January/February 2022 Texas School Business

Page 1

69

YEARS

The News Magazine for Public Education in Texas

Texas School Business

JAN / FEB

2022

A circle of trust

Texas schools improve culture and morale through restorative practices

Also in this issue:

TCASE President Michele McKinley TSPRA President Rebecca Villarreal


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Texas School Business JANUARY / FEBRUARY 2022

12 Cover Story

18

A circle of trust Texas schools improve culture and morale through restorative practices

TCASE President Profile Manor ISD’s Michele McKinley leads TCASE with a focus on equity for students with disabilities

by Dacia Rivers

by James Golsan

20 TSPRA President Profile Rebecca Villarreal, communications jack of all trades, serves as TSPRA president

Departments 7 Who’s News 26 Calendar 30 Ad Index

Photo Feature

16 Texas ASCD

Columns

5 From the Editor by Dacia Rivers 9 The Law Dawg— Unleashed by Jim Walsh 22 Student Voices 30 The Back Page by Riney Jordan

by James Golsan

The views expressed by columnists and contributing writers do not necessarily reflect those of the publisher or Texas School Business advertisers. The publisher also makes no endorsement of the advertisers or advertisements in this publication.



From the editor

I

hope this new year finds you healthy, rested and refreshed. And if not, hey, there’s only a few more weeks until spring break!

In all seriousness, it’s our hope to inform and inspire you in these pages, with good news about the amazing things happening in Texas’ public schools. In this issue, we have a feature article on restorative discipline practices, a forwardthinking approach to relationship-building that Texas schools are implementing with aplomb. We’ve also got a wonderful Student Voices column, including several submissions from students involved in the cutting-edge (pun intended) barbering academy in Spring ISD. And as always, we have informative and inspirational articles from our resident Law Dawg, Jim Walsh, and the always uplifting Riney Jordan. If there’s something going on in your school district that you’d like to see covered in the pages of Texas School Business, please don’t hesitate to drop me a line at drivers@texasschoolbusiness.com. It’s what we’re here for.

Texas School Business

JANUARY / FEBRUARY 2022 Volume LXIX, Issue 1 406 East 11th Street Austin, Texas 78701 Phone: 512-477-6361 www.texasschoolbusiness.com EDITORIAL DIRECTOR

Dacia Rivers

Dacia Rivers Editorial Director

DESIGN

Phaedra Strecher COLUMNISTS

Riney Jordan Alice Owen Jim Walsh

ADVERTISING SALES

Jennifer Garrido

TEXAS ASSOCIATION OF SCHOOL ADMINISTRATORS EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR

Kevin Brown

DIRECTOR OF COMMUNICATIONS AND MEDIA RELATIONS

Amy Francisco

Texas School Business (ISSN 0563-2978) is published online bimonthly with a special edition, Bragging Rights, in December, by the Texas Association of School Administrators. © Copyright 2022 Texas Association of School Administrators

Texas School Business JANUARY / FEBRUARY 2022

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Texas School Business JANUARY / FEBRUARY 2022


Who’s News Abilene ISD Alison Sims, who has worked

in the district for two decades, has been named associate superintendent for human resources. Initially a classroom teacher, she spent eight years as a counselor and accepted her first principalship in 2015. She is a graduate of Hardin-Simmons University, where she also earned a master’s degree in counseling and human development.

Caldwell ISD

Conroe ISD

New superintendent James Barton comes to Caldwell from San Marcos CISD, where he was assistant superintendent for business and support services. He began his career in San Antonio’s North East ISD, spending 17 years as a teacher, coach and campus administrator. He received his bachelor’s degree and master’s degree in educational leadership from the University of Texas at San Antonio and his doctorate in education from Lamar University.

Scott Moore, first vice president of Conroe ISD’s board of trustees, has been elected to a one-year term on the Texas Association of School Boards (TASB), representing TASB Region 6. He was first elected to the board of trustees in 2016 and was reelected in 2020.

Canutillo ISD (El Paso) Canutillo ISD board of trustees member

Aldine ISD LeAnnda Chenier-Ashley is

the new principal of Gray Elementary School, where she previously served as an assistant principal. She began her career as a teacher in the district in 1998. She is a graduate of Northwestern State University and holds two master’s degrees, in counseling and educational administration, from Prairie View A&M University. Now serving as principal of Hall Success Academy is Cierra Nickerson, who began her career in the district 12 years ago. Initially a member of Teach for America, she joined Houston ISD, where she was a magnet coordinator and assistant principal recruiter, before working with the Harris County Department of Education. The district’s new director of college readiness is Susana Velis, a product of Aldine ISD schools with a bachelor’s degree from the University of Texas and a master’s degree in counselor education and school counseling from the University of St. Thomas. She joined Aldine ISD in 2005.

Bryan ISD After 10 years leading the Vikings football program at Bryan High School, head coach and athletic coordinator Ross Rogers has announced his retirement. During his 34-year career, he also served as head coach in Hempstead, Waller, Giddings, College Station and Killeen ISDs. He is a 2011 inductee into the Texas High School Coaches Association Hall of Fame.

Calallen ISD (Corpus Christi) Superintendent Arturo Almendarez, who has led Calallen ISD for 27 years, has announced he will retire at the end of January. He has been an educator for more than five decades.

Armando Rodriguez has

been elected to serve as second vice-president, representing Region 19, of the Texas Association of School Boards (TASB). Now in his fifth term on CISD’s board, he has served as its secretary, vice-president and president.

Carroll ISD Former Eubanks Intermediate School assistant principal Nikki Leonard now holds this position at Dawson Middle School.

Cedar Hill ISD The district’s new transportation director is Jonquez Moore, who comes to Cedar Hill from San Antonio’s North East ISD, where he was a transportation supervisor. He began his career as a teacher and coach in Louisiana.

Cleveland ISD Stephen McCanless has accepted the position of interim superintendent of Cleveland ISD. He is an eight-year employee of the district, most recently serving as executive director of operations. He previously worked in Deer Park and Channelview ISDs.

After three years at the helm of Cleveland ISD, superintendent Chris Trotter has retired, bringing to a close a 31-year career in public education.

Corpus Christi ISD The new principal of Allen Elementary School is Jennifer Allen-Perez, former assistant principal of Oak Park Elementary. She is a 17year employee of the district, previously serving an interim and part-time principal at Baker Middle School. Christine Bernal has been

promoted from assistant principal to principal of Shaw Elementary School. She has spent her 18-year career with the district, previously working as a teacher and instructional teaching advisor.

Dallas ISD Superintendent

Michael Hinojosa has been

named one of 17 outstanding Latino educators by the Association of Latino Administrators and Superintendents (ALAS). The award was presented during the association’s annual national gala and awards dinner in October in Washington, D.C. Hinojosa was chosen to receive the ALAS National Humanitarian Award.

Decatur ISD Chad Jones is now superintendent of Decatur ISD. He spent the past three years as superintendent of Sinton ISD and previously led West Hardin County CISD and Iola ISD. The University of Oklahoma graduate earned his master’s degree in educational leadership from East Central University and his doctorate in the same field from Sam Houston State University.

Denton ISD New Harpool Middle School principal Colleen Grindle joined the district in 2006 and has served as Guyer High School’s associate principal since 2020. She has a bachelor’s degree > See Who’s News, page 11 Texas School Business JANUARY / FEBRUARY 2022

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Texas School Business JANUARY / FEBRUARY 2022


THE LAW DAWG – UNLEASHED

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Respect for the common good

T

by Jim Walsh

here is much talk of infrastructure these days. During last February’s epic “snowmageddon,” Mrs. Dawg and I huddled around the fireplace for three days, shivering in the cold and bemoaning the lack of power. Millions across the Lone Star State were doing the same, and many of them had it a lot worse than we did. Then began the blame game. Now we are in another winter, hoping that the infrastructure of power plants and pipelines will hold. But that is not the only infrastructure we need to care for. Wikipedia defines “infrastructure” as “the set of fundamental facilities and systems that support the sustainable functionality of households and firms.” One of those fundamental systems is education. Pipelines convey power. Education conveys knowledge and skills that we have spelled out in detail in the TEKS. On top of that, it conveys values. It’s not the only element of our society that conveys values. That starts with the family, churches and numerous community organizations and nonprofits. But, public education is the only institution supported by tax dollars that is expected to convey values. Those values form the necessary infrastructure that a free, self-governing society needs. Abraham Lincoln concluded his most famous speech calling for a new birth of freedom so that “government of the people, by the people, for the people, shall not perish from the earth.” That type of government will perish in any country that fails to maintain the infrastructure of values necessary to sustain it. What are those values? They are reflected in our Constitution and laws. They include the right to express myself, to practice my religion (or not), to associate with others freely, to enjoy a right of privacy in my home and personal belongings, to be treated (by the government at least) equally with my fellow citizens, to have the protections of due process

before the government can take something away from me. Without a basic consensus about the importance of these fundamental values, it all falls apart. There is another fundamental value that seems to be particularly at risk these days: a respect for the common good. In our ardent desire to assert our individual freedoms and precious rights we sometimes trample over the need to protect the common good. But the people who work in public institutions, whether they be schools, fire departments, law enforcement or health care, understand that the common good needs our care. Consensus about promoting the common good seems to be at risk of falling apart these days. Just watch what’s happening at school board meetings. I saw an elected member of Congress accuse a North Carolina school board of child abuse because the board made a decision about masks that this guy didn’t agree with. It bothered me that this man would have such arrogance as to accuse school board members, volunteers who serve without pay, of child abuse. It bothered me even more to hear the raucous applause that greeted his phony accusation. Do citizens have a right to attend board meetings and speak their minds? Of course. For decades, schools have rightfully encouraged parents to get involved. But with those rights come responsibilities to be civil, respectful and thoughtful, expressing themselves with an understanding and appreciation for the common good that schools serve. We have our work cut out for us, and it begins with shoring up the infrastructure of values. I would put respect for the common good at the top of the list of values that deserve our support. This winter, here’s hoping we all stay warm, keep the power flowing, and continue to do the daily work of demonstrating our commitment to the common good.

Check us out online at texasschoolbusiness.com for: ► recent issues ► how to submit articles ► Bragging Rights nomination info ► advertising information ► and more! Texas School Business THE NEWS MAGAZINE FOR PUBLIC EDUCATION IN TEXAS

68 Years and Counting

JIM WALSH is an attorney with Walsh Gallegos Treviño Russo & Kyle PC. He can be reached at jwalsh@wabsa.com. You can also follow him on Twitter: @jwalshtxlawdawg. Texas School Business JANUARY / FEBRUARY 2022

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Who’s News > Continued from page 7

from Stephen F. Austin State University and a master’s degree in educational administration from Lamar University. She is pursuing a doctorate at the University of North Texas. Jason Liewehr, former

director of human resources at Carrollton-Farmers Branch ISD, is now Denton ISD’s executive director of human resources. He began his career in Birdville ISD, then joined Carrollton-Farmers Branch as an assistant principal in 2006. He received his bachelor’s and master’s degrees from the University of North Texas and is working on a doctorate at the University of Texas at Arlington. Former Crownover Middle School principal Charlene Parham has been promoted to area superintendent of academic programs. She began her career in Garland ISD in 1995 and worked in White Settlement, Irving and Sanger ISDs before coming to Denton. She received her bachelor’s degree from the University of Texas at Arlington and her master’s degree in mid-management and administration from Tarleton State University. She is nearing completion of her doctorate from the University of North Texas.

Donna ISD

The district has welcomed Catherine Knepp as assistant superintendent for finance and operations. She joins DSISD from the private sector, where she worked in financial services at Moak, Casey & Associates, an educational consulting firm. She holds a master’s degree in public policy from Vanderbilt University.

El Paso ISD Patrick Gailey has accepted the position of

principal of Brown Middle School. He began his career as a teacher at Polk and Burnet elementary schools and has been assistant principal of Hornedo Middle School since 2017. He is a graduate of the University of Texas at El Paso, where he also earned his master’s degree in education.

Michael Mendoza has been named principal of Navarette Middle School, currently under construction and slated to open for the 2022-23 academic year. An educator with 32 years of experience, he previously served EPISD as a teacher and assistant principal as well as principal at several campuses. He is a graduate of the University of Texas at El Paso, where he also received his master’s degree in education.

Richardson Middle School has welcomed Christine Miles as principal. She led Nixon Elementary since 2016 and previously served as an assistant principal at Richardson. She has a bachelor’s degree and a master’s degree in agriculture and applied economics as well as a second master’s degree, in educational administration, from New Mexico State University. Maribel Ruiz, newly appointed principal

Angela Dominguez has

been named district superintendent, the first woman to serve in that position in Donna ISD. She brings 26 years of experience to her new job, including serving as chief of schools and assistant superintendent of San Antonio’s Edgewood ISD. She most recently was deputy superintendent of Colorado Springs (Colo.) School District 11.

Dripping Springs ISD Jennifer Edwards has been

selected to serve as executive director of communications. She brings over 25 years of communications and marketing experience to her new position, having most recently led communications at Black Box, a provider of IT infrastructure solutions. She is a graduate of the University of Texas with a degree in journalism.

of Guillen Middle School, returns to El Paso ISD after working at ESC Region 19. She previously was an assistant principal at Andress and Bowie high schools and at Magoffin Middle School. Her bachelor’s and master’s degrees were awarded from the University of Texas at El Paso.

Copper Creek Elementary School’s new assistant principal is Daniel Dodson, a 13-year educator with degrees from Texas A&M University and the University of Houston Clear Lake. He has been a middle school teacher and reading interventionist. Now serving as director of counseling and campus support is Mark Hard, a 19year educator who was lead counselor at Chisholm Trail High School since 2012. He holds a bachelor’s degree from McMurry University and a master’s degree from Texas Wesleyan University. Shamyria Moore has come

from Fort Worth ISD to Marine Creek Middle School, where she is now assistant principal. She has 17 years of experience as an educator. She received her bachelor’s degree from Baylor University and her master’s degree from the University of North Texas. The district’s new assistant director of human resources is Christopher Morgan, now in his 23rd year as an educator, 16 of those as an administrator. The Oklahoma Baptist University graduate comes to Eagle Mountain-Saginaw ISD from Decatur ISD, where he was director of student services. His master’s degree was awarded from the University of North Texas. A new director of special programs is in place for the district. Cindy Peavy brings more than 25 years of experience to her new job, 16 of those as an administrator. Her bachelor’s degree was earned from Louisiana State University and her master’s degree from the University of North Texas.

The new principal of Burges High School,

Eanes ISD (Austin)

since 2012 and previously held the top position at Caldwell Elementary. The 23-year educator earned his bachelor’s degree from New Mexico State University and a master’s degree in educational administration from Sul Ross State University.

Tom Leonard, Eanes ISD superintendent since 2014, has announced his upcoming retirement. His 42-year career has included stints as a teacher, coach, assistant principal and principal as well as superintendent.

Jason Yturralde, led Ross Middle School

Eagle Mountain-Saginaw ISD Brent Caldwell, new assistant principal of Lake Pointe Elementary School, is a graduate of Tarleton State University with a master’s degree from the University of North Texas. He was a teacher for eight years, the past six at Lake Pointe.

Fort Bend ISD Steve Bassett has returned

to Fort Bend ISD, where he was chief financial officer from 2013 to 2019, to take the position of deputy superintendent. He most recently was associate

> See Who’s News, page 15

Texas School Business JANUARY / FEBRUARY 2022

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A circle of trust

Texas schools improve culture and morale through restorative practices by Dacia Rivers

A

cross the country, the traditional approach to school discipline is becoming a thing of the past. Research shows that punitive discipline including suspension, expulsion and even arrests can have a harmful effect on not just involved students, but a school’s community as a whole. Some studies have found these long-used methods are often applied disproportionately to Black, male students, according to the University of Richmond Law Review. Some believe witnessing and having to enforce these practices can lead to teacher turnover, and can foster an unhappy school culture among students in general.

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Texas School Business JANUARY / FEBRUARY 2022

In 2015, TEA partnered with the Institute for Restorative Justice and Restorative Dialogue at The University of Texas at Austin School of Social Work to introduce a new discipline model to Texas’ public schools. Restorative discipline practices were designed to be less punitive and to reduce the number of discipline referrals. Because many referrals begin as a response to a small discipline issue, restorative practices are intended to give teachers other methods for handling these issues besides writing the student up or removing them from the classroom.

At the center of restorative practices are circles. Circles offer structured communication, where students have a safe space to speak up, and their comments are met with patience and understanding. An adult will use ice-breakers and prompt questions to get students talking. The point is to help students open up, to make them realize that they’re being heard, and to build connections and respect between students and educators. In a circle, an educator sets a welcoming tone and encourages open communication between everyone in the group. Students can share as much or as little as makes


them comfortable, and the educator works to ensure the space is safe and that all students are respected. The educator’s job is not to guide the circle, but to facilitate communication among the group. Restorative conversations are another key element of the discipline model. Rather than reacting to a behavioral challenge by removing a student from the classroom, restorative practices focus on having an open discussion with that student. An educator might ask a student what happened, why it happened, and what they were thinking at the time. They then can ask them to realize the effects their actions have on others, and ask them what can be done to make things right. In Tomball ISD, Tomball Connections Academy began implementing restorative practices in 2018. As part of the restorative model, each TCA student signs a classroom respect agreement when joining the campus. Students are involved in creating the agreements, detailing the ways all students and staff at the campuses should be treated. Educators at the campus focus on using “I statements” to help students take ownership of their feelings. This type of language can reduce feelings of blame or guilt and instead further build relationships and contribute to an understanding of how one student’s actions might affect the entire school community. The main goal in restorative discipline is to help foster relationships between students and their teachers. Research shows that students are responsive to these practices. In early studies performed by the University of Texas, Ed White Middle School in San Antonio saw discipline referrals drop by 80% after implementing restorative discipline. TCA has seen similar results. In the 201819 school year, TCA recorded 190 student discipline incidents. In the 2020-21 school year, that number dropped to just four. The campus has been recognized as EXPERIENCED on the RDP Continuum Scale by TEA Restorative Discipline Practices.

Sample community-building classroom circle This type of circle allows students and teachers to share positive and challenging personal stories about their school experience, which helps build empathy and stronger relationships. Based on stories shared, students and teachers can support each other and there is a natural desire to create more instances where everyone is feeling connected. 1. Opening: Inspiring or notable quote or lyrics 2. Introduction of talking piece: Explain to the group that the talking piece is a symbol for those who don’t have the talking piece to actively listen to the person who does. Teacher chooses a talking piece and explains significance (Comfort object like stress ball, squishy ball, stuffed animal). 3. Setting guidelines and values: Have each student read and explain a guideline. Go around the circle until all guidelines have been discussed. Guidelines: Respect the talking piece, Speak with respect, Listen with respect, Speak from your heart, Listen with your heart, Honor Privacy, Remain in the circle. Write 3 values on one side of a paper plate and then choose 1 to share with the group (put paper plates up in room after circle). 4. Check in: Rate from 1-10, how you feel today and explain why. 5. Discussion Questions: Share a time you felt connected on campus. Share a time you have not felt connected on campus. What can we do to support each other? 6. Check out: End with a poem, quote, song, inspirational story connected to the topic.

One TCA student says that their time in the restorative circles has allowed them to connect with other people and share their thoughts: “I’ve learned during the circle that I enjoy sharing my thoughts on things, but also explaining why and my thought process behind it. I’ve also learned in circle that the TCA staff truly care about the > See Circle, page 14

Source: National Conflict Resolution Center

Texas School Business JANUARY / FEBRUARY 2022

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> Continued from page 13

students and their success in life, which is something I probably wouldn’t have guessed without ever coming here.” Another student says the circle has opened their eyes to the struggles their peers might be facing. “I learned everybody has something bad going on in their life. It’s just how they cope with it that matters. I learned that mistakes don’t define you. I’m not looked at as a bad kid because of my mistakes. I’m glad I’m respected like any other human.” TCA staff shared input they received from a parent of a student at the campus, who says the restorative model has made a positive difference in their son’s life: “Thank you for making the choice to build up our students, for pouring into them, and encouraging and believing in them. Our son was very anxious about his time here, but that only lasted a couple of days. Don’t believe that what you’re doing each day isn’t important and lifechanging. Your efforts are touching lives and families.” Experts stress that restorative discipline isn’t something that should be used individually or only with certain students. It’s designed as a whole-school approach, and to reach the best outcomes, all students need to be included. In Carrollton-Farmers Branch ISD, the district has implemented a restorative practice model at Ted Polk Middle School in a move to build foundations and promote a positive campus culture. Educators use restorative circles to create a community atmosphere and work one-one-one with students to help them problem solve and set goals. As a bonus, these practices help develop trust between students and school staff. Administrators in the district coach students in self-regulation and emotional intelligence with a goal of not only improving the culture on campus, but better preparing students for their college and career goals. You can find more information on restorative practices on the TEA website at tea.texas.gov/texas-schools/healthsafety-discipline/restorative-disciplinepractices-in-texas, including how-to materials for interested parents. DACIA RIVERS is editorial director of Texas School Business.

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Texas School Business JANUARY / FEBRUARY 2022

Affective statements for when problems occur This is a way of explaining how someone’s choices affect you. It is also an opportunity to demonstrate that you care about students and humanize yourself. It brings you closer to the person rather than further away. They build relationships, connect people, and help prevent things from escalating. This is a great opportunity to truly exercise your influence to help students. Examples of affective statements: TYPICAL RESPONSE

AFFECTIVE STATEMENT

Be quiet.

I’m feeling irritated that you were talking when I was leading the training. I worked hard on this and think you will really like it when you learn more about it. Will you raise your hand when you want to talk?

Stop teasing him!

It made me uneasy to hear you teasing him. Respect is an important thing to me and to our community. Can you tell me what is going on with you two?

Don’t touch her.

I feel really uncomfortable when I see you touching Clare in the hall. I value all students feeling safe and secure. Would you be willing to talk about what is going on between you two?

Good job.

I am so proud of this class for working together so well. You all are showing me that you care about collaboration as much as I do! Source: Peace Learning Center


Who’s News > Continued from page 11

superintendent of business services in Carrollton-Farmers Branch ISD. He earned his bachelor’s degree in business administration and his master’s degree in public administration from the University of Texas.

Hawkins ISD The Hawkins ISD board of trustees announces the appointment of Susan Morton as district superintendent. She had been serving in that position in an interim capacity.

Highland Park ISD (Dallas) The district’s new assistant superintendent for business services is Scott Drillette, who comes to Highland Park from Dallas ISD, where he was deputy chief financial officer. He previously held similar positions in Dripping Springs, Manor and Brock ISDs. His bachelor’s degree was awarded from Texas A&M University and his master’s degree in educational administration from Tarleton State University. The former principal of Lovejoy ISD’s Sloan Creek Intermediate School, Ray Winkler, has joined Highland Park ISD as director of academic support. With 27 years in education, he previously worked as a middle school principal in Dallas and Little Elm ISDs and as an assistant principal in Plano and Carrollton-Farmers Branch ISDs.

Humble ISD Chris Cummings has been chosen to serve as Humble ISD’s chief technology officer, coming to his new position from Klein ISD, where he was information technology director. The Naval Information Technology and Intelligence Systems Academy graduate has 12 years of experience in public education and several in the private sector.

Katy ISD Martha Pulido has been selected to serve as principal of a new Katy ISD campus, called Elementary School No. 44 until a permanent name is chosen. The school is slated to open for the 2022-23

school year. Pulido began her career in KISD in 1999 and since 2017 has led Sundown Elementary.

Keller ISD Leslee Shepherd, executive director of student advancement, has retired after 30 years as an educator. She began her career as a Spanish teacher in Mesquite ISD, joining Keller ISD in 2012 as principal of Park Glen Elementary School. She opened the Keller Center for Advanced Learning as principal in 2016 and also served as the district’s career and technical education director before accepting her most recent position.

Leander ISD Kristin Britt has been

promoted from Grandview Hills Elementary School’s assistant principal to principal. She joined the district in 2015 after beginning her career as a classroom teacher in Hawaii. She holds a bachelor’s degree and a master’s degree in elementary education from FairleighDickinson University. Former Wiley Middle School principal Angela Hodges is now an area superintendent. She previously worked as an elementary school teacher in Pflugerville ISD and in Louisiana. She received her bachelor’s degree from Louisiana State University and her master’s degree in educational leadership from the University of Texas at Arlington. The principal of Leander’s newest elementary school, designated ES 29 until a permanent name is chosen, is Lara Labbé-Maginel, who spent the past seven years leading Knowles Elementary. She began her career in Austin ISD and worked several years in Pflugerville ISD. A graduate of the University of Texas, she holds a master’s degree in education from Concordia University. The new Knowles Elementary School principal is Yvette Venegas, who since 2019 has served as an administrator at Akin Elementary. Prior to that, she taught dual language classes at Whitestone Elementary, where she also led the language arts curriculum writing team. She earned her bachelor’s degree from Texas A&M International University and her master’s degree in educational leadership from Concordia University.

Lewisville ISD Gary Patterson has accepted the position of

interim superintendent for Lewisville ISD. He retired in 2014 and has since led several districts on an interim basis, most recently Lake Dallas ISD.

Superintendent Kevin Rogers, who has led the district since 2015, has announced his upcoming retirement, effective the end of January. The 35-year educator spent his career in LISD, beginning as a teacher and coach. Chief financial officer Mark Youngs has retired. Prior to his time in Lewisville, he was CFO in Keller, Killeen and Clifton ISDs.

McKinney ISD Melinna Herrera has been

named assistant principal of Press Elementary School. She returns to McKinney, where she previously worked as a bilingual teacher and instructional leader, from Frisco ISD, where she was a language coach since 2019. She is a graduate of Texas A&M International University with master’s degrees in curriculum and instruction from Concordia University and educational administration from the University of Texas at Tyler.

Nacogdoches ISD The district’s new director of pre-kindergarten programs is Charles Zemanek, who was curriculum assistant principal at Brooks-QuinnJones Elementary School. He previously was a science teacher at McMichael Middle School and a summer learning facilitator for elementary and middle school students.

North Lamar ISD Kristi Hodgkiss has accepted

the position of director of public relations. The North Lamar High School alumna has taught foreign language and speech and debate at the campus since 1990. She is a graduate of the University of North Texas with a master’s degree in public relations and crisis communication from Purdue University.

> See Who’s News, page 25 Texas School Business JANUARY / FEBRUARY 2022

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Photo Feature

TEXAS ASCD HOSTS ANNUAL CONFERENCE IN ROUND ROCK Photos by Pam Dettwiler The Texas Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development held its annual conference in the fall with a theme of Forging the Future: Heroic Lessons from the Field. Attendees gathered for two and a half days of professional learning, networking, receptions and more.

▲ Dr. Sara Ptomey, Texas ASCD board

advisor, is recognized by the Board of Directors for her leadership

▲ Jay McTighe opened the 2021 Annual

Conference with his keynote on educating for authentic performance.

▲ From left, Texas ASCD board members Dr. Kim Lawson, Katy ISD, and Katie Kordel, Lovejoy ISD, lead the conference participants in a unique version of heads or tails called “crown or tail feather.”

► Dr. Hafedh Azaiez,

Superintendent, Round Rock ISD, offers a warm welcome to attendees at the start of the 2021 Annual Conference.

◄ Dr. Priscilla Canales, board president,

gives the President’s Welcome at the Texas ASCD 2021 Annual Conference at the Kalahari Resort.

▲ The 2021 Texas ASCD board poses at the conference. From left, back row: Stacia Carew, Cypress-Fairbanks ISD; Chris Allen, Marble

Falls ISD; Susanne Carroll, Jana Rueter, San Angelo ISD; Lisa Goodnow, Elgin ISD; Anthony Jarrett, North East ISD; Brandon Johnson, Mansfield ISD. Middle: Yolanda M. Rey, Texas ASCD; Linda Macias, Cypress-Fairbanks ISD; Katie Kordel, Lovejoy ISD; Janis Jordan, Northside ISD; Jaimie Smith; Shane Conklin, Birdville ISD; Sara Ptomey; Bottom row: Kim Lawson, Katy ISD: Holly Morris-Kuentz, Dripping Springs ISD; Lisa Pedevilla, Grapevine-Colleyville ISD, Jennifer Garcia- Edwardsen, New Braunfels ISD; and Wes Cunningham, Frisco ISD.

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▲ Conference participants visit with

exhibitors over kolaches during one of the many networking opportunities at the Texas ASCD 2021 Annual Conference.

▲ Each year, the Texas ASCD President’s Reception brings attendees together for a fun evening of refreshments, entertainment, networking and more. This year, attendees were asked to come “safari-ready!” San Angelo ISD took first place in the costume contest with their “Let’s get wild!” theme.

▲ Sean Holland gives the closing keynote, presenting his session “SEL-Infused Culture: How Relationships Drive Longlasting Learning and Bring Meaning to Academics.”

▲ Dr. Stephanie Elizalde,

superintendent, Austin ISD, greets participants on the second day of the 2021 Annual Conference.

▲ Dr. Chris Allen, Marble Falls ISD, is

recognized at the Tuesday general session for his past presidency.

◄ Toni Robinson

presents her keynote “Pathways to Resilient Leadership” at the Texas ASCD general session on Monday afternoon.

▲ Douglas Reeves presents “Fearless

Schools: Building Resilience and Trust for Learning, Teaching, and Leading” to the audience at the Kalahari Resort. Texas School Business JANUARY / FEBRUARY 2022

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PRESIDENT PROFILE

Texas Council of Administrators of Special Education

Manor ISD’s Michele McKinley leads TCASE with a focus on equity for students with disabilities by James Golsan

“I

have always wanted to be a teacher. Always.”

When asked about what got her started in the education field, new Texas Council of Administrators of Special Education (TCASE) President Michele McKinley makes clear that she knew from childhood she wanted to be a teacher. She grew up watching her mother teach Sunday school and always found herself being the student who wanted to help out her teachers in the classroom. Still, with a sure passion for education, McKinley was less clear on what she wanted to teach. It took one afternoon of observing a special education classroom to know where she belonged. “I originally thought I wanted to be an English teacher, but during my undergraduate training at Lamar University, one of my professors had us go out and do observations in classrooms, and as soon as I got into a special education classroom, I was like ‘Oh my gosh, this is what I want to do!’” McKinley’s first teaching position out of college was at Bryan ISD, where she quickly became involved with administrative initiatives in the district’s special education department. While her passion for teaching special needs students remained intact, McKinley says that

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she knew early on that her long-term goals would eventually take her out of the classroom. “I didn’t want to be a principal, but I knew I wanted more of a leadership role in special education,” McKinley says. While she was already doing some informal leadership activities, such as serving as department head and frequently working as a facilitator for frontfacing department initiatives, she knew she would have to take her education one step further to reach the heights she was aiming for. “One of my mentors eventually told me that I couldn’t rest on my laurels, that I wouldn’t be able to go beyond where I already was with what I had [degree-wise], and she convinced me to go back and get my master’s degree at Sam Houston State University so I would have more options open to me.” Following the completion of her master’s, McKinley took a coordinator position with Goose Creek ISD in 2006, and followed it with her first special education director position at Connally ISD (just outside of Waco) in 2008. Following a 10-year stint at Connally ISD, McKinley began the job she has now, serving as executive director of special programs at Manor ISD.


While McKinley has nearly two decades of experience as a special education leader, her involvement with TCASE dates from even earlier in her career. “When I was at Bryan ISD, I had wonderful mentors who gave me lots of opportunities for professional development, sending me to conferences and letting me network, and one of the conferences they would send me to was TCASE.” McKinley adds that every time she attended a TCASE conference, she learned more and more, and decided to volunteer with the organization. It would turn out to be the first step toward the presidency she now holds, and she has an ambitious agenda for her time in leadership. “I want to really look at the equity for students with disabilities,” she says, acknowledging that what that means can sometimes be a complicated question. “The state tends to ‘grade’ students with disabilities on a different playing field than they do traditional students, and it’s important — both for our state’s leadership and myself as a leader of TCASE — to look at our students and see their abilities, rather than their disabilities.”

As the education community battles back from the COVID-19 pandemic, McKinley says it’s crucial to continue to ensure that students with disabilities have the same access to education that all students have. “We [as education leaders] need to make sure that special education students have what they need to succeed just as well as any other student, while keeping in mind that each child’s needs are different.” McKinley is a proud military mother with a son who is set to retire from the service next year. “I have a son who will be retiring before I will!” she says with a laugh. What comes through in everything McKinley says about her work, her goals for her time as TCASE president, and her family, is her passion and love for what she does. It is rare that someone is born for the work that they do, and in McKinley, TCASE has found a president who is exactly that. Look for the organization — and the special education community across Texas — to thrive under her leadership. JAMES GOLSAN is a writer and education professional based in Austin.

Texas Council of Administrators of Special Education Membership: TCASE membership is open to special education administrators as well as certified individuals working in special education-related jobs. Mission: TCASE’s mission is to inspire and empower special education professionals and to work on behalf of their members to help them achieve in their profession. Year founded: 1960 Website: tcase.org

65

+

years of

educational

facility design

ARCHITECTURE ▪ INTERIOR DESIGN

Texas School Business JANUARY / FEBRUARY 2022

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PRESIDENT PROFILE

Texas School Public Relations Association

Rebecca Villarreal, communications jack of all trades, serves as TSPRA president by James Golsan

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ew Texas School Public Relations Association (TSPRA) President Rebecca Villarreal has always known she wanted a career in the communications sector, but as an undergraduate student at the University of the Incarnate Word in San Antonio, she wasn’t sure in what capacity. And while she determined early in her career that public relations — especially public relations in the K-12 education space — might be her niche, it took a few steps for her to find the career that is now her “home.” “I actually started out working in K-12 education; at the time I was single it was kind of an ‘anything goes’ stretch of time,” Villarreal says with a laugh. “Then I got married and you know things change, priorities change, and I got a job in the private sector working in communications for Time Warner Cable.” It would prove to be her first, last and only stop in the private sector. Villarreal says that while she loved the job, particularly the opportunities to engage with her community and participate in philanthropic work, her passion for education and a desire to start a family brought her back to the K-12 education field.

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“I realized if I wanted to start a family I would have to move into a more family- and women-friendly public relations position,” she says. “What [could be] better for that than the K-12 sector?” Beginning in 2004, Villarreal spent six years at Schertz-CiboloUniversal City ISD, but she says the job she has now as executive director of communications for New Braunfels ISD was a job she had her eye on from the moment she returned to K-12 education because of her husband’s ties to the district. (Mr. Villarreal is a New Braunfels ISD alumnus.) In a field she has passion for and in a community she loves, Villarreal has thrived as a communications professional in Texas education. That she has speaks to her dedication, drive and adaptability, because per Villarreal, every day is different when you work in communications. “You walk in every day with a plan, and then the plan gets blown up,” she laughs. A day working in school district communications could involve anything from a newspaper interview to live on-camera work with a TV station to helping out another department in the district with print needs.


“A lot of people don’t realize that as a communications professional, you have to be a jack of all trades,” Villarreal says. “When it comes to telling the story of the district, we have to know a little bit of everything about what we’re talking about, including the history of the initiatives we’re speaking on, why we are making the decision we are making, the timing of the decision, really everything that goes into it.” It was during her time at SCUC ISD that Villarreal first became involved with TSPRA, volunteering and doing committee work for the organization whenever she could. Her involvement with the organization expanded during her early years with New Braunfels ISD. “During the past eight years my involvement with TSPRA grew and I was afforded the opportunity to grow so much as a school public relations professional,” Villarreal says, “I became accredited in public relations (APR) in 2017, a longtime career goal of mine, and also became a member of the National School Public Relations Association (NSPRA). I was elected as the TSPRA vice president for the Central Area (Austin) for a term and also served a term as an at-large vice president.” Now, as she moves into the presidency at TSPRA, Villarreal says she wants to help

TSPRA members — as well as the students they serve — find their feet in an (almost) post-COVID education world. “We will spend a lot of time gathering information and feedback from the membership this year. We need to make sure the members are getting what they need out of their membership and that we continually improve as a member-based organization,” she says. “As our membership grows, so do the needs and makeup of who we serve. We are in a strange time. We are not post-COVID, however, we are feeling the effects of COVID with more of our colleagues leaving the K-12 sector for a myriad of reasons. With that shift comes a wave of new members who have diverse needs. My goal is to make more opportunities available that will ultimately improve our members’ ability to succeed.” TSPRA members should feel confident they have elected a leader perfect for the tasks Villarreal outlines above. She loves and believes in the work that TSPRA does on behalf of Texas K-12 education professionals, and is sure to provide steady and certain leadership throughout her term as president. JAMES GOLSAN is a writer and education professional based in Austin.

Texas School Public Relations Association Membership: TSPRA membership comprises more than 1,000 public relations professionals whose main goal is to improve public education in Texas via quality communication services. Mission: The Texas School Public Relations Association (TSPRA) is a professional organization whose members are dedicated to improving public education in Texas by:

Promoting effective public relations practices

Providing professional development for its members

Improving communication between Texans and their public schools.

Year founded: 1962 Website: tspra.org

Join us for the opportunity to network, share ideas, discuss strategies, and collaborate at the premier conference for Texas school leaders

On-site Registration Available January 30-February 2, 2022 | Austin Convention Center www.tasamidwinter.org Texas School Business JANUARY / FEBRUARY 2022

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STUDENT VOICES

The cutting edge: Spring ISD launches Barbering Academy at Westfield High School

Spring ISD recently opened a barbering academy for students at Westfield High School. In this Student Voices, students from WHS share their experiences working in the program.

Note: Edited for length and clarity “Student Voices” is a regularly featured column in Texas School Business. It’s an opportunity for students of all ages from across Texas to share their experiences in K-12 public schools. Contact Editorial Director Dacia Rivers at drivers@texasschoolbusiness.com for publishing guidelines.

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◄ Former Spring ISD Superintendent Rodney Watson poses with students enrolled in Westfield High School's barbering program.

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hen I found out I was placed in barbering, I never knew I would be so into it that I would want to become a professional. My past feelings towards barbering have changed tremendously. When I first started barbering, they looked like a caterpillar; now, they’re a butterfly that shines like a diamond. Becoming a professional in barbering is now my main goal in life. Instead of just finishing college and getting a normal job, I want to become a person that cuts hair for a living. When I thought of the word “barbering” or people being barbers, I just thought it would be about cutting hair. Now I realize barbering has a whole history of many great things that made barbering so unique. Starting in barbering class, I never thought much of it. I began the course on a computer at home barely paying attention to anything the teachers were saying. Now, I’m in a newly built class with my own station for cutting hair. The class even comes with stations for shampooing hair and we have our own lockers.

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— Javon Hill, sophomore

hen I first heard about barbering I was a freshman, and immediately I was interested because I thought it’d be a fun, cool, easy way to make side money in high school. I didn’t have high expectations going into the program except learning how to cut hair. The first year of the program was a human services course. Unfortunately, we didn’t have a teacher because of COVID-19, and we were given a substitute teacher. Going into my sophomore year, I didn’t expect to have a barber teacher. After receiving my class schedule, I saw “barbering’’ and went to the class. We were escorted to a bus which took us to Mystros Barber Academy. As we walked inside, I was amazed at the sight of the shop and immediately got excited. After walking into the classroom, I met Mr. Shaw, or as we call him, “Mr. E.” He was really chill and very laid back, which I hope to see in a teacher. Fast forward a few weeks and everyone was eager to start cutting hair. Mr. Shaw allowed us to watch him cut customers as they came in one by one. As we watched and took mental notes, Mr. Shaw also allowed us to hold the clippers, other tools and implements. After a month went by, we began doing

▲ Spring ISD administrators offer a tour of the new barbering facilities.

bookwork, which focused on other aspects of barbering besides the actual hair cutting, and focused more on things such as facial structures, head and face shapes, and sizes. Once the barbershop at Westfield High was completed, we moved from Mystros Barber Academy to the new main campus. The first day in the newly built shop gave me a feeling of belonging because I know this is where I’m going to be for the next two years. As I walked through the shop, I noticed we each had our own section with top quality barbering chairs, drawers, and so forth. We were each given our own lockers, where we could leave our barbering books and smocks. I didn’t have high expectations for barbering as I started school this year. Now that I’m in it, this has truly made me happy to be able to learn all this, and to have this once in a lifetime opportunity. — Jacob Lara, sophomore

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he expectations I had for this class were to be a good barber and to learn how to cut hair so I could start making money as soon as I graduate. Moving on to my current year, this program has helped me so much. I’ve met so many new people in this program. It has helped me build so many new bonds and brought me close to more people. The thing I enjoy the most about this program is all the new things I learn from

our teacher. He also gives us free haircuts, so that’s another good thing I enjoy. The program teaches us how to communicate with other people even if we’re nothing alike, and teaches us how to be respectful to others, no matter what. This program is fun, but it’s not easy. It takes a bunch of practice and hard work. You can’t be successful by playing around and doing nothing. There will be times where you fail, and failure is the key to becoming successful. It helps you reflect on what you messed up on so the next time you try you won’t have the same mistake you had before. Everyone in this program is trying their very best to be successful at becoming a barber. Everyone has a different purpose on why they wanna do this. Whatever that reason is, it’s helping them and pushing them to do what they love. Being here has helped me grow as a person with communication skills and manners, and gave me a bunch of knowledge I never knew about. I just wanna thank Spring ISD and my teacher and everyone else who was able to make this program happen so kids like me can be successful and be able to do something they love and want to learn about. — Aiden Aguilera, sophomore

> See Student Voices, page 24 Texas School Business JANUARY / FEBRUARY 2022

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▲ Spring ISD staff celebrate the grand opening of the barbering center with a ribbon-cutting ceremony. > Continued from page 23

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hen I started my freshman year, I didn’t think I would be a barber student. I chose barbering just to fill my schedule, but didn’t know how deep it actually was. My first day of barber school I could tell it was more than I thought it would be. The first thing we learned about were rules and regulations, and how to not cause cross-contamination. We also learned about men’s hair cutting, razor honing, tools and implements, different types of clippers, etc.

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hen I first joined the barbering course, I had a lot of expectations that it would just be cutting hair. After going through all the styles of hair cutting, it wasn’t that simple. I also met a lot of cool people. The instructor [Eros Shaw] is pretty cool and chill, too, and he is good at his job. At first, I was nervous about cutting hair and the fear of messing up my client’s head. Mr. Shaw told us, “Don’t worry about all that — I won’t let you mess up someone’s

haircut.” He made us comfortable with the process of hair cutting, and he also ran the shop with a lot of people like us who are honing their skills and learning how to cut. At the shop, we learned a lot of hair cutting styles, tips about the barbering industry, and how we are going to get our license. Another thing I learned was how to talk to a client: Be friendly, considerate and talk to your clients. — Jordan Haywood, sophomore

Barbers are also required to know how to shampoo and wash hair, do a facial, shave and manicure a beard, and be able to work on nails. While in barber school we met a lot of different people older than us who are still learning about barbering. We listened to how they felt and they understood what we are going through beginning barbering school. Client consultation is also a requirement skill, but cannot be taught as easily. This involves having a conversation with your client trying to understand the picture of the haircut your client wants. This can also benefit you and your life, because you can run into a client who has an opportunity for you. — Doreoni Smith, sophomore ▲ The barbering academy features state-of-the art equipment.

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Who’s News > Continued from page 15

Northside ISD (San Antonio) Kittiya Johnson, former Cody Elementary School principal, is now the district’s director of human resources for classified, auxiliary and substitute employees. David La Boy has been

promoted from assistant principal to associate principal of Bernal Middle School.

Now serving as associate principal of Valley Hi Elementary School is Candace Maldonado, who most recently held the same position at Cable Elementary. Jennifer Platt has been

promoted from her position as Fernandez Elementary School’s reading specialist to associate principal of Scarborough Elementary School.

Susan Schottler, a former administrative intern at Rudder Middle School, is now Bernal Middle School’s assistant principal.

Former Valley Hi Elementary School associate principal Stacey Winton now serves as principal of Oak Hills Terrace Elementary. The 15-year educator began her career in San Antonio’s North East ISD, joining Northside ISD in 2009. She holds bachelor’s and master’s degrees from the University of Texas at San Antonio, where she is at work on her doctorate.

Northside ISD (Vernon)

Pflugerville ISD

Plano ISD Johnny Hill, who was Allen

ISD’s chief financial officer since 2020, is now chief financial officer of Plano ISD. He previously was assistant superintendent of financial, business and auxiliary services at Lake Travis ISD. After a 35-year career in public education, including serving as Plano ISD’s chief financial officer since 2017, Randy McDowell has retired. He previously held the same position in four other Texas districts and worked as a school finance consultant at ESC Region 16.

Round Rock ISD A new chief human resource officer has been named for Round Rock ISD. Eddie Curran served as Leander ISD’s executive director of human resources since 2020. Prior to that assignment, he worked in Austin ISD as staff coordinator for high schools, director of human resources and executive director of human capital systems. He holds a bachelor’s degree in media studies and history from the University of Ulster in Ireland and a master’s degree in education leadership from Texas Tech University.

Sinton ISD

A new superintendent has been appointed for Vernon’s Northside ISD. Benny Barnett, who was district principal, is a 34-year educator with experience as a teacher, coach and elementary counselor in districts in Oklahoma and California as well as Texas. He earned his bachelor’s and master’s degrees from Southwestern Oklahoma State University.

Sharon Sanders has agreed to serve as interim superintendent of Sinton ISD. She was employed by the district from 1980 to 1995, then joined Refugio ISD before transferring to Aransas Pass ISD, where she was curriculum director and assistant superintendent. She holds a bachelor’s degree from Trinity University and a master’s degree in educational psychology from Texas A&M University at Corpus Christi.

Northwest ISD (Fort Worth)

Snyder ISD

Superintendent Ryder Warren has announced his intention to retire at the end of the academic year. He has led the district since 2016 after serving in the top position in Midland, Marble Falls, Crane and Thorndale ISDs.

Stephenville ISD

A new director of finance is in place for Pflugerville ISD. Carla Gonzalez comes to Pflugerville from Belton ISD, where she was a payroll manager. She previously worked in Round Rock and Manor ISDs. She is a graduate of Concordia University with a degree in business administration.

After 29 years in education, 20 of those as a superintendent, Eddie Bland will retire at the end of the school year. He has led Snyder ISD since 2017.

Eric Cederstrom now leads Stephenville ISD as superintendent. Most recently deputy superintendent of Pine Tree ISD, a position he held since 2018, he previously led Palo Pinto ISD for 10 years.

Texas Association of School Boards Rodney Watson has accepted the position of deputy executive director of the Texas Association of School Boards (TASB). He was Spring ISD’s superintendent since 2014.

Tyler ISD Tyler ISD’s director of fine arts, Sandra Newton, has been named the Texas Art Education Association’s Administrator of the Year. She received the honor during TAEA’s award ceremony in Austin in November. Newton, who has been in her current position for five years, previously worked in Houston and Jacksonville ISDs.

Ysleta ISD (El Paso) Now serving as principal of Chacon International School is Candice Arispe, who began her career in 2006 at Pasodale Elementary, going on to serve as an instructional coach and assistant principal. She earned her bachelor’s degree from the University of Texas at El Paso and her master’s degree from Arkansas State University. Ysleta ISD has announced the appointment of Ruben Cadena as principal of Hanks High School. With 26 years in education, 15 of those as a campus principal, he most recently led Chacon International School. David Medina has been

promoted from serving as principal of Eastwood Knolls International School to director of special education. He began his career in 1999, serving as a teacher, teacher mentor, instructional specialist, coordinator and assistant principal. He received his bachelor’s and master’s degrees from the University of Texas at El Paso.◄

Texas School Business JANUARY / FEBRUARY 2022

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Calendar Professional development & events F E B R UA RY JANUARY 30-FEBRUARY 2 TASA Aspiring Superintendents Academy Convention Center, Austin For more info, (512) 477-6361. www.tasanet.org Cost: Online preregistration (through Jan. 21): $195. Onsite registration: $245. TASA Midwinter Conference Convention Center, Austin For more info, (512) 477-6361. www.tasamidwinter.org Cost: Online registration (through Jan. 21): TASA members, educational entity, $425; nonmembers, educational entity, $475; TASA members, noneducational entity, $525; nonmembers, noneducational entity, $775; students, $175. On-site registration: TASA members, educational entity, $495; nonmembers, educational entity, $545; TASA members, noneducational entity, $595; nonmembers, noneducational entity, $845; students, $175. February 1 TASB Training: Asbestos Designated Person Victoria ISD, Victoria For more info, (512) 467-0222 or (800) 580-8272. www.tasb.org February 2 TASA/N2 Learning Executive Leadership Institute (session 3 of 4) Hilton Garden Inn, Austin For more info, (972) 515-2268 www.n2learning.org Registration closed. TASA/N2 Learning Principals’ Institute (session 4 of 6) Hilton Garden Inn, Austin For more info, (972) 515-2268 www.n2learning.org Registration closed. TASB Legal Lunch: Special Education Legal Update, Part 2 Virtual event For more info, (512) 467-0222 or (800) 580-8272. www.tasb.org

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TASB Training: Integrated Pest Management Victoria ISD, Victoria For more info, (512) 467-0222 or (800) 580-8272. www.tasb.org February 3 TASB Grassroots Meeting, ESC Region 4 ESC Region 4, Houston For more info, (512) 467-0222 or (800) 580-8272. www.tasb.org TASBO Seminar: ACT106 Financial Coding for Texas Schools TASBO offices, Austin For more info, (512) 462-1711. www.tasbo.org Cost: TASBO members, $185; nonmembers, $235. Texas ASCD Academy: Assessment for Learning: A Proven Strategy for Closing the Achievement Gap Birdville ISD, North Richland Hills For more info, (512) 477-8200 or (800) 717-2723. www.txascd.org February 5 TRTA Retirement Seminar, District 10 Virtual event For more info, (512) 476-1622, (800) 880-1650. www.trta.org Cost: No charge for TRTA members. February 6-8 TASSP Assistant/Aspiring Principal Workshop Hilton Airport, Austin For more info, (512) 443-2100. www.tassp.org Cost: Early Bird registration (through Jan. 21): $261. After Jan. 21: $311. February 7-9 TCASE Great Ideas Conference Marriott Hotel, Austin, or virtual For more info, (512) 474-4492 or (888) 433-4492. www.tcase.org

February 8 TASA/N2 Learning Assistant Principal Leadership Academy, Austin/San Antonio cohort (session 4 of 6) Northside ISD, San Antonio For more info, (972) 515-2268 www.n2learning.org Registration closed. TASA/N2 Learning Assistant Principal Leadership Academy, Dallas area cohort (session 4 of 6) McKinney ISD, McKinney For more info, (972) 515-2268 www.n2learning.org Registration closed. TASB Grassroots Meeting, ESC Region 6 ESC Region 6, Huntsville For more info, (512) 467-0222 or (800) 580-8272. www.tasb.org TASB Grassroots Meeting, ESC Region 9 ESC Region 9, Wichita Falls For more info, (512) 467-0222 or (800) 580-8272. www.tasb.org TASB Webinar for School Board Candidates: Preparing to Serve Virtual event For more info, (512) 467-0222 or (800) 580-8272. www.tasb.org Cost: No charge for TASB members. TEPSA Spring Meeting, Region 7 Location TBA, Kilgore For more info, (512) 478-5268 or (800) 252-3621. www.tepsa.org February 8-10 TASA/CMSi Level 1 Curriculum Management Audit Training TASA Headquarters, Austin For more info, (512) 477-6361. www.tasanet.org Cost: TASA members, $800; Nonmembers, $900. February 9 TASA/N2 Learning Assistant Principal Leadership Academy, Houston area cohort (session 4 of 6) Cypress-Fairbanks ISD, Cypress For more info, (972) 515-2268 www.n2learning.org Registration closed.

TASA/TASB/TASBO Budget Cohort for Texas District Leaders Virtual For more info, (512) 462-1711. www.tasanet.org Registration is closed. TASBO Workshop: ACT108 Accounts Payable Processes ESC Region 10, Richardson For more info, (512) 462-1711. www.tasbo.org Cost: TASBO members, $185; nonmembers, $235. February 9-10 Texas ASCD Curriculum Leadership Academy 35, Waco area (session 2 of 3) Robinson ISD, Robinson For more info, (512) 477-8200 or (800) 717-2723. www.txascd.org February 9-13 TABSE Annual Conference Hyatt Regency, Dallas For more info, (937) 617-1706. www.tabse.net Cost: Early Bird Registration (by Dec. 31): Members, $350; nonmembers, $425; retiree members, $300. Group registration: 1-5 attendees, $1,600; 6-10 attendees, $1,800. February 10 TASB Webinar: Discipline of Students with Disabilities, Part 2 Virtual event For more info, (512) 467-0222 or (800) 580-8272. www.tasb.org February 10-11 TASB Conference for Administrative Professionals TASB offices, Austin For more info, (512) 467-0222 or (800) 580-8272. www.tasb.org February 11 TSPRA Zone Meeting, Region 13 Round Rock ISD, Round Rock For more info, (512) 474-9107. www.tspra.org


February 13-15 TCA Annual Professional School Counselor Conference Kalahari Resort, Round Rock For more info, (512) 472-3403. www.txca.org Cost: TCA members, $180; nonmembers, $205 February 15 TASB Grassroots Meeting, ESC Region 8 ESC Region 8, Pittsburg For more info, (512) 467-0222 or (800) 580-8272. www.tasb.org February 16 TASA/N2 Learning Assistant Principal Leadership Academy, Victoria/Corpus Christi cohort (session 4 of 6) Corpus Christi ISD, Corpus Christi For more info, (972) 515-2268 www.n2learning.org Registration closed. TASA/N2 Learning Assistant Principal Leadership Academy, virtual cohort (session 4 of 6) Virtual event For more info, (972) 515-2268 www.n2learning.org Registration closed. TASB Grassroots Meeting, ESC Region 7 ESC Region 7, Kilgore For more info, (512) 467-0222 or (800) 580-8272. www.tasb.org TASB Grassroots Meeting, ESC Region 10 ESC Region 10, Richardson For more info, (512) 467-0222 or (800) 580-8272. www.tasb.org TASB Grassroots Meeting, ESC Region 20 ESC Region 20, San Antonio For more info, (512) 467-0222 or (800) 580-8272. www.tasb.org TASB SHARS Updates Virtual event For more info, (512) 467-0222 or (800) 580-8272. www.tasb.org TASBO Workshop: ESSER Compliance Cypress-Fairbanks ISD, Houston For more info, (512) 462-1711. www.tasbo.org Cost: TASBO members, $225; nonmembers, $275.

TASPA Workshop: Documentation Fundamentals ESC Region 15, San Angelo For more info, (512) 494-9353. www.taspa.org February 16-17 TASA First-Time Superintendents Academy (session 4 of 4) Marriott North, Austin For more info, (512) 477-6361. www.tasanet.org Cost: session 4 only, $295. February 17 TASB Grassroots Meeting, ESC Region 11 ESC Region 11, Fort Worth For more info, (512) 467-0222 or (800) 580-8272. www.tasb.org TASB Grassroots Meeting, ESC Region 15 ESC Region 15, San Angelo For more info, (512) 467-0222 or (800) 580-8272. www.tasb.org TASB Grassroots Meeting, ESC Region 17 ESC Region 17, Lubbock For more info, (512) 467-0222 or (800) 580-8272. www.tasb.org TASPA Workshop: Certification Fundamentals ESC Region 17, Lubbock For more info, (512) 494-9353. www.taspa.org February 21-24 TSPRA Annual Conference Kalahari Resort, Round Rock For more info, (512) 474-9107. www.tspra.org Cost: TSPRA members, $520; nonmembers, $745. February 22 TASB Grassroots Meeting, ESC Region 3 ESC Region 3, Victoria For more info, (512) 467-0222 or (800) 580-8272. www.tasb.org TASB Grassroots Meeting, ESC Region 5 ESC Region 5, Beaumont For more info, (512) 467-0222 or (800) 580-8272. www.tasb.org

February 22-24 TASA/CMSi Level 1 Curriculum Management Audit Training Virtual event For more info, (512) 477-6361. www.tasanet.org Cost: TASA members, $800; Non-members, $900. February 23 TASB Grassroots Meeting, ESC Region 2 ESC Region 2, Corpus Christi For more info, (512) 467-0222 or (800) 580-8272. www.tasb.org February 24 TASA Breakaway Leadership Program Virtual event For more info, (512) 477-6361. www.tasanet.org Registration is closed. TASB Grassroots Meeting, ESC Region 12 ESC Region 12, Waco For more info, (512) 467-0222 or (800) 580-8272. www.tasb.org TASB Grassroots Meeting, ESC Region 19 ESC Region 19, El Paso For more info, (512) 467-0222 or (800) 580-8272. www.tasb.org February 27-March 1 TASSP Symposium: Making Middle School Matter Hilton Airport, Austin For more info, (512) 443-2100. www.tassp.org Cost: Early Bird registration (through Feb. 11): $280. Regular registration (after Feb. 11): $330. February 28 THSCA Leadership Summit Esports Stadium, Arlington For more info, (512) 392-3741. Cost: In advance, $89; onsite, $99. www.thsca.org February 28-March 1 TASBO Annual Conference Gaylord Texan Resort and Convention Center, Grapevine For more info, (512) 462-1711. www.tasbo.org Cost: Full conference: TASBO members, $425; nonmembers, $500; associate members, $625; associate nonmembers, $750.

One day conference: TASBO members, $375; nonmembers, $500.

MARCH March 1 TASBO Workshop: Certified School Risk Managers Gaylord Texan Resort and Convention Center, Grapevine For more info, (512) 462-1711. www.tasbo.org Cost: TASBO members and nonmembers, $250. TASA/TASB/TASBO Budget Cohort for Texas District Leaders Gaylord Texan Hotel, Grapevine For more info, (512) 462-1711. www.tasanet.org Registration is closed. March 1-3 TASA/CMSi Level 2 Curriculum Management Audit Training TASA Headquarters, Austin For more info, (512) 477-6361. www.tasanet.org Cost: TASA members, $800; Non-members, $900. March 2 TASB Webinar: Special Education Update, Part 3 Virtual event For more info, (512) 467-0222 or (800) 580-8272. www.tasb.org TEPSA Spring Meeting, Region 6 Location TBA, Spring For more info, (512) 478-5268 or (800) 252-3621. www.tepsa.org March 2-3 TASA Future-Ready Superintendents Leadership Network (session 3 of 3) Location TBA, Houston area For more info, (512) 477-6361. www.futurereadytx.org Texas ASCD Curriculum Leadership Academy 36, Kilgore area (session 1 of 3) ESC Region 7, Kilgore For more info, (512) 477-8200 or (800) 717-2723. www.txascd.org

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March 2-5 TASB Governance Camp Convention Center, Galveston For more info, (512) 467-0222 or (800) 580-8272. www.tasb.org March 3 TEPSA Spring Meeting, Region 17 Location and city TBA For more info, (512) 478-5268 or (800) 252-3621. www.tepsa.org March 8-10 TASA/CMSi Level 1 Curriculum Management Audit Training Virtual event For more info, (512) 477-6361. www.tasanet.org Cost: TASA members, $800; Non-members, $900. March 9 TASB Grassroots Meeting, ESC Region 14 ESC Region 14, Abilene For more info, (512) 467-0222 or (800) 580-8272. www.tasb.org TASPA Workshop: Certification Fundamentals ESC Region 8, Pittsburg For more info, (512) 494-9353. www.tassp.org March 11 TSPRA Zone Meeting, Region 13 Pflugerville ISD, Pflugerville For more info, (512) 474-9107. www.tspra.org March 19 TRTA Retirement Seminar, District 18 Virtual event For more info, (512) 476-1622 or (800) 880-1650. www.trta.org Cost: No charge for TRTA members. March 22-23 TASA/N2 Learning Executive Leadership Institute (session 4 of 4) Hilton Park Cities, Dallas For more info, (972) 515-2268 www.n2learning.org Registration closed.

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Texas School Business JANUARY / FEBRUARY 2022

TASA/N2 Learning Principals’ Institute (session 5 of 6) Hilton Park Cities, Dallas For more info, (972) 515-2268 www.n2learning.org Registration closed. March 22-24 TASA/CMSi Level 2 Curriculum Management Audit Training Virtual event For more info, (512) 477-6361. www.tasanet.org Cost: TASA members, $800; Non-members, $900. March 24 TASA Breakaway Leadership Program Virtual event For more info, (512) 477-6361. www.tasanet.org Registration is closed. TASBO Presentation: Child Nutrition Procurement Procedures Online event For more info, (512) 462-1711. www.tasbo.org Cost: TASBO members, $75; nonmembers, $125. TSPRA Zone Meeting ESC Region 4, Houston For more info, (512) 474-9107. www.tspra.org March 26 TRTA Retirement Seminar, Plano Area Plano ISD, Plano For more info, (512) 476-1622 or (800) 880-1650. www.trta.org Cost: No charge for TRTA members. March 28 TASBO Workshop: Deep Dive Into Self-Auditing Service Records TASBO offices, Austin For more info, (512) 462-1711. www.tasbo.org Cost: TASBO members, $225; nonmembers, $275.

March 30

April 9

TEPSA Spring Meeting, Region 9 Location TBA, Wichita Falls For more info, (512) 478-5268 or (800) 252-3621. www.tepsa.org

TRTA Retirement Seminar, District 19 Virtual event For more info, (512) 476-1622 or (800) 880-1650. www.trta.org Cost: No charge for TRTA members.

TSPRA Zone Meeting, Regions 6, 7, 8 Virtual event For more info, (512) 474-9107. www.tspra.org March 30-April 1 TASA/CMSi Curriculum Writing Workshop TASA Headquarters, Austin For more info, (512) 477-6361. www.tasanet.org Cost: TASA members, $550; Nonmembers, $600.

APRI L April 5 TASBO Workshop: State Aid Template for School Districts TASBO offices, Austin For more info, (512) 462-1711. www.tasbo.org Cost: TASBO members, $225; nonmembers, $275. April 6 TASB Webinar: Special Education Update, Part 4 Virtual event For more info, (512) 467-0222 or (800) 580-8272. www.tasb.org April 7 TASBO Workshop: State Template for School Districts ESC Region 15, San Angelo For more info, (512) 462-1711. www.tasbo.org Cost: TASBO members, $225; nonmembers, $275. TEPSA Spring Meeting, Region 19 Location and city TBA For more info, (512) 478-5268 or (800) 252-3621. www.tepsa.org

March 28-29

April 8

TASA/CMSi Curriculum Management Planning Workshop TASA Headquarters, Austin For more info, (512) 477-6361. www.tasanet.org Cost: TASA members, $525; Nonmembers, $575.

TSPRA Zone Meeting, Region 13 Eanes ISD, Austin For more info, (512) 474-9107. www.tspra.org

April 11 TASBO Workshop: Certified School Risk Managers TASBO offices, Austin For more info, (512) 462-1711. www.tasbo.org Cost: TASBO members and nonmembers, $250. TASBO Workshop: Deep Dive Into Self-Auditing Service Records Katy ISD, Katy For more info, (512) 462-1711. www.tasbo.org Cost: TASBO members, $225; nonmembers, $275. April 12 TASB Training: Asbestos Designated Person Spring ISD, Spring For more info, (512) 467-0222 or (800) 580-8272. www.tasb.org April 13 TASA/N2 Learning Assistant Principal Leadership Academy, Houston area cohort (session 5 of 6) Cypress-Fairbanks ISD, Cypress For more info, (972) 515-2268 www.n2learning.org Registration closed. TASA/N2 Learning Assistant Principal Leadership Academy, virtual cohort (session 5 of 6) Virtual event For more info, (972) 515-2268 www.n2learning.org Registration closed. TASB Training: Integrated Pest Management Spring ISD, Spring For more info, (512) 467-0222 or (800) 580-8272. www.tasb.org TSPRA Zone Meeting, Region 20 Location and city TBA For more info, (512) 474-9107. www.tspra.org


April 14 TASB Best Practices Course: Maintenance and Operations Spring ISD, Spring For more info, (512) 467-0222 or (800) 580-8272. www.tasb.org TSPRA Zone Meeting, Regions 12, 14, 15 Location and city TBA For more info, (512) 474-9107. www.tspra.org April 19 TASA/N2 Learning Assistant Principal Leadership Academy, Dallas area cohort (session 5 of 6) McKinney ISD, McKinney For more info, (972) 515-2268 www.n2learning.org Registration closed. April 20 TASA/TASB/TASBO Budget Cohort for Texas District Leaders Virtual event For more info, (512) 462-1711. www.tasanet.org Registration is closed.

May 11

TASB Webinar: SHARS Matters Virtual event For more info, (512) 467-0222 or (800) 580-8272. www.tasb.org

TSPRA Zone Meeting, Regions 6, 7, 8 Virtual event For more info, (512) 474-9107. www.tspra.org

TSPRA Zone Meetings, Regions 16 and 17 Location TBA, Lubbock For more info, (512) 474-9107. www.tspra.org

April 28

May 12

TASA Breakaway Leadership Program Virtual event For more info, (512) 477-6361. www.tasanet.org Registration is closed.

TASB Webinar: 2021-22 Recap and Plans for Moving Forward Virtual event For more info, (512) 467-0222 or (800) 580-8272. www.tasb.org

April 21 TASA/N2 Learning Assistant Principal Leadership Academy, Victoria/Corpus Christi cohort (session 5 of 6) Corpus Christi ISD, Corpus Christi For more info, (972) 515-2268 www.n2learning.org Registration closed. April 26 TASA/N2 Learning Assistant Principal Leadership Academy, Austin/San Antonio cohort (session 5 of 6) Northside ISD, San Antonio For more info, (972) 515-2268 www.n2learning.org Registration closed.

TSPRA Zone Meeting, Region 20 Location and city TBA For more info, (512) 474-9107. www.tspra.org

May 17

MAY May 2 TASBO Workshop: Deep Dive Into Self-Auditing Service Records ESC Region 19, El Paso For more info, (512) 462-1711. www.tasbo.org Cost: TASBO members, $225; nonmembers, $275. May 6 TSPRA Zone Meeting Sheldon ISD, Houston For more info, (512) 474-9107. www.tspra.org

TASA Breakaway Leadership Program (session 8 of 9) Virtual event For more info, (5121) 477-6361. www.tasanet.org Registration is closed. May 18 TASB Webinar: SHARS Billing Virtual event For more info, (512) 467-0222 or (800) 580-8272. www.tasb.org May 18-19 Texas ASCD Curriculum Leadership Academy 36, Kilgore area ESC Region 7, Kilgore For more info, (512) 477-8200 or (800) 717-2723. www.txascd.org ◄

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THE BACK PAGE

Texas School Business Advertiser Index

Choice Partners................................... 32 Choicepartners.org

H

Make a difference

ClassLink................................................. 10 classlink.com

by Riney Jordan

Corgan........................................................19 Corgan.com

ave you made a difference in anyone’s life today? That's a tough question.

But, in my opinion, if you took all of the journals of educational knowledge, all the books, the theories, strategies, plans, programs and research that have ever been developed, and if you were able, somehow, to condense them all down into one statement, I believe that it would come down to these three words: “Make a difference.” Oh, I’ll be the first to admit that it sounds a bit over-simplified, yet, isn’t that really what we are striving for in each of our students, each of our administrators, every person with whom we come into contact? For a moment, forget the lofty, rather boring essay in the district handbook about the goals of the school district. Admit that you never really grabbed that educational jargon and held onto it as your inspirational clutch, did you? Just make a difference. Change a life. Encourage a student to develop the gift you see in them that they don’t yet see. How many times I have wondered if I would have become an educator if it had not been for my sixth grade teacher, Mrs. Huff. What an encourager! She made each of her students feel that they could accomplish their dreams through hard work, dedication and commitment. She genuinely cared about me ... and I knew it! And here’s another important component of her technique for making a difference: She believed what she told us with all of her heart, so we believed it. For our purposes here, let me share another story of a student who was forever changed by one of her teachers. Growing up in various apartments throughout the city, she and her mother moved often, as her biological father left

them when she was only four years of age. Overweight and shy, she often heard the cruel comments of other students as she was growing up. Her mother took a job as a furniture maker, and she would spend her idle time dabbling in music. But a high school English teacher took an interest in the young girl and helped her develop a love for literature. She would later describe her teacher as “so engaging,” and add, “she really made us care and we knew that she cared about us.” That young girl would later use her love of literature to help develop her own style of writing, in the form of lyrics for songs. By the way, as a result of those lyrics and her amazing voice, she has currently sold more than 120 million records, earned 15 Grammy awards, and has been listed in the top five greatest female vocalists of all time. The teacher was Ms. McDonald, and the young vocal talent was none other than Adele Laurie Blue Adkins, known today simply as Adele. What if Adele had not encountered a teacher who made a difference? The same can be said of virtually every one of us. But for those students who go through our schools and later look back and say, “I didn’t have anyone like that in my life,” oh, what a tragedy! What a failure on our part. Today, take time to get to know that student sitting alone. Encourage one who has not had a successful day. Commit to making a difference in another individual. And at some point in the distant future, I sincerely hope that someone walks up to you, shakes your hand, looks you in the eye and says, “You may not remember me, but you’ll never know what a difference you make in my life, and I cannot begin to thank you enough.”

RINEY JORDAN is the author of two books and a frequent public speaker. To invite him to speak at your convocation, graduation or awards banquet, visit www.rineyjordan.com.

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Texas School Business JANUARY / FEBRUARY 2022

GPD Group.................................................4 gpdgroup.com Harris Co. Dept. of Education..........6 hcde-texas.org K12 Insight.................................................8 k12insight.com School Outfitters...................................2 schooloutfitters.com TASA...........................................................21 tasanet.org TASPA.......................................................... 5 taspa.org Texas School Business................ 9, 29 texasschoolbusiness.com Thought Exchange...............................31 thoughtexchange.com

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