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THE INDEPENDENT VOICE FOR PUBLIC EDUCATION IN TEXAS FOR 56 YEARS

June 2010

Texas public schools make strides to embrace 21st century learning In the Spotlight Pam Seipp D’Hanis ISD

TACS President Curtis Rhodes Needville ISD


Excellence Excellence inin

Education Education awards awards

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CONTENTS In the Spotlight: D’Hanis ISD superintendent teaches students to ‘cowboy up’

11

by Elizabeth Millard

TACS President Profile: Needville ISD’s Curtis Rhodes works for the greater good

13

by Jennifer LeClaire

COVER STORY: Closing the digital divide and bringing schools into the 21st century

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by Raven L. Hill

Texas Reform Education Foundation hosts statewide summit

31

by Stephen Thompson

Mapping it out: Acknowledging the power of vision in leadership

33

by Mike Smith, guest writer

DEPartments

COLUMNS

TSB Professional Development & Events Calendar

From the Editor

5

17

Who’s News

22

The Law Dawg  —  unleashed

7

Advertiser Index

34

by Katie Ford by Jim Walsh

Tech Toolbox

by Terry Morawski

The Back Page by Riney Jordan

9 34

Above photo: Superintendent Pam Seipp of D’Hanis ISD teaches students Gene Koch and Karson Voight the cowboy way. The views expressed by columnists and contributing writers do not necessarily reflect those of the publisher or Texas School Business advertisers. The publisher also makes no endorsement of the advertisers or advertisements in this publication. June 2010 • Texas School Business

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From the Editor In January my title with Texas School Business changed from editor to editorial director. The subtle change in my title is indicative of a very significant change in the publishing industry. Technology is literally changing the face of magazines. No longer is it enough to produce a printed publication; today’s readers want to access content online as well. And the definition of editorial content itself is evolving too. In addition to articles and photos, “editorial directors” are cranking out audio and video podcasts, blogs and other interactive media – all vehicles for telling stories and sharing information. I barely recognize my work environment these days, but these are exciting times as we begin implementing these features at Texas School Business. Teachers must feel the same way, as more and more technology is integrated into classrooms across Texas. It’s changing the face of education. For the cover story, we talked to administrators and technology experts about closing the digital divide in districts both large and small. In honor of smaller, rural districts, this month you’ll also find features on Needville ISD Superintendent Curtis Rhodes, who, in May, stepped up as the new president of the Texas Association of Community Schools. We also spoke with D’Hanis ISD Superintendent Pam Seipp, who strives to instill strong character and ethics in her students by teaching “the cowboy way.” As we roll into summer, I encourage all of you to revisit the wonderful programs and successes happening in your districts and to consider submitting a nomination in the Fourth Annual Bragging Rights 2010-2011 issue. You can read more about it and submit a nomination online at www.texasschoolbusiness.com in the Bragging Rights section.

Katie Ford Tex. Lic. #10138

(ISSN 0563-2978 USPS 541-620) June 2010 Volume LVI, Issue 9 1601 Rio Grande Street, #441 Austin, Texas 78701 Phone: 512-478-2113 • Fax: 512-495-9955 www.texasschoolbusiness.com

North Forney High School, Forney ISD

Barbara Walker Elementary School, Crandall ISD

Publisher Ted Siff Editor in Chief Jim Walsh Editorial Director Katie Ford Design Phaedra Strecher Columnists Riney Jordan, Terry Morawski, Jim Walsh Advertising Sales Manager Jim Johnson Business Manager Debbie Stover Director of Marketing and Customer Relations Stephen Markel Digital Media Manager Maira Garcia ISSN 0563-2978 USPS 541-620 Published monthly, except for July/August and November/ December, and for the Bragging Rights issue published in December (11 times a year) by Texas School Business Magazine, LLC, 1601 Rio Grande Street, #441, Austin, TX 78701. Periodical Postage Paid at Austin, Texas and at additional mailing offices. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Texas School Business,1601 Rio Grande Street, #441, Austin, TX 78701. SUBSCRIPTION RATES: $28 per year; $52 for two yrs; $72 for three yrs. Group rate: 10 or more, $18; single issues, $4.50.

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© Copyright 2010 Texas School Business Magazine LLC June 2010 • Texas School Business

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THE LAW DAWG – unleashed by Jim Walsh

Avoiding technical difficulties

L

awyers are, by nature, a conservative lot, grounded in tradition and precedent. “Stuck in the mud” might be another way of saying that. Thus, when it comes to the dizzying rate of change in the high tech world, we lawyers are lost little lambs. Sure, we hear a lot about these new tech toys and “apps,” but we prefer books and legal pads. Meanwhile, the wheels of justice grind ever so slowly. But they do grind. And thus we see that even the U.S. Supreme Court is now immersed in analyzing the legality of city officials searching for the text messages one of its police officers sent and received on his city-issued device (City of Ontario v. Quon). “Tech Toolbox” columnist Terry Morawski and I are writing about electronic communications this month — he from the tech guru perspective and me from the legal side. And my first point is that we lawyers can and will bow to the inevitable: Resistance to using these technologies is futile! Lawyers are paid to see problems in the gestation stage; we are apt to say “no” just to buy time. So, when email, text messaging, smartphones, Facebook, YouTube and Twitter established a beachhead in our schools, many school law firms advised their clients to avoid such “tools of the devil.” Dangerous devices, we said. Be careful. Better stick to the tried and true, we advised. Well, that’s not going to work anymore. Once that smartphone slips seductively into the palm of your hand, you are not going to let it go. There is no doubt that 21st century schools are going to employ 21st century tools. We cannot turn back the clock, nor should we. Therefore, we lawyers need to help you figure out how to use these tools wisely and legally. Point No. 2: Let’s not forget the PIA! The Public Information Act in Texas begins with a lofty statement that sounds like it was lifted from either a Boston Tea Party flyer or the writings of Thomas Jefferson. It reads: “The people, in delegating authority, do not give their public servants the right to decide

what is good for them to know and what is not good for them to know. The people insist on remaining informed so that they may retain control over the instruments they have created. The provisions of this chapter shall be liberally construed to implement this policy.” With this in mind, teachers and staff need to be reminded often that any electronic communication pertaining to district or school business will likely be considered “public information,” regardless of where or how the communication was generated. The simplicity of email and text messaging lends itself to informality, irreverence and sometimes awkward attempts at humor. Most of us have experienced sending a well-intentioned email to a friend, only to learn that our friendly “e-poke” to the ribs felt more like an “e-stab” in the back to the recipient. We should remember to be thoughtful and professional when communicating in writing — even in electronic communications. Point No. 3: Don’t forget FERPA! If you use electronic communications to discuss individual students, be aware that the stakes are even higher because the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act comes into play. I recently got a call from a school district about a teacher who had posted on Facebook, for the whole world to see, the following: “I’ve been moved up to high school! I still have Tiffany Sue, though.” (Name changed to protect the guilty.) If you were Tiffany Sue’s mom or dad, would you construe that remark as disparaging? I would. Teachers and administrators need to be reminded that parents have almost unfettered access to school records pertaining to their children. What it truly comes down to is using good judgment and common sense. Let’s use our new toys responsibly, and we are likely to stay within the bounds of the law. JIM WALSH is editor in chief of Texas School Business. He is also a school attorney with the firm of Walsh, Anderson, Brown, Gallegos and Green PC. He can be reached at jwalsh@wabsa.com.

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Presents Its 2010 –2011 Officers

President H. John Fuller Superintendent, Wylie ISD President-Elect Rod Townsend Superintendent, Hico ISD Vice President Jeff Turner Superintendent, Coppell ISD Texas Association of School Administrators 406 East 11th Street • Austin, TX 78701 • www.tasanet.org • 512.477.6361 or 800.725.8272 8

Texas School Business • June 2010

Past President John M. Folks Superintendent, Northside ISD


Tech Toolbox by Terry Morawski

Are u afraid of text messages?

T

hanks to a great recommendation from Texas School Business reader Nita Ellis, this month the Law Dawg Jim Walsh and I are tackling the same topic: electronic communications — specifically, text messaging and emailing. As Jim suggests in his column, up until recently, most districts have been reluctant to adopt these technologies when it comes to teachers and administrators communicating with students and parents. The legal pitfalls have yet to be clearly marked. Yet, times are quickly changing, and many districts are moving forward into unchartered waters. Below are some suggestions for using these convenient technologies without running into difficulties. Make an agreement. The best way to avoid pitfalls is to map out the terrain. Before implementing email or text message communications with students or staff, it would be wise to develop a written agreement addressing boundaries and expectations. This agreement should face legal review by your district’s legal counsel until a standard is established. At minimum, some items the agreement should address include: text message costs and who is responsible for them; text message limits; how to handle inappropriate or hostile communications; and an opt-out option for staff members who do not want to use these modes of communication and suggested alternative communication methods. Remain flexible, as you may need to change your guidelines with the times. Make sure there are individuals in your district who are responsible for keeping up with changes in technology platforms and services. This will ensure that the technologies you employ — and the guidelines you have in place — are up to date. Communicate professionally. In the name of convenience and timely communication, there will be individuals on your staff who want to send emails or text messages to students and/or parents. An

example would be a coach who is traveling with a team. Using text messaging to update students on mealtimes or schedule changes can save time and limit miscommunication. When using text messaging or email, the bottom line is this: Always draft your correspondence in a businesslike fashion. I often counsel administrators to show personality in their communications, but this is not one of those times. In the scenario above, a text message that says, “The bus leaves at 10 a.m.,” will get the job done. Practice the same policy when responding to students on email or via text message. When faced with an inappropriate response from a student, remember that you can control how you respond. In the best-case scenario, I recommend handling the situation offline (i.e., not responding by text or email, but in person). It is far too easy to send an emotional response when you are tired or angry. And as Jim points out in his “Law Dawg” column, your emails and text messages are creating a permanent written record. An email or text message driven by emotion could spell trouble, so avoid that at all costs. However, if circumstances necessitate that you respond electronically, avoid responding immediately and think before you type. In response, address the issue as briefly as possible in a professional tone, and then perhaps indicate that you will follow up in more detail the next time you and the student are in person. The topic of electronic communications is too broad to cover in one column, so if your district has a particular issue you would like to share or a question for me, just send me an email — professionally written, of course. TERRY MORAWSKI is the assistant superintendent of communications and marketing for Mansfield ISD. He writes about technology and other topics at www. communicationsjetpack.com. He can be reached at terrymorawski@gmail.com.

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Texas School Business • June 2010


In the

Spotlight

D’Hanis ISD Superintendent Pam Seipp instills character ‘the cowboy way’ by Elizabeth Millard

B

eing a cowboy or cowgirl is about more than ranching, roping and the great outdoors; there’s a code of ethics to follow, including respect for self and others. That’s just one of the many cowboy-themed character lessons taught at D’Hanis ISD, with Superintendent Pam Seipp leading the drive. A cowgirl herself, Seipp chose to work in D’Hanis ISD because of its proximity to her ranch and because of the district’s small-town feel. D’Hanis ISD has little more than 300 students and 61 employees (and that’s including maintenance, food service and teaching staff). And it didn’t hurt that the school mascot is a cowboy. Without an assistant, Seipp handles the district’s personnel, finance and curriculum issues. She devotes a large chunk of time to tailoring instruction around the book “Cowboy Ethics,” which she discovered early in her now five-year stretch at D’Hanis ISD. Although the guide, written by author James P. Owen, is designed for business executives, its lessons neatly translate to speak to the district’s students and staff, Seipp says. Seipp created a calendar around each of the book’s principles, which include always finish what you start, take pride in your work, talk less and say more and live each day with courage. “In my personal life, I’ve always been surrounded by cowboys, and in education, I felt I could bring my love of that lifestyle to my students and the whole community,” says Seipp. “I’m very adamant about modeling and teaching character to children, and they really relate to this ‘code of the West’ approach.” Before coming to D’Hanis ISD, Seipp worked as a high school science teacher and then got into administration, taking on roles as an elementary school principal, a secondary school principal and an assistant superintendent.

Students Gene Koch and Karson Voight (left to right) learn the “cowboy way” from their superintendent, Pam Seipp of D’Hanis ISD.

She admits that she didn’t grow up wanting to be in education. Seipp had dreams of becoming a doctor, and she earned a degree in chemistry from Texas Tech University in preparation for such a career. When she didn’t get into medical school, Seipp began working for a dean at the college while trying to figure out her next step. “One day my boss told me that I was wasting my degree, working for him, especially when there was such a need for math and science teachers,” she recalls. “He walked me over to the dean of education’s office, and within a week, I had five job offers from different districts.” Seipp has worked in education now

for more than 30 years. D’Hanis ISD celebrated its centennial in February. “We really looked at what we’ve achieved in the last 100 years and thought about how to move forward based on that,” Seipp says, noting that the district commemorated the anniversary with a cowboy-themed community event. While organizing the party, she and the planning committee decided to start a foundation to provide scholarships for students. Because the first planning meeting was in December, they had less than two months to pull together the event and build awareness about the new foundation. But, like cowboys getting the cattle home, Seipp and her committee members pulled See SPOTLIGHT on page 30 June 2010 • Texas School Business

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TACS PRESIDENT profile Needville ISD Superintendent Curtis Rhodes is an agent of change for public education by Whitney Angstadt

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or Needville ISD’s Curtis Rhodes, being superintendent is a legacy. The youngest son of Glen Rhodes, who served as a superintendent of schools in Texas for more than 30 years, the young Rhodes heard his calling early in life and decided to follow in his father’s footsteps. Like his father, Rhodes acknowledges the important role that school districts play in their communities — particularly in smaller towns. “My father had always been a tremendous person in the community, very upstanding and respected,” Rhodes says. “Going back to the communities where he used to work, they all love him.” This understanding planted a seed in Rhodes that ultimately prompted him to focus on an even larger community and join the Texas Association of Community Schools (TACS). He was sworn in as the new TACS president in May. Representing school districts with no more than one high school, TACS brings small districts together to develop, support and promote excellence in education. It’s a goal that Rhodes has worked toward on smaller scales for the bulk of his career. Rhodes studied education at Sam Houston State University (SHSU), graduating with a bachelor’s degree in 1987. He took a job as a junior high school coach and science teacher in Klein ISD, on the northern edge of Houston. With an eye on a superintendency, Rhodes left Klein ISD in 1992 to be the assistant principal at Cuero High School in Cuero ISD, also a one-high-school district, where he stayed for two years. Within that time, Rhodes received his master’s degree in mid-management from SHSU before heading to Groesbeck ISD in 1994, where he was the principal of the only high school there. In 1996, Rhodes left Groesbeck and became principal of Stephenville High School in Stephenville ISD, yet another one-highschool district.

Needville ISD Superintendent Curtis Rhodes hangs out in the science lab at Needville Junior High with eighth graders Makenzie Raesner and Cameron Anderson.

In 2000, Rhodes made his move up the ladder to become superintendent of schools at Ingram ISD. He moved to Athens ISD in 2002 to be close to his parents in their last years. He acted as superintendent there for two years before moving to Needville with his wife and three kids in 2006, where he now serves as the district superintendent. Rhodes works tirelessly to support public education — whether it’s an issue affecting his district, or districts statewide. “I learned as I got further into my career that you need to be a voice out there and work for your profession,” says Rhodes. “I think as you grow up in the business, you start to see where decisions are made and how decisions are made. And if you want to be a change agent in that process, you need to learn the system so that you can help make the decisions.” Now at the helm of an organization that represents more than 700 school districts, Rhodes feels particularly called to

be a part of the decision-making process. Often overshadowed by larger school districts, small school districts have banded together to protect their independent cultures. “Your school district is a direct reflection of the community it sits in,” says Rhodes. “The community portion of that, to me, is very important. There are different issues up north or out west or down south.” TACS honors that diversity and still understands the challenges that most of the smaller, independent school districts share — namely funding and representation. The association works to give its member districts every chance to meet the educational needs of their communities. For Rhodes and most TACS members, this includes maintaining as much local control as possible. See PRESIDENT on page 32 June 2010 • Texas School Business

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Closing the digital divide

Texas public schools, small and large, are moving into the 21st century

by Raven L. Hill

W

hen Shelia Joiner started teaching in 1975, technology was practically invisible in the classroom. Overhead projectors were considered the pinnacle of offerings. Teaching and learning were to the point: Teachers presented material, and students absorbed it. These days, technology is changing that dynamic — most auspiciously on the desks of Joiner’s third graders at A.B. Duncan Elementary School in Floydada ISD, near Lubbock. Each student uses a laptop for schoolwork, which allows Joiner to be a teacher and virtual tutor simultaneously. For her students, she uploads videos of her teaching various concepts. With a few clicks of a mouse, students can view the videos and review as often as needed — anywhere, anytime. “I use the laptop to multiply myself,” she says. “It’s really increased my ability to be skill-specific with certain children. Drilling and practicing have become enjoyable. Kids are more motivated to do it than they have been in the past.” Schools throughout the state are working fervently to create 21st century classrooms. Tools that were thought to be uncommon only five years ago — such as smartboards and flash drives — aren’t so rare anymore. Many districts have capitalized on state programs and local initiatives to keep their students moving quickly along the information superhighway. Lori Gracey, executive director of the Texas Computer Education Association, says technology has incomparable benefits for teachers and students. “With technology you’re able to differentiLori Gracey ate for every child in the classroom based on their needs,” she says. “Kids are doing different kinds of activities to learn, rather than passively receiving information.”

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Texas School Business • June 2010

Gracey says she expects greater movement toward learning outside of the classroom now that technology is increasingly in the picture, especially at the secondary level. “You’ll see students forming relationships with students in other states and across the world to learn and create new learning together,” she says. “Learning will be more student-to-student focused, as opposed to adult-directed learning.” In 2003, Texas launched the Technology Immersion Pilot — a $20 million, federally funded, four-year, middle school program — with the hopes that immersing schools in technology would prove to be more effective than introducing resources over time. The pilot program explored wireless, mobile computing devices (such as laptops) for each student and teacher; online resources for core curriculum subject areas; online assessments; professional development; and ongoing technical support. For Floydada ISD, one of 42 participating pilot districts, the program opened the door to technological success. Floydada ISD, in West Texas, is a rural district with a little more than 880 students. Approximately 68 percent of its students come from economically disadvantaged families, and 23 percent of teachers have more than 20 years of experience. In the 2004-2005 school year, the district was rated by the state as “academically acceptable.” “We needed something to give us a jump start, a boost,” says Rex Holcombe, the district’s director of technology and federal programs. “We needed something to help not only teachers, but students, to buy into technology. The technology immersion program gave us a way to provide staff development and integrate technology to help our kids.” Floydada Junior High School implemented a “1:1” model, in which each stu-

dent and teacher received a laptop to use in school and at home. School officials say the students quickly adapted to using their computers, and teachers were intrigued by the possibilities. As the district’s success grew, officials say they realized it would be a tremendous setback to limit the “1:1” laptop program to the junior high. For the past five years, the program has been in place at the high school — albeit, this time through local funds. Elementary school teachers received laptops as well. Community support has been key to the success of Floydada ISD’s technology immersion. The district says it’s critical that teachers embrace ongoing technology professional development and that parents are willing to pay for tuition for online classes and for Internet access at home. Floydada High School Principal Wayne Morren describes the district as being “very traditional” prior to the Technology Immersion Pilot. “[Classroom instruction] was teacherWayne Morren oriented, predominantly lecture-type delivery,” says Morren, who has been with the district for nine years. “We began immediately to put kids in project-based activities [once the program began]. We allowed students to be creative and to build examples of their knowledge. It’s paid off in big ways for us.” When working on vocabulary-building exercises, students now can do more than simply recognize words; they can build digital demonstrations of the word’s meaning, he says. “With laptops, they can personalize the meaning and connection between how they live and the new vocabulary,” Morren says. “Those connections are paying off for us.” A statewide evaluation of the immersion program found substantial benefits


Professional development is the glue first. Teeple didn’t grow up with that holds everything together, Floydada a computer at home, and the new ISD officials say. technology-based lesson plans were “Sustainable staff development and somewhat intimidating for her. Yet, The 1-to-1 Advantage: how you prepare teachers play a big role she slowly realized that this was a www.the1to1advantage.com in the success you will have with a 1:1,” good thing. Texas Education Agency programs says Principal Morren. “You can’t change “You have to be willing to ask and initiatives: www.tea.state. one thing and expect it to work.” the kids for help,” Teeple says. “Let tx.us/index2.aspx?id=5096&menu_ Gracey of TCEA agrees. the kids teach you.” id=851&menu_id2=788 “Regardless of what technology we The result has been a more buy, it’s all about changing the way we engaged classroom, where the teach and learn,” she says. quality of projects and research It’s a change that teachers like Joiner has noticeably improved, have embraced. Online assessments Teeple says. provide students with immediate feedback. “It levels the playing field for all as well, including increased rigor in curThe breadth and depth of the Internet go kids,” she says. “[Before the program], riculum, enhanced technological profibeyond Joiner’s scope of knowledge. For those who had access to technology at ciency for all students, fewer disciplinary instance, Joiner says that while her class home would turn in wonderful projects problems, and higher ninth grade readwas working on a presentation about the and the lower-level students couldn’t ing scores and seventh and eighth grade continents, she was pleased when students compete. Now every student can turn in math scores, on the Texas Assessment of asked her if she was aware of some fact something that looks good with the same Knowledge and Skills. they’d found while doing online research. quality of research.” “And it was something I didn’t know!” And when the students go home, they Leading the pack she says, laughing. “The computers aren’t can teach their parents, Teeple adds. Floydada ISD has done consulting replacing pencil and paper; the computers “They’re bridging the gap at home work with districts nationwide on similar support them. It’s a tool. It doesn’t drive too; they are teaching their parents,” she “1:1” models. Floydada ISD was named me; I drive it.” says. “I think it’s great that they have an Apple Exemplary Program for 2009access to the programs, technology and 2010, a new honor to recognize model RAVEN L. HILL is a freelance writer and the knowledge. The parents wouldn’t be implementations of Apple products and former education reporter for the Austin willing to look at the technological world solutions. Floydada was one of only 38 American-Statesman. if their children weren’t bringing it home programs to receive the honor nationwide. every day.” The district also was given an Apple Distinguished School award, the only one given in Texas during the 2007-2008 school year. Along with changing the way instruction and learning happens in the classroom, the laptop program is bridging the digital divide on three fronts: • among students of different socioeconomic levels • between Floydada ISD and more-affluent districts, and • between students and educators — and even parents and children. Today’s students are surrounded by technology tools, such as MP3 players, digital cameras, digital phones and gaming devices, and schools have no choice but to catch up. Aimee Teeple, a high school teacher who taught at Floydada ISD’s junior high during the program’s implementation, says Sheila Joiner leads her third graders at A.B. Duncan Elementary in Floydada ISD. All students in her she had some reservations at class have laptop computers, which they use to do research and engage in classroom exercises.

Online resources

June 2010 • Texas School Business

15


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Disciplinary Alternative Education Programs: The Legal Issues

Jim Walsh – Walsh, Anderson, Brown, Gallegos & Green, P.C., Austin

June 8, 2010

Navigating the Minefields of Family Legal Battles Jeana Lungwitz – Lungwitz & Lungwitz, P.C., Austin

What Principals Need to Know About Title IX

Shellie Hoffman Crow – Walsh, Anderson, Brown, Gallegos & Green, P.C., San Antonio

Avoiding Legal Claims During the Hiring Process Lisa McBride – Thompson & Horton, Houston

The Principal’s Role in Handling Cyberbullying by Students On Your Campus

Robb D. Decker – Walsh, Anderson, Brown, Gallegos & Green, P.C., San Antonio

Legal Currency in Special Education Law: Zirkel’s Top Ten Court Decisions and Other Legal Developments for School Leaders Perry A. Zirkel – Lehigh University, Bethlehem, Pennsylvania

The Latest on Religion in Our Schools

David Backus – Underwood Law Firm, Lubbock

A One-Day Conference on Current Issues Involving Legal Duties and Liabilities of Public School Principals Cosponsored by: Texas Association of Secondary School Principals and Texas School Administrators’ Legal Digest

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Texas School Business • June 2010


TSB Calendar

Professional Development & EVENTS WEEK OF JULY 5

WEEK OF JULY 19

July 9-10

July 19

TCTA Leadership Conference Arboretum Renaissance Hotel, Austin For more info, (512) 477-9415 or (888) 879-8282. www.tcta.org

Intermediate Governmental Accounting, Part 1 Beaumont ISD For more info, (512) 462-1711 or (800) 338-6531. www.tasbo.org

July 11-13 Annual TAHPERD Summer Conference Embassy Suites, Frisco For more info, (512) 459-1290. www.tahperd.org

Cost: Preregistration (by June 15): professional and associate members and out of state, $85; student and retired members, $35. Late registration (after June 15): professional and associate members and out of state, $95; student and retired members, $45.

WEEK OF JULY 12 July 12-16 Summer Coaches Clinic Convention Center, Arlington For more info, (512) 708-1333. www.austintgca.com

Cost: Early registration (before June 15), $70, includes $40 membership fee; after June 15, $35, includes $40 membership fee. TGCA members only. July 16-18 Texas Educational Theatre Association SummerFest Texas State University, San Marcos For more info, Gloria McLuckie, (979) 826-5533. www.tetatx.com

Cost: Registration, $125. July 18-21

Texas High School Coaches Association Convention and Coaching School Henry B. Gonzalez Convention Center, San Antonio For more info, (512) 392-3741. www.thsca.com

Cost: Members, $140; nonmembers, $180. July 20

Intermediate Governmental Accounting, Part 2 Beaumont ISD For more info, (512) 462-1711 or (800) 338-6531. www.tasbo.org

Cost: Members, $140; nonmembers, $180. July 21

TASPA Law Conference Doubletree Hotel, Austin For more info, (512) 494-9353. www.taspa.org

Cost: $75.

July 21-23

Northside ISD, San Antonio For more info, (512) 477-8200 or (800) 717-2723. www.txascd.org

WEEK OF AUGUST 2 No events listed. WEEK OF AUGUST 9 August 9-10 Focus On Leadership Workshop Barton Creek Resort, Austin For more info, (512) 462-1711 or (800) 338-6531. www.tasbo.org

Cost: Members, $260; nonmembers, $300. August 11

Games and Skills for Teaching Tennis, No Tennis Court Required: A Participation Workshop for Elementary and Middle School Teachers and Program Directors Connally High School, Austin For more info, (512) 459-1299. www.tahperd.org

TASPA Annual Summer Conference Doubletree Hotel, Austin For more info, (512) 494-9353. www.taspa.org

August 12

July 22-24

Cost: Members, $140; nonmembers, $180.

Cost: Members, $150; retired members, $75.

ASCD Leader to Leader Event Lansdowne Resort, Lansdowne, Va. For more info, (800) 933-2723 www.ascd.org

Cost: $100.

WEEK OF JULY 26 July 26 Basic PEIMS Workshop Location TBA, Fredericksburg For more info, (512) 462-1711 or (800) 338-6531. www.tasbo.org

Cost: Members, $180; nonmembers, $220. July 27-28

Texas ASCD: Jumping Hurdles and Raising the Bar Toward Achieving Excellence in Science

The Basics of Investing School Funds Farmsville ISD For more info, (512) 462-1711 or (800) 338-6531. www.tasbo.org

August 13 Investing School Funds Farmsville ISD For more info, (512) 462-1711 or (800) 338-6531. www.tasbo.org

Cost: Members, $140; nonmembers, $180.

WEEK OF AUGUST 16 No events listed.

WEEK OF AUGUST 23 No events listed.

See CALENDAR on page 19 June 2010 • Texas School Business

17


Back To School Special: legal Workshops with Jim Walsh This year we have court cases from state and federal courts, commissioner’s decisions and other legal developments that will impact the day-to-day operations of your schools from the classroom to the principal’s office to the board room. In particular this year we will focus on the legal issues of most concern to school principals and assistant principals: student discipline, special education matters, personnel issues and parental Rights. As usual, the presentation will be lively, upbeat and interactive, allowing plenty of time for Q and A. You will come away with specific to-do lists and tools to help you avoid legal problems in the upcoming year. check out the companion TaSSp Fall SummiT WoRkShopS visit www.TaSSp.org for more details!

Bring Your AdministrAtors, LeAd teAchers, counseLors, speciAL ed. stAff, And centrAL office teAm!

2010 Workshop Dates and locations September 1, 2010 ESC Region 1 Edinburg

September 13, 2010 ESC Region 10 Richardson

September 27, 2010 ESC Region 20 San Antonio

September 7, 2010 ESC Region 18 Midland

September 16, 2010 ESC Region 17 Lubbock

October 1, 2010 ESC Region 7 Kilgore

September 9, 2010 ESC Region 11 Fort Worth

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register online • www.legaldigest.com Ph: 512.478.2113 • Fax: 512.495.9955

Texas School Business • June 2010


TSB Calendar

Professional Development & EVENTS

CALENDAR continued from page 17

WEEK OF AUGUST 30 September 1 Back to School Special: Legal Workshop with Jim Walsh ESC Region 1, Edinburg For more info, (512) 478-2113. www.legaldigest.com

Cost: Early registration (by Aug. 25): online, $105; offline, $125. Regular registration (after Aug. 25): online, $125; offline, $145. September 2 TASSP Fall Summit ESC Region I, Edinburg For more info, (512) 443-2100. www.tassp.org

Cost: $160.

WEEK OF SEPTEMBER 6 September 7 Back to School Special: Legal Workshop with Jim Walsh ESC Region 18, Midland For more info, (512) 478-2113. www.legaldigest.com

Cost: Early registration (by Aug. 25): online, $105; offline, $125. Regular registration (after Aug. 25): online, $125; offline, $145. September 8 TASSP Fall Summit ESC Region 18, Midland For more info, (512) 443-2100. www.tassp.org

Cost: $160.

September 9 Back to School Special: Legal Workshop with Jim Walsh ESC Region 11, Fort Worth For more info, (512) 478-2113. www.legaldigest.com

Cost: Early registration (by Aug. 25): online, $105; offline, $125. Regular registration (after Aug. 25): online, $125; offline, $145. September 10 TASSP Fall Summit ESC Region 11, Fort Worth For more info, (512) 443-2100. www.tassp.org

Cost: $160.

September 10-12

WEEK OF SEPTEMBER 20

Texas Interscholastic Swim Coaches Association General Meeting and Clinic Omni Southpark, Austin For more info, John Vogel (281) 376-4460. www.tisca.org

September 22

Cost: $115.

WEEK OF SEPTEMBER 13 September 13 Back to School Special: Legal Workshop with Jim Walsh ESC Region 10, Richardson For more info, (512) 478-2113. www.legaldigest.com

Cost: Early registration (by Aug. 25): online, $105; offline, $125. Regular registration (after Aug. 25): online, $125; offline, $145. September 13 Internal Audit Academy The Woodlands Resort and Conference Center, The Woodlands For more info, (512) 462-1711 or (800) 338-6531. www.tasbo.org

Cost: Members, $265; nonmembers, $305. September 14

TASSP Fall Summit ESC Region 10, Richardson For more info, (512) 443-2100. www.tassp.org

Cost: $160.

September 16 Back to School Special: Legal Workshop with Jim Walsh ESC Region 17, Lubbock For more info, (512) 478-2113. www.legaldigest.com

Cost: Early registration (by Aug. 25): online, $105; offline, $125. Regular registration (after Aug. 25): online, $125; offline, $145. September 17 TASSP Fall Summit ESC Region 17, Lubbock For more info, (512) 443-2100. www.tassp.org

Cost: $160.

Back to School Special: Legal Workshop with Jim Walsh ESC Regions 4 and 6, Grand Palace Conference and Events Center, Spring For more info, (512) 478-2113. www.legaldigest.com

Cost: Early registration (by Aug. 25): online, $105; offline, $125. Regular registration (after Aug. 25): online, $125; offline, $145. September 23 TASSP Fall Summit ESC Regions 4 and 6, Grand Palace Conference and Events Center, Spring For more info, (512) 443-2100. www.tassp.org

Cost: $160.

September 24-26 Annual TASA/TASB Convention George R. Brown Convention Center, Houston For more info, (800) 725-8272. www.tasa.tasb.org

Cost: TASA/TASB members, $295; nonmembers, $395.

WEEK OF SEPTEMBER 27 September 27 TASSP Fall Summit ESC Region 20, San Antonio For more info, (512) 443-2100. www.tassp.org

Cost: $160.

September 29 Back to School Special: Legal Workshop with Jim Walsh ESC Region 20, San Antonio For more info, (512) 478-2113. www.legaldigest.com

Cost: Early registration (by Aug. 25): online, $105; offline, $125. Regular registration (after Aug. 25): online, $125; offline, $145. September 29-30 Using Graphic Organizers and Assessment Tools to Make Mathematics Content More Accessible to Struggling Students (session 1 of 3) Galena Park ISD, Houston area For more info, (512) 477-8200 or (800) 717-2723. www.txascd.org TSB June 2010 • Texas School Business

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CONGRATULATIONS TEXAS EDUCATORS! (Headlines we don’t find in the news.)

Nine of every 10 high school students in Texas earn diploma http://ritter.tea.state.tx.us/research/pdfs/dropcomp_2007-08.pdf (p.56)

Texas ACT scores reach all-time high http://tea.state.tx.us/index4.aspx?id=5605

Percentage of Texas schools rated exemplary skyrockets http://www.tea.state.tx.us/index4.aspx?id=5280

Texas schools measure up to NCLB requirements http://www.ed.gov/nclb/accountability/results/progress/tx.html

Public schools outperform private schools in math instruction http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/02/090226093423.htm

Nine of every 10 eighth graders pass TAKS reading http://www.tea.state.tx.us/index4.aspx?id=4115

Evidence shows achievement gaps narrowing http://nces.ed.gov/nationsreportcard/studies/gaps/

http://www.ed.gov/news/pressreleases/2008/12/12092008.html

Texas scores high marks for college readiness http://www.fotps.org/QualityCounts09

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Who’s News Abilene ISD Reagan Elementary School will have Ketta Garduno as its principal beginning June 2011, upon the retirement of Mike Kozelsky. She will continue to serve as the school’s guidance counselor until Ketta Garduno that time. An educator since 1988, Garduno has worked in both large and small districts at elementary, secondary and central administration levels as a high school teacher, elementary and secondary counselor, federal programs specialist and college instructor. Garduno earned her bachelor’s and master’s degrees in education from Abilene Christian University and her doctorate in educational administration from Texas A&M University. Newly hired Associate Superintendent for Personnel Mark Neal is an attorney who comes to Abilene ISD from Angleton. He is a 25-year member of the school law section of the Texas Bar Association and an active parMark Neal ticipant in the state and national school board associations’ Council of School Attorneys. Neal is a graduate of The University of Texas with a degree in journalism; he earned his doctor of jurisprudence degree from the university’s School of Law. An attorney in practice since 1982, he has most recently served as general counsel for Angleton ISD. Cyndi Smith will take the lead role at Thomas Elementary School as principal when the new academic year begins. She is currently an instructional specialist at Abilene High School. She has been a math teacher at middle Cyndi Smith and high school levels and a middle school instructional specialist. Additionally, she spent five years as a middle school math consultant for AP Strategies Inc. Smith has a bachelor of science degree in deaf education from Texas Christian University. Her master’s degree in education is from Abilene Christian University. 22

Texas School Business • June 2010

Alvin ISD The new assistant superintendent of curriculum and instruction is Pamela Morris, who began her career in her hometown of Cleveland as a social studies teacher. She then taught in Crosby and ChannelPamela Morris view before transferring to Ingram ISD, where she was assistant principal and then principal of Moore High School. She next moved to Sealy ISD to serve as principal of Sealy High School. She was the superintendent of Sealy ISD since 2007. Morris has a bachelor of arts degree in education from Sam Houston State University and a master of education degree from Stephen F. Austin State University. Angleton ISD Angleton High School Principal Lisa Davis will serve as a secondary education director, effective July 1. Her first administrative assignment was as an assistant principal, after which she was principal of Angleton Middle Lisa Davis School for two years before becoming the high school principal in 2008. She began her education career as a history and psychology teacher at the Brazoria County Juvenile Justice Alternative Education Program, where she remained for five years; she previously had been a drill instructor there. Davis became an educator after spending four years in the U.S. Army as a military police officer. Austin ISD John Y. Alawneh has been named the new executive director for technology. He currently serves as executive director of technology operations for Plano ISD. Prior to beginning his career as a public school administrator, he worked in the private sector, including a stint as the administrative director of information technology services for the North Texas division of the Hospital Corporation of America and as the administrative director of information technology and telecommunications for the Sierra Providence Healthcare Net-

work. Alawneh holds a bachelor’s degree in electrical engineering and a master’s degree and doctorate in computer engineering, all from The University of Texas at El Paso; additionally, he earned a master’s degree in business administration from New Mexico State University. Benavides ISD Daniel Ceballos is the new superintendent, coming to Benavides from Mathis ISD, where for the past six years he was a principal and area administrator for Benavides ISD’s college-readiness program. He has spent 15 years as a lead principal, elementary and secondary principal, library media specialist and classroom teacher. Both his bachelor’s degree in bilingual education and his master’s degree in education administration are from Texas A&M University at Corpus Christi. Birdville lSD Spicer Elementary School will have Cheryl Schwaebler as its principal when the new school year begins. She was a fourth grade teacher at Birdville’s Smithfield Elementary prior to 2005 and then served in the same caCheryl Schwaebler pacity at Walker Creek Elementary from 2005 to 2007. Since that time, she has been assistant principal of the Academy at C.F. Thomas. Schwaebler’s bachelor’s degree is from Texas Woman’s University and her master’s degree is from Dallas Baptist University. Borger ISD New Superintendent Chance Welch comes to his new post from Graford ISD, where he also held the top position. He began in 1993 as a teacher and coach, serving in Granbury, Whitesboro and Canyon Chance Welch ISDs before becoming a teacher and administrative assistant in Amarillo ISD, where he also held his first full-time administrative position as an assistant principal. In 2002, he became high school principal in Merid-


Who’s News ian ISD, remaining there for three years before taking on the superintendent role in Graford in 2005. Welch has a bachelor’s degree in speech communications and psychology from Southwest Texas State University (now Texas State University) and a master of education degree in administration from West Texas A&M University. Brownsville ISD School board Vice President Ruben Cortez Jr. has been elected to a position on the steering committee of the Council of Urban Boards of Education (CUBE). The organization, which Ruben Cortez, Jr. was established in 1967, is governed by urban school board members to serve the needs of urban school boards. Cortez’s election came in April during the National School Boards Association annual conference. Two Brownsville administrators were selected as the top principals in Texas as

recipients of the H-E-B Excellence in Education awards, presented May 2 in Houston. Alma Cardenas-Rubio of Besteiro Middle School was the winner among Alma Cardenas- secondary school princiRubio pals, and Sherry Stout, who leads Benavides Elementary School, was recognized among elementary school principals. Each won $10,000 for herself and $25,000 for her school. The H-E-B awards program Sherry Stout for educators began in 2002 in coordination with the Texas Association of School Administrators. Buena Vista ISD Guy Birdwell has been named superintendent. His most recent position was principal of Buena Vista High School.

Burkeville ISD Burkeville ISD has Paula Quick as its new superintendent. She returns to the district, where she previously served as assistant superintendent before her most recent job as superintendent of High Island ISD. Quick began Paula Quick her education career as a pre-K teacher in a private school, entering the Texas public schools as an art teacher in Buna ISD in 1982. She then was a teacher in Lumberton ISD for seven years before spending a year as an elementary teacher at the International School in Yanbu, Saudi Arabia. Upon returning to the United States, she taught science in Silsbee Middle School, later becoming that school’s academic team leader and chair of the Silsbee ISD school district advisory team. She arrived in 1998 at Burkeville ISD, where she served as principal of Burkeville High School and Middle See WHO’S NEWS on page 24

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Who’s News Clint ISD (El Paso) Cathy Macias will lead Horizon Middle School as its principal. She is currently serving as assistant principal of the school. Macias has been with Clint ISD for 20 years. Robert Mendoza has transferred from serving as principal of Horizon Middle School to the top job at Ricardo Estrada Junior High School, which will open in August.

WHO’S NEWS continued from page 23

School until 2008. At that time, she transferred to take the top position at High Island ISD, where she worked with federal agencies, including FEMA, on renovation and insurance issues following Hurricane Ike. Quick holds a bachelor’s degree in elementary education and a master’s degree in secondary education from Lamar University in Beaumont, where she also earned her mid-management and superintendent certifications.

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Texas School Business • June 2010

Colorado ISD The new superintendent is Reggy Spencer, who comes to Colorado ISD from Moran ISD, where he had served as superintendent since 2006. Prior to his time in Moran, Spencer was an agriculture teachReggy Spencer er, elementary and junior high principal, and ultimately superintendent of Roby ISD. He holds a bachelor’s degree in agricultural services and development and a master’s degree in agricultural education, both from Tarleton State University. Coppell ISD Superintendent Jeffrey N. Turner has been elected to serve as vice president of the Texas Association of School Administrators for 2010-2011. He has been a member of TASA for 16 years, representJeffrey N. Turner ing ESC Region 10 on the executive committee since 2007. He also has served the organization as a mentor superintendent, study group chair, communications and technology chair and leadership development committee member. Cypress-Fairbanks ISD Kelly Dalton is the new principal of Danish Elementary School. She has spent her 20-year career with the district, beginning as a teacher at Owens and Hairgrove elementary schools. She then spent eight years as the assistant principal of Reed Elementary before coming to her most recent position of principal of Holbrook Elementary. Dalton’s bachelor of science degree in elementary education is from Lamar University and her master’s degree in administration and supervision is from the University of Houston. Mapra Gentry, coordinator for elementary social studies, has been honored as Supervisor of the Year by the Texas Social Studies Supervisors Association. Upon joining the district, Gentry volunteered to serve in the Cy-Fair Council for Social Studies. She subsequently was the


Who’s News organization’s vice president and president. Gleason Elementary will have Melody Goffney as its principal. Her most recent position with the district was assistant Mapra Gentry principal of Postma Elementary. She is a 12year veteran of Texas public education, and 10 of those have been with CypressFairbanks. Her first teaching position was in Aldine ISD. She then taught at CypressFairbanks ISD’s Holmsley Elementary for four years before being appointed instructional specialist at Lamkin Elementary, where she spent a year. Her first assistant principal position was at Duryea Elementary, where she served for one year before moving to Postma. Goffney’s bachelor’s degree is from Sam Houston State University. Her master’s degree is from Prairie View A&M University, and she is certified as a principal and in elementary selfcontained, early childhood education and elementary history. Tipps Elementary School Assistant Principal Tonya Goree has been named principal of Lee Elementary School. Her now 19-year education career began when she was a classroom teacher and instructional specialist in Fort Bend ISD. She moved to Aldine ISD as an assistant principal at Hill Intermediate School and served there for eight years before coming to Cypress-Fairbanks ISD as Tipps’ assistant principal in 2009. Goree’s bachelor of science degree in elementary education is from Lamar University, and her master of education degree in educational administration is from Prairie View A&M University. Melissa LeDoux, a 16-year veteran of Cypress-Fairbanks ISD, is the new principal of Black Elementary School. Currently serving as assistant principal of Moore Elementary, she began her career as a teacher in Louisiana in 1990, arriving in Texas to join Abilene ISD. She began her service with Cypress-Fairbanks ISD at Metcalf Elementary, later transferring to Emmott Elementary. She then was an instructional specialist at Reed Elementary for three years before taking on her role at Moore, where she has been for five

years. LeDoux earned her bachelor’s degree from the University of Arkansas and her master of education degree from Sam Houston State University. Copeland Elementary will have Michelle Rice as its principal when the new school year begins. An educator for 10 years, she began as a first and second grade teacher in Magnolia ISD. She then spent two years as a gifted and talented teacher and coordinator at Magnolia

Elementary, moving to Ellisor Elementary in that district to serve as the school’s assistant principal. She came to CypressFairbanks ISD in August 2009, where she has been assistant principal of Warner Elementary. Rice has a bachelor’s degree from Southwestern Assemblies of God University and a master’s degree from Sam Houston State University. See WHO’S NEWS on page 26

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June 2010 • Texas School Business

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Who’s News WHO’S NEWS continued from page 25

Tricia Reilly will be the principal of Farney Elementary School, moving to her new position from serving as assistant principal of Black Elementary. An educator who has been with the district for 10 years, she began her career as a teacher in Klein ISD. Upon arriving at CypressFairbanks ISD, she spent a year teaching at Kirk Elementary before becoming the school’s instructional specialist. Her next assignment was as assistant principal at Hamilton Elementary, where she remained for three years before transferring to Black Elementary, where she has been for the past four years. Reilly has a bachelor’s degree from Sam Houston State University and a master’s degree in education from the University of Houston. Bang Elementary will have Erwann Wilson as its principal. An educator for 25 years, she has been with the district for 21 of those. She began as a teacher for three years at Frazier Elementary, then spent two years at Millsap and one year at Hamilton elementary schools. She was promoted to assistant principal of Hamilton and remained there for four years before taking on the role of principal at Frazier. After eight years at that school, she was at Metcalf Elementary for three years. She then served in Houston and Mansfield ISDs be-

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fore returning to Cypress Fairbanks. Wilson’s bachelor’s and master’s degrees are from Prairie View A&M University. Eanes ISD A new principal has been named for Barton Creek Elementary School. He is Bryan Shippey, who comes to Eanes from Arlington ISD. He began his career as an elementary teacher in Arlington Bryan Shippey and Lubbock ISDs and has most recently served as assistant principal of Arlington’s Ousley Junior High and Rankin Elementary. Shippey’s bachelor’s degree in psychology is from Texas Tech University, and his master’s degree in education is from The University of Texas at Arlington. Fort Bend ISD A new band director has been named for Willowridge High School. He is Maurice Ross, who comes to the district from Melillo Middle School in Pasadena ISD, where he held the same position. He Maurice Ross began his career 20 years ago. In Fort Bend ISD,

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he also has served at McAuliffe and Lake Olympia middle schools. Ross has a bachelor’s degree in music education from Texas Southern University and a master of music degree from the University of Houston. Goose Creek ISD Six principals and a central office administrator have been named for the 2010-2011 school year. The new director of career and technical education is Renea Dillon. She has worked for the College of the MainRenea Dillon land since 1999, serving as principal of the institution’s Collegiate High School for the past six years. From 1997 to 1999, she was special populations coordinator in Galveston ISD. Prior to that, she taught high school for nine years, seven of those at Goose Creek ISD’s Sterling High School. Dillon earned her bachelor’s degree in historical studies and her master’s degree in education leadership from the University of Houston at Clear Lake. Ruth Perrin will be the new principal of Highlands Elementary. She has been principal of Alamo Elementary for four years, serving as the school’s assistant principal for three years prior to that. She came to Goose Ruth Perrin Creek ISD from Dayton ISD, where she taught for five years. Leading De Zavala Elementary School as principal will be Precious Reimonenq, who has been the school’s assistant principal for the past four years. She began her education career in Goose Creek ISD 11 years ago Precious as a teacher at Hopper Reimonenq Primary and Harlem Elementary. She was also a dyslexia specialist and peer facilitator at Harlem. Karen Smithson will be the principal of the new Early College High School, slated to open with the 2010-


Who’s News 2011 school year. She is currently academic dean of Goose Creek Memorial High. Prior to coming to Goose Creek 19 years ago, she was a classroom teacher in Beeville ISD, instructing students at every grade level. She has a bachelor’s degree in art and history from Sam Houston State University and a master’s degree in educational leadership from Stephen F. Austin State University. The new principal of Baytown Junior High School is Michael Wahl. He is an 18-year veteran of the district, teaching and coaching at Highlands Elementary and Baytown Junior and serving Michael Wahl as assistant principal of De Zavala Elementary. He has been principal of Harlem Elementary since 2004. Stephen Warford will be the principal at Harlem Elementary. He has been with Goose Creek ISD for five years as a teacher at Pumphrey Elementary and a family involvement coordinator at Highlands Stephen Warford Elementary. He was also assistant principal of Pumphrey and most recently was assistant principal of Carver Elementary School. Ron Wyatt will take the principal position at Alamo Elementary School, where he has been assistant principal for the past four years. Prior to joining Goose Creek ISD, he taught English as a second language in New Ron Wyatt Caney ISD. Greenville ISD The district’s new chief financial officer is David Carter, a CPA with the Greenville firm of Rutherford Taylor and Co. Carter holds bachelor’s and master’s degrees from Texas A&M University David Carter in Commerce.

Rick Lynch, Greenville ISD’s director of human resources, has announced his upcoming retirement. This will conclude a 38-year career in education, which began when he taught and coached at the old Greenville JuRick Lynch nior High. He remained there until 1981, when he transferred to Greenville High School; he became that school’s assistant principal in 1998. Three years later, Lynch was appointed principal of Greenville High School. He then served as the district’s director of secondary curriculum. In 2008, he was appointed to his most recent post. Lynch has a bachelor’s degree from Texas Tech University and a master’s degree from East Texas State University. Succeeding Lynch as director of human resources is Ralph Sanders, most recently Greenville ISD’s director of preschool services. He has been with the district for 30 years as a teacher, principal and central ofRalph Sanders fice administrator. He taught for 10 years at Travis Elementary and Greenville Inter-

mediate schools, and then he was named principal of Greenville Middle School. After that assignment, he was principal of Crockett Elementary and Greenville Intermediate, before leading Waters Early Childhood Center. Sanders is a graduate of East Texas State University. Hays CISD Don Rusinger will take on the role of principal of Lehman High School when the new school year begins. Currently the principal of Dwyer Middle School in Huntington Beach, Calif., he holds a bachelor’s degree from The University of Texas and a master’s degree from Texas State University. Before transferring from Texas to California, he was a social studies teacher at Austin ISD’s Lamar Middle School and an assistant principal at Hopewell Middle School in Round Rock ISD from 1999 to 2004. Also arriving at Hays CISD from California is Julie Rusinger, who will be principal of Academy High School. Her most recent position was principal of Mira Costa High School in Manhattan Beach, Calif., where she initially was assistant principal. In Austin ISD, she was assistant principal of Johnston High School. See WHO’S NEWS on page 28

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She was a math teacher, content mastery administrator and IEP facilitator for 10 years prior to that position. She holds a bachelor’s degree from The University of Texas and a master’s degree from Texas State University. The new assistant principal of Pfluger Elementary School is Ashley Taylor. Most recently a fourth grade teacher at Tom Green Elementary, she was Hays CISD’s Teacher of the Year in 20082009. Sarah Thurman, previously principal of Sartartia Middle School in Fort Bend ISD, will lead Dahlstrom Middle School as its principal. She was a language arts, English and social studies teacher in Alief ISD before joining Fort Bend ISD, first as an assistant principal and then as principal of Walker Station Elementary School. Thurman’s bachelor’s degree is from The University of Texas, and her master’s degree and doctorate were earned at the University of Houston. Houston ISD Aggie Alvez has been appointed chief communications officer, coming to Houston from her position as director of communications and family outreach at Montgomery County Public Schools in Rockville, Md. She was a high school teacher in Montgomery County, as well as a director of public affairs at Street Law Inc., a nonprofit agency. She was also an adjunct professor at Georgetown University Law Center and a writer and consumer investigator for WJLA-TV in Washington D.C. Alvez holds a law degree from the University of Baltimore. The district’s new chief officer of business operations is Leo Bobadilla, taking responsibility for police and construction, facility, transportation, and food and operations services. He most recently held a similar position in North Carolina’s Guilford County Schools. Taking on the role of general manager of facility services is Issa Dadoush, who comes to his new role from the city of Houston, where he was director of general services.


Who’s News S. Dallas Dance is now the chief school officer of middle schools. He comes to Houston from Chesterfield (Va.) County Public Schools, where he was executive director of school improvement. He also has served as an assistant superintendent of instruction and as a middle school principal. Hurst-Euless-Bedford ISD Mike Fielder, assistant athletic director for the past five years, is the district’s new athletic director. He also has worked in Whitesboro and Birdville ISDs and at the Oakridge School in Arlington ISD. Fielder has a bachelor’s Mike Fielder degree from The University of Texas at Arlington and a master’s degree from Grand Canyon University. Kerrville ISD Donna Jenschke, principal of Wilson Sixth Grade School for the past two years, has been appointed the new principal of Peterson Middle School. She was a teacher in Kerrville ISD for 20 years. She Donna Jenschke spent five years as assistant principal of Tally Elementary before taking on the top job at Wilson. She is a cum laude graduate of Angelo State University with a master’s degree in education leadership from Texas Tech University. Lamar CISD Swim coach Toni Schramme has been honored with the Theron Pickle Lifetime Achievement Award from the Texas Interscholastic Swim Coaches Association (TISCA). She will reToni Schramme ceive her recognition at the organization’s clinic and general meeting in September in Austin. The Pickle award honors Texas high school coaches who have made significant contributions to the sports of swimming

and diving. Schramme’s career is marked by a number of other distinctions, including 10 Texas Amateur Athletic Federation (TAAF) regional championship titles; four TAAF state championship titles; five TAAF state athletes of the year; 15 UIL district championships; and four UIL state flags. She was 2005’s State High School Swim Coach of the Year. Schramme is a 10-time District High School Coach of

the Year and an eight-time Regional High School Coach of the Year. Little Elm ISD Lynne Cleveland, who has led Galveston ISD since 2006, is the new superintendent at Little Elm ISD. An educator for 27 years, she came to Galveston from Clear Creek ISD, where she was See WHO’S NEWS on page 30

Providing great benefits will help your district attract and retain valuable employees. TASB created the Supplemental Employee Benefits Program to help you do just that. Benefits for public school employees and their families are offered at special group rates, saving both employees and the district money. District-paid plans: • Group Term Life Insurance • Group Long-Term Disability Employee-paid plans: • Group Automobile and Homeowner’s Insurance • Flex Spending Accounts/Section 125 Cafeteria plans

supplemental.tasb.org 800.580.8272, ext. 7153 June 2010 • Texas School Business

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Who’s News WHO’S NEWS continued from page 29

assistant superintendent for secondary education. Additionally, Cleveland was assistant principal of Smith Elementary School, assistant principal and principal of Lynne Cleveland Clear Lake High School, and assistant principal and principal of Creekside Intermediate School. She also was assistant coordinator for gang activity prevention in the district. Cleveland earned a bachelor’s degree in elementary education from the University of Houston and a master’s degree in midmanagement administration from the University of Houston at Clear Lake. McKinney ISD The district’s newest elementary school, McClure Elementary, is scheduled to open this fall with Melanie Raleeh as principal. She has more than 17 years’ experience in Texas education, having be-

gun her career as a fourth grade teacher in Bonham ISD. She came to McKinney ISD in 1997 as a teacher at Glen Oaks Elementary. During her tenure with the district, she has been an assistant principal at Eddins and Bennett elementary schools. She was the principal of Eddins for the past five years. Raleeh earned her bachelor’s degree from Texas Tech University and her master’s degree in education from Texas A&M University at Commerce. Mesquite ISD Mesquite ISD trustee Kevin Carbo was sworn in as chair of the National School Boards Association’s Caucus of Hispanic School Board Members during the organization’s April conference in Chicago. He will serve a Kevin Carbo two-year term. A trustee since 1996, Carbo has been a board officer several times and is currently secretary.

Karyn Cummings has been chosen to lead Poteet High School as its principal. An educator for 28 years, 21 of those with Mesquite ISD, she began her career in Dallas. In Mesquite, she was a teacher Karyn Cummings at Black Elementary and Kimbrough Middle School, before taking her first administrative job as an assistant principal. She has 13 years’ experience as a principal, nine of those at Kimball Elementary and the past four at Terry Middle School. Her undergraduate and graduate degrees are from Texas A&M University at Commerce. Rutherford Elementary will have Holly Grubbs as its principal when the new school year begins. She has been with Mesquite ISD for all of her nine years as an educator. Initially a first and fourth grade teacher at Lawrence ElemenSee WHO’S NEWS on page 32

SPOTLIGHT continued from page 11

it off. A chuck wagon cook-off brought in the crowds, and numerous $1,000 donors came forward. By the end of February, D’Hanis ISD reached its goal of $25,000.

‘I’m very adamant about modeling and teaching character to children, and they really relate to this ‘code of the West’ approach.’ – Superintendent Pam Seipp, D’Hanis ISD

Seipp says the money will be put in an account for students who have just entered kindergarten. She doesn’t expect all of them to get a scholarship for college, but she hopes there will be enough money so that all who apply can receive some assistance. 30

Texas School Business • June 2010

In the meantime, the cowboy lessons continue at D’Hanis ISD. On a regular basis, she types up codes of the cowboy way and posts them in the school, as well as on a billboard in “downtown” D’Hanis, to round up the whole community. She also publishes her thoughts on cowboy character in an e-newsletter that has attracted followers from other states and even Mexico. “There’s something about cowboys that just captures the heart,” she says. “If we can bring that to everyone in D’Hanis, then I feel like I’ll have done my job.” ELIZABETH MILLARD is a freelancer who also contributes to District Administration magazine.


Education leaders, reformers convene at Commitment to Excellence summit by Steven Thompson

O

n April 19, the Texas Education Reform Foundation hosted an education summit in Houston. The summit culminated two years of the foundation’s in-depth research on creating a “success agenda” for Texas schoolchildren. Headed by TERF Chairman Jon H. Fleming, along with a host of co-sponsors — including the Houston Endowment Inc., Chevron and Texas Instruments — the summit brought together educators and researchers from across the country to hear the foundation’s findings, as well as to discuss ways to reform and improve the Texas public education system. Topics examined at the Commitment to Excellence Summit ranged from the latest teaching methods for improving classroom comprehension to the complexities of educating a bilingual state. The goal of the summit, stated emphatically on the pamphlet handed out to the attendees, was not to find fault with any school, but to use TERF-collected data to find “what works” and encourage action on the part of willing educators. Dr. Marc Schwartz, a professor in the Southwest Center for Mind, Brain Education at The University of Texas in Arlington, led one of the discussion panels on education standards. “Standards matter,” Schwartz said, “yet close to two decades into the process of creating standards, their impact on student learning is unclear.” Schwartz presented a paper he coauthored with Dr. Theo Dawson of Developmental Testing Service Inc. He cited recent studies in neuroscience that support the importance of teachers allowing more time to delve deeper into singular subjects. “In three disciplines — chemistry, physics and biology — studies show high school students who were exposed to depth of study generally performed better than students exposed to a broad curriculum,” Schwartz said, adding that by delving deeper into specific areas of study, some student gains in a short period of time were equivalent to a full semester of study. In a panel on best practices, TERF board members Willard “Bill” R. Daggett and Susan Kellner argued for more comprehensive reform, as opposed to focus-

ing on “one grade level or one best practice.” Daggett is CEO of the International Center for Leadership in Education, and Kellner is a Spring Branch ISD trustee.

‘Standards matter, yet close to two decades into the process of creating standards, their impact on student learning is unclear.’ — Professor Marc Schwartz, The University of Texas at Arlington

Daggett and Kellner said that if educators agreed to a system-wide approach and embraced a common vision and goals, schools could undergo broader, more cohesive improvements for all students. Developing an end goal — such as students graduating from high school on time and ready for college — and then working backward to develop steps to achieve that goal is a crucial component to reforming the education system in Texas. Bilingual education Chairman Fleming and Mario Loyola, a constitutional lawyer, tackled the controversial nature of bilingual education. Fleming and Loyola proposed that a 1973 state law requiring some schools to provide bilingual education or English as a second language (ESL) has failed to educate English learners well enough to overcome the language barrier. The speakers posited that “rigidly mandated bilingual education has turned out to be a significant obstacle to education reform in general.” By prioritizing quality of instruction, new technology and dropout prevention, Texas can realign its goals with the realities of teaching to a growing population of English-language learners. He contends that structured English immersion programs, while not ideal, offer more effective, flexible and cheaper alternatives to the mandated bilingual education now in place. STEVEN THOMPSON is a freelance writer who also pens satire and humor pieces for the local news department at KPFT 90.1 FM in Houston.

The People Behind the Summit Members of the steering committee for the Commitment for Excellence summit were: co-chairs Jon H. Fleming, Texas Education Reform Foundation, and Pedro Reyes, The Ashbel Smith Professor of Education Policy – The University of Texas at Austin; members David G. Anthony, superintendent, CypressFairbanks ISD; Susan B. Bonesteel, principal consultant, National Center for Educational Achievement; Tom Burnett, manager of strategic initiatives, Apple Inc.; Francisco G. Cigarroa, chancellor, The University of Texas System; Rob Eissler, state representative, Texas House of Representatives, and chairman, House Committee on Public Education; Karl Eschbach, state demographer of Texas; Gayle Fallon, Houston Federation of Teachers; Jeanne M. Gerlach, professor and dean, College of Education, The University of Texas at Arlington; Melody A. Johnson, superintendent, Fort Worth ISD; Danny P. King, superintendent, Pharr-San Juan-Alamo ISD; Susan Landry, director, Children’s Learning Institute,The University of Texas Health Science Center in Houston; Don McAdams, president, Center for Reform of School Systems; Harvin C. Moore, Houston ISD Board of Trustees; Geanie Morrison, state representative, Texas House of Representatives; Michele Pola, chief of staff, Houston ISD; Richard M. Rhodes, president, El Paso Community College; Randle B. Richardson, president, Community Education Partners; Debbie Roberts, superintendent, Windham ISD (Texas Department of Criminal Justice); Torrence H. Robinson, director of public affairs, Texas Instruments; Johnny L. Veselka, executive director, Texas Association of School Administrators; David W. Webb, chief financial officer, Deer Park ISD; Reid Whitaker, principal, Port Houston Elementary School, Houston ISD; and Robert Wimpelberg, dean, College of Education, The University of Houston. For more information about the Texas Education Reform Foundation, contact Executive Director Winona Schroeder at wschroeder5@austin.rr.com or (512) 565-3841. You can also visit the Web site at www.tperf.org. June 2010 • Texas School Business

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Who’s News

PRESIDENT continued from page 13

“We just want to maintain the character of what we are and leave some of the decision making about our schools and what makes our communities unique to us,” says Rhodes. “Everybody’s in the business to better kids for their future. I think only the local people can make those determinations. We just need education to be equitable.”

‘I learned as I got further into my career that you need to be a voice out there and work for your profession.’ Competition is among the major challenges that Rhodes sees for public education, with so many charter schools, private schools and home schools in the mix. “We need to know why some kids are moving away from public schools and reflect on that and see if we can meet the needs for those kiddos to keep them in the system,” says Rhodes. For Rhodes, every child’s right to quality education is at the heart of public education. “For private schools, you must pay to go and you’re selected to be there,” says Rhodes. “But there’s a right to education for every child. “We want TACS to be the voice for the small, midsized and rural school districts to protect free public education in Texas,” Rhodes continues. “I think what everyone is looking for is equity in all school districts. We don’t want anyone to suffer in the process.” WHITNEY ANGSTADT is a freelance writer in Austin.

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Texas School Business • June 2010

WHO’S NEWS continued from page 30

tary, she has been assistant principal of Floyd Elementary since 2007. Her bachelor’s degree is from Abilene Christian University and her master’s degree is from Holly Grubbs Texas A&M University at Commerce. The new principal of Terry Middle School is Danny Taylor, now completing his 19th year in education, 10 of those with Mesquite ISD. In Mesquite, he began as a social studies teacher and coach at Wilkinson Danny Taylor Middle School in 1994. Four years later, he transferred to Palmer ISD. He returned to Mesquite in 2004, spending the past six years as a middle school assistant principal, first at Agnew and then at A.C. New Middle School. He earned his undergraduate degree from the University of North Texas and his master’s degree from The University of Texas at Arlington. Plano ISD The district honored a number of longtime employees who retired at the end of the school year. They were: • Becky Bailey, literacy specialist, educator for 36 years, all of those in Plano. • Jane Ball, Mathews Elementary School principal, educator for 30 years, 22 of those in Plano. • Mary Ann Bargmann, Skaggs Elementary School principal, educator for 37 years, 16 of those in Plano. • Luanne Wirtz Collins, Hughston Elementary School principal, educator for 40 years, 39 of those in Plano. • Deena Herron, Shepton High School assistant principal, educator for 29 years, all of those in Plano. Tomball ISD The district’s second high school, Tomball Memorial High, will have Carol Houston as its principal when the new school opens in 2011. She will remain in

her current position as associate principal for curriculum and instruction for Tomball High School through June, at which point she will devote her time to preparing for the Carol Houston opening of Tomball Memorial. Houston began her career in 1989 teaching in Aldine ISD. She came to Tomball in 1998 as assistant principal of Tomball High School. Her bachelor’s and master’s degrees are from Sam Houston State University. The new principal of Tomball High School is Greg Quinn, who will continue in his present position of assistant principal of the school until the 20102011 school year begins. He came to Tomball ISD Greg Quinn 11 years ago as a teacher and coach at Tomball High. Prior to that, he was with Conroe and Aldine ISDs. Quinn’s bachelor’s degree is from Texas A&M University and his master’s degree in educational administration is from Prairie View A&M University. Chris Trotter has been appointed assistant superintendent for administrative services. He began his education career in 1991. He has worked for Comal, Carrollton-Farmers Branch, Hurst-EulessBedford and Birdville Chris Trotter ISDs in a number of roles, including high school principal in three districts. Trotter holds a bachelor’s degree in kinesiology from Texas A&M University and a master’s degree in education from the University of North Texas. Ysleta ISD Former Riverside High School Rangers defensive coordinator Eric Frontz has been promoted to head coach and athletic coordinator. He has been with the school for six years and replaces J.J. Calderon, who transferred to Socorro ISD in the same position with Eastlake High School. TSB


Mapping it out: Acknowledging the power of vision

TEXAS’ HOME TEAM

by Mike Smith

I

f you ever watch a really good golfer, he or she will spend a minute or two behind the ball, looking down the fairway, envisioning the shot. And golfers usually will hit their Mike Smith balls in the direction they were looking — right or wrong, or left. Also, depending on which translation you read, Proverbs 29:18 says: “…the people perish for lack of vision… .” Vision. What a powerful word. To accomplish something, we must have vision, a clear goal. Goals are simply dreams written down. We write them down to communicate them clearly. Once these goals are clearly communicated, we are held accountable for accomplishing them. If we want, we can raise the level of accountability by telling someone else our goals. In reality, there is no lasting punishment or penalty for goals unachieved — except, of course, from ourselves. We do have the personal penalty of falling short. To have vision is to have a mental picture of your goals, but it’s even more than that. Have you ever known someone who could envision the end of a project

Leadership on Purpose 1. Envision your perfect situation, or what you want your organization to look like. 2. Plan the steps to accomplish the vision and take a practice swing. 3. Do step one again, or hit the shot.

before it started? They could see the house completed, the shopping center built or the success of their students. Leadership comes in when a leader translates this vision into workable goals that can be

Leadership comes in when a leader translates this vision into workable goals that can be communicated clearly and attained. communicated clearly and attained. While it is true that a man’s reach must exceed his grasp, goals must be attainable. Followers will simply not strive for the goal if they believe it is unattainable. It takes a leader’s strength of character to stay the course when others begin to falter. Did you know that the first Apollo space mission to the moon was off course 83 percent of the time? However, through continual course correction and keeping the goal of reaching the moon in its vision, NASA’s mission was successful. And apparently it worked out pretty well on the trip back home. What do you envision for your district or your campus? I encourage you to beginning mapping your course today. MIKE SMITH retired from his position of superintendent of New Braunfels ISD in December 2009. As of this month, he is the immediate past president of the Texas Association of Community Schools.

SCHOOL MARQUEES VIDEO SCOREBOARDS

800-392-5050

spectrumscoreboards.com HOUSTON

Re-energize your staff! Lift their spirits! Let him make a difference! • More motivational talks to educators than any other current Texas speaker. • Convocations, Conferences, Staff Development Workshops, and Graduation Ceremonies. • 30 years in Texas public education. • Hear him once and you’ll see why thousands have requested him nationally and internationally. • His best-selling book, All the Difference, is now in its sixth printing.

RINEY JORDAN A Motivational Humorist 254-386-4769 www.rineyjordan.com June 2010 • Texas School Business

33


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by Riney Jordan

Whatever happened to Bob?

L

et’s just call him Bob. His first name was common and so was his last. He was the quiet one in our high school class. He usually sat by himself at the back of the room and rarely had anything to say. He wore thick glasses, was a bit overweight and had that forlorn look in his eyes. It seemed that he was always looking down, as if he were afraid to look anyone in the eye. I don’t remember him having any friends, really. Bob was just different from the other kids in class, and we just accepted that and went on about our business. Some of us from that high school class recently planned our 50th reunion. It involved an exhaustive search to locate our classmates who were scattered all over the country. No one could seem to locate Bob. And then, just days before the reunion, one of our former classmates happened to spot an obituary in a metropolitan newspaper. Same first name. Same last name. Could it possibly be our missing Bob? A short read into the item confirmed that, indeed, this was our Bob. Where had he been all these years? How could anyone so shy, so different, have been successful? In reading his obituary, we began to see a very different picture of this one who was often ridiculed for not looking nor acting like the rest of us. He had married and he had a son. In fact, he had been married for 38 years. His profession: photographer. The obituary stated that he had built his own studio and created photographs that were “honest and natural.” We learned that he had studied under a famous psychotherapist, and that later he had helped lead men’s support groups for individuals recovering from early emotional injuries. Those skills later led him to work with troubled youth, especially homeless youth. With his camera, he photographed and archived photos of homeless teenagers. His images did much to alert the public to the epidemic of young adults and teenagers living on the streets. Bob was later a court-appointed special advocate for abused children. He was a 34

Texas School Business • June 2010

15-year volunteer for Parents Anonymous, and he also volunteered on a regular basis in a children’s hospital. In 2007, he was named Youth Care Worker of the Year by his state’s network of youth services. After a little research, I located another obituary online about Bob, and I read the comments left by those who knew him best. One wrote that words were inadequate to express “the tremendous impact you have had and will continue to have on my life.” Another stated that he had never known anyone like Bob, as he “just seemed to know innately what people needed” and then was “willing to meet that need.” On and on the endearing comments continued. And finally, near the end of the comments was one from a former homeless man who once had lived in what he called a “cave.” Bob had found him, showed him that he cared and — from what I gather — must have made an incredible difference in his life. This young man wrote that Bob would always be his hero, and the one regret he had was that he had not gotten the chance to tell him that “I did something with my life.” He was no longer on the streets and he had purchased a house. He wrote: “Thank you for … caring about some dirty, little street kid and helping him to understand that he could still do stuff with his life.” We never know the impact that a few encouraging words might have on an individual, do we? Bob knew. I’m sure he had felt the hurt of rejection and the pain of isolation. Yet, in spite of that, he had a desire to change his situation and the lives of others who were going through the same emotional battles that he had experienced. God bless you, Bob. Rest in peace, knowing that the world is a little better place because of you. RINEY JORDAN, whose best-selling book, “All the Difference,” is now in its sixth printing, is an international speaker and humorist. He can be reached at riney@htcomp.net or by visiting www.rineyjordan.com.

AIM......................................................... 23 www.AIM-Companies.com Armko Industries Inc.............................. 28 www.armko.com Claycomb Associates, Architects............ 35 www.claycomb.net Combs Consulting Group....................... 27 www.Combs-Group.com Corgan Schools....................................... 12 www.corgan.com Friends of Texas Public Schools............. 21 www.fotps.org HEB.......................................................... 2 www.heb.com MBIA-Texas Class.................................... 6 www.txclass.org McGriff, Seibels & Williams of Texas.... 28 www.ffga.com My Satori................................................ 30 www.sleek.com O’Connell Robertson & Associates.......... 9 www.oconnellrobertson.com Region 4-TBD........................................... 4 www.esc4.net Region 7-DMAC Solutions.................... 12 www.dmac-solutions.net Region 10................................................ 36 www.region10.org Region 20 TCC....................................... 24 www.esc20.net/TCC Region 20.................................................. 8 www.esc20.net Riney Jordan........................................... 33 www.rineyjordan.com Spectrum Corp.................................... 5, 33 www.spectrunscoreboards.com Sungard Public Sector............................. 25 www.sungardps.com Shweiki Media........................................ 29 www.shweiki.com TECS......................................................... 7 www.tecslink.com Texas School Administrators’ Legal Digest..................... 16, 18, 20, 26 www.legaldigest.com TASA......................................................... 8 www.tasanet.org TASB-Supplemental Employee Benefits............................. 10 www.tasb.org/services/supplemental TASB-Risk Management........................ 29 www.tasb.org/services/risk VLK Architects Inc................................. 10 www.vlkarchitects.com WRA Architects........................................ 5 www.wraarchitects.com


nk ISD Melissa ISD Meridian ISD Mildred ISD Mt. Vernon ISD Neches ISD Northwest ISD Overton ISD Palestine ISD Paradise ISD Pearsall ISD Pittsburg ISD Plano ISD Riesel ISD Rockdale ISD Rockwall ISD Rogers ISD Rosebud-Lott SD S&S CISD Salado ISD Springtown ISD Sulphur Springs ISD Taylor ISD Terrell ISD Troy ISD Van Alstyne ISD Whitesboro ISD Alvarado ISD Anna ISD Bland ISD Bridgeport ISD Brownsville ISD Caddo Mills ISD Campbell ISD Celeste enter ISD China Spring ISD Chisum ISD Clifton ISD Clint ISD Comanche ISD Commerce ISD Connally ISD Cooper ISD Copperas Cove ISD Corsicana ISD Decatur ISD DeSoto ISD Durant ISD Elgin ISD Elkhart ISD Fairfield ISD Gle ville ISD Groesbeck ISD Hays CISD Kaufman ISD Kemp ISD Krum ISD Leonard ISD Lewisville ISD Livingston ISD Lone Oak ISD Lytle ISD Mabank ISD Melissa ISD Meridian ISD Mildred ISD Mt. Vernon ISD Neches ISD Northwest IS alestine ISD Paradise ISD Pearsall ISD Pittsburg ISD Plano ISD Riesel ISD Rockdale ISD Rockwall ISD Rogers ISD Rosebud-Lott ISD Royse City ISD S&S CISD Salado ISD Springtown ISD Sulphur Springs ISD Taylor ISD Terrell ISD Tro ne ISD Whitesboro ISD Alvarado ISD Anna ISD Bland ISD Bridgeport ISD Brownsville ISD Caddo Mills ISD Campbell ISD Celeste ISD Celina ISD Center ISD China Spring ISD Chisum ISD Clifton ISD Clint ISD Comanche ISD Commerc SD Cooper ISD Copperas Cove ISD Corsicana ISD Decatur ISD DeSoto ISD Durant ISD Elgin ISD Elkhart ISD Fairfield ISD Glen Rose ISD Greenville ISD Groesbeck ISD Hays CISD Kaufman ISD Kemp ISD Krum ISD Leonard ISD Lew ston ISD Lone Oak ISD Lytle ISD Mabank ISD Melissa ISD Meridian ISD Mildred ISD Mt. Vernon ISD Neches ISD Northwest ISD Overton ISD Palestine ISD Paradise ISD Pearsall ISD Pittsburg ISD Plano ISD Riesel ISD Rockdale ISD ogers ISD Rosebud-Lott ISD Royse City ISD S&S CISD Salado ISD Springtown ISD Sulphur Springs ISD Taylor ISD Terrell ISD Troy ISD Van Alstyne ISD Whitesboro ISD Sulphur Springs ISD Taylor ISD Terrell ISD Troy ISD Van Alstyne ISD W varado ISD Anna ISD Bland ISD Bridgeport ISD Brownsville ISD Caddo Mills ISD Campbell ISD Celeste ISD Celina ISD Center ISD China Spring ISD Chisum ISD Clifton ISD Clint ISD Comanche ISD Commerce ISD Connally ISD C eras Cove ISD Corsicana ISD Decatur ISD DeSoto ISD Durant ISD Elgin ISD Elkhart ISD Fairfield ISD Glen Rose ISD Greenville ISD Groesbeck ISD Hays CISD Kaufman ISD Kemp ISD Krum ISD Leonard ISD Lewisville ISD Livingston SD Lytle ISD Mabank ISD Melissa ISD Meridian ISD Mildred ISD Mt. Vernon ISD Neches ISD Northwest ISD Overton ISD Palestine ISD Paradise ISD Pearsall ISD Pittsburg ISD Plano ISD Riesel ISD Rockdale ISD Rockwall ISD Rogers ISD SD Royse City ISD S&S CISD Salado ISD Springtown ISD Sulphur Springs ISD Taylor ISD Terrell ISD Troy ISD Van Alstyne ISD Whitesboro ISD Alvarado ISD Anna ISD Bland ISD Bridgeport ISD Brownsville ISD Caddo Mills ISD Ca e ISD Celina ISD Center ISD China Spring ISD Chisum ISD Clifton ISD Clint ISD Comanche ISD Commerce ISD Connally ISD Cooper ISD Copperas Cove ISD Corsicana ISD Decatur ISD DeSoto ISD Durant ISD Elgin ISD Elkhart ISD F Rose ISD Greenville ISD Groesbeck ISD Hays CISD Kaufman ISD Kemp ISD Krum ISD Leonard ISD Lewisville ISD Livingston ISD Lone Oak ISD Lytle ISD Mabank ISD Melissa ISD Meridian ISD Mildred ISD Mt. Vernon ISD Neches ISD verton ISD Palestine ISD Paradise ISD Pearsall ISD Pittsburg ISD Plano ISD Riesel ISD Rockdale ISD Rockwall ISD Rogers ISD Rosebud-Lott ISD Royse City ISD S&S CISD Salado ISD Springtown ISD Sulphur Springs ISD Taylor ISD SD Van Alstyne ISD Whitesboro ISD Alvarado ISD Anna ISD Bland ISD Bridgeport ISD Brownsville ISD Caddo Mills ISD Campbell ISD Celeste ISD Celina ISD Center ISD China Spring ISD Chisum ISD Clifton ISD Clint ISD Comanche e ISD Connally ISD Cooper ISD Copperas Cove ISD Corsicana ISD Decatur ISD DeSoto ISD Durant ISD Elgin ISD Elkhart ISD Fairfield ISD Glen Rose ISD Greenville ISD Groesbeck ISD Hays CISD Kaufman ISD Kemp ISD Krum ISD Le ville ISD Livingston ISD Lone Oak ISD Lytle ISD Mabank ISD Melissa ISD Meridian ISD Mildred ISD Mt. Vernon ISD Neches ISD Northwest ISD Overton ISD Palestine ISD Paradise ISD Pearsall ISD Pittsburg ISD Plano ISD Riesel ISD ockwall ISD Rogers ISD Rosebud-Lott ISD Royse City ISD S&S CISD Salado ISD Springtown ISD Sulphur Springs ISD Taylor ISD Terrell ISD Troy ISD Van Alstyne ISD Whitesboro ISD Alvarado ISD Anna ISD Bland ISD Bridgeport ISD B addo Mills ISD Campbell ISD Celeste ISD Celina ISD Center ISD China Spring ISD Chisum ISD Clifton ISD Clint ISD Comanche ISD Commerce ISD Connally ISD Cooper ISD Copperas Cove ISD Corsicana ISD Decatur ISD DeSoto I gin ISD Elkhart ISD Fairfield ISD Glen Rose ISD Greenville ISD Groesbeck ISD Hays CISD Kaufman ISD Kemp ISD Krum ISD Leonard ISD Lewisville ISD Livingston ISD Lone Oak ISD Lytle ISD Mabank ISD Melissa ISD Meridian ISD M rnon ISD Neches ISD Northwest ISD Overton ISD Palestine ISD Paradise ISD Pearsall ISD Pittsburg ISD Plano ISD Riesel ISD Rockdale ISD Rockwall ISD Rogers ISD Rosebud-Lott ISD Royse City ISD S&S CISD Salado ISD Springtown IS gs ISD Taylor ISD Terrell ISD Troy ISD Van Alstyne ISD Whitesboro ISD Alvarado ISD Anna ISD Bland ISD Bridgeport ISD Brownsville ISD Caddo Mills ISD Campbell ISD Celeste ISD Celina ISD Center ISD China Spring ISD Chisum ISD SD Comanche ISD Commerce ISD Connally ISD Cooper ISD Copperas Cove ISD Corsicana ISD Decatur ISD DeSoto ISD Durant ISD Elgin ISD Elkhart ISD Fairfield ISD Glen Rose ISD Greenville ISD Groesbeck ISD Hays CISD Kaufman rum ISD Leonard ISD Lewisville ISD Livingston ISD Lone Oak ISD Lytle ISD Mabank ISD Melissa ISD Meridian ISD Mildred ISD Mt. Vernon ISD Neches ISD Northwest ISD Overton ISD Palestine ISD Paradise ISD Pearsall ISD Pit ISD Riesel ISD Rockdale ISD Rockwall ISD Rogers ISD Rosebud-Lott ISD Royse City ISD S&S CISD Salado ISD Springtown ISD Sulphur Springs ISD Taylor ISD Terrell ISD Troy ISD Van Alstyne ISD Whitesboro ISD ISD Alvarado ISD Anna ridgeport ISD Brownsville ISD Caddo Mills ISD Campbell ISD Celeste ISD Celina ISD Center ISD China Spring ISD Chisum ISD Clifton ISD Clint ISD Comanche ISD Commerce ISD Connally ISD Cooper ISD Copperas Cove ISD Co ur ISD DeSoto ISD Durant ISD Elgin ISD Elkhart ISD Fairfield ISD Glen Rose ISD Greenville ISD Groesbeck ISD Hays CISD Kaufman ISD Kemp ISD Krum ISD Leonard ISD Lewisville ISD Livingston ISD Lone Oak ISD Lytle ISD Maban SD Meridian ISD Mildred ISD Mt. Vernon ISD Neches ISD Northwest ISD Overton ISD Palestine ISD Paradise ISD Pearsall ISD Pittsburg ISD Plano ISD Riesel ISD Rockdale ISD Rockwall ISD Rogers ISD Rosebud-Lott ISD Royse City ISD o ISD Springtown ISD Sulphur Springs ISD Taylor ISD Terrell ISD Troy ISD Van Alstyne ISD Whitesboro ISD Alvarado ISD Anna ISD Bland ISD Bridgeport ISD Brownsville ISD Caddo Mills ISD Campbell ISD Celeste ISD Celina ISD Spring ISD Chisum ISD Clifton ISD Clint ISD Comanche ISD Commerce ISD Connally ISD Cooper ISD Copperas Cove ISD Corsicana ISD Decatur ISD DeSoto ISD Durant ISD Elgin ISD Elkhart ISD Fairfield ISD Glen Rose ISD Gre beck ISD Hays CISD Kaufman ISD Kemp ISD Krum ISD Leonard ISD Lewisville ISD Livingston ISD Lone Oak ISD Lytle ISD Mabank ISD Melissa ISD Meridian ISD Mildred ISD Mt. Vernon ISD Neches ISD Northwest ISD Overton ISD aradise ISD Pearsall ISD Pittsburg ISD Plano ISD Riesel ISD Rockdale ISD Rockwall ISD Rogers ISD Rosebud-Lott ISD Royse City ISD S&S CISD Salado ISD Springtown ISD Sulphur Springs ISD Taylor ISD Terrell ISD Troy ISD Van A sboro ISD Alvarado ISD Anna ISD Bland ISD Bridgeport ISD Brownsville ISD Caddo Mills ISD Campbell ISD Celeste ISD Celina ISD Center ISD China Spring ISD Chisum ISD Clifton ISD Clint ISD Comanche ISD Commerce ISD Co er ISD Copperas Cove ISD Corsicana ISD Decatur ISD DeSoto ISD Durant ISD Elgin ISD Elkhart ISD Fairfield ISD Glen Rose ISD Greenville ISD Groesbeck ISD Hays CISD Kaufman ISD Kemp ISD Krum ISD Leonard ISD Lewisville ISD one Oak ISD Lytle ISD Mabank ISD Melissa ISD Meridian ISD Mildred ISD Mt. Vernon ISD Neches ISD Northwest ISD Overton ISD Palestine ISD Paradise ISD Pearsall ISD Pittsburg ISD Plano ISD Riesel ISD Rockdale ISD Rockwall I osebud-Lott ISD Royse City ISD S&S CISD Salado ISD Springtown ISD Sulphur Springs ISD Taylor ISD Terrell ISD Troy ISD Van Alstyne ISD Whitesboro ISD Sulphur Springs ISD Taylor ISD Terrell ISD Troy ISD Van Alstyne ISD Whitesbor SD Anna ISD Bland ISD Bridgeport ISD Brownsville ISD Caddo Mills ISD Campbell ISD Celeste ISD Celina ISD Center ISD China Spring ISD Chisum ISD Clifton ISD Clint ISD Comanche ISD Commerce ISD Connally ISD Cooper ISD ISD Corsicana ISD Decatur ISD DeSoto ISD Durant ISD Elgin ISD Elkhart ISD Fairfield ISD Glen Rose ISD Greenville ISD Groesbeck ISD Hays CISD Kaufman ISD Kemp ISD Krum ISD Leonard ISD Lewisville ISD Livingston ISD Lo SD Mabank ISD Melissa ISD Meridian ISD Mildred ISD Mt. Vernon ISD Neches ISD Northwest ISD Overton ISD Palestine ISD Paradise ISD Pearsall ISD Pittsburg ISD Plano ISD Riesel ISD Rockdale ISD Rockwall ISD Rogers ISD Ro oyse City ISD S&S CISD Salado ISD Springtown ISD Sulphur Springs ISD Taylor ISD Terrell ISD Troy ISD Van Alstyne ISD Whitesboro ISD Alvarado ISD Anna ISD Bland ISD Bridgeport ISD Brownsville ISD Caddo Mills ISD Campbell I elina ISD Center ISD China Spring ISD Chisum ISD Clifton ISD Clint ISD Comanche ISD Commerce ISD Connally ISD Cooper ISD Copperas Cove ISD Corsicana ISD Decatur ISD DeSoto ISD Durant ISD Elgin ISD Elkhart ISD Fairfiel SD Greenville ISD Groesbeck ISD Hays CISD Kaufman ISD Kemp ISD Krum ISD Leonard ISD Lewisville ISD Livingston ISD Lone Oak ISD Lytle ISD Mabank ISD Melissa ISD Meridian ISD Mildred ISD Mt. Vernon ISD Neches ISD Nor on ISD Palestine ISD Paradise ISD Pearsall ISD Pittsburg ISD Plano ISD Riesel ISD Rockdale ISD Rockwall ISD Rogers ISD Rosebud-Lott ISD Royse City ISD S&S CISD Salado ISD Springtown ISD Sulphur Springs ISD Taylor ISD Terre an Alstyne ISD Whitesboro ISD Alvarado ISD Anna ISD Bland ISD Bridgeport ISD Brownsville ISD Caddo Mills ISD Campbell ISD Celeste ISD Celina ISD Center ISD China Spring ISD Chisum ISD Clifton ISD Clint ISD Comanche ISD onnally ISD Cooper ISD Copperas Cove ISD Corsicana ISD Decatur ISD DeSoto ISD Durant ISD Elgin ISD Elkhart ISD Fairfield ISD Glen Rose ISD Greenville ISD Groesbeck ISD Hays CISD Kaufman ISD Kemp ISD Krum ISD Leonard SD Livingston ISD Lone Oak ISD Lytle ISD Mabank ISD Melissa ISD Meridian ISD Mildred ISD Mt. Vernon ISD Neches ISD Northwest ISD Overton ISD Palestine ISD Paradise ISD Pearsall ISD Pittsburg ISD Plano ISD Riesel ISD Ro wall ISD Rogers ISD Rosebud-Lott ISD Royse City ISD S&S CISD Salado ISD Springtown ISD Sulphur Springs ISD Taylor ISD Terrell ISD Troy ISD Van Alstyne ISD Whitesboro ISD Alvarado ISD Anna ISD Bland ISD Bridgeport ISD Brow o Mills ISD Campbell ISD Celeste ISD Celina ISD Center ISD China Spring ISD Chisum ISD Clifton ISD Clint ISD Comanche ISD Commerce ISD Connally ISD Cooper ISD Copperas Cove ISD Corsicana ISD Decatur ISD DeSoto ISD SD Elkhart ISD Fairfield ISD Glen Rose ISD Greenville ISD Groesbeck ISD Hays CISD Kaufman ISD Kemp ISD Krum ISD Leonard ISD Lewisville ISD Livingston ISD Lone Oak ISD Lytle ISD Mabank ISD Melissa ISD Meridian ISD Mildr n ISD Neches ISD Northwest ISD Overton ISD Palestine ISD Paradise ISD Pearsall ISD Pittsburg ISD Plano ISD Riesel ISD Rockdale ISD Rockwall ISD Rogers ISD Rosebud-Lott ISD Royse City ISD S&S CISD Salado ISD Springtown IS gs ISD Taylor ISD Terrell ISD Troy ISD Van Alstyne ISD Whitesboro ISD Alvarado ISD Anna ISD Bland ISD Bridgeport ISD Brownsville ISD Caddo Mills ISD Campbell ISD Celeste ISD Celina ISD Center ISD China Spring ISD Chisum ISD SD Comanche ISD Commerce ISD Connally ISD Cooper ISD Copperas Cove ISD Corsicana ISD Decatur ISD DeSoto ISD Durant ISD Elgin ISD Elkhart ISD Fairfield ISD Glen Rose ISD Greenville ISD Groesbeck ISD Hays CISD Kaufman rum ISD Leonard ISD Lewisville ISD Livingston ISD Lone Oak ISD Lytle ISD Mabank ISD Melissa ISD Meridian ISD Mildred ISD Mt. 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Vernon ISD Neches ISD Northwest ISD Overton ISD Palestine ISD Paradise ISD Pearsall ISD Pittsburg ISD Plano ISD Riesel ISD Rockdale ISD Rockwall ISD Rogers ISD Rosebud-Lott ISD Royse City ISD o ISD Springtown ISD Sulphur Springs ISD Taylor ISD Terrell ISD Troy ISD Van Alstyne ISD Whitesboro ISD Alvarado ISD Anna ISD Bland ISD Bridgeport ISD Brownsville ISD Caddo Mills ISD Campbell ISD Celeste ISD Celina ISD Spring ISD Chisum ISD Clifton ISD Clint ISD Comanche ISD Commerce ISD Connally ISD Cooper ISD Copperas Cove ISD Corsicana ISD Decatur ISD DeSoto ISD Durant ISD Elgin ISD Elkhart ISD Fairfield ISD Glen Rose ISD Gre beck ISD Hays CISD Kaufman ISD Kemp ISD Krum ISD Leonard ISD Lewisville ISD Livingston ISD Lone Oak ISD Lytle ISD Mabank ISD Melissa ISD Meridian ISD Mildred ISD Mt. Vernon ISD Neches ISD Northwest ISD Overton ISD aradise ISD Pearsall ISD Pittsburg ISD Plano ISD Riesel ISD Rockdale ISD Rockwall ISD Rogers ISD Rosebud-Lott ISD Royse City ISD S&S CISD Salado ISD Springtown ISD Sulphur Springs ISD Taylor ISD Terrell ISD Troy ISD Van A sboro ISD Alvarado ISD Anna ISD Bland ISD Bridgeport ISD Brownsville ISD Caddo Mills ISD Campbell ISD Celeste ISD Celina ISD Center ISD China Spring ISD Chisum ISD Clifton ISD Clint ISD Comanche ISD Commerce ISD Co er ISD Copperas Cove ISD Corsicana ISD Decatur ISD DeSoto ISD Durant ISD Elgin ISD Elkhart ISD Fairfield ISD Glen Rose ISD Greenville ISD Groesbeck ISD Hays CISD Kaufman ISD Kemp ISD Krum ISD Leonard ISD Lewisville ISD one Oak ISD Lytle ISD Mabank ISD Melissa ISD Meridian ISD Mildred ISD Mt. 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Vernon ISD Neches ISD Northwest ISD Overton ISD Palestine ISD Paradise ISD Pearsall ISD Pittsburg ISD Plano ISD Riesel ISD Rockdale ISD Rockwall ISD Rogers ISD Rosebud-Lott ISD Royse City ISD S&S CISD | DALLAS | AUSTIN | www.claycomb.net | gtown ISD Sulphur Springs ISD Taylor ISD Terrell ISD Troy ISD Van Alstyne ISD Whitesboro ISD Alvarado ISD Anna ISD Bland ISD Bridgeport ISD Brownsville ISD Caddo Mills ISD Campbell ISD Celeste ISD Celina ISD Center ISD Ch hisum ISD Clifton ISD Clint ISD Comanche ISD Commerce ISD Connally ISD Cooper ISD Copperas Cove ISD Corsicana ISD Decatur ISD DeSoto ISD Durant ISD Elgin ISD Elkhart ISD Fairfield ISD Glen Rose ISD Greenville ISD Gro CISD Kaufman ISD Kemp ISD Krum ISD Leonard ISD Lewisville ISD Livingston ISD Lone Oak ISD Lytle ISD Mabank ISD Melissa ISD Meridian ISD Mildred ISD Mt. Vernon ISD Neches ISD Northwest ISD Overton ISD Palestine ISD P all ISD Pittsburg ISD Plano ISD Riesel ISD Rockdale ISD Rockwall ISD Rogers ISD Rosebud-Lott ISD Royse City ISD S&S CISD Salado ISD Springtown ISD Sulphur Springs ISD Taylor ISD Terrell ISD Troy ISD Van Alstyne ISD Whitesb o ISD Anna ISD Bland ISD Bridgeport ISD Brownsville ISD Caddo Mills ISD Campbell ISD Celeste ISD Celina ISD Center ISD China Spring ISD Chisum ISD Clifton ISD Clint ISD Comanche ISD Commerce ISD Connally ISD Cooper ISD ISD Corsicana ISD Decatur ISD DeSoto ISD Durant ISD Elgin ISD Elkhart ISD Fairfield ISD Glen Rose ISD Greenville ISD Groesbeck ISD Hays CISD Kaufman ISD Kemp ISD Krum ISD Leonard ISD Lewisville ISD Livingston ISD Lo SD Mabank ISD Melissa ISD Meridian ISD Mildred ISD Mt. Vernon ISD Neches ISD Northwest ISD Overton ISD Palestine ISD Paradise ISD Pearsall ISD Pittsburg ISD Plano ISD Riesel ISD Rockdale ISD Rockwall ISD Rogers ISD Ro oyse City ISD S&S CISD Salado ISD Springtown ISD Sulphur Springs ISD Taylor ISD Terrell ISD Troy ISD Van Alstyne ISD Whitesboro ISD Alvarado ISD Anna ISD Bland ISD Bridgeport ISD Brownsville ISD Caddo Mills ISD Campbell IS elina ISD Center ISD China Spring ISD Chisum ISD Clifton ISD Clint ISD Comanche ISD Commerce ISD Connally ISD Cooper ISD Copperas Cove ISD Corsicana ISD Decatur ISD DeSoto ISD Durant ISD Elgin ISD Elkhart ISD Fairfiel

Celebrating 25 Years of

“Designing Schools... With Kids in Mind!”


PROLOGIC - A Finance and HR package designed specifically for Texas by Texans. Doesn’t that make sense to you? It certainly makes sense for our Texas schools, staffs, and students! A single accounting infrastructure, PROLOGIC delivers great work-flow, superior user interface, and Texas-style account coding for you. Please contact: Randy Sumrall at 972.348.1170 or Randy.Sumrall@region10.org

EMPOWER - Finally a data solution that encompasses all district data and comparative data from other districts in one system, providing high level reports, analyses, queries, drill-downs, dashboards, and scorecards easily and automatically in a quality graphic environment. Please contact: Craig Gray at 972.348.1376 or Craig.Gray@region10.org

RAMS - Employees can’t see into the future, but districts can certainly help them plan for it. The Region 10 Retirement Asset Management Services (RAMS) is a way for districts to help employees invest for their futures. The plans provide employees with appropriate vehicles to tax-defer money for retirement. Please contact: Gordon Taylor at 972.348.1004 or Gordon.Taylor@region10.org

Tools for Schools. Y

ou can’T expecT To meeT the challenges of today with yesterday’s tools and expect to be effective tomorrow. Region 10 understands this so we did all the heavy lifting for you by eliminating some of the challenges. For example, all products and services listed were selected through a “Request for Proposal” and are available to school districts through interlocal agreements with Region10 ESC to make them more accessible and affordable to you.

To add these essential tools to your existing toolkit please contact:

pRoLoGIc: Randy Sumrall at 972.348.1170 or Randy.Sumrall@region10.org empoWeR: Craig Gray at 972.348.1376 or Craig.Gray@region10.org RamS: Gordon Taylor at 972.348.1004 or Gordon.Taylor@region10.org

Profile for Texas Association of School Administrators

TSB—June 2010  

TSB—June 2010  

Profile for tasanet

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