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ARTS& ARTS &LIFESTYLES

TIMES BEACON RECORD NEWS MEDIA • August 8, 2019

WMHO presents summer exhibit Journey Through Time • B15

ALSO: 'Julius Caesar' hails at the Vanderbilt B14 • 'Pinocchio' opens at Theatre Three B26 • 'Sloths Are Slow' reviewed B27

E! T A D HE T E V SA

The Greater Port Jefferson Chamber Of Commerce Presents Our Sixth Annual

©160206

THE DRAGONS ARE COMING!! Saturday, September 14, 2019

Port Jefferson Chamber of Commerce • 118 W. Broadway, Port Jefferson • 631-473-1414 • portjeffdragonracefest.com


PAGE B2 • ARTS & LIFESTYLES • AUGUST 08, 2019

The most advanced healthcare. Now on the North Fork. AT EASTERN LONG ISLAND HOSPITAL, we’ve been a part of the North Fork and Shelter Island since 1905. And while that isn’t changing, we are. We’re excited to announce we’ve joined Stony Brook Medicine, which brings the most advanced care closer to home. This means more specialists and sub-specialists, more groundbreaking clinical trials, and the very latest in medical technology – opening up a new world of access for patients on the East End of Long Island.

To learn more, visit elih.stonybrookmedicine.edu Stony Brook University/SUNY is an affirmative action, equal opportunity educator and employer. 19070093H

165807


AUGUST 08, 2019 • ARTS & LIFESTYLES • PAGE B3

ASK THE VETERINARIAN

An update on leptospirosis

Ask the Vet .............................................. B3 Book Review .........................................B27 Calendar ...........................................B18-20 Cooking Cove .......................................B17 Crossword Puzzle ................................. B8 Legally Speaking .................................B10 Medical Compass ................................. B7

Parents and Kids ...........................B25-27 Photo of the Week ................................ B5 Power of 3 ............................................... B9 Religious Directory ......................B21-22 Shelter Pet of the Week .....................B25 Theater Reviews ............................B14, 26 Vendors Wanted...................................B23

Email your community, business, health, class reunions and calendar listings to leisure@tbrnewspapers.com.

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In this edition

(must be a new client - can be used cumulatively... the more referrals, the more savings!)

• ‘Frequent Boarding Program’ • Newly renovated boarding facilities. • Compassionate and loving care for all your pets’ needs. ©142145

When I review vaccines with a pet owner, I usually get a nod of recognition on all vaccines until I mention leptospirosis. Then their face kind of squishes up in a weird sort of way. Leptospirosis is a disease caused by an S-shaped bacteria called Leptospira. The bacteria affects dogs, humans, raccoons, possums, rats and squirrels. Outbreaks occur during a wet period after a prolonged dry spell (the type of weather we see from mid-August to mid-October). Leptospirosis bacteria are passed in the urine of infected animals. Therefore dogs do not have to come in direct contact with the wildlife. The most common way the bacteria is passed is from drinking “standing water.” Standing water refers to stagnant creeks, puddles, etc. Once the Leptospira bacteria is in the mouth, the bacteria passes through the membranes of the mouth into the bloodstream. It then travels via the bloodstream throughout the body. Depending on the strain that the pet is exposed to the bacteria can do damage to the liver, kidneys or both. Symptoms of infection include lethargy, inappetance, increased thirst and urination, and sometimes vomiting. Initial blood work will show elevations in liver enzymes, kidney enzymes or both. Definitive testing takes at least 10 days to get results. Therefore, better to treat while waiting on test results than to wait. The good news is this is a bacterial infection and will respond to antibiotics. If leptospirosis is diagnosed or suspected by

• Open 7 days a week. • Sunday appointments available from 9 AM-12 PM. Drop off/Pickup boarding on Sundays as well. • ‘Care to Share Program’...Refer friends & family to Countryside, and both of you receive $25 OFF your next visit.

Visit us at www.countrysideportjeff.com Like us on to receive a complimentary nail trim for your pet 544 West Broadway, Port Jefferson 631-473-0942 • 631-473-6980

PORT JEFFERSON DERMATOLOGY Peter A. Klein, MD Adam J. Korzenko, MD Brett M. Dolgin, DO Wil D. Tutrone, MD Vanita Srivastava, DO We are excited to announce the opening of our new state of the art office in Patchogue. We are also delighted that Dr. Vanita Srivastava has joined our practice and she will be seeing new patients at both our Port Jefferson and Patchogue locations.

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BY MATTHEW KEARNS, DVM

your veterinarian, they will place your dog on antibiotics and other medications. Dogs that are too ill to take antibiotics will need to be admitted for IV fluids and medications initially. Dogs still eating and not vomiting can be sent home on oral medications. The bad news is (especially with the kidneys) the damage is sometimes already done by the time your dog presents to your veterinarian with illness. There is no way to eradicate this bacteria from the environment, but there is a vaccine available from your veterinarian that is effective against the most important strains seen on Long Island. The protection provided by the vaccine is short lived so annual boosters are a must. Make sure to keep your yard clear of puddles and other standing water (if possible), as well as keep dogs clear of wild animals or where wild animals have been. This infection is zoonotic. Zoonotic refers to diseases that can be passed from animals to humans. If exposed, most people only get flu-like symptoms (fever, muscle aches, etc.), but the bacteria can affect the liver, kidneys and central nervous system. At-risk groups are the very young, very old and those with compromised immune systems (whether it be from disease or medications). If your dog has been diagnosed, take special care in handling them or their bedding. Wear gloves, wash bedding with bleach, and leash walk in areas that can either be decontaminated with dilute bleach (a 1:40 dilution or one teaspoon of bleach to every gallon of water) or away from where other dogs and humans play. Wash hands after handling them and if you are feeling ill please see your own physician immediately. If you think your dog may be at risk for leptospirosis talk to your veterinarian about instituting the leptospirosis vaccine into your dog’s annual protocol. Dr. Kearns practices veterinary medicine from his Port Jefferson office and is pictured with his son Matthew and his dog Jasmine. Have a question for the vet? Email it to leisure@tbrnewspapers.com to see his answer in an upcoming column.


PAGE B4 • ARTS & LIFESTYLES • AUGUST 08, 2019

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AUGUST 08, 2019 • ARTS & LIFESTYLES • PAGE B5

EMBRACING THE SEASON

Gerard Romano of Port Jefferson Station snapped this beautiful photo on Aug. 3. He writes, ‘The last few weeks I have seen many butterflies, and today there was a large monarch pollinating the blossoms at Harborfront Park in Port Jefferson. I set the camera’s shutter to 6 frames a second and attempted to capture the monarch in full flight and managed to get this close.’

Send your Photo of the Week to leisure@tbrnewspapers.com

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PAGE B6 • ARTS & LIFESTYLES • AUGUST 08, 2019

HELPING YOU NAVIGATE TO OPTIMAL HEALTH

David Dunaief, M.D. Integrative Medicine

• A Whole Body Approach • Reversing, Preventing & Treating Chronic Disease and Managing Weight by Connecting Conventional Medicine with Lifestyle Modifications Our Philosophy is simple. We believe wellness is derived through nutritional medicine and lifestyle interventions that prevent and treat chronic diseases. Medications have their place - and in some cases can be lifesaving. However, there’s no medication without side effects. The goal should be to limit the need for medications - or minimize the number of medications you take on a regular basis. You are not limited by your genes. Fortunately, most diseases are based primarily on epigenetics, which are environmental influences, and not on genetics. Epigenetics literally means above or around the gene. In epigenetics, lifestyle choices impact gene expression. Just because your first degree relatives may have had a disease, you are not predestined to follow suit. We are specialists who will partner with your primary care physician. A standard medical education does not integrate enough nutritional medicine and other lifestyle interventions. We bridge that gap.

We use evidence-based medicine to guide our decision-making. The amount of research related to nutrition and other lifestyle issues continues to grow rapidly, with many studies showing significant beneficial effects on health.

Preventing and Reversing Chronic Conditions and Diseases Including:

Is disease reversal possible? Absolutely! Study evidence has found this to be true, and many of our patients have experienced reversal of diabetes, autoimmune disorders, migraines, and cardiovascular disease, just to mention a few. In many cases, because of their exceptional results, our patients have been able to reduce or eliminate their medications.

High Blood Pressure • High Cholesterol/Triglycerides

Read more common questions and answers on medicalcompassmd.com.

We invite you to tune in to our new weekly Medical Compass health video at tbrnewsmedia.com

47 Route 25A, Setauket NY

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41 Clark Street, Brooklyn, NY 631.675.2888 718.924.2655 drdunaief@medicalcompassmd.com • Visit our website www.medicalcompassmd.com

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Clinician, Researcher, Author and Speaker Dr. Dunaief was also recently published in The New York Times and appeared on NBC, News 12 Long Island and News 12 Brooklyn.

We treat each patient as an individual. We will work with you to develop a plan that allows you to take a proactive role in managing your own health. The health outcomes are worth the effort.

Dr. Dunaief has written over 2,000 medical research articles that have been published in Times Beacon Record Newspapers.

(Next to Capital One Bank & Across From Convenience Drive-thru)

David Dunaief, M.D.

Heart Disease • Stroke • Diabetes Type 1 and Type 2 Obesity • Diverticular Disease • Irritable Bowel Syndrome Fibromyalgia • Alzheimer’s Disease • Dementia Parkinson’s Disease • Depression and Mood Disorder Menopause • Asthma • Allergies Macular Degeneration • Uveitis/Scleritis • Optic Neuritis Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease “Since working with Dr. Dunaief, I have been able to reverse my cardiovascular disease. I substantially decreased plaque buildup in my neck arteries. My cardiologist was really impressed that he could no longer find inflammation associated with the disease. I am also excited that my cholesterol improved and was able to stop my medication. “ – J.M.

Dr. Dunaief builds a customized plan for each patient - he knows that “no body is the same.”


AUGUST 08, 2019 • ARTS & LIFESTYLES • PAGE B7

MEDICAL COMPASS

Overcoming insomnia

NEWS AROUND TOWN

Cognitive behavioral therapy may improve outcomes

Though statistics vary widely, about 30 percent of Americans are affected by insomnia, according to one frequently used estimate, and women tend to be affected more than men. Insomnia is thought to have several main components: difficulty falling asleep, difficulty staying asleep, waking up before a full night’s sleep and sleep that is not restorative or restful. Unlike sleep deprivation, patients have plenty of time for sleep. Having one or all of these components is considered insomnia. By David There is debate about Dunaief, M.D. whether or not it is actually a disease, though it certainly has a significant impact on patients’ functioning. Insomnia is frustrating because it does not necessarily have one cause. Causes can include aging; stress; psychiatric disorders; disease states, such as obstructive sleep apnea and thyroid dysfunction; asthma; medication; and it may even be idiopathic (of unknown cause). It can occur on an acute (short-term), intermittent or chronic basis. Regardless of the cause, it may have a significant impact on quality of life. Insomnia also may cause comorbidities (diseases), including heart failure. Fortunately, there are numerous treatments. These can involve medications, such as benzodiazepines like Ativan and Xanax. The downside of these medications is they may be habit-forming. Nonbenzodiazepine hypnotics (therapies) include sleep medications, such as Lunesta (eszopiclone) and Ambien (zolpidem). All of these medications have side effects. We will investigate Ambien further because of its warnings. There are also natural treatments, involving supplements, cognitive behavioral therapy and lifestyle changes. Let’s look at the evidence.

Heart failure

Insomnia may perpetuate heart failure, which can be a difficult disease to treat. In the HUNT analysis (Nord-Trøndelag Health Study), an observational study, results showed insomnia patients had a dose-dependent response for increased risk of developing heart failure. In other words, the more components of insomnia involved, the higher the risk of developing heart disease. There were three components: difficulty falling asleep, difficulty maintaining sleep and nonrestorative sleep. If one component was involved, there was no increased risk. If two components were involved, there was a 35 percent increased risk, although this is not statistically significant.

Save the date! The Smithtown Historical Society will host a Community Yard Sale at the Frank Brush Barn, 211 East Main St., Smithtown on Saturday, Aug. 17 from noon to 4 p.m. Come see the treasures your neighbors have to offer! Proceeds will help fund the society’s educational and farm programs. Questions? Call 631-265-6768.

Tribute to the Beatles

People with insomnia often have difficulty falling or staying asleep. Stock photo However, if all three components were involved, there was 350 percent increased risk of developing heart failure, even after adjusting for other factors. This was a large study, involving 54,000 Norwegians, with a long duration of 11 years.

What about potential treatments?

Ambien: While nonbenzodiazepine hypnotics may be beneficial, this may come at a price. In a report by the Drug Abuse Warning Network, part of the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), the number of reported adverse events with Ambien that perpetuated emergency department visits increased by more than twofold over a five-year period from 2005 to 2010. Insomnia patients most susceptible to significant side effects are women and the elderly. The director of SAMHSA recommends focusing on lifestyle changes for treating insomnia by making sure the bedroom is sufficiently dark, getting frequent exercise and avoiding caffeine. In reaction to this data, the FDA required the manufacturer of Ambien to reduce the dose recommended for women by 50 percent. Ironically, sleep medication like Ambien may cause drowsiness the next day — the FDA has warned that it is not safe to drive after taking extended-release versions (CR) of these medications the night before. Magnesium: The elderly population tends to suffer the most from insomnia, as well as nutrient deficiencies. In a double-blinded, randomized controlled trial (RCT), the gold standard of studies, results show that magnesium had resoundingly positive effects on elderly patients suffering from insomnia. Compared to a placebo group, participants given 500 mg of magnesium daily for eight weeks had significant improvements in sleep quality, sleep duration and time to fall asleep,

as well as improvement in the body’s levels of melatonin, a hormone that helps control the circadian rhythm. The strength of the study is that it is an RCT; however, it was small, involving 46 patients over a relatively short duration.

Cognitive behavioral therapy

In a study, just one 2½-hour session of cognitive behavioral therapy delivered to a group of 20 patients suffering from chronic insomnia saw subjective, yet dramatic, improvements in sleep duration from 5 to 6½ hours and decreases in sleep latency from 51 to 22 minutes. The patients who were taking medication to treat insomnia experienced a 33 percent reduction in their required medication frequency per week. The topics covered in the session included relaxation techniques, sleep hygiene, sleep restriction, sleep positions and beliefs and obsessions pertaining to sleep. These results are encouraging. It is important to emphasize the need for sufficient and good-quality sleep to help prevent, as well as not contribute to, chronic diseases, such as cardiovascular disease. While medications may be necessary in some circumstances, they should be used with the lowest possible dose for the shortest amount of time and with caution, reviewing possible drugdrug and drug-supplement interactions. Supplementation with magnesium may be a valuable step toward improving insomnia. Lifestyle changes including sleep hygiene and exercise should be sought, regardless of whether or not medications are used. Dr. Dunaief is a speaker, author and local lifestyle medicine physician focusing on the integration of medicine, nutrition, fitness and stress management. For further information, visit www.medicalcompassmd.com or consult your personal physician.

Back by popular demand, The Cast of Beatlemania returns to the Smithtown Center for the Performing Arts, 2 East Main St., Smithtown on Saturday, Aug. 31 at 8 p.m. Enjoy a night with John, Paul, George and Ringo as they sing all the classics. Tickets are $40 per person. To order, call 631-724-3700 or visit www. smithtownpac.org.

Family Scavenger Hunt

Frank Melville Memorial Park, located at 1 Old Field Road, Setauket will hold its 11th annual Family Scavenger Hunt at the Red Barn on Tuesday, Aug. 13 from 11 a.m. to noon. How well do you know this special park? Join the annual competition to solve riddles and win prizes. Free. Call 631-689-6146 for info.

Meditation in the Park

Harborfront Park, 101 East Broadway, Port Jefferson will host a Meditation in the Park event on Sunday, Aug. 11 at 2 p.m. Explore the healing power of meditation and learn how to create peace in your life in spite of the stress around you. Facilitated by John Bednarik. Bring a chair, blanket or mat. In the case of rain, program will be held indoors at the Port Jefferson Village Center. Free. Call 631-802-2160 for more info.

Meet the Doula Night

Shine Dance Studios, 6 South Jersey Ave., Setauket will host a Meet the Doula Night on Saturday, Aug. 17 from 7 to 8:30 p.m. Attendees will have the opportunity to meet several local doulas, learn about birth and postpartum support, prenatal yoga, Reiki and more. Free. Call/text 631371-1865 for further details.

Sangha Meditation Group

The Unitarian Universalist Fellowship, 380 Nicolls Road, E. Setauket hosts Stony Brook Sangha, a meditative community following the tradition of Vietnamese Zen Master Thich Nhat Hanh, on Saturday mornings from 9 to 10:30 a.m. Participants sit and walk in meditation, hear some teachings and enjoy a cup of tea. All levels of meditators welcome. Visit www.stonybrooksangha.com or call 631-543-0337.


PAGE B8 • ARTS & LIFESTYLES • AUGUST 08, 2019

Does an adopted child have the right to inherit?

CROSSWORD PUZZLE

Find out by reading my monthly column,

LEGALLY SPEAKING.

Linda M. Toga, Esq.

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Community Blood Drives

SUDOKU

PUZZLE

Long Island Blood Services will hold a blood drive at Comsewogue Public Library, 170 Terryville Road, Port Jefferson Station on Tuesday, Aug. 13 from 3 to 7:30 p.m. For more info, call 631-928-1212.

East Northport Public Library, 185 Larkfield Road, East Northport will host a blood drive on Monday, Aug. 12 from 1 to 7 p.m. Co-sponsored by New York Blood Center and Assemblyman Andrew Raia. Call 631-261-2313 for more information.

THEME:

How do you like it? ACROSS 1. “Beat it!” 6. Bupkis 9. Tobacco mouthful, slangily 13. “All My Children” diva 14. *Pie ____ ____ mode 15. Oil source 16. *____ ____ or to go 17. Meghan Markle’s Archie, e.g. 18. East Asian peninsula 19. *Italian or ____ meatballs 21. *¿ la King or Kiev 23. Pine juice 24. Jury colleague 25. U.K. broadcaster 28. Make a reference 30. Wine grape 35. Riyadh native 37. *Wafer, cake or sugar 39. “No way” partner 40. On ____, or cheap 41. Old World lizard 43. Rani’s dress 44. Like a Harvard building? 46. “Don’t bet ____ ____!” 47. Table scraps 48. *With cream or sugar 50. Montana tribe 52. Make lacework 53. Prospector’s mother 55. Directing Spike 57. *Shaken or stirred 61. *Not on the rocks 65. ____ Bashevis Singer 66. Gobbled up 68. Between 10 and Queen 69. *Mini or maxi 70. No longer working abbr. 71. Saint in the Caribbean 72. Nobel Peace Prize capital 73. Kum Ba ____, song 74. Triangular road sign

© StatePoint Media

Answers to last week’s puzzle: ‘The Wizard of Oz’

Directions: Fill in the blank squares in the grid, making sure that every row, column and 3-by-3 box includes all digits 1 through 9.

Answers to last week’s SUDOKU

DOWN 1. Gets the picture 2. ____dad or ____fish 3. Stravinsky’s “The ____ of Spring” 4. DNA and RNA 5. Natalie Merchant, once? 6. Funny poet Ogden 7. U.N. working-conditions agcy. 8. Jousting pole 9. Chocolate candy, to a Brit 10. “____! The herald angles sing” 11. Toward the lee 12. Withdraw gradually 15. Vail trail 20. Virgo’s brightest star 22. Request for tailor 24. Self-flagellation, e.g. 25. In its simplest form 26. Music to a performer’s ears 27. Representative of Allah on earth 29. *Eat in or ____ ____ 31. Comme ci, comme Áa 32. Pie display 33. Largest artery 34. *Lime or ____ 36. *Rare or medium 38. Chieftain in Arabia 42. Bikini, e.g. 45. Civil wrong 49. Bajillion years 51. More rare than daily 54. Dear one for writing 56. Boredom 57. Fermented soybeans 58. Says “What?” 59. *Not top-shelf 60. Hawaiian tuber 61. Long for Liz 62. Small European freshwater fish 63. Bad to the bone 64. In Davy Jones’ locker *Theme related clue 67. *Hot or iced Answers to this week’s puzzle will appear in next week’s newspaper and online on Friday afternoon at www.tbrnewsmedia.com, Arts and Lifestyles


AUGUST 08, 2019 • ARTS & LIFESTYLES • PAGE B9

KNOWLEDGE SEEKERS

Horoscopes of the week LEO – Jul 23/Aug 23

New SBU unit seeks to help doctors realize ‘crazy sci-fi’ ideas

BY DANIEL DUNAIEF

Screws can’t be the best and only answer. That was the conclusion neurosurgeon Daniel Birk at the Stony Brook Neurosciences Institute came to when he was reconsidering the state-of-the-art treatment for spinal injuries. The screws, which hold the spine in place, create problems for patients in part because they aren’t as flexible as bone. That’s where Stony Brook University’s College of Engineering and Applied Sciences, headed by Fotis Sotiropoulos, plans to pitch in. Working with Kenneth Kaushansky, dean of Stony Brook University’s Renaissance School of Medicine, the two Stony Brook leaders have been immersed in uniting their two disciplines to find ways engineers can improve medical care. The two departments have created the Institute for EngineeringDriven Medicine, which will address a wide range of medical challenges that might have engineering solutions. The institute will focus on developing organs for transplantation, neurobiological challenges and cancer diagnostics. ‘Science is becoming a team sport. The broader range of skills on your team, the more likely you’ll be successful.’ — KENNETH KAUSHANSKY

The institute, which already taps into the medical and engineering expertise of both departments, will move into a new $75 million building at the Research and Development Park, in 2023. The original investment from New York State’s Economic Development Council was for an advanced computing center. The state, however, had given Buffalo the same funds for a similar facility, which meant that former Stony Brook President Sam Stanley, who recently became the president of

From left, Fotis Sotiropoulos and Kenneth Kaushansky Photos from SBU

Harnessing the Technology of our Research Giants

Michigan State University, needed to develop another plan. Sotiropoulos and Kaushansky had already created a white paper that coupled engineering and medicine. They developed a proposal that the state agreed to fund. In return for their investment, the state is looking for the development of economic activity, with spin-off companies, jobs, new industries and new ideas, Kaushansky said. The two leaders are developing “a number of new faculty recruits to flesh out the programs that are going in the building,” Kaushansky added. Sotiropoulos, who has conducted research in the past on blood flow dynamics in prosthetic heart valves, believes in the potential of this collaboration. “This convergence of engineering and medicine is already doing what it was intended to do,” he said. Clinicians can get “crazy sci-fi ideas, talk to engineers and figure

SPOTLIGHTING DISCOVERIES AT (1) COLD SPRING HARBOR LAB (2) STONY BROOK UNIVERSITY & (3) BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LAB

out a way to make it happen.” In addition to spinal cord support, researchers in engineering and medicine are working on developing algorithms to make decisions about surgical interventions, such as cesarean sections. A recent project from principal investigator Professor Petar Djurić, chair of SBU’s Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, and Gerald Quirk, an obstetrician and gynecologist at Stony Brook Medicine, recently received $3.2 million from the National Institutes of Health. The goal of the project is to use computer science to assist with the decisions doctors face during childbirth. A potential reduction in C sections could lower medical costs. “This is a fantastic example of this type of convergence of engineering and medicine,” said Sotiropoulos.”

While the building will host scientists across a broad spectrum of backgrounds, researchers at Stony Brook will be able to remain in their current labs and coordinate with this initiative. Combining all these skills will allow researchers to apply for more grants and, Stony Brook hopes, secure greater funding. “For a number of years now, the [National Institutes of Health have] really favored interdisciplinary approaches to important medical problems,” Kaushansky said. “Science is becoming a team sport. The broader range of skills on your team, the more likely you’ll be successful. That’s the underlying premise behind this.” The notion of combining medicine and engineering, while growing as an initiative at Stony Brook, isn’t unique; more than a dozen institutions in the country have similar such collaborations in place. “We’re relatively early in the game of taking this much more holistic approach,” said Kaushansky, who saw one of the earlier efforts of this convergence when he was at the University of California at San Diego, where he worked with the Founding Chair of the Department of Bioengineering Shu Chien. The Stony Brook institute has created partnerships with other organizations, including Albert

POWER OF 3 Continued on page B10

Wearing your emotions on your sleeve may get you attention, Leo, but it won’t necessarily be the kind of attention you were hoping for. Reconsider what you share. VIRGO – Aug 24/Sept 22 Virgo, it can be challenging to relinquish control, but that is just what you will have to do at some point this week. This will be a good lesson to learn. LIBRA – Sept 23/Oct 23 It’s hard to see someone’s perspective when you have never gone through this particular situation, Libra. Keep that in mind when supporting a loved one in need. SCORPIO – Oct 24/Nov 22 All it takes is a subtle change of perception to turn a situation around, Scorpio. Start by taking a few risks outside of your comfort zone for some new inspiration. SAGITTARIUS – Nov 23/Dec 21 Sagittarius, it is good to be proud of your accomplishments. Just be sure not to come across as boastful, especially in certain company. You don’t want to come across as bragging. CAPRICORN – Dec 22/Jan 20 Capricorn, asking for help is not admitting weakness. If you feel you are in over your head, call in the reinforcements. Then you can get back on track more quickly. AQUARIUS – Jan 21/Feb 18 Good fortune is coming your way, and you can certainly spread the wealth if you desire, Aquarius. Chances are there are a few other people who can use a smile in the weeks to come. PISCES – Feb 19/Mar 20 Job security may have you sticking with a position long after the time has come to move on, Pisces. Re-examine the bigger picture and your goals. ARIES – Mar 21/Apr 20 Don’t let your emotions get the best of you in a heated situation, Aries. You can come out on top if you remain calm and think through your responses with utmost caution. TAURUS – Apr 21/May 21 Taurus, there are a few different ways you can play an upcoming situation. Taking a back seat and letting another person lead the way may be the smartest strategy. GEMINI – May 22/Jun 21 A few opportunities may drop into your lap, Gemini. However, just because things come about easily does not mean they are the right choices for right now. CANCER – Jun 22/Jul 22 Cancer, keeping things bottled up until the last minute seems to be the way you have been operating lately. You may want to try sharing your feelings and seeking feedback.


PAGE B10 • ARTS & LIFESTYLES • AUGUST 08, 2019

LEGALLY SPEAKING

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Does an adopted child have the right to inherit?

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THE FACTS: When I was 3, my parents adopted a baby and named her Mary. My mother died seven years later and my father remarried. My father and his second wife had two children together. My father recently died without a will. My BY LINDA TOGA, ESQ. half-siblings insist that since Mary is not my father’s biological child, she is not entitled to a share of his estate. THE QUESTION: Are they correct? THE ANSWER: Fortunately for Mary, your half-siblings are wrong. HOW IT WORKS: If your father legally adopted Mary, she has the same right to a share of your father’s estate as you and your father’s other biological children. The law in New York is quite clear on that point. Section 7(c) of the New York intestacy statute governs how an estate is distributed when someone dies without a will. It states that “the right of an adopted child to take a distributive share … continue[s] as provided in the domestic relations law.” Domestic Relations Law Section 117 explicitly states that “[t]he adoptive parents or parent and the adoptive child shall sustain toward each other the legal relation of parent and child and shall have all the rights and be subject to all the duties

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Einstein College of Medicine and Montefiore Medical Center. “The more clinical people we engage, the better it is for the institute,” Sotiropoulos said. As for the bionic spine, Kaushansky has familial experience with spinal injuries. His mother suffered through several spinal surgeries. “There’s a need for much, much better mechanical weight-bearing device that will help people with back problems,” he said. At this point, Stony Brook has gone twothirds of the way through the National Science Foundation process to receive a $10 million grant for this spinal cord research. Sotiropoulos suggested that a bionic spine could be “a game changer.” While the institute will seek ways to create viable medical devices, diagnostics and even organs, it will also meet the educational mandate of the school, helping to train the next generation of undergraduate and graduate students. The school already has a program called Vertically Integrated Projects, or VIPs, in place, which offers students experiential learning over

of that relation including the rights of inheritance from and through each other …” In other words, the relationship between Mary and your father is legally the same as the relationship between you and your father and the relationship between your half-siblings and your father. As such, she is entitled to the same percentage of his estate as any of his biological children. In addition, if Mary had predeceased your father and had children of her own, her children would be entitled to share the inheritance that would have otherwise passed to Mary. It is worth noting that Domestic Relations Law Section 117 not only sets forth the rights of the adoptive child but also the rights of the adoptive parent. If Mary had predeceased your father without a spouse or children of her own, your father, as her adoptive parent, would be entitled to her entire estate. If you are going to be petitioning the Surrogate’s Court for letters of administration so you can handle your father’s estate, you should consult with an experienced estate attorney to ensure that the administration process is handled properly and proceeds smoothly despite the position taken by your half-siblings. Linda M. Toga, Esq. provides legal services in the areas of estate planning, real estate, small business services and litigation from her East Setauket office. Visit her website at www.lmtogalaw.com or call 631-444-5605 to schedule a free consultation. the course of three or four years. The effort combines undergraduates with graduates and faculty members to work on innovative efforts. “These projects are interdisciplinary and are all technology focused,” Sotiropoulos said. “We bring together students” from areas like engineering, computer science and medicine, which “go after big questions,” and that the VIP efforts are structured to unite engineers and doctors-in-training through the educational process. Through the institute, Stony Brook also plans to collaborate with other Long Island research teams at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory and Brookhaven National Laboratory, Sotiropoulos said, adding that the scientists are “not just interested in doing blue sky research. We are interested in developing services, algorithms, practices, whatever it is, that can improve patient care and costs.” Indeed, given the translational element to the work, the institute is encouraging a connection with economic development efforts at Stony Brook, which will enable faculty to create spinoff companies and protect their ideas. The institute’s leadership would like to encourage the faculty to “create companies to market and take to market new products and developments,” said Sotiropoulos.


AUGUST 08, 2019 • ARTS & LIFESTYLES • PAGE B11

FEATURE STORY

"Good Boy Storm" is still saving animals two years after epic viral rescue Facebook video reaches over 20 million worldwide

BY MELISSA ARNOLD Two years ago, a peaceful walk down by the water in Port Jefferson brought 15 seconds of fame to injury attorney Mark Freeley and his English golden retriever, Storm. You might have read an article about Freeley and Storm in the New York Times or People magazine, or maybe you’re one of more than 20 million people who saw the pair’s dramatic viral video online. Storm made a splash in 2017 when he spotted a fawn struggling to stay afloat in the waters of Port Jefferson Harbor. Freeley, who lives in Stony Brook, walks at least five miles each day with the retriever and his younger adopted “sister,” Sarah, a mixed breed. On a steamy July morning, they headed to Harborfront Park and Centennial Park in Port Jefferson where they spent time walking along the shore and then started heading to Pirate’s Cove. Suddenly, Storm, who was offleash, made a beeline into the water. Storm is well-disciplined and rarely takes off so suddenly, said Freeley, 55. He recalled being puzzled by his dog’s behavior at the time. “Storm never brings anything back to me, not even a tennis ball. So it was weird to see him run off into the water,” he joked. “I grabbed my camera and wanted to see what he was doing, and then I noticed an animal’s head bobbing in and out of the water. Storm hesitated for a minute and looked back at me like, ‘What do I do now, Dad?’ I tried to encourage him and keep him calm.” Storm swam roughly 100 feet from shore and tenderly grabbed the fawn by the scruff of its neck before bringing it back to dry land. Freeley’s video captures the stunning rescue as he continually cheers, “Good boy, Storm! Bring it in!” When he reached the shore, Storm nervously let go of the fawn, which ran only a few paces before collapsing with apparent exhaustion. The video ends as Storm gently paws and nudges the animal with his nose in an attempt to revive it. Many people are unaware of what happened next: Freeley took a close-up video of the male deer and attempted to send it to Frank Floridia at Strong Island Animal Rescue League in Port Jefferson Station, but spotty cell service hindered the call for help. Freeley had no choice but to leave the exhausted animal behind and head back toward the village.

Once Freeley picked up a cell signal, he was able to send the video to Floridia. Together with co-owner Erica Kutzing, Strong Island responds to calls involving injured and abused animals in emergency situations. They’ve rescued dogs, cats, possums, deer and a variety of other animals, sometimes performing several rescues in a day. Floridia met Freeley in the village, and the pair headed back toward the cove. The trip takes around 20 minutes on foot and is full of slippery, rocky terrain. Kutzing drove to nearby Belle Terre, which provides faster access to the cove. It wouldn’t be an easy task. “We went back to the spot where the deer was left, but he got spooked when he heard us coming and actually ran back into the water again,” Floridia said. “We tried to get Storm to retrieve him a second time, but he wouldn’t go, and the deer became distressed — he was probably 100 feet out at least. I knew we either had to go get him or he was going to die.” Floridia and Freeley waded out into the water, flanking the deer on each side. They attempted to reach for him, but he continued to avoid them. Finally, he grew tired and Floridia was able to secure the fawn with a rope, bringing it to shore. Their initial assessment found that the fawn had cuts and scrapes, was infested with ticks and severely dehydrated. Kutzing took the animal to STAR Foundation in Middle Island, where he was promptly named Water and underwent rehabilitation for several months. He was ultimately released back into the wild with a clean bill of health. “We think he must have come down the cliff in that area, and there was really nowhere else for him to go. He had no choice but to swim,” Floridia explained. “Deer are good swimmers, but this fawn was only a few weeks old. He was so exhausted that he didn’t even put up a fight.” Storm’s brave rescue graced local and national headlines for several weeks. But Freeley wasn’t ready for their story to end. In his spare time, Freeley and his family volunteer with Last Chance Animal Rescue based in Southampton. The 501(c)3 charitable organization rescues animals from high-kill shelters in the Carolinas and Georgia on a weekly basis. Upon arrival on Long Island, the animals spend a week with volunteer foster families before being adopted by their new owners.

Photos from Mark Freeley and Frank Floridia

Above, Mark Freeley with Storm; below left, Frank Floridia carries the deer out of the water on July 16, 2017; below right, Erica Kutzing prepares to transport the deer to the STAR Foundation in Middle Island.

“Mark came to us as a volunteer leading adoption events and also offering us pro bono legal support. Once Storm had a following, people would come out to events just to see him and take pictures with him,” said Judith Langmaid, director of adoption for Last Chance Animal Rescue. “We couldn’t believe it when the video blew up. We thought it was crazy, but it was so exciting. As it got traction, Mark wanted to do anything he could to promote Last Chance and animal rescue in general. He said, ‘If I can use this for good, I want to do it.’ He’s genuine and dependable. We’re so grateful to have him,” she added. Freeley began to use Storm’s Facebook page, called Good Boy Storm, to promote Last Chance events and animals in need of adoption. “I saw this as an opportunity to raise awareness for other animals fighting for their lives in kill

‘I saw this [event] as an opportunity to raise awareness for other animals fighting for their lives in kill shelters.’ — MARK FREELEY

shelters,” he said. The page has helped connect many animals with forever homes. “There are very few things in life that you can watch make an immediate difference like this. To see a family come in and adopt an animal that would have been euthanized is a great feeling,” Freeley said. To learn more about Mark Freeley and Storm, search for Good Boy Storm on Facebook. To learn more about animal rescue efforts in our area or to adopt, visit www. lcarescue.org or call 631-478-6844. Strong Island Animal Rescue League can be reached at 631-403-0598.


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PAGE B12 • ARTS & LIFESTYLES • AUGUST 08, 2019


AUGUST 08, 2019 • ARTS & LIFESTYLES • PAGE B13

Above, from left, Judge Samantha Keeler, Tracey Monahan with River, Steve Lisker with Cooper and Judge Toby Frisch.

12th annual AKC Canine Experience

The Suffolk County Kennel Club hosted the 12th annual AKC Canine Experience on the grounds of the Smithtown Historical Society on Aug. 3. The event featured a day of activities for dogs and their owners including competitions in conformation, obedience and rally, plus agility demonstrations and run-thru’s. Judges Toby Frisch and Samantha Keeler were tasked with choosing the top three winners of the day. Cooper, an Akita owned by Steve Lisker of East Rockaway, captured the Best Puppy in Match title; and River, an English Springer Spaniel owned by Tracey Monahan of Kings Park, won for Best Adult in Match. Holly, a long coat Chihuahua owned by Kerri Kimpel of Smithtown, captured the titled of Best in All Breed Sweeps in Match. Attendees were also able to test their dogs for Canine Good Citizen titles, attended handling classes and received grooming tips. Join the group for its annual AKC Point Show at that same site on Sept. 28 with over 700 dogs participating. For additional information, visit www.suffolkcountykennelclub. org. See more photos online at www.tbrnewsmedia.com.

Photos by Heidi Sutton


PAGE B14 • ARTS & LIFESTYLES • AUGUST 08, 2019

THEATER REVIEW

PRO PORT JEFFERSON ASSOCIATION PRESENTS:

SERIES A scene from ‘Julius Caesar’ Photo courtesy of The Carriage House Players

PARTICIPATING ESTABLISHMENTS OFFERING:

‘Friends, Romans, countrymen, lend me your ears’ live music • food & drink specials Celebrate the new ‘Port Jefferson Happy Hour’ ‘Julius Caesar’ opens at the Vanderbilt All venues will have live music to include: Acoustic Guitarists, Vocal Groups, D.J.’s, and Jazz In cooperation with the Greater Port Jefferson Chamber of Commerce

thursday september 12 6-9 pm thursday october10 6-9 pm

Address

Barito's Tacos & Cocktails

201 Main St.

Billie's 1890 Saloon

304 Main St.

C'est Cheese

216B Main St.

Danfords Wave Restaurant

25 E. Broadway

Due Baci

154 Broadway

Fifth Season

34 E. Broadway

Harbor Grill

111 West Broadway

Gourmet Burger Bistro

5 Mill Creek Rd.

Nantuckets

9 Traders Cove

Pasta Pasta

234 E. Main Street

Port Jeff Bistro & Pub

201A Main Street

Port Jeff Brewery

22 Mill Creek Rd.

Port Jeff Ice Cream Café

30 Chandler Sq.

Prohibition Kitchen

115 Main St.

Ruvo Restaurant (*4-8pm)

105 Wynn Ln.

Slurp Ramen

109 West Broadway

The Steam Room

4 E. Broadway

Tommy's Place

109 Main St.

Z-Pita

217 Main St.

For more info: 631-473-1414

Extended happy hour drinks and food specials • discounts on bottles of wine 1/2 price on ice-cream drinks • $3 draft beers & MORE!!

©160102

thursday august 8 6-9 pm

Restaurant

BY LEAH CHIAPPINO

An osprey lands on its nest on top of a bell tower located above the gate in the Vanderbilt Museum Courtyard as the sun sets over William K. Vanderbilt’s Eagle’s Nest mansion. The orange hues hitting the four walls make the Spanish Revival estate, one of the last remaining Gold Coast The cast properties on the North Mary Caulfield Shore, glow. Airen Craig It is the perfect setting Jess Ader-Ferretti for the Vanderbilt’s annual Katie Ferretti Shakespeare Festival, Erika Hinson Shakespearean play readings Jae Hughes by The Carriage House Nicole Intravia Players that are performed Zoe Katsaros on an outdoor stage in the Brielle Levenberg mansion’s courtyard. The Teresa Motherway Elizabeth Sackett tradition, which is celebrating its 31st anniversary, often Dana Tortora puts a modern twist on the Colleen Tyler Gianna Zuffante Bard’s classic masterpieces. The current production of “Julius Caesar” chronicles the internal struggle of Brutus (Mary Caulfield) in joining Cassius (Nicole Intravia) to assassinate the Roman dictator Julius Caesar (Jae Hughes). Believed to have been written in 1599, it is one of several plays written by Shakespeare based on true events from Roman history. Though it helps to be a fan of Shakespeare to truly appreciate this production, audience members can’t help but be drawn in by the raw talent of the performers. Hughes as Caesar is particularly gripping and riveting. With each line carried out with such emotion and conviction, Hughes’ delivery leads the audience to forget the script comes from a Shakespearean play and forces them to believe they are being spoken genuinely in real time.

Christine Boehm directs a cast of 14 who all give excellent performances. This is especially evident during the assassination scene, which looks realistic to the point one may second guess whether or not the blood comes from the actors. The costumes take the modern version up another notch in terms of quality, with Brutus sporting a leather jumpsuit throughout the entire production. Katie Ferretti as Portia, his wife, stuns in a classic Shakespearean gown, and her natural chemistry with Caulfield make for a perfect pair between the two, as does Elizabeth Sackett in respect to Hughes, in her role as Caesar’s wife Calpurnia. Some modern lines and euphemisms are thrown in as well, such as the show opening with the dropping of a tarp sign reading “Hail Caesar” in street graffiti, and passersby flipping off Brutus as a sign of rebellion in one of the opening acts. With all of this, the true gem of the night is the experience the play offers. Arrive early to access the beautiful grounds of the estate before the show starts and bring a picnic dinner to enjoy on the lawn overlooking Northport Harbor, with views of Asharoken to Connecticut. The atmosphere allows visitors to reflect on all Long Island has to offer, surrounded by some of the most stunning architecture in the nation, coupled with natural beauty. Ultimately, the performance, a fitting example of the rich arts and culture of the island caps off the ambiance perfectly, is a must-do summer activity. The Suffolk County Vanderbilt Museum, 180 Little Neck Road, Centerport and The Carriage House Players will present “Julius Caesar” through Sept. 1. Performances are held Wednesdays and Fridays at 8 p.m., and Sundays at 7 p.m. Tickets are $20 for adults and $15 for children. To order, visit www. carriagehouseplayers.org.


AUGUST 08, 2019 • ARTS & LIFESTYLES • PAGE B15

COVER STORY

Journey Through Time exhibit in Stony Brook Village offers multigenerational entertainment

BY LEAH CHIAPPINO

F

rom now through Sept. 29, The Ward Melville Heritage Organization is turning back the clock with Journey Through Time, a summer exhibit at the WMHO’s Educational & Cultural Center that highlights the national, regional and local events and inventions of each decade, from the 1940s to the 2000s, that have had impacts on our lives. The exhibition, which took several months of research, was culled from the collections of 16 contributors including Avalon Park and Preserve in Stony Brook, the Leo P. Ostebo Kings Park Heritage Museum, Long Island state parks and the Cradle of Aviation Museum in Garden City, as well as WMHO’s extensive archives and seven private collectors. Newsday also provided notable news covers from each time period. “It was a collaboration of nine staff people, and trying to secure these items from all over Long Island,” said Gloria Rocchio, president of The Ward Melville Heritage Organization, during a recent tour. Kristin Ryan-Shea, director of the Educational & Cultural Center, came up with the idea for the exhibit to have national, regional and local events highlighted. “That crystallized what we should do,” said Rocchio. Though major national somber events such as 9/11 and World War II are highlighted in their respective decades, most of the exhibit is bright and fun-loving, giving it a feel of nostalgia, with a focus on early technology and entertainment. Visitors can even partake in an I Spy worksheet and be entered to win a $50 gift certificate to use at the many shops, restaurants and services offered at the Stony Brook Village Center. “It makes them look a little closer and remember a little more,” said Ryan-Shea.

Photos from WMHO

Clockwise from left, visitors can enjoy a game of hopscotch, play an interactive game of Minecraft and check out a 1977 Mercedes Convertible.

Items on view include a wooden score chart from the bowling alley that used to be in the basement of what is now Sweet Mama’s in the 1940s, fashionable outfits from the 1950s, a 1977 Mercedes Convertible, a newspaper announcement of the World Wide Web in 1990 and a 1997 Moto-Guzzi motorcycle. Visitors can also experience a blast from the past with vintage telephones and radios, dolls including Barbies and Betsy Wetsy and the spring toy Slinky. Children can particularly enjoy an interactive Nintendo game along with Minecraft, and the pool full of sand collected from Jones Beach, a symbol for which showcases the Melville family’s closeness with Robert Moses. “It is educational without being boring,” Rocchio explained. Much of the exhibit focuses on the history of The Ward Melville Heritage Organization and its reach, from which the original idea for the exhibit came from. “It’s our 80th anniversary and we wanted to show what we do and what has been done over the years” Rocchio said, adding that she wanted to highlight how far the organization and the world has come.

For instance, the 1940s panel includes plans that Ward Melville had to transform Stony Brook Village, followed by the 1950s panel that includes photos of the old Dogwood Hollow Amphitheatre, an auditorium that was located where the cultural center stands today that showcased concerts with the likes of Tony Bennett and Louis Armstrong. The display also features a map of plots of land Ward Melville presented to New York State in order to build Stony Brook University in the late 1950s which Rocchio said wound up being 600 acres. The exhibit also showcases information on the Erwin J. Ernst Marine Conservation Center at West Meadow Beach, where they conduct educational programs, and own the wetland side of the beach. Additional renovations and improvements to the village throughout the decades are also on view. Ryan-Shea said the exhibit, which opened in mid-July, is creating multigenerational enjoyment. “Recently there was a family here that spanned four generations. The great-grandfather was born in 1940, so the great-grandchildren were teaching him how Minecraft works and the father was teaching his children how a record player works; the

family was criss-crossing the room teaching each other things,” she laughed. The director also recounted how she witnessed a 77-year-old man playing hopscotch, a game from his childhood; a grandmother was telling her grandson stories about World War II; and a little boy walked out begging his father for Battleship, a game he had not seen before. “I feel like kids nowadays don’t even think about history, and this makes it real and a conversation. The exhibit is connecting all the generations together,” she said. WMHO’s Educational & Cultural Center, 97P Main St., Stony Brook will present Journey Through Time through Sept. 29. Viewing hours are 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily. Tickets are $5 general admission, $3 for seniors and children under 12. Call 631-6895888 for further details. The WMHO is also conducting Walking Through Time walking tours on Aug. 10, 21, Sept. 14 and 15 for $15 per person, children under 5 free. There is the option to purchase a premiere ticket, for $20, which includes admission to both the exhibit and a walking tour. For more information, call 631-751-2244 or visit www.wmho.org.


PAGE B16 • ARTS & LIFESTYLES • AUGUST 08, 2019

&

Times Beacon Record News Media’s 2nd Annual

COOKS, BOOKS CORKS

A Fundraiser: Proceeds will be raised to underwrite a summer internship for an aspiring journalist from Stony Brook University’s School of Journalism.

Tuesday, September 24, 6 - 8 p m

The Bates House•1 Bates Road • East Setauket Opposite Emma S. Clark Library

Join Us For An Appetizing Evening! Feed your mind and body

Enjoy delicious food tastings from our top local restaurants paired with book signings/meet & greets with well-known local authors, live music, basket raffles, wine tasting & silent auctions.

SPONSORSHIP OPPORTUNITIES AVAILABLE

2019



COOKS BOOKS & CORKS

INTERESTED IN PARTICIPATING?

Local Authors, Chefs, Caterers, Restaurants, Vineyards, Sponsors... please contact Laura Mastriano at events@tbrnewsmedia.com or 631-872-1977 for more information.

©160212

CB&C

For tickets $50 per person or to be a sponsor, please visit our website tbrnewsmedia.com or our Facebook page at Facebook/TBRNewsMedia to pay with PayPal.


AUGUST 08, 2019 • ARTS & LIFESTYLES • PAGE B17

COOKING COVE

Buttercup’s Dairy Store!

Food memories from way back when

SALE DATES WED. AUGUST 7 THROUGH TUES. AUGUST 13, 2019

BY BARBARA BELTRAMI

Ask any Southern lady and she will tell you that this dish is a standard at luncheons and funerals. YIELD: Makes 8 to10 servings INGREDIENTS: • 2 tablespoons unflavored gelatin • ¼ cup cold water • ¼ cup boiling water • 4 cups tomato juice • 1 tablespoon chopped onion • ½ green bell pepper chopped • 1 celery rib • 1 teaspoon brown sugar • 2 teaspoons salt • 1 teaspoon Worcestershire sauce • 1 teaspoon Tabasco sauce • ½ teaspoon celery seeds • 3 tablespoons freshly squeezed lemon juice • Nonstick cooking spray • Fresh bibb lettuce leaves • Fresh parsley for garnish DIRECTIONS:

In a small bowl, sprinkle the cold water over the gelatin; let sit 5 minutes. Whisk boiling water into gelatin until it is dissolved. In a large saucepan, combine the tomato juice, onion, pepper, celery, brown sugar, salt, Worcestershire sauce, Tabasco sauce and celery seeds. Bring to a boil over medium heat; simmer, stirring occasionally, about 15 minutes; pour through wire mesh strainer into medium bowl; discard veggies or save for another use. Stir in gelatin and lemon juice. Spray a 10-cup ring mold with nonstick cooking spray; pour mixture into mold; chill 6 hours or until set. Unmold onto plate lined with lettuce leaves; garnish with parsley. Serve with shrimp salad and deviled eggs.

Old-Fashioned Crabmeat Casserole

Casseroles were very popular decades ago. The combination of crabmeat, butter and breadcrumbs makes this a rich but oh-so-delicious seafood dish. YIELD: Makes 4 servings INGREDIENTS: • 1 large egg • 1 heaping tablespoon chopped fresh flatleaf parsley • 1 teaspoon dry mustard

Turkey Hill TEAS AND ADES

EXTRA LARGE

EGGS

Boar's Head BACON

2/$3.00

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1/2 gal. varieties

Oatmeal Lace Cookies • 1 stick unsalted butter • 1½ cups unflavored breadcrumbs • 1 cup half-and-half • Salt and freshly ground pepper, to taste • 1 pound cooked crabmeat (picked over to remove any bits of shell) DIRECTIONS:

CHEETOS

Julia’s Oatmeal Lace Cookies

Julia was the daughter of a slave. That’s how many generations the recipe for this childhood favorite has been around. YIELD: Makes 12 to 15 cookies

INGREDIENTS: • 1 cup whole grain oats (old-fashioned not instant oatmeal) • ¼ stick unsalted butter plus butter for greasing baking sheets • ¾ cup medium brown sugar • 1 egg • Pinch or 2 all-purpose flour • ½ teaspoon vanilla or to taste. DIRECTIONS:

Generously grease two baking sheets and set aside. Preheat oven to 275 F. Spread oatmeal on another baking sheet and toast it for about 10 minutes or until lightly browned. Set aside and let cool. Raise oven temperature to 350 F. In a large saucepan, melt butter over moderately low heat; add sugar and mix well. Remove pan from cook top, stir in egg and oatmeal; beat until blended, then thoroughly blend in flour and vanilla. Drop batter, about one tablespoon at a time, about two inches apart as cookies will spread, onto greased baking sheets. Bake about 10 minutes or until cookies are firm and edges are slightly brown. Let cool a few minutes on baking sheets, then with sharp spatula, carefully remove to wire racks, Serve with ice cold milk.

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Preheat oven to 350 F. Lightly butter or grease a two-quart casserole dish. In a small bowl whisk together egg, parsley and mustard. In a medium saucepan melt 6 tablespoons of the butter over medium heat; add one cup breadcrumbs and halfand-half; cook stirring constantly, until slightly thickened. Remove from heat; add egg mixture and salt and pepper and stir just enough to incorporate but not cook egg. Fold in crabmeat; transfer to prepared casserole; sprinkle with remaining bread crumbs; dot with remaining butter. Bake for 25 to 30 minutes. Serve with rice.

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Tomato Aspic

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With her passionate reminiscences and mouth-watering descriptions of comfort foods from way back in our childhoods — things that were part of our mothers’ and grandmothers’ regular repertoires; the kinds of things we neither cook anymore nor see on menus — my friend has motivated me to comb through old recipe files and cookbooks to try to duplicate them. I have done so with the caveat that they will never be as good as the ones we remember. How could they be? However, as my new muse in this as in so many things, I am dedicating this column to her.

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PAGE B18 • ARTS & LIFESTYLES • AUGUST 08, 2019

Thursday 8

East Northport Firemen’s Fair

Join the East Northport Fire Department for its annual Firemen’s Fair, 1 Ninth Ave., East Northport tonight and Aug. 9 from 7 to 11 p.m. and Aug. 10 from 5 to 11 p.m.. Enjoy a wide variety of games, live music, rides and carnival food. Call 261-0360 for further details.

Atelier lecture

From 7 to 9 p.m., The Atelier at Flowerfield, 2 Flowerfield, Suites 6 and 9, St. James will host a lecture on French impressionist painter Jean-Baptiste Chardin by Kevin McEvoy followed by a cello performance by James Acamposta. Light refreshments will be served. $10 donation requested. Call 250-9009.

Times ... and dates

Aug. 8 to Aug. 15, 2019

Harborside Concert

Farmingville Community Festival

Harborfront Park, 101 East Broadway, Port Jefferson will host a Harborside Concert titled Port Jeff Day featuring music by the Como Brothers, Lofi 3 and Heavy Duty Super Ego at 8 p.m. Free. Bring seating. Call 802-2160.

Join the Farmingville Residents Association for a Community Festival at Triangle Park on Horseblock Road from 3 to 7 p.m. The free event will feature family fun, food, cultural entertainment, activities for kids and more. Rain date is Aug. 24. Call 260-7411.

Tribute to the Beatles

Join the Smithtown Library, Main Branch, 1 North Country Road, Smithtown for a free concert on the front lawn featuring Beatles tribute band Strawberry Fields at 8 p.m. Preshow with Rock-n-Roll U at 7:30 p.m. Bring seating. No pets please. Call 3602480, ext. 231.

Friday 9

East Northport Firemen’s Fair See Aug. 8 listing.

Happenings on Main Street

The Northport Arts Coalition continues its annual Happenings on Main Street concert series with a performance by The Charlie Kaye Band (pop, rock, R&B) at the Northport Village Park Patio at Northport Harbor at 7 p.m. Bring a lawn chair or blanket. Weather permitting. Free. Call 827-6827 or 796-7613.

The Art Lande Trio in concert

Join the North Shore Public Library, 250 Route 25A, Shoreham for a concert with The Art Lande Trio (jazz) featuring Matt Wilson and Dean Johnson at 7 p.m. Open to all. Call 929-4488.

Musical Moments in Kings Park

The Kings Park Civic Association continues its Musical Moments concert series at Russ Savatt Park, 14 Main St., Kings Park with the Hoodoo Loungers (New Orleans Mardi Gras) at 7:30 p.m. Bring seating. Free. Weather permitting. Call 516-319-0672. * All numbers are in (631) area code unless otherwise noted.

Ward Melville Heritage Organization will present Walking Through Time, historic walking tours of Stony Brook Village, at 1 and 3 p.m. Take a journey through the decades and enjoy fun facts and historical happenings from the 18th to 21st centuries from a variety of historic figures. Rain date is Aug. 11. Tickets range from $15 to $20 per person, children 5 and under are free. For reservations, call 751-2244. The Three Village Historical Society will host a walking tour, Explore and Discover Setauket’s Revolutionary History, at 2 p.m. Visit the grave of Abraham Woodhull, locations of the Battle of Setauket, and 17th- and 18th-century homes. Tour leaves from the Setauket Presbyterian Church parking lot, 5 Caroline Ave., Setauket. Fee is $15 per person, $10 members. For more info, call 751-3730 or visit www.tvhs.org.

The Warren Vaché Trio, heads to the Art League of Long Island’s Jeanne Tengelsen’s Gallery, located at 107 E. Deer Park Road, Dix Hills, for a concert titled Master of Jazz at 8 p.m. Tickets are $25, $20 members and seniors. To order, call 462-5400 or visit www.artleagueli.net.

The Huntington Summer Festival at the Chapin Rainbow Stage, 2 Prime Ave., Huntington continues with Front Country (folk pop and progressive bluegrass) in concert at 8 p.m. Bring seating. Free. Call 271-8423 or visit www.huntingtonarts.org.

Walking Through Time

TVHS Historical Walking Tour

Jazz in the Gallery

Front Country in concert

1 to 3 p.m. through December. Take a trip back in time with a visit to 1721 homestead hosted by trained docents. Free. For group tours and more information, call 744-1776.

Tribute to Pink Floyd

MULTIMEDIA CONCERT EXPERIENCE The award-winning duo of Patchouli and Terra Guitarra head to the Huntington Summer Arts Festival at Heckscher Park this Friday night. Photo from HAC

Suffolk County Vanderbilt Planetarium, 180 Little Neck Road, Centerport will present Pink Floyd tribute band, Us and Floyd, in concert at 7 p.m. and again at 9 p.m. Featuring all the Pink Floyd classics including a performance of Pink Floyd’s “Dark Side of the Moon,” set to a laser light show. Tickets are $25 online at www.vanderbiltmuseum. org/ $30 at the door. Call 854-5579.

An evening of dance Woodstock tribute concert

Grounds & Sounds Cafe at the Unitarian Universalist Fellowship, 380 Nicolls Road, East Setauket will present a Woodstock tribute concert at 8 p.m. Relive the moment! Featured artists include Toby Tobias, Christine Sweeney, Rich Lanahan and The Claudia Jacobs Band. 1960s attire encouraged. Tickets are $15 at www.groundsandsounds.org or at the door. For further information, call 751-0297.

Landscape of Guitar

The Huntington Summer Festival at the Chapin Rainbow Stage, 2 Prime Ave., Huntington continues with Landscape of Guitar (multimedia Nuevo Flamenco guitar & visual art) featuring Patchouli and Terra Guitarra at 8 p.m. Bring seating. Free. Call 271-8423 or visit www.huntingtonarts.org.

Tribute to Frankie Valli

Las Vegas’ hottest Frankie Valli tribute, Oh What a Night!, heads to Theatre Three, 412 Main St., Port Jefferson at 8 p.m. Enjoy “Big Girls Don’t Cry,” “Sherry,” “My Eyes Adored You” and more. Tickets are $55. To order, call 928-9100 or visit www. theatrethree.com.

Friday Night Face Off

Theatre Three, 412 Main St., Port Jefferson will host Friday Night Face Off, Long Island’s longest

running Improv Comedy Show, on the Second Stage from 10:30 p.m. to midnight. $15 per person. Cash only. For ages 16 and up. Call 928-9100 or visit www.theatrethree.com.

Saturday 10

East Northport Firemen’s Fair See Aug. 8 listing.

Living History Tours

Suffolk County Vanderbilt Museum, 180 Little Neck Road, Centerport will present Living History Tours at the mansion today and Aug. 11 at regular intervals between noon and 3:30 p.m. Guides in costume as family members and household staff tell stories of the Vanderbilt family and its famous guests. $10 plus general admission. Call 854-5579.

VFW hosts Chicken BBQ

Join VFW Post 3054, 8 Jones St., East Setauket for its annual Chicken BBQ from 1 to 4 p.m. $20 per person includes chicken, baked potato, fresh corn, clam chowder, salad, beer, wine, soda plus games and prizes. Call 751-5541 to RSVP.

Hallock Homestead tours

The Rocky Point Historical Society’s Noah Hallock Homestead, 172 Hallock Landing Road, Rocky Point is open for tours every Saturday from

The Huntington Summer Festival at the Chapin Rainbow Stage, 2 Prime Ave., Huntington continues with the Taylor 2 Dance Company at 8 p.m. Bring seating. Free. Call 271-8423 or visit www. huntingtonarts.org.

Four By Four in concert

Celebrate the music of The Beach Boys, The Beatles, The Bee Gees and Motown with the cast of Four By Four at Theatre Three, 412 Main St., Port Jefferson at 8 p.m. Tickets are $55. To order, call 9289100 or visit www.theatrethree.com.

Sunday 11 Living History Tours See Aug. 10 listing.

Wind Down Sundays

Frank Melville Memorial Park, 1 Old Field Road, Setauket welcomes the community to a Wind Down Sundays concert at the Red Barn featuring Quarter Horse (folk, rock and alternative) at 5:30 p.m. Bring seating. Free. Call 689-6146.

Summer Concerts on the Green

The Ward Melville Heritage Organization continues its Summer Concerts on the Green with the NY Exceptions (music of the ’50s) in front of the Stony Brook Post Office, 111 Main St., Stony Brook


AUGUST 08, 2019 • ARTS & LIFESTYLES • PAGE B19 from 7 to 9 p.m. Bring seating. No rain date. Free. Call 751-2244.

Concert at the Gazebo

Join Celebrate St. James for a free concert at the Gazebo on Lake Avenue featuring Risky Business (music of the ’60s and ’70s) at 7 p.m. Rain location is the St. James Fire House. Bring seating. Visit www.celebratestjames.org.

Salute to Woodstock

The Huntington Summer Festival at the Chapin Rainbow Stage, 2 Prime Ave., Huntington concludes with a Salute to Woodstock’s 50th featuring Professor Louie & The Crowmatrix with the Woodstock Brass in concert at 8 p.m. Bring seating. Free. Call 271-8423 or visit www.huntingtonarts.org.

Monday 12 CAC to host Candace Bushnell

Author and journalist Candace Bushnell heads to the Cinema Arts Centre, 423 Park Ave., Huntington at 7:30 p.m. for Long Island LitFest. In conversation with author Ellen Meister, Bushnell will discuss her life, the impact of “Sex and the City” and her new novel, “Is There Still Sex in the City?” Tickets are $50 and include a copy of Bushnell’s new book, audience Q&A and book signing reception. Visit www.cinemaartscentre. org to register.

Civic association meeting

The Sound Beach Civic Association will hold a meeting at the Sound Beach Firehouse, 152 Sound Beach Blvd., Sound Beach at 7:30 p.m. Assemblyman Anthony Palumbo and a representative from the assessor’s office will be on hand to discuss the changes to the STAR rebate program. Open to all. Refreshments will be served. Call 744-6952.

Celebrating Janis Joplin

The John W. Engeman Theater, 250 Main St., Northport will present a celebration of Janis Joplin with Amy Lynn and the Honey Men at 8 p.m. Tickets are $25. To order, call 261-2900 or visit www. engemantheater.com.

Israeli and international dancing

Harborfields Public Library, 31 Broadway, Greenlawn will host Israeli and international dancing every Wednesday from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. Wear comfortable clothes and shoes. Free. For further details, call Linda at 269-6894.

Lois Morton’s Many Faces

Northport Public Library, 151 Laurel Ave., Northport will welcome award-winning singer and songwriter Lois Morton in concert at 7 p.m. Morton will present her show, Many Faces, featuring a variety of her most comedic songs of social commentary. Free and open to all. Call 261-6930.

Board Game Night

Looking for an opportunity to play some board games and meet some fun people? Then join the Cinema Arts Centre, 423 Park Ave., Huntington for Board Game Night in the Sky Room Cafe at 7 p.m. Free and open to all. Visit www.facebook. com/nightsattheroundtables.

Book signing

Join Book Revue, 313 New York Ave., Huntington for an evening with New York Times best-selling author Alan Paul and Long Island guitarist Andy Aledort as they speak about their new Stevie Ray Vaughan biography, “Texas Flood,” and perform a few SRV tunes at 7 p.m. Book signing to follow. Call 271-1442.

Northport Summerfest

The Northport Chamber of Commerce presents its annual Summerfest at the Robert W. Krueger Bandshell in Northport Village Park Wednesdays through Aug. 28 at 7:30 p.m. Enjoy a concert by Chaser (jazz, R&B) tonight. Bring seating. Call 754-3905.

Thursday 15 Holbrook Carnival

Join the Holbrook Chamber of Commerce for its 25th annual Carnival & Festival on the grounds of the Holbrook Country Club, 700 Patchogue-Holbrook Road, Holbrook today and Aug. 16 from 6

to 11 p.m., Aug. 17 from 1 to 11 p.m. and Aug. 18 from 1 to 9 p.m. Games, food, rides, craft vendors, entertainment and fireworks (weather permitting). 471-2725.

Summer Thursday at the LIM

Celebrate summer with a Summer Thursday event at the Long Island Museum, 1200 Route 25A, Stony Brook from 6 to 8 p.m. Enjoy crafts, music by the Cuomo Family Band and activities. Admission is free. Call 751-0066.

Kings Park Rocks concert

Kings Park Chamber of Commerce present the 4th annual Kings Park Rocks Summer Nights in the Park concert in the Kings Park Municipal Parking Lot, 1 Church St., Kings Park from 6 to 10 p.m. Featuring Donna Marketta & The Parade and Rob Gerver’s Just Sixties Band. Free. For more info visit www.kingsparkli.com.

Theater

Summer Shakespeare Festival

Suffolk County Vanderbilt Museum, 180 Little Neck Road, Centerport and The Carriage House Players continue their 31st annual Summer Shakespeare Festival with “Julius Caesar” through Sept. 1. Performances are held on the mansion courtyard stage on Wednesdays and Fridays at 8 p.m. and Sundays at 7 p.m. Tickets are $20 adults, $15 seniors and children. To order, call 516-557-1207 or visit www.carriagehouseplayers.org. See review on page B14.

‘42nd Street’

The Smithtown Center for the Performing Arts, 2 East Main St., Smithtown will present “42nd Street” through Aug. 18. One of show businesses’ most classic and beloved tales, the musical tells the story of Peggy Sawyer, a talented young performer with stars in her eyes who gets her big break on Broadway. Tickets are $38 adults, $34 seniors, $25 students. To order, call 724-3700 or visit www.smithtownpac.org.

TIMES ... AND DATES Continued on page B20

Tuesday 13

Northport Harbor Family Night

It’s back! Northport Harbor Family Nights will be held tonight along Main Street in Northport Village from 6:30 to 9:30 p.m. Enjoy live music by Tito Batista & The Black Rose Orchestra and the Northport Jazz Band, collectible car show, outdoor dining, bounce houses and more. Call 754-3905.

Tribute to Allman Brothers

The Nesconset Chamber of Commerce presents Allman Brothers tribute band, Seven Turns, in concert at the Nesconset Gazebo, 127 Smithtown Blvd., Nesconset at 6:30 p.m. Bring seating. Rain date is Aug. 27. Free. Call 724-2543.

Wednesday 14

Sunset Concerts in Port Jeff

The Greater Port Jefferson Northern Brookhaven Arts Council continues its annual Summer Concerts at Harborfront Park, 101-A East Broadway, Port Jefferson with Marci Geller from 6:30 to 8 p.m. Dogs welcome. Bring seating. Call 473-5220.

‘HOW DEEP IS YOUR LOVE?’ Michael Notardonato and Missy Dowse star in ‘Saturday Night Fever’ at the John W. Engeman Theater in Northport. The show has been extended to Sept. 1. Photo by Michael DeCristofaro

Photo courtesy of Fathom Events

Barbra Streisand stars in the classic film.

‘Hello, Dolly!’ returns to the big screen

It’s been 50 years since Barbra Streisand dazzled audiences as Dolly Levi in director Gene Kelly’s lavish, eye-popping “Hello Dolly!” and she’ll be looking swell when the dazzling musical returns to 600 select movie theaters nationwide on Sunday, Aug. 11 and Wednesday, Aug. 14 to mark its milestone anniversary, courtesy of TCM Big Screen Classics and Fathom Events. Barbra Streisand leads a huge cast that also includes Walter Matthau, Michael Crawford, and Tommy Tune as they sing and dance through more than a dozen memorable songs by Jerry Herman, including “Put on Your Sunday Clothes,” “It Only Takes a Moment,” “Before the Parade Passes By” and, of course, the title song, which features a cameo by jazz legend Louis Armstrong. In the film, matchmaker Dolly Levi takes a trip to Yonkers to see the “well-known unmarried half-a-millionaire,” Horace Vandergelder. While there, she convinces him, his two stock clerks and his niece and her beau to go to New York City. Winner of three Academy Awards, the spare-no-expenses production transformed “Hello, Dolly!” from a Broadway musical-comedy into an extravagant Hollywood production. Now, fans of all ages can get to know the incomparable Mrs. Levi and this fabled film in all of its big-screen splendor. This special two-day event includes exclusive insight from TCM Primetime host Ben Mankiewicz. Participating movie theaters in our neck of the woods include AMC Loews Stony Brook 17, 2196 Nesconset Highway, Stony Brook on Aug. 11 at 1 and 4 p.m. and Aug. 14 at noon and 7 p.m.; Island 16 Cinema de Lux, 185 Morris Ave., Holtsville and Farmingdale Multiplex Cinemas, 1001 Broadhollow Road, Farmingdale on Aug. 14 at 7 p.m. To purchase your ticket in advance, visit www.fathomevents.com.


PAGE B20 • ARTS & LIFESTYLES • AUGUST 08, 2019

‘WELL, THERE’S SOMETHING YOU DON’T SEE EVERY DAY’ Celebrate the 35th anniversary of ‘Ghostbusters’ with the Cinema Arts Centre in Huntington on Aug. 10.

TIMES ... AND DATES Continued from page B19

‘Saturday Night Fever’

Kicking off its 2019-20 season, the John W. Engeman Theater, 250 Main St., Northport will present “Saturday Night Fever The Musical” now extended through Sept. 1. Based on the 1977 blockbuster film, “Saturday Night Fever” whisks you back to the 1970s, when open shirts, bell-bottoms and disco were all the rage. Featuring music by the Bee Gees, including “Stayin’ Alive,” “How Deep Is Your Love” and many more. Call 261-2900 or visit www.engemantheater.com for tickets.

‘Menopause The Musical’

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‘Twelve Angry Jurors’

Minstrel Players, Houghton Hall at Trinity Episcopal Church, 30 Main St., Northport presents Reginald Rose’s “Twelve Angry Jurors” on Oct. 18 and 19 at 8 p.m. and Oct. 20 at 3 p.m. A young teenage boy is accused of murdering his father, the evidence is so convincing that almost everyone believes it to be an open and shut case of guilty ... almost everyone. Tickets are $20 adults, $15 seniors and students. To order, call 750-3417 or visit www. theminstrelplayersinc.org.

Film

‘The Aftermath’

The Smithtown Center for the Performing Arts, 2 East Main St., Smithtown closes its 2018-19 season with the hilarious comedy, “Menopause The Musical” from Sept. 5 to Oct. 6. Four women at a lingerie sale have nothing in common but a black lace bra AND memory loss, hot flashes, night sweats and more. Set to classic tunes from the ’60s, ’70s and ’80s, the musical parody will have you cheering and dancing in the aisles. Tickets are $40, $36 seniors. Call 724-3700 or visit www.smithtownpac.org.

East Northport Public Library, 185 Larkfield Road, East Northport will screen “The Aftermath” starring Keira Knightley on Aug. 9 at 2 p.m. Rated R. Open to all. Call 261-2313.

‘Sunset Boulevard’

‘Ghostbusters’

The John W. Engeman Theater, 250 Main St., Northport will present Andrew Lloyd Webber’s masterwork, “Sunset Boulevard,” from Sept. 12 to Oct. 27. Impoverished screen writer Joe Gillis stumbles upon faded, silent-screen goddess Norma Desmond’s mansion on Sunset Boulevard and is persuaded to work on Norma’s “masterpiece.” Featuring the much-loved score including “With One Look,” “As If We Never Said Goodbye” and “Perfect Year.” Tickets range from $75 to $80 with free valet parking. To order, call 261-2900 or visit www.engemantheater.com.

‘Jekyll & Hyde: The Musical’

Theatre Three, 412 Main St., Port Jefferson kicks off its 2019-20 season with “Jekyll & Hyde: The Musical” from Sept. 14 to Oct. 26. The epic battle between good and evil is fought when the brilliant Dr. Jekyll’s medical experiment backfires, giving life to Edward Hyde, his evil alter ego. Featuring the hit songs, “This Is the Moment” and “Someone Like You.” Contains adult themes and situations. Tickets are $35 adults, $28 seniors and students, $20 children ages 5 to 12. To order, call 928-9100 or visit www.theatrethree.com.

‘Ben Is Back’

Smithtown Public Library, Main Branch, 1 North Country Road, Smithtown presents a screening of “Ben Is Back” starring Julia Roberts on Aug. 9 at 2 p.m. Rated R. Open to all but registration required by calling 360-2480, ext. 235. In honor of its 35th anniversary, “Ghostbusters” starring Dan Aykroyd and Bill Murray returns to the big screen at the Cinema Arts Centre, 423 Park Ave., Huntington on Aug. 10 at 10 p.m. Rated PG. Tickets are $7, $5 members. Visit www.cinemaartscentre.org.

‘Spaceballs’

Port Jefferson Free Library, 100 Thompson St., Port Jefferson will screen “Spaceballs” on Aug. 12 at 2 p.m. as part of its Summer Space Cinema Series. Open to all. Popcorn will be served. Call 473-0022. CALENDAR DEADLINE is Wednesday at noon, one week before publication. Items may be mailed to: Times Beacon Record News Media, P.O. Box 707, Setauket, NY 11733. Email your information about community events to leisure@ tbrnewspapers.com. Calendar listings are for notfor-profit organizations (nonsectarian, nonpartisan events) only, on a space-available basis. Please include a phone number that can be printed. * All numbers are in (631) area code unless otherwise noted.


AUGUST 08, 2019 • ARTS & LIFESTYLES • PAGE B21

Religious D irectory

Assemblies Of God

STONY BROOK CHRISTIAN ASSEMBLY Connecting to God, Each Other and the World 400 Nicolls Road, E. Setauket 631–689–1127 • Fax 631–689–1215 www.stonybrookchristian.com PASTOR TROY REID Weekly Schedule Sunday Worship w/nursery 10 am Kidmo Children’s Church • Ignited Youth Fellowship and Food Always to Follow Tuesday Evening Prayer: 7 pm Thursday Morning Bible Study w/Coffee & Bagels: 10 am Friday Night Experience “FNX” for Pre K-Middle School: 6:30 pm Ignite Youth Ministry: 7:30 pm Check out our website for other events and times

Byzantine Catholic RESURRECTION BYZANTINE CATHOLIC CHURCH

38 Mayflower Avenue, Smithtown NY 11787 631–759–6083 resurrectionsmithtown@gmail.com www.resurrectionsmithtown.org FATHER TYLER A. STRAND, ADMINISTRATOR, JOSEPH S. DURKO, CANTOR Divine Liturgy: Sundays at 10:30 am Holy Days: See website or phone for information Sunday School Sundays at 9:15 am Adult Faith Formation/Bible Study: Mondays at 7:00 pm. Men’s Prayer Group Wednesdays at 7 pm A Catholic Church of the Eastern Rite under the Eparchy of Passaic.

Catholic ST. GERARD MAJELLA ROMAN CATHOLIC CHURCH

300 Terryville Road, Port Jefferson Station 631–473–2900 www.stgmajella.org REV. GREGORY RANNAZZISI, PASTOR Mass: Saturday 5:00pm Sunday: 7:30am, 9:00am & 11:00am Weekday Mass: 9:00am Confessions: Saturday 4:00-4:45 or by appointment Baptism and Wedding arrangements can be made by calling the Parish Office Thrift Shop: Mon-Fri 10am-4pm Saturday 10am-2pm

INFANT JESUS ROMAN CATHOLIC CHURCH

©165470

110 Myrtle Ave., Port Jefferson, NY 11777 631-473-0165 • Fax 631-331-8094 www.www.infantjesus.org REVEREND PATRICK M. RIEGGER, PASTOR ASSOCIATES: REV. FRANCIS LASRADO & REV. ROLANDO TICLLASUCA To schedule Baptisms and Weddings, Please call the Rectory Confessions: Saturdays 12:30-1:15 pm in the Lower Church Religious Ed.: 631– 928-0447 Parish Outreach: 631–331-6145 Weekly Masses: 6:50 and 9 am in the Church, 12 pm in the Chapel* Weekend Masses: Saturday at 5 pm in the Church,

5:15 pm in the Chapel,* Sunday at 7:30 am, 10:30 am, 12 pm, and 5 pm in the Church and at 8:30 am, 10 am, and 11:30 am (Family Mass) in the Chapel* Spanish Masses: Sunday at 8:45 am and Wednesday at 6 pm in the Church *Held at the Infant Jesus Chapel at St. Charles Hospital

Holy Matrimony: Contact Parish Office at least six months in advance of desired date. Religious Education: Contact 631-744-9515 Parish Outreach: Contact 631-209-0325 Our Lady of Wisdom Regional School: Contact 631-473-1211.

ST. JAMES ROMAN CATHOLIC CHURCH

Congregational

429 Rt. 25A, Setauket, NY 11733 Phone: 631–941–4141 • Fax: 631–751–6607 Parish Office email: parish@stjamessetauket.org Mission Statement: Formed as the Body of Christ through the waters of Baptism, we are Beloved daughters and sons of the Father. We, the Catholic community of the Three Village area, are a pilgrim community on Camino-journeying toward the fullness of the Kingdom of God, guided by the Holy Spirit. Nurtured by the Eucharist and formed by the Gospel, we strive to respond to Jesus’ Invitation to be faithful and fruitful disciples; to be a Good Samaritan to (our) neighbor and enemy; so that in Jesus’ name, we may be a welcoming community, respectful of life in all its diversities and beauty; stewards of and for God’s creation; and witnesses to Faith, Hope and Charity. REV. JAMES-PATRICK MANNION, PASTOR REV. GERALD CESTARE, ASSOCIATE PASTOR REV. JOHN FITZGERALD, IN RESIDENCE Office Hours: Mon.-Fri. 9am - 4pm; Sat. 9 am - 2 pm Weekday Masses: Monday – Saturday 8:00 am Weekend Masses: Saturday (Vigil) 5:00 pm (Youth) Sunday 8:00am, 9:30 am (family), 11:30 am (choir) Baptisms: Contact the Office at the end of the third month (pregnancy) to set date Matrimony: contact the office at least 9 months before desired date Reconciliation: Saturdays 4:00 – 4:45 pm or by appointment Anointing Of The Sick: by request Bereavement: 631- 941-4141 x 341 Faith Formation Office: 631- 941-4141 x 328 Outreach: 631- 941-4141 x 313 Our Lady of Wisdom Regional School: 631- 473-1211 Our Daily Bread Sunday Soup Kitchen 3 pm

ST. LOUIS DE MONTFORT ROMAN CATHOLIC CHURCH

75 New York Avenue, Sound Beach, N.Y. 11789 Parish Office: 631-744-8566; FAX 631-744-8611 Parish Website: www.stlouisdm.org Office Hours: Mon., Tues., Thurs.: 9 am to 5 pm Wednesday: 9 am to 8 pm; Friday: 9 am to 4 pm; Saturday: 9 am to 1 pm; Closed on Sunday Mission Statement: To proclaim the good news of Jesus Christ’s love through our active involvement as a parish family in works of Charity, Faith, Worship, Justice and Mercy. ALL ARE WELCOME! No matter what your present status is in the Catholic Church. No matter your family situation. No matter your practice of faith. No matter your personal history, age or background. YOU are invited, respected and loved at St. Louis de Montfort. REV. MSGR. CHRISTOPHER J. HELLER, PASTOR REV. LENNARD SABIO, ASSOCIATE PASTOR REV. MSGR. DONALD HANSON, IN RESIDENCE REV. FRANCIS PIZZARELLI, S.M.M., PARISH ASSISTANT REV. HENRY VAS, PARISH ASSISTANT Weekday Masses: Monday through Friday: 8:30 am in the Chapel Weekend Masses: Saturday Vigil: 5 pm Sunday: 7:30 am; 9:00 am; 10:30 am; 12 noon. Baptisms: Most Sundays at 1:30 pm. Please contact Parish Office for an appointment. Reconciliation: Sat.: 4-4:45 pm or by appointment. Anointing of the Sick: by request.

MT. SINAI CONGREGATIONAL UNITED CHURCH OF CHRIST

233 North Country Road, Mt. Sinai • 631–473–1582 www.msucc.org • REV. PHILIP HOBSON “No matter who you are or where you are on life’s journey, you are welcome here” No matter who you are or where you are on life’s journey, we invite you to worship with us in our judgement-free sacred space. Come experience our tradition, where freedom of thought and exchange of ideas are encouraged and celebrated. Join us as we put our Christian values into practice, following the example of Jesus, by caring for our neighbors near and far, as they suffer food insecurity, homelessness, political and domestic violence, gender discrimination and other injustices. We know it is God who put the wiggle in the children, so bring them with you so they can participate in worship and in our lively Sunday School program. Service and Sunday School on Sundays at 10:00 AM. Meditative service at 8:30 AM on Sundays.

Episcopal ALL SOULS EPISCOPAL CHURCH

“Our little historic church on the hill” across from the Stony Brook Duck Pond Main Street, Stony Brook • 631–751–0034 www.allsouls–stonybrook.org • allsoulsepiscopalchurch@verizon.net Sunday Holy Eucharist: 8 and 9:30 am All Souls now offers a 30 minute Inter-Faith Service every Wednesday Morning at 7:00 AM This is a small eclectic Episcopal congregation that has a personal touch. We welcome all regardless of where you are on your spiritual journey.Walk with us.

CAROLINE CHURCH OF BROOKHAVEN

THE REV. CN. DR. RICHARD D. VISCONTI, RECTOR 1 Dyke Road on the Village Green, Setauket Web site: www.carolinechurch.net email: office@carolinechurch.net • 631–941–4245 Thursday Noon: H.E. and Healing Service Saturday Service: 5 pm Sunday Services: 8 am - Rite I • 10 am - Rite II 10am Camp Caroline Call 631-941-4245 for registration. Let God walk with you as part of our family– friendly community.

CHRIST EPISCOPAL CHURCH

127 Barnum Ave., Port Jefferson • 631–473–0273 email: ccoffice@christchurchportjeff.org www.christchurchportjeff.org FATHER ANTHONY DILORENZO: PRIEST–IN–CHARGE Sunday Services: 8 am & 10 am Sunday Eucharist:8 am and 10 am; Wednesday 10 in our chapel Sunday School and Nursery Registration for Sunday School starting Sunday after the 10 am Eucharist Our ministries: Welcome Friends on Mondays at 5:00 pm AA meetings on Tuesdays and Thursdays at 7 pm/Prayer Group on Wednesdays at 10:30 am/Bible Study on Thursdays at 10 am.

It is the mission of the people of Christ Church to grow in our relationship with Jesus Christ and to make his love known to all through our lives and ministry. We at Christ Church are a joyful, welcoming community. Wherever you are in your journey of life we want to be part of it.

ST. JAMES EPISCOPAL CHURCH

490 North Country Road, St. James, NY 11780 We are a friendly community church, and we welcome everyone to join us to worship, learn, serve, share, and have fun! 631-584-5560 www.stjamesstjames.org Parish Office email: stjamesc@optonline.net THE REV. DAVID GABLE, INTERIM PRIEST Sunday Holy Eucharist: 8 a.m. (Rite I) and 9:30 a.m. (Rite II, with music) Prayers for healing after 9:30 worship Children welcome at all services: religious formation offered for all levels, including Godly Play. Active Choir, Altar Guild, Lay Eucharist Ministry, Fellowship and Bible Study programs. Where is God calling us? To Grow in faith through Scripture and prayer, To build relationships in Christ, To serve one another and the world.

ST. JOHN’S EPISCOPAL CHURCH

“To know Christ and to make Him known” REV. DUNCAN A. BURNS, RECTOR ALEX PRYRODNY, ORGANIST & MUSIC DIRECTOR 12 Prospect St, Huntington ● (631) 427-1752 On Main St. next to the Library www.stjohnshuntington.org ● LIKE us on Facebook Sunday Worship: 8:00 am – Rite I Holy Eucharist 10:00 am – Rite II Choral Holy Eucharist Thrift Shop Open Tuesdays & Thursdays - Noon to 3 pm Saturdays - 10am to 3 pm Come, shop our summer sale! All are Welcome!

Evangelical THREE VILLAGE CHURCH

To Know Christ and To Make Him Known 322 Main Street, East Setauket www.3vc.org • 631-941–3670 LEAD PASTOR JOSH MOODY Sunday Worship Schedule: 9:15 am: Worship Service, Sunday School (Pre-K–5TH grade), Nursery 10:30 am: Bagels & Coffee 11:00 am: Worship Service, Nursery, We Offer Weekly Teen Programs, Small Groups, Women’s & Men’s Bible Studies, Alpha, Stephen Ministry, Faith Preschool For Ages 3 & 4, Mommy & Me, VBS August 5-9 Join Us As We Celebrate 60 Years Of Proclaiming The Good News Of Jesus Christ!

To be listed in the Religious Directory please call

631–751–7663


PAGE B22 • ARTS & LIFESTYLES • AUGUST 08, 2019

Religious D irectory

Greek Orthodox

CHURCH OF THE ASSUMPTION

430 Sheep Pasture Rd., Port Jefferson 11777 Tel: 631-473-0894 • Fax: 631-928-5131 www.kimisis.org • goc.assumption@gmail.com REV. DEMETRIOS N. CALOGREDES, PROTOPRESBYTER Sunday Services: Orthros 8:30 Am - Divine Liturgy 10 Am Services Conducted In Both Greek & English* Books Available To Follow In English* Sunday Catechism School, 10 Am - 11 Am* Greek Language School, Tuesdays 5 Pm - 8 Pm* Bible Study & Adult Catechism Classes Available* Golden Age & Youth Groups* Thrift Store* Banquet Hall Available For Rental* For Information Please Call Church Office*

Jewish CHABAD AT STONY BROOK

“Judaism With A Smile” 360 Nicolls Road, East Setauket Next To Fire Dept. 631-585–0521 • 800-My-Torah • www.chabadsb.com RABBI CHAIM & RIVKIE GROSSBAUM RABBI MOTTI & CHAYA GROSSBAUM RABBI SHOLOM B. & CHANIE COHEN Membership Free Weekday, Shabbat & Holiday Services Highly Acclaimed Torah Tots Preschool Afternoon Hebrew School Camp Gan Israel • Judaica Publishing Department Lectures And Seminars Living Legacy Holiday Programs Jewish Learning Institute Friendship Circle For Special Needs Children The Cteen Network N’shei Chabad Women’s Club • Cyberspace Library Chabad At Stony Brook University – Rabbi Adam & Esther Stein

EAST NORTHPORT JEWISH CENTER

328 Elwood Road, East Northport 631-368-6474 • www.ENJC.org RABBI IAN SILVERMAN Shabbat Services every Friday evening and Saturday morning. Daily evening minyan and Sunday morning minyan Newly revamped religious school • Experiential learning for children ages 5-13 • Dynamic Teachers Family Services Monthly Tot Shabbat • Youth Group • Adult Education Adult Bar/Bat Mitzvah • Community Service Sisterhood • Men’s Club Complimentary First Year Dues for New Members A warm, spiritual, cultural & social Jewish Community “The Haimish Shul”

KEHILLAT CHOVEVEI TZION

764 Route 25A, Setauket (At The Old Victoria House) Mail: P.O. Box 544, E. Setauket, NY 11733 631-689-0257 (leave a message & you’ll get a call back) Visit Us At: www.kct.org. We Are A Traditional Conservative Congregation, Run Entirely By Our Members. We Have Services every Shabbat And All Jewish Holidays, Along With Other Community Activities, With Participation Opportunities For All Jews. Join Us Shabbat Morning And You’ll Get A Warm Welcome! KCT - An Old Fashioned Friendly Shul

©165471

NORTH SHORE JEWISH CENTER

385 Old Town Rd., Port Jefferson Station 631-928–3737 • www.northshorejewishcenter.org RABBI AARON BENSON • CANTOR DANIEL KRAMER EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR MARCIE PLATKIN PRINCIPAL HEATHER WELKES YOUTH DIRECTOR JEN SCHWARTZ Services: Friday At 8 Pm; Saturday At 9:15 am Daily Morning And Evening Minyan- Call For Times. Tot Shabbat • Family Services • Sisterhood • Men’s Club • Seniors’ Club Youth Group • Continuing Ed • Adult Bar/Bat Mitzvah • Judaica Shop Food Pantry • Lecture Series • Jewish Film Series NSJC JEWISH LEARNING CENTER RELIGIOUS SCHOOL Innovative Curriculum And Programming For Children Ages 5-13 Imagine A Synagogue That Feels Like Home! Come Connect With Us On Your Jewish Journey. Member United Synagogue Of Conservative Judaism

TEMPLE ISAIAH (REFORM)

1404 Stony Brook Road, Stony Brook 631-751–8518 • www.tisbny.org A Warm And Caring Intergenerational Community Dedicated To Learning, Prayer, Social Action, And Friendship. Member Union For Reform Judaism RABBI PAUL SIDLOFSKY • CANTOR MARCEY WAGNER RABBI EMERITUS STEPHEN A. KAROL RABBI EMERITUS ADAM D. FISHER CANTOR EMERITUS MICHAEL F. TRACHTENBERG Sabbath Services Friday 7:30 pm And Saturday 10 am Religious School • Monthly Family Service Monthly Tot • Shabbat Youth Groups • Senior Club Adult Education Sisterhood Brotherhood • Book Club-More

Lutheran–ELCA HOPE LUTHERAN CHURCH AND ANCHOR NURSERY SCHOOL

46 Dare Road, Selden 631-732-2511 Emergency Number 516-848-5386 REV. DR. RICHARD O. HILL, PASTOR Email: office@hopelutheran.com Website: www.hopeluth.com Holy Communion Is Celebrated Every Weekend Summer Schedule: Sundays at 8:30 and 10:30 am Summer Day Camp Programs: June 15-August 9 Vacation Bible School: August 12-26 Drama Camp: August 19-23 Monday-Friday 9 am - 3 pm Sunday Services Are Live-Streamed Through Our “Friends Of Hope Lutheran Church” Facebook Group. Sermons are posted on Youtube.com at “Pastor Richard O Hill” Welcome Sunday is September 8th featuring a special children’s program from 11-12 followed by a family barbeque hosted by the Men’s Fellowship.

ST. PAUL’S EVANGELICAL LUTHERAN CHURCH

309 Patchogue Road, Port Jefferson Station 631-473-2236 REV. PAUL A. DOWNING PASTOR E-mail: Pastor pauldowning@yahoo.com Pastor’s cell: 347–423–1523 Summer Services: Sunday Mornings at 9:30am Holy Communion Coffee Fellowship Hour on Lawn after service Friday Morning 10:30am-Power of Prayer Hour Free meal provided to the community on

Sunday at 1:00pm and Wednesday at 5:45pm provided by Welcome Friends Join Us For Any Service--All Are Welcome We are celebrating our second century of service to the Port Jefferson Area.

Lutheran–LCMS MESSIAH LUTHERAN CHURCH

Messiah Preschool & Day Care 465 Pond Path, East Setauket 631-751–1775 • www.messiahny.com PASTOR STEVE UNGER We welcome all to join us for worship & fellowship. It would be wonderful to have you with us. Summer Worship Services: 9:30 am with Holy Communion beginning May 26 We have NYS Certified Preschool & Day Care

Methodist BETHEL AFRICAN METHODIST EPISCOPAL CHURCH

33 Christian Ave/ PO 2117, E. Setauket NY 11733 631-941–3581 REV. GREGORY L. LEONARD–PASTOR Sunday Worship: 10:30 Am Adult Sunday School 9:30 Am Lectionary Reading And Prayer: Wed. 12 Noon Gospel Choir: Tues. 8 Pm Praise Choir And Youth Choir 3rd And 4th Fri. 6:30 Pm

ST. JAMES UNITED METHODIST CHURCH

532 Moriches Road, St. James 11780-1316 REV. PRINCE DONKOR, PASTOR 631-584-5340 Sunday Service and Sunday School at 10 am Tuesday Evening is Prayer Group at 7:30 pm Wednesday Morning Bible Study at 7:30 am Wednesday Afternoon Bible Study at 1 pm Wednesday Evening Choir Practice at 7:30 pm AA Ministry Every Monday and Wednesday Evenings at 6:30 pm Open Hearts Open Minds

SETAUKET UNITED METHODIST CHURCH

160 Main Street, Corner Of 25a And Main Street East Setauket • 631–941–4167 REV. STEVEN KIM, PASTOR www.setauketumc.org sumcny@aol.com Sunday Worship Service & Church School: 10 am Holy Communion 1st Sunday Of Month Mary & Martha Circle (Women’s Ministry) Monthly On 2nd Tuesday At 1pm

STONY BROOK COMMUNITY CHURCH UNITED METHODIST 216 Christian Ave., Stony Brook, 11790 Church Office: 631-751-0574 stonybrookcommunitychurch@gmail.com www.stonybrookcommunitychurch.org REV. CHUCK VAN HOUTEN, PASTOR Connecting People To God, Purpose And Each Other Sunday Worship: 10:00 am Sunday School: 10:00 am Renewing, Restoring, Reviving For The 21st Century!

Presbyterian SETAUKET PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH

5 Caroline Avenue ~ On the Village Green 631- 941-4271 Celebrating and Sharing the love of God since 1660. The Rev. Kate Jones Calone, Interim Pastor The Rev. Ashley McFaul-Erwin, Community Outreach Pastor www.setauketpresbyterian.org Email: setauketpresbyterian@verizon.net Sunday Worship: at 9:30 a.m. (childcare available) Summer Sunday School “The Un-bee-lievable Buzz at SPC” at 9:45 a.m. Outreach Ministries: Open Door Exchange Ministry: Furnishing homes...Finding hope www.facebook.com/welcomefriendssoupkitchen Welcome Friends Soup Kitchen Prep Site: tfolliero@yahoo.com All are welcome to join this vibrant community of worship, music (voice and bell choirs), mission (local, national and international), and fellowship. Call the church office or visit our website for current information on church activities. SPC is a More Light Presbyterian Church and part of the Covenant Network of Presbyterians working toward a church as generous and just as God’s grace.

Quakers RELIGIOUS SOCIETY OF FRIENDS

4 Friends Way, St. James 631–928-2768 • www.cbquakers.org Worship Sundays: Sept. - June 11 am , July - Aug. 10:00 am We gather in silent worship seeking God • the Inner Light • Spirit. We are guided by the Quaker testimonies of simplicity, peace, integrity, community, equality, and stewardship. Weekly coffee and fellowship, monthly discussions, Religious Education for children.

Unitarian Universalist UNITARIAN UNIVERSALIST FELLOWSHIP AT STONY BROOK

380 Nicolls Road • between Rte 347 & Rte 25A 631–751–0297 • www.uufsb.org • office@uufsb.org REV. MARGARET H. ALLEN (minister@uufsb.org) Sunday Service: 10:30 am Religious Education at UUFSB: Unitarian Universalism accepts wisdom from many sources and offers non-dogmatic religious education for children from 3-18 to foster ethical and spiritual development and knowledge of world religions. Classes Sunday mornings at 10:30 am. Childcare for little ones under three. Senior High Youth Group meetings Sunday evenings. Registration is ongoing. For more information: dre@uufsb.org.

Unity UNITY CHURCH OF HUNTINGTON

203 East Pulaski Rd., Huntington Sta. 631–385–7180 • www.unityhuntingtonny.org email: unitychurchny@yahoo.com FB & YouTube: Unity Church of Healing Light REV. SABA MCHUNGUZI, MINISTER Sunday Service - 11:30 am - 12:30 pm (Sign Language Interpreter) Sunday school for children and youth 3-17 years old Wednesday Prayer Group - 7:30 p.m. - 8:30 pm We believe that everyone is a child of God and entitled to live a fulfilling and productive life. We teach spiritual principles, such as affirmative prayer, the power of thought and the law of attraction (LOA). We celebrate a diverse fellowship where everyone finds acceptance. We are a member of Unity Worldwide Ministries and affiliated with the Daily Word devotional booklet, and Silent Unity.


AUGUST 08, 2019 • ARTS & LIFESTYLES • PAGE B23

VENDORS WANTED

• Port Jefferson Station/Terryville Chamber of Commerce is looking for vendors for its 2019 Family Fun Day at the Chamber Train Car Park in Port Jefferson Station on Sept. 28 from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Free tables for members. To view an application, visit www.pjstchamber.com. Deadline to apply is Sept. 14. Call 631-821-1313 for more info. • Town of Brookhaven will host its 3rd annual Health & Wellness Fair at Brookhaven Town Hall, One Independence Hill, Farmingville on Sept. 21 from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Businesses can sign up for a FREE vendor table. To register, call 631-451-9100 or visit www.brookhavenNY.gov/health. • Yaphank Historical Society seeks craft and merchandise vendors for its annual Fall Yard Sale to be held on the grounds of the Robert Hawkins House, 4 Yaphank Ave., Yaphank on

Sept. 21 from 9 to 4 p.m. Rain date is Sept. 22. Vendor fee is $10 for a 10×10 space payable on the day of the event. No prior registration or payment required. For further details, call 631-924-4803. • St. James Chamber of Commerce is now accepting applications for its 32nd annual St. James Day on Oct. 6 starting at 11 a.m. along Lake Avenue in St. James. 10×10 spaces are available for $125 before Aug. 15; $150 after. Call 631-584-8510 or visit www.stjameschamber.org. • Benner’s Farm, 56 Gnarled Hollow Road, East Setauket seeks makers, artisans and crafters for its annual Harvest Festival on Oct. 19 and 20 from noon to 4 p.m. $50 per day, $80 for weekend for a 10×10 spot. Call 631-689-8172 or email folks@bennersfarm.com.

A vendor offers jewelry at the Hellenic Festival in Port Jefferson. Photo by Giselle Barkley

FREE! Concert Under the Stars & Laser Light Show the g n i r u t a e F

West Point Benny Havens Band Friday Aug. 16, 2019 - 6:30 to 9:30 pm - Rain or Shine Outdoors Under the Stars at the Long Island State Veterans Home Campus of Stony Brook University 100 Patriots Road, Stony Brook, NY 11790

Opening Performer:

Janson Supermarkets, LLC Hauppauge & Patchogue

SM

Tommy Sullivan US Army Veteran Johnny Maestro and the Brooklyn Bridge and West Point Band Alumni

ASSISTED LIVING COMMUNITIES

ASSISTED LIVING COMMUNITIES

D O

W E S T B U R Y | S M I T H T O W N | P E L H A M G A R D E N S | B R O O K LY N | E L I Z A B E T H

631-768-1000

THE LAW OFFICES OF

Thank you to our sponsors:

DAVID R. OKRENT ELDER LAW ESTATE PLANNING

SPECIAL NEEDS

VFW Post 4927 Auxiliary Centereach, New York

FREE Event! Arrive Early! Bring blankets, chairs & the whole family! Food Available! Questions: 631-444-8606 or visit www.LISVH.org

162542

• Community Association of Greater St. James is looking for additional vendors for its Farmers Market, which is held at the corner of Woodlawn Avenue and Lake Avenue in St. James every Saturday from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. through August. For additional info, call 631-862-6500. • Holbrook Chamber of Commerce seeks craft vendors for its 25th annual Carnival & Festival at the Holbrook Country Club, 700 Patchogue-Holbrook Road, Holbrook from Aug. 15 to 18. Call 631-879-5197. • Smithtown Historical Society has a call out to local residents interested in renting a table for a Community Yard Sale to be held at the Frank Brush Barn, 211 E. Main St., Smithtown on Aug. 17 from noon to 4 p.m. Call 631-2656768 for details. • Greek Orthodox Church of the Assumption, 430 Sheep Pasture Road, Port Jefferson seeks vendors for its annual Hellenic Festival to be held from Aug. 22 to 25. For more information, please call 631-473-0894. • Hallockville Museum Farm, 6038 Sound Ave., Riverhead holds its 39th annual Hallockville Country Fair & Craft Show on Aug. 24 and 25 from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Interested craft vendors can fill out an application at www.hallockville. com. Call 631- 298-5292. • Ronkonkoma Chamber of Commerce hosts its annual Street Fair along Hawkins Avenue on Sept. 1 from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. Merchandise and food vendors can download an application at www.ronkonkomachamber.com. Call 631963-2796. • East Northport Chamber of Commerce is looking for street fair, sidewalk sale and craft vendors for its annual East Northport Festival on Sept. 6, 7 and 8 at John J. Walsh Memorial Park, 190 Larkfield Road, East Northport. Call 631-261-3573 or visit www.eastnorthport.com for more info. • Setauket United Methodist Church, 160 Main St., Setauket has a few spots available for its Community Yard and Vendor Sale on Sept. 7 from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Interested vendors should call Diane at 631-751-7375. • Christ Episcopal Church, 127 Barnum Ave., Port Jefferson seeks vendors for a Flea Market/Craft Fair to be held on Sept. 7 from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Rain date is Sept. 14. Tables are provided. $50 indoors, $40 outdoors. For a vendor application and further details, call 631-689-1073. • South Huntington Public Library, located at 145 Pidgeon Hill Road, Huntington Station has a call out for farmers market/flea market/art and craft vendors for its 6th annual Friends of the Library Fall Fair to be held on Sept. 21 from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. rain or shine. Spots are $35 each. Applications are available at www.shpl.info or by calling 631-549-4411.


PAGE B24 • ARTS & LIFESTYLES • AUGUST 08, 2019

READERS’ CHOICE:

Nominate your favorite businesses and be eligible to win a

$100 GIFT CERTIFICATE $50 GIFT CERTIFICATE $25 GIFT CERTIFICATE

Best of the North Shore Ballot

Times Beacon Record News Media readers will be voting for the Best of the Best in over 100 categories on the ballot below. Here’s a chance to get your favorite North Shore businesses, currently operating, the recognition and fame they deserve! Readers are asked to vote by Friday, August 30 Thursday, October 10 - By popular demand! Please print your choices and use complete names. Winners will be announced in the Best of the North Shore publication, inserted in the full run of all six newspapers.

from any of the nominated businesses that appear in the Best of the North Shore supplement.

Accountant

Chiropractor

Hospital

Psychotherapist

Acupuncturist

Cleaning Service

Hotel/Motel

Real Estate Agency

Antique Store

Clothing Store-Men’s

Ice Cream Stand/Store

Real Estate Agent

Arborist/Tree Service

Clothing Store-Women’s

Insurance Agency

Restaurant

Art Gallery

Coffee Shop

Jewelry Shop

American

Assisted Living/Nursing Home

Computer Services

Kitchen/Bath Design

Asian

Attorney/Lawyer

Consignment/Thrift Store

Landscaper

Deli

Audiologist/Hearing Specialist

Daycare/Preschool

Dry Cleaner

Diner

Auto Body Shop

Dramatic Theater (Playhouse)

Liquor/Wine Store

French

Auto Repair Service

Electrician

Local Brewery

Greek

Bakery

Local Newspaper

Italian

Bank

Eye Care Optometrist

Massage

Pizzeria

Bar/Nightclub

Financial Planner

Mortgage Company

Mediterranean

Barber

Fish Market

Movie Theater

Mexican

Bed & Breakfast

Flooring Store (carpet/tile)

Museum

Seafood

Bike Shop

Florist

Music Shop/Instruments

Security Systems Service

Bowling Lanes

Fuel Company

Nail Salon

Shipping

Bridal Shop

Funeral Home

Painter (Interior/Exterior)

Spa

Builder/Contractor

Furniture Store

Paint Store

Sporting Goods Store

Building Supply/Lumber

Garden Center

Party Supply

Supermarket

Butcher

Golf Course

Pet Boarding/Sitting Service

Tanning Salon

Canoe/Kayak Store

Grocery Store

Pet Grooming

Toy Store

Car Dealership

Gym/Fitness Center

Pet Supply Store

Trash Removal

Car Wash

Hair Salon

Pharmacy

Veterinarian

Card/Gift Shop

Hardware Store

Photographer

Walk-In Clinic

Carpet Cleaning Service

Health Food Store

Plumber

Winery

Caterer

Historical Society

Private School

Yoga Studio

Your Votes Can Be Delivered or Mailed to: TBR News Media, 185 Route 25A, Setauket, NY 11733 • (631) 751-7744 Phone:

Address: Email Address:

Please send me a free 3 month trial subscription:

©160202

Name:

RULES: Complete Business Names Required • At least 10 nominations must be filled out to be eligible, more are welcome • Employees of TBR News Media and their families are not eligible to vote • No photocopies accepted – we want you to pick up and read our papers! • Name, address, phone number & email address must be filled out • 1 entry per person


AUGUST 08, 2019 • ARTS & LIFESTYLES • PAGE B25

KIDS KORNER

SHELTER PET OF THE WEEK

Programs

Sew with Circuits

Drop by the Long Island Explorium, 101 East Broadway, Port Jefferson from Aug. 8 to 11 from 1 to 5 p.m. and learn how to sew with circuits. $5 per person. Call 331-3277 or visit www. longislandexplorium.org.

Tales for Tots

Storytime at Barnes & Noble

Join Barnes & Noble in Lake Grove at 600 Smith Haven Mall or in East Northport at 4000 E. Jericho Turnpike for a reading of “Dear Girl,” by Amy Krouse Rosenthal and “Dear Boy,” by Paris Rosenthal on Aug. 10 at 11 a.m. Followed by an activity. Free. Call 724-0341 (LG) or 462-0208 (EN).

Summer drop-in workshops

The Heckscher Museum of Art, 2 Prime Ave., Huntington offers summer drop-in workshops for children ages 5 to 10 on Wednesdays and Fridays from 10:30 to 11:30 a.m. Join them on Aug. 9 and 14 for some summer fun. Each day, children will either paint at an inspiring location in Heckscher Park (weather permitting) or draw, collage or sculpt in the museum galleries. No registration necessary. $5 per child. Call 351-3250.

Cave Encounters

Caleb Smith State Park Preserve, 581 W. Jericho Turnpike, Smithtown will present a family program, Cave Encounters, on Aug. 10 from 10 to 11:30 a.m. Many creatures living in total darkness have developed specialized adaptations. Explore their world through fun hands-on games and activities. (The room will be dark at times.) $4 per person. Advance reservations required by calling 265-1054.

Pajama Story Time

Emma S. Clark Memorial Library, 120 Main St., Setauket hosts a Pajama Story Time for ages 2 to grade 2 with a parent/caregiver on Aug. 12 from 7 to 7:30 p.m. Put on your PJs, grab your teddy bear and head over to the library for a great bedtime story. No registration required. Open to all. Call 941-4080.

Creative museum workshops

Make a date to create. The Suffolk County Vanderbilt Museum, 180 Little Neck Road, Centerport offers fun summer workshops for children in grades K to 3. Join them from 10 a.m. to noon on Aug. 12 for Ancient Egypt, Aug. 13 for Vanderbilt Cup Race, Aug. 14 for Diversity of Life and Aug. 15 for Marine Habitats. All workshops are followed by a craft. Fee is $20 per child/$18 members. To reserve your child’s spot, call 854-5539.

World of Stories: Pop Songs

Singer/songwriter Jack Licitra heads to Emma S. Clark Memorial Library, 120 Main St., Setauket for family program on the library lawn titled World of Stories: Pop Songs on Aug. 15 from 6:30 to 7:30 p.m. Sing and dance while learning about emotions, characters and plots in your favorite songs. Open to all. No registration required. Call 941-4080.

MOVIES IN THE MOONLIGHT Catch a free screening of ‘How to Train Your Dragon 3’ at Heritage Park in Mount Sinai on Aug. 9.

Theater

‘The Emperor’s New Clothes’

Children’s theater continues at the Smithtown Center for the Performing Arts, 2 East Main St., Smithtown with Hans Christian Andersen’s “The Emperor’s New Clothes” through Aug. 18. Young Emperor Marcus the Third is nervous to take the throne. Deciding that he can only gain confidence by dressing in the finest attire, he is outsmarted by a swindler who promises to make magic clothes that are “invisible to fools, liars, and anyone you should ignore.” Naturally, everyone chooses to see the magic clothes, until a friend reveals all. All seats are $18. To order, call 724-3700 or visit www.smithtownpac.org.

MEET ODIE!

Photo courtesy of Kent Animal Shelter This week’s shelter pet is Odie, a 3-yearold Jack Russel terrier/poodle mix, currently waiting at Kent Animal Shelter for his furever home. Odie is an awesome little dog, weighing in at just 14 pounds. A rescue from Georgia, this little guy loves going for walks and would be a great addition to any family. Come on down and meet him!

Odie comes neutered, microchipped and is up to date on all his vaccines. Kent Animal Shelter is located at 2259 River Road in Calverton. The adoption center is open seven days a week from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. For more information on Odie and other adoptable pets at Kent, call 631-727-5731 or visit www.kentanimalshelter.com.

‘Rapunzel: A Tangled Fairytale’

The John W. Engeman Theater, 250 Main St., Northport kicks off its 2019-20 Children’s Theater season with “Rapunzel: A Tangled Fairytale,” through Aug. 25. Locked up in a tower by an evil witch, Rapunzel longs to see the world for her 16th birthday. When a handsome prince named Brian comes to rescue her, both will have to face the wrath of the witch and a few other hilarious obstacles. All seats are $15. To order, call 2612900 or visit www.engemantheater.com.

CAMP SETAUKET at

WORLD GYM

“Celebrating our 28th Year!” 4 Exciting Camps To Choose From! Large Outdoor And Indoor Space For Numerous Sports & Activities. New Enormous Carnival Bouncer!

‘Pinocchio’

Theatre Three, 412 Main St., Port Jefferson presents an original musical retelling of “Pinocchio,” the story of a puppet that dreams of becoming a real boy, through Aug. 10. Come follow Pinocchio as he journeys down the road of misadventure and learns the importance of telling the truth. All seats are $10. To order, call 928-9100 or visit www.theatrethree.com. See review on page B26.

Film

Your Child Will Never Be Bored This Summer!

‘How to Train Your Dragon 3’

Heritage Park, 633 Mount Sinai-Coram Road, Mount Sinai presents a free screening of “How to Train Your Dragon 3: The Hidden World” on Aug. 9 at dusk (around 8:15 p.m.). Movie refreshments will be available at The Shack concession stand. Bring seating. No rain date. Call 509-0882.

‘Moonrise Kingdom’

Frank Melville Memorial Park, 1 Old Field Road, Setauket invites the community to a free outdoor screening of “Moonrise Kingdom” at the Red Barn on Aug. 9 at dusk. Free popcorn. Call 689-6146.

All numbers are in (631) area code unless noted.

Sports Camp (Ages 7 - 12) • Instruction & Competition • Soccer • Volleyball • Softball • Basketball and more Theatre Arts Camp (Ages 7 - 12) • Singing • Dancing • Acting • Stage & Costume Design • Casting for Performances General Camp (Ages 3 - 12) • Arts & Crafts • Hands on Science • Interactive Games • Recreational Sports Tennis Academy (Ages 4 - 18) • 1/2 Day • Full Day • Advanced Training • 9 Indoor, 7 Outdoor Har-Tru Courts C.I.T. Training (Ages 13 - 15) • Counselors in Training • Learn Leadership Skills • Enjoy the Activities • Special Reduced Rate Swimming is included in all camps! All camps provide: Snacks, Drinks, Lunch & a T-Shirt

Discounts for Siblings and World Gym Members!

©161855

Children ages 3 to 5 with a caregiver are invited to the Smithtown Historical Society’s Roseneath Cottage, 239 Middle Country Road, Smithtown for story time on Aug. 9 at 11 a.m. Celebrate summer through reading. Free admission. Open to all. Call 360-2480 to register.

348 Mark Tree Road, East Setauket 631-751-6100 www.WorldGymSetauket.com

Less than 5 minutes from SBU Campus, 800’ north of Rte. 347


PAGE B26 • ARTS & LIFESTYLES • AUGUST 08, 2019

THEATER REVIEW

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Christening Accessories: Shoes • Socks • Bibs • Shawls Sweaters • Candles Rosary Beads • Onesies Krystal Lawless, Matt Hoffman and Michelle LaBozzetta in a scene from ‘Pinocchio’ Photo by Peter Lanscombe/Theatre Three Productions Inc.

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Theatre Three’s ‘Pinocchio’ is a wooden wonder

TIMES BEACON RECORD ON THE WEB • www.tbrnewsmedia.com ©165813

For too short a time, the classic tale of “Pinocchio” comes to life on Theatre Three’s stage in a most magical way. While most are familiar with Walt Disney’s 1940 animated feature, Theatre Three’s original retelling, written by Jeffrey Sanzel and Douglas J. Quattrock, is suggested from the 1883 children’s novel, “The Adventures of Pinocchio,” by Carlo Collodi. Annabelle the Fairy (Krystal Lawless) has spent two centuries trying to earn her magic wand so that she can fly. Summoned before Ondine, the good and righteous Queen of the Fairies (Ginger Dalton), she is given one last chance to prove her worth or she has to leave the land of the fairies forever. Teaming up with Cassandra the Magic Cricket (Michelle LaBozzetta), she is tasked with getting Geppetto (Steven Uihlein), a miserable and lonely woodcarver (think Scrooge), to care about people the same way he cares about wood. Annabelle decides to cast a spell on the wood, making it talk, and Geppetto is inspired to carve it into a wooden boy he names Pinocchio (Matt Hoffman). Things go sour quickly as Pinocchio constantly misbehaves; so Annabelle casts another spell on him where his nose grows every time he tells a lie. However, when Pinocchio gets mixed up with con artists Ferdinand Fox (Emily Gates), Carpacious Cat (Nicole Bianco) and Ranklin Rat (C.J. Russo) and is tricked into giving them all of Geppetto’s money, things go from bad to worse. Will Annabelle ever get her wings? Will Ferdinand, Carpacious and Ranklin get their comeuppance? Will Pinocchio ever become a real boy?

Jeff Sanzel skillfully directs a cast of eight adult actors who take this delightful tale and run with it. There’s a lot to cover in an hour and a half, but the story flows nicely and keeps the audience at the edge of their seats. The musical numbers, accompanied on piano by Doug Quattrock, are lighthearted and entertaining, from “Lovely Thoughts” by Annabelle to “Bad Harmony” by the trio of con artists, to the wonderful “The Festival El Grande.” Choreography by Nicole Bianco fits the story perfectly and the costumes by Teresa Matteson and Toni St. John are sweet and fun. There are so many special moments in this show, made even grander thanks to the addition of 40 children from the theater’s summer acting camp who play various extras including fairies and townspeople. Much to the delight of the young audience, the actors utilize the aisles often and special effects are around every corner. Annabelle and Cassandra hide under a magic umbrella that deems them invisible, Pinocchio’s nose really grows and wait until you see what falls from the ceiling at the end! Theatre Three has taken a story that is over 130 years old and given it new life. Grab the kids and catch a performance of “Pinocchio.” They will love you for it. Souvenir fairy wands are sold for $10. Meet the cast in the lobby after the show. Theatre Three, located at 412 Main St. in Port Jefferson, presents “Pinocchio” through Aug. 10. Children’s Theatre continues with “A Kooky Spooky Halloween” from Oct. 5 to 26 and “Barnaby Saves Christmas” from Nov. 23 to Dec. 28. All seats are $10. For more information or to order, call 631-928-9100 or visit www.theatrethree.com. See more photos from the show online at www.tbrnewsmedia.com.


AUGUST 08, 2019 • ARTS & LIFESTYLES • PAGE B27

BOOK REVIEW

‘Sloths Are Slow’ By Kimberly Marino

Children’s Book Reviewed by Melissa Arnold As a mother of four busy children and a full-time speech pathologist, Kimberly Marino of Miller Place is constantly thinking about kids. In particular, she’s passionate about engaging children in conversation, interaction and learning. In May, she published her first children’s book, “Sloths Are Slow.” Marino has crafted an entertaining and accessible rhyming story about a sloth named Lento (which means “slow” in Spanish) and his rain forest friends. Along the way, readers will learn some interesting facts about sloths while practicing counting, gestures, following directions and more. The book is visually stunning as well, featuring artwork by Mariya Stoyanova. It is the perfect pick for sneaking some developmental skills into story time.

Were you a creative child? Did you always want to be a writer?

I never really thought much about writing as a kid, but I was always creative. I liked to draw. My mind is always working and I’m always coming up with ideas. My friend and I actually invented a language game for kids that we were able to sell, so there is definitely a creative spark inside of me.

Above, a little girl enjoys ‘Sloths Are Slow’; right, the cover of Kim Marino’s book Photos from Kim Marino

but with any book. There really aren’t a lot of tools out there that teach those skills. I’ve gotten a lot of great feedback from parents who tell me their kids are more excited about listening to the story because of its interactive features.

What did you study in college, and Did you have any reservations where did you end up working? about writing the book? I went to school for elementary education at a small school in Pennsylvania called Lock Haven University, and then I got a master’s in speech from Hofstra. I now provide speech services through a company called Metro Therapy. I also work with children from birth through age 3 through Suffolk County Early Intervention.

What inspired you to write a children’s book?

I’ve had the idea in the back of my head for a long time. Being a speech pathologist means I’m always thinking about language and helping kids develop their language acquisition skills. When my kids were little, they loved a Sesame Street book called “There’s a Monster at the End of This Book.” The main character was [the furry blue Muppet] Grover, and it was very interactive. I knew I wanted to do something like that, to teach parents how to read a book with their kids in an interactive, engaging way. You can learn to be interactive not just with this book,

Honestly, no. Once the idea was in my head, I said to myself, “I’m going to do this.” And that was it.

Why sloths?

My daughter, Katie, has always had a deep passion for all creatures, down to the tiniest bugs. She’s really into sloths, and is always sharing random facts about sloths with me. I thought it was interesting and would make for a fun story.

What was the publishing process like for you?

I started by hiring an illustrator to create the pictures that would go along with the text. My sister-in-law is a graphic artist and editor, basically a jack of all trades, so she was able to help me get the book published on Amazon. It was an easy process for me, but only because I had her help — I wouldn’t have known where to start without her! Getting the first copy was super exciting. I couldn’t believe it. When I started to write the story, I

didn’t know what Lento would look like. To see him and the story brought to life in such a beautiful way was amazing to me.

What is the target age for this book?

I would encourage parents to introduce the book when their child is 1 year old by reading it to them and performing the interactive parts themselves. That’s how they learn — by watching you model behavior. But the target audience is for kids ages 3 to 6.

What is GiGi’s Playhouse of Long Island, and what is your connection to the organization?

Working as a speech pathologist has put me in touch with a lot of people that have Down syndrome, and you’ll often hear their families refer to themselves as “the lucky few.” There’s nothing down about having Down syndrome, and I wanted to be able to support and give back to the local Down syndrome community with this book. A few local moms are in the process of forming a Long Island chapter of GiGi’s Playhouse, a free center that provides speech, language, arts and life skills classes to help people with Down syndrome achieve their goals and function as typically as possible. The centers are run by volunteers who are passionate about the Down’s community,

and a portion of the proceeds from “Sloths Are Slow” will go to the national GiGi’s Playhouse organization to support the upcoming Long Island center. They’re looking to open in the spring of 2020.

You dedicate this book to Thomas Scully. Tell us about him.

My friend, Debbie Scully, unfortunately, lost her son Thomas to brain cancer several years ago. I never met him, but the Miller Place community has worked so hard to honor his memory and legacy. Mentioning Thomas and the foundation in the back of the book is just my small way of showing my support for the family. You can learn more about Thomas and the foundation at www. thomasscullyfoundation.org.

What’s next for you?

I actually have another book in the works called “Cows Don’t Belong in Houses,” inspired by a funny conversation with one of my young clients named Jackson. In his honor, I would want proceeds from that book to benefit cleft palate organizations. I’m also thinking about writing stories based on the other characters you meet in “Sloths Are Slow.”

“Sloths Are Slow” is available online at www.Amazon.com.


PAGE B28 • ARTS & LIFESTYLES • AUGUST 08, 2019

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