sexual harassment policies, a contraceptive care act, and a governmentwide anonymous whistleblower process so victims feel safer stepping forward. “No taxpayers funds should be used to pay for any public official’s sexual harassFile photo ment or misconduct,” New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo Cuomo said. pointed to workplace sexual He also said the misconduct and overall public New York State pension safety as areas to watch. fund should only be invested in companies the comptroller determines have adequate female and minority representation in management and on the board of directors while showing effective corporate leadership. “Our lady justice is still not color blind and her scales are still not balanced,” he said. The governor spoke of a redevelopment plan for the major transportation hubs throughout the state, an initiative spearheaded in the hopes of improving safety and mobility. These places will be equipped with more and better trained police personnel and more state-of-the-art surveillance systems, according to Cuomo. A large transportation hub Cuomo said he is focusing on is Penn Station. He said he has created a plan to restructure and rebuild Penn Station to improve operations, aesthetics and security. He is also proposing a plan to rebuild the major train stations that connect the Long Island Rail Road to Penn Station. He also said he has plans to remove traditional toll booths, and replace them with electric toll structures as a way of reducing congestion along main highways and bridges, a movement that is already underway. Lastly, Cuomo said he will continue to invest in and improve public education. He plans to expand 3- and 4-year-old prekidergarten, also after-school and computer science programs. He vowed to make sure more state school aid is being dedicated to poorer districts, and to make sure the local education districts are distributing more money from received grants to poorer schools. “Trickle-down economics doesn’t work, and neither does trickle-down education funding,” Cuomo said. On Jan. 5, Senate Majority Leader John Flanagan (R-East Northport) provided a response to Cuomo’s State of the State address, expressing similar hopes for the coming year. He said the urgency of creating a more affordable New York, as well as protecting those who live here should be a priority of lawmakers for 2018. “Our self-imposed 2 percent spending cap has already saved our state $41 billion,” Flanagan said. “It’s time for the governor and Assembly Democrats to join with us in making that spending cap permanent. Doing so will help to ensure a balanced, fiscally responsible budget that protects taxpayers this year, and every year.” He echoed the governor’s message on public safety. “Senate Republicans know that if you, your family and your community aren’t safe and secure, nothing else matters,” Flanagan said. Many of the policies Cuomo spoke of in his address are already starting to be put into effect. “This is the year we make New York great again,” Cuomo said.


JANUARY 11, 2018 • TIMES OF SMITHTOWN • PAGE A9

SPORTS

Photos by Bill Landon

Clockwise from left, Kate Cosgrove shoots from outside; Alexandra Nicholson battles between defenders; Katie Illari shoots; and Sarah Leonard reaches for the rim behind a block in Smithtown East’s loss to Huntington Jan. 8.

Smithtown East falls in close game to Huntington BY BILL LANDON There were threes all over the place Monday night, and just like the three c’s in Katie Seccafico’s last name, it seemed the senior was calling for them. Seccafico banked three triples on her way to a game-high 13 points in Huntington’s 45-37 League III win over Smithtown East Jan. 8. She had eight assists and four steals to go along with it. “We spent a lot of time preparing for the face guard,” Seccafico said. “We had good communication on defense and that really helped us dropping back, letting everyone know where we are on the court.” The guard scored her first 3-pointer to cap off a 17-0 Blue Devils run to open the first quarter, and added another by the halftime break. Senior Alexandra Heuwetter nailed two of her own to help Huntington to a 26-14 lead. “At first, it’s not what we expected we thought,” Heuwetter said. “We thought they would face guard us, but they didn’t, and that gave us a lot of open shots.” Smithtown East senior point guard Ceili Williams (13 points) also made her presence known, drawing fouls while driving to the basket and going 6-for-7 from the free-throw line. Even with her team making shot after shot to extend the advantage, as Hunting-

Huntington 45 Smithtown E 37

ton outscored Smithtown East 13-9 in the third, sophomore forward Riva Bergman said she was impressed with her team’s defensive effort. “I think we’re ready for any challenge,” she said. “We slowed the tempo, we ran our plays and we were able to knock down shots.” Huntington senior Nicole Leslie, who had not seen action early in the season due to injury, was at full strength in the second half and battled in the paint to lead her team with six points in the third. She finished the game with 12 rebounds. The Bulls had their work cut out for them in the final eight minutes of play, trailing by 16, but refused to go quietly. Freshman Paige Doherty drained a three to make it a 12-point game, and Williams added her own to draw within nine points in regulation, but it was as close as Smithtown East would come. “They’re big, they’re athletic, they’re strong, but I just told them I’m very proud of how they battled back — they didn’t hang their heads and give up at 17-0,” Smithtown East head coach Tom Vulin said. The seniors led the way for the Blue Devils, which moved to 2-2 in the season to be even with Smithtown East, as Leslie and Heuwetter followed close behind Seccafico with 11 points apiece. Huntington head coach Michael Kaplan has enjoyed seeing his team at full strength. “Earlier in the year we had some inju-

ries and sicknesses, so it was hard for us to practice at full strength, but we’re finally healthy,” he said. “We’re a young team considering we only have three seniors, and it helped that we shot well early on, but our

three seniors really stepped up today — that really helped us.”


PAGE A10 • TIMES OF SMITHTOWN • JANUARY 11, 2018

SCHOOL NEWS Smithtown High School West

Mandracchia Sawmill Intermediate School

Making holidays joyful Photo from Smithtown school district

Artistic accolades

Smithtown High School West student -artists took home the top two prizes at Suffolk County Community College’s 10th annual High School Art Competition in late December. Senior Mikayla Riley won first place with a paper collage, “The Dawn of the Edge of Night.” Senior Miriam Radwan won sec-

ond place with a mixed media drawing, “Gourds.” Both students were awarded monetary prizes. Pictured above, Steve Halem, an art teacher at the high school; Riley; Radwan; and Michael Mastrangelo, the director of fine arts for Smithtown Central School District.

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Smithtown High School West senior Julia Gutierrez, at right has been recognized as a 2017-18 National Hispanic Scholar. Each year, the National Hispanic Recognition Program honors about 5,000 academically outstanding high school students from the more than 250,000 Hispanic and Latino juniors who take the PSAT/NMSQT exam.

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JANUARY 11, 2018 • TIMES OF SMITHTOWN • PAGE A11

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PAGE A14 â&#x20AC;¢ TIMES OF SMITHTOWN â&#x20AC;¢ JANUARY 11, 2018

E M P L OY M E N T / C A R E E R S LITTLE FLOWER CHILDREN AND FAMILY SERVICES OF NY SEEKS: RNâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S Residential Clinical Director Maintenance Mechanic III Direct Care Workers Child Care Workers Entitlement Eligibility Coordinator Assistant House Manager Health Care Intergrator Valid NYS Driverâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s License required for most positions. Little Flower Children and Family Services in Wading River NY. Send resume to: wadingriver-jobs@lfchild.org or fax to: 631-929- 6203. EOE PLEASE SEE COMPLETE DETAILS IN EMPLOYMENT DISPLAY ADS

BILLER, PT Busy Islandia Doctorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Office. Afternoon/Evening/Saturday hours. Excellent phone and computer skills, knowledge of MS Office. Must be able to multi-task. Fax resume to: 631-656-0634, or call 631-656-0472

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Huntington Union Free School District Weekdays M-F 1 pm - 6:30 pm Weekend Nights 10 pm - 6:30 am NYS Fingerprinting required. Must possess valid NYS Driverâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s License and NYS Security License.

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Work at home. North Atlantic Review Literary Magazine. Yearly Publication. Stony Brook.

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JANUARY 11, 2018 • TIMES OF SMITHTOWN • PAGE A15

E M P L OY M E N T / C A R E E R S +20( &216758&7,21

Stony Brook University (Stony Brook, NY) seeks an Administrative and Grants Assistant to provide administrative & grants management support to facilitate the Laufer Center’s operations. Responsible for grant proposals, grants management, personnel, event & travel coordination, procurement, & office/calendar management. Req: H.S. diploma, 5 years FT administrative experience (pref in higher ed/academic/research env), highly proficient in word processing, spreadsheet management, electronic messaging & internet applications. Experience w/confidential information w/ professionalism, integrity, discretion, & tact. Experience effectively multi-tasking in a fast-paced, deadline driven environment with a high degree of accuracy & organization. Pref: AAS degree, or higher, exp coord pre- & post-award grant proposals, both federal & non-federal sponsored research awards, exp in event planning/ travel coordination & working w/SUNY software. For a full position description, or to apply online, visit: www.stonybrook.edu/jobs (Req. # 1703727). Application deadline 01/12/18. AA/EOE. Female/Minority/Disabled/Veteran 98939

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PAGE A16 • TIMES OF SMITHTOWN • JANUARY 11, 2018

S E R V IC E S Cleaning COME HOME TO A CLEAN HOUSE! Attention to detail is our priority. Excellent References. Serving the Three Village Area. Call Jacquie or Joyce 347-840-0890.

Decks DECKS ONLY BUILDERS & DESIGNERS Of Outdoor Living By Northern Construction of LI. Decks, Patios/Hardscapes, Pergolas, Outdoor Kitchens and Lighting. Since 1995. Lic/Ins. 3rd Party Financing Available.105 Broadway Greenlawn, 631-651-8478. www.DecksOnly.com

Electricians ANTHEM ELECTRIC Quality Light & Power since 2004. Master Electrician. Commercial, Industrial, Residential. Port Jefferson. Please call 631-291-8754 Andrew@Anthem-Electric.net FARRELL ELECTRIC Serving Suffolk for over 40 years All types electrical work, service changes, landscape lighting, automatic standby generators. 631-928-0684 GREENLITE ELECTRIC, INC. Repairs, installations, motor controls, PV systems. Piotr Dziadula, Master Electrician. Lic. #4694-ME/Ins. 631-331-3449

Fences SMITHPOINT FENCE. Vinyl Fence Sale! Wood, PVC, Chain Link Stockade. Free estimates. Commercial/Residential 70 Jayne Blvd., PJS Lic.37690-H/Ins. 631-743-9797 www.smithpointfence.com.

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ALL PHASES OF HOME IMPROVEMENT From attic to your basement, no job too big or too small, RCJ Construction www.rcjconstruction.com commercial/residential, lic/ins 631-580-4518.

Furniture/Restoration/ Repairs REFINISHING & RESTORATION Antiques restored, repairing recane, reupholstery, touchups kitchen, front doors, 40 yrs exp, SAVE$$$, free estimates. Vincent Alfano 631-286-1407

Gutters/Leaders GREG TRINKLE PAINTING & GUTTER CLEANING Powerwashing, window washing, staining. Neat, reliable, 25 years experience. Free Estimates. Lic/Ins.#31398-H 631-331-0976

Handyman Services JOHN’S A-1 HANDYMAN SERVICE *Crown moldings* Wainscoting/raised panels. Kitchen/Bathroom Specialist. Painting, windows, finished basements, ceramic tile. All types repairs. Dependable craftsmanship. Reasonable rates. Lic/Ins. #19136-H. 631-744-0976 c.631 697-3518

Housesitting Services TRAVELING? Need someone to check on your home? Contact Tender Loving Pet Care, LLC. We’re more than just pets. Insured/Bonded. 631-675-1938

*BluStar Construction* The North Shore’s Most Trusted Renovation Experts. 631-751-0751 Suffolk Lic. #48714-H, Ins. See Our Display Ad THREE VILLAGE HOME IMPROVEMENT Kitchens & Baths, Ceramic Tile, Hardwood floors, Windows/Doors, Interior Finish trim, Interior/Exterior Painting, Composite Decking, Wood Shingles. Serving the community for 30 years. Rich Beresford, 631-689-3169 SUPER HANDYMAN DTA CONTRACTING WE CAN FIX OR BUILD ANYTHING. Kitchens/Baths, Tile Flooring, Doors, Windows/Moulding, Painting; Interior/Exterior, All credit cards accepted. Senior discount. daveofalltrades @yahoo.com 631-745-9230 Lic#-37878-H/Ins

Home Repairs/ Construction LONG HILL CARPENTRY 40 years experience All phases of home improvement. Old & Historic Restorations. Lic.#H22336/Ins. 631-751-1764 longhill7511764@aol.com

Lawn & Landscaping

Masonry

Tree Work

LANDSCAPES UNLIMITED SPRING/FALL CLEANUPS Call For Details. Property Clean-ups, Tree Removal, Pruning & Maintenance. Low Voltage lighting available. Aeration, seed, fertilization & lime Package deal. Free Estimates. Commercial/ Residential. Steven Long Lic.#36715-H/Ins. 631-675-6685, for details

Carl Bongiorno Landscape/Mason Contractor All phases Masonry Work: Stone Walls, Patios, Poolscapes. All phases of Landscaping Design. Theme Gardens. Residential & Commercial. Lic/Ins. 631-928-2110

ARBOR-VISTA TREE CARE Complete Tree care service devoted to the care of trees. Maintenance pruning, waterview work, sun-trimming, elevating, pool areas, storm thinning, large tree removal, stump grinding. Wood chips. Lic#18902HI. Free estimates. 631-246-5377

SETAUKET LANDSCAPE DESIGN Stone Driveways/Walkways, Walls/Stairs/Patios/Masonry, Brickwork/Repairs Land Clearing/Drainage,Grading/Excavating. Plantings/Mulch, Rain Gardens Steve Antos, 631-689-6082 setauketlandscape.com Serving Three Villages SWAN COVE LANDSCAPING Lawn Maintenance, Cleanups, Shrub/Tree Pruning, Removals. Landscape Design/Installation, Ponds/Waterfalls, Stone Walls. Firewood. Free estimates. Lic/Ins.631-689-8089

Landscape Materials SCREENED TOP SOIL Mulch, wood compost, fill, decorative and driveway stone, sand/brick/cement. Fertilizer and seed. JOSEPH M. TROFFA Landscape/Mason Supply 631-928-4665 www.troffa.com

Painting/Spackling/ Wallpaper ALL PRO PAINTING Interior/Exterior. Power washing, Staining, Wallpaper Removal. Free estimates. Lic/Ins #19604HI. 631-696-8150, Nick BOB’S PAINTING SERVICE 25 Years Experience Interior/Exterior Painting, Spackling, Staining, Wallpaper Removal, Power washing. Free Estimates. Lic/Ins. #17981. 631-744-8859 COUNTRYSIDE PAINTING A Company built on recommendations interior/exterior power washing, expert painting and staining, all work owner operated, serving The Three Villages for 23 years, neat professional service, senior discount, affordable pricing, 631-698-3770.

Masonry

COUNTY-WIDE PAINTING INTERIOR/EXTERIOR Painting/Staining. Quality workmanship. Living/Serving 3 Village Area Over 25 Years. Lic#37153-H. 631-751-8280

ALL SUFFOLK PAVING & MASONRY Asphalt Paving, Cambridge Paving Stone, Belgium Block Supplied & fitted. All types of drainage work. Free written estimates. Lic#47247-H/Ins. 631-764-9098/631-365-6353 www.allsuffolkpaving.com

LaROTONDA PAINTING & DESIGN Interior/exterior, sheetrock repairs, taping/spackling, wallpaper removal, Faux, decorative finishings. Free estimates. Lic.#53278-H/Ins. Ross LaRotonda 631-689-5998

CLOVIS OUTDOOR SERVICES LTD EXPERT TREE REMOVAL and Pruning. Landscape Design and maintenance, Edible Gardens, Plant Healthcare, Exterior Lighting. 631-751-4880 clovisoutdoors@gmail.com EASTWOOD TREE & LANDSCAPE, INC. Experts in tree care and landscaping. Serving Suffolk County for 25 years. Lic.#35866H/Ins. 631-928-4070 eastwoodtree.com

RANDALL BROTHERS TREE SERVICE Planting, pruning, removals, stump grinding. Free Estimates. Fully insured. LIC# 50701-H. 631-862-9291 SUNBURST TREE EXPERTS Since 1974, our history of customer satisfaction is second to none. Pruning/removals/planting, plant health care. Insect/Disease Management. ASK ABOUT GYPSY MOTH AND TICK SPRAYS Bonded employees. Lic/Ins. #8864HI 631-744-1577

TO SUBSCRIBE

CALL 631.751.7744

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ADVERTISE YOUR SEASONAL SERVICES Snowplowing • Firewood I Chimney Cleaning •Oil Burner Maintenance

Call our Classified Advertising Department

at 631.331.1154 • 631. 751-7663 SPECIAL RATES NOW AVAILABLE

I ©59407


JANUARY 11, 2018 â&#x20AC;˘ TIMES OF SMITHTOWN â&#x20AC;˘ PAGE A17

H O M E S E R V IC E S

Place your ad today Call 631.751.7663 or 631.331.1154

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Fall Clean Up Special

VINYL FENCE SALE

Seasonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Greetings from your friends at Smithpoint Fence Specializing in all phases of fencing: â&#x20AC;˘ Wood â&#x20AC;˘ PVC â&#x20AC;˘ Chain Link â&#x20AC;˘ Stockade

Call for details

Low Voltage Lighting Available

OVER 40 YEARS EXPERIENCE

FREE ESTIMATES

Lic. & Insured 37690-H

Steven Long, Lic.#36715-H & Ins.

70 Jayne Blvd., Port Jeff Station (631) 743-9797

Member 3 Village Chamber of Commerce

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631-675-6685 Free Estimates

www.smithpointfence.com â&#x20AC;˘ smithpointfence@gmail.com

Š98438

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ANTHEM ELECTRIC

Quality Light & Power Since 2004

Š96069

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PAGE A


PAGE A18 â&#x20AC;˘ TIMES OF SMITHTOWN â&#x20AC;˘ JANUARY 11, 2018

H O M E S E R V IC E S $//:25.*8$5$17((' )5(((67,0$7(6 (;3(5,(1&('$1'5(/,$%/(

Kitchens/Baths â&#x20AC;˘ Tile Flooring â&#x20AC;˘ Doors Windows/Moulding â&#x20AC;˘ Painting Sheetrocking â&#x20AC;˘ Spackling

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PAINTING & DESIGN

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NO JOB TOO BIG OR TOO SMALL

Please call our Stony Brook office today for a FREE in home consultation

Š93582

(631) 580-4518

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$0..&3$*"-3&4*%&/5*"-r-*$*/4]08/&301& 3"5&%

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#1 Recommendation on BBB website

A Company Built on Recommendations CERTIFIED LEAD PAINT REMOVAL

â&#x20AC;&#x153;We take pride in our workâ&#x20AC;?

FREE ESTIMATES

Ryan Southworth 631-331-5556

Licensed/Insured

#37074-H; RI 18499-10-34230

Since 1989

Š97207

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Full Service contractor â&#x20AC;&#x201C; complete jobs from start to finish Licensed H-22336 and fully insuredÂ

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Lic. #48714-H & Insured

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longhill7511764@aol.com  All Phases of Home Improvement  Porches & Decks  Old & Historic Home Restorations  Aging in Place Remodeling  Custom Carpentry:  Extensions & Dormers Built-ins, Pantries, and More  Kitchens & Baths  Siding & Windows

Specializing in Finished Basements

Owner/Operator has 25+ years serving The North Shore

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REFERENCES AVAILABLE

From Your Attic To Your Basement

Additions & renovations, decks, windows, doors, siding, kitchens, baths, roofs & custom carpentry. We love small jobs too!

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Decorative Finishes

Nick Cordovano 631â&#x20AC;&#x201C;696â&#x20AC;&#x201C;8150

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Taping Spackling

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ALL PRO PAINTING

Interior/Exterior Powerwashing Expert Painting & Staining All work owner operated. Serving and residing in the Three Villages 23 years. Neat professional service. Senior discount Affordable pricing

631â&#x20AC;&#x201C;698â&#x20AC;&#x201C;3770 Lic 59098-H/Ins

PAGE B

Š98185

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Place your ad today Call 631.751.7663 or 631.331.1154


JANUARY 11, 2018 â&#x20AC;˘ TIMES OF SMITHTOWN â&#x20AC;˘ PAGE A19

H O M E S E R V IC E S

Place your ad today Call 631.751.7663 or 631.331.1154

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FREE ESTIMATES

KITCHEN & BATH From Design to Completion

ALL PHASES OF HOME IMPROVEMENT Š98756

Specializing in:

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VINCENT ALFANO FURNITURE RESTORATION WWW.EXPERTFURNITURERESTORATION.COM

631.286.1407

343 So. Country Rd., Brookhaven

Complete Woodworking & Finishing Shop PICK-UP & DELIVERY

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ALL SUFFOLK PAV I N G & M A S O N RY

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FREE ESTIMATES & ADVICE

with this ad

631-365-6353

All Areas Properly Planned & Prepared Fast Efficient Service Choose From Many Colors & Styles

www.allsuffolkpaving.com

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+SPECIAL RATES NOW AVAILABLE FOR NEW ADVERTISERS

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PAGE F


PAGE A20 â&#x20AC;˘ TIMES OF SMITHTOWN â&#x20AC;˘ JANUARY 11, 2018

PROF E S SIONA L & B U SI N E S S DO YOU NEED A LAWYER?

Place Your Ad in the

Traffic Tickets, DUI, Drugs, Domestic Violence, Bankruptcy, chapter 7 & 13, Real Estate sale or purchase

Professional Services Directory

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Paul H. Rethier, Esq

Providing solutions to all your home or office computing needs. â&#x20AC;˘ Software and Hardware Installation â&#x20AC;˘ Wireless Home and Office Networking Reasonable â&#x20AC;˘ PC System Upgrades and Repairs Rates, â&#x20AC;˘ Internet, Web, and Email Systems Dependable â&#x20AC;˘ System Troubleshooting Service, â&#x20AC;˘ Software Configuration and Training â&#x20AC;˘ Computer System Tune-Up Plenty of â&#x20AC;˘ Network Design, Setup and Support References â&#x20AC;˘ Backup and Power Failure Safety Systems Š54806

(631)

821-2558

Email: jim@pc-d-o-c.com

Affordable fees

Š98603

Phone:

27 years serving our community (631) 744-6330 Lawbeach.com

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Place your ad today Call 631.751.7663 or 631.331.1154 Buy 4 weeks and get the 5th week

FREE

4JOHMFTJ[FrXFFLT %PVCMFTJ[FrXFFLT Ask about our 13 & 26 week special rates

 PS  

TIMES BEACON RECORD NEWS MEDIA The TIMES of Huntington, Northport & E. Northport

â&#x20AC;˘ Miller Place â&#x20AC;˘ Sound Beach â&#x20AC;˘ Rocky Point â&#x20AC;˘ Shoreham â&#x20AC;˘ Wading River â&#x20AC;˘ Baiting Hollow â&#x20AC;˘ Mt. Sinai

The Port TIMES RECORD

â&#x20AC;˘ Stony Brook â&#x20AC;˘ Strongâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Neck â&#x20AC;˘ Setauket â&#x20AC;˘ Old Field â&#x20AC;˘ Poquott

â&#x20AC;˘ Port Jefferson â&#x20AC;˘ Port Jefferson Sta. â&#x20AC;˘ Harbor Hills â&#x20AC;˘ Belle Terre

The TIMES of Smithtown â&#x20AC;˘ Smithtown â&#x20AC;˘ Hauppauge â&#x20AC;˘ Commack â&#x20AC;˘ E. Fort Salonga â&#x20AC;˘ San Remo

The TIMES of Middle Country

â&#x20AC;˘ Kings Park â&#x20AC;˘ St. James â&#x20AC;˘ Nissequogue â&#x20AC;˘ Head of the Harbor

â&#x20AC;˘ Selden â&#x20AC;˘ Centereach â&#x20AC;˘ Lake Grove



â&#x20AC;˘ Huntington â&#x20AC;˘ Greenlawn â&#x20AC;˘ Halesite â&#x20AC;˘ Lloyd Harbor â&#x20AC;˘ Cold Spring Harbor

The Village TIMES HERALD

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â&#x20AC;˘ Northport â&#x20AC;˘ E. Northport â&#x20AC;˘ Eatons Neck â&#x20AC;˘ Asharoken â&#x20AC;˘ Centerport â&#x20AC;˘ W. Fort Salonga

The Village BEACON RECORD

PAGE G

R E A L E S TAT E PUBLISHERSâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; NOTICE All real estate advertised herein is subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act, which makes it illegal to advertise â&#x20AC;&#x153;any preference, limitation, or discrimination because of race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status, or national origin, or intention to make any such preference, limitation, or discrimination.â&#x20AC;? We will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. All persons are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised are available on an equal opportunity basis.

Houses For Sale 55 OR OLDER AT 47 FREEMONT LANE CORAM. Neat 2 BR Ranch, 3 skylights, 5 appliances, CAC, Florida room, very affordable, $200,000. STRATHMORE EAST 631-698-3400

Rentals EAST SETAUKET Charming 1 bedroom cottage. Large LR, full kitchen, parklike setting w/garden. Clean, quiet. Off street parking. Close to bus/shopping. 5 minutes to campus. $1200/including most utilities. 631-365-1884

Open Houses SAT 1:00-3:00PM Sun 1:00-3:00 PM PORT JEFFERSON VILLAGE 415 Liberty Av #14. 55+ Condo, 7 units left. Main flr master BR, Prices starting from $749,000 SUN 11:30-1:00PM MOUNT SINAI 54 Hamlet Dr - Gated Hamlet, w/full unfin basement, hardwood flrs, Pool, Gym Golf $699,990 MOUNT SINAI 46 Hamlet Dr. Ranch. Main floor master BR, EIK w/gas cooking & 2 ovens, Pool, Golf. $799,000 New Listing SAT/SUN Open House by Appointment MT SINAI 83 Constantine Way. Upper Condo. Master w/pri bth, addl BR & bath, EIK, new carpet, freshly painted, $379,000. SETUAKET 37 Stadium Blvd, New Listing, Magnificent Oxford, IGP, Fin basement, .82 property $999,000 Reduced SO SETAUKET 24 Hancock Ct, Post Modern, Heated IGP, Hot Tub, Full Fin Bsmt, 5 BRs, New to the Market, $899,990. PT JEFFERSON STATION 3 Ranger Ln, Post ModernCul de sac, Master plus 3 addl BRs, 4 full baths, 2.5 garage, $559,000. Dennis P. Consalvo Aliano Real Estate Lic. RE Salesperson www.longisland-realestate.net 631-724-1000

TO SUBSCRIBE CALL 751â&#x20AC;&#x201C;7744



Classifieds Real Estate Residential Display Special

Buy 2 Weeks & get 1 Week FREE

Commercial Display Special

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This is a prime opportunity to reach your target audience â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 6 PAPERS! 1 PRICE! Cold Spring Harbor to Baiting Hollo w

To Reserve Your Space

Call 631â&#x20AC;&#x201C;331â&#x20AC;&#x201C;1154 or 631â&#x20AC;&#x201C;751â&#x20AC;&#x201C;7663 or Email class@tbrnewspapers.com

Deadline Tuesday at Noon for Thursday â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s papers Times Beacon Record News Media tbrnewsmedia.com

Š99047

Commercial Property/ Yard Space

Place your ad today Call 631.751.7663 or 631.331.1154


JANUARY 11, 2018 â&#x20AC;¢ TIMES OF SMITHTOWN â&#x20AC;¢ PAGE A21

COMMERCI A L PROPERT Y er O ok r et E N 0 T ss B .n A e 0 T IAES sine 0 tat ALREnAtLial Bu 4â&#x20AC;&#x201C;1realees

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SHOREHAM/ WADING RIVER LAND

PT. JEFF STATION-

L.I. Zoning, land for rent, 2500 sq. ft., free standing

Perfect for medical, attorney, accountant or professional. Includes 3 private offices, waiting, reception area, 2 baths & storage room. Call for details.

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PAGE A22 • TIMES OF SMITHTOWN • JANUARY 11, 2018

OpiniOn Editorial

Letter to the editor

File photo

Plans to sell the historic St. James fire house, pictured above, has divided members of the community. File photo by Rachael Shapiro

Helping an elderly or disabled neighbor this winter can be as easy as helping shovel snow.

Helping others through 2018 As we forge ahead into 2018, there are a few charitable lessons from the holidays that we should carry with us through the year, especially this winter. December is the single largest month of the year for giving, according to the 2016 Charitable Giving Report published by Blackbaud Institute for Philanthropic Impact. Based on information from thousands of nonprofits, the report found December is when more than 20 percent of all donations are made. It’s called the Season of Giving or The Most Wonderful Time of the Year in no small part because it’s when people are most likely to open their pockets or donate time to help others. There are good Samaritans who have taken caring for others to heart. North Shore residents stopped to check in on an elderly or disabled neighbor during winter storm Grayson or even offered to help shovel out walkways and driveways. Suffolk County Executive Steve Bellone (D) worked with one such individual, identified only as Ken from Ronkonkoma, who helped first responders dig out two motorists stranded on the side of the Long Island Expressway. Last week, PSEG reported more than 16,500 of its customers lost power during the snowstorm. While more than 76 percent had it restored by 4:30 p.m. Jan. 4, according to PSEG, those individuals with electric heat were temporarily left in the cold. Keeping the giving alive year-round can help make the cold, dreary winter brighter for less fortunate and needy families. It doesn’t cost anything but a few minutes to check in on neighbors to a make sure he or she is warm and OK. Better yet, lend a hand to help shovel a walkway or snow blow a path so he or she can safely get in and out of a home in case of an emergency. Families struggling to make ends meet can get assistance in paying for electricity or home heating fuel. Suffolk County’s Home Energy Assistance Program started accepting applications Jan. 2 at 631-853-8820 for families in need of one-time assistance. The nonprofit United Way has opened applications for its Project Warmth, a program that offers a one-time grant for families struggling to pay heating bills. Project Warmth can be contacted by its 211 hotline or by calling 888-774-7633 seven days a week from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Search through closets for gently used or new winter jackets, scarves, hats or gloves that can be donated to one of the many collection drives currently underway for residents in need of warm clothing. The Town of Brookhaven’s Youth Bureau is collecting donations starting Jan. 12 at town hall, the highway department and senior and recreation centers. Long Island Cares in Hauppauge also accepts donated coats. Many Salvation Army locations even accept appliance donations, like space heaters. Just because the giving season is over does not mean that some of our neighbors are any less in need of assistance. Taking a few minutes to check in on others or point them to a service that offers assistance can help everyone get 2018 off to a positive start.

Letters …

We welcome your letters. They should be no longer than 400 words and may be edited for length, libel, style and good taste. We do not publish anonymous letters. Please include a phone number and address for confirmation. Email letters to sara@tbrnewsmedia.com or mail them to The Times of Smithtown, P.O. Box 707, Setauket, NY 11733.

St. James FD: The character of Chief Springer The St. James Fire Department has been vigilantly responding to alarms of its residents since 1922. For nearly 100 years, your friends and neighbors, sons and daughters, fathers and mothers have stopped whatever they were doing to come to your aid. During the middle of a summer day or in the midst of a nighttime winter storm, the members of the St. James Fire Department have always been there to protect life and property in their community. In 2017, the fire department will have closed out the year answering 1,400 alarms. The members of the department have dedicated an average additional eight hours a week in training and meetings to further ensure any response will be swift, decisive and professional.We, your firefighters, officers, EMT’s and paramedics do this for you with no expectation of return whatsoever. We do it selflessly for you, and will continue to do so without question. There has been much talk around our community pertaining to firehouse construction and now sale of one house by the fire district back to the membership of fire department who had originally owned it since 1922. Unfortunately, in some rare cases this has fueled some animosity between the brothers and sisters of our proud department. Perhaps the words in this letter can help assuage some of these recent occurrences, because in the end we all want what is best for those we serve. It is not uncommon within a group of such dedicated and highly trained members that true leaders emerge. We’d like to direct your attention to one such devoted leader who has been misrepresented by some in the media. That is Chief Edward Springer Sr., a lifelong resident of St. James. He was born and raised in our community, attended school and worshiped in

St. James. In 1971, at the age of 18, Springer joined the St. James Fire Department and thus began his 40-year career in the fire service. The only interruption of his time was when he answered his country’s call to duty by serving proudly in the U. S. Army’s elite 101st Airborne Division from 1972 to 1975. Upon receiving his honorable discharge from the U.S. Army as a sergeant, Springer returned home to his beloved St. James. Many of the residents who lived in town then have moved on. However, Mr. Springer did not and made a choice to stay and raise his family in St. James. During his tenure in the fire service, Mr. Springer attained the ranks of chief of the department, president of the St. James Fire Department in 2007 and 2008, and was elected to the Board of Fire Commissioners for two consecutive terms. He held line officer positions at the lieutenant and captain level in the venerable Engine Co. 1 along the way. While devoting his time to St. James, Springer was employed as the chief fire marshal of the Northport Veterans Administration Hospital, and then served as a Suffolk County fire marshal and was ultimately promoted to chief fire marshal of the county where he served until his recent retirement. During his employment with Suffolk, Springer served one year as the downstate representative of the New York State Office of Emergency Management. Who is Ed Springer you ask? Springer is one of the humblest men we have ever had the pleasure of knowing. He is honest and sincere. He helps new recruits (probies) with fire academy learning. He takes a phone call about a question related to the fire service at 9 p.m. Sunday when most others wouldn’t want to answer the phone. He volunteers

his time to the American Legion where for the last four years he has served as a post commander. You can find him at the firehouse the night before our St. Patrick’s Day parade cooking and slicing 100 pounds of corned beef for the community to feast on the next day. He is the guy who sits at the bedside of a member who is about to pass on and softly speaks comforting words to him. He is the guy who takes his bunker coat off at a motor vehicle accident alarm and puts it over the patient trapped in the car so that they don’t get hit by shards of metal and glass as we cut the car apart. He is the first guy to ask if you are OK and offers his hand when he hears that someone important in your life has passed away. He is equally there for us to celebrate the successes in our lives as well. Ed Springer Sr. is that guy. Frankly, these are not simply words on a page, these are all the things we have seen Mr. Springer do, time and time again. It is our hope that this allays any false impression that has been put forth about the character of Springer. Springer has been, and remains, committed to improving the working conditions of the St. James Fire Department by putting forth great effort in designs for a new firehouse that went through two iterations and two bond votes. In all cases he has worked in earnest of the taxpayers wishes and firefighters/EMS personnel needs. It is both a shame and an honor to have to write this. The shame comes from the maligning of an iconic and devoted member of our department. The honor is in defending his character, one which we should all endeavor to be more like.

Board of Directors and Desk Officers St. James Fire Department

Get into the mix. Participate in our reader forums @ www.tbrnewsmedia.com.


JANUARY 11, 2018 • TIMES OF SMITHTOWN • PAGE A23

OpiniOn

That was the freezing week that was

I

n the dark of night, it silently slithered toward the back of the car, spray painting the windows with a sheen of opaque white. It made its way around the car, finding the seam in the doors and filling it with surprisingly strong epoxy. It glided down to the ground and sucked some of the warm air out of the tires. The car was trapped on the driveway with no way to fight off this unwelcome intrudIf its alarm By Daniel Dunaief er. could have gone off, it would have warned us. But, no, that alarm only goes off early in the morning on the weekends, when someone opens the door with the key instead of deactivating the alarm system

D. None of the above

with a button, annoying the neighbors and embarrassing our kids and us in equal measure. It slid under the hood. It paused over the heart of the machine, looking for places to extend its icy fingers into the exposed engine, snickering with delight at the opportunity to turn 3,000 pounds of metal into a frozen couch. It reached into the battery and deactivated the power. On my way to the car, it issued a warning, or was it a challenge, when it wrapped its icy fingers around my neck. I tried to ignore it and stick with my routine. When I turned the key, however, the car coughed weakly. “Come on,” I pleaded, as the cold scraped its icicle hands against my exposed calf. I tried again. The third time was not the charm, either. After getting a jump start, I decided to outsmart the wretched cold. I cleared space in the garage, hauling all the heavy items parked there into the basement. The garage

door and the walls of the house would offer greater protection. No, I wasn’t giving the car a blanket and pillow and setting it up with reruns of “Knight Rider,” but I was protecting the family car. The next day, I went through the basement into the garage, put the key in the ignition and beamed broadly as the internal combustion engine roared to life. Ha! I foiled the frigid air. I told the kids to climb in the car, which warmed up rapidly as a reward for keeping it in the garage, and drove triumphantly to school. The cold wouldn’t undermine my day, I thought, as I maneuvered through the responsibilities of the day. When I returned home, I found that the cold had recruited my garage door to its unworthy cause. I didn’t look carefully enough when I had pulled away from the house. The garage door, fooled by a small piece of snow in the corner of the floor, thought it had hit something and

reopened, where it stayed all day. I pulled the car in, closed the garage and waited for the door to close. When the metal door reached the ground, it reopened. I played a short game with the door, pushing the button just after it started to open again so that the cold air had only a small opening. “I win,” I announced as I entered the warm house. When I turned on the water in my bathroom the next morning, I realized I had lost. The combination of the cold from the open garage from the day before and the small crack at the bottom of the door was enough to enable the cold to lay its frozen hands on my pipes. Several hours later, the plumber, who was busier than a foraging ant during a Fourth of July picnic, shivered in the garage and proclaimed the small opening under the door as the culprit. This cold snap, which finally left the area earlier this week, won this battle.

Dogs, shopping bags and international students

H

ere are a couple of things to think about in this new year. First, it is the Chinese Year of the Dog. Each year is related to a zodiac animal within a 12-year cycle, and the Dog is in the 11th position, after the Rooster and before the Pig. Other Dog years include births in 1934, 1946, 1958, 1970, 1982, 1994 and so on. You get the pattern. If you are a Dog, you are undoubtedly loyal, honest, kind, amiable and sincere, although you’re By Leah S. Dunaief probably not all that good at communications. As a result, sometimes you are perceived as stubborn. However, you make up for that by always being ready to help others. Enough of that and on to the latest law for Suffolk County. As you

Between you and me

have probably experienced by now, wherever you might be shopping and inclined to make a purchase, you will have to add 5 cents to the total if you want a bag. Two bags: 10 cents. Again, you get the pattern. That means if you are shopping in a supermarket or a hardware store or Macy’s, you will need to pay for each bag. We have, however, been trained for such a situation by Costco. For years, those who shop in their warehouse-like stores have carried purchases out to their cars in shopping carts and then loaded the contents into their trunks, one item at a time. Costco has never provided bags, although it has been known to offer boxes when available. The smart ones among us carry cloth bags into the store in advance so we can load cars more efficiently at the end, and I suppose that is what the rest of us will learn to do if we don’t buy the bags. Although the charge is only a nickel, it is irksome because the nickels don’t go toward funding an environmental cause but revert to the store.

TIMES BEacon rEcord nEWS MEdIa We welcome letters, photographs, comments and story ideas. Send your items to P.O. Box 707, Setauket, NY 11733 or email sara@tbrnewsmedia.com. Times Beacon Record Newspapers are published every Thursday. Subscription $49/year • 631-751-7744 www.tbrnewsmedia.com • Contents copyright 2017

So expect to see people crossing parking lots with the items they have just purchased in their hands. While the perennially curious among us will be fascinated to check out what people buy, the instinct to bag a purchase to prove it was paid for rather than whipped off the shelf and out the door will make some of us uneasy. Best to invest in some large and solid cloth bags, which are what they bring to stores in Europe and elsewhere. And by the way, this should be a great help for our local waterways and wildlife since so many plastic bags have caused harm. So BYOB, or “bring your own bag,” and know that you are helping a fish. On to another topic to consider in 2018. Private schools and universities are going to take a beating from the loss of international students. Total tuition from those students, who generally pay more, will decline as a result of more restrictive immigration policies for those wishing to come to study here. Visa applications are being more carefully scrutinized and foreign students are finding it

EDITOR AND PUBLISHER Leah S. Dunaief GENERAL MANAGER Johness Kuisel MANAGING EDITOR Desirée Keegan EDITOR Sara-Megan Walsh

LEISURE EDITOR Heidi Sutton SPORTS EDITOR Desirée Keegan ADVERTISING DIRECTOR Kathryn Mandracchia DIR. OF MEDIA PRODUCTIONS Michael Tessler

harder to stay in the United States after graduation. There had been a huge increase in foreign students here, supplying $39 billion in revenue to the U.S. economy last year, but now schools in Canada, Australia, the United Kingdom and other Englishspeaking countries are attracting some of those dollars. The decline in new students nationwide was some 7 percent just this past fall. That means colleges will have to cut offerings and American-educated grad students who may want to settle here will be lost to the nation. It also means colleges will not be able to help low-income students as much with tuition aid. Diversity is also affected. Enrollment is already falling from China and India, the two biggest sources of students from abroad. Of course this is not only a national issue but also a local one: Stony Brook University is here. Long Island has numerous schools, and with fewer students less money will be spent locally. Meanwhile enjoy the weather. Let’s celebrate the thaw.

ART AND PRODUCTION DIRECTOR Beth Heller Mason INTERNET STRATEGY DIRECTOR Rob Alfano CLASSIFIEDS DIRECTOR Ellen Segal

BUSINESS MANAGER Sandi Gross CREDIT MANAGER Diane Wattecamps CIRCULATION MANAGER Courtney Biondo


PAGE A24 • TIMES OF SMITHTOWN • JANUARY 11, 2018 SCSMC-HealthLink-JAN-18-TimesBeacon-FullPage_Layout 1

1/8/2018 12:21 PM Page 1

Health Link Health Information from Local Health Care Professionals

Pankti Patel, MD | Bariatric Surgeon St. Catherine of Siena Medical Center Dr. Patel is American Board of Surgery certified and utilizes minimally-invasive robotic surgery techniques. Additionally, she is an active member of the American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery and the Society of American Gastrointestinal and Endoscopic Surgeons. She trained as a fellow at the Magee Women’s Hospital of University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, one of the oldest training programs in the field of bariatric surgery.

What is obesity?

What options are available for weight loss?

A. Obesity is defined as excessive fat accumulation in the body that presents a risk to heath. It is measured in terms of Body Mass Index, or BMI, which is a calculated ratio of your weight and height. Anyone with a BMI over 30 is considered obese. Obesity contributes to several other health problems including diabetes, hypertension, obstructive sleep apnea, high cholesterol, arthritis, reflux, infertility, as well as cancer. It is a multifactorial disease that is caused by a combination of genetics, environment, eating and exercise habits, and how your body processes food.

A. There are several approaches to weight loss. This includes medications, surgery, and other non-invasive procedures such as the weight loss balloons. The most common surgical options are the laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy, laparoscopic gastric bypass, and laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding.

Why should obesity be treated? A. Obesity is a national epidemic, causing higher medical costs and a lower quality of life. It is also linked to shorter life expectancy. Studies have shown that diet and exercise alone are often not effective in the long term for weight loss. Surgery is the only proven method for long term weight control in morbidly obese patients. Surgery even leads to improvement or complete resolution of obesity related comorbidities including diabetes, obstructive sleep apnea, hypertension, and high cholesterol. Depending on the type of surgery, patients may lose up to 60-80% of their excess weight loss on average.

JAN

A. Any patient with a BMI over 40 or BMI over 35 with a comorbid condition such as diabetes, hypertension, or obstructive sleep apnea may qualify for surgery. You will be required to get several medical clearances, tests, bloodwork, and procedures prior to your surgery. You may also be required to go through a supervised medical weight loss program. Patients interested in weight loss are encouraged to obtain a consultation in order to individualize their care and treatment needs. If you would like more information and are interested in making an appointment, please call (631) 870-3444.

Have more questions for Dr. Pankti Patel?

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For more information and to register, please call (631) 870-3444. St. Catherine of Siena Medical Center | 50 Route 25A | Smithtown | NY 11787 | stcatherines.chsli.org

HealthLink | JAN 2018

The Times of Smithtown - January 11, 2018  
The Times of Smithtown - January 11, 2018  
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