Page 1

A HEALTH AND LIFESTYLE RESOURCE FOR MEN IN2 MEN ISSUE #11: JANUARY 2012 FREE!

Stayin’ Healthy This Summer!


Partying Safe

Summer is here! And once again we find ourselves in a festive mood – holidays, music festivals, BBQ’s and other outdoor fun activities. This is also the time of year that finds some of us trying out new, different or exciting stuff. Maybe even mixing and matching drinks, drugs and of course, sex. While there may be some harm associated with any of these activities by themself, combining them can have serious consequences. We need to remind ourselves to always play safe and in doing so ensure that the fun times don’t turn into something else. Recreational use of alcohol and drugs either separately or mixed together can alter your mood, judgement and chances of engaging in risk taking behaviours. They lower our inhibitions, increase our confidence, alter our consciousness and affect our judgement and abilities. Alcohol and drugs can also increase our sex drive and lead to risky sexual behaviours we might regret later on. Keeping this in mind, if you are planning on consuming alcohol or taking any drugs, take some time to sit back and plan your actions prior to engaging in these activities. WHAT IS A STANDARD DRINK? Can or stubbie of light beer (up to 375 ml) = 0.8 of a standard drink Can or stubbie of mid strength beer (up to 375 ml) = 1 standard drink Can or stubbie of full strength beer (up to 375 ml) = 1.4 standard drinks 150 ml glass of wine (9.5 to 13% alcohol) =1.4 to 1.6 standard drinks 30 ml nip of spirits (37 to 40%) = 1 standard drink Can of spirits (approximately 5% alcohol) = 1.5 to 2.1 standard drinks

PAGE 2

THE AUSTRALIAN GUIDELINES In 2009, the National Health and Medical Research Council published the Australian Guidelines to Reduce Health Risks from Drinking Alcohol. These guidelines are based on the evidence concerning the health risks associated with alcohol consumption to enable consumers to make informed choices. All of us are affects each the following interpreted for

different and alcohol of us differently, so guidelines should be individuals.

Guideline 1 - For healthy men and women, drinking no more than

two standard drinks on average on any day reduces the lifetime risk of harm from alcohol-related disease or injury. Guideline 2 - For healthy men and women, drinking no more than four standard drinks on a single occasion reduces the risk of alcohol-related injury arising from that occasion. Guidelines 3 & 4 (not included here) relate to children and pregnant women, respectively. Most Australians consume alcohol in moderation, in fact the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare (AIHW) reported in 2007 that 72% of


e This Summer

• Be prepared - always have a few safe sex packs available (condoms and lube) nearby. You never know when you might need some. SAFE DRUG TIPS: • Don’t mix your drugs this can be very dangerous – particularly with alcohol, prescription drugs, stimulants and depressants – this includes high energy drinks mixed with alcohol. • There is no safe level of illicit drug use. The user can never tell exactly what an illegal drug contains or what effect it will have and this puts people at serious risk. If you suspect bad effects from drugs every second counts, react fast and call an ambulance. SAFE ALCOHOL TIPS: • Never leave your drink unattended and always order your own drinks from the bar. Drink spiking occurs when a drug is unknowingly placed in a person’s drink in order to sedate or incapacitate them. Harms associated with drink spiking include sexual assault, robbery and unsafe sex. • Take a break in between drinks and make sure you do not drink on an empty stomach. Eat snacks and other food along with your alcohol and also drink plenty of water. Article by Jonathan Paré - Community Development Project Officer at the Drug Education Network.

Australians consume alcohol at low risk levels in the long term.

• Always practice safe sex – use a condom and water based lube.

However about 10% of our population do drink at risky levels in the long term.

• Ask people if they have any known sexually transmitted infections (STIs) including HIV.

SAFE SEX TIPS: • You must have consent or permission to engage in sex with anyone.

This is in no way as difficult as contracting something and having to live with it (possibly forever).

• You must be over the age of 17 to have sex with other men in Tasmania (they must also be 17+). • Consent is always questionable when people are under the influence of drugs – and yes alcohol is a drug!

Did you know that condoms do not provide 100% protection from contracting some STIs - condoms only cover the penis and some STIs can be located anywhere in the genital area – if they are not covered neither are you.

The Editor would also like to acknowledge that in addition parts of this article were sourced from “Drink Wise Australia” and “Drug Aware – Western Australia”

USEFUL LINKS Condom Storage www.tascahrd.org.au/ condoms Safe Drinking www.drinkwise.org.au Safe Drug Use www.drugaware.com.au

PAGE 3


Start Thinking Like A Swapper! From The Editor

2012 and finally the sunny weather has arrived! In this issue of the mag we have focused on ways to play safe and enjoy the summer season. In particular being sensible with alcohol consumption, making healthy dietary & exercise choices and playing safe whilst having sex. We also take this opportunity to launch the nationwide Drama Downunder sexual health campaign again, which you may recall from a few years ago. With men’s health on the national agenda we also take a glimpse on what is being done in this area right here in Tassie and how you can also get involved in the area. From all of us in the Man2Man team we hope you enjoy a happy and safe summer. Brian Morris – Editor, Man2Man 03 6234 1242 m2m@tascahrd.org.au GPO Box 595, Hobart Tasmania 7001 www.m2mtas.com Facebook: Man2Man Tasmania www.twitter.com/Man2ManTas ISBN 978-0-646-55617-8 Views expressed in Man2Man are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the views of TasCAHRD. Man2Man is produced by David Williams on behalf of TasCAHRD. For production enquiries, call 0459 786 285

PAGE 4

You don’t have to give up everything you love to be healthy! You just need to swap a few things around! National guidelines recommend adults put together at least 30 minutes of physical activity most days and preferably every day. Guidelines also recommend adults eat at least two serves of fruit and five serves of vegetables each day. These days many of us don’t meet these guidelines. Because of that, some serious and largely preventable, long-term diseases are becoming increasingly common such as type 2 diabetes, heart disease, vascular disease, some types of arthritis and even some types of cancers. Often, these are diseases we don’t need to have. It’s hardly surprising we’re not meeting national guidelines. We live in a time when unhealthy choices are often the easy choices – especially in relation to healthy eating and physical activity. There’s heaps going on in Tasmania to make healthy choices easier choices in the places we live, work and play. And helping to spread the message is Eric, an animated blue balloon man and the hero of the Swap It, Don’t Stop It campaign, a joint Australian and Tasmanian Government initiative. Eric has a waist measurement of over 94 cm putting him at serious risk of chronic disease. Through the campaign, Eric shows how we can lose our bellies without missing out on all the things we love! He encourages people to consider small nutrition and physical activity swaps they can make in everyday life that may benefit their health and wellbeing. Often taking cues from his healthy family and pet dog, Eric has become a Swapper. He’s swapping inside for outside, big meals for small meals and watching


sport for playing sport. He’s swapping sitting for standing or walking. And he’s swapping frequent treats for sometimes treats. Eric’s doing a great job of helping others become Swappers too. You can get more tips to help you start – and keep – swapping on the Swap It, Don’t Stop It website or Facebook page WANT MORE THAN ERIC? Think it might take more than Eric to get you healthy? There’s a big difference between knowing what you need to do and getting motivated to achieve it. That’s where the Get Healthy Information & Coaching Service® comes in. Through the Get Healthy Service, you can have your own professional health coach for six months for free. The Get Healthy Service is a free, confidential, easy-to-access telephone service that helps people make lifestyle changes in relation to: • healthy eating • physical activity • achieving and maintaining a healthy weight Your personal health coach will provide information, advice and

JOIN ERIC IN GETTING HEALTHY: • Swap big for small • Swap sitting for moving • Swap often for sometimes • Swap watching for playing

support and help you set your own realistic health goals by talking through issues that maybe affecting your health. Once goals are set, the coach will help you identify simple things you can do to meet those goals, with a focus on helping you make simple changes you can stick to in the long term. Participants receive: • A free information booklet about healthy eating and being physically active • Up to ten phone calls from their own health coach, at times that suit them • A free coaching journal to keep track of their progress. Every Get Healthy health coach is a university-trained health professional with additional health coaching qualifications – and they’re experts at motivating others! Go on – start your New Year’s resolution to get healthy today. Getting started is easy. Article by Belinda Fenney-Walch, Senior Consultant Social Marketing, Population Health Department of Health and Human Services.

GET HEALTHY INFORMATION & COACHING SERVICE Phone: 1300 806 258 (M-F 8am – 8pm) Email: contact@gethealthy.tas. gov.au Web: www.gethealthy.tas. gov.au

• Swap fried for fresh

PAGE 5


The Drama Dow

What are STIs? Sexually transmitted infections (STIs) are infections that are transmitted through close body contact, usually sexual. Sexual contact includes anal or vaginal penetration, oral sex, as well as touching, fingering or oral contact with the penis, anus or vagina. STIs can be caused by viruses (e.g. HIV, herpes, genital warts), bacteria (e.g. chlamydia, gonorrhoea), or parasites (e.g. crabs, scabies). The presence of an inflammatory STI (chlamydia or gonorrhoea), or an ulcerative one (genital herpes, syphilis, etc) increases the risk of getting, or passing on, HIV, even when there are no symptoms. When to have an STI test? The more sex you have, the more frequently you should have a sexual health check-up to test for HIV and other STIs. All men who have sex with men should have a full sexual health check at least once a year, even if you only have one regular partner. More frequent testing, every 3-6 months is recommended for men who: • have episodes of unprotected anal sex • have more than 10 partners in the past six months • participate in group sex or use recreational drugs during sex If you or your partner have casual sex outside of your relationship, both of you should get tested. If you’re HIV positive, getting regular blood tests to monitor your HIV viral load doesn’t mean you are getting tests for other STIs. If you are sexually active, it is recommended that HIV positive men should have a syphilis test every 3 months as part of their routine HIV monitoring. You should also ask your doctor to test for the full range of STIs at the same time. It is also recommended that HIV-positive men should have a hepatitis C test once a year.

PAGE 6

“In the near future we will be exploring options to establish some clinical services .... sex anticipate an If you are in a new relationship, with men, try a different doctor monogamous or otherwise, it is or go to a sexual health clinic. Sexual increased focus advisable for you both to get a health clinics offer confidential STI check-up as either of you may have (including HIV) testing, treatment on LGBTI health” contracted an STI from a previous and information. Specialist medical, partner.

Indications (i.e. symptoms) that you may have an STI include: • An unusual discharge from your penis • Itching or stinging when you urinate • Sores, blisters or rashes in the genital or anal area Even if you show no symptoms, it is possible to have an STI and pass on the infection – especially if the infection is in the rectum or throat. Testing is the only way to know. You can register to receive free and confidential e-mail or SMS reminders to go for a sexual health check-up, using the Remind Me service on the Drama Downunder website (www. dramadownunder.info) What happens in an STI test? You can get a sexual health check from a GP or from a sexual health clinic. If your doctor doesn’t see many gay or bisexual men, or you don’t want them to know you have

nursing, counselling and interpreter services are also available. Public sexual health clinics are free, you don’t need your Medicare card, and you can be anonymous if you wish. Free condoms and lube are also available, and sometimes also needle and syringe programs. There is a list of sexual health clinics listed on the Drama Downunder website, listing both public and private sexual health clinics. When you go for a sexual health check, your doctor will assess your risk by asking a series of questions about your sexual history. A full sexual health check-up should include all of the tests listed below. If you don’t have any symptoms a routine check-up should involve a: • Blood test for HIV; • Blood test for syphilis and hepatitis A and B and, depending on your risk, for Hepatitis C (it is recommended HIV-positive men and men who inject drugs should get tested for Hepatitis C once a year); • Urine sample for chlamydia;


wnunder & STI’s

activities like rimming and fingering. Some practitioners will let you take your own anal swabs if this is more comfortable for you. If you are concerned or feel uncomfortable about having swabs taken perhaps go to a sexual health clinic as they do these tests every day. For blood-borne viruses (BBV), such as HIV and hepatitis C, and bacterial diseases such as syphilis you will need to have a blood test. A small vial of blood will be taken for testing. Before taking blood for HIV and hepatitis C, it essential that the practitioner has discussed the test and possible outcomes with you, this is called the pre-test discussion or pretest counselling.

• Anal swabs for gonorrhoea and chlamydia (even if you aren’t anally penetrated, as STIs can be transmitted by activities like rimming and fingering); • Throat swab for gonorrhoea; and • Physical examination for genital herpes, genital warts, pubic lice and scabies. You may need to ask specifically for some of these tests. If you have symptoms you may be offered different tests. An STI test can be done regardless of whether you have symptoms or not. For urethral tests (that is, testing for infection in the penis) the type of test you have is determined by the presence or absence of symptoms. If you do not have any symptoms you will have a urine test. A urine sample is the ‘first void urine’, the first part of the urine stream. For rectal or throat (pharyngeal) tests, or when you actually have symptoms from the penis such as discharge or an ulcer or sore, a swab will be taken with what looks like a long cotton bud. Swabs can be taken from the mouth, anus and penis. Swabs of the anus are important even if you aren’t anally penetrated, as STIs can be transmitted by

With all testing it is important to specify what you want to be tested for, as health care workers cannot test for STIs and BBVs without your permission. Talk to your practitioner if you are unsure what to be tested for. Test results can take up to seven to ten days to come back and you may need to make another appointment to receive these results in person, particularly for tests such as HIV. Post-test counselling is available and should be provided if you are receiving results for HIV or hepatitis C.

Telling If you have an STI, or had one recently, contact all the people you’ve had sex with recently and suggest they get tested. Sometimes this isn’t easy. You might find it hard to tell your sex partners you have an STI. It is important to talk to your sex partners so they can get tested and treated too. Remember, if one partner is untreated, many STIs can be passed back and forth. Sometimes a sexual health centre will anonymously contact sexual partners for you. You can also notify your recent sexual partners anonymously through email or SMS by using the Let Him Know service on the Drama Downunder website. Man2Man would like to acknowledge that information relating to this article has been adapted from the Drama Downunder website with permission

USEFUL REFERENCES: SEXUAL HEALTH SERVICE CONTACT DETAILS: HOBART 03 6233 3557 LAUNCESTON 03 6336 2216 DEVONPORT 03 6421 7759 BURNIE 03 6434 6315 FREECALL NUMBER 1800 675 859 EMAIL sexual.health@dhhs.tas. gov.au

• Drama Downunder Website on sexually transmitted infections in gay men www. thedramadownunder.info • Toolbox - A Guide to Sexually Transmissible Infections in Men www.m2mtas.com/ publications •MAN2MAN Program, TasCAHRD Tel 1800 005 900 or m2m@tascahrd.org.au

PAGE 7


TASMANIAN GLBTI SE STATEWIDE Antidiscrimination Commission Assist in pursuing claims of discrimination on grounds of sexuality, gender identity etc. Located at Level 1, 54 Victoria Street Hobart. PHONE: 03 6233 4841 OR 1300 305 062 EMAIL: antidiscrimination@justice.tas. gov.au WEB: www.antidiscrimination.tas.gov.au Bi-Tasmania Social and support group for bisexual Tasmanians CONTACT: 0401 054 003 Country Network Offers hospitality and friendship among rural GLBTI people to assist overcoming their social isolation. CONTACT: Dave Arnold on 03 6228 4166 www.countrynetwork.com.au secretary@ countrynetwork.com.au Galstays Choices for the gay and lesbian traveler. Visit www.galstays.com.au GALTA Australia’s gay & lesbian tourism organisation. Visit www.galta.com.au Gay & Lesbian Travel Association Tasmania (GALTAT) Representing the gay and lesbian travel accommodation providers in Tasmania. Visit www.galtat.com Gay & Lesbian Switchboard Confidential peer-based telephone counselling, information and referral service specifically for the GLBTI communities of Victoria & Tasmania. PHONE: 1800 184 527 WEB: www.switchboard.org.au Gay Info Line 24hr recorded message service funded by GLC Centre PHONE: 03 6234 8179 GayTAS Website The leading gay online newspaper & information source for the Tasmanian GLBTI community. Visit http://gaytas.e-p. net.au GAYunities New social networking site for the Tasmanian gay community. Visit www. gayunities.com Indeed Supporting Tasmania’s relationship registry. EMAIL: indeedrelationships@gmail.com WEB: www.relationshipstasmania.org. au/indeed.html

PAGE 8

League of Gentlefellows Regional social events for rainbow people in a safe and caring environment. PHONE: Julian Punch on 03 6239 6606 or John Perry on 03 6223 6003 EMAIL: julian@logtas.org WEB: www.logtas.org MAN2MAN Program Program run by TasCAHRD which aims to prevent the spread of HIV & STI’s among gay men and other men who have sex with men. This program incorporates the MAN2MAN magazine, MAN2MAN online outreach, volunteer program, venue outreach, as well as information & support. You will also find us in your favourite chatroom. PHONE: 03 6234 1242 or 1800 005 900 EMAIL: m2m@tascahrd.org.au WEB: www.m2mtas.com Outright Youth Group Group offering social events for young rainbow people in a safe and caring environment. Contact Scott Ryan or Connie Lavicka at scott@logtas.org for more details Parents and Friends of Lesbian and Gays (PFLAG) Currently do not have a Tasmanian representative but information is available at from the following; EMAIL: pflagtas@yahoo.com.au WEB: www.pflagaustralia.org.au QueerTas Tasmania’s GLBTI Yahoo group. WEB: queertas-subscribe@yahoogroups. com.au Relationships Tasmania Info about the deed of relationships www.relationshipstasmania.org.au S.A.F.E Spirituality and Faith Exploration meet fortnightly for LGBTI people who wish to explore their spirituality. CONTACT: Joc - 03 6228 6715 EMAIL: safetas@gmail.com WEB: www.care2.com/c2c/group/safetas Same Sex Travel A directory of same sex operated accommodation properties throughout Australia and New Zealand. WEB: www.samesextravel.com Sexual Health Service Offers counselling, support, referrals and STI & HIV testing. HOBART - 03 6233 3557 DEVONPORT - 03 6421 7759 BURNIE - 03 6434 6315 LAUNCESTON - 03 6336 2216 FREECALL NUMBER - 1800 675 859 EMAIL sexual.health@dhhs.tas.gov.au

TasCAHRD Tasmanian Council on AIDS, Hepatitis & Related Diseases including the MAN2MAN Program. PHONE: 03 6234 1242 FREECALL INFORMATION LINE 1800 005 900 (9am - 5pm) EMAIL: mail@tascahrd.org.au WEB: www.tascahrd.org.au Tasmanian Council for Sexual and Gender Diverse People Inc Supporting GLBTI people to come out with pride and live in their communities as fully respected and participating members SOUTH: Brian Doran (Greater Hobart) brian@logtas.org or Jo Goodman (Kingborough/Huon) on jo@logtas.org NORTH: Donald Mc Donald (Greater Launceston/East Coast) on donmac@ logtas.org NORTHWEST: Wilfred Laycock (NW/West Coast CLC) on wilfred@logtas.org WEB: www.comingoutproud.org Tasmanian Gay and Lesbian Rights Group (TGLRG) Is a community-based organisation campaigning for LGBTI human rights in Tasmania. TGLRG also have a stall at the Salamanca Markets every Saturday. CONTACT 03 6224 3556 EMAIL rodney.croome@tglrg.org WEB: www.tglrg.org Tasmania Police LGBTI Liaison Officers HOBART – 03 6230 2111 LAUNCESTON – 03 6336 7000 NORTH WEST – 03 6434 5211 WEB: www.police.tas.gov.au/community/community-policing/lgbt_liaison_officers TasPride An organisation dedicated to celebrating and uniting the Tasmanian GLBTI community as well as bringing you the annual TasPride Festival. See GLC Centre for contact details. WEB: www.taspride.com Working It Out Tasmania’s sexuality and gender support and education service which also provides counselling and support for LGBTI Tasmanians, their friends & family. Coordinate and implement anti-homophobia & diversity education & training programs in schools, workplaces, government & NGO’s SOUTH – Ph: 03 6231 1200; Email: south@ workingitout.org.au NORTH – Ph: 03 6334 4013; Email: north@ workingitout.org.au NORTH-WEST – Ph: 03 6432 3643; Email: northwest@workingitout.org.au WEB – www.workingitout.org.au


ERVICES AND GROUPS Working It Out Rainbow Support & Discussion Groups Support and discussion groups held statewide by Working It Out for GLBTI people HOBART – 0438 346 122 or info@workingitout.org.au LAUNCESTON – Sharon 0419 361 128 or north@workingitout.org.au DEVONPORT - Sharon 0419 361 128 or north@workingitout.org.au BURNIE - Sharon 0419 361 128 or north@ workingitout.org.au Yahoo Tasmanian GLBTI Groups (Queertas, gayhobart, tassiecasualfun, womenupnorth, bitasmania, Allsortsqueeryouth, qsoc_tasmania, gaytassieguys, triplegtas, Tasgayguys, GayTasmania, taswomen2women) http://groups.yahoo.com SOUTHERN Borderlines Hobart’s queer radio show every Monday at 10-12am on Edge Radio 99.3FM Flamingos Dance Bar Tasmania’s weekly club committed to providing a tolerant, safe, informative and fun environment for people of alternative sexualities and their friends to be able to enjoy themselves and socialize in a non-threatening environment. Located at 201 Liverpool Street, Hobart. Online at www.flamingosbar.com and www. myspace.com/flamingosbar Gay and Lesbian Community Centre Inc (GLC Centre) GLC Centre or TasPride is Tasmania’s GLBTI social and community development group. A member-based organisation, GLC produces the TasPride Festival, hosts regular events, provides the Gay Information Line, and publishes a regular bulletin. Contact on info@taspride.com or online at www.taspride.com Hobart Social Events Group Through Working It Out Hosts regular social events and dinners for GLBTI people CONTACT: Marcus on 0457 071 646 EMAIL: macdougall_60@hotmail.com or info@workingitout.org.au Les Girls Hobart GLBTI night club located at 101 Harrington Street, Hobart (formerly Mangoes Bar). With drag shows every weekend. Open every Friday & Saturday night. Free entry to all GLC members on display of membership card. WEB: http://www.myspace.com/ lesgirlshobart or http://lesgirlshobart. blogspot.com EMAIL: xshowgirl@hotmail.com

QSOC The Queer Uni Students Society in Hobart contactable via email at queerep@ yahoo.com.au

info@meetup.com POST: Launceston Meetup, PO Box 7666, Launceston Tas. 7250

QSOC South UTAS Queer Students on Campus. Contact on: qsoc_south@hotmail.com

Tas Unity An ecumenical support/study group for LGBTI people, their friends, families and supporters. PHONE: Lois on (03) 6339 1414

Queery UTAS GLBTI Social Group New UTAS social group for queer students on campus and open to other GLBTI people which meet regularly at the UTAS Queer Space CONTACT: Alex West EMAIL: akwest@utas.edu.au or queerrep@hotmail.com

Transisters Community based social and support group for transgender women in Tasmania, meeting once a month in Launceston. WEB: http://groups.yahoo. com/group/transisters/

Rodney Croome Gay Activist - Web Blog www.rodneycroome.id.au Tasmania University Union (TUU) Sexuality Officer CONTACT: Alex West on akwest@utas. edu.au or queerrep@hotmail.com Wellington Wanderers GLBTIQ activity group which runs a yearround program of events. CONTACT: 0447 225 682 or 03 6223 2690 POST: GPO Box 1872, Hobart Tas 7001 EMAIL: wellingtonwanderers@yahoo. com.au Working It Out Southern Trans Support & Discussion Group Monthly social gathering for anyone in the trans family. PHONE: Sue on 6231 1200 EMAIL: accounts@workingitout.org.au NORTHERN Allsorts GLBTI and friends under 25 youth group meeting monthly in Launceston & Devonport through Working It Out North. PHONE: 03 6334 4013 or 0419 361 128 EMAIL: north@workingitout.org.au Launceston GLBTI Social Events Group Through Working It Out Hosts regular social events and dinners for GLBTI people CONTACT: Sharon on 0419 361 128 EMAIL: north@workingitout.org.au Working It Out Northern Trans Support & Discussion Group Monthly social gathering for anyone in the trans family. PHONE: Sharon on 0419 361 128 EMAIL: north@workingitout.org.au Northern Tasmanian Men’s Meetup Launceston based discreet social group of gay and bisexual men and their friends who meet regularly for meals, BBQ’s, drinks and other events. EMAIL: northern.meetup@hotmail.com or

LGBTI Northern Social Events Bringing the LGBTI community together in a safe and social environment. Contact Sami 0431 816 032 or Emai: samifryer@hotmail.com Stay in touch with upcoming events through www.logtas.org NORTH-WEST Allsorts GLBTI and friends under 25 youth group meeting monthly in Launceston & Devonport through Working It Out North West. PHONE: 03 6432 3643 or 0419 361 128 EMAIL: northwest@workingitout.org.au Burnie Social Events Group Through Working It Out Hosts regular social events and dinners for GLBTI people CONTACT: Sharon on 0419 361 128 EMAIL: north@workingitout.org.au NW Same Sex Attracted Men’s Group Group for over 18’s meets monthly in Burnie. PHONE: Layne on 0439 733 277 EMAIL: ramonshoebridge@live.com.au EAST COAST ECQLS East Coast Queer Life Support Is a support association in the NE to coordinate and provide services and social activities for GLBTI people. EMAIL: ecqlstasmania@gmail.com OR CHECK OUT www.ecqls.org GAY-FRIENDLY CAFES •DS Coffee House, Red Velvet Lounge, Fleurty’s Café, Restaurant Waterloo, Mummy’s, Citrus Moon Café, Lebrina, Kusina, The Alley Cat, Republic Bar, Criterion Café, Sirens, Lansdowne Café, Retro Café, Machine Laundry Café, Jackman and McCross, Magnolia Café, Groovy Penguin, Fresh on Charles, Deloraine Deli, Kabuki by the Sea, O’Keefe’s Hotel, Stonies Fifties Café, Fitzpatrick’s Inn, The King of Burnie Hotel, Around The Corner Cafe, Tasmania Inn, Hotel SOHO, Hot Mothers Cafe, Restaurant Red, Pickled Evenings Indian Restaurant, Cafe Bozzey.

PAGE 9


Have Your Say - Be “Do you hide your sexual identity because you fear you will be treated differently?”

If you have ever experienced harassment or discrimination relating to your sexual identity, you will understand the negative effects it can have. Sadly, too many Tasmanians continue to experience such effects. Incidents that we often brush aside may have subtle or significant impacts on the way we go about our daily life. Have you ever changed the way you behave when going to different events? Do you hide your sexual identity because you fear you will be treated differently? Have you laughed at an inappropriate joke, while inside it made you feel angry? Incidents of harassment and discrimination can also be very serious and involve verbal or physical abuse. Much of the time, serious cases of this nature go unreported and unresolved.

PAGE 10

This could be due to a lack of faith in police responses or fear of further harassment or discrimination. All too often we hear of people who experience stress or anxiety as a result of being harassed or feeling they have been discriminated against. While some people do report these incidents, it is our understanding that many more are not reported. We do hear the phrase ‘what difference will it make’ or ‘how can my situation influence change’. Yes, taking action can be very confronting and stressful. The structure and systems you may need to use can be frustrating. Some are not geared to be specifically inclusive of LGBTI people. This is where we need to remember the law is actually on our side, these systems do need to be non-discriminatory. One way of effecting change is to build a body of evidence to

demonstrate it is needed. Being one voice among many can be powerful! In an effort to form a robust and up-to-date evidence base for change and find out more about your experiences, three community organisations have come together to form ‘Be Proud Tasmania’. Working It Out, TasCAHRD and the Tasmanian Gay and Lesbian Rights Group successfully lodged a submission to the Tasmanian Government to conduct this important research project. Combined, this group has many years of working with the LGBTI community. As a group, we believe all Tasmanians have the right to be proud of whom they are and live their life free from harassment and discrimination. Be Proud presents an opportunity for you to be heard without fear. You can provide confidential and private information about your experiences that will in turn contribute to a clear


e Proud Tasmania

“Being one voice among many can be powerful!” picture of what happens in Tasmania. Initially this has been via an online survey on the Be Proud Tasmania website (beproudtasmania.com). At the beginning of February we will be training interviewers who you can engage with to tell your story. The interviewers are mostly volunteers who will be trained by our research partners Dr Nicole Asquith and Christopher Fox. More information will be provided soon about how to set up an interview time. This will be a good alternative if you don’t feel comfortable, or confident doing the online survey. The Be Proud website not only provides access to the questionnaire but also provides useful information and links to other support. We will continue to add information to the site. Once the data has been collected and analysed, the final report will be available to the community.

At the time of writing this article fifty-seven questionnaires had been completed. We need more. If you haven’t done so already, you can contribute to this important project by telling us about your experiences here in Tasmania. We really do want to hear your story! Article by Kevin Marriott, CEO Tasmanian Council on AIDS, Hepatitis & Related Diseases

BE PROUD TASMANIA Web: www.beproudtasmania. com Facebook: Be Proud Tasmania

PAGE 11


The Miracle Cure? Over the last few years there have been tremendous treatment successes with HIV and longer life expectancy as a result, however all is not that simple when it comes to the numerous medication side effects and other complexities associated with this. In it’s concern over what appears to be increasing complacency towards HIV nowadays, especially so within the younger generation, Man2Man decided to speak to Tim who is a local Tasmanian guy living with HIV who reveals just how complex life can be living with the virus these days. This is what Tim had to say: (Editor’s Comment) If news reports of every “AIDS Cure” in the last fifteen years were true, I would have been “cured” a dozen times over by now, but I’m not and I don’t expect to be. I have lived with this “chronic manageable illness” for eighteen years now and will continue doing so for some time yet. For how much longer, I don’t know nor can any specialist tell me. That’s OK; I have had to accept that. But my beef with “AIDS Cure” stories is the misleading perception they create that “there’s a pill for that now” and “I don’t need to practice safe-sex/ injecting anymore”. All of which is WRONG. HIV treatment has come a long way and scientists’ understanding of HIV and the immune system has improved with gradual increases in the number and type of drugs available to combat this virus. But it is not “a pill”, its lots and lots of pills on a daily basis – for life. That is what living with a chronic manageable illness is about and that is the easy part. Management of this chronic illness is based on a regime of up to 6 antiretroviral tablets morning and night, all aimed at stopping the reproduction of the HIV virus in your body and slowing the rate of the destruction of your immune system. If all is going well, you visit a specialist every three months, preceded several

PAGE 12

weeks before by the inevitable blood tests that usually require up to 10 tubes of blood to be drawn. The three-monthly check up often includes a full physical work over with the required lectures on your lifestyle, healthy eating , no smoking, no drinking, no recreational drugs, no stress and certainly no unsafe sex, because the last thing you want is another opportunistic illness or STI for your weakened immune system to deal with. There’s also monthly pharmacy trips for your medications, because you can’t afford to miss a dose as that might reduce your treatment effectiveness. You can be lucky and experience no side-effects from your drug regime. But sooner or later you will because these drugs are basically toxic. The side-effects listed on these medications is long, but fortunately most people don’t experience most of the reactions that are listed. They can be excessive as I discovered early with

a drug that listed diarrhoea as a side effect. I thought, “.. everyone gets that sometimes”, only to find that for three months I felt uncomfortable being more than a minute away from the nearest toilet. That drug didn’t last long after informing the specialist that I’d prefer to die than to stay on it a minute longer. Then there was lipoatrophy (muscle wasting) that wasn’t detected until I had lost 20 kilos over ten years and then only because the specialist asked “How’s your libido”. “What libido?” I replied. Testosterone tests found that I had almost none, explaining the lost libido, but more importantly the muscle wastage which caused spinal stress, chronic back pain, testosterone replacement therapy (for life), and a whole new range of physicians (endocrinologists, physiotherapists, chiropractors and a neurosurgeon) in my life.


a major part of your daily life. Pharmacy collections and blood tests have all become more frequent, and my life in the past year has included 42 medical appointments. And we are told that for every year you live with HIV, the damage done to the body by the virus increases the likelihood of the early onset of agerelated illnesses. So, to the moral of this story - there is no Miracle Cure despite what you may hear or read in the media. Prevention (safe-sex and safe-injecting) can be inconvenient and require some forward thought and planning. In the long run that is minor compared to the inconvenience and the daily planning required to live with a chronic manageable illness like HIV. Tim Bennett, Tasmanian living with HIV

USEFUL REFERENCES A drug change was called for, with the hope that it was drug-induced lipoatrophy and not HIV-related. This proved to be the case. A new regime, new side effects - mostly chronic insomnia and the most bizarre/ horrific/sensual nightmares. That drug was traded in for an alternative as chronic insomnia eventually impairs your ability to function. The worry with the next drug was liver failure, but after graduated increases up to the full dosage and regular blood screening over the first month, the liver seems to “tolerate” it. So now there are three different antiretrovirals, testosterone replacement therapy, tablets to counter druginduced high cholesterol and the occasional anti-depressant for the mild insomnia. People with HIV are among the most heavily monitored patient groups in Australia and we are fortunate to have such a wide range of treatment

available. Without this we would not be alive.

• “HIV Tests & Treatments” – Info and advice to help you make decisions

But it does require active involvement of the “patient”, for despite all of the advances in knowledge and medical experience HIV and its treatments are still relatively new.

• “Managing Side Effects” by AFAO, NAPWA & QPP

With medications working well it is possible, with understanding from employers, workmates and friends and family, to have a relatively normal life. However, the longer you live with HIV the harder it gets to avoid it becoming

QUESTIONS? If you have any questions for Tim about what it’s like to live longterm with HIV, or would like to share your views, go to the discussion forum at www.tascahrd. org.au/hivforum

• NAPWA website – National Assoc. of People Living with HIV/AIDS www.napwa.org.au • Kate Bennett, TasCAHRD Care & Support Coordinator Tel 03 6234 1242 or kbennett@tascahrd.org.au For print/hard copies of the above resources contact Brian Morris, Man2Man Program Coordinator on Tel 03 6234 1242 or m2m@tascahrd. org.au or download a pdf online at www.m2mtas.com

PAGE 13


UPCOMING TASMANIAN GLBTI EVENTS FRIDAY 27TH JANUARY 2012

WEDNESDAY 15TH FEBRUARY 2012

Contact Brian Morris on (03) 6234 1242 or

WEDNESDAY 21ST MARCH 2012

CONNECT4LIFE SOCIAL EVENT

RAINBOW GROUPS FOR 18yrs +

email: m2m@tascahrd.org.au for more

RAINBOW GROUPS FOR 18yrs+

North West Dinner at King of Burnie Hotel,

Hosted by WIO in Burnie

details. Numbers are limited.

Hosted by WIO in Burnie

5:30pm onwards

Phone Sharon 0419 361 128

RSVP Sharon on 0419 361 128 or email:

or email: north@workingitout.org.au

north@workingitout.org.au

Phone Sharon 0419 361 128 for more WEDNESDAY 29TH FEBRUARY 2012

information or email: north@workingitout.

MAN2MAN LIVE & LOCAL DINNER IN

org.au

MONDAY 20TH FEBRUARY 2012

BURNIE

SUNDAY 29TH JANUARY 2012

GENDER IDENTITY SUPPORT AND

Join Man2Man for a topical discussion

SUNDAY 25TH MARCH 2012

DINNER & FREE GLBTI MOVIES

DISCUSSION GROUPS

session over dinner.

CONNECT4LIFE SOCIAL EVENT

At the King of Burnie Hotel

For Trans, Intersex and people exploring

Contact Brian Morris on (03) 6234 1242 or

North & North West Monthly walks

RSVP KOB on 6431 3222 for dinner or drop in

what gender means to them.

email: m2m@tascahrd.org.au for more

RSVP Sharon on 0419 361 128 or email:

on the day for a drink or movie.

Hosted by WIO in Launceston

details. Numbers are limited.

north@workingitout.org.au

FRIDAY 2ND MARCH 2012

SUNDAY GARDEN PARTY ‘HAVEN LEE’

RAINBOW GROUPS FOR 18yrs+

RANELAGH

Phone Sharon 0419 361 128 AUSSIE BBQ ‘BAANYA’

or email: north@workingitout.org.au

From 12:30pm at 2001 Huon Rd, Longley Camp Hill

TUESDAY 21ST FEBRUARY 2012

Hosted by WIO in Devonport

Steve & Rob invite you to a BBQ celebrating

For more details contact Julian on 62396606

ALLSORTS LGBTI FRIENDLY YOUTH GROUPS

Phone Sharon 0419 361 128

the original temptation ’Adam & Steve’

or email: jpunch@tassie.net.au

(for under 26)

or email: north@workingitout.org.au

For more details contact Julian on 62396606 or email: jpunch@tassie.net.au or visit www.

Hosted by WIO in Hobart CONNECT4LIFE SOCIAL EVENT

Phone 6231 1200 or 0438 346 122

SATURDAY 3RD MARCH 2012

North & North West Monthly walks

or email info@workingitout.org.au

CONNECT4LIFE SOCIAL EVENT

logtas.org

Deloraine Deli monthly brunch

TUESDAY 27TH MARCH 2012

WEDNESDAY 22ND FEBRUARY 2012

From 11:00am - 1:00pm for women only

SUNDOWNER AFTERNOON BBQ

GENDER IDENTITY SUPPORT AND

For more details contact Sharon on 0419 361

John & Ashley invite you to share their

WEDNESDAY 1ST FEBRUARY 2012

DISCUSSION GROUPS

128 or email: north@workingitout.org.au

spectacular home for a late Sundowner

ALLSORTS LGBTI FRIENDLY YOUTH GROUPS

For Trans, Intersex and people exploring

(for under 26)

what gender means to them.

TUESDAY 6TH MARCH 2012

details contact Julian on 62396606 or email:

Hosted by WIO in Devonport at “The Zone”

Hosted by WIO in Devonport

GENDER IDENTITY SUPPORT AND

jpunch@tassie.net.au or visit www.logtas.org

Phone Sharon 0419 361 128 or email: north@

Phone Sharon 0419 361 128

DISCUSSION GROUPS

workingitout.org.au

or email: north@workingitout.org.au

For Trans, Intersex and people exploring

WEDNESDAY 28TH MARCH 2012

what gender means to them.

GENDER IDENTITY SUPPORT AND

RSVP Sharon on 0419 361 128 or email: north@workingitout.org.au

afternoon BBQ 5:00 – 10pm. For more

THURSDAY 2ND FEBRUARY 2012

THURSDAY 23RD FERUARY 2012

Hosted by WIO in Hobart

DISCUSSION GROUPS

RAINBOW GROUPS FOR 18yrs+

ALLSORTS LGBTI FRIENDLY YOUTH GROUPS

Phone 6231 1200 or 0438 346 122 for more

For Trans, Intersex and people exploring

Hosted by WIO in Devonport

(for under 26)

information or email: info@workingitout.

what gender means to them.

Phone Sharon 0419 361 128 for more

Hosted by WIO in Launceston

org.au

Hosted by WIO in Devonport

information or email: north@workingitout.

Phone Sharon 0419 361 128

org.au

or email north@workingitout.org.au

Phone Sharon 0419 361 128 for more WEDNESDAY 7TH MARCH 2012

information or email: north@workingitout.

ALLSORTS LGBTI FRIENDLY YOUTH GROUPS

org.au

SATURDAY 4TH FEBRUARY 2012

RAINBOW GROUPS FOR 18yrs +

(for under 26)

CONNECT4LIFE SOCIAL EVENT

Hosted by WIO in Launceston

Hosted by WIO in Devonport at “The Zone”

THURSDAY 29TH MARCH 2012

Deloraine Deli monthly brunch

Phone Sharon 0419 361 128

Phone Sharon 0419 361 128

ALLSORTS LGBTI FRIENDLY YOUTH GROUPS

From 11:00am - 1:00pm for women only

or email: north@workingitout.org.au

or email north@workingitout.org.au

(for under 26)

SATURDAY 25TH FEBRUARY 2012

FRIDAY 16TH MARCH 2012

Phone Sharon 0419 361 128 for more

MARMALADE CAFE

RAINBOW GROUPS FOR 18yrs+

information or email north@workingitout.

SUNDAY 5TH FEBRUARY 2012

A relaxed ‘a la carte’ brunch at Marmalade,

Hosted by WIO in Hobart

org.au

BBQ AT HOLLYBANK FOREST RESERVE

237 Elizabeth St, Nth Hobart from 10:30am

Phone 6231 1200 or 0438 346 122 for more

Bbq at Hollybank Forest Reserve, Underwood

For more details contact Julian on 62396606

information or email info@workingitout.

RAINBOW GROUPS FOR 18yrs+

at 11:00am. For more details contact Sami

or email: jpunch@tassie.net.au

org.au

Hosted by WIO in Launceston

SUNDAY 26TH FEBRUARY 2012

MONDAY 19TH MARCH 2012

information or email: north@workingitout.

TUESDAY 7TH FEBRUARY 2012

CONNECT4LIFE SOCIAL EVENT

GENDER IDENTITY SUPPORT AND

org.au

GENDER IDENTITY SUPPORT AND

North & North West Monthly walks

DISCUSSION GROUPS

DISCUSSION GROUPS

RSVP Sharon on 0419 361 128 or email:

For Trans, Intersex and people exploring

FRIDAY 30TH MARCH 2012

For Trans, Intersex and people exploring

north@workingitout.org.au

what gender means to them.

CONNECT4LIFE SOCIAL EVENT

Hosted by WIO in Launceston

North West Dinner at King of Burnie Hotel

Hosted by WIO in Launceston

For more details contact Sharon on 0419 361 128 or email: north@workingitout.org.au

Phone Sharon 0419 361 128 for more

on 0431 816 032.

what gender means to them. Hosted by WIO in Hobart

CONNECT4LIFE SOCIAL EVENT

Phone Sharon 0419 361 128

20 Edwards St, South Burnie, 5:30pm onwards

Phone 6231 1200 or 0438 346 122 for more

Dinner & free LGBTI Movies At King of

or email: north@workingitout.org.au

RSVP Sharon on 0419 361 128 or email:

information or email: info@workingitout.

Burnie Hotel

org.au

RSVP Sharon on 0419 361 128 or email:

TUESDAY 20TH MARCH 2012

north@workingitout.org.au

ALLSORTS LGBTI FRIENDLY YOUTH GROUPS

SATURDAY 7TH APRIL 2012

north@workingitout.org.au

(for under 26)

CONNECT4LIFE SOCIAL EVENT

MUSIC ON THE GREEN

TUESDAY 28TH FEBRUARY 2012

Hosted by WIO in Hobart

Deloraine Deli monthly brunch

At Mole Creek, GLBTI family and friends

MAN2MAN LIVE & LOCAL DINNER IN

Phone 6231 1200 or 0438 346 122 for more

From 11:00am - 1:00pm for women only

from 2.30pm

LAUNCESTON

information or email info@workingitout.

For more details contact Sharon on 0419 361

RSVP by 4th January to Sharon on 0419 361

Join Man2Man for a topical discussion

org.au

128 or email: north@workingitout.org.au

128 or email: north@workingitout.org.au

session over dinner.

SATURDAY 11TH FEBRUARY 2012

MONDAYS: “TOM, DICK & HARRIET” QUEER RADIO, 10-12NOON Hobart’s Sexuality & Gender Issues Radio Show on Edge Radio 99.3FM

PAGE 14

EVERY FRIDAY NIGHT, THE LEAGUE OF GENTLEFELLOWS Meets every Friday at the Tasmanian Inn. Contact Julian

EVERY SECOND TUESDAY NIGHT CASTRO - THE LEAGUE OF

CONVERSATIONS DINNER

GENTLEFELLOWS

Hosted by the HepinTas Program

Meets every second Tuesday (starting from

at TasCAHRD

7th February) for meet and greet evenings,

For more details contact Carolyn on

on 6239 6606 or

at The Manhattan Wine Bar in Launceston

Email: jpunch@tassie.net.au

from 17:00 to 18:30. Phone/Text Sami on 0431 816 032 or just show up.

(03) 6234 1242


The Men’s Services Network Tasmania (MSNT) for men and acted as a peak body for men’s issues at a state level. The Tasmanian Men’s Health and Wellbeing Association (TasMen) has played a part in trying to fill this space - although being staffed completely by volunteers and with almost no funding, it has struggled to formally represent men in a substantial way or to establish programs beyond their annual Tasmanian Men’s Gathering. The Australasian Men’s Health Forum is a national peak body for a social view of men’s health and hosts the biennial men’s health conferences, the last of which was held in October in Perth, W.A. In recent months Male Health Victoria and the NSW Men’s Health Forum have both been formed.

In early 2007, a Google search for Men’s Health Week in Tasmania produced one current result - Tim Cox making the point on ABC radio that there was nothing happening for Men’s Health Week. At the time, I was involved in establishing a “Men’s Shed”, in Hobart, for which I needed to source men’s health information. There was very little material around, focused on or appealing to men and what was available was hard to find. I began networking with a few other people who were also focusing on “men” in their work, including Matthew Magnus from Relationships Australia and Brian Morris from TasCAHRD. We all agreed that in working with men who often experience isolation, we ourselves were working in isolation, even within fairly sizable organisations. We decided to meet regularly to touch base about our work, what was having positive results, what wasn’t and how we as communitybased workers could take a lead in improving our work with and support for men in the community. It was an idea whose time had clearly come, as almost identical conversations were happening in Launceston and across the North West coast. By early 2008 the three networks were in touch and working to develop a single, statewide body. In June of that year I was fortunate to take on my current role as Men’s Health Policy Officer with the Department of Health and

Human Services and by August we had met for the first time as the statewide group, Men’s Services Network Tasmania (MSNT). Since then, the group has met quarterly; collaborated on bringing training for working with men to the state, run the Health4Men forum in 2010 and contributed to a planning strategy on homelessness.

“We’re focussed on working with men to share our ideas, successes and failures and to learning more about specific issues relating to men.” Our meetings have continued to be fairly informal in nature, but filled with passion and an ongoing desire to see improved health opportunities and outcomes for men across Tasmania. The network is committed to connecting as people - both men and women are welcome. We share our ideas, successes and failures and learn more about specific issues related to working with men. At our most recent meeting we had a challenging discussion about family violence and related issues for men. On a national level, there have been few other state-based groups bringing workers together to focus on men’s health and wellbeing. The Men’s Advisory Network of Western Australia was, until recently, the only organisation with any significant level of funding that advocated

The MSNT is still an informal network, but has close ties with TasMen our web page is in fact hosted by TasMen. Our meetings are generally held in Campbell Town, but occasionally local groups meet in the three regions. Anyone interested in getting involved or supporting the MSNT is welcome to come along to the meetings, to put your views, concerns and opportunities forward. Article by Jonathan Bedloe, Men’s Health Policy and Program Officer, Department of Health & Human Services plus provides secretariat support for the MSNT. You can contact Jonathan Bedloe if you would like to come along to one of the state-wide meetings or if you wish to be put in touch with the regional groups.

USEFUL RESOURCES Men’s Services Network Tasmania (MSNT) www.tasmen.org.au/ mens-services-network Tasmanian Men’s Health & Wellbeing Association (Tasmen) www.tasmen.org.au Jonathan Bedloe, Men’s Health Policy & program Officer, DHHS jonathan.bedloe@dhhs.tas. gov.au

PAGE 15


Everythi p e ng e K

Happy downunder! Sexual Health is No Drama!

www.thedramadownunder.info or freecall 1800 005 900

Man2Man Issue #11  

A health and lifestyle resource for men in2 men in Tasmania

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you