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67

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The News Magazine for Public Education in Texas

Texas School Business

JANUARY / FEBRUARY

2020

Beyond the money the many benefits of education foundations

Also in this issue: TASBO president Michele Trongaard TSPRA president Veronica Castillon


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Texas School Business JANUARY / FEBRUARY 2020

14 16

Cover Story Beyond the money: the many benefits of education foundations

TASBO President Profile Michele Trongaard takes the TASBO helm by James Golsan

18 TSPRA President Profile New TSPRA president is a seasoned, dedicated communicator by James Golsan

Departments 7 Who’s News 22 Calendar 30 Ad Index

Columns

5 From the Editor by Dacia Rivers 13 The Law Dawg— Unleashed by Jim Walsh 20 Regional View 26 Student Voices by Audrey Seed 28 The Arts by Elizabeth Kulbeth

Photo Features

30 The Back Page by Riney Jordan

8 Texas ASCD members convene in Irving for annual conference 10 Gifted and talented educators attend TAGT’s giftED19 conference in San Antonio The views expressed by columnists and contributing writers do not necessarily reflect those of the publisher or Texas School Business advertisers. The publisher also makes no endorsement of the advertisers or advertisements in this publication.


A future doctor sits here A future architect sits here A future engineer sits here A future artist sits here A future programmer sits here

A future CEO sits here A future principal sits here A future world changer sits here

The future sits here. indecosales.com


From the editor

A

new year always offers the opportunity to check in, both personally and professionally. While year-ends often bring about reflections, one’s beginning is more of a time for making plans and setting goals. This January, I’m reflecting on the mission of Texas School Business, which is not only to help share the good news coming out of Texas’ public schools, but also to inform and inspire school administrators in the hopes that something you read in these pages might be able to make your job a little easier. If you’re with me, our feature story in this issue is one you won’t want to miss. More than half of all Texas public school districts don’t currently have an operational education foundation. I spoke to a few experts on the topic, and we compiled a story to help inform you on how starting one up could help your district reap the rewards, and not just financially. Turn to page 14 to find out what I mean and learn how you can get started. And if you need a reminder of why you do what you do, and who you’re doing it for, don’t miss an inspiring Student Voices column on page 26, an amazing Regional View story out of Region 6 on page 20, and as always, a touching tale from Riney Jordan, on page 30. This magazine exists to support you. And to that end, I hope that if you have an idea or a suggestion for a story, a program, or an inspiring administrator we should cover in Texas School Business, please do not hesitate to reach out to me at drivers@texasschoolbusiness.com. Thank you for reading, and here’s to an inspired and productive 2020, for all of us.

Texas School Business

JANUARY / FEBRUARY 2020 Volume LXVII, Issue 1 406 East 11th Street Austin, Texas 78701 Phone: 512-477-6361 • Fax: 512-482-8658 www.texasschoolbusiness.com EDITORIAL DIRECTOR

Dacia Rivers DESIGN

Phaedra Strecher COLUMNISTS

James Golsan Riney Jordan Elizabeth Kulbeth Audrey Seed Jim Walsh

Dacia Rivers Editorial Director

ADVERTISING SALES

Jennifer Garrido

TEXAS ASSOCIATION OF SCHOOL ADMINISTRATORS EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR

Kevin Brown

DIRECTOR OF COMMUNICATIONS AND MEDIA RELATIONS

Amy Francisco

Texas School Business (ISSN 0563-2978) is published online bimonthly with a special edition, Bragging Rights, in December, by the Texas Association of School Administrators. © Copyright 2020 Texas Association of School Administrators

Texas School Business JANUARY / FEBRUARY 2020

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Facilitated by N2 Learning in partnership with the Texas Association of School Administrators Registration opens January 2020 For more information, visit www.n2learning.org @N2Learning @tasanet


Who’s News Abernathy ISD Former Wellman-Union assistant superintendent Aaron Waldrip has accepted the position of superintendent of Abernathy ISD.

Allen ISD Robin Bullock is now acting superintendent of Allen ISD. An employee of the district since 2013, she previously held the top position in Midlothian ISD, where she began her career in 2001. She is at work on her doctorate in educational leadership.

Superintendent Scott Niven has retired. He led the district since 2017, coming to Allen from Red Oak ISD.

Canutillo ISD (El Paso) A new principal has been named for the Canutillo Middle School STEAM Academy. Christopher Judge, a former assistant principal at Canutillo High School, previously worked as an English teacher and coach at Brandeis High School in San Antonio’s Northside ISD and at Wagner High in Judson ISD, also in San Antonio. He earned his bachelor’s degree from the University of Texas at El Paso and his master’s degree in educational leadership from Lamar University.

Clarendon CISD Mike Jackson has been appointed the

district’s interim superintendent. He has served in the same position in Vega, Claude, Happy, Texoma and River Road ISDs.

Corrigan-Camden ISD The district has hired Richard Cooper as superintendent. He most recently served in the same position in Groesbeck ISD.

Cypress-Fairbanks ISD When the district’s newest campus and 19th middle school, Rowe Middle School, opens in August, it will be led by current Bleyl Middle School principal Stacia Carew. She

is a 22-year educator who began her career in Aldine ISD before joining CFISD in 2007, serving in her present position since 2009. She received her bachelor’s degree from Sam Houston State University and her master’s degree in educational administration from the University of Houston.

Danbury ISD The district’s new superintendent is Nancy Sandlin, who previously led Buckholts ISD.

Elementary. The former EPISD instructional coach, curriculum writer and teacher received her bachelor’s and master’s degrees from the University of Phoenix.

Fort Bend ISD Bridget Chustz-Morrison,

director of risk management, has been appointed to the risk management fund board of trustees of the Texas Association of School Boards (TASB). The board is composed of 20 school board members, superintendents and district business officials. Jim Rice, FBISD board of

Decatur ISD A new superintendent is in place for the district. Joseph Coburn, who was Lewisville ISD’s chief schools officer since 2016, previously served in Tyler ISD as executive director of administration, executive director of secondary education and director of secondary instruction.

Denton ISD Deron Robinson has been

named the district’s general counsel. Most recently serving in the same capacity in Allen ISD, he previously spent 10 years with law firms in the private sector, representing school districts across the state.

Dripping Springs ISD Todd Washburn has been approved as Dripping Springs ISD’s superintendent. He comes to his new assignment from Eanes ISD in Austin, where he was associate superintendent for curriculum, instruction and assessment.

El Paso ISD Christina Chapa has accepted

the position of principal of Moreno Elementary School. Most recently assistant principal of Bond Elementary, she has also worked as a testing coordinator, literacy coach and teacher in the district. She is a graduate of Concordia College with a master’s degree in educational administration from the University of Texas at El Paso. Michelle Corral has been promoted from assistant principal of Mesita Elementary School to principal of Clardy

trustees member, was named TASB president-elect during the organization’s recent convention in Dallas. He was elected to the Fort Bend ISD school board in 2010 and was initially elected to the TASB board of directors in 2012.

Fort Worth ISD Fort Worth ISD announces the following leadership appointments: • Jill Balzer, executive director of school leadership; • Jerry Moore, chief academic officer; • Aaron Muñoz, chief internal auditor; • Cloris Rangel, executive director of bilingual and ESL programs; • Marcey Sorensen, assistant superintendent of curriculum and instruction.

Granbury ISD GISD’s career and technical education director retired in December. Judy Gentry, who held the position since 2009, concluded 23 years of service with the district. She began as a Granbury High School teacher and was named the campus Teacher of the Year for 2008-09. She received her bachelor’s degree from Oklahoma Christian University and her master’s degree in educational administration from Tarleton State University.

Hardin-Jefferson ISD Brad McEachern, former superintendent of Warren ISD, now leads Hardin-Jefferson ISD.

> See Who’s News, page 9 Texas School Business JANUARY / FEBRUARY 2020

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Photo Feature

TEXAS ASCD MEMBERS CONVENE IN IRVING FOR ANNUAL CONFERENCE In October, the Texas Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development held its yearly conference, welcoming members to three days of networking, keynote speakers, professional development and workshops.

▲ Kim Bearden of Ron

Clark Academy opens the 2019 conference with strategies for creating a climate and culture for success.

▲ Damen Lopez of No

Excuses University presents his keynote, “How Six Exceptional Systems are Revolutionizing Our Schools.”

▲ Sean Covey, FranklinCovey Education, presents “The 4 Essential Roles of Leadership: What Every Leader Needs to Know” at the general session.

▲ The 2019 Texas Educators

Achieving Classroom Honors (T.E.A.C.H.) award recipients were Tina Vu, Katy ISD (secondary), and Jennifer Rutherford, North Lamar ISD (elementary).

◄ Irma Garcia and Tosh ▲ Dr. Abigayle Barton,

Kingsville ISD (left), is honored for her past presidency of the Texas ASCD Board of Directors by board member and past president Dr. Janis Jordan, Northside ISD.

▲ Texas ASCD recognizes

Platinum Corporate Partner Discovery Education at the President’s Reception. Shown, from left: Steve Sanchez of Discovery Education and Dr. Sara Ptomey, Texas ASCD board president.

McGaughty, McKinney ISD, share ways to help students transfer critical thinking skills between math and reading classrooms in their presentation “Math + Reading = Thinking Literacies.”

▲ West Birdville Elementary was recognized ▲ Dr. David E. Young,

superintendent of Abilene ISD, receives Texas ASCD’s most prestigious award, the George H. and Gwyn Brownlee Leadership Award, for exemplary leadership in teaching, learning and leading.

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Texas School Business JULY/AUGUST 2015

▲ Local Arrangements

Committee members Andrea Oliver Dixon, Tara Nichols, and Texas ASCD board member Dr. Treva Franklin, Mesquite ISD, celebrate at the President’s Reception and Tailgate Party.

as the 2019 Texas Whole Child School Award recipient at the 2019 Annual Conference AllAttendee Breakfast. Shown, from left: Katie Kordel, Texas ASCD Board of Directors; Maria Lopez, West Birdville Elementary; Tim Drysdale, Haltom Middle School; Vanessa Sutton, West Birdville Elementary; and Kim Adams, American Heart Association.

◄ Dr. Adam Sáenz of Culture Architects inspires

the audience with case studies demonstrating the life-impacting difference educators make every day.


Who’s News > Continued from page 7

Highland Park ISD (Dallas) A new director of accountability and assessment has been appointed. Jaime Callahan was the district’s curriculum specialist and ESL coordinator since August 2018, having served as a STEAM instructional and design coach for the 2017-18 academic year. A graduate of Texas State University with a master’s degree in education from Southern Methodist University, she received her doctorate in educational leadership from Dallas Baptist University.

Huntsville ISD Mary Samford, formerly the counselor for

Hornet Success Academy, has been named CTE (career and technical education) director for Huntsville ISD. An educator for 22 years, she joined the district in 2019. Previously an employee of Huntsville’s Windham School District and Nacogdoches ISD, she has spent the majority of her career teaching CTE and vocational education at the middle and high school levels.

Hutto ISD The district’s new director of technology and digital learning, David Oestreicher, has 23 years of experience in technology, spending the past 13 years as director of technology in Lewisville and Mineral Wells ISDs and Seattle (Wa.) Public Schools.

Irion County ISD Former Elkhart ISD superintendent Ray DeSpain now leads Irion County ISD as superintendent.

Judson ISD (San Antonio) New advanced academic director Devin Holmes has served the district for 17 years as a teacher, instructional coach and math specialist. He holds a bachelor’s degree in physics from Oklahoma Baptist University. Maria Richison, newly appointed bilingual/ESL director, is an educator with 18 years of experience, most recently leading Comal ISD’s dual language and ESL

Gary Kuykendall, newly appointed IT director, brings more than 14 years of experience to the job, most recently serving as technology director for Keene ISD.

programs. She is a graduate of Brigham Young University with a master’s degree in education from Walden University.

Katy ISD Cinco Ranch Junior High students were greeted by a new principal when school resumed after the winter break. Mona Salinas, who served as the school’s assistant principal from 2010 until taking her most recent position as principal of Fielder Elementary School, has been an educator for 20 years. She holds a bachelor’s degree from Sam Houston State University and a master’s degree in education administration and supervision from the University of Houston.

Killeen ISD Two longtime principals retired in December.

Mark McAlister is the assistant principal of Morris Elementary School. He began his career in his hometown of Denton, going on to teach for 23 years in Keller, Eagle Mountain-Saginaw, Texarkana and Birdville ISDs.

Now serving as an assistant principal of Lake Worth High School is Mandy McIntosh. She comes to the district from Burleson ISD and holds a bachelor’s degree from Texas Wesleyan University and a master’s degree from Texas Woman’s University.

Linda Butler, who worked at Pershing Park

Elementary School, first as principal and then principal, since 2002, began her career in the district in 1979.

Catherine Snyder began her career in 1982

at Fowler Elementary, joining Clifton Park Elementary seven years later. She remained there, working as a teacher, instructional specialist, assistant principal and, for the past 11 years, principal.

La Joya ISD Former interim superintendent Gisela Saenz is now the district’s superintendent.

Lake Worth ISD Howry Intermediate School’s new principal, Sylonda Burns, has 17 years of experience as an educator, the past six in administration, having served as a teacher, coach, instructional coach, assistant principal and summer school and night school principal. The district’s new DAEP (Disciplinary Alternative Education Program) director is Julie Dunn, a former employee of Hurst-EulessBedford and Castleberry ISDs. She is a graduate of Texas Tech University, where she received both her bachelor’s and master’s degrees.

University.

Another new assistant principal at Lake Worth High School is Justin Mathews, a graduate of the University of Texas at Arlington with a master’s degree in education from Texas Woman’s Morris Elementary School’s new principal, Kristina Sosebee, is marking her 13th year as an educator and her eighth year as an administrator.

The new principal of Lake Worth High School is Bobby Stults, who previously worked as a teacher, coach, assistant principal and principal in Glen Rose, Godley, Athens, Red Oak and Midland ISDs as well as Lake Worth. He has been an educator for 31 years. Eric Tingle, assistant

superintendent of teaching and learning, comes to his new position from the Texas Education Agency, where he was regional school improvement manager. Prior to that, he was a principal in Houston ISD and an adjunct professor at the University of Houston. Art Urquidi has been named

Lake Worth ISD’s assistant superintendent of student and operational services. Coming to the district from Pilot Point ISD, where he was assistant superintendent, he

> See Who’s News, page 11 Texas School Business JANUARY / FEBRUARY 2020

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Photo Feature

EDUCATORS ATTEND TAGT’S giftED19 CONFERENCE IN SAN ANTONIO The Texas Association for the Gifted and Talented hosted its annual giftED conference in December, giving members from across the state the chance to attend three days of networking and learning opportunities.

▲ Attendees were given “The Gift of Failure” by the engaging and enlightening MasterMind keynote speaker Jessica Lahey.

▲ Fort Bend ISD teammates celebrate Quail Valley

▲ giftED19 offers opportunities for

Middle School’s Innovation in Giftedness Award on Thursday.

gifted educators and researchers to connect.

◄ The 2019 TAGT

State Award Winners Monica Simonds, Sheila Mulbry and Justin Vawter shared their experiences in gifted education with previous award winner Raine Maggio.

▼ giftED19’s new

All-Access Pass offered teams such as these educators from Georgetown ISD the opportunity to collaborate and challenge themselves.

▲ Klein ISD was also honored with TAGT’s Innovation in Giftedness Award.

▲ T AGT members show off their glow at the giftED19 Opening Kickoff Celebration.

▲ The 2019 TAGT board was honored by President D’Lana Barbay at Thursday’s INSPIRE Awards.

▲ The giftED Exchange is an always popular, and sometimes chaotic, place for teachers to share their favorite strategies.

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Texas School Business JANUARY / FEBRUARY 2020

▲ Members show off their TAGT pride.

▲ MasterMind keynote speaker Ashanti Branch encourages educators to take off the mask when thinking about their students and each other.


Who’s News > Continued from page 9

is a 20-year educator with a master’s degree from National University. Miller Elementary School’s new assistant principal is Lucy Vasquez. She has been a bilingual and ESL teacher and coordinator and reading and new-teacher induction specialist. Jaclyn West has accepted

the position of Lake Worth ISD’s chief financial officer, bringing 15 years of experience to her new job. A graduate of Northwestern University, she was most recently director of business and operations for Red Lick ISD.

Leander ISD The new chief financial officer of Leander ISD is Elaine Cogburn, who comes to the district from Plano ISD, where she was director of financial services. Prior to that assignment, she was Dripping Springs ISD’s assistant superintendent for finance and operations. Now serving as principal of Danielson Middle School is Mark Koller, who led Leander Middle School since 2016. Prior to that, he was principal of Pleasant Hill Elementary and assistant principal of Plain Elementary. He is a graduate of Texas State University with a master’s degree in educational administration from Lamar University. Cedar Park Middle School’s new principal, Keith Morgan, was most recently principal of Naumann Elementary, after having served as assistant principal of Naumann, Vista Ridge High School and Cedar Park Middle School. He holds a bachelor’s degree from St. Edward’s University, a master’s degree in educational administration from Texas State University and a doctorate in educational leadership from the University of Mary Hardin-Baylor. Marianne Norman, the new principal of Reagan Elementary School, was previously assistant principal of Canyon Ridge Middle School. She began her career as a teacher at Parkside Elementary School, where she went on to serve as an assistant principal.

Lovejoy ISD

Orangefield ISD

Former Red Oak ISD superintendent Michael Goddard is now superintendent of Lovejoy ISD. He is a graduate of Stephen F. Austin State University with a master’s degree in education from the University of North Texas, where he also received his doctorate in post-secondary administration.

Kevin Weldon has been named to serve as interim superintendent.

Lufkin ISD Daniel Spikes has been chosen to serve as

assistant superintendent of administrative services. He returns to his hometown from the University of South Carolina, where he was an assistant professor in the College of Education. He earned his bachelor’s degree from the University of Texas and his master’s degree in educational leadership from Stephen F. Austin State University. His doctorate in educational administration was also received from UT.

Lufkin High School’s new success coach for dual credit is Garisa Spikes, who joins her husband in the move to Lufkin from the University of South Carolina, where she was academic programs coordinator in the department of educational leadership and policies. She previously taught in Lufkin and Austin ISDs. A graduate of the University of Texas, she earned a teaching certificate from Stephen F. Austin State University.

Marshall ISD Jeff Dyer, now serving as

assistant superintendent of personnel, was most recently Navasota ISD’s director of personnel.

Monte Alto ISD Rosalinda Cobarubbias is the district’s newly appointed superintendent. A graduate of the University of Texas-Pan American with master’s and doctoral degrees from the University of Texas at Brownsville, she has more than 30 years of experience as an educator.

North East ISD (San Antonio) Sean Maika, who served

as the district’s interim superintendent since May, has been confirmed as superintendent. An educator for 23 years, he previously served as NEISD’s assistant superintendent of instruction and campus administration, executive director for school administration, and principal of Harris Middle School.

Pharr-San Juan-Alamo ISD New superintendent Jorge Arredondo was most recently an area superintendent for Houston ISD. The 22-year educator has also worked as a teacher, principal and assistant superintendent.

Plano ISD Concluding a career that began in 1981, Plano ISD athletic director Gerald Brence has retired. He served as district athletic director since 2007.

Red Oak ISD New superintendent Brenda Sanford comes to Red Oak ISD from Canton ISD, where she was director of curriculum and assessment. She earned her bachelor’s degree from the University of Texas at Tyler and her master’s degree in education from Lamar University.

Round Rock ISD Former McNeil High School head football coach Howard McMahan is now serving as an assistant athletic director for the district. He held his previous position for six years.

Sherman ISD Two middle school principals have been selected for Sherman ISD, both to begin their new duties with the 2020-21 school year as the district plans for changes that include the opening of a new middle school. Amy Porter will move from her current

assignment leading Piner Middle School to the new Sherman Middle School. Prior to serving at Piner for the past three years, she was a teacher, technology coordinator and elementary principal.

Amy Pesina, currently principal of Washington Elementary School, will become principal of Piner Middle School.

Socorro ISD (El Paso) Patricia Fernandez, newly appointed principal of Antwine Middle School, was most recently Hernando Middle School’s assistant principal. An educator since > See Who’s News, page 12 Texas School Business JANUARY / FEBRUARY 2020

11


Who’s News

White Oak ISD

Tyler ISD Stuart Bird has agreed to serve as Tyler ISD’s interim assistant superintendent. The former Troup ISD superintendent retired in 2018.

> Continued from page 11

2007, she earned her bachelor’s and master’s degrees in educational administration from the University of Texas at El Paso. Sun Ridge Middle School’s new principal, David Herrera, has been with the district for 20 years, joining his new school from Pebble Hills High School, where he was assistant principal and director of the early college program. Now leading Pebble Hills High School is Ignacio Estorga. He began his career in Tornillo ISD 19 years ago, joining Socorro ISD in 2004. He took the reins at Sun Ridge Middle School in 2014 and was named ESC Region 19 Middle School Principal of the Year. He is at work on his doctorate at the University of Texas at El Paso. Socorro ISD’s new assistant superintendent is Melissa Parham. She began her career in El Paso’s Ysleta ISD 19 years ago, joined SISD in 2005 and most recently led Pebble Hills High School as

principal.

Sweeny ISD The newly appointed chief of the district’s police department is Marcus Way.

Who’s News

Longtime KLTV-KTRE anchor Jennifer Hines has joined Tyler ISD as executive director of communications. She is a graduate of the University of Texas with a bachelor’s degree in journalism and has two decades of experience in the field, including stints as an anchor, producer and education reporter in San Antonio, Austin and Corpus Christi. Jeffrey Millslagle has accepted

the position of director of safety and security for Tyler ISD. He served as a special agent with the FBI from 1985 to 2011, and since that time has been a special agent with the special inspector general for Afghanistan Reconstruction.

Victoria ISD The new principal of O’Connor Elementary School, Dionne Hughes, returns to Victoria ISD after serving as a school improvement and accountability consultant with ESC Region 3 for the past two years. Prior to that, she held leadership positions in VISD, including director of assessment and accountability. A graduate of Texas A&M University, she received her master’s degree in administration and supervision from the University of Houston at Victoria.

Jason Scott has been hired to fill the

position of assistant principal of White Oak Intermediate School. He was previously a middle school math teacher in the district.

Woodville ISD The district’s new superintendent is Lisa Meysembourg, who most recently led Schulenburg ISD.

Wylie ISD Assistant superintendent of operations, safety and security Craig Bessent has been named to the Texas School Safety Center, one of eight statewide appointments made by Gov. Greg Abbott. The Safety Center is responsible for implementing measures mandated by the governor’s office, Legislature and Texas Education Agency.

Ysleta ISD (El Paso) Rosa Maria Mireles Menchaca

has been named associate superintendent of high schools after serving in the position on an interim basis. The former teacher, dean of instruction, assistant principal and principal joined the district in 2017 as its academic compliance officer. She received her bachelor’s degree and two master’s degrees from the University of Texas at El Paso. ◄

Do you have good news to share about your district? Send news items for Who’s News directly to news@texasschoolbusiness.com

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Texas School Business JANUARY / FEBRUARY 2020


THE LAW DAWG – UNLEASHED

Special ed: mired in process rather than results by Jim Walsh

“T

hus, an IEP or BIP which does not authorize the recurrent use of time-outs effectively prohibits its use.” Let that sink in. This is a key quote from the 5th Circuit Court in a case decided in September. The student in this case was frequently directed to a “take-desk.” Teachers would do this after redirection and warnings failed to curb inappropriate behavior. The “take-desk” was in the classroom. The boy would be sent there for five or 10 minutes, where he would have the opportunity to “pursue replacement behavior, such as drawing.” The school district argued that this was not “time out.” The desk was in the same classroom. Moreover, he could engage in “preferred activities.” The court cited the very ambiguous definition in our Administrative Code and concluded that the district was using “time out,” even though it didn’t call it that. Key quote: …nothing in the administrative definition of “time out” suggests the definition is limited to placement in a separate room or is inapplicable when the student is allowed certain activities. Section 89.1052(b) only requires a “separation from other students for a limited period….” So if the teacher sends the student to a desk, or a comfy beanbag chair, that is in the same classroom but physically “separated” from the rest of the class, it’s a “time out.” If this is done “recurrently” it has to be authorized by the IEP or BIP. If it’s done recurrently and not authorized in the IEP or BIP, the district may be guilty of failing to implement the IEP. This one scores high on the Sheesh-O-Meter. It illustrates how we are over-legalizing education. It would be nice if federal judges recognized that teachers need to control the

classroom, just like judges need to control the courtroom. The ability to control requires the exercise of discretion. This decision turns, in part, on the use of very short cool down periods that were given to a highly disruptive student at teacher discretion. The IEP called for “cool downs,” but because the word “time out” did not appear in the IEP, the judges deemed the use of this very common disciplinary tool to be a violation of the student’s IEP. Sharp lawyers, carefully parsing every word in our regulations, convinced the court that the teachers were using a procedure that had to be authorized as “time out” by the IEP. Well, I’m a lawyer, and I can see how that argument was made and why it worked. But I can also see what’s going on here. Legal formalities and technicalities become more important than results. In the name of upholding the law, judges clip the wings of educators who struggle to find the formula that will work with our most challenging students. It sounds like nothing worked for the student in this case. Near the end of the school year, the school shortened the boy’s day, as one staff member noted that they were trying to “survive” to that final day. The student’s parents ended up placing him in an out-of-state residential facility. In a situation like that, our system goes to fault finding, which plays into the wheelhouse of the legal profession. I don’t know why O.W. did not have a successful experience in fifth grade in Spring Branch ISD. But I’d be willing to bet that it wasn’t because his IEP did not use the term “time out” to describe the five- to 10-minute cool downs that his teachers ordered.

educational progress, the decision against the district would be easier to abide. Instead, our system forces the parties to focus on petty issues. Thus we have a high level court trying to figure out how far a desk has to be away from the rest of the class to be “separated,” as the term is used in the Texas Administrative Code. That’s a silly thing to be arguing about. Lawyers thrive on stuff like that. But it doesn’t help educators much. It doesn’t help parents. And it sure doesn’t help kids. Who are we trying to serve? The case is Spring Branch ISD v. O.W., decided by the 5th Circuit Court on Sept. 16, 2019.

Legal formalities and technicalities become more important than results. In the name of upholding the law, judges clip the wings of educators who struggle to find the formula that will work with our most challenging students.

Special education is mired in process rather than results. In this case, for example, if the court had simply looked at the results and concluded that the boy did not make any

JIM WALSH is an attorney with Walsh Gallegos Treviño Russo & Kyle PC. He can be reached at jwalsh@wabsa.com. You can also follow him on Twitter: @jwalshtxlawdawg. Texas School Business JANUARY / FEBRUARY 2020

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Beyond the money the many benefits of education foundations

by Dacia Rivers

I

magine someone walking into your office and offering you a handful of cash to put toward the schools in your district. Or imagine they offer you something even better — a strong connection to donors, voters and other community members who are eager to support your schools. Now imagine telling them thanks, but no thanks, and sending them on their way. Of course it’s not quite that simple, but that’s just about what more than half of school districts in Texas are doing by not taking advantage of all the benefits an education foundation can bring. Laurie Cromwell knows firsthand what education foundations can do for a district. After serving on her local school board for six years, the superintendent asked if she would help the district launch an education foundation. She did so, and when the foundation achieved massive success in a short time, other nearby districts started reaching out for her help. After helping out here and there for a year, she founded Foundation Innovation, and some 17 years later she has helped to start or revitalize more than 300

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Texas School Business JULY / AUGUST 2019

education foundations in 15 different states. The foundation has a staff of nine consultants and its mission has become a personal passion for Cromwell. “There’s a tongue-in-cheek saying that education foundations were previously the best-kept secret,” Cromwell says. “But they can really be a beneficial tool for a superintendent to not only have a foundation for financial resources, but to engage the community in a way that perhaps the school district hasn’t been able to.”

Nuts and bolts Education foundations are charitable organizations, typically of the 501(c)(3) variety, meaning donations can be tax-exempt. A foundation is usually independent from the school district it supports, governed by its own board of directors pulled from the community, though that board often includes the superintendent and one or two school board members. This design allows the foundation to work independently while still collaborating with the district so that it can provide support in the most needed areas.

Cromwell says that this setup helps in several ways. For instance, some donors aren’t comfortable giving directly to school districts or government entities of any kind and are more likely to donate to an organization governed by their peers. But by maintaining a close relationship with the district, a foundation’s board can be sure that the donations they receive are going where they can be the most beneficial. Think of it as a symbiotic relationship. “A foundation can make a school system come alive, it can be a passionate case for support, of why funds are needed,” Cromwell says. “Then it can enhance learning with a thriving school system, which in turn benefits the entire community.” Education foundations seek donations in many ways, from holding galas to developing relationships with potential donors. They go above and beyond what, say, a booster club might do — reaching out just to parents or hosting fundraisers. And the benefits are designed to reach every student on every campus, another factor that makes donating to an education foundation more appealing to some community members.


A helping hand In 2009, Judy Geelhoed was hired to create an education foundation for San Antonio ISD, and she’s served as the executive director of the SAISD Foundation ever since. The foundation now has a full-time staff of five and works to provide 400 grants to SAISD teachers each year. In her fundraising work, Geelhoed has been able to generate large investments from corporations and philanthropists in the area that school administrators might not have the time or ability to contact. Because she comes from a higher education background, Geelhoed has also focused on reaching out to alumni of the district, including an individual who has put the foundation in their planned giving, meaning that they will be benefiting students in San Antonio’s third-largest district for years to come. “The grant program has really influenced the innovative culture, and it allows teachers to dream about what they want to do,” Geelhoed says. “They can try things out, they can innovate. It motivates them.” The SAISD Foundation also provides about 150 scholarships for its graduates each year. The district had been working on its postsecondary enrollment numbers, and Geelhoed says many students weren’t enrolling in college after graduating due to expenses such as housing deposits or orientation fees due before their financial aid came in. The foundation has been able to cover those costs for many students, even helping some to fly home over winter break when they were otherwise unable to do so. “We didn’t intend to do scholarships, but it’s how our alumni wanted to give,” Geelhoed says. “All education foundations should be unique and reflect the needs of their district and their community.”

Relationship builders Fred Markham has worked to build and revitalize close to 180 education foundations across the state for the past 15 years as executive director of the Texas Pioneer Foundation. He says that while fundraising is an important function of an education foundation, it’s not just about the money. These organizations can also serve as conduits to the community. “Education foundations don’t always raise a lot of money, but they raise a lot of support in the community if they’re done right,” he says. “They serve to build a better line of support and communications for the district and the community.”

Cromwell agrees and adds that this type of support can be even more beneficial in some districts. “For a lot of superintendents, the engagement piece is even more valuable than the financial piece,” she says. “When a district wants to launch a bond referendum, they know who their supporters are and they have people who have been versed about some of the deficiencies, so they can rely on them to help get the word out about why the referendum is necessary.” Many places in Texas, most of the community doesn’t have direct ties to the school district. Education foundations help to can bridge these communication gaps and build engagement, allowing for direct conversations that might not be possible otherwise. “Districts can focus on the everyday work, the really important work, while an education foundation can help tell the story to people who want to support that work,” Geelhoed says.

Where to start No school administrator wants to add more to his or her plate, and this might be why so many Texas districts don’t currently have an education foundation in place. Markham has spoken to administrators who say they have spent five years just trying to set one up, not out of a lack of interest, but due to a lack of time. The good news is that you don’t have to go it alone. Through Foundation Innovation, Cromwell aims to help school districts get their education foundations up and running in about a year. She focuses on five aspects to get things started on the right foot. First comes infrastructure, completing the numerous documents that must be filed with the secretary of state, IRS and comptroller. Second is choosing board members. Third is the foundation’s image, which includes logo, marketing materials, websites, social media and more. The fourth component focuses on where the foundation’s money will be spent, whether that’s classroom innovation, after-school programs, mentor programs, or something unique to the district. The final component is fundraising. Cromwell stresses that for a foundation to be as successful as possible, it should have all of those other elements in place before fundraising can begin. By using a consultant such as Foundation Innovation, school districts can get started with an education foundation that was built by experts who know how to get results.

“When you hire a professional, we can advise you so you don’t stump your toe right out of the chute with something that might not work,” Cromwell says. Markham stresses that school districts are not in competition with each other, and support can be as simple as one superintendent reaching out to another.

“The grant program has really influenced the innovative culture, and it allows teachers to dream about what they want to do. They can try things out, they can innovate. It motivates them.” —Judy Geelhoed “Get help from people who have done it,” Markham says. “All of these people are more than willing to help other school districts and share best practices and their experiences.” To further support school districts in creating and running education foundations, Markham, along with Cromwell and Geelhoed, have formed the Texas Education Foundation Network. A volunteer-run group, TEFN exists to support school foundations through communications and networking. The group hosts an annual conference and regional workshops and hopes to expand its advocacy efforts as well, educating legislators on how vital an education foundation can be to the success of public education. “Years ago we did a research project and found 55 percent of education foundation members went on to run for a school board,” Cromwell says. “We believe that education foundations can be a huge link in empowering a school district.” For more information on TEFN, visit tefn. org. You can also learn more about Foundation Innovation at foundationinnovation. com, and Texas Pioneer Foundation at texaspioneerfoundation.org. DACIA RIVERS is editorial director of Texas School Business.

Texas School Business JANUARY / FEBRUARY 2020

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PRESIDENT PROFILE

Texas Association of Business Officials

Michele Trongaard takes the TASBO helm by James Golsan

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ew Texas Association of Business Officials (TASBO) President Michele Trongaard might not be a career educator, or even someone who’s spent her whole career in the education field, but she knows money. That’s maybe the most important qualification for leadership a TASBO president can possess, as the organization describes itself as “the trusted source for school finance and operations” in Texas. In a year following one of the most substantial overhauls of the Texas school finance system in recent memory, Trongaard will likely have to lean heavily on her experience and expertise in finance and accounting to navigate the changes now being implemented. A Certified Public Accountant (CPA) by training, Trongaard’s career began at a large tax accounting firm. This might not sound like the most exciting job in the world to some, though she points out that she did work on actor Tom Hanks’ tax returns at one time. It was a desire to get out of the corporate rat race — not to mention a little nudge from her family — that lead Trongaard to work in public education.

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“I was self-employed at the time, working for a millionaire, and I just wanted something different,” she says, adding that a desire to spend more time with her children was a major factor in her desire for a career change. “It was actually my sister who suggested I look into working for [Wylie ISD].” It proved to be good advice. “I started out as an accountant there for three years, was a payroll manager for another six, and was then director of finance for three months,” she says, with a laugh at the short tenure. After that, she served as the district’s chief financial officer for another three-year stretch before moving into the assistant superintendent role. Her involvement with TASBO began shortly after she was hired by Wylie ISD, due in part to some light prodding from her bosses. Recently, Trongaard was chosen to serve as associate superintendent of business and finance in Mansfield ISD. “I asked a lot of those annoying questions,” she jokes, “Lots of ‘why do we this this way,’ ‘why do we do X at all,’ because it was very different than the way I was used to doing things in the private sector. My bosses and coworkers all told me to go to the annual


TASBO conference because they’d have the answers I wanted.” The conference proved more than impactful for Trongaard’s career. She got the answers about working in public school finance she was looking for and quickly became directly involved with the organization, first at the local level working for TASBO’s DFW-area chapter, and then eventually in statewide leadership. She’s become a powerful voice in Texas school finance as her star has ascended; Trongaard also served on the Accounting and Auditing Advisory Committee for the Texas Education Agency, among other statewide committees. Her work has been recognized at the national level as well; Trongaard was recently awarded the Pinnacle Achievement Award by the Association of School Business Officials (ASBO), the national equivalent of TASBO. As new president of TASBO, Trongaard

is preparing to serve a large constituency. With more than 7,500 members, 27 regional affiliates, and several partner organizations, TASBO is one of the bigger education agencies in the state. Couple that size with the organization’s involvement in school finance — ever a thorny issue — and you’ve got a presidency that promises to be as challenging as it is rewarding, even for someone with Trongaard’s bonafides. “Well it’s not a legislative year, so that’s nice,” Trongaard says when asked about her priorities for her time in leadership. “But that gives us a chance to really dive deep on [the school finances changes implemented in the 86th Texas Legislature], and to make sure those changes are having the intended impact on school districts.” The changes are certainly ones her organization knows well, as TASBO was a major advocate for public schools as the Legislature hashed out those

changes last spring. She adds that she hopes TASBO will continue to be a significant voice in all matters related to finance in Texas schools, including the upcoming Sunset Review of the Teacher Retirement System of Texas. While she might not have seen herself becoming one of the foremost voices in the business of Texas public schools when she began her career as a CPA, there is no debating that Trongaard has become just that in her capacity as the new president of TASBO. The organization has chosen an experienced, decorated leader for themselves, a wise move for any organization, but particularly one that has to navigate the complex, often rough waters of Texas school finance. JAMES GOLSAN is a writer and education professional based in Austin.

Texas School Business JANUARY / FEBRUARY 2020

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PRESIDENT PROFILE

Texas School Public Relations Association

New TSPRA president is a seasoned, dedicated communicator by James Golsan

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day in the life of a public relations professional, or at least a day in the life of incumbent Texas School Public Relations Association (TSPRA) President Veronica Castillon, starts early and ends late. “I’m usually on my phone answering emails and taking calls from reporters while I’m putting on my makeup in the morning,” she says with a laugh. “And I’m in the office until after 6 most nights.” In her full-time position as executive director of communications for Laredo ISD, she’s often seen in Laredo (her hometown and where she’s lived most of her life) as the “face” of the school district, so long hours — not to mention the occasional informal Q&A session with local residents if one approaches her when she’s out shopping — come with the territory. It’s work she has a passion for and a job she wakes up excited to do every morning. “Every day is fun, it’s just that some days are more fun than others” Castillon jokes, though a career in the education field was not necessarily what she had in mind when she started.

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“I was blessed in that by the time I was in middle school, I knew what I wanted to do; I wanted to be a journalist,” she says. It was a passion she pursued as early as high school, during which time she wrote a column for her local paper and served as a writer for her high school newspaper, and then on into college; she was a journalism major at the University of Texas and never deviated from her pursuit of working in the journalism and media fields. She found work as a reporter in Austin shortly after graduating from college, and again as a reporter back in Laredo, before taking a job as a marketing officer for the International Bank of Commerce in her hometown. It was around that time that her high school alma mater came calling, quite literally. “I received a call from Vidal Trevino [the superintendent of Laredo ISD at the time], and he told me, ‘I’m going to make you an offer you can’t refuse.’” Since he’d been superintendent for more than 25 years, he was familiar with her work in journalism from her high school days, and offered her a position in what was at the time called the Public


Information Department for the district. It was a career move from which she never looked back. Castillon has now worked for Laredo ISD for 27 years, serving as a public relations officer from 1994 to 2008, then as communications director from 2008 to 2016, before moving into the executive director position with the district she holds now. Her involvement with TSPRA began almost simultaneously with her hiring at Laredo ISD. “I’m one of those people who’s been involved with extracurricular activities my whole life,” she says, adding if there is a reputable organization that’s working for a good cause such as TSPRA, she wants to not only join but to be a contributing member of the organization as well. Castillon’s passion for and belief in the value of the organization she now heads are immediately obvious when she discusses TSPRA.

“It’s such a fun, great group of people who do exactly what I do,” she says, adding that the organization’s membership is at once very focused on issues relevant to what they do in public education, but is also a supportive, engaging and fun resource network for its members. “I love TSPRA,” she adds with a laugh, and describes it as the best professional organization that she’s ever been a part of. When asked about her goals for her time in leadership at TSPRA, Castillon says she hopes to grow the organization’s membership and continue to provide quality support and programming for members. “TSPRA has really given me an opportunity to develop friendships and professional relationships in every corner of the state,” Castillon says, adding that no professional organization she’s been a part of — and

there have been many — has grown her professional skill set in the same way TSPRA has, and that she hopes to bring that same benefit to TSPRA members during her presidency. Energy, commitment and passion are vital to success in any field, but perhaps especially so in a field as fast moving as media and public relations. Castillon brings all of those things to her professional pursuits in spades. TSPRA is a growing organization with a statewide footprint. Expect that footprint and the good TSPRA does for its members to keep on growing while Castillon is in charge. JAMES GOLSAN is a writer and education professional based in Austin.

Keynote Speakers

JANUARY 26-29

Kindra Hall President and Chief Storytelling Officer, Steller Collective

It's not too late to attend! Register on-site. More information at tasamidwinter.org.

Charles Best CEO and Founder, DonorsChoose

Mike Morath Texas Commissioner of Education

Texas School Business JANUARY / FEBRUARY 2020

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REGIONAL VIEW

Education service center programs & practices

Morgan’s Angels: ESC Region 6 helps students attend classes virtually

▲ A student controls an in-school robot from her hospital bed.

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ovelady ISD is a public school district located in Houston County, which is in ESC Region 6. The district has two campuses, Lovelady Junior High/High School and Lovelady Elementary/Middle School. In 2011, a student from Lovelady ISD was diagnosed with cancer and unable to attend her classes. ESC Region 6 had just received a VGo robot as a demo. The staff at ESC Region 6 decided to try and implement the robot into the classroom so that the student, Morgan, could still “attend” class while in the hospital receiving treatment. Lovelady ISD agreed, and a VGo robot was deployed to the school. A VGo robot is remotely controlled via an internet-connected computer equipped with audio capabilities and a webcam. The VGo allowed Morgan to

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“drive” the robot around the school campus to each of her classes, see her teachers, and answer and ask questions, all from her hospital bed. Her teachers were able to see her on the robot’s built-in screen. Morgan was also able to interact with her classmates between classes and at lunch. Morgan’s mom recently shared with ESC Region 6 staff that Morgan has graduated from high school and will be attending college to become a nurse. Morgan is a great inspiration to all of the staff in ESC Region 6, and by pursuing her dream of becoming a nurse, she will be giving back by helping others in need. Morgan was the first student in ESC Region 6 to use the robot, and she made the robot what it is today. The robot was truly an “angel” for Morgan, so Morgan’s Angels seemed like a perfect name for the fleet of robots that ESC Region 6 now has.

▲ Two teachers from Bryan ISD

interact with a student via one of Morgan's Angels.


Although Morgan was the first student in ESC Region 6 to use a VGo robot, she was not the last. There are many situations such as injuries, extended illnesses and immune deficiencies that prevent students such as Morgan from being able to physically attend school. School districts accommodate these special needs by providing online courses, in-home instructors, videoconferencing and other means. However, these approaches often cause students to miss out on the classroom experience and social life that comes with attending school. VGo robots enable these students to participate in classroom discussions and share in school social experiences by replicating the student in a different location. The second student to use the VGo robot was a young student from Splendora ISD named Christian. Christian decorated his robot with a J.J. Watt jersey and named it Watt before sending it to school. The local media found out about Christian and ran a story about him and his robot. When J.J. heard about Christian he paid him a surprise visit at his home. Christian’s classmates were also able to see J.J. and interact with him as he looked over Christian’s shoulder. Many students who have used the VGo robots have done as Christian did by giving their robots names and dressing them before they are deployed at the school. The robots have charging stations located at the schools, and the students guide them in to charge at the end of each day. The VGo robots run a full day without needing to be recharged.

▲ Students and teachers interact with Morgan's Angels, robots piloted by students who are unable to attend school.

As word was spreading about VGo, the demand was such that some students had to be turned down. However, the parents of a Brenham ISD student named CJ who used the VGo were so appreciative of how the robot had allowed their son to “attend” his classes that they organized a fundraiser with the proceeds going to ESC Region 6 to purchase additional VGo robots to enable more students to benefit from this program.

Over the seven years since Morgan used the first VGo robot, the ESC Region 6 fleet has grown to 20 “angels” that frequent the hallways of schools in Region 6 as well as other regions. Currently seven students in six school districts are utilizing the VGo robots. Since the program began, 111 students in 75 districts have had the opportunity to attend school via the VGo robots. For the last few years, one of our VGo robots, Reveille, has traveled to Texas A&M University to show future teachers how this technology can be beneficial in a classroom. If you know of a student who could benefit from using one of Morgan’s Angels, the school can submit a request through the ESC Region 6 website at www.esc6.net/ morgansangels. There is no cost for ESC Region 6 schools to use the robots. For out-of-region schools, there is a charge of ½ ADA plus round-trip delivery and setup charges. You can follow Morgan’s Angels on Facebook at www.facebook.com/ MorgansAngelsRobot or on Twitter at @ morgansangels6.

▲ J.J. Watts watches a student interact with his class via robot.

Texas School Business JANUARY / FEBRUARY 2020

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Calendar Professional development & events JAN UARY January 26-29 TASA Midwinter Conference Austin Convention Center, Austin For more info, (512) 477-6361 tasamidwinter.org

FEB RUARY February 3-5 TCASE Great Ideas Annual Convention Marriott, Austin For more info, (512) 474-4492 or (888) 433-4492. www.tcase.org Cost: Main conference, $440; Feb. 3 only, $355; Feb. 4 only, $355; pre- and main conference, $530. February 4 TASB Facility Services Training: Asbestos Designated Person ESC Region 14, Abilene For more info, (512) 467-0222 or (800) 580-8272. www.tasb.org Cost: Participants from TASB member districts, no charge; all others, $425. TASB Grassroots Meeting ESC Region 15, San Angelo For more info, (512) 0222 or (800) 580-8272. www.tasb.org TASB Grassroots Meeting ESC Region 3, Victoria For more info, (512) 467-0222 or (800) 580-8272. www.tasb.org TASBO Workshop: Bud to Boss ESC Region 10, Richardson For more info, (512) 462-1711. www.tasbo.org Cost: TASBO members, $500; nonmembers, $550. February 5 TASA Assistant Principal Leadership Academy, Austin/San Antonio Cohort (session 4 of 6) Hammerlun Center, Georgetown For more info, (512) 477-6361. www.tasanet.org Cost: $1,000 for all six sessions.

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Texas School Business JANUARY / FEBRUARY 2020

TASB Facility Services Training: Integrated Pest Management Coordinator ESC Region 14, Abilene For more info, (512) 467-0222 or (800) 580-8272. www.tasb.org Cost: Participants from TASB member districts, no charge; all others, $425.

February 6-7

TASB Grassroots Meeting ESC Region 4, Houston For more info, (512) 467-0222 or (800) 580-8272. www.tasb.org

TASBO Course: Financial Essentials ESC Region 1, Edinburg or ESC Region 1 extension office, Brownsville For more info, (512) 462-1711. www.tasbo.org Cost: TASBO members, $175; nonmembers, $225.

TASSP Regional Meeting, Region16 ESC Region 16, Amarillo For more info, (512) 443-2100. www.tassp.org February 6 TASA Assistant Principal Leadership Academy, Houston Area Cohort (session 4 of 6) Cypress-Fairbanks ISD, Cypress For more info, (512) 477-6361. www.tasanet.org Cost: $1,000 for all six sessions. TASB Facility Services Training: Construction Fundamentals ESC Region 14, Abilene For more info, (512) 467-0222 or (800) 580-8272. www.tasb.org Cost: Participants from TASB member districts, no charge; all others, $425. TASB Grassroots Meeting ESC Region 5, Beaumont For more info, (512) 467-0222 or (800) 580-8272. www.tasb.org TASB Grassroots Meeting ESC Region 19, El Paso For more info, (512) 467-0222 or (800) 580-580-8272. www.tasb.org TASPA Workshop: Certification Fundamentals ESC Region 8, Mt. Pleasant For more info, (512) 494-9353. www.taspa.org Cost: TASPA members, $110; nonmembers, $135.

TASB Conference for Administrative Professionals TASB offices, Austin For more info, (512) 467-0222 or (800) 580-8272. www.tasb.org Cost: $264. February 7

February 9-11 TASSP Assistant/Aspiring Principal Workshop Hilton Airport Hotel, Austin For more info, (512) 443-2100. www.tassp.org Cost: Early Bird registration (by Jan. 24), $246; after Jan. 24, $296. TCA Professional School Counselor Annual Conference Gonzalez Convention Center, San Antonio For more info, (512) 472-3403 or (800) 580-8144. www.txca.org February 10 TASBO Course: Budget and Financial Planning ESC Region 10, Richardson For more info, (512) 462-1711. www.tasbo.org Cost: TASBO members, $175; nonmembers, $225. February 10-11 Texas ASCD Workshop: Creating an Understanding-Based Curriculum and Assessment System Victoria ISD, Victoria For more info, (512) 477-8200 or (800) 717-2723. www.txascd.org February 11 TASB Grassroots Meeting ESC Region 6, Huntsville For more info, (512) 467-0222 or (800) 580-8272. www.tasb.org

TASB Grassroots Meeting ESC Region 12, Waco For more info, (512) 467-0222 or (800) 580-8272. www.tasb.org February 11-13 TASA Workshop: Curriculum Management Audit Training, Level 1 TASA offices, Austin For more info, (512) 477-6361. www.tasanet.org Cost: TASA members, $750; nonmembers, $850. February 12 TASA Assistant Principal Leadership Academy, Corpus Christi/Victoria cohort Victoria ISD, Victoria For more info, (512) 477-6361. www.tasanet.org Cost: $1,000 for all six sessions. TASB Grassroots Meeting ESC Region 10, Richardson For more info, (512) 467-0222 or (800) 580-8272. www.tasb.org TASSP Regional Meeting, Region 4 Lamar High School, Houston For more info, (512) 443-2100. www.tassp.org TASSP Regional Meeting, Region 6 A&M Consolidated High School, College Station For more info, (512) 443-2100. www.tassp.org February 13 TASB Grassroots Meeting ESC Region 1, Edinburg For more info, (512) 467-0222 or (800) 580-8272. www.tasb.org TASB Grassroots Meeting ESC Region 17, Lubbock For more info, (512) 467-0222 or (800) 580-8272. www.tasb.org TASSP Regional Meeting, Region 5 Location TBA, Beaumont For more info, (512) 443-2100. www.tassp.org


February 18

February 19-20

TASB Grassroots Meeting ESC Region 7, Kilgore For more info, (512) 467-0222 or (800) 580-8272. www.tasb.org

TASA First Time Superintendents Academy (session 4 of 4) Marriott North, Austin For more info, (512) 477-6361. www.tasanet.org Cost: TASA members, $795; non-members, $895.

TASB Grassroots Meeting ESC Region 8, Pittsburg For more info, (512) 467-0222 or (800) 580-8272. www.tasb.org TASPA Workshop: Certification Fundamentals ESC Region 15, San Angelo For more info, (512) 494-9353. www.taspa.org Cost: TASPA members, $110; nonmembers, $135. February 19 ED311/TASB Workshop: Effective Documentation of Teachers Harris County Department of Education, Houston For more info, (512) 478-2113. www.ed311.com Cost: Registration plus documentation handbook purchase, $240; registration without handbook purchase, $195. TACS Region 15 Conference ESC Region 15, San Angelo For more info, (512) 440-8227. www.tacsnet.org Cost: TACS members, $25; nonmembers, $75. TASA Assistant Principal Leadership Academy, Dallas area cohort (session 4 of 6) Allen High School, Allen For more info, (512) 477-6361. www.tasanet.org Cost: $1,000 for all six sessions. TASA Assistant Principal Leadership Academy, Lubbock area cohort (session 4 of 6) Frenship ISD, Wolfforth For more info, (512) 477-6361. www.tasanet.org Cost: $1,000 for all six sessions. TASB Grassroots Meeting ESC Region 11, Fort Worth For more info, (512) 467-0222 or (800) 580-8272. www.tasb.org TASSP Regional Meeting, Region 1 Veterans Memorial Academy, San Benito For more info, (512) 443-2100. www.tassp.org

February 19-23 TABSE Annual State Conference Hyatt Regency Riverwalk, San Antonio For more info, (937) 617-1706. www.tabse.net Cost: $495. February 20 TASB Grassroots Meeting ESC Region 20, San Antonio For more info, (512) 467-0222 or (800) 580-8272. www.tasb.org February 24 THSCA Texas Coaches Leadership Summit Esports Stadium and Expo Center, Arlington For more info, (512) 392-3741. www.thsca.com Cost: In advance, $89; at the door, $99.

TASB Grassroots Meeting ESC Region 9, Wichita Falls For more info, (512) 467-0222 or (800) 580-8272. www.tasb.org TASSP Regional Meeting, Region 8 ESC Region 8, Mt. Pleasant For more info, (512) 443-2100. www.tassp.org February 26-29 TASB Convention: Governance Camp, Powered by Student Voices Galveston Island Convention Center, Galveston For more info, (512) 467-0222 or (800) 580-8272. www.tasb.org Cost: $395.

March 4

February 27

TASSP Regional Meeting, Region 12 Midway High School, Hewitt For more info, (512) 443-2100. www.tassp.org

TASB Grassroots Meeting ESC Region 14, Abilene For more info, (512) 467-0222 or (800) 580-8272. www.tasb.org

MARCH March 1-3

TSPRA Annual Conference Omni Barton Creek Resort, Austin For more info, (512) 474-9107. www.tspra.org

TASSP Symposium: Making Middle School Matter Hilton Airport Hotel, Austin For more info, (512) 443-2100. www.tassp.org Cost: Early Bird registration (through Feb. 14), $265; after Feb. 14, $315.

February 25-26

March 2-6

February 24-27

Fast Growth Texas Annual Conference Eilan Hotel, San Antonio For more info, (512) 536-1206. www.fastgrowthtexas.org February 25-27 TASA Workshop: Curriculum Management Audit Training, Level 2 TASA offices, Austin For more info, (512) 477-6361. www.tasanet.org Cost: TASA members, $750; nonmembers, $850. February 26 ED311 Workshop: Navigating Texas RtI Requirements ESC Region 7, Kilgore For more info, (512) 478-2113. www.ed311.com Cost: $175.

TASA/TASB/TASBO Budget Cohort for Texas District Leaders (session 3 of 4) Brown Convention Center, Houston For more info, (512) 467-0222 or (800) 580-8272. www.tasbo.org Cost: $3000 for up to three participants for all four sessions; each additional participant, $750.

TASBO Annual Engage Conference Brown Convention Center, Houston For more info, (512) 462-1711. www.tasbo.org Full conference: Members, $385; nonmembers, $510; associate members, $585; associate nonmembers, $635. One-day conference: Members, $325; nonmembers, $450; associate members, $525; associate nonmembers, $575. March 3 TACS Region 12 Conference Location TBA, Waco For more info, (512) 440-8227. www.tacsnet.org Cost: TACS members, $25; nonmembers, $75.

TASSP Regional Meeting, Region 13 McNeil High School, Round Rock For more info, (512) 443-2100. www.tassp.org March 5

March 10 TASB Facility Services Training: Asbestos Designated Person ESC Region 5, Beaumont For more info, (512) 467-0222 or (800) 580-8272. www.tasb.org Cost: Participants from TASB member districts, no charge; all others, $425. March 11 TASB Facility Services Training: Integrated Pest Management Coordinator ESC Region 5, Beaumont For more info, (512) 467-0222 or (800) 580-8272. www.tasb.org Cost: Participants from TASB member districts, no charge; all others, $425. March 12 TASB Facility Services Training: Indoor Air Quality Coordinator ESC Region 5, Beaumont For more info, (512) 467-0222 or (800) 580-8272. www.tasb.org Cost: Participants from TASB member districts, no charge; all others, $425.

> See Calendar, page 24 Texas School Business JANUARY / FEBRUARY 2020

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> Continued from page 23 March 24 TASB Facility Services Training: Asbestos Designated Person ESC Region 11, White Settlement For more info, (512) 467-0222 or (800) 580-8272. www.tasb.org Cost: Participants from TASB member districts, no charge; all others, $425. March 25 TASB Facility Services Training: Integrated Pest Management Coordinator ESC Region 11, White Settlement For more info, (512) 467-0222 or (800) 580-8272. www.tasb.org Cost: Participants from TASB member districts, no charge; all others, $425. TASB Spring Workshop Texas A&M University, Kingsville For more info, (512) 467-0222 or (800) 580-8272. www.tasb.org TASSP Regional Meeting, Region 17 Frenship High School, Wolfforth For more info, (512) 443-2100. www.tassp.org March 29-31 TAGT Leadership Conference Location TBA, Sugar Land For more info, (512) 499-8248. www.txgifted.org March 30 TASB Spring Workshop ESC Region 9, Wichita Falls For more info, (512) 467-0222 or (800) 580-8272. www.tasb.org March 30-31 TASA Workshop: CMSi Curriculum Management Planning TASA offices, Austin For more info, www.tasanet.org Cost: TASA members, $450; nonmembers, $500.

March 31 TASA Academy for Transformational Leadership (session 4 of 4) Hammerlun Center, Georgetown For more info, (512) 477-6361. www.tasanet.org Cost: $1,995 for all four sessions. TASB Facility Services Training: Best Practices in Maintenance and Operations TASB offices, Austin For more info, (512) 467-0222 or (800) 580-8272. www.tasb.org Cost: Participants from TASB member districts, no charge; all others, $425. TASBO Workshop: Bud to Boss ESC Region 12, Waco For more info, (512) 462-1711. www.tasbo.org Cost: TASBO members, $500; nonmembers, $550.

A PR I L April 1 TACS Annual East Texas Spring Conference University of Texas, Tyler For more info, (512) 440-8227. www.tacsnet.org TASB Facility Services Training: Best Practices in Hazardous Materials Response and Removal TASB offices, Austin For more info, (512) 467-0222 or (800) 580-8272. www.tasb.org Cost: Participants from TASB member districts, no charge; all others, $425. TASSP Regional Meeting, Region 9 ESC Region 9, Wichita Falls For more info, (512) 443-2100. www.tassp.org TASSP Regional Meeting, Region 11 Joe T. Garcia’s, Fort Worth For more info, (512) 443-2100. www.tassp.org April 2 TASA Assistant Principal Leadership Academy, Dallas Area Cohort (session 5 of 6) Allen High School, Allen For more info, (512) 477-6361. www.tasanet.org Cost: $1,000 for all six sessions.

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Texas School Business JANUARY / FEBRUARY 2020

TASB Facility Services Training: Best Practices in Accessibility for Persons with Disabilities TASB offices, Austin For more info, (512) 467-0222 or (800) 580-8272. www.tasb.org Cost: Participants from TASB member districts, no charge; all others, $425. TASB Spring Workshop Tarleton State University, Stephenville For more info, (512) 467-0222 or (800) 580-8272. www.tasb.org April 5-8 THSADA Annual State Conference Convention Center, Waco For more info, (832) 623-7803. www.thsada.com April 7 TASA Assistant Principal Leadership Academy, Houston Area Cohort (session 5 of 6) Cypress-Fairbanks ISD, Cypress For more info, (512) 477-6361. www.tasanet.org Cost: $1,000 for all six sessions. TASB Facility Services Training: Asbestos Designated Person ESC Region 18, Midland For more info, (512) 467-0222 or (800) 580-8272. www.tasb.org Cost: Participants from TASB member districts, no charge; all others, $425. TASB Spring Workshop ESC Region 15, San Angelo For more info, (512) 467-0222 or (800) 580-8272. www.tasb.org April 8 TASB Facility Training Services: Integrated Pest Management Coordinator ESC Region 18, Midland For more info, (512) 467-0222 or (800) 580-8272. www.tasb.org Cost: Participants from TASB member districts, no charge; all others, $425. TASSP Regional Meeting, Region 10 Spring Creek Barbecue, Richardson For more info, (512) 443-2100. www.tassp.org

April 9 TASB Facility Services Training: Best Practices in Construction Fundamentals ESC Region 18, Midland For more info, (512) 467-0222 or (800) 580-8272. www.tasb.org Cost: Participants from TASB member districts, no charge; all others, $425. April 15 TASA Assistant Principal Leadership Academy, Austin/ San Antonio Cohort (session 5 of 6) Hammerlun Center, Georgetown For more info, (512) 477-6361. www.tasanet.org Cost: $1,000 for all six sessions. TASA Assistant Principal Leadership Academy, Lubbock area cohort (session 5 of 6) Frenship ISD, Wolfforth For more info, (512) 477-6361. www.tasanet.org Cost: $1,000 for all six sessions. TASSP Regional Meeting, Region 15 Lowake Steak House, Rowena For more info, (512) 477-6361. www.tassp.org TASSP Regional Meeting, Region 18 Location TBA, Midland For more info, (512) 477-6361. www.tassp.org April 19-21 TASB Risk Management Fund Members’ Conference Hyatt Regency, Austin For more info, (512) 467-0222 or (800) 580-8272. www.tasb.org April 20 TASSP Regional Meeting, Region 7 Whitehouse High School, Whitehouse For more info, (512) 443-2100. www.tassp.org April 21 TASB Facility Services Training: Asbestos Designated Person ESC Region 12, Waco For more info, (512) 467-0222 or (800) 580-8272. www.tasb.org Cost: Participants from TASB member districts, no charge; all others, $425.


TASB Spring Workshop ESC Region 17, Lubbock For more info, (512) 467-0222 or (800) 580-8272. www.tasb.org April 22 TASB Facility Services Training: Integrated Pest Management Coordinator ESC Region 12, Waco For more info, (512) 467-0222 or (800) 580-8272. www.tasb.org Cost: Participants from TASB member districts, no charge; all others, $425. TASB Spring Workshop ESC Region 4, Houston For more info, (512) 467-0222 or (800) 580-8272. www.tasb.org TASSP Regional Meeting, Region 2 Location TBA, Corpus Christi For more info, (512) 443-2100. www.tassp.org TASSP Regional Meeting, Region 3 ESC Region 3, Victoria For more info, (512) 443-2100. www.tassp.org April 23 TASA Assistant Principal Leadership Academy, Corpus Christi/Victoria cohort (session 5 of 6) Victoria ISD, Victoria For more info, (512) 477-6361. www.tasanet.org Cost: $1,000 for all six sessions.

MAY May 4 TASB Spring Workshop Sul Ross State University, Alpine For more info, (512) 467-0222 or (800) 580-8272. www.tasb.org May 5 TASB Spring Workshop Iraan-Sheffield ISD, Iraan For more info, (512) 467-0222 or (800) 580-8272. www.tasb.org May 7 TASB Spring Workshop ESC Region 19, El Paso For more info, (512) 467-0222 or (800) 580-8272. www.tasb.org May 12 TASB Spring Workshop Texas A&M University, Commerce For more info, (512) 467-0222 or (800) 580-8272. www.tasb.org

TASB Spring Workshop Stephen F. Austin State University, Nacogdoches For more info, (512) 467-0222 or (800) 580-8272. www.tasb.org May 13 TASB Spring Workshop West Texas A&M University, Canyon For more info, (512) 467-0222 or (800) 580-8272. www.tasb.org

May 18 TASB Spring Workshop ESC Region 14, Abilene For more info, (512) 467-0222 or (800) 580-8272. www.tasb.org May 19 TASB Spring Workshop ESC Region 12, Waco For more info, (512) 467-0222 or (800) 580-8272. www.tasb.org May 20

May 14 TASB Spring Workshop ESC Region 6, Huntsville For more info, (512) 467-0222 or (800) 580-8272. www.tasb.org

TASB Spring Workshop Victoria College, Victoria For more info, (512) 467-0222 or (800) 580-8272. www.tasb.org May 27

May 15-16 TASB Spring Workshop South Padre Island Convention Center, South Padre Island For more info, (512) 467-0222 or (800) 580-8272. www.tasb.org

TASB Spring Conference Uvalde CISD, Uvalde For more info, (512) 467-0222 or (800) 580-8272. www.tasb.org ◄

Where did you find that great conference?

TASB Facility Services Training: Indoor Air Quality Coordinator ESC Region 12, Waco For more info, (512) 467-0222 or (800) 580-8272. www.tasb.org Cost: Participants from TASB member districts, no charge; all others, $425. April 29 TASSP Regional Meeting, Region 14 Abilene Country Club, Abilene For more info, (512) 443-2100. www.tassp.org April 30-May 1 TASB Special Education Solutions Members’ Conference Marriott North, Round Rock For more info, (512) 467-0222 or (800) 580-8272. www.tasb.org

I found it in Texas School Business! Discover upcoming conferences and continuing education opportunities in the calendar section of each issue of Texas School Business and on our website.

TexasSchoolBusiness.com Texas School Business JANUARY / FEBRUARY 2020

25


STUDENT VOICES

A move from a small to large school comes with challenges, benefits by Audrey Seed

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n 2018, during the summer before my junior year, my family decided to move to Austin. I, of course, was terrified of the idea of a big change, but in the back of my mind, I knew that it would be good for me. I grew up knowing the exact same routine and the same people my entire life, that is, until I moved to Texas.

I lived in the smallest state in the country, Rhode Island, for 16 years. I went to a private school with a total of almost 100 students in the entire high school. My graduating class was about 23, and I only had two students in my math class. All of the teachers and staff knew me and knew about my learning difference, dyslexia. I never had to tell anyone who I was or advocate for myself with teachers, staff or tutors. When we moved, my parents searched for a good school for me, and we decided on Vandegrift High School in Leander ISD. As you can imagine, this was a different kind

of school than I was used to. It was a public school and had more than 2,000 kids in it, with almost 700 kids in my graduating class. My math class has about 30 students. A big change like this was a shock both socially and academically. I wasn’t used to trying so hard to put myself out there to others, but with the help of the Pals program and the students in my classes, I was able to make a lot of friends quickly. But meeting new people and getting used to the culture shock was not the most difficult part of my move. Getting the attention I needed for my learning differences and coping with instructors’ teaching styles was a struggle for me, but my teachers were open to my advocacy and have been super supportive since my first day. My guidance counselor and the 504 coordinator also helped me get into my new routine and understand how to navigate going to a bigger school.

At Vandergrift High School, I am not judged; I am supported.

All my life I have worked with tutors to learn

“Student Voices” is a regularly featured column in Texas School Business. It’s an opportunity for students of all ages from across Texas to share their experiences in K-12 public schools. Contact Editorial Director Dacia Rivers at drivers@texasschoolbusiness.com for publishing guidelines.

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Texas School Business JANUARY / FEBRUARY 2020


coping skills and tools to help me in school. I have spent hours after school to put extra effort into my work, and the teachers have been great about giving me extra help. Personally, I have struggled with my dyslexia and was ashamed of it when I was younger. I used to believe there was something wrong with me; I never knew anyone else who had it. At VHS, I am not judged; I am supported. I am able to work hard, be determined, put myself out there and succeed in reaching my goals. In Rhode Island, I was waived from having to take a foreign language. Since I am

dyslexic, I spent that class period working on assignments and going to speech and language therapy. When I learned I had to take a foreign language in Texas in order to graduate, I was very nervous. Luckily, Vandegrift offers American Sign Language. ASL is the perfect language for me to learn, because it is visual, and you use both your body and your mind to learn it. One of the goals I’ve met by attending VHS is being accepted to Texas State University, my first-choice school. I think that my experience at Vandegrift has gotten me ready for college. Both of my parents went to college

and got to experience their interests, and I want to do the same. My education is very important to both myself and my family. I have put a lot of hard work and effort into my own education so far in life, and I want to keep going through college and eventually graduate school. Going to Vandegrift has given me the confidence in myself that I will need for the rest of my life. I’m grateful that I am able to attend such a great school. AUDREY SEED is a senior at Vandegrift High School in Leander ISD.

GEOMETRIC SHAPES

Call for Session Proposals January 15 - March 1, 2020 Visit tasa.tasb.org for details.

Texas School Business JANUARY / FEBRUARY 2020

27


THE ARTS

News in fine arts education

Choir program in Gunter ISD grows by leaps and bounds by Elizabeth Kulbeth

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any people stop short of their destiny and settle for someone else’s story. For example, one may feel that since their parents are doctors, they should pursue a career in medicine. That

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Texas School Business JANUARY / FEBRUARY 2020

is not the case for my journey as a music educator. I knew at a very young age I was called to be a teacher, although I didn’t know I would become a music teacher.

Sixteen years ago, we made our first trip to Branson, Missouri. The students said, “Why are you taking us to an old person town?”


Music is a passion for most of my students and a love for few. I remind my students that music speaks when words fail. I tell my students that while I may not teach them a thing about music, I will teach them how to serve and care for one another. Of course, I teach them about music or we would not be the music department we are today. The adventure of building the music department in Gunter began 27 years ago with a 1A classification — small enough that the students had music every day for 30 minutes at the elementary school, and we had one middle school choir and one high school choir. Today we have a 3A classification with 45 minutes of music for kindergarten through third grade with three middle school choirs and two high school choirs. Fourth grade music is now taught by our band directors. The journey began at the high school level with only nine senior girls and two junior girls. I was uncertain how I would build a high school program, however, I dug deep and demonstrated just how fun and rewarding choir can be. It only took a few short weeks for interest to grow among our student body. I began a tutorial choir and added 18 more students to the high school program. For several years, we only performed at local events. The interest continued to grow, and the choral music department was off and running.

adventure for my students. They had the opportunity to open for a big show in Branson and work with a professional performer. The choir brought back many traditions and memories from these trips. I then had a group of young musicians who wanted to compete. Under their leadership, our choir programs have become competitive choirs receiving Sweepstakes at UIL concert and sight-reading contests as well as many TMEA All-State Students and state UIL Solo and Ensemble Qualifiers. These young musicians created traditions that are still in place today. A few of the wonderful traditions they have started include our Dining with Disney show, Hard Luck Choir Café, Christmas Concerts, Senior Moments at our Spring concerts and trips to other places. As I look back over the 27 years I have served at Gunter ISD several memories come to mind. During my first year, we performed a kindergarten through 12th grade show at Christmas in the old gym. It was a great beginning for a 1A school. For several years, we had an orchestra at our school, and we joined them in the musical “Oklahoma!” At this point, it became apparent that we could produce a big show. This was a

stepping stone to where we are today. Sixteen years ago, we made our first trip to Branson, Missouri. The students said, “Why are you taking us to an old person town?” I explained that this would be a trip they would enjoy and remember. The trip was amazing, and the students talked about it the rest of the school year, with the underclassmen wanting to know when they could go back. It began a tradition of a trip every other year. During the 27 years we have performed several Broadway musicals, including “Bye Bye Birdie,” “The Music Man,” “All Shook Up,” and “Oklahoma!” again. A new group of students came through the program and wanted to compete, which took the choir to a new level as well as creating more traditions. One of our favorite traditions is hosting our Hard Luck Choir Café. This is an event that allows the choir to sing in solos, duets and groups, performing music from the 1950s through the 1990s. The choir program continues to grow and do many amazing things. It is an honor to be the choral director of Gunter ISD. Remember, music speaks when words fail. ELIZABETH KULBETH is a music teacher and choral director in Gunter ISD.

As one knows, you have to start a program from the elementary level. At the time, our elementary housed grades kindergarten through sixth, and we started a fourth grade choir the second year. At this point, the program began to take flight. The fundamentals of music were taught, and a love of music began. A simple choir contest and musicals at the elementary level spiked a great interest as the elementary students moved on to the middle school campus and then on to high school. The focus on my high school program has been a beautiful thing to see. While we began with just 11 girls, today we have 42 students in Chamber choir and 16 in Select choir. These numbers change from year to year due to other electives. We have gone from being noncompetitive to extremely competitive. After three years of performing at local choir events, we began to attend the UIL contest once a year. The program has gone through many phases during its 27 years. For example, for several years the students did not enjoy the UIL contest or TMEA. They thought the pressure was too much. They enjoyed performing and doing musicals. This allowed us to begin a tradition of a trip to Branson, Missouri. This was a great Texas School Business JANUARY / FEBRUARY 2020

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THE BACK PAGE

Someone remembered: a story of a teacher and her student by Riney Jordan

H

is name is Tommie. His seventh grade teacher was Mrs. Martin.

And on a casual shopping trip to the men’s department at a large department store, Tommie, who has worked in the men’s department for years, asked me how things were going. We have been shopping there for more than 20 years and over the years have become quite good friends. While shopping, we always inquire about each other’s families. On this particular day, he mentioned that he had just gotten back from attending his 50th high school reunion. “I had a wonderful time seeing all my classmates who graduated with me from Alto High School. There was just a handful of us, but we’ve kept up with each other all these years.” He then proceeded to tell me that he still remembered learning several pieces of literature when he attended this small East Texas school district. “I loved ‘Invictus,’” he told me. And then, right there in the store, he quoted the ancient words penned by William Ernest Henley. He never missed a beat as the words, memorized more than 50 years ago, fell from his mouth as if he had been saying them daily for all these years. Karen and I stood there in silence, mouths agape, until he uttered the most memorable closing line, “I am the master of my fate; I am the captain of my soul.” He then proceeded to tell us about his seventh grade teacher, Mrs. Anola Martin, who worked tirelessly to instill good literature in the minds of her students. “When she turned 95, I made the trip back home to visit her in the nursing home. I was somewhat surprised how the years had taken their toll. Her eyesight was practically gone. She sat in a hunched position, and it was so sad to see her in that condition.” As he knelt beside her wheelchair that morning, he told her how much he had loved her class. He searched his mind for stories that might

trigger a smile or a feeble comment. She simply smiled and occasionally nodded her head. “Do you remember asking us to memorize ‘Invictus?’” he asked. He then told her that he still remembered every word, even after all these years. “Really?” she quietly asked. And with that, he began …“Out of the night that covers me black as the pit from pole to pole, I thank whatever gods may be for my unconquerable soul.”

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As he continued, her smile grew bigger. Her eyes seemed to sparkle. Tears welled up in her eyes.

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“It matters not how strait the gate, how charged with punishments the scroll, I am the master of my fate: I am the captain of my soul.”

Texas School Business.............. 12, 25

As he finished, they both sat in silence as the words echoed in their minds. And then, sensing that he had stayed long enough, he gave her a gentle hug and thanked her for being such a wonderful teacher. As he rose to leave, she simply said, “Thank you, Tommie.” As he walked away, he heard her mutter the words that would linger with him the rest of his days: “Thank goodness. Someone remembered.” He turned, as she quietly spoke them again and nodded her head up and down. “Someone remembered.” Was she thankful that he remembered the words to that powerful work of literature … or thankful that someone remembered her and the fact that she had made a difference in their lives? I asked him that question and he quietly responded, “I’d like to think that it was both.” My wife and I gently nodded our heads in agreement. This had been a story and a visit with our friend Tommie that we would not soon forget either.

convocation, graduation or awards banquet, visit www.rineyjordan.com.

Texas School Business JANUARY / FEBRUARY 2020

Advertiser Index

Then he remembered “Invictus.”

RINEY JORDAN is the author of two books and a frequent public speaker. To invite him to speak at your

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Advertise in Texas School Business magazine. For specs and rates, contact jgarrido@tasanet.org or by calling (800) 725-8272 TexasSchoolBusiness.com


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The January/February 2020 issue of Texas School Business, published by the Texas Association of School Administrators (TASA), includes a cov...

January/February 2020 Texas School Business  

The January/February 2020 issue of Texas School Business, published by the Texas Association of School Administrators (TASA), includes a cov...

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