January/February 2023 Texas School Business

Page 1

Texas School Business

Also in this issue: TSPRA President Megan Overman Texas ASCD holds annual conference

The News
70 YEARS
2023
Magazine for Public Education in Texas
JAN/FEB
Moves Attract and retain top teachers
Bold

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The views expressed by columnists and contributing writers do not necessarily reflect those of the publisher or Texas School Business advertisers. The publisher also makes no endorsement of the advertisers or advertisements in this publication.
School Business JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2023 Bold Moves Attract and retain top teachers by Dacia Rivers Photo Feature 20 Texas ASCD members gather for annual conference 12 Departments 7 Who’s News 24 Calendar 31 Ad Index Columns 5 From the Editor by Dacia Rivers 9 The Law Dawg— Unleashed by Jim Walsh 22 Regional View by Jenny Brandt 31 The Back Page by Riney Jordan 18 TSPRA President Profile Eagle Mountain-Saginaw’s Megan Overman empowers next generation of school PR leaders by Autumn
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From the editor

Happy New Year! I hope 2023 finds you refreshed, rested and inspired to tackle what lies ahead.

In this issue, we have a feature article that I hope will offer some ideas for ways to tackle the ongoing issue of teacher recruitment and retention. It’s a factor that affects every school district in Texas, and many of you are addressing it head-on with creative thinking. That one kicks off on page 12.

We also have a Regional View column from ESC Region 7, offering details on the best practices one district is using to improve motor skills in its youngest students. And of course we have a timely column from our Law Dawg Jim Walsh and a bit of feel-good wisdom from Riney Jordan. As we head into the new year, if there is any topic you’d like to see covered in these pages, please don’t hesitate to drop me a note at drivers@texasschoolbusiness.com. I always appreciate your feedback and insight.

Texas School Business

JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2023

Volume LXX, Issue 1 406 East 11th Street Austin, Texas 78701 Phone: 512-477-6361 www.texasschoolbusiness.com

EDITORIAL DIRECTOR

Dacia Rivers

DESIGN

Phaedra Strecher

COLUMNISTS

Riney Jordan Jim Walsh

ADVERTISING SALES

Jennifer Garrido

TEXAS ASSOCIATION

OF SCHOOL ADMINISTRATORS

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR

Kevin Brown

DIRECTOR, COMMUNICATIONS & MARKETING

Amy Francisco

Texas School Business (ISSN 0563-2978) is published online bimonthly with a special edition, Bragging Rights in December, by the Texas Association of School Administrators.

© Copyright 2023 Texas Association of School Administrators

5
Business JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2023
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Bastrop ISD

Jocelyn McDonald has been named director of digital learning. She has more than 16 years of experience in education, most recently serving as Aldine ISD’s program director of technology applications and STEM. She previously worked in the private sector and in Houston, Pearland and Fort Bend ISDs. Her bachelor’s degree and master’s degree in instructional technology were awarded from Stephen F. Austin State University and her doctorate in educational technology from Walden University.

Bryan ISD

After 30 years in law enforcement, 27 of those with the Orange County (Cal.) Sheriff’s Department, Richard Himmel is now Bryan ISD’s assistant director of safety and security. He holds a bachelor’s degree in criminal justice from California State University.

Lori Sears has accepted the position of transportation director. She comes to her new job from Garland ISD, where she was the district’s safety and training manager. She previously worked in student transportation in San Antonio’s North East ISD and Dallas ISD.

Canutillo ISD (El Paso)

Canutillo ISD trustee Armando Rodriguez is now president-elect of the Texas Association of School Boards (TASB) and was sworn in during the annual TASA|TASB Convention in San Antonio in September. A graduate of Canutillo High School and the University of Texas at El Paso, he is a founding member of the Canutillo Alumni Foundation for Education.

Comal ISD

John Chapman has been appointed Comal ISD’s superintendent, coming to his new position from Carrollton-Farmers Branch ISD, where he also held the top job. He has also served as superintendent of Chillicothe, Ennis and Comfort ISDs. His doctorate in educational leadership was awarded from Texas Tech University.

A new executive director of safety and security is in place for Comal ISD. Mario De La Rosa has 27 years of experience in both law enforcement and school security, including assignments as a U.S. Border Patrol agent and with the Department of Homeland Security. He most recently was director of safety and security for Round Rock ISD.

Conroe ISD

Bethany Medford has been promoted from assistant superintendent for middle schools to deputy superintendent.

Corsicana ISD

Corsicana ISD has announced the appointment of Raymond Linex as executive director of communications. He spent more than 20 years as a reporter with the Corsicana Daily Sun

Cypress-Fairbanks ISD

The district’s 20th middle school, as yet unnamed, will open in August for the 2023-24 school year with Elizabeth Bradley as principal. Currently leading Pope Elementary School, she is a 22-year educator who previously worked in Houston ISD. She received her bachelor’s degree from Sam Houston State University and her master’s degree in curriculum and technology from the University of Phoenix.

Tamera Felder, former principal of Wilson Elementary School, now holds the top job at Hancock Elementary. She has spent her 22 years as an educator in Cypress-Fairbanks ISD, taking her first administrative position in 2010. She earned her bachelor’s and master’s degrees from Prairie View A&M University.

Katie Herrera has been promoted from assistant principal to principal of Pope Middle School. She has spent her 22-year career in the district, previously working in Ault, Jowell and Owens elementary schools. She earned her bachelor’s degree from Texas Tech University and her master’s degree in education from the University of Houston.

Dallas ISD

The new principal of Douglas Elementary School is Sherqueena Jackson, who led Cleburne ISD’s Irving Elementary School since 2019. She previously was a teacher

and administrator in Cedar Hill ISD and a principal with A+ Charter Schools. She received her bachelor’s degree from Texas A&M University, her master’s degree in curriculum and instruction from the University of Texas at Arlington, and her doctorate from Liberty University.

Danbury ISD

Michael Homann, former superintendent of Pettus ISD, now holds the top position in Danbury ISD.

Denton ISD

Melissa Bates, the former assistant principal of Braswell High School, has been named principal of Providence Elementary School. She began her career in Mississippi in 2003, joining Denton ISD, where she has served as a teacher, math interventionist and assistant principal, in 2008. She has a bachelor’s degree from Alcorn State University and a master’s degree in education from Mississippi College.

Cheek Middle School will open its doors in August with Beth Kelly as its inaugural principal. Currently principal of Navo Middle School, she came to the district in 2005 as Guyer High School’s English department chair. She has led Navo since 2016. Her bachelor’s degree was awarded from Northeast Louisiana University, her master’s degree from Texas Woman’s University, and her doctorate in educational leadership from the University of North Texas.

Duncanville ISD

A new chief of police is in place for Duncanville ISD. Mitchell Lambert has more than 12 years of experience in law enforcement, the past five with the district.

El Paso ISD

The district’s new executive director of teaching and learning is Guy Rosales, who was director of school leadership. Before coming to El Paso in 2016, he was an administrator in Arlington ISD. He has a bachelor’s degree from the University of Phoenix and a master’s degree in human resources development from Webster University.

7 Texas School Business JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2023
Who’s News > See Who’s News, page 11

Parents with the most questions are most likely to consider switching schools

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Making board meetings boring again

Acandidate for school board recently ran for the position promising to “make school board meetings boring again.” I suspect a lot of superintendents would support that idea. In one instance in Florida the excitement over public comment bubbled up to litigation that reached the 11th Circuit.

The school’s policy was the usual. It gave the board chair the authority to “interrupt, warn, or terminate” a presentation if the speaker violated the decorum standards. It prohibited comments that were “too lengthy, personally directed, abusive, obscene, or irrelevant.”

The plaintiffs — Moms for Liberty and four of its members — alleged that the school’s public comment policy was not “content neutral,” “unconstitutional as applied,” and would have a “chilling effect” on free speech. The 11th Circuit rejected all of those arguments, relying on the decision of the lower court that provided a good analysis. Here’s how the court broke it down.

Content neutral. The court pointed out that a public school board meeting is a limited public forum and as such, it does not have to be “content neutral.” However, it does have to be “viewpoint neutral” and reasonable. And it was. Prohibiting comments that are “too lengthy, personally directed, abusive, obscene, or irrelevant” is permissible, as long as the policy is applied evenly.

Unconstitutional as applied. The Moms accused the board chair of discriminatory enforcement of the policy, shutting down disfavored speakers and allowing more favored speakers to violate the decorum standards. An issue like that cannot be determined without digging into the facts. The court noted that its decision was based on “many hours” of video review. That review revealed only four instances in which a Moms member was interrupted, and one in which a Mom was ejected from the meeting. The interruptions by the chair were “brief

and respectful,” allowing the speakers to finish what they had to say. The chair also interrupted those speakers with whom the chair agreed when they violated decorum standards.

The court noted that there may have been instances in which “the Chair strayed from evenhandedness,” but cited an earlier case for this:

“An erroneous judgment call on the part of a presiding officer does not automatically give rise to liability for a constitutional tort,” and the 11th Circuit has cautioned against Monday-morning quarterbacking of calls made by a presiding officer “without the benefit of leisurely reflection.”

Board presidents should take comfort from that.

Chilling effect. Nope. There were “more than a hundred times in which Moms for Liberty members spoke unimpeded.” Of the four plaintiffs, one never attempted to speak, two spoke often and were only interrupted once, and only one was interrupted more than once and tossed out of the meeting. That ejection occurred only after multiple warnings and after the speaker had exceeded his allotted time and “veered into other topics irrelevant to the discussion.”

One other issue came up that has occasionally come up in Texas districts: limiting the number of people in the room. The court:

“As to Plaintiffs’ passing assertion that they were unable to enter one meeting because of space limitations, attendees could still wait outside for their turn where audio of the meeting was being played, so their speech was not actually restricted.”

It’s Moms for Liberty v. Brevard Public Schools, decided by the 11th Circuit in an “unpublished” opinion on Nov. 21, 2022.

JIM WALSH is an attorney with Walsh Gallegos Treviño Russo & Kyle PC. He can be reached at jwalsh@wabsa.com. You can also follow him on Twitter: @jwalshtxlawdawg.

9 Texas School Business JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2023 THE LAW DAWG – UNLEASHED
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Manuel Verduzco, new assistant superintendent of information technology, has more than 30 years of experience in the field, previously working in El Paso’s Clint and Socorro ISDs. He received his bachelor’s degree in electrical engineering and his master’s degree in business administration and technology management from the University of Phoenix.

Electra ISD

Former Electra Junior High/High School principal Don Hasley now leads the district as superintendent. Prior to joining Electra ISD, he was Archer City ISD’s athletic director and head coach and director of career and technology programs at Nacogdoches ISD.

Frenship ISD

A new principal has been named for Frenship ISD’s fourth middle school, as yet unnamed and scheduled to open in August 2023.

Rebecca Whipkey is a 23-year educator who joined FISD in 2003. She has worked as a math teacher, basketball and track coach, and instructional coach and is currently assistant principal of Frenship Middle School.

Frost ISD

The new superintendent is Steve Reynolds, former superintendent of Adrian ISD.

Gause ISD

New superintendent Teresa Russell has been an employee of Gause ISD for 24 years, most recently serving as head of special programs. She is a graduate of Sam Houston State University with a master’s degree in educational administration from Angelo State University.

Grapevine-Colleyville ISD

Former deputy superintendent Brad Schnautz has accepted the position of interim superintendent. After beginning his career in 2002 in Bryan ISD, he served as a teacher, coach and administrator in Conroe and Magnolia ISDs before joining Lexington ISD as superintendent in 2015. He came to Grapevine-Colleyville in 2017. He earned bachelor’s and doctoral degrees from Texas

A&M University and his master’s degree from Sam Houston State University.

Hillsboro ISD

Darrell Brown has been named superintendent of Hillsboro ISD. He was previously superintendent of Birdville ISD.

Jefferson ISD

After nine years leading Jefferson ISD, superintendent Rob Barnwell has announced his intention to retire at the end of December. The 34-year educator spent 24 of those as an administrator, working in New Boston, McLeod and Queen City ISDs. He earned his bachelor’s degree from Henderson State University followed by a master’s degree in education administration from Texas A&M University at Commerce.

Jourdanton ISD

Superintendent

Theresa McAllister, who has led the district since 2016, has announced her upcoming retirement. She spent 27 of her 33 years as an educator with Jourdanton ISD.

Katy ISD

One of Katy ISD’s new elementary schools, as yet unnamed and scheduled to open in August, will be led by Charlotte Gilder, who began her career in 1994 as a teacher in Port Arthur ISD. She then worked in Goose Creek and Cypress-Fairbanks ISDs. She is a graduate of Sam Houston State University with two master’s degrees, in counseling and development and school administration.

Kristi Gonzales, who began her career in 2004 in Cypress-Fairbanks ISD and came to Katy in 2004, is now principal of Shafer Elementary. She holds a bachelor’s degree from Texas State University and a master’s degree in education administration from Texas A&M University at Commerce.

Paetow High School’s new head football coach and athletics coordinator is David Hicks, who had been serving in that position on an interim basis. The 11-year educator had a previous stint in Katy ISD, at Morton Ranch High from 2017 to 2021, and also worked in Sharpstown and Westside high schools in Houston ISD. A graduate of Grambling State

University, he received his master’s degree in education administration from Lamar University.

Michael Schwartz has been chosen to serve as principal of the district’s second new elementary school, also slated to open its doors in the fall. He came to Katy ISD in 2006, where he worked until 2012, when he joined Spring Branch ISD as an assistant principal, returning to Katy in 2014. He has a bachelor’s degree from Texas A&M University and a master’s degree in leadership and policy studies from the University of Texas at Arlington.

Now serving as principal of Hutsell Elementary School is Shauntá Smith. The 20-year educator joined Katy ISD in 2013 and has worked as an instructional coach, assistant principal, and principal of the district’s summer academic term. She earned a bachelor’s degree from the University of Houston and a master’s degree in educational administration from Prairie View A&M University.

La Porte ISD

Stacey McDowell, La Porte ISD’s new chief financial officer, is a product of La Porte ISD schools and a graduate of the University of Houston. She worked in the public sector before spending the past 17 years with Deer Park ISD, most recently serving as director of finance.

Lake Travis ISD

Amy Thomas has been selected to serve as the district’s director of corporate relations and the Lake Travis ISD Education Foundation. A graduate of Azusa Pacific University with a master’s degree in business administration from American Intercontinental University, she was most recently development director for the Salem Academy Christian School in Oregon.

Leander ISD

The Leander ISD board of trustees has announced the hiring of Pete Pape as the district’s chief financial officer. A certified public accountant with 21 years of experience in school finance, he most recently was Mesquite ISD’s assistant superintendent for finance and operations.

11 Texas School Business JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2023
> See Who’s News, page 16
Who’s News > Continued from page 7

BOLD MOVES

Teacher shortages are not new news. They are, however, bad news for public schools. And the news keeps getting worse. According to TEA, 12% of Texas teachers left the profession following the 2021-22 school year. That’s the highest teacher attrition rate the agency has recorded in decades – maybe ever. It’s a fact that affects every Texas school district, regardless of size or location.

The COVID-19 pandemic serves as an easy scapegoat for this attrition, but it’s not the only factor causing an educator exodus. Teachers point to several factors, including health and safety along with low pay and a lack of support. While schools are powerless in stopping a global pandemic, districts are able to take steps to increase teacher retention. In a recent survey conducted by the Charles

Butt Foundation that asked teachers why they might consider leaving the profession, 97% of respondents said that a more positive working environment would keep them in the classroom longer.

Under the governor’s orders, the TEA has created the Teacher Vacancy Task Force, a group that’s looking into what can be done to address Texas’ teacher shortage. But many Texas school administrators are already tackling the issue, taking strides to address teachers’ needs so that they may better recruit and retain staff when they’re most needed.

A multitiered approach

In Quinlan ISD, east of Dallas, district administrators have created a multifaceted plan aimed at recruiting and retaining more teachers. Recruiting has been difficult for

the smaller district, which has to compete with nearby urban districts that are able to pay higher salaries. Before COVID-19 even hit the news, the district started working on incentive programs to entice and retain new and veteran teachers alike.

Some of the first elements the district implemented included a staff retention incentive. As part of this incentive, school board members visit campuses during the holiday season to hand out $2,000 checks. These go to not just teachers, but also custodians, bus drivers, and all other district employees. Trustees have been handing out these holiday checks for 10 years, and at the beginning of this school year, at the 2022 convocation, they surprised staff by handing out additional $1,000 checks to all returning district employees.

12 Texas School Business JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2023

Attract and retain top teachers

surrounding districts, the larger districts, it’s not equitable,” says Jeff Irvin, Quinlan ISD superintendent. “But when you start adding in the extra opportunities and incentives, it adds up.”

The district has also created an initiative called the Panther Path, with a goal of retaining staff. Administrators in the district say they’ve seen folks new to the career “get their feet wet” in Quinlan before heading off to a larger district. The Panther Path is designed to turn those new employees into longtime employees. Through the program, these employees can earn up to $10,000, spread out over five years, if they remain in the district.

“We see a benefit in retaining what we consider ‘our people,’” says John Milton, deputy superintendent. “The Panther Path is hopefully going to allow us to do that.”

Part of the Panther Path includes a paraprofessional to certification pathway, in partnership with Texas A&M UniversityCommerce, where paraprofessionals can take a fast track to earn their certifications and bachelor’s degrees and start classroom teaching.

All of these financial incentives have made a notable difference in the lives of Quinlan ISD staff, and in the district’s staff retention rates.

Since the 2020-21 school year, salaries in Quinlan ISD have increased by 14%, a significant difference. While some of this is due to the retention incentive checks, the district also applied for the optional Teacher Incentive Allotment (TIA) from TEA. While administrative staff in the district says the application and approval process was a challenge, the payoff is more than worth it.

Last year, Quinlan had 19 teachers qualify for the TIA, with three of them receiving the highest amount. The district gives teachers 100% of the allotment, while some districts choose to keep a portion. This means that in Quinlan, some teachers are able to earn an additional $26,000 per year from the allotment.

“That’s huge for teachers,” says Tiffony

Champan, director of school community relations. “Our intent was to stick with the TIA to show teachers that it was about them. It’s about keeping them and regarding them for what they do every day.”

Staff in Quinlan are also able to earn extra income through the district’s ACE (Afterschool Centers for Education) program, funded through a 21st Century Grant. ACE is an extracurricular program, held before and after school, where teachers can work to earn up to $45 per hour. The income is TRS eligible, and staff members in the district use it to supplement their regular income. Chapman says one teacher in the district was able to add nearly $18,000 to her annual salary through her time working in the ACE program.

“If you look at our pay versus some of the

“One of our teachers who earned the top tier [TIA] was going to retire,” says Courtney Painter, assistant superintendent of curriculum. “She has a daughter who was going to go to Texas A&M and she said, ‘I’ve got to find a job where I can pay for her college.’ She earned our top tier, where she got a check for $26,000 for the next five years. Well, guess what? We’re keeping her. And she’s able to pay for her daughter’s college in full.”

Quinlan also reimburses kindergarten through third-grade teachers for the time they spend completing the newly required Texas Reading Academies course. Teachers who complete the 60-hour course, pass it, and return to the district the following year earn an additional $2,000 in recognition of the time the course requires.

“In many districts, teachers aren’t compensated for that time,” Milton says. “We wanted to tell our employees that we appreciate them and value their time.”

13 Texas School Business JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2023
> See Bold moves, page 15
◄ Quinlan ISD Board President Kenny Stone (center) presents $2,000 retention checks to district staff.
14 Texas School Business JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2023

> Continued from page 12

While increased financial incentives are a large part of Quinlan’s plan to recruit and retain staff, they’re just the tip of the iceberg. District administrators have also made changes to overhaul the culture and working environment to benefit all employees.

For starters, they cut the instructional week from five to four days. When administrators approached teachers to ask them what they needed most, the number-one request was for more time. The district still offers support for families on Fridays, through the ACE program. And by freeing up a day for staff, the district has been able to recruit and retain more educators, especially veteran educators.

“Feedback from teachers has been very positive,” Milton says of the shortened school week. “We’ve seen academic gains, and increases in state testing, as well as daily work and assignments. We did not see any losses instructionally.”

The district makes sure to value this extra day, and administrators are only allowed to use two hours of teachers’ Friday time for meetings, with the rest open for planning, grading and communicating with parents. “Work teachers were normally doing on Saturdays and Sundays, they’re now doing on Friday,” Painter says. “So that’s been a positive.”

Quinlan is also working to grow and create staff in the district, through the Grow Your Own Teacher program. High school students work on their associate degrees through Parish Junior College, observing classes in the

district to determine if education might be the right field for them. After they graduate, the district encourages them to come work as paraprofessionals while either spending two years finishing the traditional college route or completing the fast track one-year program through Texas A&M-Commerce.

“We have a big group this year and we’re hoping to see that continue to grow,” Chapman says.

In addition to the opportunities for increased pay and education opportunities, Quinlan ISD hosts a daycare open to young children and grandchildren of staff members. With a cost of $18 per day, the daycare center has been named best daycare and best place of employment by the local paper, making it a popular perk with district employees.

Last but not least, the district offers a fitness center to employees, providing cardio equipment and weights and saving many the cost of a gym membership.

“We want our teachers to be healthy, physically, so that they can support the kids,” Milton says.

This multifaceted approach to teacher recruitment and retention has paid off in Quinlan. But besides just seeing more people apply to work in the district, administrators say applicants tend to be more experienced, with even veteran teachers choosing the district.

“The quality of applicants has been much better,” Painter says. And Milton agrees.

“A few years ago, every applicant had zero experience, and then we had the turnover on

▲ Stone distributes $2,000 retention

top of that, so we were just replacing them with other non-experienced teachers,” he says. “Now, the level and quality of teaching in the classroom has increased.”

The changes made in Quinlan ISD are not small, and they are not easy. Making teacher recruitment and retention a top priority required an intense commitment from administration, along with the flexibility and creativity to try things outside of the norm. But when the main goal is to reward teachers, to appreciate them and show thanks for the crucial work that they do, the team in Quinan says that commitment came easy.

“If you want to serve kids, you’re going to have to recruit and retain the very best teachers you can,” Irvin says. “To make that happen, it’s our responsibility to do anything we can do to make those people feel welcome and want to stay.”

15 Texas School Business JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2023
DACIA RIVERS is editorial director of Texas School Business. ▲ Quinlan ISD offers top-notch daycare for district staff members. checks to returning district staff.

Longview ISD

After six years with the district, assistant superintendent Dennis Williams has retired. Before joining Longview ISD, he was an educator in West Rusk, Arp, Marshall, Nacogdoches and Kilgore ISDs.

McKinney ISD

Amy Holderman, former principal of Bennett Elementary School, will next lead Frazier Elementary, a new campus set to open in the fall. She began her career as a teacher in Ector County ISD before joining McKinney ISD. Her bachelor’s degree was awarded from the University of Texas Permian Basin and her master’s degree in school administration from Dallas Baptist University.

Former Eddins Elementary School assistant principal Cari Owens has been promoted to principal. She brings 27 years of experience to her new job, eight of those as a campus administrator. She began her career in Louisiana, coming to Texas to work in Round Rock and Frisco ISDs. She holds a master’s degree in educational leadership from Concordia University.

Morgan ISD

Morgan ISD’s new superintendent is John Bullion. He was most recently special education liaison to the Texas Education Agency from Valley Mills ISD. He began his career as a teacher in the Bosque County Educational Coop, going on to serve as a counselor and special education director there.

Northside ISD (San Antonio)

Superintendent Brian Woods, who has led the district since 2012, has announced his intention to retire at the end of the current school year. He began his career in Northside ISD in 1992 as a teacher, going on to serve as an assistant and vice principal, principal and deputy superintendent before taking his most recent position.

The Northside ISD board of trustees has approved the following administrative appointments:

• Joe Bishop, associate principal, Briscoe Middle School;

• Johnnie Fair, assistant principal, Stevens High School;

• Jaime Heye, magnet director, Hobby Middle School;

• Theresa Long, academic dean, Jay High School;

• Randolph Neuenfeldt, assistant principal, Zachry Middle School;

• Jody Noblett, assistant principal, Northside Alternative High School;

• David Ornelas, director of integrated information services;

• Matthew Patty, magnet director, Zachry Middle School;

• Israel Perales, assistant principal, Taft High School;

• Veronica Poblano, principal, Zachry Middle School;

• Elizabeth Reed, academic dean, Stevenson Middle School;

• Jennifer Rios, associate principal, Taft High School;

• Loiselle Tejada, assistant principal, Jones Middle School.

Pine Tree ISD (Longview)

The new deputy superintendent, Jonathan Eggerman, comes to Pine Tree ISD from Hallsburg ISD, where he was superintendent and principal since 2021. He earned his master’s degree in educational leadership from Arkansas State University.

Plano ISD

Now serving as executive director of enterprise systems is Greg Grimes, a 21-year educator whose most recent assignment was director of information services in McKinney ISD.

Previously assistant principal of Frankford Middle School, Jordan Rios now serves as the district’s director of assessment. Prior to joining Plano ISD, she was a math, science and engineering teacher in CarrolltonFarmers Branch ISD, and led that district’s Math, Engineering, Technology and Science Academy at Turner High School.

Stacy Singleton, new director of expanded learning pathways, has 21 years of experience as an educator, the past two as the district’s college and career readiness advisor. He previously spent five years as Garland ISD’s success coordinator.

The new director of counseling services is Laura Zimmer, who had been serving as coordinator of that area. Before coming to Plano in 2021, she worked as a teacher and counselor in Garland, Irving and Rockwall ISDs.

Poolville ISD

Now serving as superintendent is Chris Pennington, who was the district’s director of operations.

Quitman ISD

Assistant superintendent Chris Mason has been promoted to district superintendent.

Richardson ISD

Mike Jasso, who from 2017 to 2021 was Richardson ISD’s executive director of the Berkner learning community, has returned to the district to serve as chief of staff. His most recent position was with Mesquite ISD, where he was assistant superintendent of personnel and administrative services.

Rio Hondo ISD

New superintendent

Raul Trevino has more than 20 years of experience as a teacher and administrator in Los Fresnos, San Benito and Santa Rosa ISDs. He previously worked in Rio Hondo ISD as junior high principal and was the district’s assistant superintendent of academics from 2018 to 2022. He holds a bachelor’s degree from the University of Texas Pan American and a master’s degree in education from the University of Texas at Brownsville.

Round Rock ISD

The district’s newly appointed senior chief of schools and innovation, Natalie Nichols, has 20 years of experience, 10 of them in Round Rock ISD. She served as an area superintendent from 2017 to 2021 and for the past six years was principal of Round Rock High School. She is a graduate of the University of Maryland with a master’s degree from Tarleton State University and a doctorate in education from Baylor University.

16 Texas School Business JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2023
Who’s News > Continued from page 11

Somerville ISD

A new superintendent is in place for the district.

Eric Holton, who has 10 years of experience in school administration, was most recently New Caney ISD’s high school principal. He is a graduate of Lamar University with a master’s degree from Stephen F. Austin State University and is nearing completion of his doctorate from the same institution.

Spring ISD

Spring ISD has announced the appointment of Christina Riojas as director of transportation. She began her career in education 25 years ago as a teacher in Aldine ISD, going on to serve as a head softball coach and assistant principal. In 2017, she became that district’s assistant director of transportation.

Temple ISD

Dawna Aleman has accepted the position of director of budget and compliance. She has more than 20 years of experience in the human resources and payroll fields and earned her bachelor’s degree and MBA from Texas A&M University of Central Texas.

Van Alstyne ISD

Jeff Burge has accepted the position of Van Alstyne ISD’s first police chief.

Wichita Falls ISD

A new chief of police is in place for Wichita Falls ISD. Anthony Smith comes to the district from Buna ISD, where he served in that position since 2021. He previously spent eight years with the Jasper police department.

Ysleta ISD (El Paso)

The Ysleta ISD board of trustees announces the appointment of Hugo Martinez as director of career and technical education, a position he had filled on an interim basis.

He began his career in 2006 as a business education teacher at Andress High School, going on to serve as a STEM coordinator. He holds a bachelor’s degree from the University of Texas at El Paso and a master’s degree in business administration from the University of Phoenix. ◄

Who’s News

Send news items for Who’s News directly to news@texasschoolbusiness.com

17 Texas School Business JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2023
Do you have good news to share about your district?

PRESIDENT PROFILE

Astoryteller at heart, Megan Overman, executive director of communications at Eagle Mountain-Saginaw (EMS) ISD, began her career as a reporter for the Fort Worth StarTelegram. Her beat included covering public education for the Hurst-Euless-Bedford school district where she was first introduced to the field of school public relations.

“At that time, I had no idea covering schools for a school district was even a career option,” Overman says. “I was so impressed with the public information officer I worked with regularly; she was always so helpful and kind, but also didn’t shy away from difficult questions or topics. She worked with me to tell stories about the district instead of against me, which from the reporter chair, was not always my experience.”

In 2000, Overman realized that she wanted to focus solely on public education, so when there was an available position at Birdville ISD, she made the transition.

“Twenty-two years later (and counting), the role in school public relations has evolved and, admittedly, become more challenging, but my inspiration still comes from the stories of determination, resilience, and success happening in classrooms across our district and state every day,” Overman says.

She later worked in Keller ISD before moving to Grapevine-

Eagle MountainSaginaw’s Megan Overman empowers next generation of school PR leaders

Colleyville ISD, where she served 10 years. In 2015, she joined EMS ISD and is now in her eighth year in the district and 22nd year as a school communications professional. She is a graduate of TCU’s Certified Public Communicator program, holds certification in reputation management from the Public Relations Society of America (PRSA), and is accredited in public relations through PRSA’s Universal Accreditation Board.

According to Overman, misinformation and misperceptions about public education in general are issues that school districts face today and have contributed to a variety of challenges seen in local schools across the state and nation.

“The multiple channels available for information to be distributed in today’s digital world has only added fuel to the wildfire, and what is purely speculation or opinion is being received as fact without any consideration of the source or possibility of inaccuracy,” she says. “This wild spread of half-truths is quickly eroding trust in the public education system. Overall, I believe people still support their child’s local school, but the bigger perspective about public education in our state and nation is being tainted and fighting that invisible enemy is taking a toll on the systems of support and, ultimately, the people who are called to prepare the next generation.”

Overman suggests that building relationships locally can help improve communication challenges.

18 Texas School Business JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2023

“This happens by opening lines of two-way communication, providing transparency about finances and operations, establishing and maintaining high expectations for safety and well-being, and creating opportunities for authentic community engagement,” she says. “Those in positions to fight the bigger battles on the state and national stage need the support and empowerment to effect change for public education, and we at the local level can contribute with grassroots efforts to take back the perceptions, awareness, and support of our local communities for their hometown schools.”

The same year Overman transitioned into school communications, she also joined the Texas School Public Relations Association (TSPRA) and has continued to be a member for the past 22 years.

“TSPRA has been a cornerstone of my professional and personal growth. It’s where I’ve met respected colleagues who are now lifelong friends and it’s an organization and statewide support system that I believe in with all my heart,” she says.

TSPRA offers job-specific professional development, mentoring and personalized support, sharing of ideas and best practices, and career advancement programming.

“There is a benefit for anyone working in a public relations, communications, marketing

or related leadership role in Texas public schools,” Overman says.

“One of the greatest benefits I have had is networking with bright minds from around the state and having connections with people who have experienced more and accomplished more than me. I learn so much from my TSPRA colleagues and, through our collective efforts, we are all working to further our mission of improving and enhancing communication between Texans and their public schools.”

TSPRA is transitioning to a new executive director and Overman’s work as incoming president will include onboarding and supporting that person to continue the growth and stability of the organization, honoring both its foundations and its future.

“We will continue to focus on providing relevant and engaging professional learning opportunities as well as a strong system of mentoring and personalized support for all our 1,000+ members,” said Overman. “Looking ahead, TSPRA must continue to serve as the resource for preparation in sound public relations practices while growing and empowering next generation of school PR leaders. I am honored that the membership has put their trust in me to be a small part of this big effort.”

Texas School Public Relations Association (TSPRA)

Mission: The Texas School Public Relations Association (TSPRA) is a professional organization whose members are dedicated to improving public education in Texas by: Promoting effective public relations practices

Providing professional development for its members

Improving communication between Texans and their public schools.

Membership: TSPRA members include public school personnel, foundation staff and boards, education associations, and businesses that serve schools and foundations.

Year Founded: 1962 Website: tspra.org

Passionate about creating great experiences

PreK-12

19 Texas School Business JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2023
Architecture ▪ Interior Design ▪ corgan.com
AUTUMN RHEA CARPENTER is a freelance journalist based in Portland, Oregon.
Top
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Architecture Firms in the U.S. Building Design + Construction

TEXAS ASCD MEMBERS GATHER FOR ANNUAL CONFERENCE

The Texas Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development hosted its yearly conference in Houston. Attendees gathered for professional learning opportunities, networking, receptions and more. All photos taken

▲ Dr. Eric Jensen, Jensen Learning, presents the Monday morning keynote, “Teaching with Poverty and Equity in Mind.”

◄ Thomas Murray, director of innovation for future-ready schools®, presents the Monday afternoon keynote, “Staying Personal and Authentic in the Midst of Adversity.”

► Dr. Kristin Rouleau, McRel International, director of learning services and innovation, presents the closing keynote, “Curiosity Driven Culture”.

20 Texas School Business JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2023
by Pam Dettwiler. Photo Feature From left: Donna Sheppard, Gena Gardiner, Dr. Elizabeth Clark, and Dr. Lisa Pedevilla join together at the Texas ASCD Leadership Luncheon. From left: Dr. Lupita Hinojosa, superintendent of schools, Spring ISD, and Dr. Susanne Carroll, Texas ASCD board president, visit before Dr. Hinojosa welcomes the conference attendees. Conference attendees participating in an ice-breaking activity and become part of the Texas ASCD Network.

▲ Dr. Chris Allen, Marble Falls ISD, provides an exuberant Superintendent’s Welcome on the first day of the 2022 Annual Conference in Houston.

▲ Texas ASCD Board Vice President Dr. Kim Lawson, chief academic officer, Fort Bend ISD, encourages conference attendees to attend the 2023 Annual Conference that will be held at the San Antonio Marriott Rivercenter next October.

21 Texas School Business JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2023
Lindsay Medina, Humble ISD, is recognized as Texas ASCD’s 2022 Secondary T.E.A.C.H. Award recipient. Dr. Karen Garza, Battelle for Kids CEO, presents the opening keynote, “Let’s Reimagine our Education System!” ▲ Sara Farag, Leander ISD, is recognized as Texas ASCD’s 2022 Elementary T.E.A.C.H. Award recipient. From left: Maggie Tucker, Emily Grisham, and Amy Chritian of W. C. Stripling Middle School, Fort Worth ISD, celebrate with glow sticks during the President’s Reception: Lighting the Way to Success.

REGIONAL VIEW Education service center programs & practices

Ready bodies, learning minds

Have you ever noticed a student falling out of the chair, having difficulty staying in the designated space, running into hallway walls versus walking in a line down the hallway, or having difficulty moving from one area of the room to another? If so, you see a child with an underdeveloped motor sensory and response system. Did you know that poor motor system development can lead to academic difficulties, such as reading and writing, or even managing their behavior?

One Region 7 school district recognized the positive impact of improving the motor and sensory development of students, thus enhancing their academic and behavioral skills. White Oak Elementary School has implemented

the Ready Bodies, Learning Mind© Motor Lab since 2006. What began as two teachers trained by the program’s author and creator, Athena Oden, PT, has led to a campus-wide implementation of intervention strategies to improve students’ motor development to help them better understand and control their bodies within the environment.

While there are varying ways to utilize the Ready Bodies, Learning Minds© Motor Lab in the school setting, White Oak Elementary, comprising the Primary (PK-2) and Intermediate (3-5) campuses, has implemented the program into weekly specials rotation. Each kindergarten through fifth-grade class attends the motor lab once a week. The motor lab’s design includes activities of varying

Students at White Oak Elementary School work in the Ready Bodies, Learning Mind© Motor Lab.

levels, all working together to improve students’ motor movements. For example, the task of writing is not simply picking up a writing tool and putting it on paper. It involves the coordination of multiple motor movements typically developed during the early years of life.

The physical process of writing involves bilateral coordination (the ability to coordinate both sides of the body for effective posture), holding the paper in place, moving the hand only, and making lines with the pencil to form letters. Additionally, students need the ability to cross midline. Can a student draw a line on their paper from left to right without moving their trunk? If not, this can create difficulties when writing and forming letters. Additionally, students need fine

22 Texas School Business JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2023

▲ Practicing motor tasks keeps students engaged and improves hand-eye coordination.

motor skills for writing, including pencil grasping, hand strength and control, and visual processing skills to distinguish different letters.

Students also need good hand-eye coordination and the ability to maintain attention for writing task completion. The philosophy behind practicing various motor movements is so all the movements listed above become developed. This automaticity of motor movements allows the child to think about the content instead of the needed skills for writing. The principal at White Oak Primary, Stephanie Bradley, stated the staff sees students’ gross motor skills often fail to keep up with the increases in academic expectations. Bradley emphasized that the Ready Bodies, Learning Minds© program helps develop the student’s motor skills development, positively affecting handwriting development, body control for sitting through academic lessons, and eye muscle control during reading.

Upon entering the Ready Bodies, Learning Minds© Motor Lab, the students move to a carpeted square identified by a letter. Coach Chelsea Lasick then has the students stand up and do a quick gross motor movement, such as jumping jacks, to prepare them to listen to the instructions before station rotation. Lasick provides station expectations of each station by modeling the correct way to perform each motor task. During the modeling, Lasick intertwines rich language and vocabulary concepts and math skills for the students to

practice and demonstrate their knowledge. The observed kindergarten class rotated stations every three minutes doing various tasks. Sample stations targeted motor skills, including balance and coordination of alternating movements (can stilts or cup walking); integration of hand-eye coordination (flip and catch, launching board, and ball bouncing); improvement of the upper body, trunk, and shoulder strength (tower building); and increasing overall understanding of the body in space (balance beam or ball bouncing). Lasick changes the activities in the motor lab every few weeks, and she adjusts the degree of difficulty for each grade level at each station.

Coach Lasick includes additional motor tasks at each station, requiring students to take turns, remain engaged, and eliminate student wait time to participate in the motor lab. Nina Peery, who began the Ready Bodies, Learning Mind Motor Lab© in the fall 2006 and is now a technology teacher at White Oak Intermediate, stated since starting the program, she noted an increase in students’ ability to regulate their behavior and attention. Peery continues incorporating motor development strategies in her current classroom.

Brandi Barlow, a teacher at White Oak Elementary since 2001 and is now a Dyslexia interventionist, and part of the referral team at the school, shared the additional changes she has seen through the years. The campus staff integrates motor development tasks throughout the

students’ day in various settings and ways. For the primary students, daily morning announcements include a time of motor activities to prepare students for learning. Barlow also discussed using a “motor hallway” developed to help students who may be at risk for learning difficulties. This hallway includes stations such as jumping on a mini trampoline while reading sight words, running in place while counting, or using different motor skills while walking along a sensory walkway. Barlow stated activities like these help students with attention and focus, sitting in a chair, and improving reading and writing skills.

White Oak Elementary has undoubtedly taken this concept beyond implementing the Ready Bodies, Learning Minds© Motor Lab into their weekly routine for all students. The district utilizes the same ideas as part of the Multi Tiered Systems of Support process to provide interventions for students at risk of learning or behavioral difficulties. By increasing students’ gross motor development skills, White Oak Elementary has seen improvements in all areas of learning across its campus.

Thank you to the staff and students at White Oak Elementary for sharing the successful outcomes experienced by Ready Bodies, Learning Minds© Motor Lab. Region 7 Education Service Center looks forward to hosting the Reading Bodies, Learning Minds seminar in the summer of 2023.

BRANDI BARLOW is a special education specialists for Region 7 ESC.

23 Texas School Business JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2023

Calendar

Professional development & events

FEBRUARY

February 1

TASB Superintendent Mock Interview Workshop

TASB offices, Austin

For more info, (512) 467-0222 or (800) 580-8272. www.tasb.org Cost: $25.

TASSP Professional Development Series: The EQ-uipped Leader (session 5 of 8)

Online

For more info, (512) 443-2100. www.tassp.org

Cost: No charge for TASSP members; nonmembers, $55 per person/per session or $199 for all 8 sessions; campus, $599 for all 8 sessions, provides 6 licenses or individual subscriptions; district, $1,499 for all 8 sessions, provides 15 licenses or individual subscriptions.

TASSP Regional Meeting, Region 1

Location TBA, Laredo area

For more info, (512) 443-2100. www.tassp.org

TETL Winter Summit

Hays CISD, Kyle

For more info, (855) 458-9286. www.tetl.org

February 1-2

TASA/N2 Learning Executive Leadership Institute (session 3 of 4)

Hilton Garden Inn, Austin

For more info, (972) 515-2268. https://www.n2learning.org

TASA/N2 Learning Principals’ Institute (session 4 of 6)

Hilton Garden Inn, Austin

For more info, (972) 515-2268. https://www.n2learning.org

February 2

TASBO Student Detail/Campus Summary/District Summary

Online

For more info, (512) 462-1711. www.tasbo.org

Cost: Members, $85; nonmembers, $135.

February 2-3

TASB Conference for Administrative Professionals

TASB offices, Austin

For more info, (512) 467-0222 or (800) 580-8272. www.tasb.org Cost: $179.

February 4

TEPSA Regional Meeting, Region 4

ESC 4, Houston

For more info, (512) 478-5268 or (800) 252-3621. www.tepsa.org

February 5-7

TASSP Assistant/Aspiring Principal Workshop

Hilton Airport, Austin

For more info, (512) 443- 2100. www.tassp.org

Cost: Early Bird registration (through Jan. 20): $275; after Jan. 20, $325.

February 6

TASBO Workshop: Budget and Financial Planning

ESC Region 10, Richardson

For more info, (512) 462-1711. www.tasbo.org

Cost: Members, $195; nonmembers, $245.

February 6-8

TCASE Great Ideas Annual Convention

Marriott Hotel, Austin

For more info, (512) 474-4492 or (888) 433-4492. www.tcase.org

Cost: School district employees (through Jan. 9): Members, $555 for pre-conference and main conference, $465 for main conference only; nonmembers, $630 for pre-conference and main conference, $540 for main conference only. Affiliates (through Jan. 9): Members, $715 for preconference and main conference; $625 for main conference only; nonmembers, $790 for preconference and main conference; $700 for main conference only.

February 7

TASA/N2 Learning Assistant Principal Leadership Academy, Corpus Christi/Victoria cohort (session 4 of 6)

Corpus Christi ISD, Corpus Christi

For more info, (972) 515-2268. https://www.n2learning.org

TASA/TASB/TASBO Budget Cohort for Texas District Leaders (session 5 of 8) Webinar

For more info, (512) 462-1711. http://bit.ly/budget-cohort-22-23

TASB Training: Asbestos Designated Person ESC Region 14, Abilene

For more info, (512) 467-0222 or (800) 580-8272. www.tasb.org

TASBO Webinar: Purchasing a School Bus Do’s and Don’ts Virtual event

For more info, (512) 462-1711. www.tasbo.org

February 8

TASA/N2 Learning Assistant Principal Leadership Institute, Houston area cohort (session 4 of 6)

Cypress-Fairbanks ISD, Cypress

For more info, (972) 515-2268. https://www.n2learning.org

TASB Training: Integrated Pest Management ESC Region 14, Abilene

For more info, (512) 467-0222 or (800) 580-8272. www.tasb.org

TASB Webinar: Preparing to Serve, a Webinar for School Board Candidates Virtual event

For more info, (512) 467-0222 or (800) 580-8272. www.tasb.org

TASSP Regional Meeting, Region 4

Lamar High School, Houston

For more info, (512) 443-2100. www.tassp.org

February 9

TASA/N2 Learning Assistant Principal Leadership Academy, virtual cohort (session 4 of 6) Virtual event

For more info, (972) 515-2268. https://www.n2learning.org

TASA Breakaway Leadership Program (session 2 of 6) Virtual event

For more info, (512) 852-2114. https://bit.ly/breakawayleadership

TASB Webinar: Understanding the FIE from Referral to IEP Virtual event

For more info, (512) 467-0222 or (800) 580-8272. www.tasb.org

TASSP Regional Meeting, Region 5

Buna High School, Buna

For more info, (512) 443-2100. www.tassp.org

February 9-10

Texas ASCD Transformative Principal Leadership Academy (session 2 of 3)

ESC Region 7, Kilgore

For more info, (512) 477-8200 or (800) 717-2723. www.txascd.org

February 10

TSPRA Regional Meeting, Central Texas area

Round Rock ISD, Round Rock

For more info, (512) 474-9107. www.tspra.org

February 11

TRTA Retirement Seminar Virtual event

For more info, (512) 476-1622 or (800) 880-1650. www.trta.org

February 12-14

TSCA Annual Professional School Counselor Conference

Kalahari Resort, Round Rock

For more info, (512) 472-3403. www.txca.org

Cost: Members, $180; nonmembers, $205.

February 13

TASBO CSRM Workshop: Handling School Risks

Gonzalez Convention Center, San Antonio

For more info, (512) 462-1711. www.tasbo.org

Cost: Members and nonmembers, $250.

February 14

TASA/TASB/TASBO Budget

Cohort for Texas District Leaders (session 6 of 8)

Gonzalez Convention Center, San Antonio

For more info, (512) 462-1711. http://bit.ly/budget-cohort-22-23

24 Texas School Business JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2023

TASBO CSRM Workshop: Funding School Risks

Gonzalez Convention Center, San Antonio

For more info, (512) 462-1711. www.tasbo.org

Cost: Members and nonmembers, $250.

February 15

TASB Webinar: Strong IEP Documentation is Strong SHARS Documentation

Virtual event

For more info, (512) 467-0222 or (800) 580-8272. www.tasb.org

TASSP Regional Meeting, Region 6

Location TBA, College Station area

For more info, (512) 443-2100. www.tassp.org

February 15-19

TABSE Annual Conference

Horseshoe Bay Resort, Horseshoe Bay

For more info, (937) 617-1706. www.tabse.net

February 16

TASA/N2 Learning Assistant Principal Leadership Academy, Dallas area cohort (session 4 of 6)

Allen ISD, Allen

For more info, (972) 515-2268. https://www.n2learning.org

February 20-23

TSPRA Annual Conference

Omni Downtown, Fort Worth

For more info, (512) 474-9107. www.tspra.org

Cost: Members, $550; nonmembers, $980.

February 21

TASA/N2 Learning Assistant Principal Leadership Academy, Austin/San Antonio cohort (session 4 of 6)

North East ISD, San Antonio

For more info, (972) 515-2268. https://www.n2learning.org

TASA/TASB Legislative Conference

Sheraton at the Capitol, Austin

For more info, (800) 580-4885. https://bit.ly/lege-conference

Cost: No charge for TASA or TASB members.

TASBO Workshop: Fiscal, State and Federal Grants Manual

ESC Region 6, Huntsville

For more info, (512) 462-1711. www.tasbo.org

Cost: Members, $235; nonmembers, $285.

TASSP Regional Meeting, Region 2

Location TBA, Corpus Christi area

For more info, (512) 443-2100. www.tassp.org

February 21-22

Texas ASCD Curriculum Leadership Academy 41 (session 3 of 3)

ESC Region 7, Kilgore

For more info, (512) 477-8200 or (800) 717-2723. www.txascd.org

February 22

TASSP Regional Meeting, Region 8

Zoom meeting

For more info, (512) 443-2100. www.tassp.org

TSPRA Regional Meeting, East Texas area

At the TSPRA Conference, Fort Worth

For more info, (512) 474-9107. www.tspra.org

February 22-23

TASA First-Time Superintendents Academy (session 4 of 4)

Marriott North, Round Rock

For more info, (512) 477-6361. http://bit.ly/ftsa-22-23

Register by Feb. 21: $295 (session 4 only); $845/$945 member/ nonmember (full academy).

TASB Workshop: Recruiting and Retaining School Employees

Virtual event

For more info, (512) 467-0222 or (800) 580-8272. www.tasb.org Cost: $225.

February 23

TEPSA Regional Meeting, Region 7

ESC 7, Kilgore

For more info, (512) 478-5268 or (800) 252-3621. www.tepsa.org

February 27

TASSP Workshop: Teacher Expression in the Classroom Webinar

For more info, (512) 443-2100. www.tassp.org

Texas PTA Rally Day Capitol Rotunda, Austin

For more info, (512) 320-9801. www.txpta.org

February 28

TASA Executive Leadership Group (session 5 of 6) Online

For more info, (512) 477-6361. https://bit.ly/tx-exec-lead-groups

TASA Virtual Book Study: Brené Brown’s Dare to Lead (session 1 of 5) Online

For more info, (512) 477-6361. https://bit.ly/spring-23-bookstudy

Cost: Free for TASA members.

February 28-March 1

THSADA Spring Sponsor Showcase

Convention Center, Waco

For more info, (832) 240-6550. www.thsada.com

February 28-March 2

TASA/CMSi Level 1 CMAT TASA offices, Austin

For more info, (512) 852-2145. http://bit.ly/cmsi-cmat Register by Feb. 10: Members, $800; nonmembers, $900.

MARCH

March 1

TASBO Workshop: Preparing for ESSER Compliance Review

ESC Region 7, Kilgore

For more info, (512) 462-1711. www.tasbo.org

Cost: Members, $235; nonmembers, $285.

TASSP Professional Development Series: The EQuipped Leader (session 6 of 8) Online

For more info, (512) 443-2100. www.tassp.org

Cost: No charge for TASSP members; nonmembers, $55/per person/per session or $199 for all 8 sessions; campus, $599 for all 8 sessions, provides 6 licenses or individual subscriptions; district, $1,499 for all 8 sessions, provides 15 licenses or individual subscriptions.

TASSP Regional Meeting, Region 3

Location TBA, El Campo area

For more info, (512) 443-2100. www.tassp.org

TASSP Regional Meeting, Region 13

Vista Ridge High School, Leander

For more info, (512) 443-2100. www.tassp.org

March 1-2

TASA Future-Ready Superintendents Leadership Network (session 3 of 3)

Blue Ridge ISD, Blue Ridge

For more info, (512) 477-6361. https://bit.ly/22-23-frsln-3

TASB Workshop: Understanding Compensation in Schools Virtual event

For more info, (512) 467-0222 or (800) 580-8272. www.tasb.org Cost: $225.

March 1-4

TASB Governance Camp, Powered by Student Voices Convention Center, Galveston

For more info, (512) 467-0222 or (800) 580-8272. www.tasb.org

Texas ASCD Curriculum Leadership Academy 40 (session 1 of 3)

Northside ISD, San Antonio

For more info, (512) 477-8200 or (800) 717-2723. www.txascd.org

March 2

TASBO Project Management Workshop

ESC Region 1, Edinburg

For more info, (512) 462-1711. www.tasbo.org

Cost: Members, $235; nonmembers, $285.

TASBO zWebinar: Student Attendance – Develop Your District Audit Box Checklist

Virtual event

For more info, (512) 462-1711. www.tasbo.org

Cost: Members, $85; nonmembers, $135.

March 5-7

TASSP Symposium: Making Middle School Matter Hilton Airport, Austin

For more info, (512) 443-2100. www.tassp.org

Cost: Early Bird registration (through Feb. 11): $280; after Feb. 11, $330.

March 7

TASB Training: Asbestos Designated Person

ESC Region 5, Beaumont

For more info, (512) 467-0222 or (800) 580-8272. www.tasb.org

TASBO Investment Training Workshop

TASBO offices, Austin

For more info, (512) 462-1711. www.tasbo.org

Cost: Members, $235; nonmembers, $285.

25 Texas School Business JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2023
> See Calendar, page 26

TEPSA Regional Meeting, Region 6

Top Golf, Spring

For more info, (512) 478-5268 or (800) 252-3621. www.tepsa.org

March 7-9

TASA/CMSi Level 2 CMAT Online

For more info, (512) 852-2145. http://bit.ly/cmsi-cmat Register by Feb. 17: Members, $800; nonmembers, $900.

March 8

TASB Training: Integrated Pest Management

ESC Region 5, Beaumont

For more info, (512) 467-0222 or (800) 580-8272. www.tasb.org

March 9

TASA Breakaway Leadership Program (session 3 of 6)

Virtual event

For more info, (512) 852-2114. https://bit.ly/breakawayleadership

TEPSA Regional Meeting, Region 3

ESC Region 3, Victoria

For more info, (512) 478-5268 or (800) 252-3621. www.tepsa.org

TSPRA Regional Meeting, Gulf Coast area

Virtual event

For more info, (512) 474-9107. www.tspra.org

March 9-11

Texas Caucus of Black School Board Members Education Summit

Kalahari Resort, Round Rock

For more info, (512) 467-0222 or (800) 580-8272. www.tasb.org

March 10

TSPRA Regional Meeting, Central Texas area

Hays CISD, Kyle

For more info, (512) 474-9107. www.tspra.org

March 20

TASB Spring Workshop

ESC Region 17, Lubbock

For more info, (512) 467-0222 or (800) 580-8272. www.tasb.org

TASBO Workshop: Preparing for ESSER Compliance Review

ESC 19, El Paso

For more info, (512) 462-1711. www.tasbo.org

Cost: Members, $235; nonmembers, $285.

March 21

TASB Training: Asbestos Designated Person

ESC Region 11, White Settlement

For more info, (512) 467-0222 or (800) 580-8272. www.tasb.org

TASBO Fiscal, State and Federal Grants Manual Workshop

ESC Region 19, El Paso

For more info, (512) 462-1711. www.tasbo.org

Cost: Members, $235; nonmembers, $285.

TASBO Webinar: A Hungry Child Cannot Learn Virtual event

For more info, (512) 462-1711. www.tasbo.org Cost: Members, $85; nonmembers, $135.

TASBO Workshop: Commodity Codes in Purchasing

ESC Region 11, White Settlement

For more info, (512) 462-1711. www.tasbo.org

Cost: Members, $235; nonmembers, $285.

TASA Virtual Book Study: Brené Brown’s Dare to Lead (session 2 of 5)

Online

For more info, (512) 477-6361. https://bit.ly/spring-23-book-study Cost: Free for TASA members.

March 22

TASB Training: Integrated Pest Management

ESC Region 11, White Settlement

For more info, (512) 467-0222 or (800) 580-8272. www.tasb.org

TASSP Regional Meeting, Region 14

Location TBA, Abilene area

For more info, (512) 443-2100. www.tassp.org

March 23

TEPSA Regional Meeting, Region 17

People’s Bank, Lubbock

For more info, (512) 478-5268 or (800) 252-3621.

TSPRA Regional Meeting, Houston/Beaumont area

Cypress-Fairbanks ISD, Cypress

For more info, (512) 474-9107. www.tspra.org

March 24

TSPRA Regional Meeting, North Texas area

Crowley ISD, Crowley

For more info, (512) 474-9107. www.tspra.org

March 26-28

TAGT Leadership Conference Marriott Champions Circle, Dallas

For more info, (512) 499-8248. www.txgifted.org

March 27

TASBO Workshop: Commodity Codes in Purchasing

Spring Valley Conference Center, Richardson

For more info, (512) 462-1711. www.tasbo.org Cost: Members, $235; nonmembers, $285.

March 28

TASB Spring Workshop

ESC Region 9, Wichita Falls

For more info, (512) 467-0222 or (800) 580-8272. www.tasb.org

TASBO Workshop: Long-Range Planning

ESC Region 1, Edinburg

For more info, (512) 462-1711. www.tasbo.org

Cost: Members, $195; nonmembers, $245.

March 28-29

TASA/N2 Learning Executive Leadership Institute

Hilton Park Cities, Dallas

For more info, (972) 515-2268. https://www.n2learning.org

TASA/N2 Learning Principals’ Institute (session 5 of 6) Hilton Park Cities, Dallas

For more info, (972) 515-2268. https://www.n2learning.org

TASBO Workshop: Hot Topics in School Finance

ESC Region 12, Waco

For more info, (512) 462-1711. www.tasbo.org Cost: Members, $335; nonmembers, $385.

March 28-30

TASA/CMSi Curriculum Writing Workshop

TASA offices, Austin

For more info, (512) 852-2145. https://bit.ly/curr-writing-wkshop Register by March 10: Members, $600; nonmembers, $650.

March 29

TASB Spring Workshop

Texas A&M University, Kingsville

For more info, (512) 467-0222 or (800) 580-8272. www.tasb.org

TASBO Workshop: Commodity Codes in Purchasing

Orozco Professional Development Complex, Pasadena

For more info, (512) 462-1711. www.tasbo.org

Cost: Members, $235; nonmembers, $285.

TASBO Workshop: Intermediate Governmental Accounting

ESC Region 1, Edinburg

For more info, (512) 462-1711. www.tasbo.org

Cost: Members, $195; nonmembers, $245.

TASSP Regional Meeting, Region 15 Location TBA, San Angelo area

For more info, (512) 443-2100. www.tassp.org

TASSP Regional Meeting, Region 18 Location TBA, Midland/Odessa area

For more info, (512) 443-2100. www.tassp.org

TCASE Ignite Academy for New and Aspiring Directors (session 6 of 9) Virtual event

For more info, (512) 474-4492 or (888) 433-4492. www.tcase.org

Cost: Administrator and associate members, $1,070 for full academy; nonmembers, $1,270.

March 29-30

TASBO Workshop: Leadership Fundamentals

Frenship ISD, Wolfforth

For more info, (512) 462-1711. www.tasbo.org Cost: Members, $550; nonmembers, $600.

TASA Texas Public Accountability Consortium (TPAC) (meeting 2 of 2) Holdsworth Center, Austin

For more info, (512) 852-2122. http://bit.ly/tpac-2022

March 30

2022-23

Hanover Superintendents Leadership Council Meeting

“Marketing and Advocating for Your District”

Online

https://bit.ly/SLC-registration Cost: Free for TASA members.

APRIL

April 3

TASBO Workshop: Getting Things Done

Katy ISD, Katy

For more info, (512) 462-1711. www.tasbo.org

Cost: Members, $375; nonmembers, $425.

26
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> Continued from page 25

April 3-4

TASBO Academy: 2023 Bonds, Buildings and Beyond

Marriott North, Round Rock

For more info, (512) 462-1711. www.tasbo.org

Cost: Members, $335; nonmembers, $385.

TASBO Construction Academy

Marriott North, Round Rock

For more info, (512) 462-1711. www.tasbo.org

Cost: Members, $335; nonmembers, $385.

April 4

TASA/N2 Learning Assistant Principal Leadership Academy, Austin/San Antonio cohort (session 5 of 6)

North East ISD, San Antonio

For more info, (972) 515-2268. https://www.n2learning.org

TASA Virtual Book Study: Brené Brown’s Dare to Lead (session 3 of 5)

Online

For more info, (512) 477-6361. https://bit.ly/spring-23-bookstudy

Cost: Free for TASA members.

TASBO Webinar: CTE Student Business – Tracking Revenues and Costs

Virtual event

For more info, (512) 462-1711. www.tasbo.org

Cost: Members, $85; nonmembers, $135.

April 4-5

TASBO Training: Leadership Fundamentals

CORE corporate offices, Frisco

For more info, (512) 462-1711. www.tasbo.org

Cost: Members, $550; nonmembers, $600.

April 5

TASBO Workshop: Project Management

ESC Region 11, White Settlement

For more info, (512) 462-1711. www.tasbo.org

Cost: Members, $235; nonmembers, $285.

TASSP Professional Development Series: The EQ-uipped Leader (session 7 of 8)

Online

For more info, (512) 443-2100. www.tassp.org

Cost: No charge for TASSP members; nonmembers, $55/per person/per session or $199 for all 8 sessions; campus, $599 for all 8 sessions, provides 6 licenses or individual subscriptions; district, $1,499 for all 8 sessions,

provides 15 licenses or individual subscriptions.

TASSP Regional Meeting, Region 9

ESC Region 9, Wichita Falls

For more info, (512) 443-2100. www.tassp.org

TASSP Regional Meeting, Region 17

Location TBA, Lubbock area

For more info, (512) 443-2100. www.tassp.org

TEPSA Regional Meeting, Region 9

ESC 9, Wichita Falls

For more info, (512) 478-5268 or (800) 252-3621. www.tepsa.org

April 6

TASA/N2 Learning Assistant

Principal Leadership Academy, virtual cohort (session 5 of 6) Virtual event

For more info, (972) 515-2268. https://www.n2learning.org

April 10

TASSP Regional Meeting, Region 19

Location TBA, El Paso area

For more info, (512) 443-2100. www.tassp.org

April 11

TASB Training: Asbestos Designated Person

ESC Region 16, Amarillo

For more info, (512) 467-0222 or (800) 580-8272. www.tasb.org

TASBO CSRM Workshop: Administering School Risks in Insurance

TASBO offices, Austin

For more info, (512) 462-1711. www.tasbo.org

Cost: Members and nonmembers, $250.

April 11-12

TASBO Workshop: Leadership Fundamentals

ESC Region 2, Corpus Christi

For more info, (512) 462-1711. www.tasbo.org

Cost: Members, $550; nonmembers, $600.

April 12

TASA/N2 Learning Assistant

Principal Leadership Academy, Houston area cohort (session 5 of 6)

Cypress-Fairbanks ISD, Cypress

For more info, (972) 515-2268. https://www.n2learning.org

TASB Spring Workshop

ESC Region 4, Houston

For more info, (512) 467-0222 or (800) 580-8272. www.tasb.org

TASB Training: Integrated Pest Management

ESC Region 16, Amarillo

For more info, (512) 467-0222 or (800) 580-8272. www.tasb.org

TASSP Regional Meeting, Region 16

Location TBA, Amarillo area

For more info, (512) 443-2100. www.tassp.org

TSPRA Regional Meeting, Gulf Coast area

Aransas County ISD, Rockport

For more info, (512) 474-9107. www.tspra.org

April 13

TASA/N2 Learning Assistant Principal Leadership Academy, Corpus Christi/Victoria cohort (session 5 of 6)

Corpus Christi ISD, Corpus Christi

For more info, (972) 515-2268. https://www.n2learning.org

TASA/N2 Learning Assistant Principal Leadership Academy, Dallas area cohort (session 5 of 6) Allen ISD, Allen

For more info, (972) 515-2268. https://www.n2learning.org

TASB Webinar: Documentation Review – What Have We Learned and What Can We Do? Virtual event

For more info, (512) 467-0222 or (800) 580-8272. www.tasb.org

April 13-14

Texas ASCD Transformative Principal Leadership Academy (session 3 of 3) ESC Region 7, Kilgore

For more info, (512) 477-8200 or (800) 717-2723. www.txascd.org

April 14

TSPRA Regional Meeting, Central Texas area Pflugerville ISD, Pflugerville For more info, (512) 474-9107. www.tspra.org

TSPRA Regional Meeting, North Texas area Carrollton-Farmers Branch, Carrollton For more info, (512) 474-9107. www.tspra.org

April 17

TASBO Webinar: Are Your District’s Service Records in Compliance?

Virtual event

For more info, (512) 462-1711. www.tasbo.org Cost: Members, $235; nonmembers, $285.

TASBO Webinar: Developing a Fiscal Manual

Virtual event

For more info, (512) 462-1711. www.tasbo.org Cost: Members, $235; nonmembers, $285.

April 18

TASA/TASB/TASBO Budget Cohort for Texas District Leaders (session 7 of 8) Webinar

For more info, (512) 462-1711. http://bit.ly/budget-cohort-22-23

TASA Executive Leadership Group (session 6 of 6)

Online

For more info, (512) 477-6361. https://bit.ly/tx-exec-lead-groups

TASA Virtual Book Study: Brené Brown’s Dare to Lead (session 4 of 5)

Online

For more info, (512) 477-6361. https://bit.ly/spring-23-bookstudy Cost: Free for TASA members.

TASSP Regional Meeting, Region 10

Allen High School, Allen For more info, (512) 443-2100. www.tassp.org

April 19

TASB SHARS Matters Webinar: Third Party Liability Virtual event

For more info, (512) 467-0222 or (800) 580-8272. www.tasb.org

TASBO Workshop: Accounts Payable Processes

ESC Region 10, Richardson

For more info, (512) 462-1711. www.tasbo.org

Cost: Members, $195; nonmembers, $245.

TASBO Workshop: Effective Advocacy – Navigating the Political Process

ESC Region 1, Edinburg

For more info, (512) 462-1711. www.tasbo.org

Cost: Members, $195; nonmembers, $245.

27 Texas School Business JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2023
> See Calendar, page 28

TASSP Regional Meeting, Region 12

Midway High School, Hewitt

For more info, (512) 443-2100. www.tassp.org

April 19-20

TASB Workshop: Managing Personnel Records Virtual event

For more info, (512) 467-0222 or (800) 580-8272. www.tasb.org Cost: $225.

April 19-21

TASB Legal Services School Law Boot Camp

TASB offices, Austin

For more info, (512) 467-0222 or (800) 580-8272. www.tasb.org

April 20

TASA Breakaway Leadership Program (session 4 of 6)

Virtual event

For more info, (512) 852-2114. https://bit.ly/breakawayleadership

TASBO Workshop: Intermediate Governmental Accounting

ESC Region 1, Edinburg

For more info, (512) 462-1711. www.tasbo.org Cost: Members, $195; nonmembers, $245.

TSPRA Regional Meeting, Houston/Beaumont area

Spring ISD, Houston

For more info, (512) 474-9107. www.tspra.org

April 24

TASSP Regional Meeting, Region 7

Whitehouse High School, Whitehouse

For more info, (512) 443-2100. www.tassp.org

April 25

TASB Training: Asbestos Designated Person

ESC Region 12, Waco

For more info, (512) 467-0222 or (800) 580-8272. www.tasb.org

TASBO Workshop: Commodity Codes in Purchasing

Teachup Spring Learning Center, Houston

For more info, (512) 462-1711. www.tasbo.org

Cost: Members, $235; nonmembers, $285.

April 26

TASB Training: Integrated Pest Management

ESC Region 12, Waco

For more info, (512) 467-0222 or (800) 580-8272. www.tasb.org

TCASE Ignite Academy for New and Aspiring Directors (session 7 of 9)

Virtual event

For more info, (512) 474-4492 or (888) 433-4492. www.tcase.org

Cost: Administrator and associate members, $1,070 for full academy; nonmembers, $1,270.

April 26-27

TASBO Academy: Texas School Records Management

Embassy Suites Convention Center, Denton

For more info, (512) 462-1711. www.tasbo.org

Cost: Members, $335; nonmembers, $385.

April 27

TASBO Workshop: Fiscal, State and Federal Grants Manual

Hattie Mae White Education Center, Houston

For more info, (512) 462-1711. www.tasbo.org

Cost: Members, $235; nonmembers, $285.

TASBO Workshop: Intermediate Governmental Accounting

ESC Region 18, Midland

For more info, (512) 462-1711. www.tasbo.org

Cost: Members, $195; nonmembers, $245.

MAY May 2

TASA Virtual Book Study: Brené Brown’s Dare to Lead (session 5 of 5)

Online

For more info, (512) 477-6361. https://bit.ly/spring-23-bookstudy

Cost: Free for TASA members.

May 2-3

TASBO Workshop: Leadership Fundamentals

ESC Region 12, Waco

For more info, (512) 462-1711. www.tasbo.org

Cost: Members, $550; nonmembers, $600.

May 3

TASSP Professional Development Series: The EQ-uipped Leaders (session 8 of 8) Online

For more info, (512) 443-2100. www.tassp.org

Cost: No charge for TASSP members; nonmembers, $55 per person/per session or $199 for all 8 sessions; campus, $599 for all 8 sessions, provides 6 licenses or individual subscriptions; district, $1, 499 for all 8 sessions, provides 15 licenses or individual subscriptions.

May 4-5

TASB SHARS Conference

TASB offices, Austin

For more info, (512) 467-0222 or (800) 580-8272. www.tasb.org

May 5

TASBO Workshop: Advanced Financial Concepts

ESC Region 1, Edinburg

For more info, (512) 462-1711. www.tasbo.org

Cost: Members, $195; nonmembers, $245.

TASSP Regional Meeting, Region 11

Joe T. Garcia’s, Fort Worth

For more info, (512) 443-2100. www.tassp.org

May 9

TASB Spring Workshop

ESC Region 19, El Paso

For more info, (512) 467-0222 or (800) 580-8272. www.tasb.org

TASB Spring Workshop

Stephen F. Austin State University, Nacogdoches

For more info, (512) 467-0222 or (800) 580-8272. www.tasb.org

TASBO Workshop: Getting Things Done

TASBO offices, Austin

For more info, (512) 462-1711. www.tasbo.org

Cost: Members, $375; nonmembers, $425.

TASBO Workshop: HR Management for Maintenance and Operations

ESC Region 1, Edinburg

For more info, (512) 462-1711. www.tasbo.org

Cost: Members, $195; nonmembers, $245.

TASBO Webinar: Food Agriculture

Literacy – Farm to School Beyond the Plate

Virtual event

For more info, (512) 462-1711. www.tasbo.org

Cost: Members, $85; nonmembers, $135.

May 10

TASB Spring Workshop

ESC Region 14, Abilene

For more info, (467-0222 or (800) 580-8272. www.tasb.org

TASBO Workshop: Financial Coding for Texas Schools

ESC Region 10, Richardson

For more info, (512) 462-1711. www.tasbo.org

Cost: Members, $195; nonmembers, $245.

May 11

TASA Breakaway Leadership Program (session 5 of 6)

Virtual event

For more info, (512) 852-2114. https://bit.ly/breakaway-leadership

TASB Spring Workshop

ESC Region 6, Huntsville

For more info, (512) 467-0222 or (800) 580-8272. www.tasb.org

May 15

TASB Spring Workshop

Iraan-Sheffield ISD, Iraan-Sheffield

For more info, (512) 467-0222 or (800) 580-8272. www.tasb.org

May 16

TASB Spring Workshop

Location TBA, Alpine

For more info, (512) 467-0222 or (800) 580-8272. www.tasb.org

TASB Spring Workshop

Texas A&M University, Commerce

For more info, (512) 467-0222 or (800) 580-8272. www.tasb.org

May 17

TASB SHARS Matters Webinar: Documentation Requirements and Best Practices

Virtual event

For more info, (512) 467-0222 or (800) 580-8272. www.tasb.org

TASB Spring Workshop

West Texas A&M University, Canyon

For more info, (512) 467-0222 or (800) 580-8272. www.tasb.org

28
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Texas School Business
2023
> Continued from page 27

TASBO

Workshop: Fiscal, State and Federal Grants Manual

TASBO offices, Austin

For more info, (512) 462-1711. www.tasbo.org

Cost: Members, $235; nonmembers, $285.

TCASE Ignite Academy for New and Aspiring Directors (session 8 of 9)

Virtual event

For more info, (512) 474-4492 or (888) 433-4492. www.tcase.org

Cost: Administrator and associate members, $1,070 for full academy; nonmembers, $1,270.

May 17-18

Texas ASCD Curriculum Leadership Academy 40 (session 2 of 3)

Northside ISD, San Antonio

For more info, (512) 477-8200 or (800) 717-2723. www.txascd.org

May 18

May 19

TSPRA Regional Meeting, Gulf Coast Area Virtual event

For more info, (512) 474-9107. www.tspra.org

May 19-20

TASB Spring Workshop

Convention Center, South Padre Island

For more info, (512) 467-0222 or (800) 580-8272. www.tasb.org

May 23

TASB Spring Workshop

ESC Region 12, Waco

For more info, (512) 467-0222 or (800) 580-8272. www.tasb.org

May 24 2022-23 Hanover Superintendents Leadership Council Meeting “Focusing Your System on Curriculum & Instruction”

Online

TASBO

Workshop: Commodity Codes in Purchasing

Frenship ISD, Wolfforth

For more info, (512) 462-1711. www.tasbo.org

Cost: Members, $235; nonmembers, $285.

https://bit.ly/SLC-registration Cost: Free for TASA members.◄

29 Texas School Business JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2023
Building An Interoperable Digital Ecosystem for Optimal Outcomes January 30th, 2023 • 9:30-10:30AM Austin Convention Center 13A Dr. Shannon Terry SAFARI Montage Vice President of National Strategic Accounts
Rankin
ISD Director of Instructional Technology SAFARI Montage is the Leading K-12 Learning Object Repository LEARN MORE I found it in Texas School Business ! Discover upcoming conferences and continuing education opportunities in the calendar section of each issue of Texas School Business and on our website. TexasSchoolBusiness.com Where did you find that great conference?
Darlene
Katy

The Principals’ Institute (PI) is a year-long professional development series that provides a unique opportunity for principals to understand why transformation of public education is necessary. PI is designed to help principals develop the knowledge and skills required to be transformational leaders and to help build the capacity it takes to sustain transformation over time. The PI experience includes exposure to influential superintendents and speakers, such as Eric Sheninger, Rob Evans, George Couros, Dwight Carter, John Tanner, Jimmy Casas, and Joe Sanfelippo.

Logistics:

• Registration Fee: $6,000.00 per participant (excluding travel expenses)

• Six, 2-day sessions alternating between Austin, Dallas, and Houston

The Executive Leadership Institute (ELI) is designed to build the capacity of district executive leaders for system-wide improvements in teaching and learning. Sessions will include opportunities for leaders to cultivate strategic approaches and actions in order to support district transformational efforts. The ELI experience includes exposure to influential superintendents and speakers, such as Eric Sheninger, Rob Evans, George Couros, John Tanner, Jimmy Casas, and Joe Sanfelippo. In addition to the scheduled sessions, each participant will receive the support of an Executive Coach throughout the year.

Logistics:

• Registration Fee: $4,500.00 per participant (excluding travel expenses)

• Four, 2-day sessions alternating between Austin, Dallas, and Houston

The Assistant Principal Leadership Academy (APL) provides learning opportunities to develop, challenge, and inspire assistant principals to be transformative leaders. APL participants will engage in processes which support the development of skills specific to transformational leadership and building a learning organization while preparing them for the role of principal.

Logistics:

• Registration Fee: in-person sessions - $1,000 per participant (excluding travel expenses); virtual sessions - $1,000 per participant

• Six, 4-hour sessions throughout the year

The Teacher Leadership Institute (TLI) is a boundarybreaking institute for classroom teachers. Throughout the 6 sessions, committed teachers are empowered to revitalize learning cultures while leaning N2 an inspired future. Centered on teacher voice and grounded in a foundation of collaboration, the Teacher Leadership Institute challenges teachers to move beyond accountability standards and toward innovative learning that ignites student engagement.

Logistics:

•Customized for individual districts or regional consortiums of districts

•Six full day sessions

30 Texas School Business JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2023
Find out more about our partner initiatives with TASA at www.N2learning.org

There’s more to life than just answers

As I listened to the young man talking to his mother, I was totally intrigued by what I heard.

“Mom, why do I even need to go to school? Any math problem can instantly be solved on my telephone. If I want information about any subject, all I have to do is type my question into Google and everything pops up on the screen. This is the Information Age, Mom, and it’s right here in the palm of my hand!”

“You may be right, Son. I’ve been thinking about letting you stay home, anyway. Maybe it’s time we looked into that.”

This conversation really got me to thinking. How foolish of parents, or anyone else for that matter, to actually believe that knowledge is the only thing that educators dispense.

Let’s just elaborate on a few of these other attributes of having a teacher in one’s life.

We’ll begin with the first thing that happens when a student walks into a master teacher’s classroom. The student is typically greeted with a comment such as, “Hey, how are you today?” or “Missed you yesterday. Hope you’re feeling better.”

No computer ever gives a student that kind of a compassionate and caring welcome to class. Speaking of compassion, would a computer ever pull a child aside and offer condolences in the loss of one of his parents? That could be one of the most meaningful and memorable times in the student’s life.

I have yet to deal with a student who did not benefit from encouragement. That “paton-the-back” or the casual “I’m so proud of you,” can turn a child’s skills in an entirely new direction. I do not recall a computer or cellphone ever making a statement such as this that was truly believable and heartfelt.

And without a teacher, who’s going to patiently explain when the student does not grasp a new concept? How many times a day does a teacher interact with a student who

is having difficulty? I think we would all be surprised at that number.

I think back on the teachers who made a lasting impression on me. I’ve written numerous times about my sixth-grade teacher, Mrs. Huff, who encouraged me to go into education. Miss MacIntosh spurred my love of music. Mr. Lowe gave me responsibilities in the classroom that boosted my self-esteem. Mrs. O’Brien helped develop my love for journalism during my five years on the yearbook staff. Miss Yell gave me my love of reading.

There are scores of other teachers, educators, professors and lay-people who have significantly impacted my life, and I am sure that the same is true for anyone reading this.

Just a few days ago, I spent 15 to 20 minutes in the front yard helping a 6-year-old neighbor boy learn to count. It took some patience on my part, of course, but eventually we made it to 100! I have not seen that excitement from another individual in a long time. As we reached that pivotal magic number, he let out a hoop and a holler that startled even me! Immediately he started running toward home, jumping and yelling as he went.

“Mom! Dad! I did it! I counted to 100 for the first time in my life!”

Now, convince me that you would ever get that kind of excitement without a strong relationship between the student and his teacher.

Oh, don’t get me wrong. Technology is wonderful. But it’s like so many things in life: It’s just better when you have someone to share it with.

Even Bill Gates agrees, I believe. He is quoted as saying, “Technology is just a tool. In terms of getting the kids working together and motivating them, the teacher is the most important.”

And with that, I rest my case.

two books and a frequent public speaker. To invite him to speak at your convocation, graduation or awards banquet, visit www.rineyjordan.com.

31 Texas School Business JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2023
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