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66

YEARS

The News Magazine for Public Education in Texas

Texas School Business

JANUARY / FEBRUARY

2019

Mental health resources for administrators

Also in this issue: TASBO President Julie Novak, Fort Sam Houston ISD TSPRA President Monica Faulkenbery, Northside ISD


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Texas School Business JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2019

18 22

Cover Story Mental health resources for administrators

TSPRA President Profile TSPRA president works to support school communications staff in times of tragedy by James Golsan

24 TASBO President Profile Julie Novak hopes to inspire and advocate during her time as TASBO president by James Golsan

Photo Features

12 TAGT’s giftED18 conference draws gifted and talented educators to Fort Worth 35, 37 Horseshoe Bay welcomes Texas ASCD members for 70th anniversary conference

Departments 7 Who’s News 27 Calendar 38 Ad Index

Columns

5 From the Editor by Dacia Rivers 13 The Law Dawg— Unleashed by Jim Walsh 15 Digital Frontier by Dr. Brian Brown 17 Game On! by Bobby Hawthorne 33 Student Voicesby Brooke Betik with Ty Zabojnik 38 The Back Page by Riney Jordan

The views expressed by columnists and contributing writers do not necessarily reflect those of the publisher or Texas School Business advertisers. The publisher also makes no endorsement of the advertisers or advertisements in this publication.


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From the editor

H

appy New Year! I hope you’ve all had a joyful and refreshing winter break. As you return to your offices and your desks, may you be as inspired to start a fresh new year as we at Texas School Business are. We’ve got a great offering of feature articles lined up, starting with this issue, where we highlight some of the available resources for school administrators looking to institute mental health programs on their campuses to keep students safe and healthy. Turn to page 33 for an excellent Student Voices, highlighting an exciting, and tasty, program in Ennis ISD — a varsity barbecue team where students work together to create one of Texas’ favorite foods. Also of interest in this issue is our Digital Frontier column, found on page 15. Brian Brown with the Texas Computer Education Association touches on the topical issue of “fake news” and how we can all become more critical thinkers in the information age. As always, if you know of a student who’d be interested in writing for Student Voices, or an arts educator who’d like to write about their program for our The Arts section, please reach out to me at drivers@texasschoolbusiness.com. Thank you for reading, and here’s to a happy 2019.

Texas School Business (ISSN 0563-2978 USPS 541-620) JANUARY / FEBRUARY 2019 Volume LXVI, Issue 1 406 East 11th Street Austin, Texas 78701 Phone: 512-477-6361 • Fax: 512-482-8658 www.texasschoolbusiness.com EDITORIAL DIRECTOR

Dacia Rivers DESIGN

Phaedra Strecher

Dacia Rivers Editorial Director

COLUMNISTS

Dr. Brian Brown Bobby Hawthorne Riney Jordan Jim Walsh ADVERTISING SALES MANAGER

Ann M. Halstead

TEXAS ASSOCIATION OF SCHOOL ADMINISTRATORS EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR

Kevin Brown

CORRECTION

In the November/December 2019 issue of Texas School Business, on page 25, we erroneously printed that Cynthia Peltier worked at Dickinson High School, when in fact she worked at Texas City High. Also, her comment on a “knee jerk reaction,” referred to Gov. Greg Abbott, and not the TEA, as stated in the article. We greatly regret these errors.

ASSISTANT EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR, SERVICES AND SYSTEMS ADMINISTRATION

DIRECTOR OF COMMUNICATIONS AND MEDIA RELATIONS

Amy Francisco

Texas School Business (ISSN 0563-2978) is published bimonthly with a special edition, Bragging Rights, in December, by the Texas Association of School Administrators, at 406 E. 11th St., Austin, TX 78701. Periodicals postage paid at Austin, Texas, and at additional mailing offices. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Texas Association of School Administrators, 406 East 11th Street, Austin, TX 78701. © Copyright 2019 Texas Association of School Administrators

Ann M. Halstead

Texas School Business JANUARY / FEBRUARY 2019

5


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Who’s News Amarillo ISD Doug Loomis has accepted the role of interim superintendent. He began his career in the district 31 years ago, serving for the past five years as chief human resources officer.

Austin ISD Tina Salazar has been named principal of

Akins High School. An educator for 21 years, she has six years of administrative experience.

Bonham ISD Superintendent Marvin Beaty retired in December. Stepping into the role of interim superintendent is Kelly Trompler, a Bonham native and graduate of Bonham High School. With a bachelor’s degree from East Texas State University and a master’s degree in educational administration from Southeastern Oklahoma State University, she has been an employee of the district since 1994. She has been assistant superintendent of administrative services since 2012.

Canutillo ISD (El Paso) Northwest Early College High School principal

Tracy Speaker-Gerstheimer

is one of only 10 recipients nationwide of the 2018 Terrell H. Bell Award for Outstanding School Leadership. She was recognized in November in Washington, D.C., during the National Blue Ribbon Schools awards ceremony.

Chilton ISD Superintendent Brandon Hubbard has been named the 2018 John Hoyle Educational Leadership Award recipient. He was honored during the John Hoyle Administrative Leadership Institute’s banquet in November. A 16-year veteran of Texas public education, Hubbard has been with Chilton ISD for seven years as secondary principal, interim superintendent and superintendent.

Cleveland ISD Pete Armstrong has been

promoted from assistant principal to principal of Northside Elementary. He began his career 16 years ago and, working in both Texas and Florida, has been a coach, classroom teacher and instructional specialist. He holds a bachelor’s degree from Midwestern State University and a master’s degree from Lamar University. The district’s new director of special education, Tammie Marberry, was previously director of the Southeast Texas Special Education Cooperative. An educator for 30 years, she has worked as a special education teacher, counselor, speech and language pathologist, principal and director of student services. Her bachelor’s degree, two master’s degrees and doctorate were all awarded from Lamar University.

Conroe ISD A new principal has been named for Peet Junior High. Pete Kuempel, an educator for 19 years, came to Conroe ISD in 2006 as a math teacher and coach at Peet, going on to work as an assistant principal at Knox Junior High before returning to Peet in the same position. Rotasha Smith, newly

appointed principal of Conroe High School, has spent her 17-year career with the district. Initially a teacher and academic support specialist at Washington Junior High, she also served as assistant principal of Conroe High and, for the past four years, as principal of Peet Junior High. She holds bachelor’s and master’s degrees from Sam Houston State University.

Cypress-Fairbanks ISD Cypress-Fairbanks ISD board of trustees member Bob Covey has been reelected to the board of directors of the Texas Association of School Boards (TASB). He will serve as vicepresident for a three-year term, representing Region 4. A member of the CFISD board for 13 years, he is also a director of the Gulf Coast Area Association of School Boards.

Dallas ISD Now serving as Dallas ISD’s acting deputy chief of school leadership is Jolee Healey, former assistant superintendent of operations for the district’s Accelerating Campus Excellence (ACE) program. She is a graduate of Texas A&M University with a master’s degree in education from Texas Woman’s University. Brian Lusk has been named

acting chief of strategic initiatives. Formerly deputy chief of school leadership, he holds a bachelor’s degree in elementary education from California University of Pennsylvania and a master’s degree in educational administration from Texas A&M University at Commerce.

DeSoto ISD Now serving as chief of staff is Sonya Cole-Hamilton, who most recently was chief communications officer for Lancaster ISD. A graduate of Southern Methodist University, she holds two master’s degrees, one in journalism from the University of North Texas and one in education administration from Lamar University. A new superintendent is in place for the district. D’Andre Weaver was previously a community superintendent in Spring Branch ISD. He came to Texas from Chicago, where he served as principal of the Gwendolyn Brooks College Preparatory Academy.

Denton ISD Julie Zwahr, most recently

the district’s coordinator of communications, has been promoted to director of communications and community relations. She has more than 26 years of experience in the field, having served as director of communications for Little Elm and Waxahachie ISDs and as executive director of communications for Keller ISD and for North Carolina’s Guilford County Schools. She earned her bachelor’s degree in journalism from Texas Tech University.

Diboll ISD The district’s new chief of police is David Garza, a member of the Lufkin > See Who’s News, page 9 Texas School Business JANUARY / FEBRUARY 2019

7


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Who’s News > Continued from page 7

police department for more than 20 years who most recently served with the Texas Alcoholic Beverage Commission and as an FBI officer. A graduate of Diboll High School, he holds a bachelor’s degree in criminal justice.

ESC Region 1 ESC Region 1’s executive director, Cornelio Gonzalez, has been honored with the 2018 Thomas Poe Award by the John R. Hoyle Memorial Administrative Leadership Institute. The award recognizes exceptionally effective leaders in Texas education. Gonzalez, an educator for more than 29 years, has served in his current position since 2013. Prior to that, he was superintendent of Mission CISD and Tuloso-Midway and Lasara ISDs.

Flatonia ISD Former Pewitt CISD superintendent Andy Reddock now leads Flatonia ISD. A graduate of the University of Texas at Tyler, he earned his master’s degree in educational administration from Stephen F. Austin State University and his doctorate in educational leadership from Texas Tech University. He began his career as a teacher in Palestine ISD and has held administrative positions in Coahoma, Marble Falls and Seguin ISDs.

Georgetown ISD The district’s new director of guidance and wellness, David Rainey, began his career 17 years ago as a teacher and coach in Austin ISD, joining Leander ISD in 2007. He holds a bachelor’s degree in biology from the University of Texas and a master’s degree in counseling and guidance from Texas State University.

Goodrich ISD The district’s newly appointed superintendent, Bryan Taulton, comes to Goodrich from Hardin ISD, where he was principal of Hardin High School.

Hays CISD

Lamar CISD

A principal has been named for Johnson High School, which is scheduled to open for the 2019-20 school year. Brett Miksch, with more than 10 years of experience as an educator and administrator, was most recently a principal in Barbers Hill ISD. Prior to that, he was with Sweeny ISD. He is a graduate of the University of Texas with a master’s degree in education administration from Lamar University.

Jackson Elementary School principal Deana Gonzalez is one of only 10 recipients of the 2018 Terrell H. Bell Award for Outstanding School Leadership. The award honors school leaders who have transformed their schools through commitment to education. Gonzalez has led Jackson since 2013.

Holland ISD After 35 years as an educator, superintendent Cindy Gunn has announced her retirement, effective the end of January. She has been with the district since 1984, shortly after her graduation from the University of Texas, working as a teacher and principal before being promoted to superintendent in 2004.

Lake Worth ISD Now serving as principal of Marine Creek Elementary School is Carrie Harrison, who most recently was the district’s director of curriculum, instruction and professional development. She previously worked in Fort Worth ISD and in Eagle Mountain-Saginaw ISD, where she was director of secondary staffing. The new director of human resources and district communication is Hali Hunt. Previously a district director of human resources in San Antonio, he holds a master’s degree in business administration from Liberty University. Angie Kilcrease, formerly a teaching and learning coach for secondary math and science, is now assistant principal of Marine Creek Elementary School. She is a 10-year veteran educator with a bachelor’s degree from Southeastern Oklahoma State University and a master’s degree in education from Lamar University.

Lake Worth ISD’s newly appointed superintendent, Rose Mary Neshyba

previously worked as a superintendent in New Boston and Red Lick ISDs and was 2012 Superintendent of the Year for ESC Region 8.

Lubbock ISD Former Bean Elementary School assistant principal Beth Berridge has been promoted to principal of Wheelock Elementary. She began her career in Lubbock ISD, then worked in the private sector as an instructor, consultant and professor in music pedagogy, returning to the district in 2008. She earned her bachelor’s degree in music and master’s degree in music education from Texas Tech University. The district’s new director of school safety and security is Stacy Carter, who began her career in 2005 as a teacher at Tubbs Elementary. Most recently principal of Wheelock Elementary School, she received her bachelor’s and master’s degrees from Texas Tech University and a second master’s, in educational leadership, from Lubbock Christian University.

McAllen ISD McAllen ISD’s athletics program is now helmed by two women as Lorena Lopez, who coached at Memorial High School since 2001 and most recently served as head volleyball coach, has been promoted to assistant athletic director. Lopez, a graduate of the University of Texas Pan-American (now UT-Rio Grande Valley), joins MISD’s athletic director, Paula Gonzalez.

Marlin ISD Marlin ISD has created a police department and selected John Simmons to be its chief. He is a former Marlin police department captain.

> See Who’s News, page 11 Texas School Business JANUARY / FEBRUARY 2019

9


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Who’s News > Continued from page 9

Mesquite ISD Jim Cude, an educator for

32 years, is the new band director at North Mesquite High School. He spent the past 16 years in Whitesboro ISD, leading their marching band to the class AA championship in 2013 and Class AAA championship in 2015.

Midland ISD The new director of purchasing is Haydee Pena. She comes to Midland from El Paso, where she spent six years as the purchasing agent for the City of El Paso. Matthew Powell has joined

Midland ISD as general counsel. The former Lubbock County criminal district attorney also previously served as assistant county attorney for Montgomery County and assistant district attorney for Orange County and was an adjunct professor at Texas Tech School of Law and Wayland Baptist University. He holds a bachelor’s degree from Texas Tech University and a doctor of jurisprudence degree from the University of Tulsa.

Odem-Edroy ISD The district’s new superintendent is Yolanda Carr.

Pearland ISD Ellen Akers has been named director of testing and program evaluation. She previously worked as a teacher in Texas City ISD and as dean of curriculum and instruction in Clear Creek ISD’s Clear Creek High School. She holds a master’s degree in education administration and is at work on her doctorate in the same field from Taft University.

The district’s first director of bilingual education is

Susana Franco-Fuenmayor.

She comes to Pearland ISD from the University of St. Thomas, where she was a faculty academic advisor and doctoral dissertation chair. She has a bachelor’s degree in elementary education, a master’s degree in bilingual/ESL education, and a doctorate in educational psychology.

The new principal of Massey Ranch Elementary School is Melanie Grote, who spent two years as assistant principal of Silvercrest Elementary and seven years as an advanced academic specialist for the district. She earned her bachelor’s degree from the University of Houston and her master’s degree in educational management from the University of Houston-Clear Lake. Lisa Nixon, former director

of testing and program evaluation, is now executive director for special programs. She holds a bachelor’s degree in mathematics, a master’s degree in educational management and a doctorate in educational leadership.

Pleasant Grove ISD Roger Hailey has accepted the position of interim superintendent of Pleasant Grove ISD. He previously worked in the district as principal of Pleasant Grove High School and has 19 years of experience as a superintendent in Atlanta (Tx.), Crane and Henderson ISDs. He also served in interim positions in Liberty-Eylau, Linden-Kildare and New Boston ISDs.

Sealy ISD The former principal of Sealy Junior High, Lisa Svoboda, is now the district’s chief financial officer. She received her bachelor’s degree in business administration from Texas A&M University and, prior to becoming an educator, worked for the accounting firm of KPMG, LLP. Now serving as principal of Sealy Junior High is Barry Wolf, who comes to Sealy after 20 years with Bishop CISD, where he was a teacher, dean of students, athletic director and head football coach.

Slidell ISD Greg Enis, who has served as district

superintendent for 14 years, retired in October.

Former Slidell High School principal Taylor Williams has agreed to serve as interim superintendent. She is a graduate of Texas Woman’s University, where she earned her master’s degree in education administration, and has spent her career with Slidell ISD, working as a teacher, student services director, and special education and testing coordinator.

Socorro ISD (El Paso) The new principal of Jane Hambric School is Joanne Anguiano, an employee of the district for 16 years. She was most recently assistant principal of El Dorado High School. A 22-year employee of the district, Cynthia Retana, has been appointed an assistant superintendent of schools. Except for two years with El Paso ISD, her career has been spent in Socorro ISD, where she has been a teacher, counselor, assistant principal and principal. The new director of bilingual education for the district is Veronica Reyes. She has been with SISD for five years, serving as a science teacher at Fort Hancock High School and as an administrator at Americas High School. Since 2017, she has led Mission Early College High. Lynnette Vidales, now

principal of Ituarte Elementary School, comes to her new position from Antwine Elementary, where she was assistant principal. She has been an educator for

14 years.

Stephenville ISD Victor Sauceda, the new Gilbert Intermediate School principal, is a 14year educator who joined Stephenville ISD from Granbury ISD, where he taught Spanish. He previously served as assistant principal of Stephenville High School. He earned both his bachelor’s and master’s degrees from Tarleton State University.

Waco ISD David Williams II has been

named Waco ISD’s chief of police. He previously served with the Lacey Lakeview police department and was a member of the Waco police department for nine years.

Ysleta ISD Riverside High School principal Daniel Gurany has received the designation of Distinguished Administrator from the Texas Music Educators’ Association, a recognition honoring upper-level school administrators who have been instrumental in preserving music education programs on their campuses. ◄ Texas School Business JANUARY / FEBRUARY 2019

11


Photo Feature

TAGT’S GIFTED 18 CONFERENCE DRAWS GIFTED AND TALENTED EDUCATORS TO FORT WORTH The Texas Association for the Gifted and Talented held its annual giftED conference in November, welcoming members from across the state for three days of networking and learning opportunities.

◄ Attendees

from Clint ISD and Ysleta ISD take their turn posing in the photo booth during the 40th anniversary celebration

▲ A group of Manor ISD teachers enjoys the opening kickoff celebration.

▲ Past-presidents Krystal Goree, ▲ MasterMind speaker John Susan Johnsen and Michelle Swain catch up at giftED18.

Spencer poses with TAGT President-Elect Debbie Smith (right) and President D’Lana Barbay (left) after his book signing.

▲ An attendee ▲ Scholars from across the country presented at giftED18.

adds her photo to the 40th anniversary logo wall.

◄ An attendee views the 40th

anniversary history video featuring the stories of TAGT past-presidents.

▲ TAGT celebrated its 40th anniversary

at giftED18 with a birthday party, complete with decorations, party hats and cupcakes.

12

Texas School Business JANUARY / FEBRUARY 2019

▲ The largest group of attendees were from Grapevine-Colleyville ISD, whose parent group raised money to send 55 educators to the conference.


THE LAW DAWG – UNLEASHED

A dream by Jim Walsh

B

eto carried my cul-de-sac. There were three houses with Beto yard signs in the cul-de-sac in Northwest Austin where I live, and none for Ted Cruz. So, I’m pretty sure that you can paint my ‘hood blue. When the results came in, we found out that Beto carried The People’s Republic of Austin, along with Travis, Williamson, and Hays counties. This was no surprise to me. Everyone here in Austin saw the Beto yard signs blossoming like bluebonnets in March. They sprouted everywhere, and they sprouted early. About three weeks before Election Day, a red Ted Cruz sign popped up around the corner from my house. Then they, too, started to proliferate like rabbits. The electorate was energized. Shortly before the election, I drove to Wichita Falls. As I perused the yard signs and bumper stickers in Hamilton, Hico, Stephenville and Jacksboro, it was pretty clear how this election would go. While Beto had a stronghold in some of our urban areas, Cruz dominated in small town and rural Texas. That made for a pretty close race. Other statewide races were pretty close also, no doubt due to the dramatic increase in voter participation. Educators and others showed up at the polls in record numbers, and the result was that more public education supporters from both parties were elected.

SUPPORT STARTS HERE

Good. But now that we have chosen new leaders, we need to remain engaged in the political process and remind our legislators of our top priorities as Texans. People are talking seriously about fixing school finance. Great. But there are no easy solutions. This will take courage and vision.

ChoicePartners.org

Perhaps a good way to start would be to ask our legislators to sign on to a vision of how things can be. This month we will honor Martin Luther King, Jr., whose most famous speech continues to stir us. If we modified Dr. King’s message with public education in mind, it might go something like this:

Support for School Physical and Occupational Therapy

I have a dream that one day all Texans will embrace the idea that a general diffusion of knowledge is essential to the preservation of the people’s liberties. I have a dream that one day the children of the State of Texas will attend schools that are fully and equitably funded. I have a dream that one day we will recognize that the quality of a child’s education cannot be measured by a single test. I have a dream that one day we will routinely tell educators, “Thank you for your service.” And we will express our gratitude in concrete ways through better compensation, robust health coverage and professional respect. We’ve elected some new leaders. Let’s support them to help us realize this vision.

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855-821-HCDE (4233) www.HCDE-Texas.org JIM WALSH is an attorney with Walsh Gallegos Treviño Russo & Kyle PC. He can be reached at jwalsh@wabsa.com. You can also follow him on Twitter: @jwalshtxlawdawg. Texas School Business JANUARY / FEBRUARY 2019

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WE ARE A TEAM OF EXPERTS, EACH FOCUSED ON A UNIQUE ASPECT OF EDUCATION, STANDING BESIDE YOU AS WE WORK TOWARD A COMMON GOAL: THE SUCCESS OF ALL STUDENTS.

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DIGITAL FRONTIER

Separating fact from fiction: the importance of information literacy By Dr. Brian Brown

D

igital and information literacy is a skill we need as adults before we can begin to educate children. Saul Bellow wrote, “A fool can throw a stone in a pond that 100 wise men cannot get out.” This maxim rings surprisingly true in the online world with the spread of information — particularly false or misleading information. The internet and social media have narrowed the divide between fact and fiction. This issue creates both challenges and opportunities for educators, as we not only navigate this environment in our personal lives, but also as we operate official district social media profiles and seek to educate children about digital and information literacy. Not too many years ago, we were trained as a society to trust journalists such as Walter Cronkite, Ed Bradley and Susan Stamberg. These trusted voices came from our televisions and radios, never leading us astray of the events of the day. Even before broadcast news, we believed that we usually could trust the editors of local and national newspapers. If they got a story wrong, they were oft quick to print a retraction or a follow-up story in the next edition. But over the past few decades, information sharing has shifted from the analog airwaves to digital networks of the commercial internet, which evolved as new ideas for sharing information were realized. Eventually the web 2.0 movement was born with the idea that anyone could create content through text, pictures, and video, and then share it freely and globally. The strength of the web 2.0 movement, however, has become its weakness, by allowing anyone, anywhere to become a publisher of information regardless of authenticity, bias, or truth. With more than 68 percent of American adults using social media to access news, we are living in an environment where false and misleading information is easily created

and shared (Pew Research Center, Sept. 10, 2018). And like the rock in the Saul Bellow quote, once misleading information has been spread, is it difficult to quell. In a recent study by Pew Research (Dec. 15, 2016), 23 percent of American adults admitted to sharing false information online either intentionally or unintentionally. This issue requires us to use specific knowledge and skills to counter those misleading effects. We need to revisit the concept of thinking critically about the information we encounter online. We should encourage scrutiny, check facts and explore tactics used to mislead us. We must understand these skills to share them with our students, coworkers, family and friends. There are a few basic steps that can get us started in navigating the information age. The first step is to encourage scrutiny. Each news article should be checked for plausibility, bias, authenticity and timeliness. Plausibility refers to the numerical data. We ask ourselves if the data is possible based on the information provided. For something to be plausible, the numbers need to add up. Additionally, charts and graphs need to be scaled correctly and extrapolations of the data need to be possible. The most common form of bias in online information involves presenting the information in a skewed manner (e.g., statement bias). This type of one-sided bias is usually obvious; however, other forms of bias are much harder to determine. This makes obtaining news from multiple sources important for verifying facts and checking the details of the story. Authenticity of news organizations is earned over time. Organizations such as the Associated Press and Reuters have been in existence for more than 150 years and have a vested interest in protecting themselves from propagating false and misleading information. In the modern

internet, anyone can create a website to post information online without the need to develop a reputation for unbiased, truthful reporting. In social media and other online environments, it’s important to consider the credibility and veracity of the publisher. After checking plausibility, bias and authenticity, the next issue is timeliness. Many articles shared on social media are outdated. Information about missing children, while important, can become obsolete as the children are located, and an article about some legal atrocity can become invalid as laws change, yet these types of information are shared daily through social media. Finally, we need to understand some of the tools being used to mislead and confuse us. The use of logical fallacies among online information is prevalent and it is easy to fall victim to one of the methods without even realizing it. One common fallacy is the slippery slope where we connect the current issue to an extreme hypothetical. Another is the strawman fallacy where we exaggerate someone’s argument to make it easier to refute. These are just two of the many types of methods used to confuse and obfuscate the truth. We are leading schools in an ever-changing environment where the truth is what is advertised and not always based on objective reality. It is important that we ourselves be able to navigate the online information ecosystem and then share our processes with those around us. We can utilize online tools such as The News Literacy Project (https://newslit.org) and Your Logical Fallacy Is (https://yourlogicalfallacyis.com) to help brush up on skills as well as provide opportunities to teach others. Together we can begin the process of eliminating “fake news.” DR. BRIAN BROWN is the TCEA director of Area 11. Texas School Business JANUARY / FEBRUARY 2019

15


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GAME ON!

Photo finish by Bobby Hawthorne

P

ull out your iPhones, I tell my students. Go into your photo library and select a photo. It must portray a powerful moment, an intimate moment. It must feature human interaction. No cute animals, no glorious sunsets, no random body parts and no gaggles of goofballs mugging for the camera. Email it to me. Now, write approximately 100 words explaining why you chose this image. You have 15 minutes. Go. I drop the images into PowerPoint and flash the first image on a yellowing screen. I ask the student who submitted it to step forward. “Tell us why you chose this photo.” The student reads her story. “I didn’t start playing softball because I cared about it. I cared about my dad. Softball was more than playing the sport I love. I played the sport he loved. Every time we talked softball, his eyes lit up. He was so passionate about taking me to every practice and game. He enjoyed it so much that he took the offer of being the assistant coach for a lot of my teams. I can’t associate a ball or a bat with anything other than my dad.” He pushed her to be the best she could be, but there came a point when, she said, “I felt he was proud of me only when I played a perfect game.” And that wasn’t happening often. By the ninth grade, she had peaked. She began to cry. She gave up softball, and she worries that her relationship with her father will never be the same. Next picture. Another girl. A girl is serving a tennis ball. Perfect form. Perfect extension. Feet about four inches off the ground. Eyes focused on the ball. Elbow bent in a 90-degree angle. “Why did you choose this photo? And, didn’t I say something about human interaction?”

She explains. “I can hear my parents cheering in the background, and I’m thinking, ‘I can’t believe I finally did it.’ I get to walk to the net to shake the girl’s hand. She’s not disappointed. She’s happy for me. We have become friends from playing each other so often. She knows what I’ve been through. As soon as I walk off the court, my parents embrace me, and my father says the words I have been waiting so long to hear: ‘I’m proud of you, kid. You finally did it.’” She, too, starts to cry. “What?” I ask. “I won only because I tuned him out. For years, all I could hear was my dad yelling. It almost ruined my game. Every tournament, around the quarterfinals, as the competition got tougher, I could hear him, and I would lose.” This time, she won despite him. That made celebrating awkward, and very difficult. So, now, one or two other girls are crying. They get it. They’ve been there, too. A couple are elite athletes, but most are in a summer writing class for a reason: They’re not athletes. Their parents pushed them into sports because, they insisted, “It’ll be good for you.” I did the same thing years ago, so I don’t fault the parents. Team sports can be beneficial, up to a point, but that point ends when the child becomes stunted by fear, regret and guilt. One senior girl told me she had just resigned from the cheer team, not because it was painful or difficult. She had just, “grown past it.” Those are her words. “My mom still hasn’t forgiven me,” she said. “She wanted so much for me to be head cheerleader. That was her dream. But it wasn’t mine.” Then, she teared up, too.

BOBBY HAWTHORNE is the author of “Longhorn Football” and “Home Field,” published by UT Press. In 2005, he retired as director of academics for the University Interscholastic League.

Texas School Business JANUARY / FEBRUARY 2019

17


Mental health resources for administrators


B

eing a preteen and teenager isn’t always easy. Besides raging hormones, there’s academic stress, family stress and interpersonal politics, which are now omnipresent, thanks to social media. For some young students, these issues can snowball into anxiety and depression, two mental health struggles that can bring down a student’s performance. And then there’s the worst possible scenario — when a student chooses to take his or her own life. Suicide is the second leading cause of death in individuals between 10 and 24 years old, according to the National Institute of Mental Health. Across the country, suicide rates are on the rise, but there is some good news. According to the Jason Foundation, four in five teens who attempt suicide show clear warning signs, meaning early detection and prevention is both possible and helpful. School administrators take many steps to keep their students healthy and safe, from holding fire drills and lock-down simulations to providing flu shots on campus and hosting classes to discuss the risks of drug and alcohol use. Mental health can be a tricky area to discuss with students and parents, but it’s equally important, and statistically even moreso. Several groups offer support for schools who are looking to help students who might be struggling with mental health issues. Following are some of the resources available to school districts, from government-based groups to universitysponsored programs, that can help guide your schools through implementing some type of plan to identify struggling students and help them get the guidance they need to survive the tough ascent into adulthood.

State solutions Since 1991, the Texas Youth Behavior and Risk Survey has provided data biannually on Texas students, looking especially at their levels of sadness, hopeless feelings and suicide attempts, among other factors. After the survey found a 10-year period of rising rates in all of these areas, TEA moved to create a list of resources for Texas schools to help reduce these numbers. TEA offers several training options for educators, many with costs covered or partially subsidized. Teachers can take the eight-hour Youth Mental Health First Aid course with costs covered by the state. Also available are longer, more involved courses, such as a two-day class in Applied Suicide Intervention Skills Training from

LifeWorks. Educators are always stretched for time, so TEA has partnered with online training providers, such as the Suicide Prevention Resource Center and Kognito, both of which offer virtual trainings that can be completed in a few hours. However you chose your trainings, the important thing is to bring awareness to the situation. In these trainings, educators first and foremost learn to identify students who might be struggling with depression or psychological stress. Experts also offer tips on how to reach out to these students and their parents to address the issue and provide help without increasing stress or risking a student’s confidentiality. According to the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, one of the most important things a school can do to prevent suicide is to promote a healthy, safe campus environment. Many anti-violence programs on school campuses can also curb suicide attempts, such as antibullying and anti-drug initiatives. On its website, at https://tea.texas.gov/ About_TEA/Other_Services/Mental_ Health/Suicide_Prevention, TEA provides several additional resources for schools, including printable flier and toolkits with helpful acronyms that can give teachers an easy-to-remember guideline for identifying students at risk for self-harm. The site also offers helpful information for school districts on how to respond after a student suicide in a way that best helps students cope with the loss.

University partnerships Several Texas universities have created programs that help not only their own students who might be struggling with

suicidal thoughts, but also outreach opportunities to help school districts facing the same issue with their younger students. The University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center has created the Risk and Resilience Network, a partnership with local schools to help prevent depression in students. The university uses a program called YAM (Youth Aware of Mental Health) that began in Europe and was tested in 12 different countries. The results found that YAM was the most successful program tested for boosting adolescent mental health. UT Southwestern partners with several school districts in North Texas, using the YAM program in schools to educate teens on depression and suicide. During the process, UT Southwestern researchers also gather data from the students that will help them learn more about how adolescent depression works and can be treated or prevented in the future. Administrators interested in learning more about YAM or partnering with UT Southwestern can visit http://www.utsouthwestern.edu/education/ medical-school/departments/psychiatry/ research/center/youth-aware-mental-health. html or reach out to the Risk and Resilience Network at (214) 648-0154. Further south, at Texas State University, the Texas School Safety Center offers numerous resources for districts looking to keep their students safe. The center provides documents and training sessions on several school safety issues, from suicide prevention to bullying and crisis response. On its website at http://txssc.txstate.edu/ tools/suicide-prevention/policies, The Texas School Safety Center shares a wealth of suicide-prevention information, including sample model school district policies, a list Texas School Business JANUARY / FEBRUARY 2019

19


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% %

18% 12%

AVERAGE U.S. HOUSEHOLD WEALTH White

Black

Latino

$200,000 $161,400

$150,000

of wealth among Black families is projected to DECREASE by 20243 of wealth among Hispanic families is projected to DECREASE by 20243

Forecast $122,366

$102,200

$100,000

$50,000

$10,400

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of specific statutes schools must meet in this area, and a guide to implementing safety policies in schools. Several Texas universities, including the University of Texas at Austin and Texas Christian University, partner with Texas Suicide Prevention, a collaborative statewide effort to reduce suicides in the state. On their website, at http:// texassuicideprevention.org/informationlibrary, Texas Suicide Prevention hosts a large resource library, including suggested mental health device apps, printable prevention fliers in Spanish and English, and schedules for video and in-person suicide prevention training.

Federal offerings Teen depression isn’t a Texas-only problem, and many groups at the national level have launched programs to try to combat the rise in students suffering with their mental

health. Funded by the Department of Health and Human Services, the Suicide Prevention Resource Center (SPRC) works to aid schools in preventing teen suicide. Teenagers spend most of their days on campus, and one of the center’s goals is to train every school employee on how they can best interact with these students in a way that will identify potential issues and prevent violence of any kind, with a focus on self-harm.

The Society for the Prevention of Teen Suicide specifically addresses risk factors for middle- and high-school-aged students, offering training as well as information created especially for educators. On its website, http://www.sptsusa.org, the group addresses frequently asked questions from educators, and tackles concerns such as the inaccurate claim that talking to students about suicide puts the idea in their heads and makes them more susceptible.

The SPRC offers a weekly email newsletter detailing news, research and funding opportunities for suicide-prevention programs. They also offer approved online and in-person training sessions, along with a wealth of reading material on how schools can prevent student suicide by promoting emotional connections between students, their teachers, their family members and each other at http://www.sprc.org/settings/ schools.

No matter which avenue you take, deciding to consider the risk and create a nurturing campus environment that makes students feel safe and supported is the first step. The partnerships available to schools are numerous, and through them, administrators can make a huge difference in the lives of its most vulnerable students and keep students safer, healthier and happier.

The Lifeline is FREE, confidential, and always available. HELP a loved one, a friend, or yourself. Community crisis centers answer Lifeline calls. ·

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration www.samhsa.gov

Learn the Warning Signs.

Printed 2005 • Reprinted 2011 CMHS-SVP-0126 Texas School Business JANUARY / FEBRUARY 2019

21


PRESIDENT PROFILE

Texas School Public Relations Association

TSPRA president works to support school communications staff in times of tragedy by James Golsan

N

ew Texas School Public Relations Association (TSPRA) President Monica Faulkenbery was practically born to work in education public relations. A child of two educators, she knew growing up she wanted to do anything but teach. She just wasn’t sure what that anything was, even though she was drawn to journalism as early as high school. “High school journalism was a major highlight of my life,” Faulkenbery says. She was editor-in-chief of her high school newspaper, but despite some early successes — she covered local school board meetings during her high school journalism career “better than professional reporters,” per her school district’s superintendent — she set her sights on a medical career and decided to major in pre-med during her freshman year at Northeastern State University. A chance meeting on NESU’s Talequah, Oklahoma, campus with her high school journalism teacher that fall changed the course her life. “He told me I was in the wrong field, and that I should be doing PR or journalism,” Faulkenbery says, and credits him with inspiring her

22

Texas School Business JANUARY / FEBRUARY 2019

entire career. “I just wish he was alive today so I could thank him for it.” That Faulkenbery was a natural in public relations was apparent early. Her first stop in a career spent entirely in education PR was at Bacone College in Muskogee, Oklahoma, where she was hired to work in the printshop by a former undergraduate advisor. By the end of her first day, she’d been promoted to assistant director of communication for the university. From there, Faulkenbery’s career progressed quickly. Her family had frequently vacationed in San Antonio while she was growing up, and those trips left the young PR professional with a deep love for the Lone Star State. After a few years at Bacone she began job hunting in Texas, and in the fall of 1982 accepted the position of news coordinator at Texas State Technical College in Waco. It only took her two years to become director of public relations and news for the college, and later its director of institutional news and public relations.


Faulkenbery’s time in Waco lasted a decade, ending with the sad passing of her husband of several years. She moved to Missouri to live closer to her sister, and even while she fought through a terrible loss, she continued to thrive professionally. She worked as a public relations specialist in Parkway School District outside of St. Louis, and then as director of community relations at St. Charles City School District in the same area. It was during her time in Missouri that Faulkenbery had her first turn at state-level leadership, becoming head of Missouri’s TSPRA equivalent. Still, Texas called to Faulkenbery. When her sister relocated to San Antonio, Faulkenbery said she was “part of the package,” and relocated to Texas with her, accepting a job in Eanes ISD. She was there for a year before accepting the position of assistant director of communications in Northside ISD in San Antonio in the fall of 1999, where she’s been ever since. Now, as she begins her second turn heading up a state-level public relations association,

Faulkenbery says she hopes she can fill the shoes of her predecessor and make a meaningful contribution to the organization.

engagement with Santa Fe ISD after the March 2018 school shooting the community suffered.

“It’s a humbling honor,” she says of her selection as president, and emphasized her desire to keep building on TSPRA’s networking capacity for Texas public education PR professionals. “I get so much information and validation and ideas every time I’m with my colleagues,” Faulkenbery says, and hopes that in a time when so much of the country is divided and fighting, members of her organization can come together to make a difference for Texas school districts and students.

“Small or large, we just want to be able to support districts dealing with tragedies like this if we can,” Faulkenbery says. She hopes to have the crisis teams fully operational within two years.

When asked about her goals for her presidency, Faulkenbery highlighted two major ones: The first is the creation of a network of public relations crisis teams across the state, to assist school districts dealing with national newsworthy events. She cited the support TSPRA provided to district staff in Sutherland Springs ISD following the tragic church shooting experienced by the town, as well as TSPRA’s

Her second major goal for TSPRA has to do with their own messaging, and is born of Faulkenbery’s many years of experience in education public relations: “We have to keep in mind that ‘the general public’ isn’t really there anymore,” she says. “TSPRA professionals should keep in mind that every audience we address is different, and we should keep the needs of those audiences in mind.” JAMES GOLSAN is a writer and education professional based in Austin.

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Texas School Business JANUARY / FEBRUARY 2019

23


PRESIDENT PROFILE

Texas Association of School Business Officials

Julie Novak hopes to inspire and advocate during her time as TASBO president by James Golsan

N

ew Texas Association of School Business Officials (TASBO) President Julie Novak has always loved working with numbers. Her passion for working in public education came later.

“I didn’t honestly have much background in education,” she says. “There were times I thought I wanted to be a teacher, but I’ve always preferred working with numbers behind the scenes.” The Del Rio native and Texas Tech University graduate now leads one of the widest reaching education organizations in the state; TASBO engages with every aspect of the business of running a school district. Novak describes the work as making sure students and teachers have what they need to succeed in the classroom, though that work can take a number of shapes. TASBO supports all school finance and operations personnel, from those working in accounts payable to risk management and child nutrition. To say it’s not a role Novak — who began her career working for a CPA, auditing cities, banks and school districts — ever saw herself assuming would be an understatement. That said, her work as a CPA made her realize how much she loved

24

Texas School Business JANUARY / FEBRUARY 2019

working in education, as well as what got her started working with TASBO … she thinks. “I’m not honestly sure how I heard about TASBO,” she says with a laugh when asked how she first became involved with the organization she now leads. She is quick to credit TASBO with much of her professional success, and says the organization taught her the bulk of the school district knowledge she’s accrued over the last 20 years (she first began working for school districts in 1998). Now that she’s assumed leadership at TASBO, she wants to make sure other school business officials in Texas have the same professional development opportunities she had. “Professional development is a huge part of what TASBO does,” Novak says, and lists workshops, coursework and making sure school business professionals across the state have the resources they need to do their job among the organization’s vital responsibilities, with a focus on the latter.


“We’re in the process of developing an online, on-demand repository of professional development materials for school business professionals,” Novak says. The development of that repository will be a major emphasis of her presidency. Building awareness for the school business profession is another one. “TASBO needs to be sure we emphasize recruiting new talent,” she says. “Outreach to millennials is one area we really want to work on. We want young professionals to know this is a really, really rewarding profession, and it’s because we get to help students and school districts every day.” Of course, with the 86th Texas Legislature beginning this month, legislative outreach is another major component of the work TASBO will be engaging in this year. Novak says she believes there’s a strong appetite in the Legislature for school finance reform, and credits teachers with pushing the Legislature in the right direction on that front. “I think teachers have a much more powerful voice than they did in the past, and

legislators are seeing that at the voting booth,” Novak says, adding that it’s TASBO’s responsibility to make sure the information lawmakers are working off of regarding school finance is accurate. “School finance is a very challenging issue,” says Novak, who serves as chief financial officer in Fort Sam Houston ISD. “A reform that helps one school district might hurt another. TASBO just wants to make sure legislators have the information they need to make decisions that help all Texas school districts.” While she’ll doubtless be busy at the Capitol during (at least) the first half of 2019, Novak will have plenty to look forward to at home next year: Her son Ryan and his wife Jeralyn are expecting their first child in January, which will make Novak a first-time grandmother. Family has always been a huge part of Novak’s life — she also has a daughter named Sarah and has been married to her husband, Charles, for 34 years. They, Novak and Charles, live together on a family farm in Atascosa County, and she says the leadership

role she now occupies with TASBO wasn’t a consideration for her until her children graduated high school. Now, as her presidency begins, Novak wants to make certain that TASBO is an advocate for the entire public education community in Texas, but especially those business professionals TASBO represents. “We want to continue to build awareness for the profession and make sure we’re advocating for Texas school business professionals, both at the state and national levels,” Novak says. While there’s no doubt the 86th will give Novak and TASBO plenty of opportunities for the former, hopefully she’ll find plenty of time to spend with her new grandchild, too. JAMES GOLSAN is a writer and education professional based in Austin.

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Texas School Business JANUARY / FEBRUARY 2019

25


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Calendar Professional development & events

S TA N D O U T F R O M T H E C R OW D ! Get premium placement and get noticed! For a nominal fee, you can showcase your conference, workshop or seminar on the opening page as a Featured Event. Contact Ann Halstead at ahalstead@tasanet.org for more details. FEB RUARY February 4 Texas ASCD Institute: Infusing Literacy Across the Curriculum, with Dr. Sue Szachowicz Birdville ISD, North Richland Hills For more info, (512) 477-8200. www.txascd.org Cost: ASCD members, $225; nonmembers, $249. February 4-5 TASBO Workshop: Bud to Boss Allen ISD, Allen For more info, (512) 462-1711. www.tasbo.org Cost: Members, $490; nonmembers, $540. February 5 TASB Class for Asbestos Designated Person Victoria ISD, Victoria For more info, (512) 467-0222 or (800) 580-8272. www.tasb.org Cost: TASB members, no charge; nonmembers, $425. TEPSA Region 19 Winter Meeting Offices of ESC Region 19, El Paso For more info, (512) 478-5268 or (800) 252-3621. www.tepsa.org February 6 TASB Class for Integrated Pest Management Coordinator Victoria ISD, Victoria For more info, (512) 467-0222 or (800) 580-8272. www.tasb.org Cost: TASB members, no charge; nonmembers, $425. TEPSA Region 16 Winter Meeting Offices of ESC Region 16, Amarillo For more info, (512) 478-5268 or (800) 252-3621. www.tepsa.org

February 6-7 TASA Academy for Transformational Leadership (session 3 of 4) San Angelo ISD, San Angelo For more info, (512) 477-6361. www.tasanet.org Cost: $1,995 for all four sessions. February 7 TASB Class for Indoor Air Quality Coordinator Victoria ISD, Victoria For more info, (512) 467-0222 or (800) 580-8272. www.tasb.org Cost: TASB members, no charge; nonmembers, $425. TASBO Course: Financial Essentials Irving ISD, Irving For more info, (512) 462-1711. www.tasbo.org Cost: TASBO members, $170; nonmembers, $225. TASPA Workshop: Certification Fundamentals ESC Region 8, Mt. Pleasant For more info, (512) 494-9353. www.taspa.org February 7-8 TASB Conference for Administrative Professionals TASB offices, Austin For more info, (512) 467-0222 or (800) 580-8272. www.tasb.org Cost: $165. February 8 TASBO Course: Purchasing Standards and Specifications Offices of ESC Region 1, Edinburg and Brownsville (Brownsville – teleconference) For more info, (512) 462-1711. www.tasbo.org Cost: TASBO members, $170; nonmembers, $220.

February 10-12 TASSP Assistant/Aspiring Principal Workshop Airport Hilton, Austin For more info, (512) 443-2100. www.tassp.org TCA Annual Professional School Counselor Conference Gonzalez Convention Center, San Antonio For more info, (512) 472-3403. www.txca.org February 11-13 TASA Curriculum Management Audit Training, Level 1 TASA offices, Austin For more info, (512) 477-6361. www.tasanet.org Cost: Members, $750; nonmembers, $850. February 12-13 TASA Academy for Transformational Leadership (session 2 of 4) Georgetown ISD, Georgetown For more info, (512) 477-6361. www.tasanet.org Cost: $1,995 for all four sessions. TASBO Workshop: Project Management for School Business Professionals ESC Region 20, San Antonio For more info, (512) 462-1711. www.tasbo.org Cost: Members, $390; nonmembers, $440. February 14-15 Texas ASCD Curriculum Leadership Academy (session 2 of 3) Bastrop ISD, Bastrop For more info, (512) 477-8200. www.txascd.org Cost: $1,500. February 15 Texas ASCD Curriculum Leadership Academy (session 2 of 7) Rio Grande City ISD, Rio Grande City For more info, (512) 477-8200. www.txascd.org Cost: $1,700. February 18-20 TCASE Great Ideas Annual Convention Marriott Hotel, Austin For more info, (512) 474-4492 or (888) 433-4492.

www.tcase.org Cost: Members: Pre- and main conference, $625; main conference only, $535; one-day registration, $475. Nonmembers: Pre- and main conference, $700; main conference only, $610; oneday registration, $525. February 18-21 TSPRA Annual Conference Hyatt Regency Lost Pines Resort, Cedar Creek For more info, (512) 474-9107. www.tspra.org Cost: TSPRA members, $470. February 19 TEPSA Region 2 Winter Meeting Offices of ESC Region 2, X For more info, (512) 478-5268 or (800) 252-3621. www.tepsa.org February 19-21 TASA Curriculum Management Audit Training, Level 1 TASA offices, Austin For more info, (512) 477-6361. www.tasanet.org Cost: Members, $750; nonmembers, $850. February 20 TASBO Workshop: Investment Training Lubbock ISD, Lubbock For more info, (512) 462-1711. www.tasbo.org Cost: Members, $205; nonmembers, $255. February 20-21 TASA First-Time Superintendents Academy (session 4 of 4) Austin Marriott North, Round Rock For more info, (512) 477-6361. www.tasanet.org Cost: All four sessions: TASA members, $695; nonmembers, $795. Any one session: Members and nonmembers, $250. February 20-24 TABSE Annual State Conference Moody Gardens Convention Center, Galveston For more info, (713) 529-3305. www.tabse.net

> See Calendar, page 29 Texas School Business JANUARY / FEBRUARY 2019

27


1. Publication Title

Statement of Ownership, Management, and Circulation (All Periodicals Publications Except Requester Publications) 2. Publication Number

5

Texas School Business

4

_

1

13. Publication Title

14. Issue Date for Circulation Data Below

Texas School Business

09/01/2018

3. Filing Date

6

2

0

09/01/2018

4. Issue Frequency

5. Number of Issues Published Annually

6. Annual Subscription Price

Bi monthly & special issue

7

$24.00

7. Complete Mailing Address of Known Office of Publication (Not printer) (Street, city, county, state, and ZIP+4 ®)

406 East 11th Street, Travis County Austin, TX 78701

15. Extent and Nature of Circulation

a. Total Number of Copies (Net press run)

Contact Person

Ann Halstead

(1) Mailed Outside-County Paid Subscriptions Stated on PS Form 3541 (Include paid distribution above nominal rate, advertiser’s proof copies, and exchange copies)

Telephone (Include area code)

8. Complete Mailing Address of Headquarters or General Business Office of Publisher (Not printer)

Average No. Copies No. Copies of Single Each Issue During Issue Published Preceding 12 Months Nearest to Filing Date

(512)477-6361

Same as above

b. Paid Circulation (By Mail and Outside the Mail)

9. Full Names and Complete Mailing Addresses of Publisher, Editor, and Managing Editor (Do not leave blank) Publisher (Name and complete mailing address)

Texas Association of School Administrators 406 East 11th Street Austin, TX 78701

(2)

Mailed In-County Paid Subscriptions Stated on PS Form 3541 (Include paid distribution above nominal rate, advertiser’s proof copies, and exchange copies)

(3)

Paid Distribution Outside the Mails Including Sales Through Dealers and Carriers, Street Vendors, Counter Sales, and Other Paid Distribution Outside USPS®

(4)

Paid Distribution by Other Classes of Mail Through the USPS (e.g., First-Class Mail®)

c.  Total Paid Distribution [Sum of 15b (1), (2), (3), and (4)]

Editor (Name and complete mailing address)

Dacia Rivers 406 East 11th Street Austin, TX 78701

d. Free or (1) Free or Nominal Rate Outside-County Copies included on PS Form 3541 Nominal Rate Distribution (2) Free or Nominal Rate In-County Copies Included on PS Form 3541 (By Mail and Free or Nominal Rate Copies Mailed at Other Classes Through the USPS Outside (3) (e.g., First-Class Mail) the Mail)

Managing Editor (Name and complete mailing address)

N/A

10. Owner (Do not leave blank. If the publication is owned by a corporation, give the name and address of the corporation immediately followed by the names and addresses of all stockholders owning or holding 1 percent or more of the total amount of stock. If not owned by a corporation, give the names and addresses of the individual owners. If owned by a partnership or other unincorporated firm, give its name and address as well as those of each individual owner. If the publication is published by a nonprofit organization, give its name and address.) Full Name Complete Mailing Address

Texas Association of School Administrators

406 East 11th Street, Austin, TX 78701

(4)

Free or Nominal Rate Distribution Outside the Mail (Carriers or other means)

e. Total Free or Nominal Rate Distribution (Sum of 15d (1), (2), (3) and (4))

f. Total Distribution (Sum of 15c and 15e)

g. Copies not Distributed (See Instructions to Publishers #4 (page #3))

h. Total (Sum of 15f and g) i. Percent Paid (15c divided by 15f times 100) 11. Known Bondholders, Mortgagees, and Other Security Holders Owning or Holding 1 Percent or More of Total Amount of Bonds, Mortgages, or None Other Securities. If none, check box Full Name

3235

3600

2750

2975

162

180

0

0

0

0

2912

3155

0

0

0

0

0

0

80

95

80

95

2992

3250

243

350

3235

3600

97.33%

97.08%

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> Continued from page 27 February 21 TEPSA Region 18 Winter Meeting Offices of ESC Region 18, Midland For more info, (512) 478-5268 or (800) 252-3621. www.tepsa.org TEPSA Region 5 Winter Meeting Offices of ESC Region 5, Port Arthur For more info, (512) 478-5268 or (800) 252-3621. www.tepsa.org TEPSA Region 7 Winter Meeting Location TBA, Hideaway For more info, (512) 478-5268 or (800) 252-3621. www.tepsa.org February 21-22 Texas ASCD Curriculum Leadership Academy (session 1 of 3) Pat May Center, Hurst-EulessBedford ISD, Bedford For more info, (512) 477-8200. www.txascd.org Cost: $1,500. February 21-23 TASB Winter Governance and Legal Seminar Galveston Island Convention Center, Galveston For more info, (512) 467-0222 or (800) 580-8272. www.tasb.org Cost: Thursday-Saturday, $375; Friday and Saturday only, $315. February 22 Texas ASCD Curriculum Leadership Academy (session 3 of 7) Rio Grande City ISD, Rio Grande City For more info, (512) 477-8200. www.txascd.org Cost: $1,700. February 25 THSCA Texas Coaches Leadership Summit Lila Cockrell Theatre, San Antonio For more info, (512) 392-3741. www.thsca.com TASA Curriculum Management Planning Workshop TASA offices, Austin For more info, (512) 477-6361. www.tasanet.org Cost: TASA members, $450; nonmembers, $500.

February 26 TASA/TASB Legislative Conference Sheraton Hotel, Austin For more info, (512) 467-0222 or (800) 580-8272. www.tasanet.org February 27-March 1 TASA Curriculum Writing Workshop TASA offices, Austin For more info, (512) 477-6361. www.tasanet.org Cost: TASA members, $450; nonmembers, $500.

M A RC H March 3-5 TASSP Conference: Making Middle School Matter Airport Hilton, Austin For more info, (512) 443-2100. www.tassp.org Cost: $265. March 4-8 TASBO Annual Conference Marriott Riverwalk, San Antonio For more info, (512) 462-1711. www.tasbo.org TASBO Workshop: Bud to Boss Marriott Riverwalk, San Antonio For more info, (512) 462-1711. www.tasbo.org Cost: Members, $490; nonmembers, $540. March 5 TASBO Course for CSRM: Fundamentals of Risk Management Grand Hyatt, San Antonio For more info, (512) 462-1711. www.tasbo.org March 8 TASBO Course for CSRM: Funding School Risks Grand Hyatt, San Antonio For more info, (512) 462-1711. www.tasbo.org March 20-21 TASA Academy for Transformational Leadership (session 4 of 4) San Angelo ISD, San Angelo For more info, (512) 477-6361. www.tasanet.org Cost: $1,995 for all four sessions. March 21-22 Texas ASCD Curriculum Leadership Academy (sessions 4 and 5 of 7) Rio Grande City ISD, Rio Grande

City For more info, (512) 477-8200. www.txascd.org Cost: $1,700. March 24-27 THSADA State Conference Convention Center, Waco For more info, (512) 832-6237803. www.thsada.com March 26 TASB Class for Asbestos Designated Person ESC Region 9, Wichita Falls For more info, (512) 467-0222 or (800) 580-8272. www.tasb.org Cost: TASB members, no charge; nonmembers, $425. TASBO Academy: Bonds, Buildings and Beyond Marriott Town Square, Sugarland For more info, (512) 462-1711. www.tasbo.org Cost: Members, $215, nonmembers, $265. March 26-27 FGSC Annual Conference and Lobby Day Hyatt Regency, Austin For more info, (512) 535-1206. www.fastgrowthtexas.org TASA Academy for Transformational Leadership (session 3 of 4) Georgetown ISD, Georgetown For more info, (512) 477-6361. www.tasanet.org Cost: $1,995 for all four sessions. March 27 TACS Regional Conference Hardin-Simmons University, Abilene For more info, (512) 440-8277. www.tacsnet.org TASB Class for Integrated Pest Management Coordinator ESC Region 9, Wichita Falls For more info, (512) 467-0222 or (800) 580-8272. www.tasb.org Cost: TASB members, no charge; nonmembers, $425. TEPSA Region 9 Spring Meeting Offices of ESC Region 9, Wichita Falls For more info, (512) 478-5268 or (800) 252-3621. www.tepsa.org March 28 TASB Best Practices Training: Construction Fundamentals

ESC Region 9, Wichita Falls For more info, (512) 467-0222 or (800) 580-8272. www.tasb.org Cost: TASB members, no charge; nonmembers, $425. TEPSA Region 6 Spring Meeting Location TBA, Shenandoah For more info, (512) 478-5268 or (800) 252-3621. www.tepsa.org TEPSA Region 20 Spring Meeting Offices of ESC Region 20, San Antonio For more info, (512) 478-5268 or (800) 252-3621. www.tepsa.org

APRI L April 2 TASB Best Practices Training: Procurement TASB offices, Austin For more info, (512) 467-0222 or (800) 580-8272. www.tasb.org Cost: TASB members, no charge; nonmembers, $425. April 3 TACS Regional Conference Location TBA, Tyler For more info, (512) 440-8277. www.tacsnet.org TASB Best Practices Training: Efficient Facilities TASB offices, Austin For more info, (512) 467-0222 or (800) 580-8272. www.tasb.org Cost: TASB members, no charge; nonmembers, $425. April 4 TEPSA Region 10 Spring Meeting Offices of ESC Region 10, Irving For more info, (512) 478-5268 or (800) 580-8272. www.tepsa.org April 9 TASB Class for Asbestos Designated Person Dayton ISD, Dayton For more info, (512) 467-0222 or (800) 580-8272. www.tasb.org Cost: TASB members, no charge; nonmembers, $425.

> See Calendar, page31 Texas School Business JANUARY / FEBRUARY 2019

29


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> Continued from page 29 April 10 TASB Class for Integrated Pest Management Coordinator Dayton ISD, Dayton For more info, (512) 467-0222 or (800) 580-8272. www.tasb.org Cost: TASB members, no charge; nonmembers, $425. TEPSA Region 16 Spring Meeting Offices of ESC Region 16, Amarillo For more info, (512) 478-5268 or (800) 252-3621. www.tepsa.org April 11 TASB Class for Indoor Air Quality Coordinator Dayton ISD, Dayton For more info, (512) 467-0222 or (800) 580-8272. www.tasb.org Cost: TASB members, no charge; nonmembers, $425. TEPSA Region 13 Spring Meeting Location TBA, Wimberley For more info, (512) 478-5268 or (800) 252-3621. www.tepsa.org April 11-12 Texas ASCD Curriculum Leadership Academy (session 2 of 3) Pat May Center, Hurst-EulessBedford ISD, Bedford For more info, (512) 477-8200. www.txascd.org Cost: $1,500. April 12 TASBO Course: Managing Special Revenue and State Programs Offices of ESC Region 1, Edinburg and Brownsville (Brownsville – teleconference) For more info, (512) 462-1711. www.tasbo.org Cost: TASBO members, $170; nonmembers, $220. April 14-16 TAGT Leadership Conference Sheraton Hotel, Georgetown For more info, (512) 499-8248. www.txgifted.org Cost: TAGT members, $225; nonmembers, $325.

April 16 TASB Class for Asbestos Designated Person Offices of ESC Region 16, Amarillo For more info, (512) 467-0222 or (800) 580-8272. www.tasb.org Cost: TASB members, no charge; nonmembers, 4425. TASBO Course: Workers’ Compensation Specialist Update for CSRM TASBO offices, Austin For more info, (512) 462-1711. www.tasbo.org April 17 TASB Class for Integrated Pest Management Coordinator Offices of ESC Region 16, Amarillo For more info, (512) 467-0222 or (800) 580-8272. www.tasb.org Cost: TASB members, no charge; nonmembers, $425. April 18 TASB Best Practices Training: Construction Fundamentals Offices of ESC Region 16, Amarillo For more info, (512) 467-0222 or (800) 580-8272. www.tasb.org Cost: TASB members, no charge; nonmembers, $425. April 23 TEPSA Region 8 Spring Meeting Offices of ESC Region 8, Pittsburg For more info, (512) 478-5268 or (800) 252-3621. www.tepsa.org April 23-25 TASA Curriculum Management Audit Training, Level 2 TASA offices, Austin For more info, (512) 477-6361. www.tasanet.org Cost: TASA members, $750; nonmembers, $850. April 25 TEPSA Region 3 Spring Meeting Offices of ESC Region 3, Victoria For more info, (512) 478-5268 or (800) 252-3621.. www.tepsa.org April 25-26 TASBO Workshop: Bud to Boss Galena Park ISD, Houston For more info, (512) 462-1711. www.tasbo.org Cost: TASBO members, $490; nonmembers, $540.

April 29-30 TASA Academy for Transformational Leadership (session 4 of 4) Georgetown ISD, Georgetown For more info, (512) 477-6361. www.tasanet.org Cost: $1,995 for all four sessions.

May 10 TASBO Course: Business Ethics Offices of ESC Region 1, Edinburg and Brownsville (Brownsville – teleconference) For more info, (512) 462-1711. www.tasbo.org Cost: TASBO members, $170; nonmembers, $220.

April 30 TASBO Workshop: Internal Audit Klein ISD, Spring For more info, (512) 462-1711. www.tasbo.org Cost: TASBO members, $205; nonmembers, $255.

May 14 TASB Course: Accessibility for Persons with Disabilities TASB offices, Austin For more info, (512) 467-0222 or (800) 580-8272. www.tasb.org Cost: TASB members, no charge; nonmembers, $425.

MAY May 1 TASBO Academy: Texas School Records Management Omni Hotel Westside, Houston For more info, (512) 462-1711. www.tasbo.org May 1-3 TASB Risk Management Fund Members’ Conference Hyatt Regency, Austin For more info, (512) 467-0222 or (800) 580-8272. www.tasb.org May 2-3 Texas ASCD Curriculum Leadership Academy (sessions 6 and 7 of 7) Rio Grande City ISD, Rio Grande ISD For more info, (512) 477-8200. www.txascd.org Cost: $1,700. May 6 TASBO Construction Academy Courtyard Austin Hotel, Pflugerville For more info, (512) 462-1711. www.tasbo.org May 6-7 TASBO Workshop: Bud to Boss Offices of ESC Region 19, El Paso For more info, (512) 462-1711. www.tasbo.org Cost: TASBO members, $490; nonmembers, $540. May 9 TASBO Course for Certified School Risk Managers: School Risk Katy ISD, Katy For more info, (512) 462-1711. www.tasbo.org

May 15 TASB Course: Hazardous Materials Management and Emergency Responses TASB offices, Austin For more info, (512) 467-0222 or (800) 580-8272. www.tasb.org Cost: TASB members, no charge; nonmembers, $425. TASBO Workshop: Investment Training Offices of ESC Region 15, San Angelo For more info, (512) 462-1711. www.tasbo.org Cost: TASBO members, $205; nonmembers, $255. May 16 TASB Best Practices Training: Construction Fundamentals TASB offices, Austin For more info, (512) 467-0222 or (800) 580-8272. www.tasb.org Cost: TASB members, no charge; nonmembers, $425. May 21-22 TASBO Workshop: Project Management for School Business Professionals Cypress-Fairbanks ISD, Houston For more info, (512) 462-1711. www.tasbo.org Cost: TASBO members, $390; nonmembers, $440. May 22-23 TASBO Workshop: Bud to Boss Keller ISD, Keller For more info, (512) 462-1711. www.tasbo.org Cost: TASBO members, $490; nonmembers, $540.◄

Texas School Business JANUARY / FEBRUARY 2019

31


SAFETY

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STUDENT VOICES

A tasty varsity: competitive barbecue team cooks, learns, grows at Ennis High by Brooke Betik with Ty Zabojnik

P

icture this: One hundred some odd high school students all hard at work, competing for a state championship in … cooking barbecue? When I first heard about our school’s competitive barbecue team, I was just as skeptical as you are. It seemed trivial to me, a glorified hobby that could only be rewarded in smalltown Texas; grilling didn’t exactly sound like a substantial enough pastime to have such a prominent backing. Yet upon further research, I discovered that this team was doing a lot more than just cooking meat. Barbecue teams are not exactly common in North Texas just yet, but they’re supposedly gaining popularity and have strong roots in several other locations across the state. Our team here at Ennis High School came to fruition last year when horticulture teacher Tommy Copeland found out about the state championship in Burnet, and decided that Ennis had the talent to be a part of such a unique contest. So he rounded up a team of four senior boys who knew their meat and were willing to compete. Ty Zabojnik, the captain of Ennis High’s barbecue team, says that they learned several life lessons in addition to perfecting their grilling. “We would study a different type of meat every day after school, from how to cut it precisely to how to cook it in multiple ways,” says Zabojnik. “We even used some of our own Czech recipes, which have been passed down from generation to generation.” But the contest isn’t just based on the chef ’s skills on the grill — the team also had to handcraft their own cooker to use at the contest. Welding has to be in the skill set of participants as well, and the sponsors have no participation in the making of the grill or the grilling itself on contest day. The hard work put into the sport, both cooking and creating, is what Zabojnik says made him realize that “it was no playing around.” “The most beneficial thing is to learn how to deal with the pressure of a timed cook-

▲ Members of the Ennis High School barbecue team pose with awards for best pit rig and best dessert. Shown are (left to right) Ray Perez, Russell Woodard, Ty Zabonik and Jay Chapman. off and make everything perfect,” remarks Zabojnik on the topic of how his experience on the team helped him grow as a person and as a leader. He explained the early mornings and high-pressure conditions that partner with competitive barbecuing are what make the experience so intense and rewarding. Without the high-stakes environment, the team wouldn’t have learned how to work together efficiently, a necessary lesson that they can use throughout their entire lives. While the team was a new addition to the plethora of organizations and clubs offered at Ennis High School last year, the team worked together extremely well. At the state contest that inspired Copeland’s initial forming of the team, Zabojnik and the other three boys brought home a top-five award in the brisket, dessert and beans categories. This impressive feat, however, wouldn’t have been possible without the encouragement and guidance that Zabojnik provided as team captain. In fact, Zabojnik’s leadership brought the team so close that although they are all now graduates of EHS, the same four team

members are planning to compete in more barbecue contests in years to come. “Everyone needs to know the basics of cooking, so if you have a barbecue team at your school, take it,” encourages Zabojnik. But beyond just knowing how to cook, he explained how everyone also needs to know how to work under pressure without sacrificing precision or a sense of community, all valid concepts that the team has taught him. Skepticism is expected when initially addressing the concept of these barbecue teams, but with a single conversation with Zabojnik, it was clear that this sport meant a lot more to him and his teammates than just winning titles or making delicious cuisine — it gave them life skills and a family that carries beyond the walls of Ennis High School and guarantees great eats for the rest of their lives. BROOKE BETIK is a senior at Ennis High School. TY ZABOJNIK graduated from Ennis High School in 2017.

“Student Voices” is a regularly featured column in Texas School Business. It’s an opportunity for students of all ages from across Texas to share their experiences in K-12 public schools. Contact Editorial Director Dacia Rivers at drivers@texasschoolbusiness.com for publishing guidelines. Texas School Business JANUARY / FEBRUARY 2019

33


Custodial

Electrical & Lighting

Energy Performance Facilities Engineering Contracting

HVAC & Mechanical

Landscape & Grounds

Parking & Transportation


Photo Feature

HORSESHOE BAY WELCOMES TEXAS ASCD MEMBERS FOR 70TH ANNIVERSARY CONFERENCE The Texas Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development held its yearly conference in Horseshoe Bay in October. Members gathered to celebrate the group’s 70th anniversary and participate in a transformative learning experience.

▲ASCD board members Melanie Kay-

Wyatt and Ben Shuldiner greet each other with “un gran abrazo,” which translates into a big hug.

▲ Attendees participating at a Innovative Highlights session.

▲ Texas ASCD board members (left to

right) Blanca Lopez and Sara Ptomey converse with Spring ISD teacher Pam Dettwiler during a keynote icebreaker.

◄ George Couros

engages the audience during his keynote presentation.

▲ Conference attendees (left to right)

Lilia, Nancy and Kimberley at the President’s Reunion. Attendees were encouraged to wear a hat from their favorite decade.

▲ Texas ASCD President Abigayle Barton waves to conference-goers from a hot air balloon during Texas ASCD’s 70th year celebratory festivities.

▲Kendrick Lookadoo and Stephanie

Espinosa observe while at the Transformative Principal Leadership Academy.

◄ ASCD board mem-

bers (left to right) Alina Davis, Karen Baptiste and Melanie Kay-Wyatt at the Leader’s Luncheon.

▲ From left to right, Jacqueline Taylor, Matthew Meyers and Joyce Miller enjoy an evening of mingling at the President’s Reunion.

> See Texas ASCD page 37 Texas School Business JANUARY / FEBRUARY 2019

35


TASB RISK FUND


Photo Feature

TEXAS ASCD

> Continued from page 35

◄ Superintendents

(left to right) Brad Lancaster, David E. Young and Chris Allen welcome attendees to Texas ASCD’s 70th anniversary conference.

▲ Former Texas ASCD President Elvis Arterbury and Dr.

Elizabeth Clark with first-time attendees at the Newcomer’s Orientation.

◄ Nancy Frey and Doug Fisher present their keynote.

▼ Panelists (left to right) Elizabeth

Clark, Ben Schuldiner, Bill Bechtol, Deb Delisle, Leslie Grant, Roy Garcia and Chris Allen discuss the core elements of being a transformative educator.

▲ Special guests help celebrate Texas ASCD’s 70th anniversary.

From left to right: Ronn Nozoe, Noah Raskin, Alina Davis, Ben Shuldiner, Leslie Grant, Bart Epstein, Sandy Husk, Matthew Mingle, Debra Delisle, Dolores Cormier-Zenon and Phyllis Lockett.

◄ Texas ASCD Executive

Director Yolanda M. Rey presents Dr. Elizabeth Clark with a perfect attendance award for never missing a conference.

▲ Stephen Davis engages conference attendees at Monday’s Innovative Highlight.

▲ Texas ASCD board member Chris Allen welcomes guests at the Welcome Reception.

▲ Hillwood Middle School is awarded the 2018 Texas Whole Child School Award during the All-Attendee Breakfast and Awards. Texas School Business JANUARY / FEBRUARY 2019

37


THE BACK PAGE

You’ve got to have HEART Part three: Be adaptable by Riney Jordan

F

or the past two issues, I have been addressing components of the belief that we must listen to our heart if we are going to truly change the lives of the students whom we serve.

The first element of this HEART concept was being “happy.” It was followed by “empathy” toward students, peers and parents. This month we direct our thoughts toward being “adaptable.” I don’t know of any quality that is most useful in today’s fast-paced world than that of being adaptable. We’ve all heard the well-known quote from the Greek philosopher Heraclitus who said, “The only thing that is constant is change.” He also said, “No man ever steps in the same river twice.” Oh, yes. Our world is ever-changing, and adapting to change can mean the difference in happiness or misery. My heart aches for the person who simply refuses to adjust or believes that he is not capable of changing. In my own lifetime, the changes have been staggering. As a child, we had a phone with a party line. To communicate with someone outside your town, you went through an operator to call them, or you licked a stamp and mailed a letter. Microwaves, televisions and computers didn’t exist. There was no cable television. No video games. No social media. No movies available to watch in your home. If you traveled, you drove. Only the wealthy flew by airplane. Today, we can purchase any item imaginable with the click of a mouse, and it arrives in two days or sooner. Are we doing enough to teach our students the important and the necessity of being adaptable? You can blame the drug culture on a great many things, but I wonder how many individuals, young and old, have succumbed to drugs and alcohol as a means of coping with such a rapidly changing society. According to the U.S. Department of Labor, 65 percent of today’s schoolchildren will be

employed in jobs that have yet to be created. That’s an amazing statement. How in the world do we prepare them for such dramatic changes? Well, we can begin by setting examples of how mature adults handle change. I know of a teacher who literally threw a temper tantrum when she was asked to move down one grade level in an elementary school due to enrollment numbers. She simply couldn’t adjust to it. She became rude to her students and parents. She fumed. She griped. She raved and ranted incessantly about it, until she finally submitted her resignation at mid-term. Here was an opportunity for her to grow and broaden her experience, yet she let it lead to her resignation. On the other side of the coin, I remember a teacher who thought she might be interested in being a principal at some point in time. When she was asked to assume more responsibility, she jumped at the opportunity. When there was an opening for an assistant principal, she opted to give it a try. She soon discovered that she was able to impact far more students than before, and today she is a successful high school principal. Where others see frustration, anger and failure, adaptable people look and visualize new roles and new directions. Schools in Texas are growing faster than ever. We need teachers and administrators who see this growth as a means to offer more meaningful curriculum to our students, more ways to impact their lives in a positive manner, and new ways to solve old problems. What an amazing time to be an educator! What an exciting time to embrace change! What opportunities await those who choose to be adaptable! Get your heart right, and learn to adapt in order to help those who need us so badly. As Marc Andreessen so aptly stated, “Adaptability is key.”

RINEY JORDAN is the author of two books and a frequent public speaker. To invite him to speak at your convocation, graduation or awards banquet, visit www.rineyjordan.com.

38

Texas School Business JANUARY / FEBRUARY 2019

Texas School Business Advertiser Index

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Profile for Texas Association of School Administrators

TSB—January/February 2019  

Happy New Year! I hope you’ve all had a joyful and refreshing winter break. As you return to your offices and your desks, may you be as insp...

TSB—January/February 2019  

Happy New Year! I hope you’ve all had a joyful and refreshing winter break. As you return to your offices and your desks, may you be as insp...

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