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THE INDEPENDENT VOICE FOR PUBLIC EDUCATION IN TEXAS FOR 56 YEARS

February 2010

Capitol ideas affecting public education

TASBO’s Becky Estrada Lackland ISD

In the Spotlight: Scott Layne Irving ISD


Our insight. Your schools. Tyler has the insight to empower you as a K-12 education professional. Our financial, SIS, transportation, special education, food service and district planning products do more than meet your needs. They anticipate them. That’s why more and more school systems choose Tyler for their data management. To spend more time with your students and less time with data, visit us at tylertech.com or email us at info@tylertech.com.


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CONTENTS COVER: A look at the politics and personalities affecting Texas public education

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Dave McNeely

TASBO President Profile: Becky Estrada tallies up her rewarding career in education

23

Elizabeth Millard

In the Spotlight: Irving ISD’s Scott Layne has grand designs

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Whitney Angstadt

photo FEATURES TASPA members gather for winter conference

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ESC Region 4 hosts national conference in Austin

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DEPartments

COLUMNS

TSB Professional Development & Events Calendar

From the Editor

5

Tech Toolbox

11

14

Who’s News

21

The Law Dawg  —  unleashed

7

The Back Page

30

Advertisers Index

30

Young’s Inbox

9

Katie Ford Jim Walsh

John Young

Terry Morawski Riney Jordan

Above photo: Of the approximately $16 billion in federal stimulus money designated for Texas over two years, at least $6.4 billion is to be spent on public education. Pictured is the Bureau of Printing and Engraving in Washington, D.C. The views expressed by columnists and contributing writers do not necessarily reflect those of the publisher or Texas School Business advertisers. The publisher also makes no endorsement of the advertisers or advertisements in this publication. February 2010 • Texas School Business

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The 24Th annual

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Thursday, April 22, 2010

Arlington Convention Center • Arlington

Same Conference – Two Convenient Locations The Texas Council of Administrators of Special Education and the Texas School Administrators’ Legal Digest are pleased to announce the twenty-fourth annual one-day conference on current issues concerning the education of students with disabilities. Special education directors and other special education personnel, as well as superintendents, principals, school board members, and school attorneys will find this conference valuable.

Please visit www.legaldigest.com to register online and save! Topics and Presenters Include:

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From the Editor Education Week recently published a story about media coverage of public education (Dec. 9, 2009, “Is Education News Falling Off Front Pages?”). The article referenced a Brookings Institution survey that noted that public education “barely registered” in newspapers, television, radio and other news outlets in 2009 — the one exception being President Obama’s speech to students in September. As print media, in particular, struggles with declining advertising revenue, “the schools beat — never a marquee assignment in most newsrooms — has been a casualty, not only in the national media, but at local outlets as well,” the article says. This is happening when billions of federal stimulus dollars are being spent on public education. How will stakeholders stay informed? At Texas School Business, we focus on positive developments in Texas public education, but that’s not to say we sugarcoat tough issues. We address difficult topics, such as school funding, by highlighting the organizations and people who are rising above these challenges. We want to highlight progress and best practices — and the dedicated people behind these achievements. Longtime political reporter Dave McNeely pens our cover story this month, providing an overview of how federal stimulus money and state policies are affecting Texas public schools. I also want to officially welcome Terry Morawski, whose column “Tech Toolbox” debuts this month. Lastly, thank you to columnist John Young for all your contributions over the years. We wish you well! I encourage you to send feedback to katie@texasschoolbusiness.com.

Katie Ford, editor

Tex. Lic. #10138

(ISSN 0563-2978 USPS 541-620) February 2010 Volume LVI, Issue 4 1601 Rio Grande Street, #441 Austin, Texas 78701 Phone: 512-478-2113 • Fax: 512-495-9955 www.texasschoolbusiness.com Publisher Ted Siff Editor in Chief Jim Walsh Editor Katie Ford Design Phaedra Strecher Columnists Riney Jordan, Terry Morawski, Jim Walsh, John Young Advertising Sales Manager Jim Johnson Business Manager Debbie Stover Director of Marketing and Customer Relations Stephen Markel Web Manager Andrew Page ISSN 0563-2978 USPS 541-620 Published monthly, except for July/August and November/ December, and for the Bragging Rights issue published in December (11 times a year) by Texas School Business Magazine, LLC, 1601 Rio Grande Street, #441, Austin, TX 78701. Periodical Postage Paid at Austin, Texas and at additional mailing offices. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Texas School Business,1601 Rio Grande Street, #441, Austin, TX 78701. SUBSCRIPTION RATES: $28 per year; $52 for two yrs; $72 for three yrs. Group rate: 10 or more, $18; single issues, $4.50.

© Copyright 2010 Texas School Business Magazine LLC February 2010 • Texas School Business

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Texas School Business • February 2010

12/18/2009 10:24:36 AM


THE LAW DAWG – unleashed by Jim Walsh

Happily ever after — or not

F

ebruary is the time to think about renewing and terminating teacher contracts. It is also the time to be thinking about Valentine’s Day, romance and marriage. What do these things have in common? I would have drawn a blank on that question until I heard Dorcas Green speak at the annual law conference sponsored by the Texas Association of School Personnel Administrators and Texas School Administrators’ Legal Digest. Green is one of my partners at the law firm. At the conference she spoke about the latest legal developments in the teacher contract nonrenewal and termination processes. The genius of her presentation was the metaphor she chose. Green explained how the Chapter 21 contract process is similar to courtship, engagement, marriage and (sometimes) divorce — the entire life cycle of a romantic relationship. A probationary contract, Green explained, means that the school district and the teacher are “engaged.” They have a relationship and both sides hope to make it a long-term deal. Like an engagement, once the probationary period is over, the school district can decide it does not want to “marry” the teacher. Termination of a probationary contract is fairly simple from a legal perspective, even if hard feelings are engendered. Sorta like breaking off an engagement. When a school offers a teacher a term contract, however, the parties are “married.” They now have a legal commitment to each other. Term contracts are usually for only one year, but they renew automatically unless someone takes action. So it is like a marriage, rocking along from one year to the next. Of course, not all marriages last forever. The district and the teacher may be “married” under a term contract, but there could be a divorce. That’s what happens when the district institutes termination or nonrenewal proceedings. Just like busting

up a marriage, ending the district/teacher marriage involves legal proceedings. You could tell from the reaction at the law conference that Green’s analogy hit home with the members of the audience — most of whom were married. One guy I talked to wondered when he was going to get that term contract from his wife. As far as he was concerned, he was now on his 28th consecutive one-year probationary contract. Another fella reported that his first marriage did not work out because he found out that his wife apparently entered into a few “non-Chapter 21 contracts” with some other guys. Green’s analogy is a good one, but perhaps we should take it a step further and incorporate some Chapter 21 practices into our personal relationships. There is the matter of annual evaluation, for example. When was the last time you conducted an evaluation of your Primary Relationship? Have you shared any relevant third-party “cumulative data” with your Significant Other in a timely fashion? Have you identified domains needing improvement — in yourself, your partner and in the relationship? My wife and I do something similar to an annual, written evaluation. Every year, in early January, we write letters to each other about the state of our marriage (both the good and the bad), our wishes for the future and our regrets from the past. We then go to a swank restaurant and read the letters. Then, we talk about it. We call this our State of the Union date, and it is one of the tools that has kept us together for almost 37 years. I recommend it. So, happy Valentine’s Day! And happy contract renewal season! JIM WALSH is editor in chief of Texas School Business. Also a school attorney, he co-founded the firm of Walsh, Anderson, Brown, Gallegos & Green PC. He can be reached at jwalsh@wabsa.com.

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TASA School Board of the Year Award Program TASA Executive Director Johnny Veselka presents 2009 Outstanding School Board plaque to Weatherford ISD School Board President Yale Young. Individual awards were presented to each board member and to WISD Superintendent Deborah Cron. This is the second time a WISD Board has earned TASA’s top honor (the last occurring in 1994 under the leadership of Joe Tison).

Superintendents—

Would you like to see your board recognized for an outstanding job?

Nominations for TASA’s 2010 School Board of the Year Award will be accepted by your Education Service Center through June 30, 2010.

Texas Association of School Administrators http://www.tasanet.org

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Texas School Business • February 2010


YOUNG’S INBOX by John Young

A public education journey

T

he longest night of my life was 22 years ago this August. Our oldest son was to begin kindergarten that morning. Until that dreaded morn, he had been ours to ourselves. A few hours after daybreak, however, he would enter a doorway and someone we didn’t know would be helping illuminate his world. Thus began an intimate relationship with Texas public schools, one that ranged from extreme frustration when policy makers sought to reduce his education to a test he thought was too easy to be taken seriously, to exhilaration when he took the microphone as class valedictorian. Serving the dual function of parent and newspaper pundit, I observed intensely a two-pronged slow march to destinations unknown at the time, leaving me at times cringing and at times rejoicing. The first prong was what our school district was doing. A year or so before my oldest son enrolled, it had passed its first bond issue in a generation, with the audacious objective of installing air-conditioning in a bunch of school buildings, including the wing my son would inhabit for three grades. That barely put Waco ISD schools on par with those of my childhood in Colorado, but it was a big step. The second prong was what the state was doing. Were it not for judges’ interventions, the “doing” would have been way too little. While ladling on mandates, lawmakers steadily resisted the imperative to pick up the state’s rightful and constitutional share of school funding. Back at the local level, I observed school board members who were absolutely resistant to anything but barebones accommodations and to any quest that did not fit within the template of standardization. Ultimately, however, through political action by involved parents, that changed. The school board became more forward-looking. I saw the district build new schools and a new

performing arts venue. Along the way, I was extremely impressed by the educators who were lighting my sons’ world. At the state level, I saw positive changes and some heroic efforts. An organization called Texas Parent PAC decided that someone needed to speak up for schools and to counter the moneyed machinations of “school choice” schemers. Right out of the chute, these activists scored stunning political victories on both sides of the political aisle. As a result, the Legislature today is more school-friendly and more reluctant to spin the wheel of dubiosity that is school vouchers. The next frontier to tame, for true friends of public schools, is the State Board of Education. Embarrassingly, it has served as a star chamber for righteous demagogues elevated to their posts because they cunningly seized a political vacuum. How a bunch of home schoolers and people who don’t truly buy into the institution of public schools could rise to govern them is one of those unfathomable turns that undermine a state’s claim to greatness. All told, when my second son graduated from Waco High School in 2006, I had to pronounce the voyage, with all of its roiling waters and stretches of uncertainty, well worth the taking. Very good people at the local level and classroom level had managed to do their jobs exceedingly well. Other parents will experience sleepless nights as they ponder the future of their children in public schools. The task of all citizens who care about the institution that has served so many so well is to keep an eye on the horizon and not let pirates of zeal hijack Texas’ most important public policy quest. JOHN YOUNG is a columnist for Cox Newspapers. This is the last “Young’s Inbox” for Texas School Business magazine. Young now lives in Fort Collins, Colo. You can send him an email at jyoungcolumn@gmail.com.

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Texas School Business • February 2010


Tech Toolbox by Terry Morawski

To Tweet or not to Tweet?

T

o Tweet or not to Tweet? That is indeed the question many school district administrators are asking themselves in this new age of social media. If you are new to the “Twitterverse,” you may find much of the language and interaction that happens on Twitter to be silly. Do not immediately dismiss the service. To many, bottled water and mobile phones also seemed like silly ideas in the beginning. By definition, Twitter is referred to as “microblogging.” Microblogging sites allow users to instantly share short updates (140-character limit), which often include links to photos, videos or online sources. To post an update on Twitter, or a “Tweet,” all users need is Internet access or text-messaging capabilities on their phones. The technology’s applications are broad, but many businesses are using Twitter in their marketing and public relations strategies. More than 18 million users access Twitter at least once a month. Twitter is a free service, so the only associated cost is your staff’s time in training, strategy and posting. The downside to Twitter (as with any free service) is that there are a large number of spammers and Internet marketers crowding the virtual space. However, similar to managing your email account, you can manage these annoyances with blocking settings. Now that you know a little bit about the service, let’s discuss some practical applications of Twitter in your school district. Soliciting feedback. Twitter can be a great way to gather feedback from the community or from staff and students. It’s not a perfect method, though. Twitter is a public site, so replies might come from outside your target audience and dilute your results.

Advice: Try Twitter as a feedback tool, but regard your results as informal. Spreading the word. Twitter is an excellent tool for broadcasting information. Tweets could range from school closings (at the district level) to field trip reminders (at the school level). Advice: Twitter should be part of your public relations strategy. Branding school leaders. School leaders, such as superintendents and principals, could be excellent ambassadors for your district on Twitter. I would caution you against having someone else write posts for an administrator, because inauthentic communications, when discovered, can backfire. If a school leader cannot commit time to communicating on Twitter, an alternative would be to create a general account for the district or school so that multiple individuals can Tweet on behalf of the organization. Advice: Be sure to have a transition plan in place if the school leader should change jobs. If you still aren’t sure whether you should add Twitter to your communications plan, you can review a list of school districts, officials and agencies on Twitter here: http://twitter. com/morate/schools. As with any new tool, there will be a learning curve for your staff. And you’ll need to consider how Twitter fits in with your communications goals. Is this the right technology to reach your target audience? Good luck! And feel free to send me questions, comments or suggestions for future columns. TERRY MORAWSKI is the assistant superintendent of communications and marketing for Mansfield ISD. He is also the incoming president of the Texas School Public Relations Association. He can be reached at terrymorawski@gmail.com.

Need-to-know Twitter lingo Follow: When a Twitter user signs up to receive updates from another Twitter user, this is called “following” a person. Your followers and the people you follow will be visible on your Twitter profile. Direct Message: When two users follow each other, they can send direct messages to one another. These messages are not visible to the general public on your Twitter profile. For documentation purposes, copies of your Twitter messages are sent to the email address associated with your Twitter account. Link Shortener: To be economical with your 140 characters, these online services will provide you a short link to save space. A few of my favorites are linkee.com and bit.ly. For example, I could include a short link to the Texas School Business site. Reply: To reply or comment to another user publicly on Twitter, first add the @ symbol to his or her username and then type your message. That user, and the Twitter community, then will assume your reply is directed to that person. Example: “@GuyKawasaki Loved your book. Nice work.” Retweet: The act of reposting another Twitter user’s Tweet. These will often include the letters “RT” at the beginning of the post and will always include attribution using an @ symbol and the original author’s username. Retweeting is a good way to share relevant or interesting posts and to build your online presence among other users. Tweet: A short update to the Twitter community. You can “lock” your account if you are using Twitter for internal communications. However, note that blocking access to social media accounts also limits your opportunities for unexpected interactions with new “followers.” Twitpic: A service that allows you to share photos via Twitter by providing links to online photo albums. Incorporating Twitpic, or a similar service, is highly recommended; most of these services are easy to use and Twitter users love to share photos.

February 2010 • Texas School Business

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Texas School Business • February 2010


TASPA hosts winter conference in Austin

Georgia Lane and Pamela Onick of El Paso ISD.

Sandi Morgan and Katy Pruitt of Bryan ISD.

Ina Tamez of Rio Hondo ISD and Jake Wyatt of Schertz-Cibolo-Universal City ISD.

Karen Heeth of Spring Branch ISD and Carmen Lawson of Leander ISD.

Christine Muzik and Mary Pena of Lamar CISD.

Diana Green and Janis Edwards of La Porte ISD.

Aide Boggs and Cyndy Pullen of Brazosport ISD.

John Hancock and Daniel Coward of Amarillo ISD.

Herry Espinosa of Galena Park ISD and Al Rodriguez of Elgin ISD.

Mark Beaty of Seminole ISD and Chris Riggins of Lamesa ISD. February 2010 • Texas School Business

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TSB Calendar

Professional Development & EVENTS

WEEK OF MARCH 1 March 3 TASSP Region 17 meeting Lubbock High School, Liberty For more info, (512) 443-2100. www.tassp.org

March 4

SHARS Billing & Financial Cost Reporting Contact us for Professional School-Based Medicaid Services at an Affordable Cost

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March 4-6

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Texas Middle School Association annual conference Convention Center, Arlington For more info, (512) 462-1105. www.tmsanet.org

March 5 Advanced PEIMS Workshop Location TBA, Garland For more info, 462-1711. www.tasbo.org

March 6

School’s Closed…

What’s Tonight’s Assignment?

TESA Area Workshop Galena Park ISD office (Houston area) For more info, (512) 477-0724. www.tesatexas.org

March 6-8 ASCD Annual Conference Henry B. Gonzalez Convention Center, San Antonio For more info, (512) 477-6361 or (800) 725-8272. www.txascd.org

March 6-10 Texas High School Athletic Directors Association State Conference Omni Hotel, San Antonio For more info, (210) 735-9331. www.thsada.com

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WEEK OF MARCH 8 March 10 TASSP Region 11 Meeting Joe T. Garcia’s, Fort Worth For more info, (512) 443-2100. www.tassp.org

March 10 Texas Counseling Association CEU Workshop: Taking Care of Business 14

Texas School Business • February 2010


for LPCs and School Counselors Ysleta ISD central office, El Paso For more info, (512) 472-3403 or (800) 580-8144. www.txca.org

Cost: Preregistration, $100; on-site registration, $125.

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March 11-12 Mentoring the Reflective Principal, Session 2 TASA office, Austin For more info, (512) 477-6361 or (800) 725-8272. www.tasaonline.org

Cost: TASA members, $1,575; nonmembers, $1,825. Teams: $1,450 per person for members; $1,700, nonmembers.

WEEK OF MARCH 15 No events listed.

WEEK OF MARCH 22 March 22-24 50 Ways to Close the Achievement Gap: Leaving No Child Behind Hyatt Regency on the Riverwalk, San Antonio For more info, (512) 477-6361 or (800) 725-8272. www.tasaonline.org

Cost: Members, $595; nonmembers, $725. March 23

TASSP Region 14 Meeting Abilene Country Club, Abilene For more info, (512) 443-2100. www.tassp.org Federal and State Compliance Issues Workshop ESC Region 1, Edinburg For more info, (512) 462-1711. www.tasbo.org

Tell them about the Online Principal Program from Region 4. In addition to principal certification, they would also become eligible for central office administration positions. Visit www.Region4ACP.net to find out more.

March 24

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TASSP Region 10 Meeting Spring Creek BBQ, Richardson For more info, (512) 443-2100. www.tassp.org

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See CALENDAR on page 18 February 2010 • Texas School Business

15


Capitol Ideas Dave McNeely discusses the politics and developments affecting public education in Texas

T

he continually roiling waters of public school spending in Texas can be confusing to ordinary folks – and with good reason, with acronyms like WADA (Weighted Average Daily Attendance) and LEA (local education agency) being thrown around. Meanwhile, schools are often the tail wagged by several different dogs. Add in the federal stimulus program, student testing, a hot governor’s race in Texas, and the national-versus-state standards involved in the Obama administration’s “Race to the Top” scholastic ranking initiative (gasp for air!) and things get even more complex. Then there are the who-tells-whomto-do-what-and-who-pays-for-it squabbles. State legislators complain about the feds attaching to federal money requirements that amount to mandates. School officials often grouse that state legislators hand down directives without enough money to carry them out. What those dispensing the money see as due diligence, fiscal caution and good governance are often regarded by the recipients as unnecessary meddling and micromanagement. The confusion, and accompanying expressions of concern about Bossy Big Brother in Washington, ramped up in 2009 because of the federal government’s economic stimulus program, known as the American Recovery Reinvestment Act (ARRA), and the “Race to the Top” competition. Gov. Rick Perry has blasted the stimulus program as too much interference from Washington, even while officially accepting almost all of the money allocated for Texas.

Of the approximately $16 billion in federal stimulus money designated for Texas over two years, at least $6.4 billion is to be spent on public education. Top Texas legislative officials in the 2009 legislative session, however, wanted to balance the state’s budget without dipping into its $9.1 billion Rainy Day Fund. Consequently, the state government allocated half of the education stimulus money to replace funds it already was supposed to spend on schools. Of the remainder, $2.2 billion is dedicated to at-risk students and special education, and $1 billion to construction bonds. “That doesn’t help school districts pay for bus drivers, fix the roof or pay other operating expenses,” said Catherine Clark of the Texas Association of School Boards. She was interviewed by Laylan Copelin, a former and longtime reporter Catherine Clark on the Austin AmericanStatesman’s Capitol staff. He now works at the State Comptroller’s Office and is helping track and explain the distribution of the stimulus funds. Clark told Copelin, who writes a periodic column called “On the Money” for the comptroller’s Web site, that school officials across Texas know the stimulus money is a fleeting thing. The extra cash to spur the economy won’t be around after the two-year distribution period ends. What that means, Clark said, is that spending the stimulus money on new personnel is risky. “You fund new salaries at your peril,” she said. “There’s a cliff at the end of this.” Frances Koch, who is the Victoria ISD executive director of budget and finance, told the Victoria Advocate that her schools, before the stimulus, were to receive $43.9 million from the state government. But under the federal stimulus formula, the district will get $39.5 million. It had to apply to the federal government for another $4.3 million to make up the difference, Koch said.

Target investments for stimulus funds in Texas

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Texas School Business • February 2010

Increase efforts to institute rigorous post-secondary standards and highquality assessments.

Ensure continued improvements in teacher effectiveness and support the equitable distribution of qualified teachers across the state.

Enhance pre-kindergarten to post-secondary data systems that track progress and foster continuous improvement.

Expand the state’s support and effective interventions for the lowestperforming schools.


Tracy Young, a spokesperson for Texas House Speaker Joe Straus, told the Victoria newspaper that the state set up the process that way “mainly to keep track of how districts are using the funds.” Some districts prefer people to computers In Edna, near Victoria, Superintendent Bob Wells said his schools used the stimulus money to create two new positions. “We hired a math and science coordinator to make sure we’re doing the best we can in our instruction… ,” Wells told the Victoria newspaper. Victoria ISD Superintendent Bob Moore said the uncertainty about funding has him nervous. “We don’t know what the future holds,” Moore said. “It really puts pressure on the Legislature to make sure once federal Bob Moore funds are gone that they look at a continual fund of revenue.” Even in the face of the one-time nature of the stimulus money, Austin ISD also is using a sizable chunk of its allocation to create 91.5 new jobs. That’s partly because some of the money is earmarked for at-risk and special education students, and it can’t be spent at the district’s discretion. Austin ISD legislative liaison Christy Rome quips that it won’t sit well with the people who are hired if their jobs disappear in two years. But helping students requires people, Rome says. So the district is hiring them, anyway, hoping it will be able to absorb the new recruits and associated costs after the stimulus money runs out. Austin ISD invited district residents to participate in meetings and an online survey to solicit suggestions on how to deal with the projected shortfall for the 2010-2011 fiscal year. New Superintendent Meria Carstarphen Meria Carstarphen, in her first “State of the District” speech in mid-November, voiced the angst many school officials feel as they look toward 2010-2011 and beyond. “Now we’re getting to the part that makes everyone nervous — how do we fund our schools so they are effective and our students are successful while maintaining our budget integrity?” Carstarphen said. “We all know too well the state of our economic climate. Our school system is anything but immune to the turbulence the state is facing, with double-digit sales tax

declines coupled with our own local property tax declines. “The most recent news we’ve received from our appraisal district projects a drop of 8 percent in commercial property values for AISD, which increases our projected $15 million deficit to close to $20 million,” Carstarphen continued. “These austere conditions necessitate tough-minded budget tradeoffs.” Tighten the state belt? To help prepare for a projected shortfall that faces the Legislature in 2011, Lt. Gov. David Dewhurst, presiding officer of the Texas Senate, is suggesting that state agencies cut their budgets by 2.5 percent during the current two-year spending period. However, Dewhurst would exempt education and health and human services from that request, he told the Austin AmericanStatesman’s editorial board. State Sen. Dan Patrick, a Houston Republican and arguably the most conservative member of the Senate, nonetheless is pondering new sources of state revenue to shore up school budgets. Texas is one of a handful of states that does not have an income tax and relies primarily on local property taxes to fund schools. Patrick told the Houston Chronicle that he was polling school superintendents in his district as to whether they would favor an increase in the state sales tax to aid education funding. “I believe our property taxes are maxed out,” Patrick said. Race to the top Late in the year, Gov. Perry took issue with the Obama administration’s effort to get states to participate in the development of national standards for reading and math as part of a competition for $4.6 billion in federal money earmarked for Rick Perry educational innovations. Perry’s jawboning against Washington’s intrusion comes on the heels of his campaign for the Republican nomination in the March 2 primary against his most formidable challenger, U.S. Sen. Kay Bailey Hutchison. She is, by his account, a Washington insider, and Perry’s campaign has blasted most everything that has to do with the federal government. In a Nov. 23 letter, the governor directed Texas Education Commissioner Robert Scott, a former gubernatorial aide, to spurn the Obama administration’s effort to get Texas to join every state but Alaska in developing national standards for English and

Tracking stimulus money on the Web Here are some Web sites that publish information and updates on stimulus funding: Texas Education Agency www.tea.state.tx.us (see ARRA link on home page) Texas Comptroller’s Office www.window.state.tx.us/recovery/ transparency/tracking.php Federal government www.recovery.gov math — an effort led by the National Governors Association and the Council of Chief State School Officers. “Texas is already ahead of most other states in setting college- and career-ready standards in our schools,” Perry wrote. “The citizens of Texas, not the federal government, know what is best for our children. As the federal government continues its sweeping expansion of federal authority from the financial, energy and health care systems, it is now attempting to increase its intrusion into Texas classrooms.” Scott dutifully sent a letter to Texas’ congressional delegation echoing Perry’s contention that Texas leads other states in developing tough standards. The U.S. Department of Education seems to be “placing its desire for a federal takeover of public education above the interests of the 4.7 million schoolchildren in the state of Texas by setting two different starting lines — one for nearly every other state in the country and one for Texas,” Scott wrote. “Because Texas has chosen to preserve its sovereign authority to determine what is appropriate for Texas children to learn in its public schools, the state is now placed at a serious disadvantage in competing for its share of [the grant money].” U.S. Rep. Lloyd Doggett, D-Austin, says that Texas’ refusal to work with other states on developing common standards hurts students in the Lone Star State. “Other states want to race to the top, but Gov. Perry remains determined Lloyd Doggett to pursue an ideologically driven race to the bottom,” Doggett says. And those are just some of the currents swirling around public education in Texas. If it seems contentious — and confusing — that’s probably because it is. TSB February 2010 • Texas School Business

17


TSB Calendar

Professional Development & EVENTS

CALENDAR continued from page 15

March 26-28 Celebrating Educational Opportunities for Students of All Cultures (Arizona/California/New Mexico/Texas) Grand Resort Hotel, Phoenix For more info, (800) 580-8272, ext. 6171. www.tasb.org

March 27

March 29

TESA Area Workshop Pasadena ISD office For more info, (512) 477-0724. www.tesatexas.org

Three Ps: Payroll, PEIMS and Personnel Location TBA, Corpus Christi For more info, (512) 462-1711. www.tasbo.org

WEEK OF MARCH 29 March 29 TAGT Leadership Conference Marriott Airport South, Austin For more info, (512) 499-8248. www.txgifted.org

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March 31 Critical Issues Influence Institute ESC Region 13, Austin For more info, (512) 477-8200 or (800) 717-2723. www.txascd.org

March 31 TASB Spring Workshop Texas A&M University, Kingsville For more info, (800) 580-8272, ext. 2241. www.tasb.org

March 31 TASSP Region 6 Meeting Magnolia High School, Magnolia For more info, (512) 443-2100. www.tassp.org

March 31 TASSP Region 4 Meeting McAdams Junior High School, Dickinson For more info, (512) 443-2100. www.tassp.org

April 1

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18

Texas School Business • February 2010

TASSP Region 5 Meeting Hardin-Jefferson High School, Sour Lake For more info, (512) 443-2100. www.tassp.org

WEEK OF APRIL 5 April 7 TACS East Texas Conference Ornelas Activity Center, University of Texas at Tyler For more info, (512) 440-8227. www.tacsnet.org

April 7 TASSP Region 18 Meeting Location TBA, Midland For more info, (512) 443-2100. www.tassp.org

April 8 Fixing Special Education: Celebrating What is Right, Addressing What is Wrong Henry B. Gonzalez Convention Center, San Antonio


TSB Calendar

Professional Development & EVENTS

For more info, (512) 478-2113. www.legaldigest.com

Cost: Early registration (by March 19), $70; regular registration (after March 19), $90. April 8-11

NAESP Annual Convention Brown Convention Center, Houston For more info, (512) 478-5268. www.tepsa.org

April 9

TCASE/Legal Digest Conference Henry B. Gonzalez Convention Center, San Antonio For more info, (512) 478-2113. www.legaldigest.com

Cost: Early registration (by March 9), $135 online, $160 offline. Regular registration (after March 9): $160 online, $185 offline.

WEEK OF APRIL 12 April 13-15

April 15-16 Mentoring the Reflective Principal, Session 3 TASA offices, Austin For more info, (512) 477-6361 or (800) 725-8272. www.tasaonline.org

Cost: TASA members, $1,575; nonmembers, $1,825. Teams: $1,450 per person for members; $1,700, nonmembers. April 16 Texas Small Schools Symposium Location TBA, Mt. Pleasant For more info, (512) 462-1711. www.tasbo.org

April 17 TESA Area Workshop Killeen ISD offices For more info, (512) 477-0724. www.tesatexas.org

April 22 Annual TCASE/Legal Digest Conference Convention Center, Arlington For more info, (512) 478-2113. www.legaldigest.com

Cost: Early registration (by March 22), $135 online, $160 offline. Regular registration (after March 22), $160 online, $185 offline.

WEEK OF APRIL 26 April 26 Three Ps: Payroll, PEIMS and Personnel Location TBA, Lubbock For more info, (512) 462-1711. www.tasbo.org

April 27 TACS/Hardin Simmons Conference Hardin Simmons University, Stephenville For more info, (512) 440-8227. www.tacsnet.org

Texas Retired Teachers Association Annual Convention Convention Center, Arlington For more info, (800) 880-1650. www.trta.org

WEEK OF APRIL 19

April 28

Cost: Preregistration (by March 22), $20. After March 22, $25.

TASB Spring Training Workshop ESC Region 17, Lubbock For more info, (800) 580-8272, ext. 2241. www.tasb.org

April 14

April 20

April 28

First-Time Superintendents’ Academy, Session 4 Marriott North Hotel, Round Rock For more info, (512) 477-6361 or (800) 725-8272. www.tasaonline.org

Cost: Four sessions, $595; one session, $195. April 14

TASSP Region 1 Meeting Science Academy of South Texas, Mercedes For more info, (512) 443-2100. www.tassp.org

April 15

TASB Spring Training Workshop Tarleton State University, Stephenville For more info, (800) 580-8272, ext. 2241. www.tasb.org

April 15

TASSP Region 13 Meeting Liberty Hill High School, Liberty Hill For more info, (512) 443-2100. www.tassp.org

April 20

Federal and State Compliance Issues Location TBA, Beaumont For more info, (512) 462-1711. www.tasbo.org

TASB Spring Training Workshop ESC Region 9, Wichita Falls For more info, (800) 580-8272, ext. 2241. www.tasb.org

TASB Spring Training Workshop ESC Region 4, Houston For more info, (800) 580-8272, ext. 2241. www.tasb.org

April 20

WEEK OF MAY 3

TCASE/Legal Digest Conference Convention Center, Arlington For more info, (512) 478-2113. www.legaldigest.com

May 3

Cost: Early registration (by March 20), $150; regular registration (after March 20), $175. April 22 TASB Spring Training Workshop Cattleman’s Steakhouse, Fabens For more info, (800) 580-8272, ext. 2241. www.tasb.org

April 22 TASB Spring Training Workshop ESC Region 18, Midland For more info, (800) 580-8272, ext. 2241. www.tasb.org

Three Ps: Payroll, PEIMS and Personnel Location TBA, Huntsville For more info, (512) 462-1711. www.tasbo.org

May 5 TASB Spring Training Workshop Sul Ross State University, Alpine For more info, (800) 580-8272, ext. 2241. www.tasb.org

May 6

Using Graphic Organizers and Assessment Tools to Make Mathematics Content More Accessible to Struggling Students See CALENDAR on page 20 February 2010 • Texas School Business

19


TSB Calendar

Professional Development & EVENTS

CALENDAR continued from page 19

Joyce Zotz Education Center, Galena Park ISD For more info, (800) 717-2723. www.txascd.org

Cost: Texas ASCD members and Galena Park ISD staff, $750; others, $850. May 6

TASB Spring Training Workshop Sul Ross State University, Uvalde

For more info, (800) 580-8272, ext. 2241. www.tasb.org

WEEK OF MAY 10 May 13

TASB Spring Training Workshop ESC Region 14, Abilene For more info, (800) 580-8272, ext. 2241. www.tasb.org

May 13

TASB Spring Training Workshop Temple High School, Temple For more info, (800) 580-8272, ext. 2241. www.tasb.org

May 14-15

TASB Spring Training Workshop Convention Center, South Padre Island For more info, (512)467-0222. www.tasb.org

WEEK OF MAY 17 May 18

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TASB Spring Training Workshop Stephen F. Austin State University, Nacogdoches For more info, (800) 580-8272, ext. 2241. www.tasb.org

May 18

TASB Spring Training Workshop Texas A&M University, Commerce For more info, (800) 580-8272, ext. 2241. www.tasb.org

May 19

TASB Spring Training Workshop West Texas A&M University, Canyon For more info, (800) 580-8272, ext. 2241. www.tasb.org

May 19

TASB Spring Training Workshop Parkway Church, Victoria For more info, (800) 580-8272, ext. 2241. www.tasb.org

May 20

Board2Board Session: Board Focus Location TBA, Nacogdoches For more info, (512) 535-2046 www.foundationinnovation.com

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WEEK OF MAY 24 May 26

TASB Spring Training Workshop ESC Region 6, Huntsville For more info, (800) 580-8272, ext. 2241. www.tasb.org

WEEK OF MAY 31 No events listed.

20

Texas School Business • February 2010

TSB


Who’s News Abilene ISD Heath Burns comes to Abilene ISD as the new superintendent from Angleton ISD, where he served in the same capacity. He has been a teacher at Lamar University, Port Neches-Grove High School and Tomball High School. He began Heath Burns his administrative career as principal of Assumption Catholic School. He then was a principal in Livingston ISD before taking on the role of superintendent of Anderson-Shiro CISD, serving there for four years before taking the top job in Angleton. Burns earned both his bachelor’s and master’s degrees from Lamar University, with certifications in English, speech, physical education and special education. His doctorate in educational leadership is from Sam Houston State University. Bastrop ISD Steve Murray has been named superintendent. He joins the district from Little Elm ISD, where he also was superintendent. Additionally, he has served as superintendent for La Vernia ISD and deputy superintendent for Del Valle Steve Murray ISD. He began his education career as a teacher and coach in Klein ISD, and he has been a principal in Marble Falls, Brenham, Katy and Wimberley ISDs. Murray’s bachelor’s degree is from Stephen F. Austin State University and his master’s degree is from Southwest Texas State University (now Texas State University), where he also earned his mid-management certification; his superintendent certification is from Texas A&M University. A new campus, Cedar Creek High School, will open for the 2010-2011 school year with Russell Sassin as its principal. He currently serves as an assistant principal of Akins High School in Austin ISD, where he will remain until Russell Sassin taking on his new position. He began his career teaching world geography in Angleton ISD, and then he taught in Alvin ISD, where he subsequently served as facilitator and coordinator of alternative education. He was an associate principal of Clear Lake and Clear Creek high schools in Clear Creek ISD, and an associate principal of Westlake High School in Eanes ISD. Be-

fore assuming his duties at Akins High, he was an education specialist for ESC Region 13. Sassin’s bachelor’s degree in history is from Sam Houston State University and his master’s degree in education management is from the University of Houston at Clear Lake. Brenham ISD Byron McAdams is the district’s new assistant superintendent. He was most recently superintendent of Devine ISD. He holds a bachelor’s degree from the University of Houston and a master’s degree from Stephen F. Austin State University. Brownsville ISD Brownsville ISD trustees unanimously selected Brett Springston as superintendent. Springston had been serving as the district’s interim superintendent since January 2009 after a 26-year career in education. Prior to being named interim Brett Springston superintendent, Springston worked in Brownsville ISD as the assistant superintendent for operations and as an area assistant superintendent. He was also a high school principal in three Texas school districts: Judson, Spring Branch and Lamar Consolidated. During his tenure in Spring Branch ISD, Springston’s high school was selected as one of three winners of the U.S. Department of Education’s National Awards for Model Professional Development. His background in education also includes experience as a junior high school principal, assistant principal, and coach for both high school and junior college basketball teams. Springston obtained his superintendent certification from Prairie View A&M University. He earned his master of education degree from Sul Ross State University and holds a bachelor of science degree from The University of Texas at Tyler. He is completing a doctoral degree in educational leadership. Springston is a member of several professional organizations, including Rotary International. Clear Creek ISD Jamey Majewski will serve as principal of a new intermediate school, yet to be named, that is scheduled to open in the fall of 2010. The school will be part of Clear Creek ISD’s Education Village, an arrangement in which an elementary school, intermediate school and high school share common prop-

erty, connect at the center of the property and share a kitchen. This project is the only one of its kind in Texas. Majewski currently serves as the district’s director of human resources for secondary education. Jamey Majewski He was associate principal of Clear Creek High School’s Ninth Grade Center and served five years as an assistant principal of Clear Creek High. His bachelor’s degree in business administration is from Texas A&M University and his master of science degree in education administration is from the University of Houston at Clear Lake. Cypress-Fairbanks ISD Stacia Carew, currently assistant principal of Cypress Woods High School, will serve as principal of Bleyl Middle School, replacing Barbara Crook, who is retiring. A 13-year veteran of Texas public education, she began her career in Aldine ISD as a language arts and reading teacher and Title I and parent involvement coordinator; she later served as the curriculum assistant principal at Carver Magnet High School. She came to Cypress-Fairbanks ISD in 2007 as an assistant principal at Aragon Middle School, where she remained until taking the lead role at Cypress Woods High in 2008. Carew’s bachelor of science degree in education is from Sam Houston State University, and her master of education degree is from the University of Houston. Fort Worth ISD Fort Worth ISD’s first single-gender school, the Young Women’s Leadership Academy, will have Mia Hall as its principal when it opens in August. A member of Fort Worth ISD’s staff since 2002, Hall taught social studies at Elder Middle School for three years before being named assistant principal of Eastern Hills High School. In 2008, she was appointed principal of the Center for New Lives, one of the district’s alternative schools. Hall has a bachelor of arts degree from The University of Texas and a master’s degree in educational administration from The University of Texas at Arlington. L. Hank Johnson has been named chief financial officer. With more than 20 years of school finance experience, he is a certified public accountant and most recently served as chief financial officer of Grapevine-Colleyville ISD. He also has been associated with Richardson and Plano ISDs. See WHO’S NEWS on page 22 February 2010 • Texas School Business

21


Who’s News WHO’S NEWS continued from page 21

Johnson is a graduate of Midwestern State University in Wichita Falls, where he taught accounting courses while working with a private accounting firm. Goose Creek ISD The new director of bilingual/ESL education is Norma Picacio-Jones. She comes to her new job from Horace Mann Junior High, where she was assistant principal. Prior to serving in Goose Creek ISD, she spent 15 years as a teacher, Norma assistant principal and adPicacio-Jones ministrator in Killeen ISD. She has two bachelor’s degrees, in English and history, from the University of Hawaii. She earned her master’s degree in curriculum and instruction from Tarleton State University. Tom Kelchner has been appointed director of special education. He comes to Goose Creek ISD from Dallas ISD, where he was a teacher; a principal at the elementary, middle school and high school levels; Tom Kelchner and dean of instruction. He also has served as president of the Dallas School Administrators Association and as a hearing officer for Dallas ISD. Additionally, he taught in Fort Worth and Hurst-Euless-Bedford ISDs and in private schools. Kelchner earned his bachelor’s degree from Texas Christian University, a master’s degree in educational administration from the University of North Texas, and a master’s degree in special education from The University of Texas at Dallas. His doctorate of education is from the University of North Texas. Highland Park ISD (Region 10) Rebecca Nagy Cormey has been appointed teacher on special assignment for math. Cormey comes to the district from Atlanta, Ga., where she was lead instructional coach and curriculum support speRebecca Nagy cialist in mathematics for Fulton County Schools. Cormey She also served as an el22

Texas School Business • February 2010

ementary math specialist, team leader and classroom teacher in the Seattle and Redmond, Wash., school districts. Says Highland Park ISD Assistant Superintendent for Curriculum, Instruction and Special Programs Gena Gardiner: “She is a proven leader who is well respected by her peers across the nation, and  we know she will be an invaluable part of our team here.” “My work over the past several years has focused on supporting teachers to increase their math content knowledge and to move toward student-centered instruction,” Cormey says. She attended the University of Oregon, where she earned a bachelor’s degree in elementary education. Houston ISD Tina Medlin has been named president of the Houston ISD Foundation, where she will work closely with the district’s leadership, the foundation’s board of directors, Houston business leaders and the philanthropic community to raise awareness and funds for Houston ISD’s programs supporting literacy, math and science. She has spent 18 years leading higher education and health care advancement programs and has worked with university leaders to raise nearly $100 million in capital efforts, major endowments, and deferred and annual gifts. She has been associated with The University of Texas Health Science Center, the Memorial Hermann Foundation, Project GRAD Houston and the Asia Society Texas Center. Medlin is a graduate of The University of Texas. Lago Vista ISD Matt Underwood is the new superintendent. An educator since 1994, he began his career as a teacher and coach in Boerne ISD, becoming an assistant principal for that district in 1997. He then served as assistant principal of Matt Underwood Lampasas Middle School before transferring to Mason ISD in 2000 to serve as Mason High School’s principal for two years. His next assignment was principal of Llano ISD’s middle school, where he remained for a year before returning to Mason as the district’s superintendent, a position he held until accepting his new role in Lago Vista. Underwood earned his bachelor of arts degree in history from Texas State University and his master of education degree from Texas A&M University. His superin-

tendent certification is from Angelo State University, and he has done post-graduate work at Lamar University. Little Elm ISD Kent Crutsinger has been named Little Elm ISD’s interim superintendent, stepping in for Steve Murray, who has accepted the position of superintendent in Bastrop ISD. Crutsinger had been serving as the district’s deputy superinKent Crutsinger tendent for administrative services. He has been with Little Elm ISD for nine years, initially serving as assistant superintendent of facilities and planning; he then was interim superintendent in 2003. His career began in Sanger ISD, where he was a teacher and coach before serving as assistant principal and principal of Sanger High School. He also was superintendent of Pilot Point ISD. Crutsinger earned a bachelor of science degree in education from North Texas State University, and his master of education degree is from Texas Woman’s University. Lubbock ISD The district’s new assistant director of curriculum and instruction is Lisa S. Leach, former assistant superintendent of Roosevelt ISD and an adjunct professor at Wayland Baptist University. She taught high school science in LubLisa S. Leach bock ISD for 10 years before serving as ESC Region 17’s curriculum coordinator. Leach earned her bachelor’s degree from Vanguard University in Costa Mesa, Calif. Her master’s degree in biological sciences is from California Polytechnic University in San Luis Obispo; her doctorate is from Texas Tech University. New Braunfels ISD The new superintendent is Randy Moczygemba, who has been serving as the district’s assistant superintendent for business and operations since June 2007. He began his career as an agricultural science teacher in Post ISD and Randy was the principal of WilMoczygemba son ISD’s high school and See WHO’S NEWS on page 24


TASBO PRESIDENT profile Becky Estrada has a head for business and a heart for education By Elizabeth Millard

W

hen thinking back on her childhood, Rebecca “Becky” Estrada isn’t surprised that she chose to enter the educational field at a young age. As kids, she and her three siblings often played “school,” at their mother’s prompting. Both parents placed a heavy emphasis on learning, even though neither of them had reached high school. “As immigrant workers, they didn’t have the opportunity for education, but they really instilled in us a love for school,” recalls Estrada, who officially is retired but still serves as business manager for Lackland ISD. “In the summer, we’d write book reports and play games like ‘Name all 50 capitals.’ Part of it was my mom keeping the four of us out of trouble, but I think it did create a path for me.” This month Estrada became president of the Texas Association of School Business Officials (TASBO), tapping her years of experience in education to tackle the role. Estrada began working in education while attending Southside High School, in Southside ISD, in 1975. She worked as a clerical aide in the vocational education program during her senior year; after graduation, she became a bilingual teacher’s aide at the school. Estrada then moved to Harlandale ISD to assume the role of continuing education secretary, followed by a promotion to auxiliary personnel secretary. She was taking classes at Palo Alto College at the time, but it was her autodidactic studies that truly made a difference in her next career move. “I’d taught myself how to use computers in the mid-80s, when everything was ‘stop/start’ commands,” she says. When the director of Harlandale ISD’s data processing center resigned, the superintendent put Estrada in the job, which she described as “crash training.” In 1991, after getting her undergraduate degree from Incarnate Word College, Estrada returned to Southside ISD to serve as the director of data resources. A

Business Manager Becky Estrada (at left) presents a financial report to the Lackland ISD Board of Trustees. Estrada says she enjoys the challenge of serving a school district where military service greatly affects student enrollment numbers and funding is always an issue.

few years later, she expanded her skills by becoming the district’s business manager and then the assistant superintendent for business and fiscal services. Even in a high-level position, her desire to keep learning didn’t fade. In 2000, Estrada earned a master of business administration from Our Lady of the Lake University. When the opportunity arose in 2002 to become the business manager at Lackland ISD, she decided to make the leap, mainly because the district is so distinctive, Estrada says. Located entirely within the boundaries of Lackland Air Force Base, the district has about 950 students, as well as a number of issues that other districts may not face, such as a student population that’s fairly transient. Most students only stay in the district about two to three years before

a military parent is transferred. Lackland ISD administration, consequently, has to stay flexible in accommodating incoming students. It’s a situation that presents a funding challenge, Estrada notes, especially because the district doesn’t receive any tax money. Instead, it receives funds from the Department of Education. “Part of my excitement about coming to Lackland ISD was the different twist on the funding structure,” Estrada says, adding that she enjoys managing so many different areas of business. “Because we’re such a very small district, I handle accounting, such as payables, but also operational needs, like construction and food maintenance — and somehow they all come together.” See PROFILE on page 25 February 2010 • Texas School Business

23


Who’s News

WHO’S NEWS continued from page 22

middle school from 1987 to 1990. He was with Lamesa ISD from 1990 to 1999, serving as the district’s assistant superintendent, high school principal and assistant principal. Prior to arriving in New Braunfels in 2007, he was superintendent of Medina ISD. He earned both his bachelor’s and master’s degrees from Texas Tech University.

Pecos-Barstow-Toyah ISD Santos Lujan begins his 38th year as an educator as the district’s new superintendent. His career has included stints as director of bands in Reagan County ISD and Raymondville ISD, where he also served as director of business and operations (assistant superintendent) and superintendent. He was superintendent of Kermit ISD from 2001 until accepting his new position. Lujan earned both his bachelor’s and master’s

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degrees from West Texas State University; his mid-management certification is from The University of Texas – Pan American, and his superintendent certification is from The University of Texas at Brownsville. Round Rock ISD The district’s 10th and newest middle school, Cpl. Robert P. Hernandez Middle School, will open in August with Deborah Brennan serving as the principal. This year, the school operates as Stony Point Ninth Grade CenDeborah Brennan ter, but it will revert to a middle school at the beginning of the 20102011 school year. Currently associate principal of Stony Point High School, Brennan has 11 years’ experience as a middle school and high school teacher; she came to Round Rock ISD from Colorado, where she served as an administrator. Brennan earned her bachelor’s degree from the University of Central Oklahoma and her master’s degree in educational leadership and special education from the University of Northern Colorado. Her doctorate in special education is also from that institution. Rebecca Lavender will be the principal of another new school scheduled to open next year, Chandler Oaks Elementary. For the past nine years, Lavender has been principal of Anderson Mill Elementary, where she will remain Rebecca Lavender until her replacement is named. She also has spent five years as an assistant principal in Round Rock ISD. Before becoming an administrator, Lavender taught in Round Rock and Ysleta ISDs. She has a bachelor of arts degree in history and a master’s degree in education administration, both from The University of Texas at El Paso. San Marcos CISD Superintendent Patty Shafer has been named Superintendent of the Year by the Greater Austin Chamber of Commerce. The announcement was made at the chamber’s State of Education Luncheon. Shafer began her career teachPatty Shafer ing math in San Antonio See WHO’S NEWS on page 26

24

Texas School Business • February 2010


PROFILE continued from page 23

Although Estrada handles a wealth of tasks, she only works part time and is officially retired, having entered the Teachers Retirement System two years ago. While not working for the district, Estrada focuses on TASBO duties; she teaches numerous classes on financial and management issues, such as how to prepare a district for an IRS audit. “I love teaching and presenting and sharing best practices,” she says, “but I also love being part of a district and covering all the crucial functions.” Fortunately, Estrada can do both now, and she credits TASBO for giving her many of the resources that brought her to this point. As a member for a number of years, she has taken countless classes and networked through the organization; she calls TASBO “one of the best survival mechanisms” for school business officials. Estrada was first asked to teach a TASBO-sponsored class in 2002 with Pattie Griffin, who became past president when Estrada stepped up to bat. “It was so exciting to be given the chance to teach; I just really enjoyed it,” Estrada says. The involvement brought her deeper into the organization, as she became part of research committees and helped develop curricula. She notes, “I got more involved in the mission of TASBO, and I wanted to be part of it more and more.” Now as president of TASBO, Estrada intends to keep teaching, and to work with staff and the board of directors on growing the organization. She would like to further strengthen the group’s curricula and certification courses, because she feels those areas especially are gathering momentum and recognition. “It’s pleasing to see a job announcement for a business official that mentions they prefer a TASBO certification; it means that our training is being seen as valuable, and we want to be able to further develop that so it continues to be recognized,” she says. A particular focus for Estrada will be making sure that TASBO is keeping up with the needs of members who are trying to get training, but who have limited budgets. Toward that end, the group is producing more Webinars and beefing up its online community so that members can stay in touch. Estrada says, “It’s all about meeting the needs of members, and we think that

the more we increase digital options for training, the more members we can reach.” When asked about her hobbies and how she enjoys her free time, Estrada laughs. She notes that even her mother teases her about working harder now than she did before she retired. But Estrada did get remarried recently and she has grandchildren from a previous marriage, so her spare time is directed toward friends and family. Many years ago, Estrada was widowed, and she dealt with her grief by

working long hours — sometimes up to 24 hours at a stretch. But Estrada now feels she has hit the right balance to keep up her personal happiness and her professional enthusiasm. “It’s important to keep that balance, to laugh a lot and enjoy life,” she says. “My goal is for nothing to ever become a burden, and I think I’ve done well in reaching that. I truly enjoy what I do every day.” ELIZABETH MILLARD is a freelance writer who also contributes to nationally distributed District Administration magazine.

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Who’s News WHO’S NEWS continued from page 24

largest student population among Texas’ 20 service centers. While there, she coordinated the education service center’s quality management system and its response in assisting districts that were providing services to hurricanes Rita and Katrina evacuees. Shafer earned her bachelor’s degree in secondary education from Southwest Texas State University (now Texas State University) and a master’s degree in guidance and counseling from the University of Houston at Victoria. Her doctorate in educational

ISD and went on to teach English and math in Calhoun County ISD. She then became an elementary and secondary counselor, an elementary and middle school principal and a director of instruction for Calhoun County ISD. She also was superintendent of Liberty and Utopia ISDs. Prior to coming to San Marcos CISD in 2007, she served as deputy director of ESC Region 4 in Houston, which serves the

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leadership is from Nova Southeastern University in Fort Lauderdale, Fla. Texarkana ISD Georgette Duke, director of risk management and children’s services, has received her designation as a certified school risk manager from the National Alliance for Insurance Education and Research. The CSRM designation Georgette Duke requires the completion of five courses with examinations. Annual updates to further knowledge and maintain standing are also mandatory. Duke has been with Texarkana ISD since 1996, serving as a teacher at Nash, Kennedy and Highland Park elementary schools. She became coordinator of child care services for the district’s Tiger learning centers in 1998. In 2001, she took on the additional responsibilities of safety, repair and compliance for district playgrounds. In 2008, she became the director of risk management and child care services and an administrative intern for child nutrition. Victoria ISD Lisa Blundell is on tap to serve as the principal of Cade Middle School, which is slated to open in 2010-2011. While preparing for the school’s inaugural year, she will continue in her present position as principal of Crain Middle School, where she has served since 2004. Prior to taking on middle school administrative duties, she spent six years as principal of Shields Magnet School. Blundell has been with Victoria ISD since 1988, serving as an elementary school assistant principal, teacher and math specialist. She earned her bachelor of science degree in education and her master of education degree in administration and supervision from the University of Houston at Victoria. TSB

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In the

Spotlight

Assistant Superintendent Scott Layne has grand designs for Irving ISD by Whitney Angstadt

I

f, when he was a child, you had asked Irving ISD Assistant Superintendent for Support Services Scott Layne where he would live and work as a grownup, he most likely wouldn’t have thought about Texas — or a career in education, for that matter. Born and raised in Central Illinois, Layne followed his childhood dream of being an architect all the way to the University of Illinois at UrbanaChampagne, where he received a bachelor of science degree in architectural studies in 1982. The youngest of nine siblings, Layne’s brothers and sisters were scattered all over the country by the time he graduated. On a whim, he followed a brother to Texas to start a career in architecture; however, Layne quickly met some unexpected challenges. “The economy wasn’t good at that time,” he says. “It was difficult to find a job in architecture; firms just weren’t hiring.” Eventually, he found a job as an architectural draftsman for Katy ISD. He started out working with the consulting architect to design additions and renovations for existing schools in the district, located 30 miles west of Houston. Little did Layne realize, that this job would kick off a rewarding career in public education. When, within two years, Katy ISD implemented an in-house construction program, Layne’s role was expanded from assisting the consulting architect to working closely with the entire planning department on larger-scale projects. Collaborating with the assistant superintendent for planning, the consulting architect and the construction manager, Layne developed design criteria and goals for new and existing buildings in Katy ISD. Just three years into his work with Katy ISD, Layne was put in charge of the newly installed, computerized energy management system and all of the district’s

Assistant Superintendent for Support Services Scott Layne (right) works with Assistant Superintendent for Teaching and Learning Marie Morris (center) and other Irving ISD administrators on school planning issues.

telecommunications operations. With that responsibility, his title changed to energy management/telecommunications specialist and Layne’s career path veered in a new direction. With his technical know-how, a gift for learning things quickly and a constant eye on the big picture, Layne headed to Midland ISD in West Texas in 1988 to assume the position of energy manager. The following year, he was promoted to director of school plant services, adding maintenance and grounds duties to his repertoire of experience. In 1991, he moved on to Irving ISD to take on bigger challenges. Since 2006, he has served as the district’s assistant superintendent of support services. In this role, Layne has worked tirelessly to ensure that every school’s immediate maintenance and safety needs are met, as well as their long-range needs — from

replacing carpet and mechanical systems to interior and exterior painting. Always with an eye on the future, Layne also has served as district liaison for the 1997, 2001 and 2007 bond referendums — all of which were successful. “There are people who maintain and people who build. I’m a builder,” Layne says. “I want to keep moving forward. I want my people to be progressive and forward-thinking.” Layne has found a good match in his current employer. “Irving ISD is constantly looking for new ways to grow and to make a difference. The community is very supportive of this too,” he says. “I could have the greatest ideas in the world, but without the support of the district and the parents, I wouldn’t accomplish anything.” Layne is active in numerous organizations, including the Texas Association See SPOTLIGHT on page 28 February 2010 • Texas School Business

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SPOTLIGHT continued from page 27

of School Business Officials (TASBO), the Association of School Business Officials, the North Texas Maintenance and Operations Association, the Association of Energy Engineers and the Council of Educational Facility Planners International. In 2003, TASBO honored him with its first-ever Above and Beyond Award, which it now bestows annually to TASBO members who demonstrate service in their districts and communities that extends beyond their job responsibilities.

Staying true to his forward-thinking nature, Layne’s next big undertaking is to spearhead an initiative to build the first net-zero energy school in Texas — in Irving ISD. Only a handful in the country, net-zero schools incorporate new and emerging technologies to produce as much renewable energy as it will use over the course of a year. The schools utilize solar panels, windmill turbines, rainwater collection, daylight harvesting, and geothermal heating and cooling systems to produce energy for daily operations. The schools themselves become the ultimate

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‘There are people who maintain and people who build. I’m a builder. I want to keep moving forward. I want my people to be progressive and forward-thinking.’ teaching tool for kids learning about the environment and alternative energies. “Nonrenewable energy and our dependence on foreign oil are serious issues that our children will have to face,” says Layne. “Fifth graders already know what has to be done. They know more than we adults do sometimes. We would be doing them a disservice by not making ourselves an example. We have the opportunity to tie the school itself into the curriculum. “[A net-zero energy school] would be great for the district, but it would be great for the state of Texas too,” he says. Layne, 50, says he derives great satisfaction from knowing his work makes a positive difference in the lives of Irving ISD’s schoolchildren. “Working for a school district, everything we do is for the children — to make their lives better and to give them a better chance at a successful future,” Layne says. “Everything ties back to the education of these kids, and no matter what job you’re doing, you are constantly reminded that that is the goal.” After nearly 20 years in educational services, Layne seems to be exactly where he’s meant to be. “Maybe it’s because I’m getting old or because I have my own kids now, but I see how important it is to do what you can to help the next generation,” he says. “When I get home from work every night, I ask myself, ‘What did I do today to make a difference?’ With this job, every day I can say that something I did will impact a kid.” When asked what the secret of his success is, Layne keeps it simple. “My philosophy is to work hard. Work really hard. Be patient and be positive, and good things are going to happen,” he says. WHITNEY ANGSTADT is a freelance writer in Austin.

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Texas School Business • February 2010


ESC Region 4 hosts national conference in Austin for Association of Educational Service Centers

Keila Sandridge of Region 16 and Don Rogers of Region 13.

Judy Lisewsky and Scot Goen of Region 15.

Carmen Moreno and Doris Delaney of Region 4.

Sydney Roach and Karla Weatherly, both of Region 16.

Gerald Cobb and Linda Tinnerman of Region 4.

Mackey Ervin and Bob Garcia of Region 4 with guest Jane Garcia (center).

Pat Pringle and Buddy Lorenz of Region 13.

Shirley Sanford of Region 13 with Angela Bishop and Bill McKinney of Region 4.

Steve Overton, Elvia Flores and Charlie Williams of Region 10.

John McCauley, Jeffrey Stone and Rick Alvarado, all of Region 20. February 2010 • Texas School Business

29


THE BACK PAGE Advertisers Index

by Riney Jordan

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Above and beyond the call of duty

I

’ve never seen it listed as a qualification on a job application. I don’t think I’ve ever heard it asked during an interview. But if there were a way to find out whether or not an individual is accustomed to going above and beyond what was expected, wouldn’t he or she most likely make an incredible employee? “Above and beyond the call of duty” is the way most of us have heard it. I actually “Googled” the phrase and found that there were more than 968,000 search results associated with it. I also discovered that the phrase is an idiom. (I’ve used that word a few times when describing someone I thought was a complete moron.) But basically, “above and beyond the call of duty” means “one who does much more than is expected.” Folks who research origins of idioms and metaphors will tell you that this phrase initially was reserved for police officers, firefighters, or soldiers lauded for heroic efforts. Well, I think the definition needs to be expanded to include educators who do more than what is expected. Lately, it seems, I’ve been hearing more stories from teachers who routinely go above and beyond the call of duty. Take, for example, a third grade teacher who recently took a day of her Christmas holidays to attend the funeral of the mother of one of her students. During a time of year when kids should be allowed to stay up late, sleep in and look forward to surprises, this little girl got the biggest surprise of all: the death of her mother. On short notice, this teacher left her family and drove across town to an unfamiliar neighborhood because she cared. I’m sure this little girl will never forget running to her teacher, throwing her arms around her and sobbing her little heart out. Nowhere in a school district handbook does it state that you are to be there for the students 24 hours a day, seven days a week, come rain or shine. It states that you should be able to do your job in 185 days,

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Texas School Business • February 2010

7:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. But I bet there’s not an educator around who has a heart for the teaching profession and believes that. I remember Coach Gordon Wood telling me some of those “above and beyond” stories as I sat in his living room in Brownwood. At that time, he had coached more teams to state championships than anybody in the country. You know what he told me? He said, “Riney, it wasn’t just the game of football I had to teach. It was the game of life.” Then, for an hour or so, he told stories of kids who needed more than just a coach; they needed someone who was willing to go above and beyond. Coach Wood said he once drove all night to get to the Texas-Mexico border to pay a fine that released one of his students from jail. “We had a good father-son talk for the next six hours,” Wood said. “He was a different kid after that.” Coach Wood developed pneumonia, suffered a heart attack and died a few months after our visit. Above and beyond the call of duty. That third grade teacher did it when she made certain that she was there for a student who had lost her mother. Coach Wood did it almost daily during his 43 seasons. And right now, as you are reading this, there is a person in education going above and beyond the call of duty. Oh, it might be a coach, a secretary, a principal, a custodian, a bus driver or a superintendent, but you can bet that it happens more often than any of us realize. Because they don’t do it for the glory; they do it for the kids. Above and beyond. What a difference it would make if we all followed that philosophy! RINEY JORDAN, whose best-selling book, “All the Difference,” is now in its sixth printing, is an international speaker and humorist. He can be reached at riney@htcomp.net or by visiting www.rineyjordan.com.

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Vernon ISD Neches ISD Northwest ISD Overton ISD adise ISD Pearsall ISD Pittsburg ISD Plano ISD Riesel ISD Rockdale ISD Rockwall ISD Rogers ISD Rosebud-Lott ISD Royse City ISD S&S CISD Salado ISD Springtown ISD Sulphur Springs ISD Taylor ISD Terrell ISD Troy ISD Van Als boro ISD Alvarado ISD Anna ISD Bland ISD Bridgeport ISD Brownsville ISD Caddo Mills ISD Campbell ISD Celeste ISD Celina ISD Center ISD China Spring ISD Chisum ISD Clifton ISD Clint ISD Comanche ISD Commerce ISD Con ISD Copperas Cove ISD Corsicana ISD Decatur ISD DeSoto ISD Durant ISD Elgin ISD Elkhart ISD Fairfield ISD Glen Rose ISD Greenville ISD Groesbeck ISD Hays CISD Kaufman ISD Kemp ISD Krum ISD Leonard ISD Lewisville ISD Li ne Oak ISD Lytle ISD Mabank ISD Melissa ISD Meridian ISD Mildred ISD Mt. Vernon ISD Neches ISD Northwest ISD Overton ISD Palestine ISD Paradise ISD Pearsall ISD Pittsburg ISD Plano ISD Riesel ISD Rockdale ISD Rockwall ISD sebud-Lott ISD Royse City ISD S&S CISD Salado ISD Springtown ISD Sulphur Springs ISD Taylor ISD Terrell ISD Troy ISD Van Alstyne ISD Whitesboro ISD Sulphur Springs ISD Taylor ISD Terrell ISD Troy ISD Van Alstyne ISD Whitesboro D Anna ISD Bland ISD Bridgeport ISD Brownsville ISD Caddo Mills ISD Campbell ISD Celeste ISD Celina ISD Center ISD China Spring ISD Chisum ISD Clifton ISD Clint ISD Comanche ISD Commerce ISD Connally ISD Cooper ISD C D Corsicana ISD Decatur ISD DeSoto ISD Durant ISD Elgin ISD Elkhart ISD Fairfield ISD Glen Rose ISD Greenville ISD Groesbeck ISD Hays CISD Kaufman ISD Kemp ISD Krum ISD Leonard ISD Lewisville ISD Livingston ISD Lone D Mabank ISD Melissa ISD Meridian ISD Mildred ISD Mt. Vernon ISD Neches ISD Northwest ISD Overton ISD Palestine ISD Paradise ISD Pearsall ISD Pittsburg ISD Plano ISD Riesel ISD Rockdale ISD Rockwall ISD Rogers ISD Rose yse City ISD S&S CISD Salado ISD Springtown ISD Sulphur Springs ISD Taylor ISD Terrell ISD Troy ISD Van Alstyne ISD Whitesboro ISD Alvarado ISD Anna ISD Bland ISD Bridgeport ISD Brownsville ISD Caddo Mills ISD Campbell ISD ina ISD Center ISD China Spring ISD Chisum ISD Clifton ISD Clint ISD Comanche ISD Commerce ISD Connally ISD Cooper ISD Copperas Cove ISD Corsicana ISD Decatur ISD DeSoto ISD Durant ISD Elgin ISD Elkhart ISD Fairfield D Greenville ISD Groesbeck ISD Hays CISD Kaufman ISD Kemp ISD Krum ISD Leonard ISD Lewisville ISD Livingston ISD Lone Oak ISD Lytle ISD Mabank ISD Melissa ISD Meridian ISD Mildred ISD Mt. Vernon ISD Neches ISD North n ISD Palestine ISD Paradise ISD Pearsall ISD Pittsburg ISD Plano ISD Riesel ISD Rockdale ISD Rockwall ISD Rogers ISD Rosebud-Lott ISD Royse City ISD S&S CISD Salado ISD Springtown ISD Sulphur Springs ISD Taylor ISD Terrell n Alstyne ISD Whitesboro ISD Alvarado ISD Anna ISD Bland ISD Bridgeport ISD Brownsville ISD Caddo Mills ISD Campbell ISD Celeste ISD Celina ISD Center ISD China Spring ISD Chisum ISD Clifton ISD Clint ISD Comanche ISD Co nnally ISD Cooper ISD Copperas Cove ISD Corsicana ISD Decatur ISD DeSoto ISD Durant ISD Elgin ISD Elkhart ISD Fairfield ISD Glen Rose ISD Greenville ISD Groesbeck ISD Hays CISD Kaufman ISD Kemp ISD Krum ISD Leonard IS D Livingston ISD Lone Oak ISD Lytle ISD Mabank ISD Melissa ISD Meridian ISD Mildred ISD Mt. Vernon ISD Neches ISD Northwest ISD Overton ISD Palestine ISD Paradise ISD Pearsall ISD Pittsburg ISD Plano ISD Riesel ISD Rock ll ISD Rogers ISD Rosebud-Lott ISD Royse City ISD S&S CISD Salado ISD Springtown ISD Sulphur Springs ISD Taylor ISD Terrell ISD Troy ISD Van Alstyne ISD Whitesboro ISD Alvarado ISD Anna ISD Bland ISD Bridgeport ISD Brown Mills ISD Campbell ISD Celeste ISD Celina ISD Center ISD China Spring ISD Chisum ISD Clifton ISD Clint ISD Comanche ISD Commerce ISD Connally ISD Cooper ISD Copperas Cove ISD Corsicana ISD Decatur ISD DeSoto ISD Du D Elkhart ISD Fairfield ISD Glen Rose ISD Greenville ISD Groesbeck ISD Hays CISD Kaufman ISD Kemp ISD Krum ISD Leonard ISD Lewisville ISD Livingston ISD Lone Oak ISD Lytle ISD Mabank ISD Melissa ISD Meridian ISD Mildred ISD Neches ISD Northwest ISD Overton ISD Palestine ISD Paradise ISD Pearsall ISD Pittsburg ISD Plano ISD Riesel ISD Rockdale ISD Rockwall ISD Rogers ISD Rosebud-Lott ISD Royse City ISD S&S CISD Salado ISD Springtown ISD ISD Taylor ISD Terrell ISD Troy ISD Van Alstyne ISD Whitesboro ISD Alvarado ISD Anna ISD Bland ISD Bridgeport ISD Brownsville ISD Caddo Mills ISD Campbell ISD Celeste ISD Celina ISD Center ISD China Spring ISD Chisum ISD C D Comanche ISD Commerce ISD Connally ISD Cooper ISD Copperas Cove ISD Corsicana ISD Decatur ISD DeSoto ISD Durant ISD Elgin ISD Elkhart ISD Fairfield ISD Glen Rose ISD Greenville ISD Groesbeck ISD Hays CISD Kaufman IS um ISD Leonard ISD Lewisville ISD Livingston ISD Lone Oak ISD Lytle ISD Mabank ISD Melissa ISD Meridian ISD Mildred ISD Mt. Vernon ISD Neches ISD Northwest ISD Overton ISD Palestine ISD Paradise ISD Pearsall ISD Pitts SD Riesel ISD Rockdale ISD Rockwall ISD Rogers ISD Rosebud-Lott ISD Royse City ISD S&S CISD Salado ISD Springtown ISD Sulphur Springs ISD Taylor ISD Terrell ISD Troy ISD Van Alstyne ISD Whitesboro ISD Alvarado ISD Anna IS dgeport ISD Brownsville ISD Caddo Mills ISD Campbell ISD Celeste ISD Celina ISD Center ISD China Spring ISD Chisum ISD Clifton ISD Clint ISD Comanche ISD Commerce ISD Connally ISD Cooper ISD Copperas Cove ISD Cors r ISD DeSoto ISD Durant ISD Elgin ISD Elkhart ISD Fairfield ISD Glen Rose ISD Greenville ISD Groesbeck ISD Hays CISD Kaufman ISD Kemp ISD Krum ISD Leonard ISD Lewisville ISD Livingston ISD Lone Oak ISD Lytle ISD Mabank D Meridian ISD Mildred ISD Mt. Vernon ISD Neches ISD Northwest ISD Overton ISD Palestine ISD Paradise ISD Pearsall ISD Pittsburg ISD Plano ISD Riesel ISD Rockdale ISD Rockwall ISD Rogers ISD Rosebud-Lott ISD Royse City ISD SD Springtown ISD Sulphur Springs ISD Taylor ISD Terrell ISD Troy ISD Van Alstyne ISD Whitesboro ISD Alvarado ISD Anna ISD Bland ISD Bridgeport ISD Brownsville ISD Caddo Mills ISD Campbell ISD Celeste ISD Celina ISD C pring ISD Chisum ISD Clifton ISD Clint ISD Comanche ISD Commerce ISD Connally ISD Cooper ISD Copperas Cove ISD Corsicana ISD Decatur ISD DeSoto ISD Durant ISD Elgin ISD Elkhart ISD Fairfield ISD Glen Rose ISD Gree eck ISD Hays CISD Kaufman ISD Kemp ISD Krum ISD Leonard ISD Lewisville ISD Livingston ISD Lone Oak ISD Lytle ISD Mabank ISD Melissa ISD Meridian ISD Mildred ISD Mt. Vernon ISD Neches ISD Northwest ISD Overton ISD adise ISD Pearsall ISD Pittsburg ISD Plano ISD Riesel ISD Rockdale ISD Rockwall ISD Rogers ISD Rosebud-Lott ISD Royse City ISD S&S CISD Salado ISD Springtown ISD Sulphur Springs ISD Taylor ISD Terrell ISD Troy ISD Van Als boro ISD Alvarado ISD Anna ISD Bland ISD Bridgeport ISD Brownsville ISD Caddo Mills ISD Campbell ISD Celeste ISD Celina ISD Center ISD China Spring ISD Chisum ISD Clifton ISD Clint ISD Comanche ISD Commerce ISD Con ISD Copperas Cove ISD Corsicana ISD Decatur ISD DeSoto ISD Durant ISD Elgin ISD Elkhart ISD Fairfield ISD Glen Rose ISD Greenville ISD Groesbeck ISD Hays CISD Kaufman ISD Kemp ISD Krum ISD Leonard ISD Lewisville ISD Li ne Oak ISD Lytle ISD Mabank ISD Melissa ISD Meridian ISD Mildred ISD Mt. Vernon ISD Neches ISD Northwest ISD Overton ISD Palestine ISD Paradise ISD Pearsall ISD Pittsburg ISD Plano ISD Riesel ISD Rockdale ISD Rockwall ISD sebud-Lott ISD Royse City ISD S&S CISD Salado ISD Springtown ISD Sulphur Springs ISD Taylor ISD Terrell ISD Troy ISD Van Alstyne ISD Whitesboro ISD Alvarado ISD Anna ISD Bland ISD Bridgeport ISD Brownsville ISD Caddo ell ISD Celeste ISD Celina ISD Center ISD China Spring ISD Chisum ISD Clifton ISD Clint ISD Comanche ISD Commerce ISD Connally ISD Cooper ISD Copperas Cove ISD Corsicana ISD Decatur ISD DeSoto ISD Durant ISD Elgin ISD rfield ISD Glen Rose ISD Greenville ISD Groesbeck ISD Hays CISD Kaufman ISD Kemp ISD Krum ISD Leonard ISD Lewisville ISD Livingston ISD Lone Oak ISD Lytle ISD Mabank ISD Melissa ISD Meridian ISD Mildred ISD Mt. Ve ISD Northwest ISD Overton ISD Palestine ISD Paradise ISD Pearsall ISD Pittsburg ISD Plano ISD Riesel ISD Rockdale ISD Rockwall ISD Rogers ISD Rosebud-Lott ISD Royse City ISD S&S CISD Salado ISD Springtown ISD Sulphur Sp SD Terrell ISD Troy ISD Van Alstyne ISD Whitesboro ISD Alvarado ISD Anna ISD Bland ISD Bridgeport ISD Brownsville ISD Caddo Mills ISD Campbell ISD Celeste ISD Celina ISD Center ISD China Spring ISD Chisum ISD Clifton ISD che ISD Commerce ISD Connally ISD Cooper ISD Copperas Cove ISD Corsicana ISD Decatur ISD DeSoto ISD Durant ISD Elgin ISD Elkhart ISD Fairfield ISD Glen Rose ISD Greenville ISD Groesbeck ISD Hays CISD Kaufman ISD Kemp I onard ISD Lewisville ISD Livingston ISD Lone Oak ISD Lytle ISD Mabank ISD Melissa ISD Meridian ISD Mildred ISD Mt. Vernon ISD Neches ISD Northwest ISD Overton ISD Palestine ISD Paradise ISD Pearsall ISD Pittsburg ISD Plan Rockdale ISD Rockwall ISD Rogers ISD Rosebud-Lott ISD Royse City ISD S&S CISD Salado ISD Springtown ISD Sulphur Springs ISD Taylor ISD Terrell ISD Troy ISD Van Alstyne ISD Whitesboro ISD Alvarado ISD Anna ISD Bland ISD Br ownsville ISD Caddo Mills ISD Campbell ISD Celeste ISD Celina ISD Center ISD China Spring ISD Chisum ISD Clifton ISD Clint ISD Comanche ISD Commerce ISD Connally ISD Cooper ISD Copperas Cove ISD Corsicana ISD De ISD Durant ISD Elgin ISD Elkhart ISD Fairfield ISD Glen Rose ISD Greenville ISD Groesbeck ISD Hays CISD Kaufman ISD Kemp ISD Krum ISD Leonard ISD Lewisville ISD Livingston ISD Lone Oak ISD Lytle ISD Mabank ISD Melissa IS Mildred ISD Mt. Vernon ISD Neches ISD Northwest ISD Overton ISD Palestine ISD Paradise ISD Pearsall ISD Pittsburg ISD Plano ISD Riesel ISD Rockdale ISD Rockwall ISD Rogers ISD Rosebud-Lott ISD Royse City ISD S&S CISD Sa | DALLAS | AUSTIN | www.claycomb.net | own ISD Sulphur Springs ISD Taylor ISD Terrell ISD Troy ISD Van Alstyne ISD Whitesboro ISD Alvarado ISD Anna ISD Bland ISD Bridgeport ISD Brownsville ISD Caddo Mills ISD Campbell ISD Celeste ISD Celina ISD Center ISD Chin sum ISD Clifton ISD Clint ISD Comanche ISD Commerce ISD Connally ISD Cooper ISD Copperas Cove ISD Corsicana ISD Decatur ISD DeSoto ISD Durant ISD Elgin ISD Elkhart ISD Fairfield ISD Glen Rose ISD Greenville ISD Groes SD Kaufman ISD Kemp ISD Krum ISD Leonard ISD Lewisville ISD Livingston ISD Lone Oak ISD Lytle ISD Mabank ISD Melissa ISD Meridian ISD Mildred ISD Mt. Vernon ISD Neches ISD Northwest ISD Overton ISD Palestine ISD Par ISD Pittsburg ISD Plano ISD Riesel ISD Rockdale ISD Rockwall ISD Rogers ISD Rosebud-Lott ISD Royse City ISD S&S CISD Salado ISD Springtown ISD Sulphur Springs ISD Taylor ISD Terrell ISD Troy ISD Van Alstyne ISD Whitesbor ISD Anna ISD Bland ISD Bridgeport ISD Brownsville ISD Caddo Mills ISD Campbell ISD Celeste ISD Celina ISD Center ISD China Spring ISD Chisum ISD Clifton ISD Clint ISD Comanche ISD Commerce ISD Connally ISD Cooper ISD C D Corsicana ISD Decatur ISD DeSoto ISD Durant ISD Elgin ISD Elkhart ISD Fairfield ISD Glen Rose ISD Greenville ISD Groesbeck ISD Hays CISD Kaufman ISD Kemp ISD Krum ISD Leonard ISD Lewisville ISD Livingston ISD Lone D Mabank ISD Melissa ISD Meridian ISD Mildred ISD Mt. Vernon ISD Neches ISD Northwest ISD Overton ISD Palestine ISD Paradise ISD Pearsall ISD Pittsburg ISD Plano ISD Riesel ISD Rockdale ISD Rockwall ISD Rogers ISD Rose yse City ISD S&S CISD Salado ISD Springtown ISD Sulphur Springs ISD Taylor ISD Terrell ISD Troy ISD Van Alstyne ISD Whitesboro ISD Alvarado ISD Anna ISD Bland ISD Bridgeport ISD Brownsville ISD Caddo Mills ISD Campbell ISD ina ISD Center ISD China Spring ISD Chisum ISD Clifton ISD Clint ISD Comanche ISD Commerce ISD Connally ISD Cooper ISD Copperas Cove ISD Corsicana ISD Decatur ISD DeSoto ISD Durant ISD Elgin ISD Elkhart ISD Fairfield D Greenville ISD Groesbeck ISD Hays CISD Kaufman ISD Kemp ISD Krum ISD Leonard ISD Lewisville ISD Livingston ISD Lone Oak ISD Lytle ISD Mabank ISD Melissa ISD Meridian ISD Mildred ISD Mt. Vernon ISD Neches ISD North

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