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TEXAS ASSOCIATION OF SCHOOL ADMINISTRATORS QUARTERLY PUBLICATION

FALL 2002

INSIGHT Keep the children in mind


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INSIGHT F

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TASA Legislative Perspective by Michael Hinojosa Highlights significant challenges for the impending legislative session and emphasizes that TASA’s Governmental Relations staff and Legislative Committee are prepared to move forward

Ready to Serve by Karen Soehnge Urges all educators to convey to their legislators their concern about and interest in providing new and more flexible monies for public education

Elementary and Secondary Education Act and No Child Left Behind Act, 2001— Parent Notice/Information Requirements by TransACT Communications, Inc. Summarizes the parent notice/information requirements of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act and No Child Left Behind Act, 2001

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Leader to Leader: Meeting State and Federal Accountability Requirements

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Book Summary: Learning by Heart

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Need Graduate Follow-Up?

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by Gina Friedman Offers a report on the first of two national meetings addressing implementation of the No Child Left Behind Act

by Diane Fisher Provides motivation and an understanding of the change process as well as some practical strategies that may be used to achieve the vision of better schools and better teaching

Explains LifeTrack Services’ proven system and powerful public relations tool that provides a cost-effective way to utilize graduate feedback as a way to demonstrate accountability to all stakeholders

Region 5 PIA/IPDP Center—The Full Story by Dorman Moore and Sandra K. Ellington Gives an overview of the Region 5 PIA/IPDP Center, including a self-assessment process (PIA) and an individualized professional development plan (IPDP), emphasizing research parameters and confidentiality FALL 2002 3


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2002 Superintendent of the Year, New TASA associate executive director for governmental relations, 2002 Outstanding School Board, TASA Past President seeks position on AASA Executive Committee

President’s Message Pull in the same direction

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Executive Director’s View Clearly focused

The Leader Paraprofessionals—a good investment in your district’s future, review of Edutopia: Success Stories for Learning in the Digital Age, board briefs

INSIGHT Officers

At-Large Members

Don Gibson, President, Wall ISD Dawson R. Orr, President-Elect, Pampa ISD Michael Hinojosa, Vice-President, Spring ISD Leonard E. Merrell, Past President, Katy ISD

Dana S. Marable, Marble Falls ISD Hector Montenegro, Dallas ISD Debra K. Nelson, Frisco ISD Ronald Peace, Victoria ISD

Executive Committee

Editorial Advisory Committee

Eliseo Ruiz, Jr. , Los Fresnos, 1 Henry D. Herrera, Alice ISD, 2 Tom R. Jones, Jr., Tidehaven ISD, 3 Rick Berry, Cypress-Fairbanks ISD, 4 Gail Krohn, Nederland ISD, 5 Dorman C. Jackson, Crockett ISD, 6 Dee W. Hartt, Tatum ISD, 7 R. Lynn Marshall, Pittsburg ISD, 8 Randel R. Beaver, Archer City ISD, 9 Kay Waggoner, Red Oak ISD, 10 Vernon N. Newsom, Mansfield ISD, 11 George Kazanas, China Spring ISD, 12 Ron Reaves, New Braunfels ISD, 13 Rick Howard, Comanche ISD, 14 Billy Jack Rankin, Bangs ISD, 15 Danny R. Cochran, Boys Ranch ISD, 16 Ken McCraw, Lamesa ISD, 17 David Kennedy, Terrell County ISD, 18 Paul Vranish, Tornillo ISD, 19 Alton J. Fields, Pleasanton ISD, 20

Don Gibson, Wall ISD, chair Alton J. Fields, Pleasanton ISD Michael Hinojosa, Spring ISD Rick Howard, Comanche ISD John R. Hoyle, Texas A&M University Debra K. Nelson, Frisco ISD Vernon N. Newsom, Mansfield ISD Dawson R. Orr, Pampa ISD

TASA Headquarters Staff Johnny L. Veselka, Executive Director Ellen V. Bell, Associate Executive Director, Professional Development Karen Soehnge, Associate Executive Director, Governmental Relations Paul Whitton, Jr., Associate Executive Director, Administrative Services Dian Cooper, Assistant Executive Director, Professional Development Ann M. Halstead, Assistant Executive Director, Technology & Information Systems Amy T. Turner, Assistant Executive Director, Governmental Relations Gina Friedman, Director, Communications Pat Johnston, Director, Special Services Emily Starr, Design/Production Karen Limb, Editorial Coordinator Neal W. Adams, TASA General Counsel, Adams, Lynch, & Loftin—Bedford

Advertising For information on advertising in INSIGHT, contact Ann Halstead, TASA, 512-477-6361. INSIGHT is published quarterly by the Texas Association of School Administrators, 406 East 11th Street, Austin, Texas, 78701-2617. Subscription is included in TASA membership dues. © 2002 by TASA. All rights reserved. TASA members may reprint articles in limited quantities for in-house educational use. Articles in INSIGHT are expressions of the author or interviewee and do not necessarily represent the views or policies of TASA. Advertisements do not necessarily carry the endorsement of the Texas Association of School Administrators. INSIGHT is printed by Thomas Graphics, Austin, Texas.

FALL 2002 5


NEWS WIRE

Michael Hinojosa Named 2002 Superintendent of the Year Michael Hinojosa, formerly of Hays CISD (Region 13), now at Spring ISD, was named Superintendent of the Year by the Texas Association of School Boards at the TASA/TASB Convention in Dallas, September 29. Hinojosa led Hays CISD for five years before moving to the superintendent post at Spring ISD this August. He holds a bachelor’s degree from Texas Tech University, master of education degree from the University of North Texas, and doctorate from The University of Texas at Austin. Of note to the selection committee was Hinojosa’s ability to build community support during an

attendance zone change without conflict, and completion of numerous facility projects to serve some 7,700 students. Another highlight was the implementation of an education foundation that supplies laptop computers and hosts an annual celebration for the top 10 percent students. Other finalists for the prestigious award were Rick Schneider, Pasadena ISD (Region 4); Margaret Davis, Pleasant Grove ISD (Region 8); Elizabeth Abernethy, nominated by Hereford ISD (Region 16), now at Region 7; and Patrick L. Henderson, Lubbock-Cooper ISD (Region 17).

Karen Soehnge Named New TASA Associate Executive Director for Governmental Relations Karen Soehnge joined the TASA staff on October 15 as associate executive director for governmental relations, filling the vacancy created by the resignation of Louann Martinez. Soehnge most recently served as executive director for curriculum, staff development, and accountability in Katy ISD. She was previously employed by TASA as assistant executive director for governmental relations (1997–1999).

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During that time she represented the association in working with the legislature, State Board for Educator Certification, and State Board of Education. Soehnge has served in various teaching and administrative positions in Texas school districts, including curriculum supervisor K–12 in El Campo ISD (1996–97); elementary principal in Palacios ISD (1994–96); education specialist in ESC Region 3, Victoria (1991–94); and teacher in Yoakum ISD (1986–91). She received her Ph.D. in educational administration from The University of Texas at Austin in 2002, and earned her B.S. and M.Ed. degrees from the University of Houston at Victoria.


Cypress-Fairbanks ISD Named 2002 Outstanding School Board of Texas The Cypress-Fairbanks ISD (Region 4) Board of Trustees was named the Outstanding School Board of Texas for 2002 by TASA at the TASA/TASB Convention in Dallas, September 28. Members of the board are Lou Bertoli, president; Lida Woodul, vice-president; Terry Newcomer, secretary; and Alton Frailey, Al Martinez, Jr., William O’Brien, and Don Ryan. The board was nominated by Superintendent Richard E. Berry. In presenting the award, the TASA School Board Awards Committee cited the board’s team approach to governance; strong commitment

to maintaining academic excellence; and vision, commitment, and dedication to providing a quality education for the children in its district. Also honored as 2002 Texas Honor School Boards were Bronte (Region 15), Llano (Region 13), Northwest (Region 11), and Quinlan (Region 10) ISDs. Two other boards were recognized as Regional Honor Boards—Bullard (Region 7) and Mathis (Region 2) ISDs. (See photos on page 28)

TASA Past President Leonard Merrell Seeks Position on AASA Executive Committee

When choosing an engineering firm, it’s best to go by the numbers.

AASA voting members will elect a president-elect and two members of the Executive Committee in 2003. Ballots for the 2003 AASA Election will be mailed to all voting members following the Annual Conference & Exposition, February 20–23 in New Orleans. New officers are installed at the AASA Leadership Conference and officially take office on July 1. Biographical information on the candidates and their responses to major education issues can be accessed at AASA’s Web site, www.aasa.org. 2003 AASA CANDIDATES President-Elect Donald L. Kussmaul East Dubuque Unit School District 119 East Dubuque, Illinois Executive Committee Leonard E. Merrell Katy ISD Katy, Texas Daniel D. Curry Wood County Schools Parkersburg, West Virginia

Charles Collis Lyle III Long Beach School District Long Beach, Mississippi Kay E. Royster Peoria Public Schools Peoria, Illinois

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President’s

MESSAGE

Pull in the Same Direction As successful candidates from the November 5 election celebrate their recent victories, TASA is actively preparing for the upcoming legislative session. This issue of INSIGHT contains an insert of TASA’s 2003 Legislative Program, which was developed by the TASA Legislative Committee based upon input from TASA members across the state. It serves as a guide for both association staff and members in handling the swelling number of legislative issues that will impact the operations of our public schools. It comes as no surprise to any of us that obtaining additional funds for public schools is the number one issue that captures our attention, and will be that of legislators as they debate the issue of school finance. With 250 districts at the $1.50 tax cap and more than 400 districts at or above $1.45 tax rate, there are no means to increase revenue at the local level. In addition, the 78th Legislature must focus on other issues impacting public schools, including school choice, school vouchers, children’s health, school start date, and the increasing shortage of certified teachers. Undoubtedly, each of us has felt a sense of frustration and helplessness in dealing with legislative matters. It is imperative to remember that a unified voice can and does make a difference. As education leaders, we can have a monumental impact on the total process. That impact is strengthened and improved when we join forces and pull in the same direction. I encourage each of you to familiarize yourself with TASA’s legislative program and garner support in your respective district for Texas public schools.

FALL 2002 9


Executive Director’s VIEW

Clearly Focused Although the 2002 elections are now history, the results of the November 7 election will weigh heavily on the issues and the debate to follow in the coming legislative session. By the time you read this message, the Interim Joint Select Committee on Public School Finance likely will have finalized its report on alternatives for school funding. As expected, there is little that is “new” in the report. Yet, it presents a framework that, hopefully, will give guidance to the 78th Legislature in addressing its most important challenge—finding a way to solve the school finance crisis and avoid jeopardizing the successes that have been achieved by school districts across the state. At TASA, we are clearly focused on the legislative priorities established by our Legislative and Executive Committees and are preparing to represent your views effectively during the 140-day session that begins on January 14. In addition to addressing issues related to school finance, accountability, assessment, and teacher recruitment, TASA vigorously will oppose efforts to enact a voucher plan. The legislature, however, is not our only focus. Critical decisions affecting every aspect of public school operations require our constant attention. Setting the passing standards for the TAKS test may have been just the beginning of a protracted discussion regarding implementation of the new assessment requirements, the Student Success Initiative, the determination of Adequate Yearly Progress, and the establishment of new accountability standards. Our staff is closely monitoring the work of TEA and SBEC on No Child Left Behind, especially advocating flexibility for local school districts as guidelines are developed. Within the last few weeks we also have initiated and encouraged discussions with TEA staff about the agency’s audit requirements for the use of compensatory education funds and procedures related to District Effectiveness and Compliance (DEC) monitoring. We are confident that greater flexibility can be achieved in both of these areas. We have assembled an outstanding team of staff members and legislative consultants to represent TASA members. Our team is led by Karen Soehnge, associate executive director for governmental relations, and Amy Turner, assistant executive director for governmental relations. Our external consultants are David Thompson, attorney, Bracewell and Patterson; Neal Adams, general counsel; Beamon Floyd; and Louann Martinez. We look forward to your feedback and participation as we effect state policy development. In closing, as we approach the holiday season, I want to take this opportunity to express my appreciation for your support of our association. I wish each of you, and your family, a very special and joyous holiday.

FALL 2002 11


TASA Legislative Perspective by Michael Hinojosa The impending legislative session will certainly challenge educators in the state. With the budget shortfall projected to be very significant, it will be necessary to stay focused on major priorities. The changing political landscape will create new leadership in very significant roles. The Texas Legislature will have a new Speaker of the House, a new lieutenant governor, and significant changes in chairmanship of most of the key committees.

70,000 students in Texas each year, will create significant challenges for this particular legislative body. Texas educators have never shied away from accountability. The implementation of the Texas Assessment of Knowledge and Skills and the No Child Left Behind federal initiative, as well as the changes in calculating dropout rates will certainly create much discussion in your home districts and at the Capitol. Please be assured that TASA will take a stand on issues important to public education. The staff and the Legislative Committee have reviewed the issues you have identified via the legislative survey and are prepared to move forward in a proactive manner.

“For the first time

The “Take the Pledge” Campaign has generated significant interest in the state. While the number of legislators that have signed the pledge is lower than what I expected, the response of most legislators is that they support our efforts. More importantly, there appears to be a groundswell of grassroots support in most parts of the state. The campaign rhetoric of state and local candidates for virtually all races included the importance of having a vibrant and robust public education system.

in over a decade there is a strong

indication that a special session

will be necessary,

especially if there is a will to

This legislative session will prove to be exciting with significant issues to address. For the first time ” in over a decade there is a strong indication that a special session will be necessary, especially if there is a will to address school finance.

address school finance.

The renewed interest in school vouchers will create another competing interest for the diminishing funds for public education. The school finance system is at 97 percent capacity, and that number is higher in urban and suburban districts. This fact, coupled with the demand to educate an additional 12

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As has been said before . . . come early, stay late, and be loud! Your voice needs to be heard during this important legislative session.

Michael Hinojosa, superintendent, Spring ISD, is TASA vice-president and legislative chair.


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Ready to Serve by Karen Soehnge he 78th Session of the Texas Legislature will convene very soon. This elected body will meet for 140 days—more if we have a special session or two—yet its influence will be felt for years to come.

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venes, school finance must be this legislature’s top priority. I urge all educators to convey to their legislators their concern about and interest in providing new and more flexible monies for public education.

The coming session will be particularly interesting. We will see many new members, particularly in the House, and new leadership in key positions such as lieutenant governor and Speaker of the House, as well as new chairpersons on influential committees.

Machiavelli observed in The Prince that fortune favors the prepared, the tenacious, the responsive, and the courageous. Will this new legislature demonstrate the courage to address the problems associated with the funding of public schools? Will school leaders demonstrate the will, the tenacity, and the courage to get involved and actively communicate with their members and others about the issues facing public schools?

This is one of the most critical times in the history of public eduI urge all cation in Texas. Texas educators educators to convey have demonstrated that we can improve our educational systems to their legislators and overall quality of educational programs to ensure success in their concern about learning for all students. In fact, our state has become a model for and interest in the nation in how this is best providing new and accomplished. Recognizing we have had a successful past, we now more flexible must look to the future. We now must implement new and much monies for more rigorous standards for state assessment, high school graduapublic education.” tion, and state accountability. At the same time, school districts are experiencing enormous difficulty in securing the necessary resources to meet these more challenging demands.

The financial strain on school districts is great. As expectations for schools are increased, so too are the demands for resources needed to meet these expectations. As this session con14

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The 78th Session will provide educators the opportunity to actively share the good news about education in Texas, to convey a positive vision for the future of education in this state, and to solicit the financial support of their legislators. And, further, this coming session provides our legislature an opportunity to demonstrate its commitment to and support for systems of public education— systems that serve to ensure the continuation of an educated workforce; a strong, vital economy; and an involved citizenry. As the new TASA associate executive director for governmental relations and as a lifelong educator, I stand ready to serve as an advocate for the needs of all public schools in Texas. I encourage you to call upon me if I can be of assistance to you in your local districts. I look forward to joining with you and other educational organizations to represent the educational needs of the children of this state.


ELEMENTARY and SECONDARY EDUCATION ACT NO CHILD LEFT BEHIND ACT, 2001

The information contained within this document is intended to provide assistance that school systems may find helpful to address educational issues. The information is not intended to describe all applicable requirements contained in any federal or state law nor represents the endorsement or approval of any federal or state agency.

Provided by TransACT Communications, Inc. May 2002

PARENT NOTICE/INFORMATION REQUIREMENTS SUMMARY Notices and information must be provided to parents in an “understandable and uniform format, and to the extent practicable, provided in a language that parents can understand.” All Parents: • Must be informed of their right to request information regarding their child’s teacher. Once requested, this must be provided in a timely manner. • Must receive notification if their child is being taught by a teacher who is not highly qualified. • Must receive annual academic assessment results. • Must be informed of each student enrolled in a school identified for improvement, corrective action, or restructuring, including information on option to transfer student, with transportation provided, to another school. • Must be provided at least annual notice regarding the availability of supplemental educational services if a school fails to meet adequate yearly progress. • Must be provided access to the parental involvement policy of their school. • Must be invited to an annual meeting that will inform them of their school’s participation in programs funded under the No Child Left Behind Act. • Must be provided with a description of curriculum, assessment, and proficiency levels students are expected to meet. • Must be provided district and school information and reports. • Must be notified annually of board policies relating to student privacy and parental access to information. All Parents of Limited English Proficient Students: • Must be provided notice of failure of program to meet annual measurable achievement objective. • Must be provided notice of opportunities for attending meetings. • Must be provided information on how they can be involved in education of their child. • Must be given access to a schoolwide comprehensive plan. • Must be notified of their students’ continuing placement in a language development program. • Must be notified of initial placement of student in a language instruction program. • Must be informed of their right to remove their child from a language instruction program and their options for choosing another program.

No Child Left Behind Act, 2001

PARENT NOTICE/INFORMATION REQUIREMENTS

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Section

Timeframe for Delivery of Notice/Information

General Requirement

Required Content for Notice

Required Content for Information

Format: All parent notices and information requirements must be “provided in an understandable and uniform format, and to the extent practicable, provided in a language that parents can understand.”

Sec.1111 (6)(A) “Parents’ Right to Know”

Annually, at the beginning of each school year Notify parents of each student attending any school receiving funds under this part; they may request information on the professional qualifications of their child’s teacher. On parental request, in a timely manner

Information on: • Professional qualifications of student’s classroom teachers. • Whether the teacher has met State qualification and licensing criteria. • Whether the teacher is teaching under emergency or other provisional status. • The baccalaureate degree major of the teacher and any other graduate certification or degree held by the teacher. • Whether the child is provided services by paraprofessionals and if so, their qualifications.

Sec.1111 (6)(B) “Parents’ Right to Know”

On parent request, in a timely manner A school shall provide to each individual parent information on the level of achievement of the parent’s child in each of the State academic assessments as required under this part Timely notice Notify parents if their child has been assigned or has been taught for four or more consecutive weeks by a teacher who is not highly qualified.

Sec.1112 (c) (1)(N) “Assurances”

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As soon as practicably possible

Results from the academic assessments required under section 1111(b)(3) will be provided to parents


Timeframe for Delivery of Notice/Information

Required Content for Notice

Sec.1112 (g)(1)(A) “Parental Notification”

Not later than 30 days after the start of the school year

Must inform a parent or parents of a limited English proficient child identified for participation or participating in a program of language instruction:

Also note sect.3302 (a)(1-8)

• The reasons for the identification of their child as limited English proficient and in need of placement in a language instruction educational program. • The child’s level of English proficiency, how such level was assessed, and the status of the child’s academic achievement. • Methods of instruction used in the program, and methods of instruction used in other available programs. Must include how programs differ in content, instructional goals, and the use of English and a native language in instruction. • How the program will meet the educational strengths and needs of the child. • How the program will specifically help their child learn English and meet ageappropriate academic achievement standards for grade promotion and graduation. • The specific exit requirements for the program, including the expected rate of transition from such program into classrooms that are not tailored for limited English proficient children and the expected rate of graduation from secondary school for such program. • In the case of a child with a disability, how such program meets the objectives of the individualized education program of the child. • Information pertaining to parental rights that includes written guidance detailing the right that parents have in removing their child immediately from such program and the options that parents have to decline to enroll their child in such program or to choose another program or method of instruction if available. Sec.1112 (g)(1)(B) “Separate Notification” Also note sec.3302 (b)

Sec.1112 (g)(3) “Special Rule Applicable During the School Year” Also note sec.3302 (d)

Failure to make progress: 30 days after such failure occurs

Failure to make progress: If there has been no progress on the annual measurable achievement objectives, must separately inform a parent or the parents of a child identified for participating in such program, or participating in such program, of such failure not later than 30 days after failure occurs.

Special Rule… First two weeks of language instruction educational program

Special Rule… For those children not identified as limited English proficient prior to the beginning of the school year, the local educational agency must notify parents of the child being placed in a language instruction educational program. Content of notice must be the same as required under “parental notification.”

Required Content for Information

No Child Left Behind Act, 2001

Section

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Section

Timeframe for Delivery of Notice/Information

Required Content for Notice

Sec.1112 (g)(4) “Parental Participation”

Required Content for Information

Parental Participation: Each local educational agency shall implement an effective means of outreach to parents of limited English proficient students to inform the parents regarding how they can be involved in the education of their children and be active participants in assisting their children to attain English proficiency, achieve at high levels in core academic subjects, and meet challenging state academic achievement standards and state academic content standards expected of all students.

Sec.1114 (b)(2)(B)(iv) “School-wide Programs, Plan Development”

Sec.1116 (b)(6) “Notice to Parents”

Plan Development: Available to the local educational agency, parents, and the public is information contained in such plan which shall be in an understandable and uniform format and, to the extent practicable, provided in a language that the parents can understand. Notice to Parents: Promptly provided

Notice to Parents: In an understandable and uniform format in a language the parents can understand, the local educational agency shall provide a notice of each student enrolled in an elementary or secondary school identified for school improvement, for corrective action, or for restructuring. Additionally it will provide: • An explanation of what the identification means. • The reason for the identification. • An explanation of what the school identified for school improvement is doing to address the problem of low achievement. • An explanation of what the local educational agency or State educational agency is doing to help the school address the achievement problem. • An explanation of how the parents can become involved in addressing the academic issues that caused the school to be identified for school improvement. • An explanation of the parents’ option to transfer their child to another public school, with transportation provided by the agency when required, or to obtain supplemental educational services for the child.

Sec.1116 (b)(6)(E) “Notice to Parents”

Publication and Dissemination: The local educational agency shall publish and disseminate information regarding any corrective action the local educational agency takes under this paragraph at a school. • To the public and to the parents of each student enrolled in the school subject to corrective action.

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Section

Timeframe for Delivery of Notice/Information

Required Content for Notice

Required Content for Information

No Child Left Behind Act, 2001

• In an understandable and uniform format and, to the extent practicable, provided in a language that the parents can understand. • Through such means as the Internet, the media, and public agencies. Sec.1116 (e)(2)(A) “Supplemental Educational Services”

Local Agency Responsibilities: Annual notice at a minimum

Local Agency Responsibilities: Provide notice of: • The availability of educational services under this subsection • The identity of approved providers of those services that are within the local educational agency or whose services are reasonably available in neighboring local educational agencies. • A brief description of the services, qualifications, and demonstrated effectiveness of each such provider.

Sec.1116 (e)(2)(B) “Supplemental Educational Services”

Local Agency Responsibilities: If requested

Sec.1118 (b)(1) “School Parental Involvement Policy”

Sec.1118 (c)(4)(A)&(B) “Policy Involvement”

Sec.1118 (d) “Shared Responsibilities for High Student Academic Achievement”

Local Agency Responsibilities: Assist parents in choosing a provider from the list of approved providers maintained by the state.

Each school served shall jointly develop a written parental involvement policy. Such policy shall be made available to the local community and updated periodically to meet the changing needs of parents and the school. Provide Parents of Participating Children: Timely information

Provide Parents of Participating Children: Information about programs and a description and explanation of the curriculum in use at the school, the forms of academic assessment used to measure student progress, and the proficiency levels students are expected to meet.

Shared Responsibilities: Schools shall jointly develop with parents for all children served, a school-parent compact that outlines how parents, the entire school staff, and students will share the responsibility for improved student academic achievement and the means by which the school and parents will build and develop a partnership to help children achieve the state’s high standards. The compact shall: • Describe the school’s responsibility to provide high-quality curriculum and instruction in a supportive and effective learning environment that enables the children served under this part to meet the state’s student academic achievement standards, and the ways in which

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Section

Timeframe for Delivery of Notice/Information

Required Content for Notice

Required Content for Information

each parent will be responsible for supporting their children’s learning and participating as appropriate in decisions relating to the education of their children and positive use of extracurricular time. • Address the importance of communication between teachers and parents on an ongoing basis. Sec.1118 (e) “Building Capacity for Involvement”

Shall ensure that information related to school and parent programs, meetings, and other activities is sent to the parents of participating children in a format and, to the extent practicable, in a language the parents can understand.

Sec.1118 (f ) “Accessibility”

In carrying out the parental involvement requirements, local educational agencies and schools, to the extent practicable, shall provide full opportunities for the participating of parents with limited English proficiency, parents with disabilities, and parents of migratory children, including providing information and school reports in a format and, to the extent practicable, in a language such parents understand.

Sec.3302 (e)(1) “Parental Participation”

In General: Each eligible entity shall implement an effective means of outreach to parents of limited English proficient children to inform such parents of how they can:

Sec.3302 (e)(2) “Parental Participation”

Sec.3302 (a)(1-8) “Parental Notification” Also note sect.1112 (g)(1)(A)

INSIGHT

Be involved in the education of their children

Be active participants in assisting their children to learn English, to achieve at high levels in core academic subjects, and to meet the same challenging state academic content and student academic achievement standards as all children are expected to meet.

Receipt of Recommendations: The outreach shall include holding and sending notice of opportunities for regular meetings for the purpose of formulating and responding to recommendations from parents described in such paragraph. Not later than 30 days after the start of the school year

Must inform a parent or parents of a limited English proficient child identified for participation or participating in a program of language instruction: •

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The reasons for the identification of their child as limited English proficient and in need of placement in a language instruction educational program.


Section

Required Content for Notice

The child’s level of English proficiency, how such level was assessed, and the status of the child’s academic achievement.

Methods of instruction used in the program, and methods of instruction used in other available programs. Must include how programs differ in content, instructional goals, and the use of English and a native language in instruction.

How the program will meet the educational strengths and needs of the child.

How the program will specifically help their child learn English and meet ageappropriate academic achievement standards for grade promotion and graduation.

The specific exit requirements for the program, including the expected rate of transition from such program into classrooms that are not tailored for limited English proficient children and the expected rate of graduation from secondary school for such program.

In the case of a child with a disability, how such program meets the objectives of the individualized education program of the child.

Information pertaining to parental rights that includes written guidance detailing the right that parents have in removing their child immediately from such program and the options that parents have to decline to enroll their child in such program or to choose another program or method of instruction if available.

Also note sec.1112 (g)(1)(B)

Failure to make progress: 30 days after such failure occurs

Failure to make progress: If there has been no progress on the annual measurable achievement objectives, must separately inform a parent or the parents of a child identified for participating in such program, or participating in such program, of such failure not later than 30 days after failure occurs.

Sec.3302 (d) “Special Rule Applicable During the School Year”

Special Rule… First two weeks of language instruction educational program

Special Rule… For those children not identified as limited English proficient prior to the beginning of the school year, the local educational agency must notify parents of the child being placed in a language instruction educational program. Content of notice must be the same as required under “parental notification.”

Also note sec.1112 (g)(3)

Required Content for Information

No Child Left Behind Act, 2001

Sec.3302 (b) “Separate Notification”

Timeframe for Delivery of Notice/Information

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Section

Timeframe for Delivery of Notice/Information

Required Content for Notice

Title X, Part F, Sec. 1061 (2) Parent Notification

Student Privacy, Parental Access to Information: Annually

Student Privacy, Parental Access to Information: District is required to notify parents regarding the content of board policies that: • Permit parents to inspect any thirdparty surveys of students before they are administered, including policies to protect student privacy if the survey delves into certain sensitive subjects identified in the law. • Permit parents to inspect any instructional material used in the curriculum. • Pertain to the administration of any physical examinations or screenings the school may administer. • Pertain to the collection and use of personal information collected from students for the purpose of marketing that information (except for the purpose of developing educational products or services).

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Required Content for Information


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Leader to Leader: Meeting State and Federal Accountability Requirements by Gina Friedman ore than 90 state leaders and superintendents from across the nation gathered in Dallas, October 15–16, 2002, for one of two national meetings addressing implementation of the No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB). Another national meeting will be held in North Carolina, November 19–20, 2002.

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North Carolina Association of School Administrators

Leader to Leader: Meeting State and Federal Accountability Requirements is a project initiated by TASA and the North Carolina Association of School Administrators (NCASA) with a grant from the U.S. Department of Education. The project has provided a forum for Texas and North Carolina leaders to examine their own practices in order to learn from each other’s strategies for addressing increased accountability standards. Don Gibson, superintendent, Wall ISD, and TASA president said, “I thought the meeting was extremely beneficial. It is important for us to share what we know in Texas with other states— we’re one step ahead of the game because we already have an accountability system in place.” The national meetings are part of the study— giving participants the opportunity to share what they have learned over the past decade in implementing accountability standards and assessment in their states. On the first day of the meeting, Felipe Alanis, commissioner of education, Texas Education Agency; and Bob Bellamy, associate superintendent of accountability and technology services, North Carolina State Department of Public Instruction, gave an overview of common elements in the Texas and North Carolina accountability systems. In addition, three administrative teams comprised of rural (Valley View), suburban (Katy), and urban (Aldine) ISDs presented the steps they

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have taken over several years to meet and exceed state accountability standards. On the second day of the meeting, participants had the opportunity to attend several breakout sessions addressing aligning curriculum to meet accountability standards, building community understanding of accountability requirements, and developing school leaders and teachers. Results of the Leader to Leader online survey also were presented. In addition, Susan Sclafani, counselor to the secretary of education, U.S. Department of Education, presented information pertaining to NCLB, including facts concerning the Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP) report. AYP is an individual state’s measure of yearly progress toward achieving state academic standards. It sets the minimum level of improvement that states, school districts, and schools must achieve each year. NCLB raises the bar of expectations for all students—especially those ethnic groups and disadvantaged students who are falling farther and farther behind and who are most in danger of being left behind. Dawson Orr, superintendent, Pampa ISD, and TASA president-elect said, “I valued the opportunity for dialogue and discourse with colleagues from Texas and across the nation. The No Child Left Behind legislation represents a significant leadership opportunity and will demand the best we have to offer as leaders for learning and champions for children. I found the meeting helpful in understanding the far-reaching consequences of this legislation.”

Gina Friedman is TASA director of communications.


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Book Summary: Learning by Heart by Diane Fisher

eading Roland Barth is like listening to your favorite uncle unraveling family tales, with the addition of scholarly insight and the experience of having been there. In Learning by Heart, Barth’s easy conversational style, sense of humor, and personal anecdotes engage the reader immediately and maintain attention throughout. Barth understands both what is right and what is wrong with America’s public schools; by the book’s end, the reader is challenged and motivated to join him in his quest to improve them.

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“Teachers who have been in classrooms for some years are often heard to say, ‘Kids have changed.’ Yes, they have, and so has the world.” Barth, a former teacher and administrator and current faculty member at Harvard University, discusses the importance of school culture to reform. He argues that schools must become learning communities in which lifelong learning for students, teachers, and administrators is stressed and all are constantly involved in evaluating and improving student achievement and instructional practices. Teachers and administrators, he insists, must become the “leading learners” in our schools in order to make this happen. This is so because he believes that true educational reform must occur at the school level with responsibility for change shared by all within the schoolhouse walls. 26

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Besides providing the reader with motivation and an understanding of the change process, Barth offers some practical strategies that may be used to achieve the vision of better schools and better teaching. He expands on the practice of reflection as a way to help teachers evaluate and improve their teaching, and he suggests ways to encourage leadership at the teacher level, the most important level for change to occur. He explains the undisputed importance of the principal to changing school culture, and offers examples of ways to transition to a more instructional leadershipfocused role. All of this is accomplished in a nonthreatening, positive manner, leaving even the most reluctant reader with an “I can do this!” attitude. Teachers who have been in classrooms for some years are often heard to say, “Kids have changed.” Yes, they have, and so has the world. Barth talks of the sacred nature of


“the way we do things around here” in our schools. We can no longer ignore the changes that are going on around us while refusing to change what is going on in our schools. We must take a good look at “the way we do things around here” and determine if we need to “do things around here” differently. Barth speaks of “discovering the joy, the difficulty, and the excitement of learning” and challenges us to create schools in which those discoveries are made by students, teachers, and administrators alike. Can such schools exist within the current climate of high standards, high-stakes accountability, and concern about student achievement? After reading Barth’s book, I stand adamant in my belief that yes, indeed this is possible. Teaching has been traditionally a lonely profession with few built-in supports for

those new to the profession. As we face the possibility of severe teacher shortages in America, it will become even more critical to create school cultures designed to encourage reflection and lifelong learning, as well as support teachers and retain them in the profession. Public schools must become places in which students and teachers want to be, each taking responsibility for the learning that happens inside—schools in which “learning by heart” is embraced and embedded within. Reading Barth’s book may be an important initial step toward achieving that vision.

Diane Fisher is a doctoral student at Baylor University. Learning by Heart, by Roland Barth, is published by Jossey-Bass, a Wiley Company, San Francisco, 2001, ISBN 0-78795543-4.

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These boards represent the highest standards in teamwork and educational leadership, and are true models of what can be done when an entire district strives to champion its children. If you would like to nominate your board of trustees for TASA’s 2003 School Board Awards Program, review the nomination criteria at our Web site, www.TASAnet.org, or contact TASA Director of Communications Gina Friedman (GFriedman@TASAnet.org), 512-477-6361 or 800-725-8272.

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Need Graduate Follow-Up? ince 1989, LifeTrack Services, Inc. has been helping America’s schools accomplish graduate follow-up. In fact, the company was founded on the principle that each and every school/district should have the ability to hear from each and every student they graduate. Simply put, LifeTrack’s proven system allows for a cost-effective way to collect and report this invaluable feedback.

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We all are aware of the state and national mandates that emphasize accountability. Since its inception, LifeTrack Services, Inc. has stressed to educational leaders the importance of utilizing graduate feedback as a way to demonstrate accountability to all stakeholders.

“Many school districts have tried (unsuccessfully) to complete graduate follow-up in-house. Many of them enroll with us the next year.” “Graduate follow-up is something that can no longer be ignored,” states Jim Gilliland, executive director of LifeTrack Services, Inc. “It is a way to demonstrate accountability, identify school improvement strategies, and greatly enhance a school’s ability to properly analyze curriculum and programs directly from their graduates’ perspective.” 30

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LifeTrack Services’ most comprehensive program offers a three-survey format, which spans a five-year time period. Included are a Senior Exit Survey, an Initial Graduate Survey, an Advanced Graduate Survey, Completion Reports, and a whole host of additional program features and benefits. Gilliland stated, “It would be difficult, if not impossible, for a school to put together a total program such as this and have it be cost and results effective.” He added, “Schools cannot find their graduates. The last place students go to update an address or phone number or even a name change is their high school.” So what makes LifeTrack Services so unique and successful in being able to locate your graduates? 1-800-REUNION. This phone number (a registered trademark of LifeTrack Services, Inc.) allows graduates to call and update address, phone, and name changes . . . FOR LIFE . . . and at NO ADDED COST! It is included in the cost of the program. This central database allows you to remain in contact with your graduates for life! Talk about a powerful public relations tool! By the way, LifeTrack Services, Inc. is proud of the fact that it does not sell, rent, or give out any information from the database. Access is available only to school administration and up to three graduates from a class for reunion purposes. LifeTrack Services, Inc. must be doing something right. Testimonials from customers fill its brochure. It is endorsed by or a service


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Gilliland stated, “Any way you look at it, this system makes sense. Many school districts have tried (unsuccessfully) to complete graduate follow-up in-house. Many of them enroll with us the next year.” Need graduate follow-up? Call LifeTrack Services, Inc. at 1-800-738-6466 for a brochure or visit online at www.lifetrack-services.com.

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Region 5 PIA/IPDP Center— The Full Story

by Dorman Moore and Sandra K. Ellington

T

he Region 5 PIA/IPDP Center provides an individual self-assessment process (PIA) with an opportunity to develop an individualized professional development plan (IPDP) based on skills assessed primarily through a group of job-embedded leadership activities of the principalship. These activities determine the presence of leadership knowledge, skills, and behaviors directly related to the standards in 19 TAC Chapter 241.15. The Region 5 PIA/IPDP Center is located at ESC Region 5 in Beaumont, Texas. It serves as a campus administrator assessment center as mandated in TEC 21.054, 21.046 and 19 TAC 241 and approved by the State Board for Educator Certification (SBEC) in Texas. In addition to serving the assessment needs of Region 5, the assessment team of Sandra Ellington, director; and Dorman Moore, James Warner, and Steve Fleming, assessors, has trained directors and assessors in Regions 10 (Richardson), 11 (Ft. Worth), and most recently 13 (Austin) in the delivery of this assessment process. We have received and continue to receive positive feedback from the directors and assessors in these regions as they continue to utilize the process. The PIA/IPDP process is predicated on identifiable leadership skills and behaviors that are documented in the Texas Standards for Principals identified in 19 TAC 241.15. Overview The PIA/IPDP Center requires a day and a half (day one and day three) of participation time plus additional outside prework. During the first day, participants complete the SelfAssessment Matrix; Goal Setting 1; and Scenarios 1, 2, and 4. Scenarios 3 and 5 are completed as prework before the assessment

and brought to the Center on day one. Observations written on a second Goal Setting Activity (a day three exercise) determines if, after completing the self-assessment and the five scenarios, the participant’s goals have changed. Each assessment center participant’s work is assessed by trained and certified assessors on day two. The feedback conference is held on day three and is the basis for the individual professional development plan formulated by the participants as the culminating activity. The feedback session is scheduled with one of the feedback specialists (assessors).

“We have received and continue to receive positive feedback from the directors and assessors in these regions as they continue to utilize the process.” Scenario 1—requires the participant to read, organize, justify effective use of time, make judgments, and delegate as appropriate. Scenario 2—requires the participant to respond, in written form, to a teacher grievance. Scenario 3—requires the participant to respond to a career opportunity. Scenario 4—requires the participant to disaggregate data and develop a plan for improvement. Scenario 5—requires the participant to facilitate planning using collaboration and involving stakeholders. FALL 2002

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“The PIA/IPDP process has campus principals and assistant principals look at and respond to opportunities to demonstrate individual leadership skills and behaviors…” During the feedback session, participants receive: • A matrix noting skill strengths and areas for possible improvements •

Feedback with summary comments from assessors

Completion of the personal professional development plan

The participants reflect on their behavior after each of the exercises on day one. Following the complete assessment and the feedback conference, participants are asked to respond to a final reflection (ORID) of the entire event. ORID is a methodology developed by the Institute of Cultural Affairs to help reflective persons think back on an experience in order to determine “next steps.” ORID also helps persons delay moving too quickly to action steps before thoroughly examining options. The ultimate goal of the assessment center is to satisfy the requirements outlined in TEC 21.054 and 19 TAC 241.30 and to move dedicated professional leaders toward professional growth opportunities that support leadership skills for the academic achievement of ALL learners. Upon completion, the assessment provider certifies to SBEC the individuals who have completed an appropriate assessment. Research Parameters and Confidentiality In a monograph publication entitled Learning to Lead, Leads to Learning— Improving School Quality Through Principal 34

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Professional Development, funded by Region 5 and Lamar University, authors Sandra Ellington (also adjunct professor in Educational Leadership at Lamar University) and Dorman Moore (associate professor in Educational Leadership at Lamar University) address the assumptions, data evaluation, etc. for reliability and validity of the first two years of the assessment center at Region 5. This publication is mentioned in an article published in the Summer 2002 INSIGHT titled “Can Your District Have Exemplary Campuses?” by Elvis Arterbury and Judy Travis. Although the article mentions “effectiveness” of principals and identification of principals from acceptable, recognized, or exemplary rated campuses (from the Texas Accountability System), there are no provisions in this assessment process to gauge “effectiveness” of principals nor to address the accountability rating of their campus as any form of measure for their exhibiting the skills and behaviors connected to this assessment. The mention of these measurements as part of the assessment is in error. The PIA/IPDP process has campus principals and assistant principals look at and respond to opportunities to demonstrate individual leadership skills and behaviors; it does not attempt to measure the participants’ effectiveness on the job. Our monograph does not identify individual participants, campuses, or their state accountability rating. Complete confidentiality is maintained at all times during and after the individual assessment. A complimentary copy of our monograph publication may be obtained by contacting Sandra K. Ellington at Region 5 (409-951-1822 or sandrael@esc5.net). Dorman Moore is associate professor in Educational Leadership at Lamar University and Sandra K. Ellington is Region 5 PIA/IPDP Center director and adjunct professor in Educational Leadership at Lamar University.


Is your District . . . • Losing teachers? • Hiring more substitutes every year? • Having trouble filling critical needs positions* ? *Special Ed, Math, Science, etc.

• Facing a large number of retiring educators in the next few years? TCG Consulting provides fee based employee benefits and compensation consulting services. TCG Consulting and ESC Region 10 have developed an innovative strategy called the Teacher/Employee Retention & Recruitment Program (TERRP). TERRP is designed to provide financial incentives to attract and retain district employees, increase employee attendance and provide incentives to help meet other district goals. If your district could use help in any of these areas, please contact us.

TCG Consulting Contact: John Pesce 3160 Bee Caves Road, Suite 300B Austin, TX 78746 Phone: (512) 306-9939 Fax: (512) 306-9959 Website: www.pension-consulting.com Email: john.pesce@pension-consulting.com Education Service Center Region 10 Contact: Bill Smith 400 E. Spring Valley Road Richardson, TX 75083 Phone: (972) 348-1004 Fax: (927) 348-1060 TERRP Website: www.terrp.org Email: smithb@esc10.ednet10.net

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Paraprofessionals: A Good Investment in Your District’s Future by Grant Simpson From 1980 to 1999, the population of instructional aides almost doubled to more than 620,000, in large part reflecting public schools’ commitment to serve rapidly increasing numbers of special education and limited-English-proficient (LEP) students. In the 1990s, a growing consensus for raising paraprofessional qualifications developed at all policy levels. This culminated in January 2002 with President Bush signing the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001 (NCLB), which focuses on helping disadvantaged children achieve to the same high state performance standards as others. For all paraprofessionals in Title 1 schools, NCLB requires at least two years of study at the college level or a formal state or local academic assessment of knowledge and ability to assist in instructing reading, writing, and mathematics (NOREL, 2002). Special education is reauthorizing in 2003 and is likely to follow suit. In Texas, this has a huge impact, since the requirement for paraprofessionals has been a high school diploma or its equivalent. Existing paraprofessionals will have four years to meet the new requirements. Education service centers, junior colleges, and universities are scrambling to answer the questions and meet the needs of our state’s paraprofessionals.

What Helps? A study conducted by Recruiting New Teachers, Inc. documented 150 programs throughout the nation assisting 36

INSIGHT

paraprofessionals seeking teacher certification (Haselkorn & Fideler, 1996). The great majority of these programs are in heavily unionized states that require an associate’s degree to become a teacher aide. Financial assistance is a pivotal first step provided in assistance programs. Through House Bills 570 and 1130, Texas has provided tuition exemption for school employees serving in any capacity who have worked as an educational aide for at least one school year during

“…established a policy that allows its paraprofessionals up to 10 hours per week release time with pay to attend courses toward certification.” the five years preceding the semester of enrollment. Managed by the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board, to date some 5,000 employees have accessed close to $4,000,000, with an average award of $605. Money helps, but it is only the first step. The great majority of paraprofessionals are women, most with families. Returning to college or going for the first time is invasive and disrupting to both job and family. A

variety of support measures is appropriate and necessary, especially in the first semester, including tutoring, peer support groups, topical seminars, study skills and test preparation workshops, counseling, flexible scheduling, and cultural and family activities (Genzuk, 1997; Haselkorn & Fideler, 1996; Recruiting New Teachers, 2000; Simpson, 1996; Simpson, 1997).

What You Can Do Supportive policies. Districts throughout the state have adopted policies that support paraprofessionals seeking to improve their skills and achieve certification. For example, in December 2001, Wichita Falls ISD established a policy that allows its paraprofessionals up to 10 hours per week release time with pay to attend courses toward certification. Working mothers need flexible scheduling and no reduction in pay in order to add the challenge of college work. School districts should think of this as an investment in good employees who are trying to attain the professional level. Supportive networks. All novices need safety nets that support their risk taking. The biggest of these is an assigned mentor, someone who is there to help guide the way and provide a strong back or shoulder to cry on. Identifying a mentor and enabling times for them to be together is an ideal support measure. Other “doable” things that help paraprofessionals include: continued on page 38


theLeader Book Review

News from the Texas Leadership Center

Edutopia: Success Stories for Learning in the Digital Age Compiled by The George Lucas Educational Foundation and edited by Milton Chen and Sara Armstrong Published by Jossey-Bass, ISBN: 0-78796082-9 Reviewed by Patsy Lanclos, knowledge architect and professional developer—Instructional Technology, planclos@mac.com Often asked are the questions “What does technology integration mean?” and “What does technology integrated into the curriculum look like?” Some answers are found in the book Edutopia: Success Stories for Learning in the Digital Age, a collection of success stories that focuses on integrating technology in a seamless fashion. The stories in the book are actual accounts of educators who are courageously trying something different in order to engage students in their learning and prepare them for their future. The George Lucas Educational Foundation (http://www.glef.org), which compiled the book, was created to help educators and the public imagine a broader vision for education through videos, CDs, books, newsletters, and Web sites. The first publication, Learn and Live (video and book), describes a grade 4–5 class and the integration of technology into the curriculum. Edutopia is divided into three major parts: “Innovative Classrooms,” “Involved

Communities,” and “Skillful Educators.” In part one, 17 short scenarios describe classrooms where students are learning in rather nontraditional ways, each subscribing to project-based learning. Project-based learning focuses on rich, challenging, and real-world topics integrating curricular areas and technology tools. A Virginia teacher tells an especially poignant story of how technology and access to a NASA Web site, integrated into her science curriculum, literally changed the life of some of her students and helped to bridge the gap between the culturally advantaged and disadvantaged. Another story describes a variety of online projects such as the “Holocaust/Genocide Project,” “Global Shopping List,” and “Geogame” that extend the classroom beyond the school walls. Following many of the stories are short descriptions of supporting research. One story describes the use of laptop computers and project-based learning in a Harlem grade school that increased student interest and achievement. Another story describes how handheld computers are used to beam assignments, collect data, record information, review lessons, write and peer edit reports, and even take tests involving beaming and group consultation. Other stories include descriptions of project-based learning, assisted technology that enables all children to learn, and other school structuring topics such as looping, multiage classrooms, class-size reduction, block scheduling, and schools within schools. Articles in the “Innovative Classrooms” section focus on social and emotional learning as well as topics such as developing emotional intelligence, creative conflict resolution, peer pressure, and administrators who teach. Daniel Goleman, author of Emotional Intelligence and Primal Leadership, provides

an essay on emotional intelligence five years later than his original writings. Stories providing different perspectives on assessment are included in this part as well as stories involving the strategy of performance-based assessment to assist educators determined to provide learning in a project-based environment. “Involved Communities” describes strategies for schools, communities, and businesses to dissolve the artificial barrier that now separates them. Some of the topics include parent involvement, connecting home and school, creating business partnerships, school-to-work concepts, promoting science for girls, and virtual mentoring. Strategies for getting the community involved include student exposure to worldwide collaboration on networks such as iEARN, the requirement for school board members to take classes, and technology community centers. The last part of the book, “Skillful Educators,” is certainly not the least important. The quality of teachers is the single most important factor in student success. The stories in this section describe innovative ways that colleges of education are preparing teachers and districts and supporting teachers with ongoing professional development and mentoring programs. An important chapter in the book, written by a librarian, addresses the need for information literacy. The last stories focus on educational leadership opportunities such as principals who go back to school and the digital superintendent. This book is a must-read for those who want additional leadership skills necessary to transform schools through systemic change in a way that prepares students for their future. Accompanying the book is a CD that contains 11 short video documentaries (5–8 minutes each) describing project-based learning, emotional intelligence, assessment, and teacher preparation.

FALL 2002 37


Paraprofessionals: continued from page 36 • assisting with paperwork (for financial aid, application, registration, etc.) • allowing for flexible work schedules and job sharing • maintaining salary and health benefits • arranging for substitutes/parent volunteers to help out in the classrooms while the paraprofessional attends coursework • locating tutors for mathematics and writing skills as needed • recruiting retired teachers to serve as mentors/tutors • pooling school district paraprofessionals into cohorts that could be enrolled in coursework at the same time

increasing student achievement (NOREL, 2002; Recruiting New Teachers, 2000). When districts invest in paraprofessionals who have the potential to be certified, they: • address the teacher shortage in a proactive, community-based manner • increase diversity and retention of the professional workforce • enhance the synchrony between home and school culture

Area junior colleges and universities. An effective strategy with paraprofessionals is the use of cohorts that take coursework together. This facilitates study groups and any remediation efforts that may be involved. Many preparation programs have distance education capabilities that allow groups of paraprofessionals in a district to receive coursework through interactive television or Web-based coursework without going to campus. Likewise, junior colleges and universities may be willing to schedule special on-campus classes or enroll cohorts in the same section. Obviously, none of this will happen unless it is requested. In smaller districts, an entrepreneurial superintendent or principal can work wonders to effect individualized responses from local institutions. Larger districts can utilize existing lines of communication or establish them as part of a staff member’s job description. College deans want to hear from feeder school districts and will work hard to provide needed services. Call them!

Grant Simpson is dean and professor, Educational Leadership, Midwestern State University, West College of Education.

Why Bother? “Grow Your Own Professional” programs work. Paraprofessionals are usually products of the community, homegrown, and home to stay. Many of them are from underrepresented groups in teaching. These valued employees are experts in knowledge of local students, families, culture, language, and local dynamics, all of which are factors in 38

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No Child Left Behind has sounded the call. Will you follow or will you lead? Either way your investment will yield long-term benefits.

REFERENCES Genzuk, M. (1997). Diversifying the teaching force: Preparing paraeducators as teachers. ERIC Clearinghouse on Teaching and Teacher Education. Haselkorn, D. & Fideler, E. (1996). Breaking the class ceiling: Paraeducator pathways to teaching. Belmont, MA: Recruiting New Teachers, Inc.

Board Briefs The following are highlights of the Texas Leadership Center board of directors meeting held September 28, 2002, in conjunction with the TASA/TASB Convention. UPDATES • Center for Creative Leadership (CCL) Educators’ Leadership Development Program (ELDP) CCL provided a training of trainers October 1–4, 2002, for the ELDP, in which nine Texas representatives of ESC Regions 1 and 11 and TASA/TLC became trainers. •Technology Leadership Academy The board received a report of the 2002–2003 Texas Leadership Academy schedule and enrollment totals to date for Year Three (927 as of 10/31/02). Additional funding from matching sources will be required in Year Four of the program to deliver the program at the current tuition level.

Simpson, G. W. (1996). The EDIT project: A partnership to encourage minorities to enter teaching. Texas Study of Secondary Education. 5(2), 14–16.

• Leader to Leader: Meeting State and Federal Accountability Requirements A report of enrollment for the two national meetings for the Leader to Leader project in Dallas, October 15–16, 2002; and Raleigh-Durham, North Carolina, November 19–20, 2002, was given to the board. (Approximately 90 administrators attended the Dallas meeting, and approximately 90 are registered for the North Carolina meeting as of 10/31/02). A publication will be produced summer 2003 from the conference proceedings, as well as an online survey of school leaders.

Simpson, G. W. (1997). To grow a teacher: A Texas program gives minority paraprofessionals a boost. The American School Board Journal, 184(9), 42–43.

In official business, the board of directors approved the minutes of the June 24, 2002, meeting and the financial statement of the center.

NOREL (Northwest Regional Educational Laboratory). (2002). Designing state and local policies for the professional development of instructional paraeducators. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Education, Office of Educational Research and Improvement. Recruiting New Teachers. (2000). A guide to developing paraeducator-to-teacher programs. Belmont, MA: Author.


TASA CORPORATE PARTNERS

President’s Circle Apple Classwell Learning Group Platinum CompassLearning, Inc. PLATO Learning and NetSchools SHW Group, Inc. Gold ARAMARK/ARAMARK-SERVICEMASTER Microsoft Silver Scantron Corporation Palm, Inc. TIAA-CREF Bronze Academic Systems, Inc. 3D/International, Inc. Brainchild Corporation Cole Marketing First Southwest Company Gateway Computers Scientific Learning Sodexho School Services TCG Consulting, Inc.

Please note: This list is current at the date of publication: 11/22/2002


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INSIGHT—Fall 2002