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THE HACK

Centenary Junior College Hackettstown, N e w Jersey Volume

XXXlX


- THE HACK ALMA MATER HYMN

.

Tune "Austrra

3,

Haydn

the silent hills surrounded, Ripened b y the flight o f time, A n d with honors still unbounded, In her strong and lusty prime,

'Mid

Alma Mater proudly raises Halls and tower tall and strong, A n d her children sing her praises, Sing them loud and sing them long. Ever shall her children love her, Forming still a noble band; While the flag that waves above her, W e shall bear t o every land. Let us laud her colors glorious, Loyal t o the Black and Blue. Let us wave her flag victorious, Pledging each one t o be true. A n d when age a t last steals o'er us, Softly like the sinking sun, Visions will appear before us,

Of the course that we have run. When our lives have told their story Failing lips shall move t o cry: "Alma Mater! live thy glory! Alma Mater, C. C. I.!"

HARRY H. R U N Y O N , '05


HACK BOARD Editor-in-Chief Dorothy Hunt

, ,,,aciate

Business Managers

Editors

Jane Be!ding

Jean McKendrick

Susanne Cameron

Harriet Desmond A r t Staff

Helen Lamb

Carol y n Eckhardt


- THE HACK CENTENARY BEFORE THE BLACKOUT My

dear Seniors,

When we t r y t o look ahead twenty-six years the span o f time seems interminable; but, as I look back upon the twenty-six years that I have spent here a t Centenary, if i s difficult t o realize they are twenty-six. I am beginning t o feel, with apologies t o Lord Tennyson, "girls may come and girls may g o but I stay on forever!" Many changes have taken place, not only a t home b u t here a t Centenary as well. Surely you will all enjoy a resume. of what we have done and how we have changed. The first girls t o brave the criticism o f bobbed hair confined their shorn locks t o a hair net and thus avoided the resemblance t o a Fiji Islander. Of course, the members o f the faculty refrained from this "fad." C a r d playing was not sanctioned and any decks o f cards found in a girl's possession were confiscated. O u r sorority anniversaries were celebrated with much-rehearsed plays. Boy Criends-yes, b u t no dancing-and many parents. The boys were very often guests for dinner in the main dining-room with one member o f the faculty presiding a t each fable. H i g h shoes were requit.ed from Thanksgiving t o Easter, and all laced up a t breakfast time!! Arctics were very much required for snowtime. Students went in chap eroned lines t o the village t o shop on Saturdays afid no food was allowed t o b e brought back. Batchler's was the college spot, now replaced b y the College Shoppe. A siore with fresh fruit, crackers, and chocolate was mainfained in the school. Certain walks were laid out where the girls could spend Saturday afternoon also; but. longer walks-and dates, o f course-required chaperones. Sunday night suppers were enjoyed b y the Seniors with the Trevorrows. Week-ends-only one a month. Then everyone went and Monday was added for a longer week-end. Special cars were added and teachers chaperoned, having a difficult time restraining the girls from entering the dining car. Many more groups went t o plays and operas and museums. They seemed more inierested, or had more money t o spend. The winters were kind enough t o give us all a marvelous sleigh ride in the moonlight-hoarse voices in the mcrning from vigorous singing, b u t then one always pays .In kome I way. The Juniors had fun stealing the Senior banner and hiding it. Then the Seniors had fun prowling around the buildings after hours searching for it. The Sophomores always treated their sister class, the Seniors, t o a hay ride and picnic supper.


THE HACK

-

I

Each society gave an open meeting with original faculty and representatives from other societies. Much play titles. A strong spirit for Trophy contests-no one Eager competition for members in the autumn. Regular urday evening weekly meetings.

entertainment, inviting the secrecy about officers and would think of being away! and full attendance a t Sat-

At the beginning o f every year the Guild sponsored their annual picnic a t midday, and the entire student body attended. The b i g fire, coffee, and games all lent their picnic air. The G u i l d did i t s same splendid philanthropic work with a devotional meeting each Thursday evening. Today you are interested in "your man" and intensely interested in "week-ending." Granted it i s a national habit, b u t your memories are fewer and your quality for friendship weaker for the lost opportunities for storing these things during school and college days. During the last war many articles were made and sent t o France b y our girls.

We adopted a French school with an enrollment about as large as ours and made many garments f o r them. A t Christmas time k i t s containing hair ribbons and other fascinating trinkets were filled for each girl. O u r only rationed product was sugar and each girl had a little bowl containing two teaspoonfuls per day.

A change that i s felt as a loss i s the old keen spirit in school life-in athletics -making the team, and helping the team win; In societies-becoming a member-being a strong helpful member-not missing a meeting; In studies-the honor roll was more worth while working for. O u r days are just as full, probably our courses o f study are more interesting, ouipleasures are more mature with the coming of the Junior College. All o f us dance and have gentlemen friends here, making the campus appear "coedish" a t times. Some of the things which have not changed in the twenty-six years are: the high standard in scholarship, the high standard o f conduct, the determination t o have the physical equipment in as fine order and beauty as is possible, the desire for each girl's happiness and progress. The fact i s that girls today are the same lovely and worth while, working-overtime-for persons as they always have been. A n d lastly our ideals f o r these lovely girls remain high and fixed-that they should be noble women, broadly educated, cul; I tured and with human sympathies, matured and prepared for what tasks, b i g or little, await them, with outstanding personalities founded on faith and ideals.

With sincere best wishes for the next twenty-six years for Centenary Junior College-and for the girls, undergraduate, graduate, and alumna, my true affection. Editha

C. Trevorrow


THE BLUE AND THE BLACK The ivied halls o f C. J. C. A r e ever f a i r t o see A n d may we praise her colors true A n d sing b o t h glad and free:" O u r hearts are with t h e Blue and Black, A n d may we never sever The ties t h a t b i n d our hearts t o thee A n d C. J. C. forever."

0 may t h e girls o f C. J. C. Send o u t a mighty cheer, A n d may N e w Jersey's verdant hills Re-echo year by year:" O u r hearts are with t h e Blue and Black, So may our great endeavor Raise high t h e glorious Blue and Black A n d C. J. C. forever."


PRESIDENT ROBtKT J. TREVORROW APRIL, I917 -JANUARY, 1943


- THE HACK CARRY ON Dr. Trevorrow was with Centenary more than twent y -five years. H e helped our college grow from a preparatory school for girls t o one o f the highest ranking junior colleges in the East. N o w that he is gone, it is our resp onsibility t o uphold the high ideals and traditions that he gave us. W e , the students, usually saw Dr. Trevorrow through the door o f his office where he sat working a t his desk. Once in a while we met him walking through the halls. H e always had a smile and a pleasant word f o r each girl. O n e time he explained t o a group o f us how he could predict the weather b y observing the leaves on a plant outside the corridor window. H e was very fond o f golfing and played an excellent game. In fall and spring his iaunty figure was frequentl y seen on the Country Club golf course, distinguisha,ble in his dark golfing beret. Centenary beginners found his expert advice invaluable. Dr. Trevorrow was ever a pop ular host a t the after dinner coffees. H e could tell us many important facts and describe interesting scenes from his wide experience and travels, enlivening his conversation with amusing anecdotes. When he chose t o b e serious, his firm common sense inspired confidence and respect. A t the birthday dinners, too, he quickly put everyone a t her ease and soon had the table laughing with his quiet humor. O u r most lasting memory o f Dr. Trevorrow will probably be his talks a t Vespers. H e was our favorite Vesper speaker because he knew the lives we led, and he gave us sound counsel about ourselves. H e , himself, lived a full and happy life. H e had made a success o f his own life, not only in the material sense that everyone can see, b u t also in a spiritual sense that we could only feel through what he said. H e was a t peace with the world and with G o d , and he knew how t o help us find peace. H e knew college girls' problems and he told us how t o call upon our religion t o solve them. H e gave us high ideals, and he inspired us t o t r y t o use them. In his last Vesper talk, he gave us a life-time motto, "Carry On." H e referred t o the war situation, and t o the additional tasks it brought, and he told us t o keep our eyes on the goal, and t o persevere in our efforts t o reach it. H e showed us how important it i s t o sacrifice our little privileges for a while so that we can have our greater privileges for all time. Most o f all, he encouraged us t o keep faith in the righteousness o f our cause and t o g o on; he urged us not t o give up, b u t t o keep fighting for our ideals, and praying for God's aid. That aifitude, he said, would he!p us win victory. H e was speaking o f carrying on through a war t o win victory in the war. But so universal is the truth o f what he said that we realize that " Carry O n " expresses t h e d t t i t u d e we should take toward all life. W e have carried on without Dr. Trevorrow a t Centenary this year. The staff has cheerfully shouldered new tasks, and, thouqh we miss him very much, we have gone on almost as before. Next year we shall b e out in the world, unprotected b y Centenary's sturdy walls, and we shall remember Dr. Trevorrow saying "Carry On," and our new responsibilities will seem lighter. Dr. T~.evorrowhas given us a golden motto for life: "Carry On."


0

0

UNVEILED A T C H A P E L SERVICE ON DR. TREVORROW'S BIRTHDAY

RPIm

0

IN TRIBUTE TO ROBERT JOHNS TREVORROW, D.Dm May 21, 1877 - January 31, 1943 FOR HIS UNWAVERING DEVOTION TO ALL OF US WHO KNEW AND LOVED HIM. CLASSES OF '43 and '44

0


FOREWORD It is the p a t r i o t i c d u t y o f every American t o work :/

unceasin g ly, t o sacrifice, t o strive, t o p r a y , so t h a t we m a y come f o r t h f r o m the blackout which now lies s b o u t us reunited in a lasting peace. The tyranny t h a t threatens the world is almost unconquerable, y e t we know this: t h e harder t h e conflct, t h e more glorious the triumph.


THE HACK

-

FACULTY The year indicates the beginning of service here *ROBERT J O H N S TREVORROW, A.M., D.D., President (19 17) ............................. College of the Pacific; Drew Theological Seminary

Religion

FREDERIC ARTHUR METS, A.A.G.O., Director of Music (1906) ................. Organ, Piano Post-Graduate, Guilmant Organ School; Pupil of Joseffy and Harold Bauer GERALDINE SHIELDS, L.BsL. ( 1 91 7) University of Lausanne ALEXANDRIA SPENCE, A.M., (1922) Home Economics-Cookery University o f Toronto; Columbia University Voice, Chorus ELISE GARDNER (1923)........................................................................................................................ Hunter College; Pupil of George Fergusson, Joseph Regneas and Matja von Niesson Stone MRS. OLIVE H. HARING, B.S., (1927) .................................... Health and Physical Education The Savage School for Physical Education; Teachers' College, Columbia University

H. G R A H A M DuBOIS, A.M., Ph.D., ( 1 929) .................................................................................... English Johns Hopkins University; Columbia University; New York University FRANK A. LaMOTTE, M.S., A.M., (1929) .............................. Mathematics, German, Spanish The Gymnasium, Vienna, Austria; University of Chicago; University of Wisconsin LOUISE O M W A K E , A.M., Ph.D., (1933) .......................................................................... George Washington University; Columbia University

Psychology

ROY J. CREGAR (1933) Centenary '05; Guilmant Organ School

Organist

H O W A R D TIFFANY KNAPP ( 1 935) Pratt Institute; A r t Students' League

Art

A N N E TRONECK, A. M., (1936) Stenography, Secretarial Studies Syracuse University; Teachers' College, Columbia University LEILA R. CUSTARD, B.Pd., A.M., Ph.D., (1937) Social Service Goucher College; Syracuse University; University of Southern California ;? WALTER G. STEWART, A.M., Ph.D., (1937) ............................................................ Clark University; Columbia University *Deceased January 3 1, 1943

Physical Science


- THE HACK Typewriting and Secretarial Studies EVELYN FOWLER, A.B., (1939) . Catawba College; George Washington University; Women's College of the University of North Carolina Home Economics-Clothing ELIZABETH GREGORY, B.S., (1940) . Kansas State Teachers College; New York University; Traphagen School of Design Dramatic Arts

MRS. LOUISE BOWNE CILLEY, A.B., (1942) Centenary Junior College; New York University

Librarian FRANCES E. PECK, A.B., B.S. in L. S., (1942) Albany State Colle g e for Teachers; Albany State College Library School Registiar MARGARET E. HIGHT, A.M., (1942) . North Carolina College for Women; University o f North Carolina; Columbia University; University of Virginia; University of Wisconsin; Ohio State University

EXECUTIVE STAFF +Robert Johns Trevorrow, A.M., D.D.

President

.........................

ean

%Mrs. Robert J. Trevorrow, A.M.

C. Hammond Blatchford, A.M.

........................................................................

Assistant t o the President

Margaret E. Hight, A.M. Mrs. Mabel W . Kelley ..............................................................................................................

ssistant t o the Dean

Alexandria Spence, A.M.

......................................................................................................

Head of North Hall

.................................................................................................................

H a d of South Hall

Mrs. L. E. Carpenter Florence K. Black

. .

of Adm~ss~ons . .

xecutive Secretary

Helen D. Van Clief

ecretary

Mrs. Ella Rost Ultz

Secretary

MatiIda Stockel

...................................................................................................................................

...............................................................................................................................................

MrsYElizabeth M. Porch Mrs. Jean K. Stewart, R.N. +Deceased January 3 1, 1943 %Acting Head

Accountant


THE SENIOR CLASS Takes

this opportunity t o

express i t s gratitude t o the Faculty and Staff for their patience, friendly cooperation, and inspiring efforts.

THE HACK BOARD Wishes t o express i t s appreciation for the time and assistance given b y DR. DuBOlS

DR. O M W A K E MR. KNAPP MISS STOCKEL in the assembling of the year book.


CLASS


CLASS OFFICERS

Secretary

M a r y Murphy

Treasurer

uriel Judscn

Sergeant-at-Arms

usanne Cameron

Class Colors

Class M o t t o

Navy Blue and W h i t e

TO-day we follow, to-morrow we lead.


PATRICIA

J. DWYER

A X E

AZE

435 Webster Avenue

204 Tunbridge Raad

New Rochelle, New York

Baltimore, Maryland

President Student Council '43 Class Secretary '42 Book Club '42 International Relations '42 Camera Club '43 W a t e r Ballet '42 Dancing Honors '42 Sorority Dance Committee '42 '43 Business Club '42 Class Dance Committee '42 '43 Honorary Swimming Varsity '42 Sorority Tea Committee '43 Class Swimming Team '42 May Court '43

.

JANE BELDING

That friendly manner o f hers and that infectious laugh will surely make friends for her wherever she goes, (and who can tell where with her "Navy poppa"). There are so many things we love about Patty-those captivating eyes, even disposition, and efficient management of the council.

Class President '43 Student Council '43 Hack Board '43 Class Hockey Team '42 '43 Honorary Hockey Taam '42 Class Hocke Taam Captain' '42 Camera c l u b '43 Internatiwal Relations '42 Class Dance Committee '42 '43 Class Initiation Committee '43 C e n t e n a r Piayers '42 Senior Li e Saving '42 Honorary Swimming Varsify '42 W a t e r Ballet '42 A. A. Board '42 A i r Raid Warden '42 '43 M a y C o u r t '43

Never let it be said that a woman does not make a good President. W e won't forget Jane's meetings in southern dialogue. Usually she is seen writing letters t o Al, knitting, pla y ing hockey or laughing a t "Woodie-Woodoecker." We'll miss her hel~fulnessand sunny disposition.


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BARBARA JEAN ROBISON Brooklands

44 1 Allen Street

RD 4

Hudson, New York

Troy, New York Spilled Ink Associate Editor '.f3 Spilled Ink Staff '42 French Club '42 '43 French Cabaret '42 '43 International Relations Club '43 Class Hockey Team '42

H o w can we write all t h a t Bobbie has done and meant t o Centenary? If we are sick we will just call on her t o b e our nurse. H e r name can always b e found on the honor roll. Have you ever heard about all the letters and presents ,.-@$ .;.gig$@+? - . . . ,$L5;yvs.rt z r -n c**, ,- - , " . ' , ,,.. 5 9,:-, , > . , - .n.d$. .. , -

.

ANN GRACE VAN DEUSEN

I : -

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'

Spilled Ink Editor '43 Class Vice President '42 Book Club '42 '43 Book Club Treasurer '43 Chorus '42 '43 , Class Hockey Team '43 Class Dance Committee '42 '43 Class Song Committee '42 Class Softball Team '42 Student Council '43 . A i r Raid Warden '43

Versatile i s the word f o r Miss Van Deusen. H e r nonchalance hides the f a c t that she i s one of the busiest girls a t Centenary with spare time f o r a few hands of bridge. The honor roll just wouldn't be the honor roll without Annie. She's an ideal American girl.


72 Bennett Avenue

12 Blackstone Blvd,

Binghamton, New York

Providence, Rhode Island

French Club Cabaret '42 '43 Book Club '42 '43 Badminton Club '43

Camera Club '42 '43 Sorority Chaplain '43 French Club Treasurer '43 French Cabaret '42 '43 Class Dance Committee '43 Spilled Ink Staff '43

.

Jean i s another o f our versatile seniors. With her foods and chemistry backing her up, she plans t o be a dietitian some day. In her more carefree moods Jean is found talking around the back campus. Did you know we had a new Life Saving Instructor this year? Miss McLean.

To know Posie, i s t o love her. Famed for her parties and inexhaustible supply o f food, she has endeared herself t o all with her kindness and generosity. W h at ever Posie chooses as a career, we know she'll be a success.


.GRACE E. 1, LEWlS Z E g, 378 Prospect Avenue

'

Hackensakk,

New Jer$ey

OLIVE VIRGINIA WIGHARDSGN

BE N 1 78- 1 1 Dalny Road -Jamaica Estates, Lang Island, N. Y.

A. A.

Presidqnt '43 Camera Club " 2 Camera Club Presidmt '43 Sororify Treasurer '43 Class Initiation CornmFttee '43 B a d m i h n Club '42 '43 Senior Life Saving '42 Sororitv Tea Committee '43 Class Bance Committee, '42 '43 Class Swimming Team '42 Sorority Dance committee '42 '43 Business Club '42 C h a r w '43 A i r Raid Duty '43 Sgrority Play '43 Class Day Committee '43

Student Council '42

Hall P~esident"42 Senior Life Saving '42 Class Swimming t e a m '42 Sorority Dance Committee '42 '43 Class Dance CommiTtee "2 '43

tl

Gracie i s so full o f pep and life no wonder the A. A. has been so successful with her as i t s head. H e r contagious gi g gle, dimple, and easy going manner make her loved b y all. NOWwe know where t o g e t advice on anything from law t o dancing.

Olive keeps us all in a good mood with her humor. Before going t o sleep, she composes songs in bed. A r e they any good, Dot? She dislikes cherry ice cream, and has a mania for neat drawers. Clothes t o meet Bob are somewhat , o f a problem.


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HARRIET DESMOND 439 Prospect Avenue Oradell, New Jersey Hack Board '43 Sorority Treasurer '43 Senior Dance Committee '43 A. A. Board '42 Vice President A. A. Board '43 Business Club Treasurer '42 Chorus '42 '43 Hocke y Varsity '43 Class Basketball Team '43 Kin Club '42 '43 Sorority Tea Committee '43 W a t e r Ballet '42

There is Harriet with her genial smile and g o o d humor, crocheting again. She is also a skillful tennis player. " Yot" i s as popular with the men as she is with Centenary girls. W e ' l l find her after graduation in the secretarial world. By the way, has she finished her afghan yet?

Bug's naturalness and hearty giggle will forevef remain as one o f our pleasant memories. H e r level head and abili t v t o reason thinas o u t made her an aiset t o the student council as well as t o +he student body. Music, the kindergarten, and Bud are her special interests.


. ELIZABETH REYNOLDS

GERALDINE M. VOGEL

@ E N Kinderhook,

5 Columbia Avenue

New York

Cranford, New Jersey

Class Vice President '43 Sorority Secretary '43 S p illed Ink Staff '43 Book Club '43 Basketball '42 '43 Business Club '42 Class Dance Committee '42 Sorority Dance Committee '42 '43 Sorority Tea Committee '43

Sorority President '43 Spilled Ink Staff '43 Chorus '42 '43 Book Club '43 Basketball Team '43 Hocke y Team '43 Class Dance Committee '42 '43 Sorority Dance Committee '42 '43 Class Banner Committee '43 Class Jacket Committee '42 Class Song Committee '42

Boop is that cute dark haired lass who spends most o f her time "on switchboard" keeping an accurate account o f who called whom, and who d i d n ' t call. A n all around girl, Boop's cheerful and easy going disposition ve made her liked b y all o f us.

G e i r y is our "Vogue wardrobed beauty" who insists she hasn't a thing t o wear and then appears perfectly dressed for any occasion. Despite disturbing elements, Ger's g o o d humor remains intact, and she can always be relied on t o make things interesting.


Park Place

Short Hills, New Jersey Spilled

Ink Staff '43 '42 '43

&wkClub

Iny~rnationalRela+ions club '43 &ii+enary Players '42 Ctass Hsckey Team '43 ' Vhrsify Hockey Team '43 , C l a s Sroft.ball Team ?42 Badrninf.on Club '43 %r~)rif> Dance Committee "42 "3 Class an= C5mmittee '42 '43 Somrity T@a Commifi-ee '43

&

Wherever there's a crowd, Kay i s sure t o b e in the middle o f it. Although she may die young from overexertion of the vocal cords, everyone loves her. One o f her favorite topics is her brother. There i s no doubt that our class must have many reunions with Kay and her jokes.

The locker room for a coke, a smoke, and a brid g e game-then t o her books -that's Jan. W e know her only during the week for on weekends-well, she's just gone! H e r happy-go-lucky manner hides a diligent mind-maybe that's what gets the men.


N o brid g e table need lack a fourth or quick repartee when Janie i s around. H e r abilit y t o see the funny side o f things makes her give an equally humorous answer. Wouldn't we be lucky t o knit the beautiful sweaters that she does? A n d have you noticed her assured poise?

With her pretty red hair and blue eyes Millie is one o f the most attractive girls of our class. She i s extremely efficient in all she does and we will always remember hearing her typewriter a t almost any hour. Unlike most redheads Millie does not have a temper.


W e ' l l always admire her efficiency as President of Cal. She bubbles and sparkles with enthusiasm. She is famous for her dancing, hair and Bobbie. Some day we will be cutting o u t her picture in Vogue. Here's t o you, Janie and don't lose that mind o f your own.

It's 8: 10, George is still in b e d b u t never fear. She saunters into class iust before the late bell a t 8:15. She likes music, pickles, dancing, golf, and "Pitch." W e are all waiting f o r the day when she will don her nurses' cap and help preserve humanity.


S I U M E &@tPWES

BET? Crement Driw

!

36 Lenox Avenue

Elmsfe~d,New Y Q P ~ G ~ & D & TPlayer* ~ '42 Centmar

Radis PIiyeis

M a y w o o d , N e w Jersey Senior Life Saving '42

'43

Bod C I U ~'43 Secrefaiy! Book Glib '43 Intemetimr~l4IZalatims '43 . Spiiked Ink '43 . C~.msraGlub. '42 Sacarity Tea Cornwfithe

BETH.GA&@lT!W

,

'43

Those on "upper north" have enjoyed many a iaugh a t Sue's witticisms. She is known b y all of us for her acting ability and her radio work. Sue is a diligent worker, both scholastically and socially. Did you g e t that letter, Sue?

Beth i s the girl who always has a twinkle in her eyes and a cheerful greeting for everyone. Centenary delights in her presence and ability and knows her many fine qualities will lead her on the road t o success.


B a l a Glub '4 '43 5p711s3.d

Ink' '43

Centerrary Playen

Chorws

'42 '43

Eeok Club

"2

'43

C e n k m w y .Rdio Play$:~s'4.8 Class D a c e Cernmifbe '43 Sar&rri+y Dance C ~ m m i ~ e'43 e C l e s Swimming T&am Captarn '42 Honorary Sairnirring Vanity %Zc ' W a f e r Bdl& '42 Modsi-n Dan- Honors '42 Sorori-?y Plsy '43

W e are rather proud o f Alice. Just listen t o her accomplishments-she is an actress, appears on the radio, is artistic and i s always on the honor roll. H e r helpful and good advice have been a great help t o us all. W e wi!l expect great things o f Alice.

"2 '43.

,

In.ferma.fi'cma1 Relatione '43

C a m ~ eCkb '42 '43 &adrnin+op Spilled Ink

Glarbh '49 '42 '44

,

H o w can Mary Lou be always so cheerful? W e hear her singing most o f the time, perhaps t h a t i s the reason. She plays the piano beautifully, too. W e have noticed her preference for Lafayette houseparties this year. Keep singing and pla y ing and good luck will come your way.


Barrie i s noted for her congeniality and easy going manner. W e admire her sportsmanship especially in hmkey and those long basketball shots. H e r ambition i s t o become a WAVE. Barrie can usually b e found in the b u t t house o r in the cooking lab. She loves t o sing too.

Ozzie is just another proof t h a t honor roll girls are not grinds or bookworms. Have you seen her play basketball or heard her sing? She's versatile all right, and along with it always goes such a cheery countenance.


Almost any time o f day we can hear Muriel tearing up and down the hall. H e r carefree manner and friendliness make her outsta~ding.Muriel's favorite haunts are the library, south hall, and the locker-room. H e r personality will carry her far after graduation.

Cleverness and responsibility combined with a charming personality mark Sue as a leader. Her dark eyes and hair g o well with the lovely clothes that she makes. N o description o f Sue would be complete without mentioning George. Just spend a weekend here and meet Centenary's perfect couple.


The class wouldn't be the same without her sincere and lovable personality. W h a t wouldn't we give for her artistic ability as well as her curly tresses? Whenever we hear o f conscientiousness, versatility, knitting, sports, sunbathing, and Colgate, we think o f Mue.

A n y day we can hear Ann's vic blaring, while she dances--quite the iitterbug too. She is famous f o r her parties and generosity. Behind her friendly smile is an ambition t o become a teacher. Wi-ih her brain and musical ability, Annie is destined t o make good.


MARJORIE ELIZABETH PUPPO

CONSTANCE R. LUCAA

A X E

A X 2

2 12 Westchester Avenue

202 Helena Road

Crestwood, New York

Staten Island, New York

Dinner Club 4 3 French Club '42 Senior Life Saving '42 Class Hockey Team '43 usiness Club '42

4 joke, a pause, and a belated laugh suggests our Puppy. H e r sparkling brown eyes and beaming smile always seem t o radiate her good humor. If Puppy had her choice she would spend all her time in the food de p artment whipping up dishes for us.

International Relations Club '43 Book Club '43 Class Dance Committee '42 Sorority Dance Committee '42 Badminton Club '42 Sorority Tea Committee '43 ' Sorority Initiation Committee '43 Sorority Play '43

Precious things come in small packages. Connie is, believe it or not, learning t o fly an aeroplane. Could it be her interest in the Air Corps? H e r specialties are the opera, sail boats, crepe suzettes, and moonlight and snow. Of course we are always anxious t o hear about Rollie


CLARE JEAN BARTLETF 37 Lee Street Waterbury, Connecticut Centenary Players '43 Class Dance Committee '42 '43 Sorority Dance Committee '42 Dinner Club '43

Marcia-Marie, with her unique brand o f humor and imagination, keeps us all in stitches. Soon she may become a radio star. H e r interest in Second Lieutenants, more ice-crearn (chocolate o f course) and her rendition o f the shag give us a brief picture o f March-Mree.

Have you ever tasted her delicious cooking? With her feather-cut and beautiful clothes C. J. i s the picture o f a typical Centenary girl. H e r ambition is t o g o skiing in N e w England every winter. Colgate, a b i g grin, dimples, and Deep Purple remind us o f C. J.


Maril y n i s one o f the peppiest seniors. She has certainly made life more enjoyable f o r all o f us with her fun loving and mischievous pranks. A S secre-tary o f the class and president of the French Club she has proved herself worthy of an outstanding future.

Helyn's sweet, quiet manner hides an efficient, tactful mind, capable o f handling any situation. She is always ready with her quick, dry w i t and an infelligent answer. W e all envv her full mailbox and those phone calls.


Marie is noted f o r her genial manner (have you noticed how well she gets along with her roommate,) and her Chi Psi pin. She i s amply supplied with patience, gentleness, and understanding which will b e required o f her in the arduous duties of a nursing career.

"For she's a jolly good fellow." With ready w i t and sparkling eyes Joan enlivens many a drear y educational session. She has worked faithfull y for Spilled Ink and her sorority. You will have t o look long and far t o find another Joan.


WkHm . 9 John Street Chatham, New Jersey Class Hocke y Team '42 '43 Honorary Varsity Hockey Team '42 '43 Book Club '42 '43 Guild Representative '43 Senior Dance Committee '43 Class M o t t o Committee '43 Class Day Committee '43

Whenever something is doing, Nancy i s there. W h a t would the Senior hockey team have done without her? In her serious moods Nancy listens t o symphonies. She is full o f fun and i s going t o be an ideal nurse. W a t c h out for those interns, Gou!

Jean is one o f our best-looking girls. She has charm and personality that have won her friends b y the dozens. W e know Jean would make a sympathetic kinder g arten teacher o r a dramatic critic, but first of all she'll make Arn a good wife.


Sorority 'Vice President '43 Student Council '42 '43 French Club '43 Camera Club '42 Book Club '43 Business Club '42 Sorority Dance Committee '42 '43 French Cabaret '43 Sorority Play '43

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have you seen her gorgeous ring! H e r friendl y manner won her many friends and contributed t o her efficiency in the council. W e are all envious o f her long curly hair. W e wish Johnny and her lots o f luck.

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n 2 petite, a resoun Ing aug catching eye-that's Til. Jen joined our ranks this year and was immediately loved b y all because o f her good sportsmanship. G i v e her a coke and a real jive number and her skirts will twirl.


A friendly, cheery smile greets you as Florrie approaches. She spends a lot o f time planning diets and writing letters-box eight certainly shows results. But these never interfere with her work. Unlike most o f us, she finds time for ever y thing . A n d oh! how she cheers for Cornell.

Everyone knows Marie for her friendliness and smile. H e r impulsiveness, her carefree manner, and her willingness t o help others are her distinguishing characteristics. She is an ardent Tommy Dorsey and Frank Sinatra fan and has shared her collection o f records f o r our enjoyment.


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Flossie with her smallness and petiteness has a giant's share o f generosity and friendliness. She i s a worker and will be sure t o make a success of whatever she undertakes. Neatness is an outstanding feature of the p e r t little picture she makes.

Marion certainly enjoys the social life o f college and has had many good times, what with dates and dinners, phone calls and letters from the Navy. Nevertheless she knows what college is for and has made a real effort t o gain "a l o t o f knowledge."


MURIEL ELAINE TOMPKINS A X E l I 0 East Franklin A v e . Collingswood, N e w Jersey Spilled Ink Staff '42 Sorority Tea Committee '43 Book Club '43 Centenary Players '42

Will we ever forget Phyl's dimpled smile? H e r friendliness, helpfulness, and s y mpathetic nature have won her many friends. One of her favorite pastimes i s drawing, a t which she i s very adept. By the way, have you seen the decorations from the A r m y in Phyl1s room?

Hall President '43 Student Council '43 Centenary Players 143 Book Club '43 French Club '42 Class Dance Committee '43 A i r Raid Warden '43 Sorority Play '43 Class Day Committee '43

Who i s t h a t playing in, yes, a sandbox? Could it be our Hall President? Muriel i s always ready t o hear or tell a good joke. H e r letter writing, love f o r perfume, and Harry James are wellknown. W e can picture her in future kindergartens.


F"" '

Blond hair, blue eyes, a neat appearance, and pretty clothes - that's Annasteen. She i s always helpful t o everyone and enioys h e humor o f the little things in life. Just mention hillbilly music and Annbsteen will be there.

*

Jane is the cute little dark-haired senior with the b i g brown eyes we all envy. Although she i s quiet a t times, her laugh often tinkles down the hall. Jane's ambition i s t o b e thin b u t eating i s more fun.


HELEN MARTlfiA LAMB

MARY LOUISE WILLIAMS

@ E N 58 South Swan Street Larchmont,

NLWYork I

Chorus President '4 Chorus '42 '43 Hack '43 Sorority Chaplain '4 Senior Life Saving '42 Book Club '43 French Cabaret '43 Business Club '42 Class Dance Committee '42 M a y C o u r t Attendant '43

That tall, dark girl with the striking appearance is Lambie. W h a t will be the Choir's loss will b e the commercial a r t field's gain when she goes into i t s ' ranks this fall. A lovely voice and a real artistic talent make her one o f the prize girls o f the class.

Albany, New York International Relations '43 Book Club '43 French Club '43 French Cabaret ,43 W a t e r Ballet '42 Class Dance Committee '42 Life Saving '42

Lou's apparantly unassuming nature and human understanding are dttributes which have won f o r her many friends. A dislike o f snakes and a love o f cats and boogie-woogie are a p a r t of our little, blonde senior. W e admire Lou for never losing her temper. H o w does she d o i t ?


BEmam

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BARBARA LALONE BYRNE

O E N Rockport Road Hackettstown, N e w Jersey Chorus '42 '43

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ever seen a distracted senior running around the halls looking for something? Betty's ability t o mislay things is well nigh miraculous t o her friends. In her saner moments she likes t o sew, and have you seen the clothes she makes? Because she i s such a good sport, Betty i s grand company.

Byrnsie i s the girl with a wonderful sense o f humor. Has she ever told you about "Snort" her beautiful black horse, and her new cocker spaniel? She is known by her lovely hair. A r t is one o f her favorite pastimes. N o doubt b y no* Barbara is a new A i r Corps enthusiast.

.


- THE HACK HIGHLIGHTS IN THE DIMOUT It hardly seems possible that t w o years, perhaps the happiest and most cherished two years o f our lives, are almost over. Toda y marks the beginning of our final activities. O n occasions such as these we find our thouqhts and conversations going back over the numerous incidents o f our Centenary life which will always be foremost in our memories.

Will any o f us ever forget that first day of school? September 17, 1941! So many strange faces, getting lost in the halls, wandering around making friends, greeting roommates, unpacking, everything confusion. But remarkably soon we all started t o feel as though we had known Centenary f o r years, instead o f days W e were introduced t o our b i g sisters, and the next night we met the faculty. Soon initiation was upon us. Memorizing sixty-five senior names was just about one o f the hardest assignments we had t o undertake those first few days. But, after " Hell Week" was over, we all agreed it was a l o t o f fun and we wouldn't have missed it for the world. N o t long after we had recovered, sorority teas were planned. Peith presented a fashion show. C a l entertained us with music and dancing, and Diok gave a spelling bee. Then there was pledge day and the wait for a senior sorority sister t o claim us. The Senior Dance followed, and wasn't it a marvelous first dance? Peith Ann was the first t o uphold the traditional sorority weekerlds. Since everyone enjoyed herself so much, we might add that the Princeton Glee Club boys helped t o make the dance such a huge success.

Will any o f us forget December 7, 1941? W e were now living in a country that was a t war, something t h a t not many o f us could quite comprehend. However,, the spirit of cooperation grew here a t Centenary, and we all did what little tasks of helpfulness we could, b u t still the social activities continued. W h a t fun we had decorating the gym for our dance, which was fhe next thing on the calendar. Since it was Valentine's Day it was called the "Sweetheart Ball." Even if we d o say so ourselves, "fun was had b y all." Lafayette, Stevens, and Princeton's Glee Clubs came here for concerts which were really wonderful. Then our girls went t o Stevens, where there was a joint concerf, t o say nothing of the super dance that followed. Later our chorus was invited t o the Mosque Theatre t o sing with Drew University a t the Newark Conference o f the Methodist Church. The Diok dance in March was our next social event. The theme was a park

;! scene and Don Gibson's music was really inspiring. The decorations were left untouched as our chorus was singing with Penn the following weekend and there was t o be a dance afterwards. Then came the C a l Ann. Many people reading this, our history, would think perhaps that Centenary life i s made up entirel y o f social activities, dances, and so forth. W e all know that isn't true, b u t it seems that we calendar events according


- THE HACK t o our social life. The Cals had as their theme "Defense." The decorations were all o f red, white, and blue, defense stamps were sold, and t h e evening was a g r e a t success. Alumni Day was next on our schedule. W e m e t many old Centenary girls, yes, and boys, and eniertained prospective students. This day was really an auspicious occasion because Doctor and k r s . Trevorrow celebrated their twent y -fifth anniversary as President and Dean o f Centenary. Class Day (just a year a g o today--doesn'i it seem im p ossible!) was upon us and then Baccalaureate Sunday . The Seniors " gave us t h e steps" and we sang them our farewell song. Then final exams, President's Ball,-and G r a d l ~ a t i o nDay was suddenly here. W e ushered f o r our b i g sisters as our little sisters will usher f o r us this year. W e bade farewell t o our Senior friends, w e p t on each other's shoulders, and looked forward t o a busy summer and our return t o Centenary. The summer vacation was somewhat different f o r us because nearly everyone was busy working in order t o b u y defense bonds. The t i m e flew by, however, and before long we were g e t t i n g ready t o come back t o school. O p e n i n g day again, b u t this t i m e we weren't a t all strange o r frightened. W e were Seniors! W a s n ' t it exciting t o see all our o l d friends and teachers and help the freshmen g e t adiusted? Initiation week was even more fun than last year and so we all t r i e d t o make

it a happ y (?) occasion f o r t h e freshmen. Sad t o say, there was an epidemic going around which made it especially hard f o r them. W h a t was more fun than society rushing, with t h e annual teas? Diok had a fortune teller t o p r e d i c t all t h e freshmen's futures, Peith presented their annual fashion show, and C a l had a musical entertainment. It was a happy d a y when every girl was acce p ted and t h e sororities had new members. O n November 14 we gave our Senior Dance. A p p r o p r i a t e l y t h e decorations were "in tune with t h e times"- Thanksgiving. Then Christmas vacation. It was wonderful being a t home with our parents and friends exchanging stories o f college life. Of course, on our last ni g ht here before t h e holida y s, in true Centenary style, we caroled through Hackettstown's streets and stampeded into t h e College Shoppe f o r I h e last coke o f t h e old year "downstreet." W e returned f r o m the vacation just in time f o r mid-year exams. They tau g ht us all a lesson, a painful one f o r some o f us, b u t we all weathered through, d i d n ' t we?

With t h e passing o f Doctor Trevorrow Centenary has lost t h e presence o f a greatirhan, b u t we feel t h a t t h e things he believed in and stood f o r will always remain in Centenary. W e shall all miss him and count it a g r e a t honor and privile g e t o have known him. Freshman Dance, as last year, was t h e "Sweetheart Ball." It was a g r e a t success, like all Centenary functions. A n a d d e d attraction was t h e scattering o f our named hearts over the g y m walls.


THE HACK

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With the world a t war, everyoee i s busy trying t o give her aid in defense. Centenary is no exception, b u t has entered into this problem with enthusiasm. This year, such courses as nutrition, first aid, home nursing, child psvchology, and story telling are all available and will prove t o be most worthwhile. Although it i s n o t a regular course, the Red Cross work i s also a wartime activity. Every Thursday finds many students and teachers over in the new building making surgical dressings t o send across the seas t o help wounded soldiers. Realizing that this i s one way in which we can b e o f service, we have tried t o give our earnest cooperation. Peith Ann was next on our schedule. The theme was a merry-go-round. Wasn't the ceiling gorgeous? Some of us had just as much fun pinning all those streamers t o the hoop in the middle as we did seeing it a t the dance. Again Brooks Dexter's music couldn't have been better. The decorations, as in the case o f last year's Diok dance, were left untouched for the Concert-Dance with Stevens on the following weekend. It was our first concert o f the year, and didn't we have fun " cutting in" on the boys? Quite a novel experience f o r some of us, and f o r the boys, too. Spring vacation suddenly was upon us and we were all a t home again. There was trouble buying t h a t spring outfit, b u t we didn't mind t o o much. I rather think it gave us a feeling o f helping in a small way, by having t o give up a few things t h a t had once seemed important in our lives. O u r dances and other entertainments, exams and vacat:ons will always live in our memories. But, perhaps, more than these, we'll remember our walks downstreet t o George's o r the College Shoppe, our cokes and cigarettes, plus a few hands o f bridge in the locker room, t h a t 9:30 b u t t in the Butt House, " battling the Bug," getting up in the morning in fourteen degree weather, waiting impatiently f o r the mail, sunbathing on South Campus, the first sign o f Spring, Christmas and Mum dinners, coffee and birthday dinners with the Trevorrows. Some recent events t o remember are the lack o f butter, coffee, and large dips o f ice cream, and the Senior lounge. Shall we ever forget the back campus looking like the revival o f the 1849 G o l d Rush, or snow and rain every dance weekend? Centenary has pointed out the way t o us-the way t o a successful and happy life. W e hope that we can repay her, through endeavor, for all she has given us. This isn't goodby, Centenary,- it would be impossible t o t o a place we have all known and !oved so well.

bid

a final farewell

Jane Belding and Jane W h i t e

CLASS SONG Tune

. . . Georgine Hill

W e are singing, praises ring

Of the Class o f '43. With loyalty, we will honor thee O u r dear old C. J. C. You mean so much, t o each o f us O u r hearts will bear our trust. O u r colors stand for peace and right Royal blue and white.

--


I

.

THE HACK 1

CLASS PROPHECY THE CRYSTAL BALL CLEARS June, 1953 New York is full o f wonderful ~ h i n g s ! Today while waiting in Penn Station f o r Jean McKendrick t o arrive from the M i d West, whom should I see b u t Barrie Bush! Barrie, who served with the WAVES during the war, is now a physical education teacher. A s Jean and I started out the door t o g o on our tour of New York, we heard a heart y "hi yus!". There, sitting in the information booth, was Kay Erbacher trying t o explain t o Janet Edmiston how t o find the Astor. W e reached the street and hailed a taxi. The driver was none other than Ann Clendenin. She now owns a whole fleet o f Chrysler taxis and enioys nothing better than t o drive through New York traffic during rush hour. As we crossed Fort y -second Street, a sign caught my attention: " Alice Wolfson, star o f play in i t s niqth year on Broadway." Ri g ht across the street was a large neon sign proclaiming McLean's Restaurant. Through the glass front we could see Connie Lucaa finishing an eight course dinner. She has eaten there f o r only a week and has already gained four pounds.

As we passed one of the large Presbyterian churches, it looked like ladies' day a t the ball park. Jeanne Souder was standing in the doorway greeting the home nursing class as it came in. W e learned from Jeanne that Marie Siacomo i s teaching the class with Jane Van Sickle as her victim. Today the young married women are having their lesson. Among the crowd we recognized Sue Cameron, Wilina Hagan, Georgine Hill, Olive Richardson, and Carol y n Eckhardt. Starting through the revolving door t o g e t into the NBC !roadcasting Studio, we were nearly knocked down b y Ann Van Deusen, who was rushing t o her weekly book review broadcast. A t the reception desk Betty Reynolds left the switchboard long enough t o tell an adjacent studio Today Muriel Reid w ;the "hair-carr y on

where we could find Marcia-Marie Weber's variety program. In we watched Ruth Moore rehearsing for her television broadcast. of the life guard patrol is the guest star-she will demonstrate one o f us.

A t Presbyterian Hos p ital we sat in on a nurse's discussion led by Barbara Robison. Nancy Goulet came up f o r this meeting from Johns Hopkins, where she is supervisor of nurses. In one corner we could see ~ r o r e n c eGreen furiously taking notes-no doubt brushing up on medical shorthand terminolog y . Posie Pierrel told us t h a t Joan Davies and Marie Cushing are still as inseparable as ever. Cush gives


THE HACK C

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smelling salts t o all Joan's potential customers after they have looked a t Joan's revolutionary, ultra-modern mechanical drawings. Jane Belding, the medical secretary who married her boss, told me t h a t she saw Jane W h i t e in Philadelphia this past week. Jane, chief guardian o f the files in the hospital record room, is having her troubles with girls who don't know t h a t B comes after A in the filing system. She i s now seriously considering sending them t o Miss Bogert's Kinder g arten for a refresher course in the sequencs of the alphabet. In front o f the Metropolitan Opera House we found Betty Burger staring a t a p o i t e r , trying t o find her name. It seems that Helen Lamb i s so busy with her cornmercial a r t that she f o r g o t t o include Betty's name on the poster. Ozzie and Betty cooperate,--Ozzie hits the high notes and Betty fills in with the low ones. Mary Louise Hahn and Eleanor Mills, billed as the piano twins, are now Qn tour. Beth Carruth travels along with them t o t y p e answers t o all their fan mail. To g e t a glimpse behind the scenes in a New York department store, we called on Marion Martin, secretary t o the president a t Best and Company. Marion, efficient as ever, has been help ing the accountant since his adding machine broke last week. Next we looked in on the fashion design department. H e r e we saw Mue Judson draping a Bartlett original on her mannikin. W e didn't have a chance t o talk t o C. J. as she was in conference preparing f o r one o f the b i g fashion shows. Jane Schlegel i s modeling all o f C. J.'s creations in this important show. N o t r i p t o New York would be com p lete without seeing some of the white collar girls. Grace Lewis is working f o r Western Union. During her lunch hours she leaves her typewriter and sings soprano in the singing telegram quartet. Patty Dwyer i s emplo y ed as Barbara Byrne's secretary. Since Barbara has taken over the Lone Ranger program, Patty types thousands of letters during the day and then after five o'clock exercises the horses t o keep her weiqht down. Harriet Desmond,is secretary t o the principal a t public school 205. She often sees Helyn Vogel and Muriel Tompkins. Helyn teaches the kindergarten and Muriel acts as music teacher in the grade school. Maril y n Murphy has a permanent position as secretary t o her doctor. She and ;Jouise Williams live in the same apartment. Lou is now taking a short course in dentistry so that when someone on the telephone asks her what t o d o for a toothache she won't have t o call Steven from his office. Dotty H u n t i s now secretary t o Sue Wise, originator o f the Bedtime Story Program or, H o w t o Scare Junior in Fifteen Easy Minutes. It's Dotty's job t o revise The Shadow scripts f o r Sue t o use on her broadcast.


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Since it was then getting late, Jean and I decided t o call some o f the girls we wouldn't g e t a chance t o see. The call t o Florence Sherman's number was answered by 'Annasteen Hirst. The phone had interrupted the weekly bridge game a t Flo's house. Each week Phyl Buhrmaster and Helen Papp come in t o make up a table of bridge. From what Annasteen said, 1 gathered that those four have as much fun as we used t o have down in the locker room. The only difference is that there aren't coke bottles all over the living room rug.

A call t o Gerry Vogel's home found her going almost crazy because she has been trying t o explain t o people t h a t when she answers the phone and says, "Plumber residence" it i s not the Plumbing and Heating Company that they have called. While waiting f o r the Detroit plane t o leave, we talked t o the stewardess, Jeannette Tilly. She has been working for T W A A i r Ways for several years and had many experiences t o tell us. She and Mariorie Puppo are living together in New York, although they haven't seen each other in t w o weeks. Puppy i s stewardess on night flights and works in the office during the day. This has certainl y been an exciting day f o r Jean and me renewing old acquaintances and, lest old acquaintance be forgot, let's all g e t together in 1963. MILDRED H O F F M A N

March, 1943


- THE HACK SHADOGRAPHS Do you remember - - - ? The Peony Walk Songs on the steps Dust collecting in your mail box The seven o'clock bell-how could you forget it! Pink slips Pigtails and long black stockings Your first day a t Centenary Three pairs o f shoes a year Gas rationing The " Butt House" after meals Picnics in the Grove College Walk and the Fish Hatchery The arrival o f the Senior proofs Bangle bracelets Your proctor duty Decorating for dances The station on home week-ends Sorority "Anns" That wonderful (?) institution, the blind date The Troph y Contest Black-outs and fire drills and not knowing which was which Sunday breakfast a t the Diner Mid-semesters and finals--or would you rather forget them? The Faculty Recital The "fox-holes" on campus Sunbathin g and sunburns The fear o f getting a "lemon" out o f the coke machine Study (?) hour Centenarv broadcasts over WEST The familiar striking of the tower clock Little grey mice Green tams and painfers' caps The long awaited Senior privileges The night before Christmas vacation H o w we app lauded Dr. DuBois for his "Queen Bess and William Shakespeare" Calisthenics and vocal lessons a t the crack o f dawn Rolls without butter The "Come As You Are" party O u r annual " Mum Dinner"


I

,...

-

..

"Wheeeee!" Oh f o r heaven's sakes!" -_

"Oh,

heavenly day!" , ' C a n t stand it!" Oh, I've lost it.' 'Let's play pitch."

"Thats kills me!" ...................................................... Most people are different from some."

Marie Giacomo Nancy Goulet .....................-..........I1

Florence Green Wilma H a g a n ' Mary Louise Hahn ........... Georgine Hill

Annasteen Hirst Mildred Hoffman

.-I

iny feet

Let's g e t this over with."

Constance Lucaa

..

Black's office. Behind a shorthand book. food from the College Shoppe. n front of a mirror.

. Knitting.

With

. -.. ?,[ ,

',

rs--on scratch paper.

over chemistry ~robrems. a pencil over her ear.

.................................................................G e t t i n g

........................................................................... oice. Leadership.

Profile.

W h a t dtya mean?" O h , gad." Oh, dear!" Hi yus men!" .

Wittiness. G o o d humar. a .

rseverance.

h ill^.

Complaining about her bridge hand. With Ger-making ~lans.

hind George's counter.

Twirling her glasses. g Shoppe. Sketching. With George.

W r i t i n g letters.

In Dr. Dentons. Doing Shorthand. Doing kindergarten work.

Usually Seen

.. 'Buttin' " with Hagan and od-natedness n s c e n i o e s . ......-..v...........-........--~.........--......Delivering papers.

.... C

....

Generosity. Friendliness.

ice. hletic ability. . . .. A r t l s t ~ c ablllty. Eyes. ...... Swee Dancing.

G o o d sense. H e r line.

Doroth y H u n t ..--..-............-........I Muriel Judson Helen Lamb .-.._..........-,-.......-...."..I1 Grace Lewis ...--...........--.-..-......-.I1

1,

."May i have a shredded wheat?" I smell something burning."

"

Janet Edmiston Katherine ErbachertI...........

P a t r ~ c ~Dwyer a Carolyn Eckhardt

"Comi

Let's not generalize."

"I mean-" ...........

I,

j;'

..........

Well, golly."

1

I know."

Ann Clendenin -1.I..-....

' - . ' ;Joan Davies

1

Yes,

Creations. Southern charm.

Admired For

SENIOR SILHOUETTES

no lie!" . Belleve me." .....................................................................

."It's a howl!" 1 II b e darned!"

I t

...................,"That's

Usually Says

Beth Carruth

Betty Burger

Jane Belding Nancy Bogert Phyllis Buhrmaster

Clare-Jean Bartlett

Name

-..-


1

.

I,

Usually Says

-.

I'm hot f o r that!" Bob always says-" Hello, Hons."

I

hhhhh-

..............Si

Jewelry ."

Good-naredness. es. air. ........................ .-..............

..

Studying.

.

Tearing out the back door f o r a butt. Lincoln Zephyr.

D o i n g something f o r somebody. T a n a bath. With Bobby.

In a hurry. At the station.

T i n room.

Muriel Tompkins ..I1 Ann Van Deusen Jane Van Sickle Geraldine 4I..Vogel .........................

L

t

us!"

1

P

Versatility. O h , horrors!" "Hello, Bi-bi," Intelligence. r i n g Bob. G e t t i n g things done a t the last minute .-.. :...Anticipating the future. Gad!" I had the sweetest letter from Bill today." Ability t o wear cloth With Erb-making plans. I, Helyn Vogel I II bump m y h e a d against the wall." ............Sincerity. .......................................................................... W r i t i n g lettergd. . ', : , 7 :, Marcia-Marie W e b e r I d i d n ' t d o .rt!I ! ............ Wit. Resting. . . ,Jane W h i t e .......................-.....-..-.I1 Guess I'll have t o g o over my ration Poise. again." Louise Williams Look a t the 'fweet'." Comm Dramatic abilit y . Locker room. Suzanne Wise ........-.. ................. "Hi ,I I Alice Wolfson I m hungry." Acting. L i t theater.

must g o up!" Barbara Robison ....--.-....-,..-...."I 1 J.ane Schlegel ..............-................I It's a panic!" Florence Sherman 1I.-..........-......... Congratulations!" Jean Souder .................................... "HOW about t Jeanette Tilly Oh, I'm going insane." .-

Muriel Reid ..........-.......-.....-..-.....It Elizabeth Reynolds Olive Richardson

!I

Usuaily Seen

erseverance. .gnigniS. . incerity, ............................................................................. Reading a magazine. . . wlrnmlng a b ~ l ~ t y . Knitting. .. ablllty. The library. Complexion. Locker room.

Admired For

Ruth Moore ....................................... Don t be silly! postion. Maril y n Murphy .....---....,...-.-,"M y word!'' "Has the bell rung yet?" ice. A r e you kidding?" ........ I hope you're not mad a t me." .................... Generosity. ...... H e r laughter. You know what I mean."

Marion Martin ............................... W h a t ? " . .-.. Jean McKendrick t"0h-" Jean McLean ................-..-..........-..I Oh, my Eleanor Mills I ' m hungry!"

Name

SENIOR SILHOUETTES


THE HACK ' S WHO? -

E LIGHT

-


- THE HACK WHO'S WHO?- AFTER BLUE LIGHT SIGNAL


- THE HACK

, ,

PERSONALITY POLL IDEAL SENIO'R

L............................*............"?............................................................

MOST C O N G E N I A

Jane Belding

A n n Van Deusen, H a r r i e t Desmond

CUTES

eannette Tilly, Jane Schlegel G e r r y Vogel

BEST DRESSED

MOST GENEROU

semary Pierrel

BEST SENSE O F H U M

Katherine Erbacher

MOST AMICABLE WITTIEST.......... -............

A n n Van Deusen, Elizabeth Re y nolds ......................~....................................~..T.................~...............................

Katherine Erbacher

M O S T L O Q U A C I O U S.

Joan Bush, Katherine Erbacher

M O S T H A P P Y- G O-L U C K Y

G r a c e Lew~s,Olive Richardson

BEST POISE-....-

Jeanne Souder, Dorothy H u n t

BEST PERSONALITY-........=

Jane Belding, Patricia Dwyer

I

M O S T PETITE...

Constance Lucaa

M O S T VIVACIO'US..

Janet Edmiston

.Barbara

M O S T RESOLUTE ALWAYS SMILING

Harriet Desmond, G r a c e Lewis

THAT LAUGH

Jeanette Tilly, Katherine Erbacher

.

M O S T VERSATILE ...... -......-......-......................... ::.

.-........

A n n Van Deusen

M O S T ATHLETI

uriel Judson

M O S T ARTISTIC ;!

....................

..Susanne

-...?.. ..-.

MOST MUSICA ..............-....-.-...-........x-.-.............................-......2...............-..............

%. . . . . . . . . . .

M O S T D R A M A T I C...................... -.................. M O S T LIKELY TO' SUCCEED .

.

.

- 8

.

.

,.

, I.

..

..;,y - 5 , ' ..,.,a

-

Camer on

Helen Lamb

BEST STUDENT....-

.

Robison

'

8-

.

,

Suzanne Wise, Alice Wolfs on

.........- ..

I.

.

;

' ., . L

.A;

.,r-1,.-4de

;-r-:,,

$,

ILL*

--

Barbara Robison

-,>:'.--

:

3.!.:;,~*Ly ,,

8

.

-.c.>.I!;,&>

'L~:,):<;,:-L,

, 'r;? '-.!n-.,7::./,, .

A n n Van Deusen - , , ., , . . -.

.

-

A

r_

,P1


BANNER HUNT The dedication o f the Senior Class banner and the banner hunt are old traditions a t Centenary which we enthusiastically revived this year. A f t e r the dedication the Freshman class has three days in which t o steal and hide the banner, and if they succeed the Senior class has three weeks in which t o find it. The Class o f '43's banner arrived on Wednesday, A p r i l 14, and we decided t o have the dedication ceremony that very evening a t dinner. All wearing our class jackets and singing our class song, we marched into the dining room. O u r class officers, a t the head o f the procession, carried the banner for all t o see and admire. A f t e r dinner it was tacked t o i t s place on the wall between rooms 45 and 47 on Lower North Hall, where it was allowed t o stay for five peaceful days. At Mondav noon the viail started. W e ~ o s t e dauards on one hour shifts after classes and allfthrouqh the >night. Vague nbises, fiotsteps, and shadows moving along the corridors were re p orted, b u t no action occurred. O n Tuesday morning during classes, the banner disappeared, b u t a contrite thief returned the banner when she found that during classes was out o f hours. lmmediatelv after s u m e r a social crowd o f seniors aathered about +he banner. 2 A few freshmen a p peared, and after some friendl y warm words were exchanged, challenges were issued and acce p ted. More freshmen were gathered and, sensing trouble, we sent a call for more seniors and erected barricades. Soon a contest was in full swing. The freshmen came on in droves, from all sides, more and more o f them. W e struggled bravel y , but soon our barricades were broken through. Still we fought them off until suddenly, the girls leaning their backs directly against the banner,found themselves leaning against the bare wall. N o one, not even the freshmen, s6ems t o know how that happened. W e made a final grab a t the freshmen who had our banner, b u t gave up because it was wrinkled and wet and even gave signs of ripping. So, promising t o take good care o f it, the Freshmen triumphantly bore it off. Later in the evening indul g in g in a little gloating, they marched through North Hall singing their class song. Well, we shall soon d o them the same honor, for our hunting parties are ready t o set out. G o o d luck, classmates! P.S. O n the evening o f Wednesda y , A p r i l 2 8 , a group of Senior banner-hunters found our banner buried in the d i r t in the cellar of South Hall, and we did march the halls singing in triumph. 0

8


THE HACK

-

CLASS CREED (By Barbara Robison)

C-herish n o t greed. E-nvy not others. N- urture love. T-hink not on th y self. E-xpect the best in everyone. N-ever lose thy sense o f humor. A-lways work toward a goal. R-ise with a smile. Y-esterday has gone. Build f o r tomorrow. F-rom kindness thou reapest greatest happiness; O-pen thy heart t o those who would seek t h y help. R-eward i s secondary. T-hrive on righteousness. Y-ield not t o deceit. T-urn thy face t o the light. H-earken unto the voice o f thy conscience. R-est in the knowledge o f truth. E-ach day renew thy faith in God. E-lect the Christian way o f life.

THE IDEAL SENIOR

$

r!

Hair

.................................................

Jeanette Tilly

Eves

...........................................

Suzanne Wise

.

.

Teeth

..........................................

M a e G~acoma

Smile

..................................................

Jane Eelding

Complexion ...............................

Wilma Hagan

,

Hands

.............

........................Olive Richardson

Nails .................................... Legs

.......Muriel Tompkins

.................................................

Patty Dwyer

Figure

.............................................

--.Muriel Judson

...............................

Eyelashes

............................

Barbara Robison

Nose

.................................................

Feet

......................................................

Posture

Helyn Vogel

........................................

Jane Schlegel Jane W h i t e Jeanne Souder

Walk

...................................................

Helen -Lamb

Poise

.............................................

Dorothy H u n t

Personality

...........................

. G e r r y Vogel


- THE HACK YOUR SHADOWS LIVE ON W e , the Class o f 1943, being o f sound mind and b o d y , d o declare this t o b e our last will and testament. W e d o hereby give and bequeath: To C E N T E N A R Y our heartfelt thanks f o r all it has given us and our hope t h a t Centenary's traditions will carry on in t h e future as they have carried on f o r us. To MRS. T R E V O R R O W our gratitude f o r her kind help and guidance during t h e t w o years we have spent here. To t h e F R E S H M A N C L A S S an appreciation o f what it means t o become Seniors and our wishes f o r a successful year. J A N E BELDING'S leadershi p qualities t o t h e president o f next year's Senior Class. HELEN L A M B ' S artistic ability t o Jackie Montgomery. FLORENCE S H E R M A N ' S interest in U p p e r N e w York State t o anyone lucky enough t o have a man in Cornell. LOUISE W I L L I A M S ' pep, vim, and vigor t o Jean Packer, Betty Rothrock and Barbara Nielsen.

C. J. BARTLETT'S excellence in the culinary field t o N a n c y Backman. G E O R G I N E H I L L ' S enthusiasm over weekends t o Betty Glenn. after

MURIEL T O M P K I N S ' calm ways, even when her hall is having a " jam session" I2 P. M., t o Shirley Demerath.

MARCIA WEBER'S sense o f humor t o Betty Dickinson and Helen Hilsdon. HARRIET D E S M O N D ' S interests in Hackettstown and Princeton t o Nancy Nelson. R U T H M O O R E ' S technique o f knitting backwards t o Jean Van Fleet. ROSEMARY PIERREL'S generosity t o Joan Savale. A L I C E W O L F S O N ' S ability t o g e t news clippings t o Ruth Kammelhor and M a r g a r e t Pace so t h a t Dr. Omwake will be able t o carry o n her Frida y morning Quiz Program. BETH C A R R U T H ' S passion f o r mice t o C y n

Wight.

KATHERINE ERBACHER'S " pep" a n d " patience" during initiation week t o next year's chairman. BARBARA ROBISON'S ability t o evenly proportion work with pleasure-and we do:mean her men-to Bette Silcox. J A N E WHITE'S willingness t o help t o Pat W h i t e a n d Nancy Shelly so t h a t next year's seniors will n o t want f o r cooperation. BETTY BURGER'S chair in t h e chorus t o M a r i o n Merrill. DOTTY H U N T ' S " Hack" troubles t o next year's editor.


- THE HACK BETTY REYNOLDS' capacity for doing shorthand and for playing br;dge a t the sarne time t o Peg Winston. HELYN VOGEL'S pleasing personality t o Bebe

Childs and Nancy Brierley.

BARBARA BYRNE'S friendl y way t o Marion Waters. FLORENCE GREEN'S preciseness t o Evie Bahr. M A R I L Y N MUPPHY'S French t o Theza Exstein. SUE WISE'S ape act t o Jane Houston and Elise Elsasser so that there w;!l always be a laugh. N A N C Y BOGERT'S abilit y t o keep the halls quiet after I0 P.

M. t o Lyn Gifford.

MARIE G I A C O M A ' S joke book t o Phoebe Willard. J A N E V A N SICKLE'S tiny steps t o Anne Frey, Jean de Girolamo and Dorothy Deakin so they may slow down a pace. GERRY VOGEL'S bridge table in the locker room t o Marilyn Hammond, Margaret McCallum, Elaine Robb and Betty Preger with wishes for a better bridge season next year. MARIE C U S H I N G ' S quietness t o Jane Paul. J E A N McLEAN'S long hours in the "lab" and no free time t o Dot Mooney. MILLIE H O F F M A N ' S covered knees t o ~ e t t yRhodes. HELEN PAPP'S commuter's ticket on the D. L. & wish for a bon voyage.

W. t o Stella Tarabicos and a

JOAN BUSH'S abilit y t o shoot baskets t o Barbara Danziger. CONNIE L U C A A ' S petiteness t o Marie Strickler. ANN VanDEUSEN'S telephone calls and telegrams t o Louise Jonker and Marcia Ytterberg.

ANN CLENDENIN'S ability t o hold a filibuster in soc. class and on the hall t o Jean Hoffman. PATTY DWYER'S "cleaner troubles" t o Evelyn Schutzman. JEANNETTE TILLY'S lovely hair t o Eleanore Bogert, and her contagi.sus laugh t o M i d g e Bates. PHYLLIS BUHRMASTER'S ability t o read a ten minute pyschology report in three minutes t o Pat St. George.

;!

MURIEL JUDSON'S ability t o leave the dining room before dessert t o Muriel Dochtermann who rarely has time for the first course. JEANNE SOUDER'S memories o f Lafayette t o Elinor Cole.

JOAN DAVIES' chapel announcements t o Barbara Seely. W I L M A H A G A N ' S journey t o the altar t o Lillian Becker and Grace Motthews.


- THE HACK SHIRLEY O S M U N ' S delight in running t h e scales in voice lessons t o Marguerite ' T rlmmer. C A R O L Y N E C K H A R D T ' S excellent horsemanship t o Louise Ellis and G l o r i a Willis. ELEANOR MILLS' serenity t o Joyce Willever. M A R J O R I E PUPPO'S feather cut, scissors, and curlers t o Ginny G e o r g e and Terry Grosman. M A R Y L O U H A H N ' S early practice hours on the piano t o Edith Bullwinkel. J A N E SCHLEGEL'S Dr. Dentons and p i g tails t o Bettie-Deane Pearson and Phyllis Henderson. A N N A S T E E N HIRST'S madness f o r

hill billy music t o Eleanor Erskine.

M A R I O N M A R T I N ' S kindness t o Shirley Rounds. MURIEL REID'S chatter and laughter t o G l o r i a Friedman and Ina Berkeley. J A N E T EDMISTON'S ability t o e a t a quick meal o f shredded wheat t o Bunny Taylor. O L I V E R I C H A R D S O N ' S fondness o f Hackettstown t o Helen W a r c h and Betty Keene and her interest in t h e diner t o D o t t i e Mack. SUE C A M E R O N ' S frequent visits t o and f r o m Lafayette t o Jane Snyder. N A N C Y GOULET'S paper route t o Ruth Morris just f o r the sake o f exercise. G R A C E LEWIS' secretarial worries and shorthand blues t o Edith Smith and Ruth Tietz. J E A N M c K E N D R I C K ' S sweetness t o Charlotte Arpin. A N D T O Joan Valentine, Kay Remsen, Dorothy Stewart, A u d r e y Lindblom, Dora and Erna Oskarsdottir, A n n Farrar, and M a d g e Easton, the Senior Class says thanks f o r entering Centenary in February. You saved much work during Initiation.

-

In testimonv whereof we have herewith subscribed our names t o this, our last will and testame&, a t Hackettstown, N e w Jersey, this twenty-ninth day o f ~ ' a y 1943, , A. D. T H E SENIOR C L A S S Centenary Junior College Hackettstown, N e w Jersey Katherine Erbacher, Clerk Sdgned, sealed, and published and declared b y t h e said testator, t h e Class o f 1943, our last will and testament, who a t our request, in our presence, in t h e presence o f each other, subscribed our names as witnesses thereto. Elizabeth Reynolds Geraldine Vogel


- THE HACK FRESHMAN CLASS Colors President

- Kelley Green and W h i t e Bette Silcox

...............................................................

Vice President

Edith Bullwinkel

Secretary

.................................................................................................................................................

Charlotte Arpin

Treasurer

.......................................................................................................................................................

Sergeant-at-Arms

Barbara Seely Peggy Winston

MEMBERS Charlotte Arpin Nancy Backman Evelyn Bahr Madeleine Bates Lillian Becker Ina Berkeley Eleanore Bogert Nancy Brierley Edith Bullwinkel Bebe Childs Elinor Cole Barbara Danziger Dorothy Deakin Jean d e Girolamo Shirley Demerath Betty Dickinson Muriel Dochtermbnn Madge Easton Louise Ellis Elsie Elcasser Eleanor Erskine Theza Exstein Anne Farrar Anne Fjglton Anne Frey Gloria Friedman Virginia George Marilyn G i f f o r d Elizabeth Glenn

Lucille Griesser Terese Grosman Maril;/n Hammond Phyllis Henderson Helen Hilsdon Jean Hoffman Jane Houston Louise Jonker Ruth Kammelhor Elizabeth Keene Audrey Lindblom Dorothy Mack Grace Matthews Margaret McCallum Marion Merrill Jacqueline Montgomery Dorothy Mooney Ruth Morris N a n c j Nelson Barbara Nielsen Dora Oskarsdottir Erna Oskarsdottir Margaret Pace Jean Packer Jane Paul Bettie-Deane Pearson Betty Preger Catherine Remsen

Bette Rhodes Elaine Robb Elizabeth Rothrock Shirley Rounds Patricia St. George Joan Savale Evelyn Schutzman Barbara Seely Nancy Shelly Bette Silcox Edith Smith Jane Snyder Dorothy Stewart Marie Strickler Stella Tarabicos Bunny Taylor Ruth t i e t z Marguerite Trimmer Joan Valentine Jean Van Fleet Helen Warch Marion Waters Patricia W h i t e C y nthia W i g h t Phoebe Willard Joyce Willever Gloria Willis Peggy Winston Marcia Ytterberg


ICELAND GIRLS ENJOYING C. J. C. From "Spilled

PAIR FROM REYKJAVIK CAME TO AMERICA IN CONVOY

By this time most of us are well acquainted with our two new and very attractive students, Dora and Erna Oskarsdottir. Dora and E r n a were born in Reykjavik, Iceland, in 1924 and 1925, respectively. Although they did not a6tend school until their eighth year, their father taught them to read and write when they were about our kindergarten age. After graduation from grammar school, they attended high school for two years. D~~~ and Erna remarked that though Iceland high schools are somewhat different from ours, they did have dances every week and a ball once a year. Sounds good, eh girls? Clubs Have Objective School organizations in Iceland seem to play a n important part in the extracurricular activities. The clubs have one all-important aim, and that is to help the needy. Besides this there a r e group discussions on political and social ;/ problems. The clubs also give dances. One interesting difference between ~~~~i~~~ and ~ ~ culture ~ isl the ~ Christmas celebration. I n Iceland, the 24th, 25th and 26th of December are observed a s holidays. On the third day there is great rejoicing and a festival, while in America we celebrate only on Christmas Day.

Ink"

Travelled I n Convoy B e f o r e Dora and E r n a reached American soil, they travelled for three weeks in a convoy of thirty-six American and British ships. They enjoyed the trip but were greatly relieved to see our Statue of Liberty overlooking the Hudson. The New York skyline impressed them deeply, but the one thing they seem to like the best is Broadway. Of Course, We can't dispute about that a s many of US will always thrill to the sight of the "great white way." -4bout three weeks after she arrived Dora took a trip to Washington, D. C., where she visited a friend of'.the Minister from Iceland for three days. She seems to !favor the nation's Capital more than York. Upon their arrival a t Centenary, Dora and Eearned r n a felt rather timid, but they that Centenary had many l friends awaiting them. i t was only last week that they started taking English lessons from Miss Gardner, they have made great strides in learning our language. Both girls intend to come back to Centenary next fall. Dora seems to be interested ~ din some of the secretarial Courses, while Erna would like to study ~ C o n ~ i c s ~ Centenary welcomes you, Dora and Erna, and we hope you will enjoy your stay with us, as much as we are enjoying you.


- THE HACK FRESHMAN CLASS SONG T o t h e tune o f N e w York University's "Palisades," Bebe Childs and Evelyn Bahr wrote t h e words t o t h e song t h e Freshman Class now claims as its own: The Class o f 44's united 'Til t h e crossroads o f our parting ways, The green a n d white is proudly flaunted, A s high our colors we d o raise. O u r hearts shall ever b e uplifted In thanks f o r her fidelity. A n d still our voices shall b e ringing In praise o f C. J. C.

From April issue of "Spilled Ink"

FRESHMEN PROUDLY STRUT NEW JACKETS Our freshmen proud!y strutted into the dining room not so long ago all decked out in stunning new jackets. Yes, t h a t was quite a day f o r the class of '44, and well worth waiting for, don't you agree? The jackets a r e white with a green border and green emblem on the pocket. The beauty of white jackets is t h a t they can be worn to dinner, thus solving the white dress problem by offering a change from the usual thing. The senior jackets proved so successful in this respect last year t h a t the freshmen decided to follow their example this year. W h a t trouble the freshmen did have

in obtaining the jackets before Easter! Mr. Ginsberg, our able agent, apparently had difficulty making u p the order. When they finally arrived, it appeared t h a t he wanted to accelerate their courses, and had p u t '43 on the pockets instead of '44. Back went the jackets f o r the very necessary adjustment, and another wait ensued. Perhaps you noticed the anxious faces and heavy hearts t h a t came and went with each mail. It really seemed a s though the jackets never would come. But ah, a t last came victory! The jackets arrived and once again our merry freshmen were light-hearted and gay.

THE CLASS OF 1944 .presents

THE SWEETHEART BALL FEBRUARY 13, 1943 COMMITTEES acquie Montgomery and Edith Smith Decorations (In the center o f the wall was a large r e d heart trimmed with a lacy white frill, and "Pan" Cupid, with his b o w and arrow, was perched u p in the corner. Tb,b rest o f t h e wall was decorated with smaller hearts, each o f which had on it t h e name o f a girl a n d her escort.) Refreshments .......................................................................................................................................... Dorothy Deakin (Cokes and pretzels a t t r a c t e d many couples t o t h e refreshment table.) Orchestra ............................................................................................................................................... Marilyn G i f f o r d (Brooks Dexter and his orchestra p r o v i d e d t h e music.) lnvttat~ons.................................................................................................................................................. Charlotte A r p i n Programs ........................................................................................................................................................ Bebe Childs (The r e d heart-shaped dance programs with lacy trimming were like t h e wall decorations.)

. .


- THE HACK DELTA SIGMA SIGMA SORORITY Founded a t Pennington Seminary, 186 1 Removed t o C. C. I., 19 10 Colors

- G o l d and W h i t e OFFICERS

President ....................................... Jane Schlegel Treasurer ................................. Georgine Hill Vice President ......................... Jeanne Souder Secretary .................................. Dorothy H u n t Ser g eant-at-Arms and Chaplain ............................................................................................... Helen Lamb SORORES Florence Green Helen Papp Evelyn Bahr Lucille Griesser Jane Paul Clare Jean Bartlett Marilyn Hammond Marjorie Puppo Jane Belding Phyllis Henderson Muriel Reid Nancy Bogert Barbara Robison Georgine Hill Nancy Brierley Dorothy H u n t Jane Schlegel Susanne Cameron Louise Jonker Evelyn Schutzman Marie Cushing Muriel Judson Betty Silcox Jean de Girolamo* Helen Lamb Jeanne Souder Muriel Dochtermann Constance Lucaa Marie Strickler Patricia Dwyer Marion Martin Vivian (Bunny) 'Taylor Carolyn Eckhardt Margaret McCallum Muriel Tompkins Janet Edmiston Jean McKendrick Marguerite Trimmer Louise Ellis Jean Van Fleet Eleanor- Mills Katherine Erbacher Ruth Moore Jane Van Sickle Ann Felton Barbara Nielsen Marcia-Marie Weber Anne Frey Jean Packer

-

EIGHTY-SECOND ANNIVERSARY Saturda y Evening, December Twelfth Ninefeen Hundred Forty Two D A N C E COMMITTEES DECORATIONS:

Pairicia Dwyer, Chairman; Carolyn Eckhardt, Marie Cushing, Marilyn Hammond, Louise Ellis, Nancy Brierley. PROGRAMS: Helen Lamb, Chairman; Bette Silcox, Ann Felion, Nancy Bogert. INVITATIONS: Sue Cameron; Chairman; Marie Strickler. REFRESHMENTS: Constance Lucaa, Chairman; Georgine Hill, Margaret McCallum, Jean Packer. $nce was cancelled because majority of escorts could not be released from the war time program. Sunday Afternoon, December Thirteenth 4:00 p. m. Christmas program o f music. 5:00 p. m. Afternoon Tea. Saturda y Evening, M a y Twent y -Ninth PLAY: Sweet " 16" b y Thyson, a back stage farce concerning college dramatic productions.


- THE HACK SIGMA EPSILON PHI SORORITY Founded in 1875 Colors

- G o l d and Black

FIRST A N D SECOND TERM OFFICERS President Sherman . . Vice President ..........................................................................................................................................Wi!ma Hagan Treasurer ............................................................................................................................................................Gra~e Lewis Hoffman Secretary ............................................................................................................................................Mildred h i r e y Osmun, Elinor Cole Sergeant-at-Arms .................................................................................................... Chaplain Rosemary Pierrel, Shirley Osmun SORORES Nancy Backman Katherine Bingaman Elinor Cole Barbara Danziger Shirley Demerath Betty Dickinson Elise Elsasser Theza Exstein Virginia George Marie Giacoma Terese Grosman

Wilma Hagan Jean Hoffman Mildred Hoffman Jane Houston Ruth Kammelhor Grace Lewis Grace Matthews Marion Merrill Ruth Morris Shirley Osmun Bettie-Deane Pearson Rosemary Pierrel

Betty Preger Betty Rothrock Shirley Rounds Joan Savale Florence Sherman Stella Tarabicos Jeannette Tilly Patricia W h i t e Gloria Willis Alice Wolfson Marcia Ytterberg

SIXTY-EIGHTH ANNIVERSARY Saturday Evening, M a y 1 , 1943 PLAY

in conjunction with the Centenary Players--"FOR HER C-H-E---ILD'S SAKE," b y Paul Loomis.

DANCE

in gymnasium decorated with M a y Pole and Spring Flowers.

COM*YITTEE CHAIRMEN: Decorations, Grace Lewis: Programs, Virginia George Osmun; Rerreshments, Marie Orchestra, Shirley Giacoma. Sunday Afternoon, May 2, 1943

4:00 p. m, Vesper Service, The tlon. J. Parnell Thomas, New Jersey Congressman. 5:00 p. m. Afternoon Tea.


- THE HACK THETA EPSILON NU SORORITY Founded 1880 Colors

- Gold

and Blue

OFFCERS Geraldine Vogel President ....................................................................................................... Helen Vogel Vice President Treasurer .................................................................................................................................... Harriet Desmond Secretary ................................... :................................................................................................ Elizabeth Reynolds Sergeant-at-Arms ........................................................................................................................ Joan Davies Chaplain .................................................................................................................................................. Jane W h i t e

SORORES Charlotte Arpin Madeleine Bates Lillian Becker Ina Berkeley Eleanore Bogert Phyllis Buhrmaster Edith Bullwinkel Betty Burger Joan ,Bush Barbara Byrne Marjorie Childs Ann Clendenin Joan Davies Dorothy Deakin Harriet Desmond Eleanor Erskine Gloria Friedman

Marilyn Gifford Elizabeth Glenn Mary Louise Hahn Helen Hilsdon Annasteen Hirst Elizabeth Keene Dorothy Mack Jacqueline Montgomery Doroth y Mooney Marilyn Murphy Nancy Nelsen Margaret Pace Elizabeth Reynolds Bette Rhodes Olive Richardson Elaine Robb

~ a r b a r a Seely ' Nancy Shelly Edith Smith Jane Snyder Patricia St. George Ruth Tietz Ann Van Deusen Geraldine Vogel Helen Vogel Helen Warch Marion Waters Jane W h i t e C y nthia W i g h t Joyce Willever Louise Williams Peggy Winston Suzanne Wise

SIXTY-THIRD ANNIVERSARY Saturday Evening, March 13, 1943 D A N C E and MERRY-GO-ROUND BALL. Committee Chairmen: Decorations-Joan Davies Programs-Jacqueline Montgomery Refreshments-Marilyn Murphy Orchestra- Olive Richardson Properties-Jane W h i t e

Sunday Afternoon, March 14, 1943 VESPERS-Christmas Choral Service Afternoon Tea


"THE LADY" G o l d bronze statue by a French artist: imported b y Tiffany o f New York. Gift o f the Trustees many years ago. This trophy is kept in the custod y o f the Sorority winning the "trophy" contest in June. This year's contestants are: For Callilogian Society:

Barbara Robison, Bette Silcox, Georqine

$or Diokosophian Society:

Shirley Osmun, Kammelhor.

Alice

Wolfson,

Joan

Hill Savale,

Ruth

For Peithosophian Society: Elizabeth Reynolds, Edith Bullwinkel, Jacqueline Montgomery, Dorothy Mooney, Mary-Lsuise Hahn, Louise Williams, Ann Clendenin.


STUDENT COUNCIL Director ...,

.

.

E : ,.,, m , :,

............................................................................................................

Mrs. Trevorrow

MEMBERS President

Patricia Dwyer

..........................

Secretary ................................

..................................................................................

Class Presidents

Helyn Vogel

Seniors: Jane Belding Freshman: Bette Silcox North: Nancy Bogert, Muriel Tompkins South: Lynn Gifford, Ruth Tietz

CLASS REPRESENTATIVES Firsf Term Mildred Hoffman Wilma Haqan Ann Clendenin Jane Van Fleet Jean Hoffman

Second Term Ann Clendenin Ann Van Dausen Caroline Eckhardt Jean Hoffman Joan Savale


THE HACK T H E BOOK CLUB Faculty Advisor .........

..............................................................................................

Dr.

H. Graham DuBois

OFFICERS President Secretary Treasurer

.........................

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...................................

Jeanne Souder

......................................................................................

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Suzanne Wise Ann Van Deusen

.........................................................................................

...................................................................................................................................................

O n e of the first institutions o f the Junior College is the Book Club which has coppleted another successful year. O u r meetings were held on the second and fourth Monday o f each month. These occasions will long be remembered thanks t o the gracious hospitality o f Dr. and Mrs. DuBois.

A t each meeting one or more book reports were given. These were usually followed by a literar y selection read b y Dr. DuBois. A f t e r the business meeting, our members always enjoyed delicious refreshments served b y our charming hostess, Mrs. DuBois. The first event o f the year was the Friends o f the Library evening, t o which all Centenary was invited. Many came t o enjoy glancing through the exceptional books which were display ed. At a business meeting held a t the close o f the program plans were revealed t o award a prize t o the student having added the most worthwhile books t o her own personal library b y the end o f the school year. This idea was received with enthusiasm, and many f e l t that they would like t o contribute t o the already fine Centenary library. W h e n the meeting had adjourned, after-dinner coffee was served t o all. The Book Club was also responsible for the lovely tree which stood in the library a t Christmas time. Though many o f us will leave this organization, we will always keep the memory o f the pleasure and benefit we derived from it.

FRIENDS OF THE LIBRARY The FRIENDS O F THE LIBRARY has made i t s presence felt again this year b y c o n t r i b d n g t o the literature section o f the librar y . In November the Book Club entertained the faculty and student body with the annual ;pfter-dinner coffee. Mrs. Trevorrow graciously poured and Mrs. DuBois surprise'd us all with delicious candy. Three members gave i n t e r d i n g book reviews: Geraldine Vogel reviewed "The Snow Goose" b y Paul Gallico; Marcia Marie Weber, "The Pied Piper" b y Nevil Shute; and Janet Edmiston, " Wind, Sand, and Stars" by Antoine de Saint Exuprey. W e are deeply indebted t o Mrs. Trevorrow who has so kindly presented f o the library many books from the personal librar y o f Dr. Trevorrow.


SPILLED INK EDITORIAL STAFF Editor .......................................... Ann Van Deusen Associate Editor ..........................Barbara Robison Business Manager ................................ Joan Davies Circulation Manager ............................ Helyn Vogel TYPISTS Betty Reynolds, Grace Lewis Dorothy Hunt, Jeannette Tilly, Rosemary Pierre1 LITERARY BOARD Feature Editor ................................ Marie Giacomo Mary Louise Hahn Rosemary Pierrel Katherine Erbacher Betty Reynolds Gerry Vogel J a n e t Edmiston Alice Wolfson Helen Papp Ruth Kammelhor Elayne Robb Charlotte Arpin Annasteen Hirst Phyllis Buhrmaster Suzanne Wise

EDITORIAL Have you ever stopped to realize how little we have had to give u p so f a r in this w a r ? W e still have our homes, our families, our friends, our opportunities f o r education, our freedoms, and yes, even our luxuries. Compare t h a t with the multitude of things t h a t people in t h e occupied and fighting countries have given up. W h a t would we do if we had to get along even without some of t h e essential things in our life? Right here a t Centenary we can begin to learn t h e right habits, acquire the best attitudes, and form the most, correct opinions about the situation a t hand. W e cannot blindly ignore the conditions of war, neither can we fail to see the results t h a t will inevitably arise from it. Let us learn to appreciate w h a t we now have and let us also resign ourselves to the f a c t t h a t perhaps we may have to relinquish some of the pleasures that we a r e now taking for granted. We would have no more whining over inconsequential saqrifices if we all asked ourselves this one quedtion: Would I rather give u p a few of my small pleasures f o r a while, or would I rather lose all of t h e inherent rights and freedoms t h a t I a s a n American can enjoy? I n the face of the sacrifices t h a t people a r e making f o r our country now-the supreme sacrifice of one's own life-can we do anything but work, and strive, and pray in order t h a t our land may remain f r e e ?

Innocent Children Always remember t h e children, (The little tiny children) Lying along the roadsides, dead, With their faces raised towards heaven, And their wide eyes filled with fear. Never forget those children, (Who were innocent, carefree children) Still and white on the hillside, dead, So-me by the mothers who bore them, And their fathers who died f o r peace. -By Barbara Robison. -

A Senior Tells W h y It Is Necessary to Initiate Because of the terrible conditions of t h e world, we, the seniors, felt i t necessary to impress the lowly frosh with what the well-dressed freshman will wear for the duration. W e will do without many luxuries of the past, so we decided t h a t the freshmen should adjust themselves to the changing conditions. Long black stockings took the place of silk or nylon; they kept the girls w a r m a s well a s enhanced the beauty of their legs. Make-up i s soon going to be scarce, so our f a i r beauties appeared with t h a t envied out-door complexion t h a t the men love so. Long bobs a r e definitely out this season; the new "up swirl, down roll" coiffure rapidly took its place. The proper effect was attained only when a paper bag was worn; since they were so large, they kept ears w a r m besides being very chic. Fringe a s a decoration is very inappropriate. I t uses unnecessary material and is a temptation to twirl or braid; consequently, we suggested alternate hankies and colored socks. It is our duty to keep our bodies and minds in good condition also. Ask any freshman and she'll surely tell you t h a t exercise on the hockey field before breakfast, especially a conga line, really started t h e day off right. We were fortunate to have Miss Katherine "Kill-em-offquick" Erbacher to instruct. A graduate of the "build. today, break tomorrow" school, Miss Erbacher is available a t any time f o r free demonstrations. Manners a r e another important factor in the life of today. The freshmen always addressed their elders a s Miss, and proved considerate enough to have a n extra pack of cigarettes handy. No matter what happened during Freshman Week, the seniors do think t h a t all of the freshmen a r e a grand bunch of good sports.


-

THE HACK INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS CLUB Faculty Advisor

...............................................................................................................................

Dr. Leila Custard

OFFICERS President

...........................................................................................................................................................

Vice President Secretary Treasurer

............................................................................................................................................. .......................................................................................................................................................

Program Chairman; Sergeant-at-Arms

Georgine

Hill

Joyce Willever

................................................................................

Mildred Hoffman A n n Clendenin Jeanette Tilly

In September, t h e International Relations C l u b held its annual picnic with toasted marshmallows, a fire, and songs t o interest t h e Freshmen in our club. I t brought t h e membership t o twent y -four. Although n o t as large as we could be, we have given many worthwhile programs. First, o n November I I in chapel an armistice program was presented b y G e o r q i n e H i l l , Sue W i s e and Florence Sherman. There were three talks stressing t h e idea t h a t we honor and think o f the dead soldiers so t h a t war can never occur again. In December, eight o f us h a d a wonderful t i m e a t the International Relations C l u b convention held a t Princeton a t which there were m.any inspiring speakers and rousing discussions. The girls chosen t o represent Centenary were Georgine Hill, Louise Williams, M i l d r e d Hoffman, Jeanette Tilly, Constance Lucaa, Janet Edmiston, A n n Clendenin and Patricia St. George. Dr. Custard accompanied us W e have been receiving books f r o m the Carnegie Endowment Fund. These are used as a basis f o r the semi-monthly discussions. With these a summary o f war news is sent. M r . Blatchford, havin g lived in Syria f o r several years, gave on January I 7 an interesting talk on Syria, illustrated b y slides. A vesper program was devoted t o this most important country in t h e world toda y . Being l e f t t o entertain ourselves now o n Frida y evenings, t h e International Relations C l u b and French C l u b held a b r i d g e party. Prizes f o r high scores in cards and t h e f l a g contest were given. A s we have t w o Icelandic girls with us this year, they were interviewed in a radio broadcast b y members o f t h e club. It was presented over WEST. Dora and ;{ Erna Oskars, G e o r g i n e H i l l , Florence Sherman, Patricia St. George, A n n Clendenin, Marcia W e b e r , Sue W i s e a n d Dr. Custard took part. For Jefferson's two-hundredth birthda y , a chapel program was given on A p r i l 13th. Louise Williams, Sue Wise, a n d A n n Clendenin each took a differ&+ phase o f his life. It was perhaps one o f our most impressive programs, ending with t h e chorus singing the f l a g salute.


- THE HACK CERCLE Prgsidente ............................................................................................................................................... , Vice-Pres~dente......................................................................................................................................... Secrktaire -........................................................................................................................................ P Huissier Faculty Advisor .................................................................................................................... Miss

.

Maril y n Murphy T h e Exstein .. a c a St. George Rosemary Pierrel Geraldine Shields

C e t t e annke le cercle fransais a consacrk beaucoup de son temps eux oeuvres d e guerre. Le French Coordinating Council d e New York nous a envoy6 de la laine. Nous avons tricot6 des chandails e t des chaussettes pour prisonniers de guerre f r a n ~ a i se t pour orphelins fransais. Le onze decembre a eu lieu notre cabaret. Tout le monde en a beaucoup ioui. Nos comediennes ont donnk une representation bien ravissante. Elles ont f a i t rire tous ceux qui k t a i t 18. C e t t e soirke k t a i t au bknkfice d'un p e t i t garcon belge Ivan b Deley, auquel le cercle s'intkresse. En mai le cercle fransais a cklkbrk la f6te de Jeanne d ' A r c A la chapelle. Beaucoup de nos camarades, mdmes celles qui n'ktudiaient pas le fransais, ont assist6 B cet kvenkment qui marquait notre admiration pour une jeune fille hbroique. Nous nous sommes bien amuses cette annke mais nous sentons que nous avons contribuk un peu au bonheur des autres. Nous espkrons que le cercle de I'annee prochaine aura une annee aussi utile e t heureuse que la n6tre.

THE CAMERA CLUB Faculty Advisor President .......................................................................................................................................................... Secretary

r. W a l t e r Stewart Grace Lewis Joan Savale

Snap! Click! Have you seen the girls o f C.J.C. with their trusty cameras taking pictures o f interesting scenes and people on the campus? N o doubt they were members o f the Camera Club practicing what they had learned. W e have had many informative lectures. Dr. Stewart has shown us how t o develop our own pictures and how t o enlarge them. O n Saturday mornings the girls meet in the dark room and have lots o f fun experimenting with their films, really producing some worthwhile pictures. At Christmas time we learned how t o make attractive cards with greetings and an appropriate illustration beside it. W e also had a very interesting lecture on "Photography and Crime," in which slides were used t o illustrate the value of collecting evidence through pictures, leading t o the;folution o f the crime and the final arrest o f the suspect. Ira Hoagland, o f Hackettstown, explained in detail the working parts o f a camera. His explanation included those complicated little gadgets on the front which few people seem t o know how t o use. Then he showed us prints and explained some of the faulty photography. H e t o l d us what should have been done t o remedy those faults. In conclusion, he many really fine pictures as examples o f excellent photography.

resented


THE HACK L

-

THE GUILD Faculty Advisor

......................................................................................................................

Miss Margaret H i g h t

OFFICERS President ........................................................................................................................................................ Jeanne Souder Secretary-Treasurer Katherine Erbacher Publicity Director ............................................................................................................................ Susanne Cameron Soufh Hall Representatives ....................................................................... Bette Silcox, Edith Bullwinkel North Hall Representatives ........................................................................... Nancy Goulet, Muriel Reid

PURPOSE ( A s i t appeared in the first issue of "Spilled Ink") LET'S LOOK AT THE GUILD Since e v e r y o n e connected with Centenary is a member of the Guild, I believe you should become acquainted with its duties, activities, and requirements-if I may call them such. The Guild, in my estimation, is the heart of Centenary. I t upholds the high campus standards within and beyond the campus limits. It serves not only the school itself, but also many organlzations and reliefs. Wherever aid is needed-no matter what kind i t may be -the Guild is always ready to make itself useful. The punpose of the Guild, a s stated in the Constitution, is "to unite the members in a spirit of friendliness and service." To be united a s ONE in friendliness and service in this year of world conflicts means that we, a s members of the Guild and students of Centenary, must be prepared for self-

sacrifice, and we must accept a great deal of responsiblity toward being helpful to others. Centenary is a school to be proud of; it stands for the highest ideals. Remember, however-we have not come to Centenary only to absorb knowledge. Whatever we gain, we should share. We can do this by taking an active part in the activities of the school and the Guild.

* * * *

This year we will be called wpon again to serve by sacrifice and effort. I feel sure that we will all be ready to do our share in serving others and thereby gain something for ourselves. The only reward the Guild receives for its work is the happiness. This can be found only by giving ourselves unreservedly to the task of making others happy. JEANNE SOUDER

ACTIVITIES

by

Letters o f welcome were sent t o the incoming students during the summer months the G u i l d officers.

As a p a r t o f the program t o welcome students, a picnic was given early in October. Also in October a cider and doughnut sale raised money f o r the treasury. A bridge party was held in November t o raise funds for blackout curtains for the First Aid Station in the Little Theatre. Twent y -five Christmas stockings were filled for children recommended b y the G o o d Will Mission of Jersey City. A n evening in December was set aside for the purpose o f collecting silk stockings for the war effort. In January a breakfast was served one Sunday morning for those who like to sleep late t o increase our deposits. The Guild participated in the March o f Dimes in February.


During the year the Guild sponsored the Red Cross Surgical Dressing Class, which met every Thursday afternoon from 3:30 t o 6:OO. The Hall Representatives sold candy throughout the year and turned the proceeds over t o the fund.

SERVICES 25 Christmas stockings were filled. Hundreds o f surgical dressings were made each week f o r the American Red Cross. During the Red Cross Drive we collected $255.00 which became p a r t o f the Hackettstown quota. The Guild volunteered t o meet the expense of blackout curtains which were essential in the First Aid Station used by students and town They cost $85.00. Checks were sent t o the following organizations:

ki

American Red Cross March o f Dimes Russian Relief Save-the-Children Federation


- THE HACK THE CENTENARY GLEE CLUB .' Director

Elise Gardner elen Lamb

President Secretary ..................................................................................................................................Marguerite

Trimmer

Rosemary Plerrel, Katherine Erbacher, Joan Savale

Librarians

MEMBERS Charlotte Arpin Evelyn Bahr Madeleine Bates Lillian Bocker Nancy Bogert Betty Burger Susanne Cameron Ann Clendenin

Helen Lamb Grace Lewis Audrey Lindblom Marion Martin Grace Matthews Doroth y Mooney

Jean De Girolamo Harriet Desmond Muriel Dochtermann Katherine Erbacher Mary-Louise Hahn

Ruth Moore Nancy Nelson Barbara Vielsen Shirley Osmun Rosemary Pierre! Catherine Remsen Elizabeth Rothrock

Phyllis Henderson Helen Hilsdon

Joan Savale Barbara Seely

Bette Silcox Marie Strickler Vivian Taylor Muriel Tompkins Marguerite Trimmer Joan Valentine Ann Van Oeusen Jane Van Sickle Geraldine Vogel Helen March Marion Waters Jane W h i t e Patricia W h i t e Phoebe Willard Gloria

Willis

This year the Centenary Glee Club as well as other qlee clubs has felt the impact o f war conditions. Several concerts o f former years shared b y iafayette, Princeton, and Pennsylvania were missed, but we were fortunate t o have the Stevens Glee Club with us again. O n one occasion we gathered all the girls o f the college together and enjoyed an informal "sing fest" in the main parlor.

0 6 course we all know that the Glee Club under Miss Gardner's direction has contrquted much t o +he Sunday evening Vesper services each week as well as t o speciil occasions such as t h e Christmas pageant, Anniversary services and Commencement.

It may be added that the double quartet of the Glee Club made several recordings which were used on some o f the Centenary broadcasts. It i s

with many fond memories that we come t o the close o f another active year.


THE HACK

.

CENTENARY RADIO PLAYERS Director: Louise B. Cilley. Members: Marcia-Marie Weber, Alice Jean McKendrick.

Wolfson, Suzanne

Wise, Ruth

Moore,

BROADCASTS over WEST in Easton, Pa.: October: November: January: February: March: April:

A sketch written b y Ph y llis Williams ' 3 9 . Vocal solos by Shir!ey Osmun. A play in verse, "The Stranger," written b y Dr. H. Graham D~lBois. A play, "To Freedom and f o Peace," written b y Roberta Fleming ' 3 9 . A short sketch called "Rumor" from the government. Vocal selections by Helen Lamb and piano solos by Phoebe Willard. Assisted b y International Relations Club in interviewing Dora and Erna Oskarsdottir o f Iceland. Original piano solos by Gilbert Winkler. Final broadcast an Easter play in verse, "A Green Hill Far Away," written b y Dr. H. Graham DuBois.

SPECIAL PERFORMANCE o f this Easter play was Sunday.

resented

o t Vespers on Palm

CENTENARY PLAYERS Director: Louise

B. Cilley.

First year Play Production class: Claire-Jean Bartlett, Lucile Griesser, Elaine Robb, Jean Hoffman, Ruth Tietz. Second year: Alice Wolfson. Plays presented November 20, 1942.

SUPPRESSED DESIRES

......

.

-Henrietta Brewster Stephen Brewster ....................... Mabel Stage Manager Property Manager Electrician

'-

:-,

.

. b y Susan Glaspell .

Alice Wolfson Jean Hoffinan .................. Elaine Robb Hoffman a ne Robb Clare-Jean Bartlett

2" ............................................................................................... . . .

A MONOLOGUE "The Flapper's Elopement" (Florence Huet) ....................

i/

Florence Dorothy

Alice Wolfson

T H E STRANGER A Dramatic Episode in Verse by Dr. H. Graham DuBois ........................................................................................................................................ ......................................................................................................................................................

Clare-Jean Bartlett Lucille Griesser


- THE HACK THE DIOKOSOPHIAN SOCIETY and

THE CENTENARY PLAYERS presented M a y

I , 1943

"FOR HER C-H-E----ILDISSAKE" A C o m e d y Meller Drayma by Paul Loomis CAST Jeannette Tilly Pansy Paine, our fair young heroine ................................................................... G r a c e Lewis H i l a r y Paine, her hard-hearted young husband .......................................................... . r. A l i c e Wolfson ................................................................ Marcella Paine, his h y p o c r ~ t ~ c sister al G r a c e Matthews M i d g e Paine, another sister ..........................................................................

.

G a y l o r d Duckworth, t h e world's most fabulous villain

..................................

G l o r i a Willis

Doroth y Bullock, a trained nurse in love with G a y l o r d . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Elaine Robb Wilma Hagan Fairfax Kisselbergh, our manly hero ................................................................ . 0 ....................................................................... Jean Hoffman Amelia, housekeeper a t t h e P a ~ n es Dawson, t h e Paine butler Mrs. H e d d a Barrington, a Basil Barrington, her son ... Beatrice H u d n u t , a voice f r o m o u t o f t h e past .............................................. Virginia G e o r g e Ruth Morris, Joan Savale, Shirley Osmun, G r a c e Lewis Four girls Bettie-Deane Pearson, Betty Preger, Elinor C o l e Three me ............. Clare-Jean Bartlett Stage Manager ................................................................ Assistant Stage Manager ..................................................................... Mildred doffman Betty A n n Rothrock, Patricia W h i t e Properties .................................................................................... .. C h i e f e l e c t r ~ c ~ a................................................................................................................ n Marcia Y t t e r b e r g

The entire action o f t h e play takes place in the drawing room o f t h e Paine Mansi,qn, located in a medium-sized city in t h e East. Act

I.

Scene I: Late afternoon in early summer. Scene II: Early evening- three weeks later

A c t II. Three months later- late afternoon. Act

Ill. O n e year later- early evening.


RAGGEDY ANN KINDERGARTEN FOR PSYCHOLOGY CLASS PRACTICE


ATH LETICS


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THE HACK ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION BOARD OF DIRECTORS Grace Lewis

President . Vice President

Harriet Desmond

Senior Representatives Jeanne Souder Carolyn Eckhardt

Freshman Representatives Bette Rhodes Barbara Nielsen ASSISTANTS

Senior: Freshman: Senior: Freshman:

Hocke y Heads Marilyn Murphy Bette Silcox

Tennis Heads Muriel Judson Edith Smith

Outing Heads Nancy Goulet Evelyn Bahr

Swimming Heads Katherine Erbacher

Dance Heads Mildred Hoffman Patricia St. George

Basket Ball Heads Elizabeth Reynolds Elizabeth Glenn

ATHLETIC RECORD FOR 1942- 1943 Hockey Scores Seniors vs. Freshmen Freshmen vs. Seniors Freshmen vs. Seniors Seniors vs. Freshmen Freshmen vs. Seniors

2-2

6-0 32 2-2 6-3

Basket Ball Scores Seniors vs. Fre:hmen 27-23 Freshmen vs. Seniors 30- 19 Freshmen vs. Seniors 38-22 Freshmen vs. Seniors 23-19 Seniors vs. Freshmen 22-1 1

EMBLEM A W A R D S Freshmen Grace M j t t h e w s Marie Strickler Betie Silcox Edith Bullwinkel Bette Rhodes El;zabeth Glenn Edith Smith Jane Snyder Jean Van Fleet Jean Packer Stella Tarabicos

Seniors Harriet Desmond Jane Schleqel Janet Edmiston Muriel Judson Marilyn Murphy Joan Bush Nancy Goulet Jane Beld;ng Gerry Vogel Kay Erbacher CLASS NUMERALS

;I

Seniors Harriet Desmond Georgine Hill Jane Schlegel Florence Green Joan Davies Muriel Judson Ann Van Deusen Maril y n Murphy Joan Bush Jane Belding Betty Burger Elizabeth Reynolds Kay Erbacher Shirley Osmun Dorothy Mack

Freshmen Marye Strickler Madeleine Bates Bette Silcox Jane Snyder Edith Bullwinkel Patricia St. George Bette Rhodes Elizabeth Glenn Ruth Morris Edith Smith Doroth y Dealrin Marcia Ytterberg Aqn Farrar Jean Van Fleet Elizabeth Keene Barbara Seely Evelyn Schutzman Joan Savale


I

SENIOR CLASS H O C K E Y TEAM

I

Back row: Jane Belding, Janet Edmiston, Harriet Desrnond, Muriel Judson, Nancy Goulet, Joan Bush, Joan Davies. Kneeling: Gerry Vogel, Ann Van Deusen, Marcia-Marie Weber, Georgine Hill (Capt.), Marilyn Murphy, Jane Schlegel. Absent: Florence Green, Marjorie Puppo, Barbara Byrne, Mildred Hoffman, Bet+y Burger.

SENIOR CLASS BASKET

.. . .

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,

.

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TEAM

Back row: Muriel Reid, Joan Bush, Jane Belding, Muriel Judson, Kay Erbacher. Kneeling: Harriet Desmond, Joan Davies, Gerry Vogel (Capt.], Elizabeth Reynolds, Shirley Osrnun. . . _,-. r '.Y?..-.-"r L. , . ~ -2 . nv.-," ~ . ~ . 4. .' h - ,; :' 7L-..?.'.-*. i r.< ,.- r.-.: _ .r 1 - ,. -. r .- r .. ,*:\ r.B*!v? i-4.+F-G-&+ng$q;;@ , -- 9. , , . ',, i.., 8

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BALL

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-

FRESHMAN CLASS H O C K E Y TEAM C y nthia W i g h t , Patricia St. George, Ruth Morris, Jean Packer, Dorothy Deakin, Elizabeth Glenn, Edith Bullwinkel, Marie Strickler, Marilyn Gifford, Madeleine Bates, Jane Snyder, Marcia Ytterberg, Evelyn Schutzman, Edith Smith, Grace Matthews. Kneeling: Bette Silcox, Bette Rhodes (Capt.)

FRESHMAN CLASS BASKET

BALL TEAM

Back row: Stella Tarabicos, Marcia YHerberg, Elizabeth Glenn, Jane Snyder, Ann Farrar, Bette Kneeling: Edith Bullwinkel, Jean Van Fleet, Silcox, Jean Packer, Madeleine Bates, Edith Smith. Bette Rhodes (Capt.), Barbara Seely, Joan Savale,


TENNIS INSTRUCTION


- THE HACK SOCIAL EVENTS OF THE YEAR 22 Students arrive. Registration during the day. . Assignment o f "Big Sisters" in the evening. .-m:s:.-,f. .-;. '23 First Chapel. Orientation Program. ! 'p. Sept.

.:.

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?

.

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Guha and Sushila. 4 -,. 25 Oriental Dan,cers-Bhupesh . 26 Athletic Association entertains new students in "Come As You A r e " Party 27 First Vesper Service-Dr. George W. Roesch, Hackettstown Methodist Church. "A W o r l d Old Test, W h a t Think Ye?" 29 Freshmen initiation f o r three days.

- ..@.,. .-' --.<I

1,

8

2 Faculty Recital. 3 The Guild entertains new students with picnic in Sully's Grove. 4 Vespers. Rev. Harold A. Scott, Presbyterian Church, Hackettstown.

Oct. II

' . <*

6

I.I -L.>

. ;* %i.'P,

::;A

.?

,8 lr

-.

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r .: t '.< -8 ; / !;-I

-

5 Delfa Sigma Sigma Tea. 7 II 12 15 18 27 28 29 30

' J

L?&:b?:'.3

Theta Epsilon N u Tea. Vespers. President Trevorrow. "Essential College Freedoms". Siama E ~ s i l o nPhi Tea. -I Psychology Class visits Clinton Reformatory. Vespers. Hymn Service. Radio Players broadcast over WEST. PPschology Class visits Letchworth Village. Pledge Day. " Mum" Dinner. Dr. Charles H. Elliott, State Commissioner o f Education. " Our Freedom." Guild, Benefit card party. Vespers. Gilbert Winkler in piano recital. Book Club and Friends of the Library. A f t e r dinner coffee and book displa y . Senior Dance. Piano Recltal-Josef Lhevinne. Psychology Class visits Marlboro Asylum.

I Vespers.

Nov.

6 8 9

14 15 I7 7:' J ~ ~ 2L 0 Centenary ' : Players. Fall program o f plays. ' .* ; ..,, - &;:.\' 8: . . - 22 Vespers. Hymn service. 4fk.h:;: '' ; '-2 4 Radio Players over WEST. 8

Dec.

. .e. >?. <;A i. - .-* .-,.a r

.

; A?

8

.A

I Student recital. 4 International Relations Club representatives attend area meeting in Princeton, N. J. 6 Vespers. Illustrated lecture. Mrs. Ava Hamilton Singer. " Our African Outposts,"


- THE HACK SOCIAL EVENTS OF THE YEAR II I2 I3 15

Dec.

French Club Cabaret. Delta Sigma Sigma anniversary. Cancelled. Vespers. Christmas program. International Relations Club. Echoes o f conference in Princeton. 17 Christmas dinner and play. 18 Special chapel service in Little Theatre. President Trevorrow. Chorus. Christmas recess begins. 30 Alumni Reunion a t Essex House.

Jan.

3 4 10 17 19

Christmas recess ends. Raggedy Ann kindergarten opened. Vespers. Captain Frederick M. Browning. "Forgotten Obligations." Vespers. M r . Blatchford. Illustrated lecture on Syria. January Birthday Party. Radio Players broadcast over WEST. 23 Theatre Parties t o "The Pirates" and "Eve of St. ~a;ks." 24 Vespers. President Trevorrow. 25 Mid-year exams, all week.

I

II

I 7 13 14 16

Feb. !t

I t

19 21 23 26 28

, ,I

I,

Mar.

;/

I!

The Guild sponsors "Victory Book" drive. Vespers. Rev. Herbert Rhinesmith, Washington, N. J. Freshman Dance. Recital. Gilbert Winkler. Current Events test. February Birthdays-Party. " G o o d Times" program. French Club and lnternational Relations Club give a bridge party. Vespers. Dr. A. H. Brown, Methodist Church, Ridgewood, N. J. Party for September birthda y s. " Good Times" program. Chorus hold "Sing" in parlors. Vespers. Mrs. C. Hammond Blatchford. "Syria."

5 Home weekend. 9 March birthdays party. 10 Lecture on History of Money System b y J. Harold Nunn '05. DisFlayed his famous collection o f coins from 2500 B.C. t o present day. .r 13 Theta Epsilon Nu anniversary. Merry Go-Round Ball. I 4 Vespers. Choral service. 16 Party for October birthdays. Student Recital.


- THE HACK SOCIAL EVENTS OF THE YEAR Mar. 8 I

20 Stevens Glee Club concert and dance. 21 Recital. Miss Ellen Osborn '36. 23 Party f o r November birthda y s. 28 Vespers. Dr. Stephen F. Bayne, Jr., Chaplain, Columbia University. 30 Radio Players broadcast over WEST. 31 Fashion Show.

2 t o l l Spring recess. I3 A p r i l Birthday Party. 18 Vespers. k a d i o Players present Dr. DuBois' "A Green Hill Far Away." 20 Party for December birthdays. 27 Party f o r July birthdays.

April

Radio Players broadcast over WEST.

I Sigma Epsilon Phi anniversary. Play and Dance. 2 Vespers. The Honorable J. Parnell Thomas, Member o f the House o f Representatives.

4 M a y birthdays party. 7 Athletic Association and Camera Club stages "Minstrels" f o r their

9 II 14 !6 21

23 29

,

June

30

" G o o d Times" program. Vespers. Prof. Katherine V. Gates, Kennedy School o f Missions, Hartf o r d Seminary Foundation. "India." Party f o r August birthdays. Trophy Contest. Vespers. Dr. Karl K. Quimby, Trustee. Physical Education Department. Demonstration. Vespers. Dr. Parker B. Hollaway, District Su p erintendent of Newark Conference. "Last Chapel." Presentation o f athletic awards. Class Day. Crowning o f May Queen. Callilogian Play a t eight p. m. Demonstration b y Mr. V. Arnold Cigliano, National Batonisf. Baccalaureate service. Dr. Henry Smith Leiper, M.A., D.D., "Life's Priorities." 8:00 p. m. Choral service.

I Final examinations week. June birthdays party. 4 President's Dance. 5 Commencement exercises.


LAMB


A CHINA TEACUP IS

A MOST FITTING GIFT We'll post an "Engagement Tea" of English Bone China to any address in the U. S. on receipt of your card and two dollars.

EDMISTON "THINGS YOU'D LOVE TO HAVE" 330 SPRINGFIELD AVE.,

SUMMIT, N. J.

Telephone 322

Wm. L. Apgar, Prop.

COMPLIMENTS O F

APGAR'S TAXI

HACKETTSTOWN, N. J.


CENTENARY A STANDARD JUNIOR COLLEGE APPROVED BY THE MIDDLE STATES ASSOCIATION O F COLLEGES AND SECONDARY SCHOOLS ACCREDITED BY

The Departnient of Education of New Jersey The Regents of the State of New York The University Senate of the Methodist Church

.

An active member of The American Association of Junior Colleges Listed by The American Council on Education The Department of Education of the United States In the past ten years, Centenary students have transferred with advanced college credit to 60 fot~r-yearcolleges and universities

"Eclucation for Usefulness" - . -q. ,

.

-

I

" ROBERT J. TREVORROMT, President MRS. R O B E R T J. TREVORROW, Aclmi.nistrator

*Deceased January 31, 1943

mtn~~txxmtxx~tm~tn~~xTmcxxj~txxmtxxm~xxm~xxmtxx


You Reeelve FULL VALUE When You But

I I

ARTGLO

The Fabric of Dirtinction

STERLING

All Wool Double Warp Bunting md

DEFIANCE

Two Ply Cotton Bunting TEE FLAGS THAT GIVE SERVICE

9OLD BY DEALERS EVERYWHERE Manufsctured only by BS FIFTH AWL

ANNIN & GO, Na:t;:;i%.y. k d t FIa9 Eouse in the World

Even after leaving Centenary Junior College you should always feel a t home, for the chances are that whereever you go you will be sitting on Lackawanna upholstery leather. The most modern airplanes, streamline trains, custom made automobiles, swanky cocktail lounges and modern ocean liners Lackawanna use leather.

THE LACKAWANNA LEATHER CO. HACKETTSTOWN, N. J. Largest Manufacturers of Military ,Upholstery Leather i n the U . S.

COMPLIMENTS O F

McMONAGLE & ROGERS

ALVAH THOMAS FLOUR

- FEED

HAY - GRAIN

Manufacturers of

;/

Perfectly Pure Highest Quality

VANILLA EXTRACT MIDDLETOWN. N. Y

HACKETTSTOWN, N. J.


THE PARKER STUDIO

MORRISTOWN, NEW JERSEY

Official Photographers for the "Hack"


THE PEOPLES NATIONAL BANK OF HACKETTSTOWN HACKETTSTOWN, N. J.

1906

A Ranlc Statement That Any Man o r Woman Can Understand Condensed Statement of Condition a t the Close of Business Dec. 31, 1942 Our Deposits and Other Liabilities a r e .............................................................. $2,103,814.37 To meet this indebtedness we have: Cash in Vault and Due from Banks .................................................................. $ 460,978.35 U. S. Government Securities (Paid f o r i n full) ........................................ 1,312,332.50 Other Securities ........................................................................................................ 574,501.09 (No Securities carried above par) Loans and Discounts ........................................................................... .................. 277,724.94 Land a n d Equipment .............................................................................................. 5,505.00 Total To Meet Indebtedness

..................................................................

$2,631,041.88

This leaves ................................................................................................ $ 527,227.51 Capital Stock (common), $100,000.00 Surplus, $200,000.00 Reserves and Undivided Profits, $227,227.51

It is with appreciation that we present this statement of condition to our Depositors and to the Public in general. Confidence and Co-operation has made this record possible. Large Enough to handle your Business with SAFETY but not tcro large to know you PERSONALLY. Phone 101

A Night Depository Service

MILTON K. THORP

WILLIAMS & HIBLER

STATIONER

RYTEX PERSONAL STATIONERY

COAL AND BUILDING MATERIALS

1/

139 MAIN ST.

TEL. 47M

Hackettstown, N. J. HACKETTSTOWN, N. J.

Tel. 49


Petersen-Owens, Inc. 428 WEST 13th STREET

NEW YORK, N. Y.

Purveyors of prime meats, fancy poultry, and game to all first class hotels, schools, steamships, and summer resorts, etc.

Deliveries guaranteed to any part of the United States 2

and Canada


THEODORE G. PLATE, JR. :-: Jeweler

:-:

Established 1857

HACKETTSTOWN, N. J.

SMITH'S

Sprinting again in its 88th year

FANCY GROCERIES

Corner of Main and Liberty Hackettstown, N. J.

Leading in coverage of local news and the best medium for advertising messages

Tel. 248 Job Printing


DIEGES & CI.,UST

Phone 208

Floral Designs

New York, N.Y

17 John Street,

iRk?

M.MORGAN

& SON

Manufacturing specialty jewelers Class rings and pins

Member of Florists' Telegraph Delivery Association

Medals, cups, trophies and plaques

Cut Flowers and Potted Plants

Athletic Awards

HACKETTSTOWN, N. J.

H. J. MARLATT Plumbing-Heating-Tinning Contractor PetrO-NokoL Oil Burners

/

221 MAIN STREET

HACKETTSTOWN, N. J. Tel. 60-W


STEWART D. WILLIAMS (CARL'S RADIO SHOP)

COMPLIMENTS O F

THE HACKETTSTOWN

Guaranteed Repairs On All Makes of Radios

NATIONAL BANK Hackettstown, New Jersey

Photo Finishing Cameras and Supplies

Organized 1855 170 Main St. Hackettstown, N. J. Phone 525 Extension at Home

COMPLIMENTS O F COMPLIMENTS O F

REX'S PHARMACY

Strand Theatre

GEORGE DIEHL, Prop.

A. CORTRIGHT, Mgr.

"DOLLY MADISON ICE CREAM" FOUNTAIN SERVICE 135 MAIN S T R E E T

HACKETTSTOWN, N. J. PHONE 238

HACKETTSTOWN, N. J.

Phone 106

We Deliver


COMPLIMENTS OF

COLLEGE S H O P P E Luncheonette

hloglia's Ice Cream '-2

Proprietors

- Mrs.

Joe Tomaino and daughter Evelyn

'x HACKETTSTOWN, N. J.

151 MAIN STREET,

DRESSES HOSIERY MILLINERY

I

THE VILLAGE BAKERY 155 Main Street Hackettstown, N. J.

YARNS Variety of BREADS, CAKES, PIES and PASTRIES

HOOVER'S

R

HACKETTSTOWN, N. J. All Baked on Premises


EAGLE REGALIA COMPANY

NEWTON CLEANERS AND DYERS

Manufacturers of

Emblem Buttons and Pins Medals and Trophies Flags

-

CLEANING SERVICE

Banners - Badges

Wednesdays and Saturdays

Rzl! 298 Broadway,

New York, N. Y.

NEWTON, N. J.

Tel. Worth 2-2260

JMORRIS CLOTHING CO., Inc. WEST END SPORTWEAR CO. MAKERS O F

SPORTS WEAR College Blazers For Schools, For Camp, For Beach ;I

HARRY GINSBERG Sales Agent

125 FIFTH AVENUE NEW YORK


Are Those Fresh Eggs? Fresh food f o r the table . . . the modern housewife wisely demands it.

Hackettstown Cleaners & Furriers

Yet fresh foods a r e merely health-helps f o r the healthy . . fresh drugs a r e health-helps f o r the sick. With health, and even life a t stake, fresh drugs, of tested strength and refrigerated serums of normal potency a r e most important to your sick ones. Even aspirin, iodine and cod liver oil . . . just common household drugs lose their strength a s medicines if not liept strictly fresh.

.

211 Main

St.

One Day DeLuxe Cleaning Services

We Do ALL .Our IVork at

Our drugs a r e fresh, their strength is guaranteed.

Our Own Plant Phone 21R

BACH'S DRUG STORE The Rexall Store HACKETTSTOWN, N. J.

I As We Know C. J. C. Means a Perfect School So We Try To Make

;/

ELECTRIC CO. A Perfect Store

Phone 25 276 Main St. Hackettstown, N. J.

Permanents of Distinction

E X Z ~ AJOHNSON BEAUTY SALON 100 Church Street

Phone: Hackettstown 197M

GENEVIEVE SHOP " The Shop of Thoughtful Gifts" 153 MAIN S T R E E T

HACKETTSTOWN. N. J.


OUR OWN PRODUCTS

WHITEHOUSE

FROM OUR OWN FARM

CHEVROLET

114 MAIN STREET

HACKETTSTOWN, N. J.

1 D. W. ALLEN

JOSEPH DeSANTIS Complete Shoe Repair Service Reliable and Reasonable

FINE TAILORING

119 Main St., Hackettstown, N. J.

Phone 47-R

SMALE, The Tailor

(Not responsible f o r goods left over 30 days)

..-. . .'.-

'. . ,

.

4

-

,>:

- #

4.;*; 8

COMPLIMENTS O F

A. .

".

.":. .- ;.,, ..4"6 L..*

<.:

:

-.

L. LEVITT

CLEANING & DYEING

I

'.*c '

. -.-.

1,;

STATIONERY and CONFECTIONERY

Phone 26-5

Hackettstown, N. J.


Tel. 592

153 Main Street

ROBERT K, TEEL HARDWARE, PAINTS & OILS SPORTING GOODS

/

JOHN G. BECK Painter, Paper Hanger and Decorator

AUTO ACCESSORIES

HACKETTSTOWN, N. J.

HACKETTSTOWN, N. J.

COMPLIMENTS O F

HENDRA AND ELY COMPANY

ROYAL SCARLET STORES

WHOLESALE FRUIT & PRODUCE

$

G E O R G E - H . GUMM, Prop.

THIRD AND LEHIGH STS. EASTON. PA.

Phones: 9135 - 9136


BEINECKE, INC.

PURVEYORS O F MEAT, POULTRY AND GAME

BORDEN'S QUALITY IS GUARANTEED Borden's protects and guarantees the quality and purity of its ice cream with a rigid system of control in manufacturing and distribu tion. The finest ingredients known to ice cream making, including every modern product improvement, are a t the command of Borden's.

821 WASHINGTON STREET

NEW YORK Telephone Watkins 9-8600

TRANS-BRIDGE LINES, INC.

ICE CREAM "If it's Borden's it's got t o be good."

School and College Diplornas a Specialty

Peckham, Little & Co., Inc.

OPERATORS Easton, Pa., to Washington, N. J.

BUS SERVICE

School and College Supplies Printing of Every Description

;/

' SORRY NO CHARTER TRIPS FOR THE DURATION

Telephone: Watlrins 9-3396-3397 BROADWAY, N. J.

243-247 WEST 17th STREET

Washington 229

New York, N. Y.


1943 Hack Yearbook  
1943 Hack Yearbook  

This is the 1943 Hack yearbook for Centenary College. At the time, the college was known as Centenary Junior College.

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