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The News Magazine for Public Education in Texas JANUARY/ FEBRUARY

2016

Texas School Business

EXCELLENCE THROUGH PARTNERSHIPS Also in this issue: TASBO President Karen Smith TSPRA President Ian Halperin


Texas Reads One Book Once again, we are proud to offer this unique opportunity in Texas...

Jason Garrett

Head Coach of the Dallas Cowboys

wants to lead the charge with a huge Texas style kick-off this coming spring as

Texas Reads One Book! Coach Garrett will read the first chapter by exclusive videocast and your district is invited to read along together.

Jason Garrett

Head Coach of the Dallas Cowboys

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KICKOFF : April 11, 2016 Sign up today!

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Deadline for signup is March 15, 2016

Coach Garrett will kick things off and each of the families in your schools will read a chapter from the book each night. Tens of thousands of families across the state will be reading together in this celebration of literacy! This year’s book is

Charlotte’s Web (available in English and Spanish)

The registration fee is $5.95 per student so that every child will have their own copy of Charlotte’s Web to follow along with Coach Garrett. Along with the books, you will receive in-school activities, assembly ideas, teacher resources, and family and community engagement tools.

Send an email to texasreads@readtothem.org and sign up your district.

It’s all done. All you have to do is lead the way. TASA Don’t forget to invite all the dads! TASA Texas Association of School Administrators Texas Association of School Administrators

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® Creating a Culture of Literacy in Every Home

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Texas School Business JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2016

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TSPRA President Profile Wylie ISD’s Ian Halperin aims to help districts better tell their stories

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by Ford Gunter

Cover Story

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Public-private partnerships open doors for top-notch programs, education

In the Spotlight Arlington ISD principal brings her pioneering spirit to new academy

by Merri Rosenberg

By Raven L. Hill

27 TASBO President Profile Cy-Fair ISD’s Karen Smith steps up to lead by John Egan

Photo Feature

10 Texas ASCD hosts ‘Transformative Momentum’ annual conference

Departments 6 Who’s News 29 Regional View 33 The Arts 35 Calendar 38 Ad Index

Columns

5 From the Editor by Katie Ford 9 The Law Dawg— Unleashed by Jim Walsh 11 Digital Frontier by Nancy Allen 13 Game On! by Bobby Hawthorne 31 Student Voices by Julianna Teoh 38 The Back Page by Riney Jordan

The views expressed by columnists and contributing writers do not necessarily reflect those of the publisher or Texas School Business advertisers. The publisher also makes no endorsement of the advertisers or advertisements in this publication. Cover story photo by Brian Hatton. Cover art © kotoffei/Shutterstock.com


Texas Association of School Administrators Midwinter Conference Thought Leaders In addition to keynotes by Sir Ken Robinson, former LEGO president Stephan Turnipseed, and UT System Chancellor Bill McRaven, as well as 150 concurrent sessions, the 2016 TASA Midwinter Conference will feature sessions by Thought Leaders in education, including ‌

Matt Chapman President and CEO, Northwest Evaluation Association (NWEA)

Re-envisioning Teaching and Learning for Today’s Digital Students

George Couros Division Principal, Innovative Teaching and Learning, Parkland School Division, Stony Plain, Alberta, Canada

Karen Mapp Senior Lecturer, Harvard Graduate School of Education Building the Capacity for Effective Family-School Partnerships

Leading Innovative Change

Scott Kinney Senior Vice President of Educational Partnerships, Discovery Education

Harry Potter and He Who Must Be Named: The Assessment Journey

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Doug Fisher Chair, Department of Educational Leadership, San Diego State University Unstoppable Learning

Tom Vander Ark Author and CEO, Getting Smart Charting Your Course to Next-Gen Learning tasanet.org/Midwinter

See the full lineup of Thought Leaders with session descriptions at tasanet.org/Midwinter and register today!


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From the editor

t takes a village. The cliché has never been more true in Texas public education as school administrators aim for excellence with limited resources and budget constraints.

Join us! Summer Conference: July 13-16, 2016 Fall Conference: September 25-26, 2016 Winter Conference: Nov 30-Dec 2, 2016 The conferences are all at the Westin-Domain in Austin.

Not to be deterred, an increasing number of districts are forging partnerships with industry, local businesses and institutions of higher education to create top-notch programs and services for students, staff — and even the community at large. In this issue’s cover story, writer Merri Rosenberg speaks to three districts — Hunt ISD, Lamar CISD, Rockdale ISD — that have leveraged the power of public-private partnerships. These three examples prove that partnerships are conceivable and achievable, no matter the size of your district. Also, in this issue we highlight the presidents of the Texas Association of School Business Officials and the Texas School Public Relations Association. You’ll also find a Spotlight profile on Arlington ISD Principal Katiuska Herrador, whose carpe diem spirit may prove contagious, so read on! As always, our columnists offer a wide range of commentary on athletics, school law, the fine arts and regional education service centers. Check out our student contributor for our January/February edition of “Student Voices” — Julianna Teoh, a junior in Klein ISD. Never doubt the power of encouraging words when you find an opportunity to say them to a student. Happy New Year!

Texas School Business (ISSN 0563-2978 USPS 541-620) JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2016 Volume LXIII, Issue 3 406 East 11th Street Austin, Texas 78701 Phone: 512-477-6361 • Fax: 512-482-8658 www.texasschoolbusiness.com EDITORIAL DIRECTOR

Katie Ford DESIGN

Phaedra Strecher COLUMNISTS

Katie Ford Editorial Director

Bobby Hawthorne Riney Jordan Terry Morawski Jim Walsh ADVERTISING SALES MANAGER

Ann M. Halstead

TEXAS ASSOCIATION OF SCHOOL ADMINISTRATORS EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR

Johnny L. Veselka

ASSISTANT EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR, SERVICES AND SYSTEMS ADMINISTRATION

Ann M. Halstead

DIRECTOR OF COMMUNICATIONS AND MEDIA RELATIONS

Amy Francisco

Texas School Business (ISSN 0563-2978) is published bimonthly with a special edition, Bragging Rights, in December, by the Texas Association of School Administrators, at 406 E. 11th St., Austin, TX 78701. Periodicals postage paid at Austin, Texas, and at additional mailing offices. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Texas Association of School Administrators, 406 East 11th Street, Austin, TX 78701. © Copyright 2016 Texas Association of School Administrators

Texas School Business JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2016

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Who’s News Austin ISD Austin ISD Board of Trustees member Jayme Mathias has been elected to a oneyear term on the board of directors of the Texas Association of School Boards, representing ESC Region 13. He was elected to the Austin ISD board in 2012 and serves as pastor of Holy Family American Catholic Church in Austin.

Birdville ISD Katie Bowman has been

appointed associate superintendent for finance. She has been the district’s director of business since 2013. Bowman received her bachelor’s degree from Texas A&M University Commerce and her master’s degree from The University of Texas at Arlington. She is a licensed CPA.

Bullard ISD Bullard Intermediate School has welcomed Amy Bickerstaff as its new principal. The Bullard High School graduate went on to earn a bachelor’s degree in interdisciplinary studies from Stephen F. Austin State University and a master’s degree in educational administration from The University of Texas at Tyler. She has been with the district for 14 years and had served as Bullard Intermediate’s interim principal since August.

Cameron ISD Cameron ISD’s new superintendent, Allan Sapp, was most recently principal of Moorehead Junior High in Conroe ISD.

Comal ISD Superintendent Andrew Kim has been appointed for a second year to the Texas Education Agency’s Accountability Policy Advisory Committee. He joined Comal ISD in 2012 from Manor ISD, where he was deputy superintendent and superintendent. Kim holds a bachelor’s degree from Fordham University and a master’s degree from The University of Texas.

Conroe ISD Chris Hines, formerly the district’s deputy superintendent for schools, is now deputy superintendent for operations.

The district has named a new deputy superintendent for schools. Chris Null, who

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Texas School Business JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2016

has spent 12 of his 15 years as an educator with Conroe ISD, had been serving as assistant superintendent for secondary education. He earned his bachelor’s degree from the University of Houston, where he also received his doctorate. He earned his master’s degree from the University of Florida. Darin Rice, a 25-year employee of Conroe ISD and most recently executive director of finance, is now chief financial officer.

Cypress-Fairbanks ISD Heather Bergman, former associate principal of Cypress Springs High School, now leads Dean Middle School as principal. Her 15-year career includes six years with Cypress-Fairbanks ISD. Bergman received her bachelor’s degree in mathematics from the University of Houston and her master’s degree in the same field from Texas A&M University. Her doctorate in educational leadership was earned from Stephen F. Austin State University. Chris Hecker, principal

of Dean Middle School, has been named principal of the district’s 11th high school, Cypress Park High, scheduled to open its doors in August of 2016. The 18year education veteran has spent his career in Cypress-Fairbanks ISD. He received his bachelor’s degree in history from The University of Texas and his master’s degree in educational leadership from the University of Houston.

press-Fairbanks ISD, where she was most recently principal of Arnold Middle School. She is a graduate of Oklahoma State University, with a bachelor’s degree in secondary science education. She received her master’s degree in education administration from Sam Houston State University.

Denison ISD Two Denison ISD administrators have announced their retirement, effective in January. They are Mike Archer, director of business, and Lee McNair, assistant superintendent. Returning to Denison ISD, where he previously served as director of business, is Randy Reid. Most recently Sherman ISD’s assistant superintendent for finance and support services, his new role with Denison ISD is assistant superintendent for business services.

Deweyville ISD Former Elkhart ISD high school Principal Kevin Clark has been named superintendent. An educator since 1990, he earned his bachelor’s and master’s degrees in education from Stephen F. Austin State University.

Eagle Mountain-Saginaw ISD Debbie McCune has joined the district as director of elementary staffing. An educator for 29 years, she was most recently principal of Cox Elementary School in Northwest ISD.

Jodi Matteson, former prin-

cipal of Millsap Elementary, now holds the top position at Arnold Middle School. She has 31 years of experience as an educator, all of them with Cypress-Fairbanks ISD. After earning her bachelor’s degree in education from The University of Texas, she received a master’s degree in education administration from Sam Houston State University. Sarah Sanders, the district’s

art coordinator, was named the 2015 Texas Art Education Association’s Texas Art Educator of the Year during the organization’s annual conference in November in Galveston. She has served 46 years as an art educator in Kansas and Oklahoma, as well as in Texas, including 28 years as an administrator and teacher with Cypress-Fairbanks ISD. The new principal of Cypress Creek High School is Vicki Snokhous. She has been an educator for 32 years, 18 of them with Cy-

El Paso ISD Dori Fenenbock, president

of the El Paso ISD Board of Trustees, has been reelected to a two-year term on the board of directors of the Texas Association of School Boards, representing ESC Region 19. Fenenbock is a graduate of The University of Texas and the University of Tulsa School of Law.

Ferris ISD New Superintendent James Hartman was most recently superintendent of Sonora ISD.

Fort Bend ISD Michelle LeBleu is the new director of

special education. With more than 20 years of experience as an educator, she came to Fort Bend ISD in 2012 as special education coordinator and most recently


was assistant director of special education. LeBleu earned her bachelor’s degree in elementary education from McNeese State University and her master’s degree in educational administration from the University of Houston Clear Lake.

Harris County Department of Education Jeffrey Drury is the new director of the pur-

chasing cooperative of the Harris County Department of Education. The native Houstonian has more than 20 years of experience in sales, marketing and management. He holds a bachelor’s degree in industrial distribution from Texas A&M University and a master’s degree in business administration from the University of St. Thomas. Former Clear Creek ISD Principal Andrea Seagraves has been named special events director for the Teaching and Learning Center. She is a graduate of the University of Oklahoma and has a master’s degree from the University of Houston Clear Lake. Frances Watson-Hester,

most recently a middle school principal in Lamar CISD, is the new senior director of the Teaching and Learning Center. The 24-year educator graduated from Grambling State University and received her master’s degree in counseling and administration from Texas Southern University. She is completing her doctorate in educational leadership at Prairie View A&M University.

Klein ISD After 47 years as an educator, 35 of those with Klein ISD, Superintendent Jim Cain has announced his retirement, effective at the end of the current academic year. He began his career in his home state of Illinois, taking his first job in Texas schools in Clear Creek ISD. He joined Klein ISD in 1978 and became superintendent in 2004.

Lake Travis ISD Amber King has been ap-

pointed the district’s general counsel. She is a graduate of Oklahoma State University, with a bachelor’s degree in journalism and broadcasting. King earned her doctor of jurisprudence degree from Texas Tech University. She has spent the past 12 years with the law firm Thompson and Horton, where she focused on special education law. A new director of facilities and construction has been named for the district. Robert Wintovich holds a degree in environmental design and architecture from Texas A&M University. He has 15 years of experience in architecture and project management in both the private and public sector. Since 2010, he has served as Lake Travis ISD’s facility resources, compliance and construction manager.

Lamar CISD

financial officer for Humble ISD. An educator for 19 years, he holds a bachelor’s degree from Baylor University. His master’s degree was awarded from Stephen F. Austin State University.

Now serving as principal of Huggins Elementary School is Janice Harvey. She is a graduate of Texas A&M University. She has a master’s degree from the University of Houston at Victoria. She most recently worked as assistant principal of Bowie Elementary.

Houston ISD

Leander ISD

Deputy Superintendent and Chief Financial Officer Ken Huewitt has been honored by the Council of Great City Schools with the 2015 Bill Wise Award for distinguished service to urban education. He joined the district in 2001 after serving as an auditor for the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development’s Office of the Inspector General.

Leander ISD trustees have approved the appointment of Matthew Smith as assistant superintendent for instructional services. He came to the district last summer from the Hillsboro School District in Oregon in preparation for serving as principal of a new high school scheduled to open for the 2016-2017 school year. Smith is a graduate of Virginia Wesleyan College and holds a master’s degree from Arizona State University. He is at work on his doctorate from Concordia University.

Humble ISD Mike Seale has agreed to serve as chief

Katy ISD Katy ISD trustee Joe Adams was elected second vice president of the Texas Association of School Boards during the organization’s annual delegate assembly and convention in Austin. Adams has served on the Katy ISD board since 1989. He is a graduate of Leadership TASB and a master trustee.

Little Elm ISD Chris Epps is now executive director for human resources. She has been with the district since 2005, serving in various roles, including working as a teacher, an associate

principal and in the Human Resources Department. Ross Roberts has been chosen to serve as Little Elm ISD’s assistant superintendent for student and administrative services. He joined the district last year as executive director for human services.

McAllen ISD Achieve Early College High School Principal Rosalba De Hoyos is one of only seven school leaders nationwide to receive the prestigious Terrel H. Bell Award for Outstanding School Leadership, conferred by the U.S. Department of Education. Now in her fourth year leading Achieve, she holds a bachelor’s degree in bilingual education and a master’s degree in guidance and counseling. Her doctorate in professional counseling was awarded from Mississippi College.

McKinney ISD A new chief financial officer has been chosen for McKinney ISD. Jason Bird has been with the district for 20 years and was senior director of finance since 2005. He holds a bachelor’s degree in civil engineering from Texas A&M University and two master’s degrees from Texas A&M University Commerce, in business administration and educational administration.

Mesquite ISD Mesquite ISD announces the hiring of a superintendent. David Vroonland comes to his new position from Frenship ISD, where he also held the top job. An educator for 29 years, he earned his bachelor’s degree from Centenary College in Louisiana, his master’s degree from Midwestern State University and his doctorate from the University of North Texas.

Midlothian ISD Kim Tunnell, formerly with Tyler ISD, has joined Midlothian ISD as superintendent.

Northwest ISD Kim Becan has been approved as principal of Cox Elementary School, moving to her new job from Love Elementary, where she was assistant principal. The former Northwest ISD Elementary Teacher of the Year holds a bachelor’s degree from Texas A&M University, a master’s degree in education from > See Who’s News, page 8 Texas School Business JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2016

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Who’s News

bachelor’s degree in journalism from Texas Southern University and a doctorate in law enforcement from The University of Texas.

> Continued from page 7

the University of Houston and a second master’s degree, in education administration, from Lamar University. Joel Johnson, the district’s newly appoint-

ed executive director of athletics, came to Northwest ISD in 2009 as offensive coordinator for Northwest High School, before being named assistant athletic director in 2014. Tim McClure has been named

the district’s architect planner, charged with managing facilities, planning, development and operations. With more than 20 years of experience in architecture and construction, he has spent his career providing architectural and planning services for many North Texas districts. McClure earned his bachelor’s degree in kinesiology from the University of North Texas and his master’s degree in architecture from The University of Texas at Arlington.

Plano ISD The newly appointed president of the Plano ISD Education Foundation for the 2015-2016 school year is Jean Callison, a graduate of Plano ISD schools and former Plano City Council member. She served as president-elect and director of development for the foundation last year.

Pringle-Morse ISD A new superintendent is in place for the district. Scott Burrow was previously director of special programs for Tulia ISD.

Round Rock ISD The district’s new general counsel is Sandra Carpenter, who comes to the job from a private law firm in Irving and Houston, where she represented school districts and trained district personnel. She earned a

Round Rock ISD has named Bob Cervi as the new chief operating officer. Formerly executive director of facility operations in Austin’s Eanes ISD, he holds a bachelor’s degree in industrial arts from Southwestern Oklahoma State University and a master’s degree from the University of Oklahoma.

Tomball ISD Marcy Canady, an educator for 28 years, is the district’s new director of bilingual services. She was the principal at Canyon Pointe Elementary School. She holds a bachelor’s degree in curriculum and instruction from Texas A&M University and a master’s degree in educational administration from the University of Houston Clear Lake.

The newly hired director of fine arts, JD Janda, joins Tomball ISD from Georgetown ISD, where he was director of curriculum and fine arts. He is a graduate of Southwestern University, where he earned a bachelor’s degree in music education. He earned his master’s degree in educational management from the University of Houston Clear Lake. Arcelia Leon, now director of secondary language arts and social studies, was most recently an assistant principal in Aldine ISD. She earned a bachelor’s degree in education from Trinity University in Vermont and a master’s degree in education from St. Thomas University.

The new director of maintenance for the district is DeWayne Lucius, former maintenance superintendent for the city of Brenham.

Chris Scott has been named

principal of Creekside Park Junior High School, which is scheduled to open in the fall of 2016. He has been an educator for 18 years, working as Tomball ISD’s director of math and science for the past seven. The Tomball High graduate received his bachelor’s degree from the University of Houston and his master’s degree in education from Sam Houston State University. Mark White, director of

research and accountability, comes to Tomball ISD from Houston ISD, where he worked for 22 years. He earned two bachelor’s degrees from the University of Houston and a master’s degree in educational administration from Texas Southern University.

Wharton ISD Tina Herrington, who had been serving as the district’s interim superintendent since July, is now superintendent. Formerly superintendent of Meyersville ISD, she came to Wharton ISD in 2014. She received her master’s degree from the University of Houston at Victoria.

A new deputy superintendent has been named for the district. Randall Meyer, an educator since 1993, was most recently superintendent of Sweet Home ISD. He has two bachelor’s degrees, one in political science and one in sociology, and a master’s degree in education, all from Southwest Texas State University (now Texas State University).

Ysleta ISD Mario Rodriguez, the new director of mainte-

nance and operations, joined the district as transportation supervisor in 2004 and was named transportation director in 2006. He holds a bachelor’s degree in business management from the University of Phoenix. ◄

Submit Who’s News to: Texas School Business provides education news to school districts, state organizations and vendors throughout the state. With seven issues a year, TSB can be an effective news source for your organization.

news@texasschoolbusiness.com www.texasschoolbusiness.com 406 East 11th Street • Austin, Texas 78701

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Texas School Business JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2016


THE LAW DAWG – UNLEASHED

The most important thing to do in 2016 by Jim Walsh

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ou know what I’m going to do in 2016? I’m going to VOTE, that’s what I’m going to do. And I encourage you to do the same.

The first opportunity is right around the corner. On March 1, Texas will hold its primary election. I intend to be in line to vote that day, and I hope it is a long line, full of well-informed public school employees, ready to take back the public schools. We haven’t done so well on this voting thing recently. According to the Annette Strauss Institute for Civil Life at The University of Texas, Texas ranked dead last in voter turnout in 2010 — and it rose all the way to 48th in 2012. Wallethub.com ranks us 48th among the states in “political engagement.” Voter turnout in Texas is very poor, but it is downright pathetic in the primaries. In the 2014 primary, only about 10 percent of the registered voters took the time to vote in the Republican primary. The Republicans swept all of the statewide offices in 2014, as they have done for two decades. So, the primary is where the decisions are made for governor, lieutenant governor, attorney general and all other statewide offices.

I don’t know of any reliable statistics as to how many public school employees voted, but I keep hearing people say “teachers don’t vote.” How sad is that? How irresponsible is that? I’m hoping that 2016 will be the year that the trend line reverses. Think of what a difference a committed army of well-informed educator voters could make! We have the numbers, people! There are 656,541 public school employees in Texas. Just imagine what a difference it would make if we could get that public school employee voter number up to 50 percent. If just half of the employees voted, we would have 328,270 voters. That just might make a difference. When educators don’t show up at the polls, we get a governor who thinks it is OK to appoint a home-schooling parent to head the State Board of Education. We get Do a member not cut offof the Senate Education Committee who sees no black outline political risk in describing public education as a “monstrosity.” If the people who have the most at stake took the time to vote, we might have leadership in our state that values and supports public education. We don’t have that now.

hope you will take the time to look at www. So did 10 percent Advertiser: of the registered votersWRAIArchitects, Inc. choose our leaders? Actually, it was less than texaseducatorsvote.com. This website is Submitted Date: Monday, December 07, 2015 that. To win the Republican primary, all you sponsored by the Texas Association of ComSchools, the Texas Rural Education Publication: School Business Magazine need is to get one vote more than half of thatTexasmunity Association and Pastors for Texas Children. Ann Halstead, 512.963.6584 10 percent. So, about 5 percent of the regisa h a lThey ste a d @ ta s a n et .o teachers, rg encourage custodians, bus tered voters in Texas chose our leaders. drivers, cafeteria workers and administrators You could effectively be elected to statewide to “take the oath” to vote in both the primary Pub Date(s): 2016 office in 2014 with 679,038 votes. That wouldJanuary-February and general election and to form “accounthave been enough to win in the Republican ability teams” to follow through on those primary. This is 3.5 Ad percent of the voting age1/3-page commitments. Size/Color: vertical, full color population in our state. That’s who is choos-2.5” wide x 9.75” tall March 1. November 8. Be in line to VOTE. ing our leaders. Think of a lineup of 100 adultMonday, Art Deadline: December 07, 2015 Texans. It only takes three or four of them to Art Contact: elect a governor, because so many of us areGrady L. Frank, AIA WRA Architects, Inc. sitting out.

Full Architectural Services Facility Assessment Site Evaluation Feasibility Studies Pre-Bond Planning, Budgeting Bond Election PR, Advertising Bond Program Management Programming Master Planning Architectural Design Interior Design Scope-to-Budget Management Construction Administration

214-750-0077 main 972-658-0103 cell g f r a nGallegos k @ w r Treviño a a r c h Russo i t e c t &s .Kyle com JIM WALSH is an attorney with Walsh PC. He can be reached at jwalsh@wabsa.com. You can also follow him on Twitter: @jwalshtxlawdawg. Texas School Business JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2016

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Photo Feature

TEXAS ASCD HOSTS ‘TRANSFORMATIVE MOMENTUM’ ANNUAL CONFERENCE The Texas ASCD annual conference, held in Austin this past fall, focused on progressive approaches to curriculum development.

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Karen Lloyd and Treva Franklin of Mesquite ISD.

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Suzanne Burke, Austin ISD; Abigayle Burton, Corpus Christi ISD; and Shanna Peeples, 2015 National Teacher of the Year, Amarillo ISD.

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Katie Preast and Ava Johnson of Troup ISD.

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Ruth Vail, Priscilla Canales, Jonathan Harris and Kelly Crook of Del Valle ISD.

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Michele Rusnak of Austin ISD.

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Della Taylor of AASCD and Tonya Hyde of Fort Sam Houston ISD.

Del Valle ISD Superintendent Kelly Crook addresses Texas ASCD members during a general session.

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Texas School Business JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2016

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Julia McComas and Nancy Tarvin of Leander ISD.


DIGITAL FRONTIER

Technology plays critical role in personalized learning by Nancy Allen

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t’s the start of a new year and a great time to think about resolutions you can make to provide a better educational experience for the students in your district, school or classroom. We must frequently assess our ability to engage and educate 21st century learners to guarantee the success of all. One strategy for improving instruction is to use technology to personalize the learning experience for each and every child. While this may sound like a gargantuan task, individualized learning experiences hold value that extends well beyond graduation. Why should we personalize learning experiences for our students? Personalized experiences better meet the specific needs of every student. Given the diverse nature of most classrooms, teachers find themselves wishing they had more time to work with the struggling student and more learning opportunities for the student who moves at the speed of light. Creating lessons and activities that are keyed into the specific needs of these students will allow them to learn at their own pace, instead of forcing them to move along with the rest of the class.

A second benefit of personalized learning is the opportunity to receive continuous feedback. Frequent, brief assessments can determine whether or not students are learning the content needed for their success. If the assessment shows that more content coverage is needed, the teacher can provide opportunities for more instruction to ensure the student is on the right track. Another advantage of personalized learning is increased student engagement and intrinsic motivation. When students have the opportunity to decide what information they want to learn and how they can learn it, they become active participants in the learning process. In addition, when students have the chance to study a topic that interests them, they are more motivated to complete the work being assigned to them.

Technology can support personalized learning for all students. The use of online, blended and flipped classroom environments allows students to learn content and work on projects at their own pace. This also allows teachers to spend class time on activities that require students to use higher-level thinking skills and make connections between content and real-world applications. Students also can use technology to collaborate with one another and deepen their understanding of a topic. Having students create websites or blogs on their chosen topics offers an opportunity to showcase their knowledge and gain skills in digital media. It also allows them to share what they have learned with students in other states and countries — in effect, transforming their personalized learning experience into a globalized one.

‘When students have the opportunity to decide what information they want to learn and how they can learn it, they become active participants in the learning process.’ Lastly, teachers can employ a number of online assessment programs to monitor their students’ progress and provide instant feedback. Many of the programs require only that a student log in to a website with a smartphone or tablet, and the assessment information is sent instantly to the teacher.

Choice Partners.org Purchasing Cooperative

TxSPOT.org

Support for School Physical and Occupational Therapy

Digital Learning & Innovation Facility Safety Audits Facility Reviews

Creating Value, Delivering Opportunity, and Providing Service for Texas Students and Educators

As we move further into the 21st century, our teaching methods must evolve as our students do. Personalizing the learning experience is one way to ensure that our students are actively engaged and motivated throughout the school year.

855-821-HCDE [4233] www.HCDE-Texas.org NANCY ALLEN is an educator in Angleton ISD and a member of the Texas Computer Education Association. Texas School Business JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2016

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The sense of brotherhood and culture of ambassadorship in our “district has never been stronger. Ambassador training has helped unite our team around our schools and our profession.”

-- Scott Niven, Superintendent, Red Oak ISD

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hen my country, into which I had just set my foot, was set on fire about my ears, it was time to stir. It was time for every man to stir.”

-- Thomas P a i n e

COMMON SENSE

Thomas Paine’s political declaration in Common Sense helped direct the energies of the rebels and point the way to American independence from England. The Ambassador Training Academy staff development program is inspired by Thomas Paine’s work. There are many parallels between educators today, condemned by blinded reformists, and early Americans, condemned by a blinded Crown. Just as Paine “enunciates... the specific right of the people to challenge unjust laws and an unjust government”, we are mobilizing an army of educators to challenge unjust criticism and false accusations of widespread failure.

Class of 2011 Red Oak ISD Ambassadors Academy

Friends of Texas Public Schools is educating Texans about Texas public schools and their many strengths and achievements through Ambassador Training and other initiatives in order to: 4 4 4 4 4 4

Underscore the significance of them; Unite Texans around them; Restore pride in them; Strengthen confidence in them; Lift spirits among them; and Inject resources into them…

…all of which will lead to even greater performance.

Stir your team into champions for your students, district, and profession by enrolling your school district in our Ambassador Training Academy.

It’s time for every educator to stir Visit www.fotps.org to learn more, or email us at lmilder@fotps.org.


GAME ON

What it is to be an American by Bobby Hawthorne

I

’m as confused and frustrated as the next person about the world we’re leaving to our children and grandchildren, and I appreciate the dangers of skinny-dipping in the bilge-water that is modern politics — what with all the blather about building walls along both borders, of shipping 11 million people away from here to somewhere else, of Syrian jihadists masquerading as refugees and sneaking across the Rio Grande alongside rapists and drug lords to blow up Dairy Queens. Such xenophobic prattle sickens me. Still, I’m neither naïve nor blind. Bad people out there would love to kill me and you for reasons we can’t begin to comprehend. It’s a scary time, but I’m reminded of FDR’s famous line from his first inaugural speech: “…the only thing we have to fear is fear itself.” Do you know the second half of that sentence? Here it is: “…nameless, unreasoning, unjustified terror, which paralyzes needed efforts to convert retreat into advance.” The following piece, written for me years ago, reminds me that we can survive and thrive if we’re smart enough and brave enough to squelch our fears and embrace our humanity. Happy New Year.

“I grew up in Cienegas, 3.2 square miles of some of the poorest, most disadvantaged people in all of Del Rio. Despite our poverty, my parents — immigrants from Mexico — worked hard to make ends meet. Though humble, they instilled in me the importance of education and Christian values, but my world did not exist beyond my barrio — until one day. When I was in the fourth grade, I attended my first football game at Ram Stadium. The sounds, the lights, the spirit! I never knew such things existed! I felt in my heart the beat of the marching band and fell in love with the spirit of not just my barrio but of my entire hometown. My family and I did not have much, but we were part of a close-knit community. Rich or poor, old or young, male or female, we shared a special bond each fall — a

bond that grew stronger each year. For four years, I was a member of the Del Rio Mighty Ram Band that practiced and performed on the same field I had fallen in love with back in fourth grade. We entertained the same crowds I had once been part of. I graduated from high school and The University of Texas at San Antonio, but I never doubted that I would one day return to my hometown and start my career and my life as

‘...we can survive and thrive if we’re smart enough and brave enough to squelch our fears and embrace our humanity.’

✯ ADAMS, LYNCH & LOFTIN, P.C. A Texas Law Firm

NEAL W. ADAMS RICHARD E. HILL ALLAN S. GRAVES CORY S. HARTSFIELD General Counsel for Texas Association of School Administrators

an elementary educator. I taught fourth grade, bilingual education. My students came with the same story, the same history, the same experiences as I had. Many of them were recent immigrants themselves and knew little of the world outside the barrio. More than academics, I wanted to offer my students the chance to experience life as a U.S. citizen, as a Texan. So, on Friday nights, when our team was playing at home, I would pick up a couple of my students from their homes and drive them to Ram Stadium. Most had never seen such a sight: the cheerleaders, the drill teams, the players in their helmets and shoulder pads. I remember the looks in their eyes, the same look I must have had 10-15 years ago. I wanted them to feel the pounding of the bass drums, hear the fans singing their fight songs, witness the camaraderie of the players and coaches, and share in the magic of the Friday night lights. To participate in this American ritual is to understand what it is to be an American.”

BOBBY HAWTHORNE is the author of “Longhorn Football” and “Home Field,” published by UT Press. In 2005, he retired as director of academics for the University Interscholastic League.

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Texas School Business JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2016

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y

Fifteen Lamar CISD students, six teachers and one principal gained exposure to Chinese education and culture for two weeks, thanks to a collaboration among Fort Bend Global Initiative, Fort Bend County and the city of Foshan, China.

Public-private partnerships open doors for top-notch programs, education by Merri Rosenberg

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ith budget constraints a relentless reality for Texas public schools, many districts are exploring public-private partnerships with businesses, industry and higher education to bring rigorous, workforce-relevant programs to the K-12 experience.

East meets west One such example is in Lamar CISD, where students and staff at George Ranch

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Texas School Business JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2016

High School are gaining a global perspective on education, thanks to a collaborative effort among the Fort Bend Global Initiative (FBGI), Fort Bend County and the city of Foshan, China. FBGI is a nonprofit that fosters international commerce, economic growth, and educational and cultural exchange in Fort Bend County. It already had a working relationship with the city of Foshan when it invited Lamar CISD to form a partnership with Foshan School Number 3.

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Education is an easy way to start dialogue and conversation,â&#x20AC;? says Mike Rockwood, Lamar CISD executive director of community relations. Mike Rockwood

During the 2014-2015 school year, 15 students, six teachers and the principal at George Ranch High School immersed themselves in a two-


week experience at the Foshan school. The students lived in the dormitories (just like their Chinese counterparts), experienced a 12-hour school day and stayed with host families on the weekends.

Leslie Haack

“It was truly an amazing experience for myself and our students,” Principal Leslie Haack says. “You can learn about foreign countries and different cultures, but for two weeks in China, we lived it.”

The trip marked one year since 13 students and two school administrators from Foshan visited George Ranch High School for two weeks. Prior to the visit, George Ranch High School hosted a delegation of Chinese principals and administrators to

create the foundation for the long-term educational and cultural exchange. In March 2013, Lamar CISD Superintendent Thomas Randle signed a memorandum of understanding with the Education Thomas Randle Bureau of Chancheng District of Foshan, and Haack signed a similar memorandum of understanding with Foshan School Number 3. The international exchange program is an extension of a sister community relationship agreement between Fort Bend County and the Chancheng District of Foshan. The collaboration began when a Fort Bend delegation, which included Superintendent Randle, visited China in 2011.

“We felt it would be advantageous for our students,” says Randle. “We believe that our kids are going to be part of the global economy and global marketplace. This fits really well. The business sector already is working with businesses over there. We want our kids to have these experiences too.”

Banking on financial literacy Hunt ISD Superintendent Crystal Dockery also sought to expand her students’ horizons when she reached out to a national bank to bring financial literacy to her rural school district, which has less than 200 students in grades K-8. > See PRIVATE, page 16

A Hunt ISD student learns financial literacy at a school-based bank branch, thanks to a partnership with Wells Fargo Bank.

Texas School Business JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2016

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A student is treated at one of Rockdale ISD’s schoolbased clinics, thanks to a partnership with Little River Healthcare.

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Texas School Business JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2016


> Continued from page 15

Inspired by her experience as a PTA booster in Amarillo, where school officials had established a similar program, Dockery reached out to Wells Fargo Bank about two years ago to see if the national bank would open a school-based branch. The bank responded favorably and built the Wells Fargo Eagles Branch at the Hunt ISD school.

‘The partnership is an innovative way to stress the importance of financial literacy.’ — Hunt ISD Superintendent Crystal Dockery

Open every other Wednesday from 7:30 a.m. to 8:30 a.m., it’s admittedly not a typical bank. It’s designed as a mobile bank branch, with a teller window where students can make their deposits and withdrawals. “It’s important to us at Wells Fargo to be leaders in supporting education, financial literacy and volunteerism,” says Wells Fargo Program at Work consultant Heather Justen. She explains that every two weeks, two Wells Fargo team members from a neighboring community volunteer their time at the school bank branch, where minors can open checking and savings accounts for free (with a parent account owner when certain qualifications are met). “It’s an opportunity for kids to learn more about the banking process,” says Dockery. “Children fill out deposit slips. It’s been a cool thing.” Almost half of Hunt ISD students come from economically disadvantaged households. Students who don’t have cash to deposit can use “best bucks,” which are earned every six weeks with report cards when students maintain good grades, get to school on time and behave well. Students can deposit their best bucks and learn how to allocate them for savings, spend them

(at the school store), or donate them to the local food bank, animal shelter, or even to a fellow student in need. “They get a grasp of financial literacy as it really plays out,” says Dockery. Parent Kit Werlein clearly sees the benefit. “What I’ve noticed as a result is most 10-year-olds don’t understand the value of money or the purchasing power of money. Now, my daughter understands the value of saving money,” he says. “The program is a good one. My daughter gets a bank statement with her name on it. I commend the school for doing it.” That’s exactly the result Dockery hoped to achieve when she reached out to Wells Fargo. “The partnership is an innovative way to stress the importance of financial literacy,” she says. “Students understand how to save, make a budget and donate to others. It’s a neat way to teach banking.”

Health and wellness for all Rockdale ISD is another district that has teamed up with a local business to better serve students and staff members. Thanks to a partnership with Little River Healthcare, all four Rockdale ISD campuses have school-based health clinics. According to Allen Sanders, community relations director for Rockdale ISD, many parents work in Austin, about an hour away, so the school-based clinics reduce the need for parents to leave work when their children need minor health-care services. Parents who want to participate in the school-based clinics sign consent forms, provide health insurance information and pay the necessary co-payments. The system is set up so that the school nurse first evaluates the student and then contacts the parent with an update. Students who are running fevers are sent home; however, the school nurse, in consultation with the parent, may send a student with, say, an allergy flare-up or other minor ailment to the clinic, eliminating the need for the parent to collect the child and make a separate

appointment to see a physician. Students are typically sent back to class after treatment. Each clinic is open twice a week on a rotating schedule, which means that health care services are available every day of the week. On Fridays, clinic hours rotate among the different schools. “Students at any campus can have an appointment at any time during the week, even if the clinic is not on their campus,” Sanders explains. However, a parent or legal guardian would need to accompany a student if the appointment is not at his/her home campus. The district leases space to Little River Healthcare, which covers the clinics’ operational costs with grant money. This includes staffing each clinic with a nurse practitioner and a medical assistant. Additionally, the district was able to hire a fourth school nurse with the revenue generated by the leasing fees, so now all four campuses have a dedicated school nurse. The clinics are housed in spaces formerly used as administrative offices or classrooms, so a little bit of retrofitting was required, from adding sinks to modifying doorways. The clinics have exam tables, privacy curtains, supply cabinets, desks, chairs and printers. The clinics opened to staff members in February 2014 and then to students a month later. The partnership began when Little River Healthcare contacted the district with the idea, according to Pam Kauffman, Rockdale ISD assistant superintendent and chair of the district’s health advisory committee. “It took several years of discussion to make this happen,” she says, but adds that the resulting partnership has done wonders for student wellness and absenteeism. “It also helps our staff members, who don’t have to miss their classes,” Kauffman says. “I can leave my office and be back in 15 minutes.” Sanders agrees, adding: “As far as the district is concerned, (the partnership) is a blessing.” MERRI ROSENBERG also writes for The New York Times.

Texas School Business JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2016

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JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2016


In Focus

Texas School Business Special Section

How Do We Help Our Most At-Risk Learners? by Scientific Learning

In this special section, Round Rock ISD Superintendent Steve Flores discusses how to support the districtâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s most at-risk students: English language learners and those living in poverty. Also, neuroscience researchers explore the links between household income and early childhood brain development.

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Texas School Business Special Section

Q&A with Dr. Steve Flores Question 1: In literature and in educational conversations, two recurring themes seem to surface: English language learners and children of poverty continue to lag behind in student achievement. You have served in multiple districts in Texas. What has been your experience with these two student populations? Answer 1: Throughout my over 30 years in education as a classroom teacher, coach, principal and superintendent, I have encountered thousands of students who were English language learners (ELLs) or from impoverished homes — or oftentimes, both. Without exception, these students were every bit as capable to learn and be creative as the native-English-speaking students from middle-class homes. Oftentimes, the difference was in their academic readiness as they entered their first day of schooling. Neuroscience research shows us there are many factors that impact the development of cognitive skills in children. It is our fundamental duty for us to provide them with opportunities that help them quickly develop the cognitive and language skills they need to achieve academic success, while celebrating and valuing their diverse backgrounds. Q2: Is it fair to say that English language learners often come from poverty? What are the multiple challenges that you believe they have to overcome? A2: It happens, but they don’t always go hand-in-hand. In our district, we have numerous ELLs from affluent families, but the challenges they face as non-English speakers are similar. That can be quite a challenge for districts like Round Rock, where more than 84 languages are spoken. The key is to provide targeted language strategies through core content instruction and intervention, early and with fidelity. Many states are debating whether or not to provide early learning centers, and I firmly believe that it’s essential, especially for ELLs and those experiencing poverty. These student groups enter our school systems at a perceived disadvantage, initially due to their lack of English language proficiency, vocabulary development and life experiences. However, the more support we have with highly trained teachers and staff utilizing second language and multicultural and culture-responsive strategies, the greater our ability to close the achievement gap early when their brains are the most malleable.

Q3: What do you believe are some of the solutions for meeting the needs of these students? A3: The first step is to educate everyone, including students, teachers, parents, lawmakers and the community as a whole, as to the challenges these populations face. School districts need to provide high-quality early learning curriculum, enrichment opportunities, and before- and after-school programs to help students enter school ready to learn and support their academic journey along the way. It’s also imperative to establish a culture of high expectations, from the start, that are supported and fostered at home and at school. Next, we need high-quality teachers who have access to professional development and tools to help meet the needs of every student. The tools and programs utilized to meet student needs must be research- and evidence-based to improve and sustain academic achievement for lifelong learning. We use the Fast ForWord® program from Scientific Learning because, among other things, it’s What Works Clearinghouse’s top-ranking English language development intervention. It’s high quality and engaging, and it allows students to experience success in learning English as quickly as possible, as well as succeeding in their native language. That brings me to my next point: We must demonstrate and model to ELLs our respect for their cultural backgrounds and life experiences. Every child comes to school with their own cultural capital, and we as educators need to value their experiences and build upon them to make their learning meaningful, but not at the expense of their native language. The advantages of true bilingualism are clearly documented, so we must ensure that ELLs are highly literate in their first language to become bilingual and biliterate in their second language. Finally, the school district must be a model for understanding that all children have the potential to succeed. It can happen with the right tools and high-quality teachers who understand and care for students in a manner that encourages them to be creative geniuses for their entire lives.

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About Steve Flores, Ph.D Steve Flores, Ph.D., has served the students of Round Rock ISD since October 2013. He began his educational career as a paraprofessional, coach and bus driver in San Angelo ISD, while completing his bachelor’s degree. He then went on to become a teacher and a coach, eventually serving as a vice principal at Central High School and then as a principal of Edison Junior High School in San Angelo. He has served as an assistant superintendent for both Pflugerville ISD and Round Rock ISD. While at Round Rock ISD, he also served briefly as the acting superintendent. Flores served the students of Dallas ISD, first as area VI superintendent, then as deputy superintendent and finally as chief of staff. Before coming to Round Rock ISD in his current capacity, he served as superintendent at Harlingen CISD for five years.


In Focus

Texas School Business Special Section

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In Focus

Texas School Business Special Section

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The Path Out of Poverty: Education Plus Neuroscience How family income impacts children neurologically By Dr. Martha Burns Poverty impairs the brain’s ability to develop and learn. Perhaps as toxic as drugs and alcohol to a young child’s brain, poverty not only affects the development of cognitive skills in young children, but it also changes the way the brain tissue itself matures in the critical brain “setup” period during early childhood. We have known for decades, since Hart and Risley’s seminal research published in 1995, that children who come from homes of poverty are exposed to millions of fewer spoken words in the home environment by the time they enter school, than children who are raised in homes where the parents are professionals. Neuroscientists have recognized that human brain maturation is experience-dependent, and one of the most important times for experience to mold the brain is from early childhood through the elementary school years. It goes without saying that the less language a child is exposed to, the fewer opportunities the brain has to develop language skills. But language function in the brain is not the only casualty of poverty; there are many other cognitive skills that are affected by low socioeconomic status. Kimberly Noble, an associate professor of neuroscience and education at Columbia University Teachers College, has been studying the effects of poverty on many aspects of cognitive development and brain structure for over a decade. As early as 2005, with M. Frank Norman and Martha Farah, she published research on the relationship between socioeconomic status and specific cognitive functions. Her findings show that children who come from homes of poverty have limitations in a range of cognitive skills, including the following: • • • •

long- and short-term (working) memory; visual and spatial skills; executive functions, like self-control; and ability to learn from reward

What is the link between brain development and household income? More recently, Noble and Elizabeth Sowell, professor of pediatrics at The Saban Research Institute at Children’s Hospital Los Angeles, have found compelling links between family income and brain structure as well, especially those areas of the brain important for memory and attention, regions essential for academic success. In a recent article in the journal Nature Neuroscience, they reported that increases in both parental education and family income were associated with increases in the surface area of numerous brain regions, including those implicated in language and executive functions. Family income, however, appeared to have a stronger positive relationship with brain surface area than parental education.

IN FOCUS

What causes the correlation between poverty and brain development? The reasons for the effect of poverty on brain development are complex. Sowell has asserted that family income is linked to factors such as nutrition, health care, schools, play areas and, sometimes, air quality — all of which can affect brain development. Other researchers, like Jack Shonkoff and Pat Levitt of the National Scientific Council on the Developing Child at Harvard University, have emphasized the role of stress in brain development. Stress is associated with the release of the hormone cortisol, which, in the short term, activates the body to respond to problematic situations. With chronic stress, however, the authors cite research indicating that sustained cortisol can have a toxic effect on brain architecture. How can educators help reverse these effects? As educators, the new research begs the question: Are children raised in poverty doomed to educational struggle, no matter how well we teach? The answer, fortunately, is that neuroscience has not only clarified the problems caused by poverty, but it also provides solutions. In a recently published report titled, “Using Brain Science to Design Pathways Out of Poverty,” Dr. Beth Babcock, CEO of Crittenden Women’s Union, argues that because those areas of the brain affected by the adverse experiences of poverty and trauma remain plastic well into adulthood, neuroscience research offers promise for coaching and other methodologies that can strengthen and improve brain development and function. In her report, Babcock advocates, in part, for the use of computer games designed to “improve memory, focus, attention, impulse control, organization, problem solving and multitasking skills.” These games, according to Babcock, are now widely available and beginning to create positive outcomes. The beginning levels of a widely used neuroscience-based intervention program target attention, memory, processing and sequencing skills — core cognitive skills essential for learning. The later level programs add specific technological instruction in reading comprehension, spelling, phonological awareness and decoding, while also incorporating components to continue building attention and memory skills. Research-proven: Increased reading skills and neurological changes Neuroscience imaging research, conducted at Stanford University and replicated at Harvard, with students who

About the Author Martha Burns, Ph.D., is a joint appointment professor at Northwestern University and has authored three books and more than 100 journal articles on the neuroscience of language and communication. Burns’ expertise is in all areas related to the neuroscience of learning, such as language and reading in the brain, the bilingual brain, the language-to-literacy continuum and the adolescent brain. Burns is also a fellow of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association and the director of neuroscience education for Scientific Learning Corporation.

exhibited reading disabilities and used these neuroscience-based programs for six weeks indicated not only significant improvements in reading skills on standardized testing, but also neurological changes in areas of the brain critical to reading success. Summary: Education is the key! Poverty is toxic to the developing brain and, thereby, endangers academic success. Education offers the key to a path out of poverty. However, increasing class sizes and limitations on teachers’ time to individualize instruction — especially in school districts with high poverty rates — limit the ability of teachers to be as effective as they might be if they could work with students individually. Furthermore, even the best curriculum does not include courses to improve attention, memory or other underlying cognitive functions compromised by living in poverty. Neuroscience now offers not only an explanation of the problem but low-cost solutions that can change the brains of all students to enable learning, so that teachers can do what they do best: teach!

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solutions in K-12 education. To learn more about submission requirements and pricing for this special section, contact Ann Halstead at ahalstead@tasanet.org or 800-725-TASA.


PRESIDENT PROFILE

Texas School Public Relations Association

Wylie ISD’s Ian Halperin aims to help districts better tell their stories by Ford Gunter

h Ian Halperin explains the details of Wylie ISD’s 2014 bond proposal to a group of senior citizens during one of the district’s many public information meetings. Thanks to a comprehensive communications plan, Wylie ISD has passed two bond referendums in the four years Halperin has been with the district. The 2012 bond communications plan earned TSPRA’s Crystal Commendation award.

O

n paper, Ian Halperin’s upcoming term as president of the Texas School Public Relations Association has been two decades in the making. When Halperin takes office in February, it will be exactly 20 years since he left his job as a photographer and photo editor at the Plano Star Courier for a spot in the Mesquite ISD Communications Department. “I had been working in community news, so I had the opportunity to work with a lot of school PR people,” Halperin explains. “When the opportunity came up, I knew the roles, and I felt my experience in journalism would make me that much better at it.” He was right. In Mesquite, Halperin found a school district that was growing rapidly. “They trusted me to take on additional responsibilities,” he says. “Public and open records and information requests, then taking over the TV Department.” Expanding into new horizons has been a hallmark of Halperin’s career. In his current role as executive director of communi-

cations and community relations at Wylie ISD, he was integral in installing a new video board at the football stadium. The video board, operated primarily by students, provides hands-on career experience and opens the district to marketing partnership opportunities with local businesses. It also increases the district’s social media presence. It’s that last one — social media — that best exemplifies the brave new world that Halperin and other school PR people must navigate. While the path from journalism to public relations remains well-traveled, it’s also more littered with new and evolving landmines than ever before. “The biggest challenge facing public schools is just making sure our voice is heard among all the voices out there,” Halperin says. “There are some parents and mom bloggers who have just as much influence as our newspapers. An active blog or Facebook page may have an audience of 3,000 to 4,000 people. That’s not something we can take lightly. You have to look at the sphere of influence of that person. A PTA mom with 200 people who follow her, that’s a pretty big voting bloc in that school.” > See TSPRA, page 24 Texas School Business JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2016

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> Continued from page 23

It’s not the participation in social media, per se, that Halperin finds troubling; it’s the never-ending noise of it. “Social media doesn’t like a void; it doesn’t like silence,” he says. “It’s got to have noise, or information, to survive. It’s up to us to get the right information out there.” One of Halperin’s main goals for his term as president of TSPRA is to get the smaller districts without a dedicated communications specialist up to speed on this modern minefield. “Smaller districts have limited budgets and small administration staffs, so it’s hard to justify a full-time communications person,” he says. “We have an opportunity as an organization to work with these supers, assistant supers and board members on basic communication skills and basic social media knowledge.” This past summer, Halperin facilitated such a training with small-district superintendents. “In these small districts, you may not have The Dallas Morning News covering you, but

you might have a mom with an active Facebook page,” Halperin says, “and if she decides she doesn’t like something, you could find yourself behind in the PR war pretty quickly.” Halperin credits his journalism experience for helping him wade these tricky waters and to get to the meat of what all parties want. “I think being a journalist, you listen and you get to hear a lot of points of view,” he says. “You have a lot of different experiences and that helps when I’m talking to parents and teachers. I think you have a better sense of the world around you.” Halperin was born in Chicago, Ill., and grew up in Michigan, before his family moved to Lubbock when he was 12. In Lubbock, Halperin took up photography and threw himself into working for the high school newspaper and yearbook. His family moved again, to the Austin area, before his junior year. Halperin says his newspaper and yearbook experience helped him transition into a new school. He graduated from Round Rock ISD’s Westwood High School in 1990 and returned to Lubbock on a full scholarship for photography at Texas Tech University, where he shadowed professional photographers from local media.

“An incredible experience,” Halperin recalls. After graduation, it only took a few years as a professional journalist for Halperin to see trouble — and opportunity. “I kind of saw, even 20 years ago, that newspapers were struggling and media was changing, and how important it was for school districts to articulate their plans and purpose to the public,” he says. “It was always so much easier to go through a district’s communications department than to deal with districts that didn’t have one. That’s what gave me the awareness that there are school PR people.” And the awareness of where more are needed. “Our biggest thing is to make sure at our individual campuses and districts that the good stories and the correct information are getting out to the public,” Halperin says. “The story is being told, and whether it’s their version or your version, it’s still going to be out there. So, it’s in your best interest to make sure that it’s your version being told.”

FORD GUNTER is a freelance writer and filmmaker in Houston.

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IN THE SPOTLIGHT

Thought leaders and innovators in education

Arlington ISD principal brings her pioneering spirit to new academy By Raven L. Hill

h Principal Katiuska Herrador makes music with her students at the Jimmy and Laura Jones Academy of Fine Arts and Dual Language, which opened this year with 88 kindergarteners in four classrooms. It eventually will expand up to sixth grade. Students spend half the day speaking Spanish and the other half speaking English. Math and science are taught in Spanish; language arts and social studies are taught in English. Students also spend 90 minutes in music, theater, visual art and dance classes.

W

hen Katiuska Herrador heard about a new dual language and fine arts academy opening in Arlington ISD, she went for the top job — even though it meant leaving the school district where she had spent her entire career to date. Carpe diem has been Herrador’s lifelong mantra, passed down by her mother, who left her native Venezuela to study biology and become a college professor. “She always said, ‘Take every opportunity that comes your way because you’re not sure when the next one will,’” Herrador recalls. Herrador wants to instill a similar sense of determination in others as the founding principal at the Jimmy and Laura Jones Academy of Fine Arts and Dual Language. Jones Academy, which opened this school year, is one of two academies in Arlington ISD designed to nurture students’ artistic interests while exposing them to world languages and culture. Jones Academy is housed at Roquemore Elementary, which is slated to close at the end of the school year. Being principal of both the new academy and the closing elementary school requires a careful balancing act.

Superintendent Marcelo Cavazos says he knew immediately that Herrador would be up for the challenge. “Katiuska’s commitment to excellence, her enthusiasm for education, and her passion for teaching and learning — those things really came through when we first met,” he says. “Katiuska and her staff have been able to make this campus one, continuing the traditions of [Roquemore] and keeping the excitement of the first cohort [at Jones]. She is the right person in the right program for our community and students.” With the first half of the school year behind her, Herrador credits her success so far to strong and frequent communication among all stakeholders. “That helps spread the theme of unity. Yes, we have two different programs, but we’re one team,” says Herrador, who is also Region 10 president-elect for the Texas Elementary Principals and Supervisors Association. “At the end of the day, we’re responsible for every child who comes through the door. Our focus must always be what’s best for all kids.” > See SPOTLIGHT, page 26 Texas School Business JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2016

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> Continued from page 25

As a child, Herrador always knew what she wanted to be when she grew up. Her mother was her inspiration. “I used my Barbies and stuffed animals as my students and held class in my bedroom,” she says. After graduating from Texas A&M University, she started her career as a third grade, bilingual teacher in Irving ISD. She moved up the administrative ranks there, serving as an instructional specialist, assistant principal and principal. The desire to make a difference for more students motivated Herrador to leave the classroom for an administrative role. “I may not be as intimately involved in classrooms as classroom teachers, but I feel the difference I’m making has a much larger scope,” she says. “Instead of a class of 22 students, I have a class of 670.” Her background in bilingual education makes her one of Jones Academy’s biggest cheerleaders, while her personal experiences allow her to relate to students and families. Her childhood was marked by frequent moves as her mother accepted work wherever her research led her. The Herrador family lived in North Carolina and Oklahoma before settling in Texas.

“Early on in my elementary years, my sister and I were considered students who were learning English as a second language. Certain schools were more diverse than others,” Herrador recalls. “Being the new kid and always having to put yourself out there — I think about that a lot because our students are going through similar things.” Jones Academy opened with 88 kindergarteners in four classrooms. It eventually will expand up to sixth grade. Students spend half the day speaking Spanish and the other half speaking English. Math and science are taught in Spanish; language arts and social studies are taught in English. Students have 90 minutes of music, theater, visual art and dance classes. Future plans include offering Mandarin Chinese as well. Herrador’s long-term vision is to infuse the arts across the curriculum. “Art can help our students build skills like critical thinking, communication, collaboration and, of course, instill creativity in them,” she says. “If we have that mindset and those integrative lessons, we can bring literacy, math and science to life through art, through drawing, painting, music and movement.” Herrador also hopes to nurture an environment that includes a lot of parental involvement. “The school will be full of students whose

parents want them to be here — not because they have to be here,” she says. “Parent involvement is crucial for our students’ growth. With their involvement and participation, I know that our students can achieve great things.” Zenobya Young, whose daughter attends Jones, is already sold. “The amount of Spanish that Abby is already coming home with after only a couple of months is impressive,” Young says. “It has been an awesome program.” It’s one that Herrador believes is good enough for her own daughters, who are in first grade and fourth grade at Roquemore. “I’m personally invested, having my own children here,” she says. “I’m talking to parents as collaborative partners. I don’t think there’s a stronger advocate for this program.” Herrador says she believes being at Jones is her calling, which all goes back to her belief in seizing opportunities. “Even though I was happy where I was, there might not have been another opportunity that would have come my way like this,” she says. “I had to grab it.” RAVEN L. HILL is a former education reporter for the Austin American-Statesman.

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PRESIDENT PROFILE

Texas Association of School Business Officials

Cypress-Fairbanks ISD’s Karen Smith paves the way for emerging leaders by John Egan

h All Cypress-Fairbanks ISD administrators are assigned to serve at a particular school throughout the year. Karen Smith, assistant superintendent of business and financial services, has worked with Moore Elementary for the past four years. Among other duties, she attends campus improvement council meetings and has bus duty at the beginning of the school year. She is pictured here with the school bus crew.

K

aren Smith’s paternal grandmother, Pearl Wauson, was a teacher in Oklahoma. In fact, she taught Smith’s father, Merle Wauson. Smith’s paternal grandfather, Ted Wauson, was principal of the school where Pearl taught and Merle learned. On the other side of her family, an uncle — Colby Glass — was a principal in San Antonio’s Northside ISD, where an elementary school bears his name. Three other of Smith’s relatives also have worked in the education sector. Education doesn’t just run in Smith’s family; it sprints. Following in the family footsteps, Smith, a CPA, jumped into the education field in 1992, after a decade in the private sector. During the first 10 years of her career in finance, Smith worked in the oil-and-gas industry and at the corporate headquarters of the La Quinta hotel chain. During that time, Smith survived several economic ups and downs. However, her increasing workload started to chip away at her time at home with husband, Joe, and son, Kyle. So when a close friend told her about a job opening as assistant director of food service finance in Northside ISD, Smith applied and got hired.

“Since I had a young child, I felt that the education sector would offer a challenging opportunity while being family-friendly,” says Smith, a graduate of Texas A&M University. These days, Smith remains in the family-friendly education sector as assistant superintendent of business and financial services at Cypress-Fairbanks ISD in Houston. On top of that, Smith is incoming president of the Texas Association of School Business Officials (TASBO). As such, Smith will be managing her duties as TASBO’s president along with overseeing Cypress-Fairbanks ISD’s 2015-2016 general budget of almost $883 million. During her time at the helm of TASBO, Smith wants to focus on polishing the skills of school business officials across the state. For instance, she envisions offering more programs to develop emerging business leaders in Texas school districts. TASBO hosted its first academy for emerging leaders in 2014-2015. Smith also will strive to add more TASBO-sponsored certification courses and webinars. “As business officials move up in their districts or retire, we need to prepare those new to the profession to step in,” Smith says. > See TASBO, page 28 Texas School Business JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2016

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Another TASBO goal for Smith will be educating administrators and legislators about school finance issues. Along those lines, TASBO has teamed up with the Texas Association of School Administrators (TASA) and the Texas Association of School Boards (TASB) on a project aimed at providing access to “transparent and understandable” data about public schools’ finances, she says. At the same time, Smith still must keep an eye on the finances of Cypress-Fairbanks ISD, which she joined in 2009 after stops at Northside ISD and in Harris County’s Klein ISD, where she was the controller from 1993 to 2008. For Smith, her job is anything but burdensome. “I truly love my job. I work with a great group of people, have been fortunate to have a boss who I consider my greatest mentor and have had wonderful superintendents,” Smith says. At Cypress-Fairbanks ISD, Smith feels fortunate to collaborate with first-year principals, guiding them through the twists and turns of school finance. Her goal, she says, is to make finance “a little less scary.” She adds: “Assis-

tant principals are prepared in the curriculum and discipline areas, but often have had little financial training.” Smith takes pride in helping educators inside and outside the classroom get a handle on financial matters. “Teachers and principals have a huge job,” she says, “and my goal is to make the finance side a little easier for them.” Aside from assisting first-time principals, Smith is helping Cypress-Fairbanks ISD cope with being one of the state’s fastest-growing school districts. In May 2014, voters passed a $1.2 billion bond referendum to help the state’s third-largest district keep pace with the growth. Cypress-Fairbanks ISD has added more than 27,000 students in the past 10 years, with enrollment hovering close to 115,000. Over the next five years, the district is projected to enroll nearly 9,800 more students. For now, the district comprises 87 campuses. Amid that growth, Smith and her team have built an impressive record of fiscal responsibility. Among other achievements, the district has been repeatedly recognized by the Texas comptroller for its financial transparency, has notched a “superior achievement” rating in the Financial Integrity Rating

System of Texas (FIRST) program for 12 consecutive years and has kept administrative expenses below two percent of the operating budget. Rather than being rattled by the district’s growth, Smith says she thrives on the constant change. Day in and day out, Smith draws inspiration from helping ensure that Cypress-Fairbanks ISD’s students get the education they deserve. “I had a great education, and I want the students of today and tomorrow to have the same opportunities that I had,” says Smith, who was raised in Houston and went to school in Spring Branch ISD. Recently, Smith and her husband moved into her childhood home in Spring Branch ISD to be closer to the assisted living center where her 90-year-old mother, Helen Wauson, lives. The youngest member of their family is their 3-year-old granddaughter, Alison. “My family is the most important thing in my life,” Smith says. JOHN EGAN is a writer and editor in Austin.

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Texas School Business JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2016


REGIONAL VIEW

Education service center programs & practices

y

Students get the message to “Save Before You Selfie” at an ESC Region 1 Financial Literacy Summit.

ESC Region 1 takes college, life readiness a step further with financial literacy initiative

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hen ESC Region 1 directors reviewed survey results of their highly successful college-awareness program, GEAR UP, they were ecstatic at the responses that indicated their work was taking hold. Students and parents were no longer just talking about “if I go to college… .” The conversation had shifted to “when I go to college… .” However, in that same survey, the directors came upon a startling discovery: While a whopping 95.4 percent of parents believed that saving money for college was important, only a little less than three-fourths (72.7 percent) reported that they had started saving money for their children’s college education. “The harsh reality is that the cost of a higher education is skyrocketing, and financial aid doesn’t always fill the gap.

Students will have to find ways to meet that disparity,” explains Tina Atkins, ESC Region 1 administrator for the Center for College, Career and Life Readiness. She goes on to explain that research from the Corporation for Enterprise Development indicated that low-income students’ unmet needs are anywhere between $5,000 and $7,000 annually. Sadly, when faced with the burden of having to find ways to cover these costs, many students don’t enroll in college or even finish college. Even more alarming for Atkins and her team was that the research also showed that the Rio Grande Valley had some of the lowest credit scores in the nation and was among the most “unbanked” and “under-banked” regions in the state. Equipped with that information, ESC Region 1 GEAR UP developed the idea of incorporating a financial literacy component in its next

grant to help students become aware of how to save money for college and take steps toward financial literacy and responsibility — and to extend that support to their families as well. ESC Region 1 GEAR UP, with the support of U.S. Congressman Rubén Hinojosa, kicked off the initiative with the First Annual Financial Literacy Summit in October 2012. More than 364 students and their parents joined community members, financial institutions and partnering institutions of higher education at the inaugural event, which focused on money and banking, budgeting and credit. That year, the GEAR UP: Ready, Set, College! Partnership replicated the summit at four additional regional conferences — all with similar attendance rates. The summit laid the foundation for extensive follow-up efforts throughout the region, where members of the bank> See REGIONAL, page 30

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> Continued from page 29

ing community volunteered their time and expertise to educate families about banking and saving. At the latest Financial Literacy Summit this past October, 464 students and 65 parents were treated to keynote speaker Peter Bielagus, who shared how to take steps to start saving money right away. Later in the day, Bielagus held a Q&A session to a crowded room of students, parents and teachers eager to learn more from the morning’s presentation. The jampacked day consisted of breakout sessions — some presented in Spanish — addressing money and banking, credit and credit card management, financial aid, future financial planning, building wealth, and scholarships. Local bank representatives, who served as breakout session speakers, explained college savings plans. Additionally, representatives from The Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas shared information on setting financial goals and using a budget to achieve those goals. “Perhaps the greatest testimony to the success of this financial literacy program can be found in one of our students who attended the very first Financial Literacy Summit,” says Melissa Lopez, ESC Region 1 GEAR UP specialist. “We talked to the students at that conference about the importance of saving money and passed out little blue piggy banks and challenged the students to get started on saving money that very day. “This student took that challenge to heart,” Lopez continues. “She began by saving nickels, dimes, whatever change she came across. In time, she not only filled that piggy bank one time, but multiple times — enough to take to her savings to a local bank for her first-ever bank deposit. But that’s not the truly inspiring part of the story. This student then went back to her younger sister, who was still in elementary school, and gave her a speech about the importance of saving money for college. And, you guessed it: Before too long, the younger sister was making her own deposit.” Since that first event, the financial literacy component of the GEAR UP program has mushroomed into an integral part of the Center for College and Career Readiness. “What we learned from that very first event is that students and their families are hungry for information,” says Cornelio Gonzalez, ESC Region 1 executive director. “We take it for granted that

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families, and even educators, know how to save money, that they are familiar with the different kinds of financial aid opportunities or that they themselves know about banking operations, such as loans, interest rates, about the importance of good credit. “We knew that we needed to take steps to support our students, parents and educators in this regard, so we made available these events to all students through the Region One Center for College and Career Readiness,” Gonzalez says. In addition to the Financial Literacy Summit, whose target audience is primarily students, the Region One Center for College and Career Readiness developed “Moolah Palooza,” a professional development opportunity for educators to equip them with free financial literacy resources and curriculum, ideas and knowledge. The event also supports the legislative requirement for financial literacy instruction in public schools. “With Moolah Palooza, we are providing free financial literacy resources to teachers, counselors and administrators,” Gonzalez explains. “This is done with the expectation that financial literacy is taught throughout the students’ high school career — and not only in the high school economics courses. The more informed the educators are, the better they can translate this important information to their students.” Moolah Palooza is a comprehensive day of financial literacy information, bringing forth the best ideas for classroom instruction, parent workshops, and student engagement in the areas of saving, spending and investing money wisely. The session speakers included both local and national financial literacy experts. The second annual Moolah Palooza event attracted 147 participants. None of these programs could be as successful as they are without the tremendous support of community partners, notes Lopez. She explains that when the initial call to action went out in 2012 to organize community banking partners to work toward advancing financial literacy in the region, local banking representatives did not hesitate to get involved. Within a short time, the Deep South Texas Financial Literacy Alliance (DSTFLA), made up of more than 25 institutions, was formed. Today, the DSTFLA boasts a membership of 48 members who represent higher education, financial institutions, businesses and government entities. They meet

several times a year to plan outreach activities and ways to support the ESC Region 1’s financial literacy initiative. The main goal of the DSTFLA is to increase the financial literacy awareness of families in deep South Texas. You can find DSTFLA members at Region 1 student conferences, school-sponsored family evenings, and campus-based events and workshops.

‘What we learned from that very first event is that students and their families are hungry for information.’ — Cornelio Gonzalez, executive director, ESC Region 1

At the latest Financial Literacy Summit, DSTFLA members set up shop in a meeting room and met with parents who had scheduled appointments to ask personal financial-related questions. Last year, the DSTFLA helped more 1,694 parents with financial aid counseling, averaging approximately 1.77 hours per parent. “When we had the initial idea of a financial literacy component to the early Region 1 GEAR UP grant, we really had no idea that it would be as successful as it is today,” says Atkins. “Now, our students and their families are not just talking about going to college, they are talking about saving for college and saving for their future — and making financial plans. These are the fruits of our labor. This is success for us, when we see students and their families succeed.”


STUDENT VOICES

Encouragement, support make all the difference by Julianna Teoh

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alent. When most people hear the word, they automatically think of athletic prowess, dedication to the visual arts, musical skill or theatrical ventures. Very rarely does the word “talent” evoke thoughts of the literary arts; yet, when it does, the thought resounds nationally. The Scholastic Art Writing Awards, a regional and national platform for teen writers and artists, recognizes student writers and offers them numerous opportunities to share their work with the country, as well as expand their craft. I am lucky enough to have been one of these writers; I won a national Silver Medal last school year for my poetry collection, and I can safely say that the Scholastic Awards have changed my life for the better. A national medal opens countless doors for young writers that allow us to explore our passions and take the literary arts to a higher level than most school courses offer. However, none of these opportunities would be possible without a community of support for the student. The Harris County Department of Education has supported my journey as the regional sponsor for the awards for the four years that I’ve participated in them, and the encouragement and motivation I’ve received has been a huge factor in my success. A deeply rooted dedication to the literary arts is necessary for success in endeavors such as Scholastic. Equally vital is the support system available to the writer. Without encouragement and other resources made accessible to the student writer, it becomes much more difficult to channel inspiration into a great piece of writing. HCDE, as well as Klein ISD, has provided me with a fantastic community of support and assistance. I was offered various resources and opportunities to refine my writing and explore the possibilities of writing. During > See VOICES, page 32

Julianna Teoh (right) and Melba Kent of the Harris County Department of Education are all smiles outside Carnegie Hall in New York City.

“Student Voices” is a regularly featured column in Texas School Business. It’s an opportunity for students of all ages from across Texas to share their experiences in K-12 public schools. Contact Editorial Director Katie Ford at katie@texasschoolbusiness.com for publishing guidelines.

Texas School Business JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2016

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> Continued from page 31

the entry period for Scholastic, I was met with total encouragement from not only my school but my county as well. Having such a supportive and enthusiastic community really made my past experiences with Scholastic memorable, not to mention life-changing. Due to my silver medal, so many amazing opportunities have developed for me in the past year to pursue my dream of writing. The Harris County Department of Education has made me grow as a poet and as a person. The chance to enter the Scholastic Awards was one of the greatest opportunities I’ve had in my sixteen years, and it was all thanks to HCDE spreading word of the awards through Harris County schools. Without my school actively encouraging students like myself to enter, I never would have begun to consider my writing so seriously as a possibility for the future instead of just a hobby. As a result of Harris County’s support for my writing, I’ve pursued my passion for poetry and benefited immensely from it. My growth as a writer has come from personal experiences in my local community, as well as interactions facilitated through Scholastic that made me realize just how powerful my words can be. Before I began on my Scholastic journey, I had very little

confidence in myself and in my writing. I dismissed my penchant for the literary arts as something fleeting — after all, poetry is hardly something most teens take seriously. However, after I received my first Scholastic Writing Award, I began to have faith in writing as a way to speak out in my community and share my perspective with the world. My voice grew infinitely stronger when I was able to express myself freely through a written medium that approached various topics sans boundaries. By encouraging me to write, express myself and continue submitting my work to institutions, such as the Scholastic Awards, Klein ISD under the HCDE helped strengthen my personal voice and raise my self-confidence to a level I never would have imagined previously.

allow myself to fall completely in love with poetry, something I had always had passion for, but denied to myself for years. My voice was made audible by the efforts of the county, something I will always be grateful for.

I distinctly remember one instance after my first Scholastic Writing Award when a friend asked me why I had become so devoted to honing my writing skills. The answer came to me immediately, and I responded without hesitation: “Because I believe in myself as a writer.” That conversation continued to stick out in my head from that moment on; I questioned myself as to how I had developed that self-esteem and why writing appealed to me so strongly. Again, the answer came immediately: I had received such positive feedback and support from my educational community that it seemed more than natural to

So many things in my life would not be possible if I hadn’t had the amazing support of HCDE and the community of teachers and administrators who encouraged me to develop my poetry. My experiences with HCDE and the public school system have led me to better myself as a poet and thrive in an unconditionally supportive environment. As I enter my junior year of high school, I look forward to putting forth another entry to the Scholastic Awards and creating new memories with my county.

Since I’ve allowed myself to realize my passion and, consequently, taken action to pursue writing, my life has become something out of a dream. I’ve won numerous awards since my first, and I’ve been invited to speak about my Scholastic experience to members of my community. Last summer, I was invited to the iconic Carnegie Hall in New York City to accept my national silver medal. Later, I learned I was a semifinalist in the National Student Poets Program.

JULIANNA TEOH is a junior at Klein Oak High

Texas School Business 62

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THE ARTS

News in fine arts education

Students are locating music rhythms, reinforcing musical concepts.

Elementary music class hits high notes in all subjects by Rachel Walker

A

s I wished the kids well leaving music class for the day, a parent visitor who attended the class said to me, “Music is not the same as it was when I grew up.” That comment is certainly true!

Students are making academic connections in music class and learning skills that reach well beyond the walls of our music room. As an elementary music teacher, it keeps me active to teach from the music curriculum, while helping students connect what they learn to math, science,

writing, reading, geography, history and more. In this week’s recorder lesson, for example, students studied the angles used to hold a recorder in playing position, discovered that condensation forms inside the recorder when played, and found similarities and differences between our modern > See ARTS, page 34 Texas School Business JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2016

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> Continued from page 33

recorder and a prehistoric recorder found in Germany. It was a powerful moment, connecting our present-day music-making on our recorders to humans who did the same activity 35,000-40,000 years ago. How is it possible to cover that much material in 50 minutes and still have time to learn music skills? Technology is the answer! I am beyond blessed to be in a district that sets the standard for technology for other school districts and richly blessed to have an incredibly supportive school administration. Each year, teaching at Cactus Ranch Elementary has been a stepping stone in my understanding of how technology can capture the attention and curiosity of every student. A recent technology initiative set by Round Rock ISD is the Next Generation Digital Classroom, which involves implementing digital devices in classrooms on a one-to-one student-to-device ratio. This model facilitates collaboration, critical thinking, communication and creativity. The one-to-one initiative also enables quick assessment and data collection in an efficient way I could not capture before. I am extremely excited how all voices can be heard when students can provide instant feedback on their connected tablets. Previously, with limited classtime, I could only select a handful of students to answer questions and/or share their observations. Now, I can gain insight to every students’ answers and ideas. For instance, when we compared the modern and prehistoric recorder, we used a collaboration app to post observations. It took minutes for students to provide feedback, and we were able to get into deeper levels of discussion much faster.

instruments can emulate real-sounding instruments and that sound projection is an issue with some instruments. Students can adjust their recordings as needed. When finished, students eagerly share their masterpieces by submitting their assignments to me via AirDrop. Another technology gem was the first time students used the Makey Makey. We talked about conductors and insulators and how those are used in circuits. We created our own circuits, using conductors, and a complete circuit would play a virtual instrument sound. We made our circuits play “mi re do” patterns and had paper pianos come to life! How? We used the graphite from pencils as the conductor. Students used pencils to color the black keys of the piano worksheet, and when the keys were touched in the circuit, they

produced virtual piano sounds. Amazing moments are happening in elementary music classes, equipping students to make connections that reach well beyond our subject of music. Our classroom is not the same as in years past; in elementary music, we are preparing lifelong learners to experience and appreciate music, integrating 21st century skills. Using divergent and convergent thinking skills, along with technology, equips every student to serve our community better in the future. The integration of technology in elementary music is reaching every learner in powerful ways. The scope of music education is expanding and shaping our future positively for us all. RACHEL WALKER is a music educator at Cactus Ranch Elementary in Round Rock ISD.

Using tablets has enriched the classroom experience too. The first time students used tablets to write rhythms in class, quality writing examples were selected to share out to all tablets. Every student could see the examples selected. All our tablets were connected using a classroom app, and students were amazed. I had control to show specific student examples on every screen. Their reaction surprised me. When they saw each other’s work on the tablets for the first time, they clapped and cheered for each other! We’ve used the tablets in many other ways to reinforce music concepts. Another classroom favorite is when students use a music creation app to create percussion recordings. The goal is to create an eight-measure recording and figure out a way to solo an instrument paired with other instruments. Students resolve how to spotlight an instrument by adjusting the volume or complexities of patterns to be highlighted. They quickly learn that virtual

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The Makey Makey is being used to play “mi re do” songs, using a virtual piano.


Calendar Professional development & events

S TA N D O U T F R O M T H E C R OW D ! Get premium placement and get noticed! For a nominal fee, you can showcase your conference, workshop or seminar on the opening page as a Featured Event. Contact Ann Halstead at ahalstead@tasanet.org for more details. F EB RUARY February 1-2 TASA’s Academy for Transformational Leadership (session 3 of 4) Doubletree North, Austin For more info, (512) 477-6361. www.tasanet.org Cost: For individuals from districts that subscribe to TASA’s School Transformation Network, $1,995 for all four sessions; others, $2,195 for all four sessions. February 2 TASB Region 6 Grassroots Meeting Offices of ESC Region 6, Huntsville For more info, (512) 467-0222. www.tasb.org TASB Region 18 Grassroots Meeting Sul Ross State University, Alpine For more info, (512) 467-0222. www.tasb.org

February 4 TASB Region 15 Grassroots Meeting Offices of ESC Region 15, San Angelo For more info, (512) 467-0222. www.tasb.org TASB Region 17 Grassroots Meeting Offices of ESC Region 17, Lubbock For more info, (512) 467-0222. www.tasb.org TASB Region 20 Grassroots Meeting Offices of ESC Region 20, San Antonio For more info, (512) 467-0222. www.tasb.org TASBO Investment Training Workshop Offices of ESC Region 14, Abilene For more info, (512) 462-1711 or (800) 338-6531. www.tasbo.org

Texas K-12 CTO Council Winter Meeting Omni Hotel, Austin For more info, (972) 672-3254. www.texask12ctocouncil.org

February 7 Texas ASCD Five-Day Math Workshop (session 3 of 3) Location TBA For more info, (512) 477-8200 or (800) 717-2723. www.txascd.org

February 2-3 Texas ASCD Two-Day Academy with Tony Frontier Katy ISD, Katy For more info, (512) 477-8200 or (800) 717-2723. www.txascd.org

February 7-9 TASSP Assistant/Aspiring Principals Workshop Doubletree Hilton, Austin For more info, (512) 443-2100. www.tassp.org Cost: $510.

February 3 TASB Region 18 Grassroots Meeting Offices of ESC Region 18, Midland For more info, (512) 467-0222. www.tasb.org

February 10 TASA’s Digital Learning Design Academy (session 2 of 3) Marriott North, Austin For more info, (512) 477-6361. www.tasanet.org Cost: For individuals from districts that subscribe to TASA’s

School Transformation Network, $495 for all three sessions; others, $595 for all three sessions. TASB Region 4 Grassroots Meeting Offices of ESC Region 4, Houston For more info, (512) 467-0222. www.tasb.org February 11 TASB Region 5 Grassroots Meeting Offices of ESC Region 5, Beaumont For more info, (512) 467-0222. www.tasb.org February 11-12 TASB Conference for Administrative Professionals TASB offices, Austin For more info, (512) 467-0222. www.tasb.org Cost: $145. February 14-17 TASA’s Texas Assessment Conference Hilton Hotel, Austin For more info, (512) 477-6361. www.tasanet.org February 16 TASB Winter Legal Seminar Holiday Inn, Tyler For more info, (512) 467-0222. www.tasb.org Cost: $160. February 17 TASB Region 10 Grassroots Meeting Offices of ESC Region 10, Richardson For more info, (512) 467-0222. www.tasb.org February 18 TASB Winter Legal Seminar Offices of ESC Region 19, El Paso For more info, (512) 467-0222. www.tasb.org Cost: $160. February 18-19 TASA’s Transformational Leadership Academy (session 3 of 4) Offices of ESC Region 10,

Richardson For more info, (512) 477-6361. www.tasanet.org Cost: For individuals from districts that subscribe to TASA’s School Transformation Network, $1,995 for all four sessions; others, $2,195 for all four sessions. February 22 TASB Region 14 Grassroots Meeting Offices of ESC Region 14, Abilene For more info, (512) 467-0222. www.tasb.org February 23 TASB Region 9 Grassroots Meeting Offices of ESC Region 9, Wichita Falls For more info, (512) 467-0222. www.tasb.org TASB Region 12 Grassroots Meeting Offices of ESC Region 12, Waco For more info, (512) 467-0222. www.tasb.org February 24 TASB Region 2 Grassroots Meeting Offices of ESC Region 2, Corpus Christi For more info, (512) 467-0222. www.tasb.org TASB Region 11 Grassroots Meeting Huckabee Inc., Fort Worth For more info, (512) 467-0222. www.tasb.org February 24-25 TASA’s Academy for Transformational Leadership (session 3 of 4) Klein ISD Multipurpose Center, Klein For more info, (512) 477-6361. www.tasanet.org Cost: For individuals from districts that subscribe to TASA’s School Transformation Network, $1,995 for all four sessions; others, $2,195 for all four sessions.

> See CALENDAR, page 36 Texas School Business JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2016

35


February 25-27 TASB Winter Governance and Legal Seminar Omni Hotel, Corpus Christi For more info, (512) 467-0222. www.tasb.org February 26 Texas Classroom Teachers Association Annual Meeting Sheraton at the Capitol, Austin For more info, (512) 477-9415. www.tcta.org February 26-28 Texas PTA Family Engagement Conference Sheraton Hotel, Dallas For more info, (800) 825-5782. www.txpta.org Cost: $80. February 29-March 4 TASBO Annual Conference Hutchison Convention Center, Dallas For more info, (512) 462-1711. www.tasbo.org March 2 TASB Region 7 Grassroots Meeting Offices of ESC Region 7, Kilgore For more info, (512) 467-0222. www.tasb.org March 2-3 TASA’s First-Time Superintendent’s Academy (session 3 of 4) Marriott North, Austin For more info, (512) 477-6361. www.tasanet.org Cost: $695 for all four sessions; $185 per individual session. March 3 TASB Region 1 Grassroots Meeting Offices of ESC Region 1, Edinburg For more info, (512) 467-0222. www.tasb.org TASB Region 19 Grassroots Meeting Cattleman’s Steakhouse, Fabens For more info, (512) 467-0222. www.tasb.org TASB Region 8 Grassroots Meeting Offices of ESC Region 8, Pittsburg For more info, (512) 467-0222. www.tasb.org

36

Texas School Business JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2016

March 3-5 Texas Mid-Size Schools Association’s Annual Conference on Adolescent Success Sheraton Hotel, Arlington For more info, (512) 468-1168. www.tmsanet.org March 4 TASBO Certified School Risk Managers Workshop: Handling School Risks Omni Hotel, Dallas For more info, (512) 462-1711 or (800) 338-6531. www.tasbo.org March 16-17 Texas ASCD Curriculum Leadership Academy XVI (session 2 of 3) Offices of Garland ISD, Garland For more info, (512) 477-8200 or (800) 717-2723. www.txascd.org March 22-23 TASA’s Central Office Academy (session 4 of 4) TASA offices, Austin For more info, (512) 477-6361. www.tasanet.org Cost: $1,800 for all four sessions. April 3-6 Texas High School Athletic Directors Association Annual Conference Embassy Suites, San Marcos For more info, (832) 328-6123. www.thsada.com Cost: Members, $100; nonmembers, $150; onsite registration, $150; administrative assistants, $75. April 4-5 Texas Association for the Gifted and Talented Leadership Conference Hilton Hotel, Fort Worth For more info, (512) 499-8248. www.txgifted.org April 5 Texas Association of Community Schools East Texas Spring Conference University of Texas, Tyler For more info, (512) 440-8227. www.tacsnet.org April 6 TASB Spring Workshop Texas A&M University, Kingsville

For more info, (512) 467-0222. www.tasb.org April 10-12 Texas Retired Teachers Association Annual Conference Westin Hotel at the Galleria, Houston For more info, (800) 880-1650. www.trta.org April 13 Texas Association of Community Schools Hardin-Simmons Conference Hardin-Simmons University, Abilene For more info, (512) 440-8227. www.tacsnet.org April 18 TASB Spring Workshop Offices of ESC Region 9, Wichita Falls For more info, (512) 467-0222. www.tasb.org April 19 TASB Spring Workshop Offices of ESC Region 17, Lubbock For more info, (512) 467-0222. www.tasb.org April 20-21 Texas ASCD’s Two-Day Academy with Eric Sheninger Offices of Ysleta ISD, El Paso For more info, (512) 477-8200 or (800) 717-2723. www.txascd.org April 24-26 TASB Risk Management Fund Members Conference Hyatt Regency, Austin For more info, (512) 467-0222. www.tasb.org April 25 TASB Workshop Cattleman’s Steakhouse, Fabens For more info, (512) 467-0222. www.tasb.org April 27 TASB Workshop Offices of ESC Region 4, Houston For more info, (512) 467-0222. www.tasb.org April 28 TASB Workshop Tarleton State University, Stephenville For more info, (512) 467-0222. www.tasb.org

May 11 Curriculum Leadership Academy XVI (session 3 of 3) Offices of Garland ISD, Garland For more info, (512) 477-8200 or (800) 717-2723. www.txascd.org TASB Spring Workshop Sul Ross State University, Alpine For more info, (512) 467-0222. www.tasb.org May 12 TASB Spring Workshop Offices of ESC Region 14, Abilene For more info, (512) 467-0222. www.tasb.org TASB Spring Workshop Sul Ross State University, Uvalde For more info, (512) 467-0222. www.tasb.org May 17 TASB Spring Workshop Stephen F. Austin State University, Nacogdoches For more info, (512) 467-0222. www.tasb.org TASB Spring Workshop Texas A&M University, Commerce For more info, (512) 467-0222. www.tasb.org May 18 TASB Spring Workshop Texas A&M University, Canyon For more info, (512) 467-0222. www.tasb.org TASB Spring Workshop Parkway Baptist Church, Victoria For more info, (512) 467-0222. www.tasb.org May 24 TASB Spring Workshop Offices of ESC Region 12, Waco For more info, (512) 467-0222. www.tasb.org May 25 TASB Spring Workshop Offices of ESC Region 6, Huntsville For more info, (512) 467-0222. www.tasb.org


1. Publication Title

Statement of Ownership, Management, and Circulation (All Periodicals Publications Except Requester Publications) Texas School Business

4. Issue Frequency

2. Publication Number

09-27-15

5 4 1 _6 2 0 5. Number of Issues Published Annually

Bi-Monthly

$24.00

7. Complete Mailing Address of Known Office of Publication (Not printer) (Street, city, county, state, and ZIP+4 ®)

Average No. Copies No. Copies of Single Each Issue During Issue Published Preceding 12 Months Nearest to Filing Date

a. Total Number of Copies (Net press run)

Jeremy Norton

3088

Same as Block 7 9. Full Names and Complete Mailing Addresses of Publisher, Editor, and Managing Editor (Do not leave blank) Publisher (Name and complete mailing address)

Texas Association of School Administrators 406 East 11th Street Austin, TX 78701

(2)

Mailed In-County Paid Subscriptions Stated on PS Form 3541 (Include paid distribution above nominal rate, advertiser’s proof copies, and exchange copies)

(3)

Paid Distribution Outside the Mails Including Sales Through Dealers and Carriers, Street Vendors, Counter Sales, and Other Paid Distribution Outside USPS®

(4)

Paid Distribution by Other Classes of Mail Through the USPS (e.g., First-Class Mail®)

c. Total Paid Distribution [Sum of 15b (1), (2), (3), and (4)]

Texas Association of School Administrators 406 East 11th Street Austin, TX 78701

3100

(1) Mailed Outside-County Paid Subscriptions Stated on PS Form 3541 (Include paid distribution above nominal rate, advertiser’s proof copies, and exchange copies) b. Paid Circulation (By Mail and Outside the Mail)

8. Complete Mailing Address of Headquarters or General Business Office of Publisher (Not printer)

2622

2633

2622

2633

300

300

300

300

d. Free or (1) Free or Nominal Rate Outside-County Copies included on PS Form 3541 Nominal Rate Distribution (2) Free or Nominal Rate In-County Copies Included on PS Form 3541 (By Mail and Free or Nominal Rate Copies Mailed at Other Classes Through the USPS Outside (3) (e.g., First-Class Mail) the Mail)

Katie Ford Editorial, LLC 406 East 11th Street Austin, TX 78701

10. Owner (Do not leave blank. If the publication is owned by a corporation, give the name and address of the corporation immediately followed by the names and addresses of all stockholders owning or holding 1 percent or more of the total amount of stock. If not owned by a corporation, give the names and addresses of the individual owners. If owned by a partnership or other unincorporated firm, give its name and address as well as those of each individual owner. If the publication is published by a nonprofit organization, give its name and address.) Full Name Complete Mailing Address

Johnny Veselka, Executive Director, TASA

Sept/Oct 2015

15. Extent and Nature of Circulation

Contact Person

406 East 11th Street Austin, TX 78701

Managing Editor (Name and complete mailing address)

14. Issue Date for Circulation Data Below

Texas School Business

6. Annual Subscription Price

7

Editor (Name and complete mailing address)

13. Publication Title

3. Filing Date

406 East 11th Street Austin, TX 78701

(4)

Free or Nominal Rate Distribution Outside the Mail (Carriers or other means)

e. Total Free or Nominal Rate Distribution (Sum of 15d (1), (2), (3) and (4))

f. Total Distribution (Sum of 15c and 15e)

g. Copies not Distributed (See Instructions to Publishers #4 (page #3))

h. Total (Sum of 15f and g) i. Percent Paid (15c divided by 15f times 100) 11. Known Bondholders, Mortgagees, and Other Security Holders Owning or Holding 1 Percent or More of Total Amount of Bonds, Mortgages, or None Other Securities. If none, check box

2922

2933

166

167

3088 84.9%

3100 84.9%

* If you are claiming electronic copies, go to line 16 on page 3. If you are not claiming electronic copies, skip to line 17 on page 3.

X

Full Name

Complete Mailing Address

12. Tax Status (For completion by nonprofit organizations authorized to mail at nonprofit rates) (Check one) The purpose, function, and nonprofit status of this organization and the exempt status for federal income tax purposes:

X Has Not Changed During Preceding 12 Months

Has Changed During Preceding 12 Months (Publisher must submit explanation of change with this statement)

PS Form 3526, July 2014 [Page 1 of 4 (see instructions page 4)] PSN: 7530-01-000-9931

PRIVACY NOTICE: See our privacy policy on www.usps.com.

PS Form 3526, July 2014 (Page 2 of 4)

Statement of Ownership, Management, and Circulation (All Periodicals Publications Except Requester Publications) 16. Electronic Copy Circulation

Average No. Copies

No. Copies of Single

Average No. Copies Each Issue During 0 Preceding 12 Months

No. Copies of Single Issue 0 Published Nearest to Filing Date

Statement of Ownership, Management, Circulation Each Issue DuringandIssue Published 12 Months Nearest to Filing Date (All Periodicals Publications ExceptPreceding Requester Publications)

16. Electronic Copy Circulation a. Paid Electronic Copies b. Total Paid Print Copies (Line 15c) + Paid Electronic Copies (Line 16a) a. Paid Electronic Copies c.  Total Print Distribution (Line 15f) + Paid Electronic Copies (Line 16a) b. Total Paid Print Copies (Line 15c) + Paid Electronic Copies (Line 16a) d. Percent Paid (Both Print & Electronic Copies) (16b divided by 16c Í 100) c.  Total Print Distribution (Line 15f) + Paid Electronic Copies (Line 16a)

I certify that 50% of all my distributed copies (electronic and print) are paid above a nominal price. d. Percent Paid (Both Print & Electronic Copies) (16b divided by 16c Í 100) 17. Publication of Statement of Ownership I certify that 50% of all my distributed copies (electronic and print) are paid above a nominal price. X If the publication is a general publication, publication of this statement is required. Will be printed

2622 0 2922 2622 89.7% 2922

89.7%

0

2633

2933 2633 89.8% 2933 89.8%

Publication not required.

17. Publication of Jan/Feb Statement of2016 Ownership issue of this publication. in the ________________________

18. Signature and Title of Editor, Publisher, Business Manager, or Owner X If the publication is a general publication, publication of this statement is required. Will be printed

Date not required. Publication

Jan/Feb 2016 in the ________________________ issue of this publication.

18. Signature and Title of Editor, Publisher, Business Manager, or Owner

9/27/15

Texas School Business THE News Magazine for Public Education in Texas!

Since 1954, Texas School Business has published positive school news about and for Texas educators and the districts they serve. Considered an institution among public school administrators for its insightful writing and positive message, the magazine is a must-read for K-12 leadership teams in Texas.

Date

I certify that all information furnished on this form is true and complete. I understand that anyone who furnishes false or misleading information on this form 9/27/15 or who omits material or information requested on the form may be subject to criminal sanctions (including fines and imprisonment) and/or civil sanctions (including civil penalties). I certify that all information furnished on this form is true and complete. I understand that anyone who furnishes false or misleading information on this form or who omits material or information requested on the form may be subject to criminal sanctions (including fines and imprisonment) and/or civil sanctions (including civil penalties).

Annual subscription rate: $24/year Subscription includes 6 bimonthly issues, plus our annual Bragging Rights special issue

Subscribe online today at www.texasschoolbusiness.com Reminder: Active, Associate and Student members of the Texas Association of School Administrators receive a copy of Texas School Business magazine as a membership benefit. Subscribe now for board members and other members of your leadership team. PS Form 3526, July 2014 (Page 3 of 4)

PS Form 3526, July 2014 (Page 3 of 4)

PRIVACY NOTICE: See our privacy policy on www.usps.com.

PRIVACY NOTICE: See our privacy policy on www.usps.com.

Texas School Business JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2016

37


THE BACK PAGE

Adams Lynch and Loftin P.C. ....... 13 www.all-lawfirm.com

by Riney Jordan

George K. Baum and Co. ................ 18 www.gkbaum.com

A

We sat down, and I asked her what had happened. She looked at me, ever so sadly, and simply said, “It’s too much. I can’t do it any longer.” Later, I thought back on how she had looked and responded years earlier when she first decided to become a teacher. She would talk about the exciting things she was planning for her classroom. Her eyes would light up as she told me about children in her classroom: Some needed encouragement; others were lacking in motivation. It was obvious that her students’ immediate needs were greater at that moment than their need for the curriculum. Her story is just one of countless thousands being heard across the country. Master teachers, who have made incredible differences in the lives of their students, are opting to get out of the classroom. Their reasons are multifaceted, but, in a nutshell, many of them believe we have changed our focus from the child to higher test scores, to more involved curriculum, to an emphasis on priorities that are being mandated by those who have not taught in the classroom but who assume they have the right answers to solve education’s problems. I’ll be the first to admit that everything is not perfect. There are some changes that need to be made in our public schools. But we must wake up to the fact that although we are there for many purposes, it is difficult for any of these to come to fruition until we address the social and emotional learning that each child requires to be successful. Norman Cousins, a prominent political journalist, author and professor, says: “The purpose of education is to enable us to

develop to the fullest that which is inside us.” Over the years, the purpose of education seems to have changed. At one time, it was to educate children for the workforce. Eleanor Roosevelt, in a 1930s article, wrote that the purpose of education was “good citizenship.” For a while, it was to help students develop into critical thinkers. At other times, there were those who screamed that we needed to prepare our children to compete in a global marketplace. We all recognize, of course, that these are important. But if there is one component that seems to resonate at the core of all of them, it is that we need to teach our students to “learn to learn,” as Nicholas Negroponte once stated. I firmly believe that we cannot scrap everything that has served us well in the past. Whether we are using textbooks or terminals, chalkboards or motherboards, we must remember to focus on the whole child. As I watch the nightly news, I realize that the world could use some common sense practices again. How differently would our world look today if we had spent a little more time demonstrating and teaching kindness, compassion, forgiveness, patience and understanding? For my two cents’ worth, I’ll go with Aristotle. He simply said: “Educating the mind without educating the heart is no education at all.” If you’re in a position to change the way schools are required to do things, then consider the following: (1) cut back on the paperwork; (2) involve educators in more of the decision making; (3) let teachers teach; (4) cut back on testing; and (5) recognize that meeting a child’s basic needs can be far more important than any lesson in the textbook. You might be surprised how quickly things get better.

RINEY JORDAN’S “The Second Book” is now available at www.rineyjordan.com, along with his other publications. You can contact him at (254) 386-4769, find him on Facebook or follow him on Twitter: @RineyRiney.

38

Advertiser Index

What really is the purpose of education? s I listened to her tell how her school year was going, I saw such sadness in her eyes. She no longer had the excitement that she once had. Her enthusiasm had changed. This teacher was tired. Very tired. And it showed in everything she did. Quite frankly, she appeared to be defeated.

Texas School Business JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2016

Texas School Business

Choice Partners................................26 www.choicepartners.org

Friends of Texas Public Schools... 12 www.fotps.org Harris County Department of Education.......................................11 www.hcde-texas.org Scientific Learning (In Focus)....... 19 www.scilearn.com SXSWedu...........................................39 www.sxswedu.com/tasa TASA................................................. 2, 4 www.tasanet.org Texas ASCD....................................... 28 www.txascd.org TASPA................................................... 5 www.taspa.org Texas Computer Cooperative.......24 www.texascomputercooperative. net Texas School Business............................8,32, 37, 40 www.texasschoolbusiness.com WRA Architects.................................9 www.wraarchitects.com

Advertise with us! Texas has more than 4.6 million public school students and more than 1,000 school districts that need your company’s products and services. Let us help you reach this vast market – advertise in Texas School Business magazine. For specs and rates, contact ahalstead@tasanet.org or by calling (800) 725-8272 TexasSchoolBusiness.com


Join Your Community. Igniting a Practice Revolution

Is Education Policy Stifling Digital Innovation?

Barbara Jenkins

Bob Wise

Damon Williams

Dallas Dance

David Coleman

Heath Morrison

Sal Khan

Caitlin Emma

Superintendent, Orange County Public Schools

Senior Vice President and Chief Education Officer, Boys and Girls Clubs of America

President and CEO, The College Board

Founder and CEO, Khan Academy

Former Governor of West Virginia, President, Alliance for Excellent Education

Superintendent, Baltimore County Public Schools

Senior Vice President of Government Affairs, McGraw Hill Education

Education Reporter, Politico

Opening Keynote: Helping Different Kinds of Minds Solve Problems

Temple Grandin Professor of Livestock Behavior & Welfare, Colorado State University

Explore the rest of the program and register at sxswedu.com/tasa


TASA

PERIODICALS

Texas Association of School Administrators 406 East 11th Street Austin, TX 78701-2617

CONGRATULATIONS

to the 12 winning Texas school districts! Alamo Heights ISD

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BRAGGING RIGHTS 2015-2016

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Texas School Business

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