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ARTS&LIFESTYLES TIMES BEACON RECORD NEWS MEDIA • OCTOBER 24, 2019

Long Island Young Artists Exhibition opens in St. James ■ B13 'Ensnared' by Jonathan Horn

ALSO: Maleficent 2 reviewed B12 • Highlights of Spirits Tour B11 • Halloween Happenings on the North Shore B23 The Original 10 Acre Location Since 1972

YOUR FULL SERVICE MASONRY & LANDSCAPE SUPPLY CENTER SERVING YOU SINCE 1972 FROM THE SAME LOCATION

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STOP IN & VISIT JOE TRO FFA


PAGE B2 • ARTS & LIFESTYLES • OCTOBER 24, 2019

A discussion on

Microaggressions and the Pursuit of Equity Jelani Cobb

Journalist, educator and staff writer for The New Yorker

Monday, October 28, 2019 • 7 pm Student Activities Center, Gelber Auditorium Free and open to the public • Seating is limited

Jelani Cobb, a professor in the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism and a longtime staff writer at The New Yorker, writes about the enormous complexity of race in America. As the recipient of the 2015 Sidney Hillman Prize for Opinion and Analysis Journalism for his New Yorker columns on race, the police and injustice, Cobb was praised for combining “the strengths of an on-the-scene reporter, a public intellectual, a teacher, a vivid writer, a subtle moralist, and an accomplished professional historian.” 166036

To RSVP by October 23 and to submit questions, visit stonybrook.edu/presidentiallecture JELANI COBB

Co-sponsored by the Office of the Chief Diversity Officer

For an accessibility-related accommodation, please call (631) 632-6320.

Stony Brook University/SUNY is an affirmative action, equal opportunity educator and employer. 19100579


OCTOBER 24, 2019 • ARTS & LIFESTYLES • PAGE B3

PHOTO OF THE WEEK

THE LONG ISLAND MUSEUM’S

COMMUNTY LEADER

PATRONS OF THE ARTS

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Saturday, November 9, 2019

6:30 p.m. COCkTAILS & HORS D’OEUVRES • 7:30 p.m. DINNER & SILENT AUCTION Black tie optional • RSVP BY NOVEMBER 1, 2019 For more information, call (631) 751-0066 ext 247 or visit longislandmuseum.org/events

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A FUNGUS AMONG US Marvin Hazan of Setauket submitted this unique photo of a sulphur shelf mushroom, aka Chicken of the Woods, which perfectly captures the season’s colors. He writes, ‘I took this shot of a magnificent fungus growing out of a recently removed tree on my property.’

Send your Photo of the Week to leisure@tbrnewspapers.com

Make Your Landscape Dreams A Reality In Any Season

In this edition Movie Review .......................................B12 Parents and Kids ...........................B22-23 Power of 3 .............................................B11 Religious Directory ......................B19-20 SBU Sports ............................................B21 Vendors Wanted .................................... B5

Email your community, business, health and calendar listings to leisure@tbrnewspapers.com

FU L L S E RV I CE CR E AT I V E L A N D S C A P I N G ©145489

Business News ........................................ B5 Calendar ...........................................B16-18 Cooking Cove .......................................B14 Crossword Puzzle ................................. B8 Medical Compass ................................. B7 Making Democracy Work ................... B4

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PAGE B4 • ARTS & LIFESTYLES • OCTOBER 24, 2019

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FREE EVALUATIONS

Why voting matters on Nov. 5

Off-year elections (not congressional or presidential) tend to draw much smaller numbers of voters to the polls. In the final four weeks before Election Day 2019, it’s the 2020 presidential race that dominates the media. More people can name the prospective Democratic presidential candidates than know the races on their ballot on Tuesday, Nov. 5.

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By the time you read this column, if Stock photo you haven’t yet registered you will not be The league (and other civic groups) able to vote on Nov. 5 this year — but register will organize candidate debates prior to the soon if you want to vote in the 2020 primaries election. Some groups sponsor meet and greets, and general election. Use the NYS Board others will spotlight individual candidates. The of Elections website: https://voterlookup. league’s best practices reflect our nonpartisan, elections.ny.gov/ to see if you are registered citizen-education mission. Debates must and to see your assigned Election Day poll site. include two candidates — we have a strict No Assuming you are registered to vote — you Empty Chair policy. should be making your plan now — a plan For example, in 2019 the league coinvolves deciding what day, when and where sponsored two county executive debates (Sept. you’ll vote if you take advantage of the nine 21 with NAACP and Oct. 21 with Kings Park days of early voting in New York State this School District) as well as many town-level year. Make voting a social occasion — go with debates. Candidates agree to guidelines in a friend and then stop for coffee, or perhaps advance, and questions on a wide range of topics take a child with you to the polling place and are solicited, submitted, vetted and asked by the introduce her to voting. moderators. All debates involving the league If you choose early voting, there are 10 are listed at https://my.lwv.org/new-york/ polling sites (one in each town in Suffolk) that suffolk-county/upcoming-events#debates. you may choose from, with a variety of times to suit nearly everyone’s convenience. Details are You might learn something This November, you’ll have the opportunity at https://my.lwv.org/new-york/suffolk-county. to vote for Suffolk County executive (fourUse the new voting process year term) and all 18 members of the Suffolk The voting process will be different this County Legislature (two-year terms). Some year — the old poll books are being replaced town supervisors are on the ballot, as well as by electronic tablets (similar to iPads) and many town council members and other town electronic signature devices. Your personalized officials such as clerk and receiver of taxes. ballot will be printed immediately. You’ll go Towns have their own laws regarding terms to a voting station to make your choices on of office and which officials are elected vs. the paper ballot (same as the past few years) appointed. Judges are also on the ballot. and then insert your completed ballot into the By studying your ballot in advance, optical scanner to cast your vote. and following the campaigns and media It’s different and that’s one reason you reporting, you’ll know more about candidate should vote this year. Understand the process positions on issues of importance to you and now and get comfortable with the new system your community. Suffolk County and our 10 before 2020’s federal election. towns face many serious challenges: fiscal, Do your homework before you go environmental, public health, economic Local media are interviewing candidates, development and more. Yes, you can complain to your elected making endorsements and planning voter guides, earlier than usual because early voting officials and advocate in the coming years, starts on Oct. 26. The League of Women Voters but wouldn’t it be better if you started with an Education Fund developed VOTE411.org, which informed choice and voted on Nov. 5? Lisa Scott is president of the League of Women provides election information for each state. By entering your address (no names needed), you Voters of Suffolk County, a nonprofit, nonpartisan will find a guide to all races and candidates on organization that encourages the informed and your ballot. Candidates are provided tools to active participation of citizens in government upload their photo, bio, experience and answer and influences public policy through education several questions on the issues. If candidates and advocacy. For more information, visit do not respond, you’ll still see their name and http://lwv-suffolkcounty.org, email league@lwvsuffolkcounty.org or call 631-862-6860. prospective office.


OCTOBER 24, 2019 • ARTS & LIFESTYLES • PAGE B5

BUSINESS NEWS

VENDORS WANTED

Fountaingate Gardens to break ground in spring of 2020 Fountaingate Gardens, the proposed Life Plan Community (also known as a Continuing Care Retirement Community) sponsored by Gurwin in Commack, recently revealed its plans to begin construction on the 129-apartment community in spring 2020. The announcement came at an exclusive luncheon event for members of the Fountaingate Gardens Founders Club, early adopters of the community and the lifestyle concept it will provide. So far, more than 75 individuals and couples have chosen their new homes and secured preconstruction pricing by placing a deposit on their future residence of choice. “We’re here to celebrate that Fountaingate Gardens will be a reality in just a few months, as

we are ready to break ground this coming spring,” said Herbert H. Friedman, founding executive vice president and former CEO of Gurwin, who is now consulting on the Fountaingate Gardens project. “We’ve been listening to the Founders Club members, further developing our plans, and now it is all about to come to fruition.” The celebration took place on Sept. 24 at The Hamlet Golf & Country Club in Commack, directly across the street from the future site of the community. Fountaingate Gardens’ newest site plan, floor plans and community renderings were shared with the Founders Club members before being released to the public. “It was wonderful to see the updated renderings and hear a little more about what our new

Photo from Lupinacci’s office

The Firefly Artists managing partners, from left, Beth Atkinson, Katheryn Laible and Drigo Morin accept a proclamation from Huntington Town board from Supervisor Chad Lupinacci at last Thursday’s event.

community at Fountaingate Gardens will look like,” said one Founders Club member who attended the lunch with her husband. “We’ve been interested since the day we learned about it; we can’t wait to move in!” According to a press release, when built, Fountaingate Gardens will provide residents a well-connected, wellness-focused active lifestyle alongside an array of new independent living apartment homes. Its status as a Life Plan Community, an uncommon living concept in the area, will also provide residents longterm peace of mind and financial security. Pictured above, the Fountaingate Gardens team with a rendering of the new retirement community. Photo from Gurwin

RIBBON CUTTING

The Northport Chamber of Commerce hosted a ribbon cutting to mark the official grand re-opening of The Firefly Artists art gallery at its new larger location at 162 Main St. in Northport on Oct. 17. The celebration was attended by chamber President Jim Izzo, Northport town trustees Mercy Smith and Tom Kehoe, Huntington Supervisor Chad Lupinacci, Firefly artists, members of the community, friends and family. The event also kicked off the gallery’s fall exhibit, Autumn Works, featuring the work of the Firefly artists, on view through Nov. 30. “Northport is a wonderful community, and it is a privilege to get to work with so many wonderful local artists and other businesses right here on Main Street,” said Katheryn Laible, a Firefly artist who recently became one of the group’s managing partners, in a press release. For more information, call 631-6515545 or visit www.thefireflyartists.com.

• St. James Lutheran Church, 229 2nd Ave., St. James seeks vendors for its annual Holiday Craft Fair on Nov. 9 from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. For details, call Herb or Marie at 631-473-7976. • Siena Village, 2000 Bishops Road, Smithtown seeks vendors for its annual Bazaar set for Nov. 9 from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. For more information, call Grace at 631-656-5725 or Laura at 631-265-3415. • Walt Whitman Shops, 160 Walt Whitman Road, Huntington Station seeks merchandise and food vendors for the 5th annual I Love Chocolate Fest on Nov. 9 and 10. Deadline to apply is Nov. 6. Call 631-488-0521. • Preferred Promotions has a call out for merchandise vendors for an Autumn Art & Craft Festival at the Huntington Hilton, 598 Broadhollow Road, Melville on Nov. 10 from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Call 631-5638551 or visit www.preferredpromotions. com for a vendor application. • Ronkonkoma Middle School, 501 Peconic St., Ronkonkoma holds its 3rd annual Craft Fair on Nov. 16 from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Interested merchandise and food vendors can call 631-747-2468. Deadline to apply is Nov. 1. • St. Matthew R.C. Church, 35 N Service Rd, Dix Hills seeks vendors for its annual Holiday Craft Fair on Nov. 17 from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Call Louise at 631-5864515 for more information. • Walt Whitman High School, 301 West Hills Road, Huntington Station seeks merchandise and food vendors for its 18th annual Fine Art and Crafts Fair on Nov. 23 from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. For more information, call 631-549-8582. • Centereach Fire Department, 9 South Washington Ave., Centereach will hold its annual Christmas Extravaganza from Nov. 29 to Dec. 1 from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Interested vendors may call 631-5889220 before Nov. 1. • Art League of Long Island, 107 East Deer Park Road, Dix Hills invites fine artists and fine crafters to submit applications to display and sell their original work at its 56th annual Holiday Fine Art & Craft Fair on Dec. 7 and 8 from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Deadline to apply is Nov. 24. Call 631-4625400 or visit www.artleagueli.org. • Preferred Promotions seeks merchandise vendors for its Deepwells Holiday Boutique at Deepwells Farm in St. James on Dec. 7, 8, 14 and 15 from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Call 631-563-8551 for a vendor application. • St. Peter’s Lutheran Church, 11 Ogden Court, Huntington Station seeks merchandise vendors for its Christmas Boutique on Dec. 8 from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Deadline to apply is Dec. 1. Call 631-3276089 for further information.


PAGE B6 • ARTS & LIFESTYLES • OCTOBER 24, 2019

HELPING YOU NAVIGATE TO OPTIMAL HEALTH

David Dunaief, M.D. Integrative Medicine

• A Whole Body Approach • Reversing, Preventing & Treating Chronic Disease and Managing Weight by Connecting Conventional Medicine with Lifestyle Modifications Our Philosophy is simple. We believe wellness is derived through nutritional medicine and lifestyle interventions that prevent and treat chronic diseases. Medications have their place - and in some cases can be lifesaving. However, there’s no medication without side effects. The goal should be to limit the need for medications - or minimize the number of medications you take on a regular basis. You are not limited by your genes. Fortunately, most diseases are based primarily on epigenetics, which are environmental influences, and not on genetics. Epigenetics literally means above or around the gene. In epigenetics, lifestyle choices impact gene expression. Just because your first degree relatives may have had a disease, you are not predestined to follow suit. We are specialists who will partner with your primary care physician. A standard medical education does not integrate enough nutritional medicine and other lifestyle interventions. We bridge that gap.

We use evidence-based medicine to guide our decision-making. The amount of research related to nutrition and other lifestyle issues continues to grow rapidly, with many studies showing significant beneficial effects on health. We treat each patient as an individual. We will work with you to develop a plan that allows you to take a proactive role in managing your own health. The health outcomes are worth the effort. Is disease reversal possible? Absolutely! Study evidence has found this to be true, and many of our patients have experienced reversal of diabetes, autoimmune disorders, migraines, and cardiovascular disease, just to mention a few. In many cases, because of their exceptional results, our patients have been able to reduce or eliminate their medications. Read more common questions and answers on medicalcompassmd.com. Dr. Dunaief has written over 2,000 medical research articles that have been published in Times Beacon Record Newspapers.

47 Route 25A, Setauket NY

(Next to Capital One Bank & Across From Convenience Drive-thru)

631.675.2888

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41 Clark Street, Brooklyn, NY 718.924.2655

drdunaief@medicalcompassmd.com • Visit our website www.medicalcompassmd.com ©21606

David Dunaief, M.D. Clinician, Researcher, Author and Speaker Dr. Dunaief was also recently published in The New York Times and appeared on NBC, News 12 Long Island and News 12 Brooklyn.

Preventing and Reversing Chronic Conditions and Diseases Including: High Blood Pressure • High Cholesterol/Triglycerides Heart Disease • Stroke • Diabetes Type 1 and Type 2 Obesity • Polymyalgia Rheumatica (PMR) Rheumatoid Arthritis • Hypothyroid • Hyperthyroid Lupus • Multiple Sclerosis • Sjogren’s Syndrome Raynaud’s Syndrome • Inflammatory Bowel Disease Ulcerative Colitis • Crohn’s Disease • Psoriatic Arthritis Celiac Disease • Psoriasis • Sarcoidosis “I lost 135 lbs and have kept it off for several years with the guidance, recipes and encouragement that Dr. Dunaief has provided. Also my inflammation has been reduced significantly. This means I was able to stop my two immunosuppressives for rheumatoid arthritis. I have no more pain or swelling in my joints and can move my fingers normally. This is a surreal experience. I also have reduced my CA125 by tenfold to well within the normal range associated with my BRCA1 ovarian cancer.” – C.H.

Dr. Dunaief builds a customized plan for each patient - he knows that “no body is the same.”


OCTOBER 24, 2019 • ARTS & LIFESTYLES • PAGE B7

MEDICAL COMPASS

Reducing osteoarthritis effects

Lifestyle changes may slow progression

Osteoarthritis is widespread. Most commonly, it affects the knees, hips and hands. There are three types of treatment: surgery, involving joint replacements of the hips or knees; medications; and nonpharmacologic approaches. The most By David commonly used firstDunaief, M.D. line medications are acetaminophen and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, such as ibuprofen. Unfortunately, medications mostly treat the symptoms of pain and inflammation. However, the primary objectives in treating osteoarthritis should also include improving quality of life, slowing progression of the disease process and reducing its disabling effects (1).

Dairy and milk

When we think of dairy, specifically milk, there are two distinct camps: One believes in the benefits, and the other thinks it may contribute to disease. In this case they both may be at least partly correct. In the Osteoarthritis Initiative study, an observational study of over 2,100 patients, results showed that low-fat (1 percent) and nonfat milk may slow the progression of osteoarthritis (2). The researchers looked specifically at joint space narrowing that occurs in those with affected knee joints. Radiographic imaging changes were used at baseline and then to follow the patients for up to 12 to 48 months for changes. Compared to those who did not drink milk, patients who did saw significantly less narrowing of knee joint space. Was it a dose-dependent response? Not necessarily. Specifically, those who drank less than three glasses/week and those who drank four to six glasses/week both saw slower progression of joint space narrowing of 0.09 mm. Seven to 10 glasses/week resulted in a 0.12 mm preservation. However, those who drank more than 10 glasses/week saw less beneficial effect, 0.06 mm preservation compared to those who did not drink milk. Interestingly, there was no benefit seen in men or with the consumption of cheese or yogurt. However, there are significant flaws with this study. First, the patients were only asked about their dietary intake of milk at baseline; therefore their consumption could have changed during the study. Second, there was a recall bias; patients were asked to recall

Weight

This could not be an article on osteoarthritis if I did not talk about weight. In a study involving 112 obese patients, there was not only a reduction of knee symptoms in those who lost weight, but there was also disease modification, with reduction in the loss of cartilage volume around the medial tibia (4). On the other hand, those who gained weight saw the inverse effect. A reduction of tibial cartilage is potentially associated with the need for knee replacement. The relationship was almost one-to-one; for every 1 percent of weight lost, there was a 1.2 mm³ preservation of medial tibial cartilage volume, while the exact opposite was true with weight gain.

Exercise and diet

Osteoarthritis is a common form of arthritis that often affects the knee. Stock photo

their weekly milk consumption for the previous 12 months before the study began. I don’t know about you, but I can’t recall my intake of specific foods for the last week, let alone for the past year. Third, there could have been confounding factors, such as orange consumption. Oddly, this was not a dose-response curve, since the most milk consumption had less beneficial effect than lower amounts. Also, why were these effects only seen in women? Finally, researchers could not explain why low-fat or nonfat milk had this potential benefit, but cheese was detrimental and yogurt did not show benefit. We are left with more questions than answers. Would I recommend consuming low-fat or nonfat milk? Not necessarily, but I may not dissuade osteoarthritis patients from drinking it. There are very few approaches that slow the progression of joint space narrowing.

Vitamin D

Over the last five years or so, the medical community has gone from believing that vitamin D was potentially the solution to many diseases to wondering whether, in some cases, low levels were indicative of disease, but repletion was not a change-maker. Well, in a randomized controlled trial (RCT), the gold standard of studies, vitamin D had no beneficial symptom relief, nor any disease-modifying effects (3). This two-year study of almost 150 men and women raised blood levels of vitamin D on average to 36 ng/ml, which is considered respectable. Researchers used MRI and X-rays to track their results.

In a study, diet and exercise trumped the effects of diet or exercise alone (5). Patients with osteoarthritis of the knee who lost at least 10 percent of their body weight experienced significant improvements in function and a 50 percent reduction in pain, as well as reduction in inflammation, compared to those who lost 5 to 10 percent and those who lost less than 5 percent. This study was a well-designed, randomized controlled single-blinded study with a duration of 18 months. Researchers used a biomarker — IL6 — to measure inflammation. The diet and exercise group and the diet-only group lost significantly more weight than the exercise-only group, 23.3 pounds and 19.6 pounds versus 4 pounds. The diet portion consisted of a meal replacement shake for breakfast and lunch and then a vegetable-rich, low-fat dinner. Low-calorie meals replaced the shakes after six months. The exercise regimen included one hour of a combination of weight training and walking with alacrity three times per week. Therefore, concentrate on lifestyle modifications if you want to see potentially disease-modifying effects. These include both exercise and diet. In terms of low-fat or nonfat milk, while the study had numerous flaws, if you drink milk, you might continue for the sake of osteoarthritis, but stay on the low end of consumption. And remember, the best potential effects shown are with weight loss and with a vegetable-rich diet.

References:

(1) uptodate.com. (2) Arthritis Care Res online. 2014 April 6. (3) JAMA. 2013;309:155162. (4) Ann Rheum Dis online. 2014 Feb. 11. (5) JAMA. 2013;310:1263-1273. Dr. Dunaief is a speaker, author and local lifestyle medicine physician focusing on the integration of medicine, nutrition, fitness and stress management. For further information, visit www.medicalcompassmd.com or consult your personal physician.

NEWS AROUND TOWN

First Responders Day

Suffolk County Vanderbilt Museum, 180 Little Neck Road, Centerport will offer free admission for first responders including police, firefighters, paramedics and emergency medical technicians along with their families on Sunday, Oct. 27 from noon to 4 p.m. ID card required. Call 631854-5579 for more information.

Book signing

Z Pita, 217 Main St., Port Jefferson hosts a meet and greet and book signing for Nicole J. Christian, author of “How to Consult, Coach, Freelance and Gig: Gaining Financial Independence by Doing What You Know and What You Love,” on Tuesday, Oct. 29 at 7 p.m. Light refreshments will be served. For more information, call 631-476-7510.

An evening of comedy

The Long Island Comedy Festival returns to Theatre Three, 412 Main St., Port Jefferson on Saturday, Nov. 2 at 8 p.m. Enjoy an evening of nonstop laughter and fun with stand-ups Dennis Rooney, Leighann Lord, Joe Starr and Maria Walsh. Tickets are $45 per person. To order, call 631-928-9100 or visit www.theatrethree.com.

Indoor Yard Sale

Save the date! Temple Isaiah, 1404 Stony Brook Road, Stony Brook will hold an Indoor Yard Sale on Sunday, Nov. 3 from noon to 4 p.m. and Monday, Nov. 4 from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. (Bag Day). Something for everyone, from apparel, housewares and tools to collectibles, toys, sporting goods and more. No early birds please. Call 631751-8518 for more information.

Murder Mystery fundraiser

The Bates House, 1 Bates Road, Setauket hosts a Murder Mystery Masquerade Ball fundraiser for Twin Oaks Horse Sanctuary on Saturday, Nov. 9. $45 per person includes a two-hour interactive show, buffet dinner and dessert, free masquerade mask, Chinese auction and 50/50. Doors open at 5:30 p.m., show starts at 7 p.m. To reserve your spot, call 631-874-4913.

Avalon hosts ‘Ringworld’ screening

Avalon Park & Preserve in Stony Brook invites the community to a screening of “Ringworld” at the Avalon Barn off Shep Jones Lane on Friday, Oct. 25 at 7 p.m. Followed by a Sky Lab and Sky Dome viewing of Jupiter, Saturn, fall constellations and various deep sky objects (weather permitting) at 8 p.m. Free. Call 631-689-0619.

Open House

The Yaphank Historical Society will host an Open House of the newly restored Homan-Gerard House, 3 Yaphank Road, Yaphank, on Saturday, Oct. 26 from 2 to 4 p.m. The community is invited to tour the house and enjoy refreshments. For more VENDORS continued on page B10 information, call WANTED 631-924-4803.


PAGE B8 • ARTS & LIFESTYLES • OCTOBER 24, 2019

CROSSWORD PUZZLE

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SUDOKU

PUZZLE

City Financial Services, Chris Pallas (631) 928-4496 • email: pcfs16@aol.com

Directions: Fill in the blank squares in the grid, making sure that every row, column and 3-by-3 box includes all digits 1 through 9.

Answers to last week’s SUDOKU

©162719

1. *Birds of ill omen 6. Comes before flow 9. Hair styling products 13. B on Mendeleev’s table 14. Variable, abbr. 15. Lace loop 16. *Cemetery slab 17. Paleozoic or mesozoic 18. Orderly arrangement 19. *Vampire’s bed © StatePoint Media 21. *Trick-or-treating garb 23. Tan purveyor 24. Best ____ secret 25. What highwaymen do 28. Rossini’s “La Scala di ____” 30. 1 1/2 calorie breath mint 35. Copycat 37. Rotterdam or Singapore, e.g. 39. Expressing an assertion 40. Wine, to Pliny 41. Hiker’s path 43. Ship to Colchis 44. Finish 46. Serengeti antelope 47. Wyatt Earp action? 48. Like Matryoshka inside Matryoshka 50. Bagpiper’s tartan 52. Hankering 53. ____ E. Coyote 55. Precedes Sept.. 57. *Full of ghosts 61. *Fearful reaction 64. Acquiesce 65. Metal-bearing rock 67. Observatory observations 69. *Parents’ post-Halloween nightmare? 70. Epitome of easiness 71. Phrase of explanation 72. House of Lords member 73. Mar. follower 74. Lively

Answers to last week’s puzzle: Things Ghastly and Macabre

DOWN 1. Gayle King’s network 2. Drilling grp. 3. Sandwich cookie 4. CNN’s Blitzer and Accept guitarist Hoffmann 5. Blunders or bloopers 6. Fifty-fifty 7. Fly hangout? 8. Ankle support, e.g. 9. Horizontal wall beam 10. Common hosiery shade 11. Type of rich soil 12. Eye affliction 15. Anise-flavored spirit 20. All thumbs 22. Make a choice 24. James Corden’s kind of singing 25. *”Once upon a midnight dreary” bird 26. Express a thought 27. Gives in 29. Suit material? 31. Republic in Africa 32. Leave slowly 33. Pond buildup 34. *Funny to some, scary to others 36. Overwhelming defeat 38. Cone-shaped quarters 42. Whitman’s famous flower 45. Not silver 49. *Marilyn Manson: “Trick or treat till the neighbors gonna ____ of fright” 51. *Traditional alternative to pumpkin 54. Parkinson’s disease drug 56. Glittery stone 57. Door fastener 58. Malaria symptom *Theme related clue 59. Egg on 60. Not far 61. *Palm reader, e.g. 62. Affirm 63. *Fake face 66. *Gravestone wish 68. Chester White’s home Answers to this week’s puzzle will appear in next week’s newspaper and online on Friday afternoon at www.tbrnewsmedia.com, Arts and Lifestyles


OCTOBER 24, 2019 • ARTS & LIFESTYLES • PAGE B9

NEWS AROUND TOWN

FEATURE STORY

Setauket Artists’ exhibition welcomes fall

Science walking tour

Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, 1 Bungtown Road, Cold Spring Harbor hosts a Science Walking Tour on Sunday, Oct. 27 from 10 to 11:30 a.m. The 1½-hour guided tour will begin in the lobby of the Grace Auditorium. Tour fee is $5 per person, payable in cash or check (made out to CSHL), to your tour guide. Call 516-367-8455 for more information.

T

he cooler weather signals the return of a perennial favorite, the Setauket Artists Fall Exhibition at the Setauket Neighborhood House, 95 Main St., Setauket from Oct. 27 to Nov. 19. The annual juried exhibit was founded by Flo Kemp, a much admired local artist. Thirty-nine years later the group, now coordinated by the group’s president, Irene Ruddock, consists of about 50 artists from all over Long Island. Together they continue the tradition of exhibiting paintings at the historic Setauket Neighborhood House along with several other venues during the year. Each year the artists choose an honored artist and this year’s choice is Renee Caine. “Renee has contributed an enormous amount of time to this group, creating and implementing new ideas. Because of her boundless energy Renee is always ready to help out on any occasion,” said Ruddock. Caine will be exhibiting a piece titled “Giverny #4,” part of the “Giverny Series.” Fred Bryant, art collector and loyal supporter who has shown his dedication to the group for over a dozen years, returns as this year’s sponsor. “Because of Fred, our group had been able to purchase many items that have added to the professionalism of the Setauket Artists and for that we are grateful,”

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Join the Village of Port Jefferson for A Day in the Colonial Life at Drowned Meadow Cottage Museum, corner of Broadway and Barnum avenues, Port Jefferson on Saturday, Oct. 26 from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. The day will include an unveiling of a new historic marker recognizing Phillips Roe’s role in the Culper Spy Ring by Mayor Margot Garant, Colonial games and Colonial workshops including an outdoor cooking demonstration. Free. Call 631-473-4724 for further details.

Healthy U Health Fair

‘Pumpkin,’ watercolor by William Graf, will be on view at the Setauket Neighborhood House from Oct. 27 to Nov. 19. Image courtesy of the Setauket Artists

said Vice President Rob Roehrig. This year’s event will be judged by contemporary realism artist David Peikon who teaches at the Art League in Dix Hills. The community is invited to an opening reception on Sunday, Oct. 27 from 1 to 4 p.m. An open

MMER SALE U S ! S S E DL

house will be held on Nov. 9 and 10 and again on Nov. 15 to 17 to meet the artists, attend tours of the exhibit and observe an artist demonstration by pastel and oil painter Anthony Davis. Visit www.setauketartists.com or call 631-365-1312 for further information.

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PAGE B10 • ARTS & LIFESTYLES • OCTOBER 24, 2019

LIFE LINES

The elderly were exempt from fasting on holidays in Iceland in 1200 CE. Painting by Johan Peter Raadsig

Our life cycle determines our social circumstances

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We start our journey as a zygote, or fertilized egg, and become an embryo and fetus forming organ systems. We then become infants and children, then adolescents, and finally achieve adulthood and a heap of rights and activities as we raise BY ELOF AXEL CARLSON families and enter our careers. We become old, mature, age and become senescent in a dependent way requiring assisted living and then die. Biologists call this a life cycle. It is true of all multicellular life. Each stage of the life cycle has its vulnerabilities and its diverse activities. I am now 88 years old and Nedra and I will be shifting to the senescent age of our life cycles as we enter assisted living in a retirement community that is affiliated with Indiana University. As a historian of science and a biologist, I am interested in how things originate. Humans have cared for the elderly at least as long ago as 500,000 BCE when fossil human remains revealed it was that of a cared for person we would classify as senescent. Canes have been retrieved from burials of Egyptian mummies some 30,000 years ago. The oldest dentures date back to 700 BCE. Multigenerational households were constructed in Rome in 100 BCE. In the Christian era, in Iceland in 1200 CE persons over 70 were exempt from fasting on holidays. The Catholic Church cared for the elderly in Europe until the Protestant revolution, when the burden shifted to the government, and it introduced poor laws and the creation of almshouses, poor houses and poor farms. These were often poorly supported and dismal in their environment with the psychotic residents often chained or placed in strait

jackets and the elderly were neglected because funding from taxes was minimal. Poor houses were established in the Colonies shortly after the Pilgrims arrived. The first home for the aged in the U.S. was in 1823 in Boston. It was Dorothea Dix whose social work led to the separation of the paupers, “lunatics” and the aged from such poor houses and poor farms. The germ theory was introduced in the 1870s and 1880s and the number of people surviving to old age increased dramatically, but it was not until 1935 that the U.S. and President Franklin Roosevelt introduced Social Security as a separate tax-gathering organization, allowing unemployed people in their old age to live in their own homes. It was not until 1965 when President Lydon Johnson’s Great Society created Medicare and Medicaid that the aged could shift from boarding houses and nursing homes to communities of assisted living. Today there are 32,000 assisted living communities in the U.S. With humans living longer because of medical advances and these social measures, the population of those in their 60s or older will increase dramatically in the 21st century, and we will see far more assisted living communities that incorporate the hospitality of resorts with the medical care needs of the aged and the opportunities for music, lecture, exercise and a variety of eating choices for those who live in these facilities. It will also lead to higher taxes and debates on how society should respond to these needs when the opportunities for acquiring private wealth are limited for most of our citizens whose incomes provide little surplus funds for investment in their future retirement. It is our biology, not our ideology, that dictates our needs. It is our ideology or politics that dictates how we accommodate those needs. Elof Axel Carlson is a distinguished teaching professor emeritus in the Department of Biochemistry and Cell Biology at Stony Brook University.


OCTOBER 24, 2019 • ARTS & LIFESTYLES • PAGE B11

SPIRITS TOUR A SPOOKY HIT

The 25th annual Spirits Cemetery Tour: The Unforgotten will be long remembered as a great success for Three Village Historical Society and a night of spooky merriment for both volunteers and visitors. The event, co-chaired by Frank Turano and Janet McCauley, was sold out days in advance and attracted around 340 visitors. The actors, dressed in period garb provided by Antique Costumes and Prop Rental by Nan Guzzetta, mingled among tombstones and tourgoers at the Setauket Presbyterian Church cemetery and Caroline Church of Brookhaven cemetery. Twelve “spirits” recounted stories of lives that spanned the centuries and crossed the continents, but all connected to Setauket. Before embarking on the walk, groups gathered in the Presbyterian Church community room. There they enjoyed

complimentary donuts and cider, time period appropriate harpsichord music from Kyle Collins of Three Village Chamber Players, an exhibit curated by archivist Karen Martin of photos and other primary source materials about the people who were depicted on the tour and an interactive photo station. The tour ended at the Caroline Church carriage shed, where guests sampled cookies and apple cider. Food and beverages were provided by Ann Marie’s Farm Stand, Stop & Shop East Setauket and Starbucks East Setauket. Preparations are already underway for Spirits Cemetery Tour October 2020, which will feature the Spirits of Chicken Hill! If you are interested in volunteering as an actor or in some other capacity for the next tour, please call 631-751-3730 or visit www.tvhs.org.

Photos by Anthony White and Beverly C. Tyler


PAGE B12 • ARTS & LIFESTYLES • OCTOBER 24, 2019

MOVIE REVIEW

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It’s been five years since Disney brought us the fairy tale Maleficent, a twist on the story of “Sleeping Beauty” where the focus is not on Aurora who falls into a deep sleep after pricking her finger on a spindle but on the evil fairy who put a curse on the princess in the first place. Now its darker sequel, Maleficent: Mistress of Evil hits local theaters and does not disappoint. Prince Stefan is dead and Aurora has been raised by her fairy godmother Maleficent in the Moors, a magical place filled with Aurora (Elle Fanning) meets her future mother-in-law strange and mythical creatures. Humans (Michelle Pfeiffer) in a scene from Maleficent 2. and fairies live separate but in peace. When Aurora becomes engaged to It’s hard to figure out who director Joachim Prince Phillip, his parents, King John and Queen Ronning’s target audience is. On the one Ingrith of the Kingdom of Ulstead, invite Aurora hand, the film is at times very violent, with an and Maleficent to the castle for dinner. It is there intense war scene between the humans and an that we discover the queen’s true intentions — army of dark fey, an attempted extermination to frame Maleficent for the murder of the king of the Moorfolk in the palace’s church of all in order to have cause to declare war on the places and the sacrifice of one of the film’s Moorfolk with devastating consequences. most beloved characters. On the flip side, Fans of the first film will be pleased to know many of the Moors’ inhabitants are borderline that much of the original cast is back, with the silly with big eyes and cute voices and seemed exception of Brenton Thwaites who played geared toward children. Prince Philip in the first film. Angelina Jolie With a budget of $180 million, the film is is back as Maleficent complete with horns, visually stunning with special mention to the wings and cheek prosthetics; Elle Fanning is scene where an injured Maleficent is rescued the sweet Aurora; Sam Riley returns as Diaval, by her own kind and given a winged tour of Maleficent’s loyal servant and pet raven; while a secret world where the dark fey eek out an Imelda Staunton, Juno Temple and Lesley existence away from humans. (I predict a new Manville reprise their roles as pixies Knotgrass, ride at Disney World.) Thistlewit and Flittle. In the end, the wedding of Aurora and Phillip Newcomers include the handsome Harris serves as a union of the Kingdom of Ulstead Dickinson as Aurora’s prince, Robert Lindsay and the Moors and a timely lesson against fear, as King John, Chiwetel Ejiofor as Conall the bigotry, racism and intolerance and that makes Dark Fey and the incredible Michelle Pfeiffer it worth a view. as the villainous Queen Ingrith, aka Aurora’s Rated PG, Maleficent: Mistress of Evil is now future mother-in-law from hell. playing in local theaters.


OCTOBER 24, 2019 • ARTS & LIFESTYLES • PAGE B13

COVER STORY

The Atelier at Flowerfield’s latest exhibit highlights young talent

BY MELISSA ARNOLD

F

or the past three years, The Atelier at Flowerfield has buzzed with activity. Artists of all skill levels come to the St. James art studio to create, learn and connect with others through classes, studio time, social events, art history lectures and exhibits. As The Atelier has grown, it has also attracted a host of young, talented creatives looking for a place to hone and share their skills. Since 2017, the annual Long Island Young Artists Exhibition has provided a platform to celebrate their accomplishments with the community. “I believe that when artists are young, they’re uninhibited. The sky is the limit for their creativity, and they don’t filter themselves by what will or won’t sell or how people will respond,” said Director Kevin McEvoy in a recent interview. “They’re willing to experiment, to take risks with their art. It’s incredible to be a part of that,” he said. McEvoy estimates that 50 to 60 young people spend time at a workshop on a regular basis, many of them students at local schools or recent college graduates. Some of the artists take classes or have studio time five nights a week, while others come by for several hours during the day. The Atelier’s state-of-the-art studio space simulates natural light, allowing nighttime students to create pieces with realistic-looking daylight without interrupting their daytime responsibilities. This year’s Young Artists Exhibition invited artists ages 11 to 28 to submit works of any medium or theme to be reviewed by a panel of curators including Margaret McEvoy, Gaby Field-Rahman, Dr. Stephen Vlay and Barbara Beltrami. In total, 46 applicants submitted 130 different pieces for judging. The completed exhibit includes 47 pieces from 33 artists, mostly from Suffolk and Nassau counties. Aside from age, there were no specific requirements to enter a piece for consideration. McEvoy said he wanted to welcome young artists of all kinds to explore themes and mediums that appeal to them the most. One of this year’s exhibitors, Ariel Meltzer, 16, has always been fascinated with drawing people. “I’ve always found art to be very calming, and even when I was young I loved drawing faces and people in general,” said the artist, who lives in Stony Brook. “There’s so much diversity in the human figure, but there

Brookhaven Town Supervisor Ed Romaine with Pam Green, executive director of Kent Animal Shelter and her dog, Frodo. Photo courtesy of Kent Animal Shelter

Kent Animal Shelter honored by Town of Brookhaven

Joseph Santarpia of Farmingville’s 64- by 60-inch ‘Amphibian II,’ alcohol ink on Yupo paper, is one of the larger pieces on display. Image courtesy of The Atelier at Flowerfield

are so many similarities at the same time.” Meltzer discovered The Atelier a few summers ago after her mother encouraged her to find something fun to do. She said she was interested in continuing to develop the art skills she’d gained during the school year at The Stony Brook School, and the St. James studio was a perfect fit. “You get to know so many different people that each have their own perspective on art,” Meltzer said. “I love the connections that I’ve been able to make through The Atelier. Everyone is welcoming and supportive — it’s a great atmosphere to learn in.” Whether she’s attending morning classes in the summer or night classes during the school year, Meltzer always has a new project to work on. She’s worked with charcoal, oil, acrylics and more, but at home she tends to return to her old standby, graphite pencil. Her submission to this year’s exhibit, “Grace,” is a drawing of a classmate she completed for a school assignment. Meltzer said she wanted to make the girl’s hair and face appear softer to match her name, Grace. “I’m proud of the work that I send in no matter what, so I don’t worry too much about whether or not it gets chosen. But it’s still really exciting to be a part of the exhibit. This is my second year being included,” Meltzer said. Jonathan Horn, 27, is on the upper end of the young adult group, but that doesn’t stop him from creating whimsical, unique and fun works of art. The East Setauket resident has been artistic his entire life, starting to draw with markers at just 2 years old. These days, he’s primarily

a painter, but his tools are one of a kind. Horn studied studio art and anthropology at Stony Brook University, and in the process developed a deep curiosity for the tools used in ancient civilizations. “I started to wonder what it would be like to make and use these tools to paint with,” Horn said. “So I did. And I found that they work just as well as anything you’d buy commercially today.” His yucca leaf and palm brushes are used with paints Horn has made himself using a special clay. While Horn enjoys painting using classic techniques and subjects, his real passion is fantasy. “I grew up watching a lot of cartoons and playing video games, so the work I do tends in the direction of fantasy,” he explained. Horn’s two works in the exhibit include a clay-based gouache painting of flowers done on watercolor paper and a vivid gouache painting on gypsum board of a fish being attacked by a squid and eel. “This is the first recent exhibit I’ve submitted work for, so I was pretty nervous and relieved to be chosen,” he said. “The Atelier is a fantastic place to learn, whether you’re an experienced artist looking to hone your skills or a beginner looking to dip your toes in the water for the first time.” The Long Island Young Artists Exhibition is currently on view at The Atelier at Flowerfield’s Atelier Hall Gallery, located at 2 Flowerfield, Suite 15, St. James through Nov. 21. The gallery is open from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Saturday, and admission is free. For more information, call 631-250-9009 or visit www. atelierflowerfield.org.

Brookhaven Town Supervisor Ed Romaine (R) awarded a proclamation to Kent Animal Shelter on Oct. 15 citing its 50 years of dedicated work for the betterment of animal welfare. Long recognized for being a small shelter doing monumental work, the Kent Animal Shelter has operated since its incorporation in 1969 as an organization dedicated to helping homeless animals. Since its beginning in its humble space along the scenic Peconic River in Calverton, the shelter has given refuge to over 35,000 homeless animals. A humane bedrock in East End communities, it gradually extended its reach throughout Long Island and the tristate area and now rescues and rehabilitates abandoned, abused and homeless animals throughout the U.S. and neighboring countries especially during crisis situations. Programs include rescue, adoption, lowcost spay/neuter and humane education. To date, over 50,000 animals have been spayed or neutered to help control animal overpopulation. Over the years, plans to expand the shelter have been blocked by town and government regulatory agencies due to zoning and restrictions within the Pine Barrens. “Our efforts will not be thwarted, and the shelter fully intends to rebuild its facility on its current footprint. We are grateful to Ed Romaine and the Town of Brookhaven for recognizing and always supporting the vital efforts of the shelter to make a difference in the lives of companion animals,” said Pam Green, executive director at Kent. Kent Animal Shelter is a 501(c)(3) organization, no-kill that operates solely on the generosity of individuals and foundations. For more information, call 631-727-5731 or visit www.kentanimalshelter.com.


PAGE B14 • ARTS & LIFESTYLES • OCTOBER 24, 2019

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WE HAVE PUMPKINS, PUMPKIN PIES AND MUFFINS!

LOCAL SQUASH, BROCCOLI & CAULIFLOWER!

SHELTER PET OF THE WEEK MEET SALLY! This week’s shelter pet is Sally, a 1½-year-old heeler mix rescued by Kent Animal Shelter from Texas, where sadly many dogs are euthanized. Sally is one of the lucky ones and is very grateful to have a second chance at life! She is eager to please and loves to go for walks with our volunteers. All she needs is a new home. Come on down to visit her! Sally comes spayed, microchipped and up to date on her vaccines. Kent Animal Shelter is located at 2259 River Road in Calverton. The adoption center is open seven days a week from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. For more information on Sally and other adoptable pets at Kent, call 631727-5731 or visit www. kentanimalshelter.com.

1.99 / 8 oz. pkg

$

COOKING COVE

Surprises from the pumpkin patch

BY BARBARA BELTRAMI

Most of us think of pumpkins as the main ingredient in pies, but they’re far more versatile than you might think. I’m not talking about pumpkin martinis or lattes or dishes made with canned pumpkin puree. I’m talking about savory familiar dishes that feature fresh pumpkin instead of their usual main ingredients … dishes such as curry or risotto or even oven fries. Yes, I know it’s a lot of work to cut up a pumpkin, but the taste and texture of what you get from doing it are worth the trouble. If you really think you can’t be bothered, then wait till Halloween and use the pumpkin flesh that’s carved out of the jack-o’-lanterns.

Thai Curried Pumpkin

YIELD: Makes 3 to 4 servings INGREDIENTS: • One 1½- to 2-pound pumpkin, peeled, seeded and cut into bite-size cubes • 2 shallots, peeled and finely chopped • 3 garlic cloves, peeled and chopped • 1 tablespoon red curry paste • One 14-ounce can unsweetened coconut milk • 2 tablespoons Asian fish sauce • Freshly squeezed juice of one lime • 1 tablespoon brown sugar • ¼ cup peanut oil • 2 tablespoons chopped fresh basil DIRECTIONS:

To a large pot of boiling salted water add pumpkin; cook 5 to 8 minutes, until barely tender. With slotted spoon remove from water and set aside. In a blender or food processor, puree shallots, garlic and curry paste with two tablespoons water; add coconut milk, fish sauce, lime juice and brown sugar and pulse a few times to combine with curry paste mixture. Put oil in a wok and warm over medium heat; add curry mixture and stir constantly just until it releases its fragrance, about 10 to 15 seconds. Stir in coconut milk mixture, bring to boil, add pumpkin and reduce heat to low; cook, stirring once or twice until pumpkin is very tender but not mushy, 5 to 10 minutes. Transfer to serving bowl, sprinkle with basil and serve immediately with rice.

Pumpkin Risotto

YIELD: Makes 6 servings INGREDIENTS: • One 2-pound pumpkin, peeled, seeded and cut into 1-inch cubes • 2 tablespoons olive oil • Salt and freshly ground pepper to taste • 1½ quarts chicken broth • 4 tablespoons unsalted butter • ½ cup minced onion • ½ cup minced celery • 1½ cups arborio rice • ¾ cup dry white wine • 1 cup freshly grated Parmesan cheese

Pumpkin Risotto DIRECTIONS:

Stock photo

Preheat oven to 400 F. Toss pumpkin cubes with olive oil, salt and pepper in shallow baking pan; bake until they are tender but not mushy, about 20 to 25 minutes. Remove from oven and set aside to keep warm. Meanwhile, in a medium saucepan over medium heat warm chicken broth and leave on low heat to simmer. In a large heavy pot or saucepan over medium heat melt butter, then reduce heat to medium, add onion and celery and, stirring frequently, cook until onion is opaque, about 5 minutes. Add rice, stir, add wine, and stir for another one and a half minutes. Add one or two ladlefuls of broth and stir frequently until broth is absorbed. Repeat procedure, always stirring frequently, until all broth has been absorbed and rice is al dente, about 20 to 30 minutes. Stir in the baked pumpkin and Parmesan cheese. Serve immediately with a sauteed leafy green vegetable.

Pumpkin Oven Fries

YIELD: Makes 8 to 10 servings INGREDIENTS: • One 2- to 3-pound pumpkin, peeled, seeded and cut into ½-inch sticks • Salt and freshly ground pepper to taste • 1/3 cup olive oil • 1 teaspoon garlic powder • 1 teaspoon onion powder • 1 cup grated Parmesan cheese DIRECTIONS:

Preheat oven to 400 F. In a large bowl toss all ingredients together until pumpkin is thoroughly coated. Line baking sheet with parchment paper and spread pumpkin sticks around so that there is space between them. Place in oven and bake 20 to 30 minutes, until crispy and golden brown on outside and tender on inside. Place in a serving bowl and toss with cheese. Serve hot or warm with poultry or meat and a green salad.


OCTOBER 24, 2019 • ARTS & LIFESTYLES • PAGE B15

KNOWLEDGE SEEKERS

SBU’s Schleider scores $2 mln for teen depression intervention Harnessing the Technology of our Research Giants

BY DANIEL DUNAIEF Many teenagers who are struggling with depression need help. According to several estimates, less than half of teens with depression receive treatment that would help them manage through everything from negative feelings toward themselves and their lives to a lack of control over events during the day. Jessica Schleider, an assistant professor of clinical psychology in the College of Arts and Sciences at Stony Brook University, wants to offer teenagers battling depression a new kind of assistance. Schleider is seeking participants for a new study, called Project Track to Treat, that offers teenagers from 11 to 16 years old symptom-tailored treatment. After participating teens respond to surveys she sends them on smartphones, she will provide single-session, computer-based interventions that address symptoms such as hopelessness or withdrawal from daily activities. Schleider recently received a fiveyear, $2 million Early Independence Award from the National Institutes of Health to test the benefits of these half-hour computer sessions. The funds will go toward study staff, the cost of recruiting youths and families for the study, equipment, statistical packages for the analyses she plans to run and compensation for the families who take part. “A vast majority of teenagers who experience depression never access treatment,” Schleider said, potentially because teens are not typically in a position where they can seek out treatment on their own. “Between the lack of access to services and the limited potency of services, there needs to be a broader array of options and layers we can provide.” In the world of clinical psychology, three to four months is generally considered brief treatment. A single computer-based session

SPOTLIGHTING DISCOVERIES AT (1) COLD SPRING HARBOR LAB (2) STONY BROOK UNIVERSITY & (3) BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LAB

‘A vast majority of teenagers who experience depression never access treatment.’ — Jessica Schleider that a teenager can access at any time offers support during a much shorter time frame. The idea behind the briefer, more targeted intervention is that it could offer help. The goal of the session is to create positive momentum, to teach teens useful skills for coping with depression-related difficulties, and to offer it in a setting where modern teenagers spend much of their time, online, Schleider suggested. “For young people who would never go to a therapist, the question may be whether there is something else that could help, and [Schleider’s] work may offer one such ‘something else,’” John Weisz, a professor in the Department of Psychology at Harvard University, wrote in an email. It’s also possible, explained Weisz, who has known Schleider since 2013 when she worked in his lab, that a single session might encourage teenagers to believe that other types of therapy can also help if they try. Part of the motivation for this study is to determine if the nature of the symptoms — which she will explore through survey questions — can inform how teenagers will respond to a single, therapeutic session. Schleider created these programs from available research in psychology and education. She adapted some of those programs to these specific circumstances and she taught herself rudimentary coding with html. She currently has three programs available on her website, which interested parents and teenagers can explore at www. schleiderlab.org/participate. The teenagers participating in the study will receive questions a few

Jessica Schleider Photo from SBU

times a day for three weeks about how they are feeling, checking to see any signs of depression. From those interactions, Schleider will be able to determine which symptom is the most central and which might lead to other symptoms over time. She hopes to take parameters from that to see if those symptoms predict how much a participant will respond to a session. Schleider will also measure how teenagers respond to training through the study. If their emotional state deteriorates, the researchers can intervene and can monitor the level of risk and refer any cases appropriately. “Our top priority as researchers is to make sure the kids are taken care of,” she said. She was skeptical before she started working on brief sessions. “I was on the side of, of course you can’t do anything in one session,” Schleider said. “I thought you need several sessions to make a sustained change.” In looking at the available research, however, she discovered that through 50 randomized control trials in 2017, the magnitude of the effect of the trials was between small to medium range, which matched the effect of sessions ranging from an hour to 16 sessions for other teenagers. After her study, she realized that “there is something to this. We need to do more work to find out what to do and how to harness it for our youth.” Through monitoring over two

years, Schleider hopes to gain a better awareness of who will benefit from this session and under what time frame they might see an improvement. She hopes teenagers can share their thoughts and ideas for how to improve these programs. She also offers some of these teenagers to help reconstruct the content and language and references. Teenagers who don’t participate in the Track to Treat study can participate in an anonymous Project Yes effort, which is a program evaluation initiative. These participants can offer feedback on these sessions. For a subset of teenagers, one session likely won’t be sufficient. Weisz suggested that Schleider, who joined Stony Brook last year, is a “terrific addition” to the university and the community. “I believe her work will reflect very well on both.” Weisz added that Schleider’s colleagues in the Department of Psychology at Stony Brook “are among the finest psychological scientists in the nation,” where Schleider can “take her work to a very high level.” Schleider, who joined Stony Brook last year, lives in Coram with her husband, David Payne, who is a medical resident in radiology at Stony Brook Hospital. As for her work, Schleider said she recognizes that there is no panacea, but that this approach is “something when the alternative is nothing.”

Horoscopes of the week LIBRA – Sept 23/Oct 23 Libra, after you get through an exciting event, life may slow down for a little while. But you can find plenty of ways to infuse some excitement into your days. SCORPIO – Oct 24/Nov 22 You cannot seem to focus your attention on one thing for more than a few minutes, Scorpio. Random thoughts, however distracting, can inspire new ideas. SAGITTARIUS – Nov 23/Dec 21 Sagittarius, you may like to tackle projects all by yourself, but sometimes letting someone else get the job done frees up opportunities to recharge your batteries. CAPRICORN – Dec 22/Jan 20 It may finally be time to get serious about getting out in the job market once more, Capricorn. Whether you’re looking for a new job or returning after a hiatus, retool your resume. AQUARIUS – Jan 21/Feb 18 While success brings you many things, it can feel lonely at the top, Aquarius. Surround yourself with associates who can be a sounding board and offer assistance. PISCES – Feb 19/Mar 20 Take time to listen more and speak less, Pisces. Doing so allows you to make a better assessment of what those around you need and want. ARIES – Mar 21/Apr 20 Aries, this week may start off somewhat unbalanced. Work may be demanding more of you, and you’re finding it tough to even out the field. By midweek you’ll regain control. TAURUS – Apr 21/May 21 Make the necessary changes in your life to get back on target, Taurus. These goals may run the gamut from fitness to career. Put the future in focus. GEMINI – May 22/Jun 21 You may be inspired to do something creative but don’t know where to focus your attention just yet, Gemini. Look to Sagittarius as a good source of inspiration. CANCER – Jun 22/Jul 22 Cancer, this week you may be unable to keep everything as organized as you would like. Take a cue from someone you know is always organized. LEO – Jul 23/Aug 23 Take control of a situation that comes to light this week, Leo. No one seems willing or able to grab the reins, but you can be an excellent leader in this situation. VIRGO – Aug 24/Sept 22 Expand your social circles and you may meet some influential people, Virgo. This can help spread the word about your stellar reputation and open doors to opportunities.


PAGE B16 • ARTS & LIFESTYLES • OCTOBER 24, 2019

Times ... and dates

See family-friendly Halloween events on page B23

Thursday 24 An evening of jazz

The Jazz Loft, 275 Christian Ave., Stony Brook welcomes the Interplay Jazz Orchestra in concert at 7 p.m. The 17-piece big band will play original compositions written by band members. Tickets are $25 adults, $20 seniors, $15 students, $10 children, children under 5 free. Call 751-1895 or visit www.thejazzloft.org.

Oct. 24 to Oct. 31, 2019

Grist Mill tours

Last chance to visit the Stony Brook Grist Mill for the season! The mill, located at 100 Harbor Road, Stony Brook will be open for guided tours today and Oct. 27 from noon to 4 p.m. Admission is $2 for adults, $1 for children. Call 751-2244.

Chrysanthemum Show

The Long Island Chrysanthemum Society will present its 65th annual show at Starkie Brothers Garden Center, 721 Main St., Farmingdale today from 12:30 to 5:30 p.m. and Oct. 27 from 11 a.m. to 3:45 p.m. Come see a beautiful display of spectacular mums in a variety of colors and bloom types. Visit www.longislandmums.org.

Historical Walking Tour

Book signing

Take part in the Three Village Historical Society’s Down the Ways: Wooden Ship Era walking tour with historian Beverly C. Tyler at 2 p.m. Explore the history of shipbuilding in Setauket and learn about ship captains and families prominent in the area’s maritime history. $15 per person, $10 members. To make a reservation, call 751-3730.

Book Revue, 313 New York Ave., Huntington presents an evening with New York Times best-selling author Nelson DeMille and his son, screenwriter Alex DeMille, as they discuss and sign copies of their new thriller, “The Deserter,” at 7 p.m. Call 271-1442.

Jazz in the Gallery

The Art League of Long Island, 107 E. Deer Park Road, Dix Hills presents Chatter Jazz with Ray Anderson & Friends at 7 p.m. Trombonist Ray Anderson leads the band in an evening of lively musical banter reminiscent of Chatter Jazz greats Rex Stewart and Dicky Wells. Tickets are $25 adults, $20 seniors. To order, call 462-5400, ext. 222.

Old Burying Ground Tour

Singer Songwriter Night

International Folk Dancing

Join the Huntington Historical Society for a guided tour of the 17th-century Old Burying Ground cemetery at 4 p.m. Meet at the Soldiers & Sailors Memorial Building, 228 Main St., Huntington. Tickets are $15 adults, $10 members, $5 children. Advance reservations required by calling 4277045, ext. 401. Hauppauge Public Library, 1373 Veterans Memorial Highway, Hauppauge hosts an afternoon of International Folk Dancing from 2 to 4:30 p.m. No partner needed. Free. Call 896-4751 or 9791600 for more info.

Singer Songwriter Night is back at the Huntington Arts Council’s Main Street Gallery, 213 Main St., Huntington from 7:30 to 10 p.m. (sign-up at 7 p.m.). Original music only, no backline. First come, first serve. $10 donation to perform, $5 to listen. Call 271-8423, ext. 12.

History of Rock ‘n’ Roll concert

Friday 25

Spooky Lantern Walks

The Miller Place–Mount Sinai Historical Society hosts Spooky Lantern Walks from the William Miller House, 75 North County Road, Miller Place today and Oct. 26. Explore the haunted history and spooky stories of the over 300-year-old Miller Place Historic District in this not-so-scary evening walking tour. $15 per person. Call 476-5742 or visit www.mpmshistoricalsociety.org.

Deepwells Haunted Mansion

Deepwells Mansion, 2 Taylor Lane, St. James is transformed into a terrifying Dead & Breakfast today and Oct. 26. Each floor is filled with horrific scenes including creepy clowns, spiders galore and scientific experiments gone wrong! Fee is $15 in advance, $20 at the door. For more information, visit www. deepwellshauntedmansion.com.

Ray Anderson in concert

The Jazz Loft, 275 Christian Ave., Stony Brook welcomes Ray Anderson and his Pocket Brass Band in concert at 7 p.m. Dubbed “the wild man of the trombone” by the L.A. Times, Anderson will be performing with Jose Davila on sousaphone, Steven Bernstein on trumpet and Tommy Campbell on drums in the New Orleans style. Tickets are $25 adults, $20 seniors, $15 students, $10 children ages 6 and up. To order, call 751-1895 or visit www. thejazzloft.org.

A MOSAIC OF WORLD CULTURES

The Staller Center for the Arts presents Ensemble Español in Flamenco Passion for Hispanic Heritage Month on Oct. 26. Photo by Dean Paul

Poets in Port

Caffe Portofino, 249 Main St., Northport hosts an evening of Poets in Port at 7:30 p.m. Featured poets will be Peter Dugan and Rita B. Rose followed by an open mic. Visit www. northportarts.org for more info.

Stand-Up Comedy in the Cafe

The Cinema Arts Centre, 423 Park Ave., Huntington welcomes stand-up comedian Jo Firestone to the Sky Room Cafe at 9:30 p.m. Tickets are $17 adults, $13 members. Visit www. cinemaartscentre.org.

Friday Night Face Off

Theatre Three, 412 Main St., Port Jefferson will host Friday Night Face Off, Long Island’s longest running Improv Comedy Show, on the Second Stage from 10:30 p.m. to midnight. $15 per person. Cash only. For ages 16 and up. Call 9289100 or visit www.theatrethree.com. * All numbers are in (631) area code unless otherwise noted.

Saturday 26

Spooky Lantern Walks See Oct. 26 listing.

Deepwells Haunted Mansion See Oct. 26 listing.

Setauket Cemetery Tour

The Smithtown Historical Society 5th annual Cemetery Tour will explore the historic Caroline Church of Brookhaven, 1 Dyke Road, Setauket at 10 a.m. Meet at the church and join Beverly Tyler, Three Village historian, for a tour of the cemetery grounds and interior of the church. Tickets are $5 per person. Call 265-6768 to RSVP.

Harvest Fair

St. John’s Church, 12 Prospect St., Huntington presents its annual Harvest Fair from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. featuring raffle baskets, silent auction, food, crafts, White Elephant, farmers market, local vendors and more. Proceeds benefit community outreach programs. Call 427-1752.

The History of Rock ‘n’ Roll band brings the decades of rock ‘n’ roll to life at the Suffolk County Vanderbilt Planetarium, 180 Little Neck Road, Centerport from 5:30 to 7 p.m. Enjoy a multimedia show with costumes, video and the rock music of the ’50s through ’80s, from Elvis and the Beatles to disco and Billy Joel. Tickets for adults are $20 online at www.vanderbiltmuseum.org, $25 at the door; $15 for children 15 and under. Call 854-5579.

Haiti Outreach fundraiser

The Jazz Loft, 275 Christian Ave., Stony Brook will host a Haiti Outreach fundraiser titled Operation Creole Love Songs featuring music with Caribbean flavor at 7 p.m. Tickets are $25 adults, $20 seniors, $15 students, $10 children ages 6 and up. To order, call 751-1895 or visit www.thejazzloft.org.

Forever Motown in concert

Back by popular demand, the Smithtown Center for the Performing Arts, 2 E. Main St., Smithtown presents a nonstop, high-energy trip down memory lane with Forever Motown in concert at 8 p.m. Enjoy hits like “My Girl,” “I Heard It Through the Grapevine,” “Dancin’ in the Street” and many more. Tickets are $50 per person. To order, call 724-3700 or visit www.smithtownpac.org.

Ensemble Español

Come see Spanish culture come alive at Stony Brook University’s Staller Center for the Arts, 100 Nicolls Road, Stony Brook at 8 p.m. with Ensemble Español, the premier Spanish dance company in the United States. With 40 dancers,


OCTOBER 24, 2019 • ARTS & LIFESTYLES • PAGE B17 singers and musicians, Ensemble Español fills Staller Center’s Main Stage with a magnificent mosaic of world cultures – Latin, North and South America, Asia, Middle East, and Europe. Tickets are $48. To order, call 632-2787 or visit www. stallercenter.com.

Sunday 27 Grist Mill tours See Oct. 26 listing.

Chrysanthemum Show See Oct. 26 listing.

Halloween Mash Car Show

Long Island Cars’ Halloween Mash Car Show & Swap Meet returns to the Bald Hill Cultural Center, 1 Ski Run Lane, Farmingville from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. featuring classic and collectible automobiles including street rods, muscle cars, antiques, exotics and imports. The event will also feature a Halloween costume contest for children, vendors, cars for sale, food, refreshments and entertainment. Admission is $9 adults, free for ages 11 and under. Call 567-5898 or visit www. longislandcars.com.

Tide Mill Tour

The Huntington Historical Society will present a tour of the Van Wyck-Lefferts Tide Mill today at 1 p.m. and Oct. 31 at 1:15 p.m. Built in 1795, the mill is one of the best preserved 18th-century tide mills in the country. The 1½-hour tour includes a short boat ride. For ages 12 and up. $20 per person, $15 members. Advance reservations required by calling 427-7045, ext. 401.

Fall Seasonal Stroll

Join the staff at Caumsett State Historic Park Preserve, 25 Lloyd Harbor Road, Huntington for a Fall Seasonal Stroll (1.5 miles) from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. to observe the park’s seasonal changes. Adults only. $4 per person. Advance registration required by calling 423-1770.

Port Jeff Village Harvest Fest

Port Jefferson Village presents the 10th annual Harvest Fest throughout the village from noon to 5 p.m. Attractions will include a Chowder Crawl, costumed dog parade, Scarecrow Alley, marshmallow roasting, haunted walking tour, farmers market, festive harvest crafts, live music and woodcarving. www.portjeff.com.

Argentina and Armenia featuring the New Docta Ensemble. Tickets are $30 adults, $25 seniors, $12 students. Call 385-0373 or visit www.ridotto. org to order.

Evening Lantern Walk

Join the staff at Caleb Smith State Park Preserve, 581 W. Jericho Turnpike, Smithtown for an Evening Lantern Walk from 6:30 to 8 p.m. Walk through the dark meandering trails of the park while discussing some spooky Long Island tales. For families with children 5 and up. $4 per person plus $8 parking. Advance registration required by calling 265-1054.

Monday 28

Food and Climate lecture

Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, 1 Bungtown Road, Cold Spring Harbor together with the Nature Conservancy, Three Harbors Garden Club, St. John’s Church and North Country Garden Club host a lecture titled “Food and Climate – The Way Forward” from 6 to 8 p.m. Call Call 516-367-8455.

Tuesday 29 Book signing

Join Book Revue, 313 New York Ave., Huntington for an evening with Long Island filmmaker and photographer John Lazzaro as he speaks about and signs copies of his new book, “The Walls Still Talk,” at 7 p.m. Call 271-1442.

Wednesday 30

Israeli and international dancing

RJO Intermediate School, located at the corner of Church Street and Old Dock Road, Kings Park will host an evening of international and Israeli folk dancing every Wednesday (when school is in session) from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. $10 per person. For further details, call Linda at 269-6894.

Thursday 31 Tide Mill Tour See Oct. 27 listing.

Halloween Pancake Breakfast

Rocky Point Lions Club presents its 52nd annual Halloween All You Can Eat Pancake Breakfast at the Joseph A. Edgar School, 525 Route 25A, Rocky Point from 7:30 to 11:30 a.m. Pancakes and sausage will be served with a costume contest for children under age 12. Admission is $7 adults, $5 children 11 and under at the door. Call 662-1235.

Theater

‘Sunset Boulevard’

The John W. Engeman Theater, 250 Main St., Northport will present Andrew Lloyd Webber’s masterwork, “Sunset Boulevard,” now extended through Nov. 3. Impoverished screen writer Joe Gillis stumbles upon faded, silent-screen goddess Norma Desmond’s mansion on Sunset Boulevard and is persuaded to work on Norma’s “masterpiece.” Features the much-loved score including “With One Look,” “As If We Never Said Goodbye” and “Perfect Year.” Tickets range from $75 to $80 with free valet parking. To order, call 261-2900 or visit www.engemantheater.com.

‘Menopause The Musical’

The Smithtown Center for the Performing Arts, 2 East Main St., Smithtown closes its 2018-19 season with the hilarious comedy, “Menopause The Musical” through Oct. 27. Four women at a lingerie sale have nothing in common but a black lace bra AND memory loss, hot flashes, night sweats and more. Set to classic tunes from the ’60s, ’70s and ’80s, the musical parody will have you cheering and dancing in the aisles. Tickets are $40, $36 seniors. Call 724-3700 or visit www.smithtownpac.org.

‘Jekyll & Hyde: The Musical’

Theatre Three, 412 Main St., Port Jefferson kicks off its 2019-20 season with “Jekyll & Hyde: The Musical” through Oct. 26. The epic battle between good and evil is fought when the brilliant Dr. Jekyll’s medical experiment backfires, giving life to Edward Hyde, his evil alter ego, featuring the hit songs, “This Is the Moment” and “Someone Like You.” Contains adult themes and situations. Tickets are $35 adults, $28 seniors and students, $20 children ages 5 to 12. To order, call 928-9100 or visit www.theatrethree.com.

Suffolk County Community College, 533 College Road, Selden kicks off its fall 2019 theater season at the Shea Theatre in the Islip Arts Building with “The Heidi Chronicles” on Oct. 24, 25 and 26 at 8 p.m. and Oct. 27 at 2 p.m. Are modern-day American women happy? Are their lives more fulfilling than that of women who lived before the Equal Rights Amendment? Wendy Wasserstein considers these questions in her Pulitzer Prize-winning play. *Mature content. Tickets are $14 adults, $9.75 age 16 or younger. Call 451-4163 to order.

‘Phantom’

Star Playhouse at Suffolk Y JCC, located at 74 Hauppauge Road in Commack, presents Maury Yeston’s musical “Phantom” on Nov. 9 and 23 at 8 p.m. and Nov. 10, 17 and 24 at 2 p.m. Tickets are $25 adults, $20 seniors, students and members. To order, call 462-9800, ext. 136.

‘Annie’

The Smithtown Center for the Performing Arts, 2 East Main St., Smithtown opens its 2019-20 season with “Annie” from Nov. 9 to Jan. 20. Based on the popular comic strip by Harold Gray, the story follows little orphan Annie on her quest to find the parents who abandoned her on the doorstep of a New York City orphanage. Tickets are $40 adults, $36 seniors, $25 students. Call 724-3700 or visit www.smithtownpac.org.

‘Almost, Maine’

The Carriage House Players, Suffolk County Vanderbilt Museum, 180 Little Neck Road, Centerport continues its fall 2019 season with John Cariani’s “Almost, Maine,” a series of nine vignettes about love, on Nov. 15, 16, 22 and 23 at 8 p.m. and Nov. 17 and 24 at 3 p.m. Tickets are $20 adults, $15 seniors and children. To order, call 516-557-1207 or visit www. carriagehouseplayers.org.

‘Matilda’

The John W. Engeman Theater, 250 Main St., Northport presents the inspiring story of an extraordinary girl in “Matilda the Musical” from Nov. 14 to Dec. 29. Packed with high-energy dance numbers and catchy songs, children and adults alike will be thrilled and delighted by this holiday treat. For ticket information, call 2612900 or visit www.engemantheater.com.

‘A Christmas Carol’

“I will honor Christmas in my heart …” Celebrate the holiday season with the 36th annual production of “A Christmas Carol” at Theatre Three, 412 Main St., Port Jefferson from Nov. 16 to Dec. 28. Follow the miser Ebenezer Scrooge on a journey that teaches him the true meaning of Christmas – past, present and future. Tickets are $35 adults, $28 seniors and students, $20 ages 5 to 12. To order, call 928-9100 or visit www.theatrethree.com.

Fall Chinese Auction

The Women’s Fellowship of the Farmingville Congregational Church, 335 Horseblock Road, Farmingville invites the community to a Fall Chinese Auction at noon. $5 admission includes coffee, cake, 25 tickets and a chance at the door prize. Lots of great prizes. Call 736-7699.

A Night of Opera

TIMES ... and dates continued on page B18

Unitarian Universalist Fellowship, 109 Browns Road, Huntington hosts a concert by Opera Night Long Island at 4 p.m. Enjoy an assortment of vocal excerpts from famous and beloved operas featuring costumes designed and created by local artists. $20 donation. Visit www.operanight.org.

Ridotto concert

Huntington Jewish Center, 510 Park Ave., Huntington hosts a Ridotto concert, Los Pajaros Perdidos (The Lost Birds) at 4 p.m. The World Music concert will feature classical music from

‘The Heidi Chronicles’

HALLOWEEN MASH CAR SHOW

Custom and collectible cars, like this 1934 Ford, will be on display at Bald Hill during a monster Halloween-themed car show on Oct. 27. Photo from Long Island Cars

CALENDAR DEADLINE is Wednesday at noon, one week before publication. Items may be mailed to: Times Beacon Record News Media, P.O. Box 707, Setauket, NY 11733. Email your information about community events to leisure@tbrnewspapers.com. Calendar listings are for not-for-profit organizations (nonsectarian, nonpartisan events) only, on a space-available basis. Please include a phone number that can be printed.


PAGE B18 • ARTS & LIFESTYLES • OCTOBER 24, 2019

TIMES ... and dates

TBR NEWS MEDIA

Continued from page B17

Celebrates Our Hometown Heroes To Honor Our Local Servicepeople For Veterans Day We Will Publish A Special Section in the November 7th Issue

Catch a screening of ‘Mike Wallace Is Here’ at Stony Brook University’s Wang Center on Oct. 28. Image from PJDS

‘Jacob Marley’s Christmas Carol’

The Carriage House Players, Suffolk County Vanderbilt Museum, 180 Little Neck Road, Centerport continues its season with Tom Mula’s “Jacob Marley’s Christmas Carol” on Dec. 13, 14, 20 and 21 at 8 p.m. and Dec. 15 and 22 at 3 p.m. “Marley was dead, to begin with ...” but what happens to Ebenezer Scrooge’s business partner after that? Tickets are $20 adults, $15 seniors and children. To order, call 516-557-1207 or visit www.carriagehouseplayers.org.

Please send us photos of your friends and loved ones in uniform*

Film

‘Red Joan’

East Northport Public Library, 185 Larkfield Road, E. Northport screens “Red Joan” starring Judi Dench on Oct. 25 at 2 p.m. Rated R. Open to all. Call 261-2313.

THIS FORM MUST ACCOMPANY YOUR PHOTO Name Hometown

‘Men in Black: International’

(YOUR name and phone # also on back of photo, please)

Port Jefferson Free Library, 100 Thompson St., Port Jefferson will present a matinee screening of “Men in Black: International” starring Chris Hemsworth on Oct. 25 at 2 p.m. No registration necessary. Open to all. Call 473-0022.

Branch of Military Rank Years of Service

‘Arsenic and Old Lace’

(-)

Just in time for Halloween, Celebrate St. James will present the “Arsenic and Old Lace” (1944) starring Cary Grant at the historic St. James Calderone Theater, 176 Second St., St. James on Oct. 25 at 7 p.m. as part of its Comedy, Coffee & Croissants Classic Film Series. Wine, cheese and Halloween treats will be served. Tickets are $25, $20 seniors. To purchase, call 862-4615 or visit www.celebratestjames.org.

year to year

Phone Number (will not appear in paper) E-mail:

*Those who are newly graduated, currently serving, veterans and deceased service members. Pictures of military service animals are also welcome for inclusion.

If you would like your picture returned, please enclose a self-addressed stamped envelope. You may also pick up the picture at the newspaper office after it appears in print.

‘Rocky Horror Picture Show’ ©162671

If you wish to email: • Send photo as jpeg attachment • Include information fields required on this form • Subject line must read: Hometown Heroes Photo • Email to: art@tbrnewsmedia.com OR send or bring your photo to: 185 Route 25, Setauket, NY 11733 by Friday, November 1.

Join the Cinema Arts Centre, 423 Park Ave., Huntington for a screening of the cult classic “Rocky Horror Picture Show” on Oct. 26 at 11 p.m. The showing includes a live performance, raffles and a costume contest. Prop bags are not permitted at the performance but will be available for purchase. Tickets are $17, $12 members. Visit www.cinemaartscentre.org.

‘Mike Wallace Is Here’

The Fall 2019 Port Jefferson Documentary Series concludes with a screening of “Mike Wallace Is Here” at Stony Brook University’s Charles B. Wang Center, 100 Nicolls Road, Stony Brook on Oct. 28 at 7 p.m. Through archival footage, the film shows Wallace butting heads with iconic figures such as Malcolm X, Donald Trump, Bill O’Reilly, Oprah Winfrey, Vladimir Putin, Johnny Carson, Barbra Streisand and many others. Followed by a Q&A with guest speaker producer Peggy Drexler. Tickets are $8 per person (no credit cards please) at the door. Call 473-5220 or visit www.portjeffdocumentaryseries.com.

‘Dracula’

As part of its Anything But Silent series, the Cinema Arts Centre, 423 Park Ave., Huntington will screen “Dracula” (1931) starring Bela Lugosi on Oct. 29 at 7:30 p.m. with live organ accompaniment by Ben Model. Tickets are $16, $11 members. Visit www.cinemaartscentre.org.

New York Cat Film Festival

On Oct. 30 at 7:30 p.m. the Cinema Arts Centre, 423 Park Ave., Huntington hosts the New York Cat Film Festival featuring a collection of short films from around the world showcasing our feline friends. $17 per person, $12 members. Proceeds benefit the Golden Paw Society. Visit www. cinemaartscentre.org.

‘Tolkien’

Comsewogue Public Library, 170 Terryville Road, Port Jefferson Station will screen “Tolkien” starring Nicholas Hoult as J.R.R. Tolkien on Oct. 31 at 2 p.m. Open to all. Registration optional by calling 928-1212.

‘The Evil Dead’

The Cinema Arts Centre, 423 Park Ave., Huntington will screen Sam Raimi’s iconic horror film “The Evil Dead” (new 4K remaster) on Oct. 31 at 10 p.m. followed by a costume contest. Tickets are $12, $7 members. Visit www.cinemaartscentre.org. * All numbers are in (631) area code unless otherwise noted.


OCTOBER 24, 2019 • ARTS & LIFESTYLES • PAGE B19

Religious D irectory

Assemblies Of God

STONY BROOK CHRISTIAN ASSEMBLY Connecting to God, Each Other and the World 400 Nicolls Road, E. Setauket 631–689–1127 • Fax 631–689–1215 www.stonybrookchristian.com PASTOR TROY REID Weekly Schedule Sunday Worship w/nursery 10 am Kidmo Children’s Church • Ignited Youth Fellowship and Food Always to Follow Tuesday Evening Prayer: 7 pm Thursday Morning Bible Study w/Coffee & Bagels: 10 am Friday Night Experience “FNX” for Pre K-Middle School: 6:30 pm Ignite Youth Ministry: 7:30 pm Check out our website for other events and times

Byzantine Catholic RESURRECTION BYZANTINE CATHOLIC CHURCH

38 Mayflower Avenue, Smithtown NY 11787 631–759–6083 resurrectionsmithtown@gmail.com www.resurrectionsmithtown.org FATHER TYLER A. STRAND, ADMINISTRATOR, JOSEPH S. DURKO, CANTOR Divine Liturgy: Sundays at 10:30 am Holy Days: See website or phone for information Sunday School Sundays at 9:15 am Adult Faith Formation/Bible Study: Mondays at 7:00 pm. Men’s Prayer Group Wednesdays at 7 pm A Catholic Church of the Eastern Rite under the Eparchy of Passaic.

Catholic ST. GERARD MAJELLA ROMAN CATHOLIC CHURCH

300 Terryville Road, Port Jefferson Station 631–473–2900 www.stgmajella.org REV. GREGORY RANNAZZISI, PASTOR Mass: Saturday 5:00pm Sunday: 7:30am, 9:00am & 11:00am Weekday Mass: 9:00am Confessions: Saturday 4:00-4:45 or by appointment Baptism and Wedding arrangements can be made by calling the Parish Office Thrift Shop: Mon-Fri 10am-4pm Saturday 10am-2pm

©163259

INFANT JESUS ROMAN CATHOLIC CHURCH

110 Myrtle Ave., Port Jefferson, NY 11777 631-473-0165 • Fax 631-331-8094 www.www.infantjesus.org REVEREND PATRICK M. RIEGGER, PASTOR ASSOCIATES: REV. FRANCIS LASRADO & REV. ROLANDO TICLLASUCA To schedule Baptisms and Weddings, Please call the Rectory Confessions: Saturdays 12:30-1:15 pm in the Lower Church Religious Ed.: 631– 928-0447 Parish Outreach: 631–331-6145 Weekly Masses: 6:50 and 9 am in the Church, 12 pm in the Chapel* Weekend Masses: Saturday at 5 pm in the Church,

5:15 pm in the Chapel,* Sunday at 7:30 am, 10:30 am, 12 pm, and 5 pm in the Church and at 8:30 am, 10 am, and 11:30 am (Family Mass) in the Chapel* Spanish Masses: Sunday at 8:45 am and Wednesday at 6 pm in the Church *Held at the Infant Jesus Chapel at St. Charles Hospital

ST. JAMES ROMAN CATHOLIC CHURCH

429 Rt. 25A, Setauket, NY 11733 Phone: 631–941–4141 • Fax: 631–751–6607 Parish Office email: parish@stjamessetauket.org Mission Statement: Formed as the Body of Christ through the waters of Baptism, we are Beloved daughters and sons of the Father. We, the Catholic community of the Three Village area, are a pilgrim community on Camino-journeying toward the fullness of the Kingdom of God, guided by the Holy Spirit. Nurtured by the Eucharist and formed by the Gospel, we strive to respond to Jesus’ Invitation to be faithful and fruitful disciples; to be a Good Samaritan to (our) neighbor and enemy; so that in Jesus’ name, we may be a welcoming community, respectful of life in all its diversities and beauty; stewards of and for God’s creation; and witnesses to Faith, Hope and Charity. REV. JAMES-PATRICK MANNION, PASTOR REV. GERALD CESTARE, ASSOCIATE PASTOR REV. JOHN FITZGERALD, IN RESIDENCE Office Hours: Mon.-Fri. 9am - 4pm; Sat. 9 am - 2 pm Weekday Masses: Monday – Saturday 8:00 am Weekend Masses: Saturday (Vigil) 5:00 pm (Youth) Sunday 8:00am, 9:30 am (family), 11:30 am (choir) Baptisms: Contact the Office at the end of the third month (pregnancy) to set date Matrimony: contact the office at least 9 months before desired date Reconciliation: Saturdays 4:00 – 4:45 pm or by appointment Anointing Of The Sick: by request Bereavement: 631- 941-4141 x 341 Faith Formation Office: 631- 941-4141 x 328 Outreach: 631- 941-4141 x 313 Our Lady of Wisdom Regional School: 631- 473-1211 Our Daily Bread Sunday Soup Kitchen 3 pm

ST. LOUIS DE MONTFORT ROMAN CATHOLIC CHURCH

75 New York Avenue, Sound Beach, N.Y. 11789 Parish Office: 631-744-8566; FAX 631-744-8611 Parish Website: www.stlouisdm.org Office Hours: Mon., Tues., Thurs.: 9 am to 5 pm Wednesday: 9 am to 8 pm; Friday: 9 am to 4 pm; Saturday: 9 am to 1 pm; Closed on Sunday Mission Statement: To proclaim the good news of Jesus Christ’s love through our active involvement as a parish family in works of Charity, Faith, Worship, Justice and Mercy. ALL ARE WELCOME! No matter what your present status is in the Catholic Church. No matter your family situation. No matter your practice of faith. No matter your personal history, age or background. YOU are invited, respected and loved at St. Louis de Montfort. REV. MSGR. CHRISTOPHER J. HELLER, PASTOR REV. LENNARD SABIO, ASSOCIATE PASTOR REV. MSGR. DONALD HANSON, IN RESIDENCE REV. FRANCIS PIZZARELLI, S.M.M., PARISH ASSISTANT REV. HENRY VAS, PARISH ASSISTANT Weekday Masses: Monday through Friday: 8:30 am in the Chapel Weekend Masses: Saturday Vigil: 5 pm Sunday: 7:30 am; 9:00 am; 10:30 am; 12 noon. Baptisms: Most Sundays at 1:30 pm. Please contact Parish Office for an appointment. Reconciliation: Sat.: 4-4:45 pm or by appointment. Anointing of the Sick: by request.

Holy Matrimony: Contact Parish Office at least six months in advance of desired date. Religious Education: Contact 631-744-9515 Parish Outreach: Contact 631-209-0325 Our Lady of Wisdom Regional School: Contact 631-473-1211.

Congregational MT. SINAI CONGREGATIONAL UNITED CHURCH OF CHRIST

233 North Country Road, Mt. Sinai • 631–473–1582 www.msucc.org • REV. DR. PHILIP HOBSON We invite you to worship with us in our judgement-free sacred space. Come experience our tradition, where freedom of thought and exchange of ideas are encouraged and celebrated. Join us as we put our Christian values into practice, following the example of Jesus, by caring for our neighbors near and far, as they suffer food insecurity, homelessness, political and domestic violence, gender discrimination and other injustices. We know it is God who put the wiggle in the children, so bring them with you so they can participate in worship and in our lively Sunday School program. Service and Sunday School on Sundays at 10:00 AM. Meditative service at 8:30 AM on Sundays. Thanksgiving Beach Worship Service November 28, 2019 at 9:00 am Cedar Beach on Harbor Beach Road, Mt. Sinai A brief service will be led by Dr. Rev. Phil Hobson of Mt. Sinai Congregational Church, and we’ll sing with the gulls and the breaking waves. Service begins at 9 am, left of the main building. All are welcomed!

Episcopal ALL SOULS EPISCOPAL CHURCH

“Our little historic church on the hill” across from the Stony Brook Duck Pond Main Street, Stony Brook • 631–751–0034 www.allsouls–stonybrook.org • allsoulsepiscopalchurch@verizon.net Sunday Holy Eucharist: 8 and 9:30 am All Souls now offers a 30 minute Inter-Faith Service every Wednesday Morning at 7:00 AM This is a small eclectic Episcopal congregation that has a personal touch. We welcome all regardless of where you are on your spiritual journey.Walk with us.

CAROLINE CHURCH OF BROOKHAVEN

THE REV. CN. DR. RICHARD D. VISCONTI, RECTOR 1 Dyke Road on the Village Green, Setauket Web site: www.carolinechurch.net email: office@carolinechurch.net • 631–941–4245 Thursday Noon: H.E. and Healing Service Saturday Service: 5 pm Holy Eucharist Sunday Services: 8 am - Rite I; 9:30 am - Rite II (family Service) 9:30 Children’s Chapel & Sunday School Classes Sunday School Classes now forming; Call 631-941-4245 to register. Let God walk with you as part of our family– friendly community.

CHRIST EPISCOPAL CHURCH

127 Barnum Ave., Port Jefferson • 631–473–0273 email: ccoffice@christchurchportjeff.org www.christchurchportjeff.org FATHER ANTHONY DILORENZO: PRIEST–IN–CHARGE Sunday Services: 8 am & 10 am Sunday Eucharist:8 am and 10 am; Wednesday 10 in our chapel Sunday School and Nursery Registration for Sunday School starting Sunday after the 10 am Eucharist

Our ministries: Welcome Friends on Mondays at 5:00 pm AA meetings on Tuesdays and Thursdays at 7 pm Bible Study on Thursdays at 10 am. Friday: Hands of Love knitting, crocheting and stitching ministry 10 am - 12 pm It is the mission of the people of Christ Church to grow in our relationship with Jesus Christ and to make his love known to all through our lives and ministry. We at Christ Church are a joyful, welcoming community. Wherever you are in your journey of life we want to be part of it.

ST. JAMES EPISCOPAL CHURCH

490 North Country Road, St. James, NY 11780 631-584-5560 www.stjamesstjames.org Parish Office email: stjamesc@optonline.net THE REV. DAVID GABLE, INTERIM PRIEST Where is God calling us? To grow in faith through Scripture and prayer, To build relationships in Christ, To serve one another and the world. Sunday Holy Eucharist: 8 a.m. (Rite I) and 9:30 a.m. (Rite II, with music) Prayers for healing after both 8 and 9:30 worship Children welcome at all services, religious formation offered for all levels Active Choir, Altar Guild, Lay Eucharist Ministry, Fellowship and Bible Study programs We are a friendly community church, and we welcome everyone to join us to worship, learn, serve, share and have fun!

ST. JOHN’S EPISCOPAL CHURCH

“To know Christ and to make Him known” REV. DUNCAN A. BURNS, RECTOR ALEX PRYRODNY, ORGANIST & CHOIR DIRECTOR 12 Prospect St, Huntington ● (631) 427-1752 On Main St. next to the Library www.stjohnshuntington.org ● LIKE us on Facebook Sunday Worship: 8:00 am – Rite I Holy Eucharist 10:00 am – Rite II Choral Holy Eucharist An innovative program ranging from Bach to Messiaen exploring conversations between classical & modern, male & female, and identity as a mixed-race and non-binary person. Special guest: Alex Pryrodny, piano Harvest Fair: Saturday, October 26th, 10am – 4pm Food, Crafts, Raffle, Silent Auction, VT Cheese & more! All are Welcome!

Evangelical THREE VILLAGE CHURCH

To Know Christ and To Make Him Known 322 Main Street, East Setauket www.3vc.org • 631-941–3670 LEAD PASTOR JOSH MOODY Sunday Worship Schedule: 9:15 am: Worship Service, Sunday School (Pre-K–5TH grade), Nursery 10:30 am: Bagels & Coffee 11:00 am: Worship Service, Nursery, We Offer Weekly Teen Programs, Small Groups, Women’s & Men’s Bible Studies, Alpha, Stephen Ministry, Faith Preschool For Ages 3 & 4, Mommy & Me, Join Us As We Celebrate 60 Years Of Proclaiming The Good News Of Jesus Christ!

Continued on next page •


PAGE B20 • ARTS & LIFESTYLES • OCTOBER 24, 2019

Religious D irectory

Greek Orthodox

CHURCH OF THE ASSUMPTION

430 Sheep Pasture Rd., Port Jefferson 11777 Tel: 631-473-0894 • Fax: 631-928-5131 www.kimisis.org • goc.assumption@gmail.com REV. DEMETRIOS N. CALOGREDES, PROTOPRESBYTER Sunday Services: Orthros 8:30 Am - Divine Liturgy 10 Am Services Conducted In Both Greek & English* Books Available To Follow In English* Sunday Catechism School, 10 Am - 11 Am* Greek Language School, Tuesdays 5 Pm - 8 Pm* Bible Study & Adult Catechism Classes Available* Golden Age & Youth Groups* Thrift Store* Banquet Hall Available For Rental* For Information Please Call Church Office*

Jewish CHABAD AT STONY BROOK

“Judaism With A Smile” 360 Nicolls Road, East Setauket Next To Fire Dept. 631-585–0521 • 800-My-Torah • www.chabadsb.com RABBI CHAIM & RIVKIE GROSSBAUM RABBI MOTTI & CHAYA GROSSBAUM RABBI SHOLOM B. & CHANIE COHEN Membership Free Weekday, Shabbat & Holiday Services Highly Acclaimed Torah Tots Preschool Afternoon Hebrew School Camp Gan Israel • Judaica Publishing Department Lectures And Seminars Living Legacy Holiday Programs Jewish Learning Institute Friendship Circle For Special Needs Children The Cteen Network N’shei Chabad Women’s Club • Cyberspace Library Chabad At Stony Brook University – Rabbi Adam & Esther Stein

KEHILLAT CHOVEVEI TZION

764 Route 25A, Setauket (At The Old Victoria House) Mail: P.O. Box 544, E. Setauket, NY 11733 631-689-0257 (leave a message & you’ll get a call back) Visit Us At: www.kct.org. We Are A Traditional Conservative Congregation, Run Entirely By Our Members. We Have Services every Shabbat And All Jewish Holidays, Along With Other Community Activities, With Participation Opportunities For All Jews. Join Us Shabbat Morning And You’ll Get A Warm Welcome! KCT - An Old Fashioned Friendly Shul SERVICES CANDLE LIGHTING Shabbat Bereshit Friday, Oct. 25 Saturday, Oct. 26 9:00am Rosh Chodesh Cheshvan Tuesday-Wednesday Oct. 29-30

5:40pm

NORTH SHORE JEWISH CENTER

©163260

385 Old Town Rd., Port Jefferson Station 631-928–3737 • www.northshorejewishcenter.org RABBI AARON BENSON • CANTOR DANIEL KRAMER EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR MARCIE PLATKIN PRINCIPAL HEATHER WELKES YOUTH DIRECTOR JEN SCHWARTZ Services: Friday At 8 Pm; Saturday At 9:15 am Daily Morning And Evening Minyan- Call For Times. Tot Shabbat • Family Services • Sisterhood • Men’s Club • Seniors’ Club Youth Group • Continuing Ed • Adult Bar/Bat Mitzvah • Judaica Shop Food Pantry • Lecture Series • Jewish Film Series NSJC JEWISH LEARNING CENTER

RELIGIOUS SCHOOL Innovative Curriculum And Programming For Children Ages 5-13 Imagine A Synagogue That Feels Like Home! Come Connect With Us On Your Jewish Journey. Member United Synagogue Of Conservative Judaism

Jewish

TEMPLE ISAIAH (REFORM)

1404 Stony Brook Road, Stony Brook 631-751–8518 • www.tisbny.org A Warm And Caring Intergenerational Community Dedicated To Learning, Prayer, Social Action, And Friendship. Member Union For Reform Judaism RABBI PAUL SIDLOFSKY • CANTOR MARCEY WAGNER RABBI EMERITUS STEPHEN A. KAROL RABBI EMERITUS ADAM D. FISHER CANTOR EMERITUS MICHAEL F. TRACHTENBERG Sabbath Services Friday 7:30 pm And Saturday 10 am Religious School • Monthly Family Service Monthly Tot • Shabbat Youth Groups • Senior Club Adult Education Sisterhood Brotherhood • Book Club-More

Lutheran–ELCA HOPE LUTHERAN CHURCH AND ANCHOR NURSERY SCHOOL

46 Dare Road, Selden 631-732-2511 Emergency Number 516-848-5386 REV. DR. RICHARD O. HILL, PASTOR ERIC FARET, VICAR Email: office@hopelutheran.com Website: www.hopeluth.com Holy Communion Is Celebrated Every Weekend Saturday Evenings 5 pm. Sundays at 8, 9:30 & 11 am. Sunday Services Are Live-Streamed Through Our “Friends Who Like Hope Lutheran Church” Facebook Group. Sermons are posted on Youtube.com at “Pastor Richard O Hill” Children’s Programs Sunday School (3-11) 9:30 am, Saturday Sparklers 5 pm Anchor Nursery School Tuesday-Thursday 9:15 am - 12:15 pm. Tuesdays Hugs Toddlers (ages 18 mos-3 yrs) 9:15 am Hugs (ages 3-5yrs.) 12:15 pm Wednesdays - Kids’ Club 4:15 pm

ST. PAUL’S EVANGELICAL LUTHERAN CHURCH

309 Patchogue Road, Port Jefferson Station 631-473-2236 REV. PAUL A. DOWNING PASTOR E-mail: Pastorpauldowning@yahoo.com Pastor’s cell: 347–423–1523 (voice or text) www.StPaulsLCPJS.org facebook.com/stpaulselca Service Times: Sundays 8:30 am and 10:30 am Adult Bible Study 9:30 am Sunday School during 10:30 am service Holy Communion offered at both services Fridays: Power of Prayer Hour 10:30 am Meal provided by Welcome Friends Sundays at 1:00 pm and Wednesdays at 5:45 pm We continue to seve the Port Jefferson Community Now in our 102nd year

Lutheran–LCMS

Presbyterian

MESSIAH LUTHERAN CHURCH

FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH OF PORT JEFFERSON

Messiah Preschool & Day Care 465 Pond Path, East Setauket 631-751–1775 • www.messiahny.com PASTOR STEVE UNGER We welcome all to join us for worship & fellowship. It would be wonderful to have you with us. Sunday Worship Services: 8:15, 9:30 & 11am (All with Holy Communion), Sunday School at 9:30am, Sunday Bible Study at 9:30am We have NYS Certified Preschool & Day Care

Methodist BETHEL AFRICAN METHODIST EPISCOPAL CHURCH

33 Christian Ave/ PO 2117, E. Setauket NY 11733 631-941–3581 REV. GREGORY L. LEONARD–PASTOR Sunday Worship: 10:30 Am Adult Sunday School 9:30 Am Lectionary Reading And Prayer: Wed. 12 Noon Gospel Choir: Tues. 8 Pm Praise Choir And Youth Choir 3rd And 4th Fri. 6:30 Pm

ST. JAMES UNITED METHODIST CHURCH

532 Moriches Road, St. James 11780-1316 REV. PRINCE DONKOR, PASTOR 631-584-5340 Sunday Service and Sunday School at 10 am Tuesday Evening is Prayer Group at 7:30 pm Wednesday Morning Bible Study at 7:30 am Wednesday Afternoon Bible Study at 1 pm Wednesday Evening Choir Practice at 7:30 pm AA Ministry Every Monday and Wednesday Evenings at 6:30 pm Upcoming Events Open Hearts Open Minds

SETAUKET UNITED METHODIST CHURCH

160 Main Street, Corner Of 25a And Main Street East Setauket • 631–941–4167 REV. STEVEN KIM, PASTOR www.setauketumc.org sumcny@aol.com Sunday Worship Service & Church School: 10 am Holy Communion 1st Sunday Of Month Mary & Martha Circle (Women’s Ministry) Monthly On 2nd Tuesday At 1pm

STONY BROOK COMMUNITY CHURCH UNITED METHODIST 216 Christian Ave., Stony Brook, 11790 Church Office: 631-751-0574 stonybrookcommunitychurch@gmail.com www.stonybrookcommunitychurch.org REV. CHUCK VAN HOUTEN, PASTOR Connecting People To God, Purpose And Each Other Sunday Worship: 10:00 am Sunday School: 10:00 am Renewing, Restoring, Reviving For The 21st Century!

To be listed in the Religious Directory please call 631–751–7663

107 South/Main Streets • (631) 473-0147 We are an accepting and caring people who invite you to share in the journey of faith with us. THE REV. DR. RICHARD GRAUGH Email: office@pjpres.org Website: www.pjpres.org Sunday Worship Service -10am (Childcare Provided) Christian Education-Sunday School: 10:15am Coffee and Fellowship 11:15am Bible Study: Tuesday 3pm Holy Communion 1st Sunday of the Month Meals Provided by Welcome Friends every Friday at 6pm Call the church office or visit our website for current activities and events. NYS Certified Preschool and Daycare - Noah’s Ark The purpose of First Presbyterian Church of Port Jefferson is, with God’s help, to share the joy and good news of Jesus Christ with the congregation, visitors and the community at large; to provide comfort to those in need and hope to those in despair; and to seek justice for all God’s people.

SETAUKET PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH

5 Caroline Avenue ~ On the Village Green 631- 941-4271 Celebrating and Sharing the love of God since 1660. THE REV. KATE JONES CALONE, INTERIM PASTOR THE REV. ASHLEY MCFAUL-ERWIN, COMMUNITY OUTREACH PASTOR www.setauketpresbyterian.org Email: setauketpresbyterian@verizon.net Sunday Worship: at 9:30 a.m. (childcare available) Sunday school at 9:45 (grades pre-k through 6) Adult Education at 11 am Outreach Ministries: Open Door Exchange Ministry: Furnishing homes...Finding hope www.facebook.com/welcomefriendssoupkitchen Welcome Friends Soup Kitchen Prep Site: tfolliero@yahoo.com All are welcome to join this vibrant community of worship, music (voice and bell choirs), mission (local, national and international), and fellowship. Call the church office or visit our website for current information on church activities. SPC is a More Light Presbyterian Church and part of the Covenant Network of Presbyterians working toward a church as generous and just as God’s grace.

Quakers RELIGIOUS SOCIETY OF FRIENDS

4 Friends Way, St. James 631–928-2768 • www.cbquakers.org Worship Sundays: Sept. - June 11 am , July - Aug. 10:00 am We gather in silent worship seeking God • the Inner Light • Spirit. We are guided by the Quaker testimonies of simplicity, peace, integrity, community, equality, and stewardship. Weekly coffee and fellowship, monthly discussions, Religious Education for children.

Unitarian Universalist UNITARIAN UNIVERSALIST FELLOWSHIP AT STONY BROOK

380 Nicolls Road • between Rte 347 & Rte 25A 631–751–0297 • www.uufsb.org • office@uufsb.org REV. MARGARET H. ALLEN (minister@uufsb.org) Sunday Service: 10:30 am

Religious Education at UUFSB: Unitarian Universalism accepts wisdom from many sources and offers non-dogmatic religious education for children from 4-18 to foster ethical and spiritual development and knowledge of world religions. Classes Sunday mornings at 10:30 am. Childcare for little ones under four. Senior High Youth Group meetings Sunday evenings. Registration is ongoing. For more information: dre@uufsb.org.


OCTOBER 24, 2019 • ARTS & LIFESTYLES • PAGE B21

SBU SPORTSWEEK OCTOBER 24 TO OCTOBER 30, 2019

TOMORROW IS FRIDAY – WEAR RED ON CAMPUS!

STONY BROOK UNIVERSITY

Men’s cross-country conquers field at Princeton Invitational PRINCETON, N.J. – The Stony Brook men’s cross-country team placed all five of its scorers in the top 30 to earn a commanding team win at the Princeton Invitational on Saturday morning. The Seawolves tallied just 55 points to top the 24-team field, well distancing themselves from runner-up Connecticut (120 points) and third-place La Salle (133 points). “The guys did today what they have been doing in the last few races, they competed well and are finding ways to get the best out of themselves when it’s not going tactically well or they are not feeling as good as they would like to be,” said head coach Andy Ronan. “Cameron (Avery), Vann (Moffett) and Rob (Becker) have been doing a real good job up front in each race and with our depth we have different guys completing the scoring at four and five. I am excited for Chris Biondi who has battled back from sickness and injury over the last 18 months to regain the form we know he is capable of. Freshman Evan Brennan announced his arrival on the collegiate scene with a battling run today.” Up next, the Seawolves will compete at the Central Connecticut Mini Meet on Oct. 25. Action is set to get started at 3 p.m.

Home games for SBU Seawolves MEN’S SOCCER

Oct. 26 vs. UAlbany

WOMEN’S VOLLEYBALL.

Oct. 25 vs. Hartford Nov. 1 vs. Binghamton Nov. 15 vs. New Hampshire

FOOTBALL.

Nov. 9 vs. Towson Nov. 23 vs. UAlbany

7 p.m. 6:30 p.m. 6:30 p.m. 6:30 p.m. 2 p.m. 2 p.m.

WOMEN’S SOCCER. Oct. 27 vs. New Hampshire

1 p.m.

Nov. 5 vs. Yale Nov. 11 vs. Farmingdale State Dec. 2 vs. Manhattan Dec. 7 vs. Brown

7 p.m. 7 p.m. 7 p.m. 7 p.m.

MEN’S BASKETBALL

WOMEN’S BASKETBALL Nov. 8 vs. Manhattan Nov. 21 vs. Iona Nov. 24 vs. Sacred Heart

6:30 p.m. 6:30 p.m. 2 p.m.

Photo from SBU

Elijah Olaniyi (3) returns to the squad on Nov. 5. Photo by Jim Harrison/SBU Athletics

Men’s basketball selected third in America East preseason poll

Photo from SBU

Women’s soccer team beats Vermont in road victory BURLINGTON, VT – The Stony Brook women’s soccer program is back in first by themselves after a 2-0 win over the Vermont Catamounts on Oct. 20 in Burlington. Juniors Alyssa Francese (Yorktown Heights, N.Y.) and Fanny Götesson (Varnamo, Sweden) each scored to give the Seawolves all they would need en route to the team’s seventh clean sheet of the year. Francese now sits with 11 goals on the campaign, a team high. Her six game-winning goals are tied for the national lead. Götesson now has five goals to go along with her five assists this season. “This was a great win on the road. We used 18 players this afternoon and it was a total team effort to earn it. I am also very happy with our defense that preserved a shutout,” said head coach Toby Bischof. The Seawolves have outscored the opposition 11-2 in their last five road contests. With four points in its final two contests, Stony Brook can clinch its second consecutive America East regular season title.

UVM’s Ella Bankert (10) and SBU’s Paula Petri (7) battle for the ball during last Sunday’s game. Photo from SBU

Up next, the team plays its final regular season home game on Oct. 27 when they host New Hampshire for Senior Day at LaValle Stadium. Admission to the game is free.

Fresh off of a 24-win campaign in the 2018-19 season, the Stony Brook men’s basketball team was selected to finish third by the America East’s coaches in the upcoming campaign. In a tight 2-4 section, UMBC sits second at 53 points, Stony Brook is third with 48 and UAlbany is fourth with 47. Vermont was selected unanimously to repeat as the league’s champions, with 64 points and eight first-place votes. UMass Lowell, Binghamton, Hartford, Maine and New Hampshire round out the poll that came out 19 days before the season’s tip on Nov. 5. The Seawolves finished second in last year’s campaign, marking the seventh time in the last eight seasons that the team has finished inside the top two in the league. They are the only team to do so in that span. The team is under new leadership, with former Kent State and Bradley head coach Geno Ford taking the reins this season. He led the Golden Flashes to a pair of MAC Regular Season titles in his time just outside of Cleveland, Ohio. He will have an experienced group back, with All-Conference members Elijah Olaniyi (Newark, N.J.) and Miles Latimer (Fairfax, Va.) returning to the squad, as well as 2018-19 Sixth Man of the Year Andrew Garcia (Harlem) and Defensive Player of the Year Jeff Otchere (Bronx). The Seawolves start play on opening night, Nov. 5, at home against Yale at 7 p.m. The nonconference schedule features BIG East members Seton Hall and Providence, as well as reigning national champion Virginia.

Content for this page provided by Stony Brook University and printed as a service to our advertiser.


PAGE B22 • ARTS & LIFESTYLES • OCTOBER 24, 2019

ish” imes v a l “ T Y the N on,

Lips

KIDS KORNER

SEISKAYA BALLET’S

Nutcracker

Programs

Halloween Party at the Vanderbilt

Children in grades K through 3 are invited to a Halloween Party at the Suffolk County Vanderbilt Museum, 180 Little Neck Road, Centerport on Oct. 25 from 4 to 6 p.m. Explore the museum’s collection with flashlights and then create a creepy jar perfect for Halloween. $20 per child. Advance registration required by calling 854-5539.

6 Spectacular Performances

December 19 thru 22 Thursday at 7PM Friday at 7PM Saturday at 2PM & 7PM Sunday at 1PM & 6PM

Pumpkin Fun

Benner’s Farm, located at 56 Gnarled Hollow Road, E. Setauket hosts a Pumpkin Fun kids workshop for ages 3 to 13 on Oct. 26 from 10 a.m. to noon. Try some pumpkins practically every way. Decorate them, eat them, play pumpkin games and help carve them. Children will leave with a decorated pumpkin. $35 per child. To register, call 689-8172.

Staller Center for the Arts Stony Brook University Box office (631) 632-ARTS

Storytime at Barnes & Noble

Barnes & Noble in Lake Grove at 600 Smith Haven Mall and in East Northport at 4000 E. Jericho Turnpike will present a reading of “No More Monsters Under Your Bed!” by Jordan Chouteau on Oct. 26 at 11 a.m. An activity will follow. Free. Call 724-0341 (LG) or 462-0208 (EN).

www.nutcrackerballet.com

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“ENCHANTING” Parks, Newsday

$5 discount on all tickets purchased before 12/1/19.

Open Farm Days

Benner’s Farm, 56 Gnarled Hollow Road, Setauket will be open for visits on Oct. 26 and 27 from noon to 4 p.m. Meet the sheep, goats, chickens and pigs living on a real working farm, take a tractor ride through the woods, visit the Big Swing and much more. Admission is $8 adults, $6 seniors and children. Call 689-8172.

Crafternoon at the library

Stop by Emma S. Clark Memorial Library, 120 Main St., Setauket on Oct. 26 between 1 and 3 p.m. to make a fun craft. Choose between a Halloween Cat Door Knob Hanger and a Welcome Fall Pumpkin Sign. No registration required. Open to all. Call 941-4080.

Tales, Trails and Treats

Sweetbriar Nature Center, 62 Eckernkamp Drive, Smithtown hosts Tales, Trails and Treats, a fun afternoon for kindergarten and preschool children, on Oct. 26 from 1 to 3:30 p.m. Featuring close encounters with animals, a ghostly garden, crafts and a special trick or treat trail complete with animal characters and a story book. $10 per child. Call 979-6344. 159922

Halloween at the Explorium

Celebrate Halloween at the Long Island Explorium, 101 E. Broadway, Port Jefferson on Oct. 26 and 27 from 1 to 5 p.m. and Oct. 30 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Come in costume if you like for Halloween maker activities. Bring an old T-shirt and repurpose it to make a trick or treat bag. Admission is $5 per person. Call 331-3277.

Bubble, Bubble, Toll & Trouble

Caleb Smith State Park Preserve, 581 W. Jericho Turnpike, Smithtown presents a Tiny Tots program, Bubble, Bubble, Toll & Trouble, on Oct. 31 from 10 to 11 a.m. Enjoy nature explorations and hands-on activities. For ages 3 to 5. $4 per child. Advance registration required by calling 265-1054.

Make one of these cute crafts at Emma Clark Library in Setauket on Oct. 26.

Museum Scholars

New! Join the Long Island Museum, 1200 Route 25A, Stony Brook for a new 5-week after-school museum course for grades 3 through 5. Students will join museum staff for an exploration of galleries and exhibits on view at LIM. Gallery experiences will inspire students to utilize a wide scope of art and history concepts as a springboard for the creative process. The program will culminate with a student-curated exhibit and reception for families to attend on the last class date. Students will leave with a portfolio of their work. Sessions will be held on Thursdays, Nov. 7, 14, 21, Dec. 5 and 12 from 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. Fee is $95 per child, $85 members. Register by Nov. 1 by calling 751-0066, ext. 212.

Theater

‘Madagascar: A Musical Adventure Jr.’ Smithtown Center for the Performing Arts, 2 E. Main St., Smithtown presents “Madagascar: A Musical Adventure Jr.” on Oct. 27 at 11 a.m. Based on the smash DreamWorks animated motion picture, the show follows all of your favorite crack-a-lackin’ friends as they escape from their home in New York’s Central Park Zoo and find themselves on an unexpected journey to the madcap world of King Julien’s Madagascar. All seats are $18. To order, call 724-3700 or visit www.smithtownpac.org.

‘The Wizard of Oz’

John W. Engeman Theater, 250 Main St., Northport continues its Children’s Theater season with “The Wizard of Oz” now extended through Nov. 3. Join Dorothy Gale as she ventures down the yellow brick road to see the Wizard. The classic story by L. Frank Baum is presented as a fresh new musical comedy, containing adventure, friendly characters and humor. Tickets are $15. To order, call 261-9700 or visit www. engemantheater.com.

‘A Kooky Spooky Halloween’

Theatre Three, 412 Main St., Port Jefferson presents “A Kooky Spooky Halloween,” a merry musical about a ghost named Abner who’s afraid of the dark, on Oct. 26 at 11 a.m. Hilarious hijinks and a message of cooperation highlight this holiday story, a delightful show for the entire family. All seats are $10. To order, call 928-9100 or visit www.theatrethree.com.

All numbers are in (631) area code unless noted.


OCTOBER 24, 2019 • ARTS & LIFESTYLES • PAGE B23

Halloween Happenings on the North Shore

W

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Haunted Garden

Sachem Public Library, 150 Holbrook Road, Holbrook presents The Legend of Sleepy Hollow from Oct. 25 to 30 from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. The legend lives on as the Headless Horseman rises each night in the library’s Haunted Garden! Come for a scare and a snack and hold onto your head! Weather permitting. Free. Call 588-5024.

Family Fun Day

The Long Island Museum, 1200 Route 25A, Stony Brook hosts a Family Fun Day on Oct. 27 from noon to 4 p.m. Come in costume and enjoy pumpkin painting, trick or treating, crafts and a special family performance by the magic of Amore. Free. Call 751-0066.

Halloween Festival

Heritage Trust invites the community to its annual Halloween Festival at the Heritage Center, 633 Mount Sinai-Coram Road, Mount Sinai on Oct. 26. The event will run in two sessions, 11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. and 1:30 to 3 p.m. Have fun with pumpkin picking and decorating, unlimited game playing, fun raffles, prizes and much more. Registration is $10 and required for all participants (no walk-ins, parents and guardians are not required to register). Each registrant will receive a snack and beverage along with a goodie bag and pumpkin to decorate and take home. Don’t forget to wear your costumes! Call 509-0882 or visit www.msheritagetrust.org.

Haunted Hatchery

Calling all ghosts and goblins! Cold Spring Harbor Fish Hatchery, 1660 Route 25A, Cold Spring Harbor invites the community to join them for a not so scary Haunted Hatchery on Oct. 26 from 2 to 5 p.m. Receive a treat as you trick or treat. Wear a costume and have fun! Admission is $6 adults, $5 seniors and children ages 3 to 12. Call 516-692-6768.

Haunted Wail-ing Booseum

The Whaling Museum, 301 Main St., Cold Spring Harbor hosts its biggest event, Haunted Wail-ing Booseum, on Oct. 27 from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. with spooky (and not so scary) games, creepy crafts and lots of fun activities. See live critters in Dr. Gellerman’s Spooky Zoo and make your way through the mysterious museum maze! Admission is $15 child, $6 adults. Call 367-3418.

Halloween Hayride

Halloween Festival

The Ward Melville Heritage Organization hosts its annual Halloween Festival at the Stony Brook Village Center, 111 Main St., Stony Brook on Oct. 31 from 2 to 5 p.m. Trick or treat in the shops and restaurants, take part in a costume parade, and enjoy games galore. Free. Call 751-2244.

New! Join the Tesla Center at Wardenclyffe, Shoreham for a supercharged Halloween celebration on Oct. 26 from 4 to 7 p.m. Featuring the wonders of Nikola Tesla, the master of technology and wizard of electricity. Enjoy a Monster Mash robotics competition, a Halloween Tech Parade, storytelling, activities, entertainment, food, vendors and more. Tickets are $15 adults, $13 seniors/students, $5 ages 5 to 12, free for ages 4 and under. To purchase, visit https://teslasciencecenter.org.

Port Jeff Village Harvest Fest

Port Jefferson Village presents its 10th annual Harvest Fest throughout the village on Oct. 27 from noon to 5 p.m. Attractions will include a Chowder Crawl, costumed dog parade, Scarecrow Alley, marshmallow roasting, haunted walking tour, farmers market, festive harvest crafts, live music and woodcarving.Call 473-4724 or visit www.portjeff.com.

Spooktacular Parade

The Community Association of Greater St. James will present a Spooktacular Parade on Oct. 27 from 1 to 4 p.m. Little ghosts and goblins should gather at Lake and Woodlawn avenues in St. James by noon for a contest, prizes and fun!

Trick or Treat at the Heckscher

The Heckscher Museum of Art, 2 Prime Ave., Huntington offers free museum admission for children in costume and their families from Oct. 30 to Nov. 3 from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Make an art activity at the Create Your Own Activity Station, pose with spooktacular props at the

Time For Giving * All numbers are in (631) area code unless noted.

Selfie Station, make a magical digital action painting and explore the museum’s exhibits. Call 351-3250.

Home For The Holidays

Time For Giving

Boo Bash Family Fun Day

Smith Haven Mall, Moriches Road, Lake Grove will host a Boo Bash Family Fun Day in Center Court on Oct. 26 from noon to 3 p.m. Come in costume and enjoy an afternoon filled with crafts, activities, goodies, giveaways, spooktacular fun and surprises with Vampirina. Call 724-8066.

Halloween Costume Parade

The Town of Huntington will present its annual children’s Halloween Costume Parade starting at Gerard Street in Huntington Village on Oct. 31 from 4 to 5 p.m. Children of all ages (and their parents or guardians) are welcome to dress in costume and walk in the parade. Parade route will move east down Gerard Street and south down Wall Street, ending where Wall Street meets Main Street. Village merchants will pass out candy to trick or treater’s. For info, call 351-3112.

Trunk-or-Treat events Kids Clubhouse of Suffolk at Cornerstone Bible Church, 324 Jayne Blvd., Port Jefferson Station invites you to wear your costume and join them as they go from trunk to trunk for a fun, safe, family event on Oct. 31 from 3 to 5 p.m. Enjoy music, games and peanut-free treats. Call 675-1615. Lake Ronkonkoma United Methodist Church, 792 Hawkins Ave., Lake Grove welcomes all families to celebrate Halloween at its 3rd annual Trunk-or-Treat on Oct. 26 from noon to 2 p.m. Children will trick or treat for candy and other goodies in the

Free Gift Catalog

church’s parking lot where cars will be decorated with festive themes. Complimentary refreshments will be served. Call 588-5856. Join the Commack United Methodist Church, 486 Townline Road, Commack for a Trunk-N-Treat event on Oct. 26 from 3 to 5 p.m. Rain date is Oct. 27. Questions? Call 499-7310. Three Village Church, 322 Route 25A in East Setauket, hosts a Trunk or Treat event on Oct. 31 from 6 to 8 p.m. with trick or treating at decorated car trunks, a bounce house, crafts, games and more! Call 941-3670.

The Exclusive Free Ferry Publication

MBER 22, 2018 D NEWS MEDIA • NOVE TIMES BEACO N RECOR

Our Guide to Hometown Holiday Shopping Reaching the North Shore readers.

PUBLISHED Nov. 28, 2019 DEADLINE: TUESDAY, OCTOBER 22

For All Your Holiday Advertising ©21417

The Northport Chamber of Commerce hosts a day of fun at Northport Village Park, 1 Bayview Ave., Northport on Oct. 27 from noon to 4 p.m. featuring hayrides, music, pumpkin patch, petting zoo, costume contest and refreshments. Call 754-3905 or visit www.northportny.com.

Halloween at Wardenclyffe

CALL 631–751–7744 NOW! TIMES BEACON RECORD NEWS MEDIA

185 Route 25A (P.O. Box 707), Setauket


PAGE B24 • ARTS & LIFESTYLES • OCTOBER 24, 2019

Our Brand New Children’s Hospital is Here – Celebrate at Our

OPEN HOUSE! Saturday, November 2 10 am to 2 pm Stony Brook University Hospital Campus 101 Nicolls Road, Stony Brook • Activities for kids of all ages!

• Take home free giveaways

• Enjoy free food and refreshments

• Discover why children’s hospitals are so important

• Tour our new state-of-the-art facility

• Park for free, too!

Pre-registration preferred: stonybrookchildrens.org/openhouse Rewards for pre-registering!

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For accessibility-related accommodations, please call (631) 444-4000. Stony Brook University/SUNY is an affirmative action, equal opportunity educator and employer. 18080259H

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