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THE INDEPENDENT VOICE FOR PUBLIC EDUCATION IN TEXAS FOR 56 YEARS

In the Spotlight Kathy Clayton of TEA

TCASE President Cynthia Gann Hondo ISD

Changing the face of bad behavior

April 2010


Our insight. Your schools. Tyler has the insight to empower you as a K-12 education professional. Our financial, SIS, transportation, special education, food service and district planning products do more than meet your needs. They anticipate them. That’s why more and more school systems choose Tyler for their data management. To spend more time with your students and less time with data, visit us at tylertech.com or email us at info@tylertech.com.


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CONTENTS In the Spotlight: TEA’s Kathy Clayton believes listening leads to learning

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Sarah Orman

TCASE President Cynthia Gann sees the possibilities, not the disabilities

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Whitney Angstadt

COVER: Experts cite challenges of classroom behavior management

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Jennifer LeClaire

photo FEATURES TCEA members download valuable training at annual conference TASBO hosts annual conference in Fort Worth TSPRA members rally in Austin for annual convention

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DEPartments

COLUMNS

TSB Professional Development & Events Calendar

From the Editor

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Tech Toolbox

19

Who’s News

23

The Law Dawg  —  unleashed

7

The Back Page

From Our Readers

33

Advertiser Index

34

Katie Ford Jim Walsh

Terry Morawski Riney Jordan

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The views expressed by columnists and contributing writers do not necessarily reflect those of the publisher or Texas School Business advertisers. The publisher also makes no endorsement of the advertisers or advertisements in this publication.

April 2010 • Texas School Business

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From the Editor Classroom behavioral management is a topic often discussed in the teachers’ lounge and in administrative circles. More often now, it is a challenge that school districts are asking their special education departments to address. The need for best practices in behavioral management has become so great that the Texas Council of Administrators of Special Education (TCASE) has created a series of behavior academies. For the April cover story, we interviewed administrators and experts about counteracting disruptive behavior in the classroom. This month, we offer a profile on TCASE President Cynthia Gann of Hondo ISD, who knows well the challenges of having a disability. She also knows the possibilities, as demonstrated by her father, who lost his sight at age 30 and went on to pursue a successful second career. Also, we shine April’s Spotlight on the state with a feature on Kathy Clayton, Texas Education Agency’s special education director. Clayton spent 15 years working in various Texas school districts prior to joining the TEA. Today, she leads IDEA coordination for Texas. A quick, but important, announcement: On March 29, we launched the call for nominations for the Fourth Annual Bragging Rights 2010-2011 special issue, which comes out Dec. 1. We welcome school districts to nominate their innovative programs. See details on page 19.

Katie Ford, editor

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(ISSN 0563-2978 USPS 541-620) April 2010 Volume LVI, Issue 7 1601 Rio Grande Street, #441 Austin, Texas 78701 Phone: 512-478-2113 • Fax: 512-495-9955 www.texasschoolbusiness.com Publisher Ted Siff Editor in Chief Jim Walsh Editor Katie Ford Design Phaedra Strecher Columnists Riney Jordan, Terry Morawski, Jim Walsh Advertising Sales Manager Jim Johnson Business Manager Debbie Stover Director of Marketing and Customer Relations Stephen Markel Web Manager Maira Garcia ISSN 0563-2978 USPS 541-620 Published monthly, except for July/August and November/ December, and for the Bragging Rights issue published in December (11 times a year) by Texas School Business Magazine, LLC, 1601 Rio Grande Street, #441, Austin, TX 78701. Periodical Postage Paid at Austin, Texas and at additional mailing offices. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Texas School Business,1601 Rio Grande Street, #441, Austin, TX 78701. SUBSCRIPTION RATES: $28 per year; $52 for two yrs; $72 for three yrs. Group rate: 10 or more, $18; single issues, $4.50.

© Copyright 2010 Texas School Business Magazine LLC April 2010 • Texas School Business

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Strategic Planning Workshop Program Objective The program is designed for educational leaders who want to align resources and energies toward their strategic objectives through effective planning and execution.

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THE LAW DAWG – unleashed by Jim Walsh

Don’t duct tape that Doe kid

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f you want to stay out of the courthouse, you should check your student rolls every year to see if the infamous Doe family has moved into your district. This family is singlehandedly responsible for more litigation than any ambulancechasing, tassel-shoe-wearing, briefcasetoting lawyer in the country. The sheer number of Doe v. Somebody cases will boggle your mind. My favorite Doe case is Doe v. State of Hawaii, 334 F.3d 906 (9th Circuit, 2003). The case arose in 1998 when a second grader named “John Doe” was sent to the vice principal’s office for fighting. The vice principal, David Keala, instructed young Doe to stand still against the wall as a form of time out. Young Doe did not stand still, thus inducing the vice principal to make a colossal mistake: He told Doe that if he did not stand still, he would take him outside and tape him to a tree. The second grader continued to wriggle and squirm, thus throwing down the proverbial gauntlet. Whereupon, according to the court, “The vice principal used masking tape to tape Doe’s head to the tree. The record is unclear as to whether Doe’s face was pressed against the bark.” This situation went on for five minutes, at which point a fifth grade girl confronted the vice principal about how inappropriate this behavior was. Perhaps feeling a tad embarrassed and ashamed to be scolded by a fifth grader, the vice principal instructed the young lady to free Doe — or perhaps we should say “the plaintiff.” The Doe family filed suit. Keala filed a motion for summary judgment, asserting that he was entitled to immunity from personal liability, but the court denied it. The court concluded that Doe had been “seized” in violation of the Fourth Amendment for no offense greater than “horsing around.” As to immunity, the court observed that even a fifth grader knew what Keala did was wrong. So, no immunity for our vice principal. He should have known

that taping a kid’s head to a tree is a violation of the U.S. Constitution. The case ended up being tried in 2004. After a two-week trial, the jury awarded the Doe family $3,600, a far cry from the $500,000 they sought. According to the Honolulu Star-Bulletin, Keala was 67 at the time and had come out of retirement to serve as a temporary vice principal. I’m guessing that he stayed retired after this incident. Several lessons can be gleaned from this brief, but fascinating, case. First, vice principals should not try to bluff students into compliance. I suspect Keala did not really want to tape the kid to a tree. But when his warning didn’t work, he felt honor bound to follow through. So don’t bluff. Second, I expect the heroine of this story, the fifth grade girl, is destined to be an educational leader, probably a superintendent. At an early age, she illustrated exemplary judgment and courage in this situation. Third, this case clearly shows that the U.S. Constitution is a living document. I did a word search of the historical text, looking for tape, trees and horsing around. None of those words are in the Constitution. It is silent on all of these issues. And yet, the 9th Circuit said Keala violated the Constitution. So, you have to be careful. Finally, this case illustrates a general rule: I call it the duct tape rule. Although the court used the term “masking” tape, I’m confident it was duct tape. And I have learned that if you end up in court, it is better to be the tapee than the taper. We all know that “horsing around” among students is on the rise in the spring, but to all vice principals I say the same thing: Save the duct tape for ducts! JIM WALSH is editor in chief of Texas School Business. Also a school attorney, he co-founded the firm of Walsh, Anderson, Brown, Gallegos & Green PC. He can be reached at jwalsh@wabsa.com.

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Tech Toolbox by Terry Morawski

Five Facebook privacy settings every administrator should know

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t is hard to dismiss the popularity of Facebook. The social networking service has exploded to more than 400 million users since its modest beginnings in 2004 as a networking site for college students. It’s a wonderful communications tool, but beware of the pitfalls. Remember: Facebook’s business model is based on people connecting and sharing information. Facebook wants to be a billboard of your everyday life, not a private messaging service. Following this logic, most privacy settings on your account default to views that everyone on Facebook (and sometimes the Internet) can see. School administrators and educators who participate on social networking sites, like Facebook, for personal reasons must pay attention to how public they want to make their private lives. Below are five privacy settings to ensure your Facebook experience remains fun and productive, not embarrassing or damaging. Manage the profile and contact information you share. You have the choice to share as much private information as you like on Facebook. On your profile, you can list your phone number, email address, education background, religious views, political views, relationship status and more. To control what people can see, under the Account tab, go to Privacy Settings. You will see sections for Contact Information and Profile Information. Here, for each piece of information, you can choose to share with friends only, friends of friends, everyone or no one. Do not allow friends to post to your wall. By eliminating others’ ability to post to your wall, you are in complete control of what information is posted about you on your wall. To change these settings, under the Account tab, go to Privacy Settings and then Profile Information. Make sure the box for “Friends can post on my wall” is unchecked. Also, under Comments on Posts, select Customize and then Only Me so that people cannot respond to posts you make on your wall.

Remove yourself from Facebook and public search listings. By default, your account is accessible to the Facebook community and public search engines like Google. You can hide your profile from search engines. Under Privacy Settings, select Search. Make sure Facebook Search Results is set to Only Friends and that the box for Public Search Results is unchecked. Create friend lists and use them. Maybe you want to use Facebook for business and personal reasons. If so, you would benefit from creating “mailing lists” for each group. This way, each time you post something to your wall, you can choose which group sees the post. To create lists, click on the Friends tab and then the Create a List tab. Don’t let friends tag photos and videos of you. If you disable your friends’ ability to “tag” you (i.e., identify you) in photos or videos, then your name will not appear in News Feeds when those items are posted. You can also “untag” photos or videos that have been tagged, which prevents anyone from tagging those items again. Unfortunately, aside from talking to a friend beforehand, you cannot prevent someone from uploading photos and videos of you. If you discover items that you don’t want on Facebook, you’ll have to contact the person who posted it and ask them to remove it. To protect yourself from unwanted tagging, click on Privacy Settings and then Profile Information. Under Photos and Videos of Me, choose Custom and select Only Me. This will ensure that only you can tag yourself. Please continue to write me with suggestions for future Tech Toolbox columns. Your feedback is always appreciated! TERRY MORAWSKI is the assistant superintendent of communications and marketing for Mansfield ISD. He writes about technology and other topics at www. communicationsjetpack.com. He can be reached at terrymorawski@gmail.com. April 2010 • Texas School Business

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In the

Spotlight

Texas Education Agency’s Kathy Clayton believes that listening leads to learning by Sarah Orman

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athy Clayton is a good listener. As the state director of special education, Clayton leads by listening to representatives of every stakeholder group in special education — parents, advocates, school districts and students with disabilities. “If you listen instead of talking, you get better information,” she says. Nineteen years ago when the Texas Education Agency hired Clayton to evaluate preschool programs, she never expected that one day she would direct the agency’s Division of Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) Coordination. Prior to joining TEA, Clayton had worked at multiple school districts in Texas as a classroom teacher, speech therapist and early childhood intervention specialist. In 1991, she moved to Austin and took the job at TEA. Clayton had intended to return to a school district within a few years, but she ended up staying at TEA and eventually moving up to her current post. Clayton enjoys the viewpoint the position affords her. “(In my division), we get to see everything from all sides,” she says. “While our job (at the state level) is very challenging and things never move as quickly as you want them to, the ability to see subtle change is fascinating.” In a state as large and diverse as Texas, Clayton admits there is no “one size fits all” policy. “Every district has its own culture,” she says. Consequently, providing guidance that is appropriate in Houston and in Dumas, for instance, is no small task. That is why Clayton relies heavily on listening to people close to the front lines. “You have to talk to people at ground level,” Clayton says. The Division of IDEA Coordination is primarily responsible for developing and implementing policy and programs to benefit students with disabilities; yet, it

also runs the state’s complaint process for IDEA-related matters — an area in which Clayton’s listening skills serve her well. At one point, TEA’s handling of IDEA complaints received heavy criticism from parents, advocates and school districts. “When every group involved is unhappy, that really gets your attention,” Clayton says. Through a series of decisions in 2004, Clayton broke down the system and started over from scratch, improving the agency’s response to complaints and its self-assessment process. She says she is proud that during her tenure, the data shows that Texas has fewer due process complaints and more mediation. Still, she is careful not to claim sole responsibility for the improvement. “I say to people who come to work with us: You don’t own every failure or every celebration; you are a part of it and it takes a lot of people,” Clayton says. She estimates that 90 percent of the concerns brought to her department’s attention are because of “poor communication” between parents and districts. She sees TEA’s primary role as listening to parents to understand their concerns, and then connecting them with the individuals in their respective districts who can best help them. “We’re going on the premise that if we can get those parties talking, maybe next time there’s a problem, the parties will talk first and the state won’t have to come in,” Clayton says. “One of my greatest interests is trying to ensure that parents and schools are really working together. There is nothing more important that we can do.” To that end, Clayton serves on the advisory board of the national Center for Appropriate Dispute Resolution in Special Education, or CADRE. She also recently was elected to the board of the National Association of State Directors of Special Education. “Special education is a service that is there to be complementary to the gen-

Kathy Clayton spent 15 years working for multiple school districts in Texas as a classroom teacher, speech therapist and early childhood intervention specialist prior to joining the Texas Education Agency.

eral education programs we have for all students,” she says. “We forget sometimes that a student with a disability is a student first.” Outside the office Clayton lives in Austin with her husband and two “spoiled rotten” cats. In her spare time, she loves to travel, read books and watch old movies about almost any subject, as long as it is “very removed” from her job. Despite that intention, Clayton is currently reading “Better Together,” a book that resonates with the work she values most. “It’s about restoring the American community and working together to get things done; that’s what we are trying to do,” she says. “(By default), you talk to the people who are like you, but getting different viewpoints is how to get to a better solution. More good comes from that.” SARAH ORMAN is a freelance writer in Austin. She formerly worked as an attorney in Oakland, Calif. April 2010 • Texas School Business

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Texas School Business • April 2010


‘Techies’ network at TCEA annual conference

Joanne Knepper and Agnes Gobert of Liberty ISD with Stacey Eaglin of Hull-Daisetta ISD.

Gladys Carrasquille, Joan Constantine and Isabel Ahearn of Austin ISD.

Dionicio Ramirez, Tina Meiser and Orlando Vera of Southwest ISD.

Gustavo Barquero, Terry Davis and Shane Bayles of Waller ISD. Paul Mach and Carolyn Green of Waco ISD.

John Larson and Brian Willis of McAllen ISD.

Jayme Duckett and Melissa McKelvain of Granbury ISD.

Nicole Moody and Lisa Williams of Granbury ISD. Michael Rodriguez and Michael Norris of Pasadena ISD.

Alejandra Mireles and Rachel Montemayor of Austin ISD. April 2010 • Texas School Business

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Learn Practical Solutions for Challenging Behavior TCASE

Behavior Academy June 14 – 15, 2010

“This conference covered the Behavior and RTI Process better than anything I had ever attended.” - Kimberly Ilse, Brackett ISD

Omni Mandalay Hotel at Las Colinas, Irving For agenda and registration, go to: www.tcase.org (888) 433-4492

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Texas School Business • April 2010


TCASE PRESIDENT profile Hondo ISD Cynthia Gann believes disabilities shouldn’t define a person by Whitney Angstadt

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s director of special education in Hondo ISD, about an hour west of San Antonio, Cynthia Gann is accustomed to wearing many hats. Last summer, she took on one more — stepping up to president-elect of the Texas Council of Administrators of Special Education (TCASE). This coming July, Gann is poised to take office as president. Having served on the TCASE board since 2004, Gann is fully prepared to play an influential role in ensuring that Texas children with disabilities have access to the very best in public education. She knows all too well the struggles that come from living with disabilities. And perhaps more importantly, she understands what can be achieved if given the chance. Gann spent her formative years in Sabinal, a small town west of San Antonio, where her mother worked as a classroom teacher and her father owned a crop-dusting business. When Gann was 5 years old, her father was in a plane accident. His life was spared, but he lost his sight. Her father’s sudden blindness affected the way Gann saw things. “I think that I really learned most of my lessons about people with disabilities from him,” says Gann. “I really noticed while I was growing up that my father did not let his disability defeat him, but rather, he found ways to overcome it.” After some training, Gann’s father started a new career, taking a job in computer programming at Frost Bank of Texas, where he quickly moved up the ranks. “He really brought that department from nothing to a pretty spectacular (one); he was not defined by his disabilities,” Gann says. “He was not the banker who was visually impaired; he was the man who brought the computer technology component of banking to a new level at Frost Bank.” Gann decided to pursue a career in education once she graduated from Southwest Texas State University (now Texas State University) in 1987. She started out as a first grade teacher at East Terrell Hills

Elementary in San Antonio. Two years later, she moved to Hondo ISD, which adopted the concept of inclusion not long after she arrived. Gann’s first grade class became one of these inclusion classes. “Although I wasn’t the special education teacher, I was this general education teacher who had to find ways to make these students (with disabilities) be successful in my classroom,” Gann recalls. Inspired by these challenges, Gann headed back to school in 1993 to get her educational diagnostician certification, as well as her master’s degree in administration. She continued working for Hondo ISD and was hired as a diagnostician in 1995, performing all the testing that qualifies students for special education. In 2000, Hondo ISD’s superintendent encouraged Gann to put her master’s degree to good use by offering her the newly vacated director of special education position. “This is my 10th year doing this, and I (still) feel a commitment to developing a really great program for students with disabilities,” Gann says. “Over the years, the landscape for our programs in the classroom has changed. Challenges that were rare 10

“I really noticed while I was growing up that my father did not let his disability defeat him, but rather, he found ways to overcome it.” years ago have almost become regular occurrences. So, our programs have had to change along with those challenges. I enjoy that part of my job that involves coming up with solutions for kids who are struggling.” During her presidential term at TCASE, Gann vows to continue the organization’s pursuit to support not only the kids served by special education programs, but also the educators and administrators behind those programs.

Special Education Director Cynthia Gann leads a staff training at Hondo ISD.

In the next year, she plans to incorporate more virtual trainings, such as Webinars and audio postcards, to accommodate districts that can’t afford to send their employees to the workshops and programs that TCASE offers. Gann also wants to find new ways to meet the need of TCASE’s increasingly diverse membership. “There are all different kinds of districts — rural, urban and suburban, large and small,” she says. “We need to make sure we provide enough diverse information so that anyone can implement these tools when they go back home.” Despite all she has learned during her years in the classroom and in administration, Gann attributes her formative years in Sabinal as the guiding force behind her work. “I look at my father and I transfer that to children with disabilities,” she says. “I want them to be more than just ‘the kid in the wheelchair’ or ‘the kid who can’t hear.’” WHITNEY ANGSTADT is a freelance writer in Austin. April 2010 • Texas School Business

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Best practices for counteracting bad behavior Experts discuss the challenges – and solutions – for dealing with minor to severe behavior in the classroom

By Jennifer LeClaire

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ullies. School violence. Horseplay. Disrespectful language. Today’s educators face a whole new world of bad behavior among students. And the consequences of these classroom disruptions can reach well beyond detentions and suspensions. Students who misbehave at school could be on the road to lifelong problems — at least that’s what some experts say. British researchers at the Medical Research Council, in their National Survey of Health and Development, found that severe behavior problems in adolescence more than double the likelihood that an adult will have poor mental health, difficulties in family life and relationships and financial hardships.

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Texas School Business • April 2010

With so much at stake, educators are mobilizing to develop best practices, policies and procedures to deal with the rising tide of severe behavior issues in students. Take, for example, the Texas Council of Administrators of Special Education’s recently launched behavior academies. These trainings aim to give campus and district teams practical solutions for challenging behavior in the classroom, and the best practices apply to both the general and special education populations. “We are serving more kids with diagnosed or undiagnosed mental health disorders in schools, and those kids generally don’t receive help outside of the school,” says Dr. Brenda Scheuermann,

a professor at Texas State University and a nationally known advocate for students with behavioral disorders. “Teachers are also challenged with general day-to-day classroom management with minor, but chronic, behavior problems (among students).” Before educators can weed out — or at least mitigate — behavior issues in the classroom, they need to understand the root of the problem. Sometimes the root is a mental health concern. Over the past five years, Galena Park Carol Booth ISD Director of Special Education Carol Booth has witnessed among her students an increase in diagnoses of depression, bipolar disorders, AD/HD and psychotic disorders. “The primary treatment location for the child’s mental health ends up being the school, but the average school nurse or school counselor is not a mental health provider,” Booth says. “Most of these kids are probably not being medicated or managed by a child psychiatrist. On the other end of the spectrum, you have the run-of-the-mill delinquent and oppositional students who don’t have mental health issues but are belligerent.” According to Darrin Murphy, a behavioral specialist in Amarillo ISD, many students these days seem to be dealing with intense stress on the home front and outside of school, and they aren’t as


prepared to learn when they come to class. That, he says, puts the onus on educators to not only teach kids the curricula, but also teach them how to properly behave and Darrin Murphy interact in public. “Unfortunately, many teachers aren’t exposed to the knowledge of how to prevent behavioral problems in the classroom,” Scheuermann says. “We know that children will take advantage of opportunities to misbehave if they are given the opportunity. There are some simple, yet effective, techniques we can use to deal with these challenges.” In the behavior academies, participants learn that you can’t just “nice” a kid into a behavioral change. The instructors offer best practices for dealing with challenging behavior through interventions designed to breed lasting behavioral changes.

Defining the countermeasure on disruptive behavior Correcting severe student behavior begins by setting crystal clear expectations, says Scheuermann. That means defining classroom rules and specific behaviors that are allowed and not allowed — and not just defining them once, but throughout the course of the school year. “When I say teach, I mean actively teach,” she says. “That means more than posting the rules on the wall. It means an active demonstration of what those rules look like, what they don’t look like, and what behaviors students can do that are reflective of the rule or violate the rule. “With younger children, you can actually have students practice role playing to illustrate what the rules look like when followed or when broken,” Scheuermann continues. “Teaching the rules this way can prevent a lot of behavior concerns.” Another tactic is to acknowledge students for rule-following behavior. Scheuermann says students tend to get far more attention for inappropriate behavior than they do for good behavior. Changing the formula for how students get attention in class can make a dramatic difference. Teachers may feel that they shouldn’t have to acknowledge kids for simply doing what is expected, Scheuermann says. But

if students aren’t cooperating, a different approach might be required to get the desired results. Murphy’s approach in Amarillo ISD is similar and he takes it one step further. He educates teachers on the communication styles and cultural nuances of younger generations so they can better understand the motivations of their students. Teachers shouldn’t expect students to step back in time to an earlier societal culture, Murphy says, but rather they should engage kids within the context of their culture. “If we tell kids stop, don’t and quit all the time, we get more of that behavior,” Murphy says. “The old way of discipline was to take away what kids want and give them what they don’t, but that doesn’t work anymore. We have to teach them how to get what they want and that requires a change in the way we discipline kids. We want to reinforce the good behaviors.” One significant generational difference is the way kids see teachers. Murphy says today’s students are growing up in a world where everyone is to be treated equally. The idea is well intended, but it can backfire when a fifth grader feels he should be on equal ground with his teacher. Order is the baseline of success, says Booth. “We have more difficulty when we try to include students (with disabilities) in a mainstream environment where classroom management is difficult,” she says. “The more orderly the class is in general, the

better able the teacher is to manage and structure the classroom for all students.”

Calling in backup Booth says districts should be able to point the way to a continuum of support services for teachers, as well as for students. Support may include ongoing classroom management trainings, a school-based mental health clinic, or access to social workers and other professionals who can address student needs in multiple settings. “For some of our youngsters with behavior problems, the earlier we get in there and assist, the better. But that doesn’t necessarily mean that the earlier we intervene, the more successful the outcome,” Booth says. “The child still may have problems, but [those problems] may be lessened to such an extent that they’re more manageable and require less support later.” Murphy sees hope when educators collaborate and share best practices. “I believe we can see change when we teach expectations the way we would teach academics and then reinforce the positive behaviors,” Murphy says. “I wish every teacher would think about those concepts and apply them. It will make a difference.” JENNIFER LECLAIRE has written for The New York Times, the Associated Press and The Christian Science Monitor. April 2010 • Texas School Business

17


The 23rd Annual

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Conference Agenda

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Disciplinary Alternative Education Programs: The Legal Issues

Jim Walsh – Walsh, Anderson, Brown, Gallegos & Green, P.C., Austin

June 8, 2010

Navigating the Minefields of Family Legal Battles Jeana Lungwitz – Lungwitz & Lungwitz, P.C., Austin

What Principals Need to Know About Title IX

Shellie Hoffman Crow – Walsh, Anderson, Brown, Gallegos & Green, P.C., San Antonio

Avoiding Legal Claims During the Hiring Process Lisa McBride – Thompson & Horton, Houston

The Principal’s Role in Handling Cyberbullying by Students On Your Campus

Robb D. Decker – Walsh, Anderson, Brown, Gallegos & Green, P.C., San Antonio

Legal Currency in Special Education Law: Zirkel’s Top Ten Court Decisions and Other Legal Developments for School Leaders Perry A. Zirkel – Lehigh University, Bethlehem, Pennsylvania

The Latest on Religion in Our Schools

David Backus – Underwood Law Firm, Lubbock

A One-Day Conference on Current Issues Involving Legal Duties and Liabilities of Public School Principals Cosponsored by: Texas Association of Secondary School Principals and Texas School Administrators’ Legal Digest

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Texas School Business • April 2010


TSB Calendar

Professional Development & EVENTS WEEK OF MAY 3 May 3 Three Ps: Payroll, PEIMS and Personnel ESC Region 6, Huntsville For more info, (512) 462-1711. www.tasbo.org

Cost: Members, $180; nonmembers, $220. May 4 Cost Accounting for Accountants ESC Region 19, El Paso For more info, (512) 462-1711. www.tasbo.org

May 5 TASB Spring Training Workshop Sul Ross State University, Alpine For more info, (800) 580-8272, ext. 2241. www.tasb.org

May 13

May 18

TASB Spring Training Workshop Temple High School, Temple For more info, (800) 580-8272, ext. 2241. www.tasb.org

TASB Spring Training Workshop Texas A&M University, Commerce For more info, (800) 580-8272, ext. 2241. www.tasb.org

May 14-15

May 19

TASB Spring Training Workshop Convention Center, South Padre Island For more info, (512)467-0222. www.tasb.org

TASB Spring Training Workshop West Texas A&M University, Canyon For more info, (800) 580-8272, ext. 2241. www.tasb.org

WEEK OF MAY 17

May 19

May 18 TASB Spring Training Workshop Stephen F. Austin State University, Nacogdoches For more info, (800) 580-8272, ext. 2241. www.tasb.org

TASB Spring Training Workshop Parkway Church, Victoria For more info, (800) 580-8272, ext. 2241. www.tasb.org See CALENDAR on page 20

May 6 Using Graphic Organizers and Assessment Tools to Make Mathematics Content More Accessible to Struggling Students (Session 3 of 3) Joyce Zotz Education Center, Galena Park ISD For more info, (800) 717-2723. www.txascd.org

Cost: Texas ASCD members and Galena Park ISD staff, $750; others, $850. May 6 TASB Spring Training Workshop Sul Ross State University, Uvalde For more info, (800) 580-8272, ext. 2241. www.tasb.org

May 6 TASSP Region 15 Meeting Lowake Steak House, Lowake For more info, (512) 443-2100. www.tassp.org

WEEK OF MAY 10 May 13 TASB Spring Training Workshop ESC Region 14, Abilene For more info, (800) 580-8272, ext. 2241. www.tasb.org

We need your help in singling out the programs — and the people — who deserve some positive press! In December 2010, Texas School Business will publish its Fourth Annual Bragging Rights 2010-2011 special issue, which will honor 12 deserving school districts and their innovative programs. Do you have a brag-worthy program? Just send an email to brag@texasschoolbusiness.com. Describe your program, how it came about and some of the program’s noteworthy results. Winners will be announced in the Fourth Annual Bragging Rights 2010-2011 special issue on December 1. Nomination deadline: August 31, 2010.

TS 2009-2010 BRAGGING RIGH

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ol Districts 12 Texas Schoams with Super Progr

Questions? Email Editor Katie Ford at katie@texasschoolbusiness.com. Send us your success stories. Texas School Business wants to brag about you!

w w w. t e x a s s c h o o l b u s i n e s s . c o m April 2010 • Texas School Business

19


TSB Calendar

Professional Development & EVENTS

CALENDAR continued from page 19

May 20 Board2Board Session: Board Focus Location TBA, Nacogdoches For more info, (512) 535-2046. www.foundationinnovation.com

Cost: $45.

WEEK OF MAY 24 May 26 TASB Spring Training Workshop ESC Region 6, Huntsville For more info, (800) 580-8272, ext. 2241. www.tasb.org

WEEK OF MAY 31 June 3 MIA: Managing Inevitable Absences TASB offices, Austin For more info, (512) 467-0222. www.tasb.org

Cost: Early registration (by May 19), $180; after May 19, $230.

20

Texas School Business • April 2010

WEEK OF JUNE 7 June 8 Annual TASSP/Legal Digest Conference Convention Center, Austin For more info, (512) 478-2113. www.legaldigest.com

Cost: Early registration (by May 9): Members, $130 online; $145 offline. Nonmembers, $180 online; $195 offline. Regular registration (after May 9): Members, $155 online; $170 offline. Nonmembers, $205 online; $220 offline. June 9-10 Curriculum Leadership Academy III (Session 2 of 3) Pat May Center, Hurst-EulessBedford ISD For more info, (512) 477-8200. www.txascd.org

Cost: $1,500, six-day academy.

June 9-11 TASSP Summer Conference Convention Center, Austin For more info, (512) 443-2100. www.tassp.org

Cost: Members, $195; nonmembers, $365; student nonmembers, $95. June 9-11 TEPSA Summer Conference Renaissance Hotel, Austin For more info, (512) 478-5268. www.tepsa.org

Cost: Early registration (by May 12): Members, $221; nonmembers, $460. After May 12: Members, $246; nonmembers, $485. June 10 Three Ps: Payroll, PEIMS and Personnel Rockwall ISD For more info, (512) 462-1711. www.tasbo.org

Cost: Members, $180; nonmembers, $220.


TSB Calendar

Professional Development & EVENTS

June 10-12

WEEK OF JUNE 28

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TASB Summer Leadership Institute Marriott Rivercenter, San Antonio For more info, Kathy Dundee, (512) 467-0222, ext. 6171. www.tasb.org

Cost: Individuals, $150. Team of five, $650; each additional person, $130. Registration deadline: May 28.

WEEK OF JUNE 14

June 23-26

June 28-30

WEEK OF JUNE 21 NAEOP/TESA Summer Conference Embassy Suites, Frisco For more info, (512) 477-0724. www.tesatexas.org

June 17-18 TASBO Summer Conference Tivy High School, Kerrville For more info, (512) 462-1711. www.tasbo.org

June 24-27

June 17-19 TASB Summer Leadership Institute Omni Hotel, Fort Worth For more info, Kathy Dundee, (512) 467-0222, ext. 6171. www.tasb.org

New Principal Academy Trinity University, San Antonio For more info, (512) 443-2100. www.tassp.org

UT Austin/TASA Summer Conference on Education Renaissance Hotel, Austin For more info, (512) 477-6361 or (800) 725-8272. www.tasaonline.org

WEEK OF JULY 5 July 11-13 Annual TAHPERD Summer Conference Embassy Suites, Frisco For more info, (512) 459-1290. www.tahperd.org

Cost: Early registration (by June 1), $775; after June 1, $875. June 25-27

June 17-19 TREA Summer Conference DFW Marriott Hotel and Golf Club, Fort Worth For more info, (512) 423-0293.

TCWSE Summer Conference Renaissance Hotel, Austin For more info, (512) 477-6361. www.tcwse.org

See CALENDAR on page 22

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TSB Calendar

The 24Th annual

TCASE - LEGAL DIGEST CONFERENCE ON SPECIAL EDUCATION LAW same Conference – Two Convenient locations Friday, april 9, 2010

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Professional Development & EVENTS

CALENDAR continued from page 21

WEEK OF JULY 12 July 12-16 Summer Coaches Clinic Convention Center, Arlington For more info, (512) 708-1333. www.austintgca.com

Cost: Early registration (before June 15), $70, includes $40 membership fee; after June 15, $35, includes $40 membership fee. TGCA members only.

the texas Council of administrators of Special Education and the texas School administrators’ legal Digest are pleased to announce the twenty-fourth annual one-day conference on current issues concerning the education of students with disabilities.

informative Topics:

July 18-21

Practical Strategies For Dealing With the renegade arD Member Whoops! We goofed!! Practical Strategies For Damage Control Practical Strategies For Determining Eligibility the nuts and Bolts of Procedural Safeguards Practical Strategies For Dealing With all of those Diagnoses Practical Strategies For Handling Student Discipline Presented by: Jim Walsh, Dave Richards, Elena Gallegos, Paula Maddox Roalson Jim Hollis, and David Hodgins, respectively

Texas High School Coaches Association Convention and Coaching School Henry B. Gonzalez Convention Center, San Antonio For more info, (512) 392-3741. www.thsca.com

WEEK OF JULY 19 July 21

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TASPA Law Conference Doubletree Hotel, Austin For more info, (512) 494-9353. www.taspa.org

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July 21-23 TASPA Annual Summer Conference Doubletree Hotel, Austin For more info, (512) 494-9353. www.taspa.org

Henry B. Gonzalez Convention Center San Antonio

Celebrating What is Right Addressing What is Wrong

Celebrating What is Right, Addressing What is Wrong is the perfect workshop for all those seeking to transform Special Education services for the 21st century. It is for Educators, School Board members, Parents, Advocates and Attorneys. Fixing Special Education author, Miriam K. Freedman, and school law experts Jim Walsh and Chance FREE Book Heinsohn will review the problems inherent in the current with Registration system of laws and regulations governing Special Education. Their presentations will focus on the on cati Edu cial Spe Fixing needed changes and how to accomplish them. There will be ample time for questions and answers. 12 Steps to Transform

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Who’s News Argyle ISD Mandi Pels is the new assistant principal of Hilltop Elementary School. A four-year member of the Argyle ISD staff, she holds a bachelor’s degree in exercise physiology from Texas Woman’s University, and she is completing a master’s degree in school administration from Lamar University. Before arriving in Argyle, Pels was a teacher, coach and youth leader in Austin. Arlington ISD Coach Eddy Peach, a 45-year veteran of Arlington ISD, has announced his upcoming retirement. Officially the “winningest 5A coach in Texas high school football,” he had only four losing seasons Eddy Peach in his 40 years of coaching. He began his coaching career in Arlington in 1965 at Carter Junior High, moving to Arlington High School in December of that year as head baseball and junior varsity football coach. He opened Lamar High School in 1970 as head football coach, a position he held for the next 39 years. Peach has a bachelor’s and a master’s degree from Oklahoma University, where he was an all-district and all-American player. He comes from a family of teachers and coaches; both his father and brother were basketball coaches in Oklahoma and elected to the Oklahoma Hall of Fame. Brookeland ISD Kevin McCugh, former assistant superintendent, has been promoted to superintendent. Canutillo ISD (El Paso) Damon Murphy is the district’s new superintendent. He comes to this new position from El Paso ISD, where he served as associate superintendent for priority and secondary schools. An educator Damon Murphy for 19 years, he initially taught middle school and

high school English, and then he served as an assistant principal and principal at the secondary level. During the past four years, he was responsible for overseeing more than a dozen El Paso elementary schools. Murphy earned his bachelor’s degree in English from Texas Tech University and his master’s degree in school administration from The University of Texas at San Antonio. He earned a doctorate in school leadership from the University of Houston. Center Point ISD Kim Bishop is the new business director for the district. A certified public accountant, she began her career as a senior corporate accountant for Raytheon. She moved on to be a math teacher and department head in Quinlan ISD from 2001 to 2007. Bishop was named the district’s Teacher of the Year in 2006. She then spent a year as a curriculum consultant. Bishop holds an accounting degree from Texas A&M University at Commerce. Comal ISD Dani Baylor is leaving her position of principal at Church Hill Middle School to become the district’s director of secondary education. She began her career as a middle school teacher, joining Comal ISD in 2005 as the principal of the former Canyon Intermediate School. Jan Bettersworth, a science instructional specialist for the district since 2008, is moving on to serve as the academic dean at Smithson Valley High School. Scott Hammond is taking the reins at Church Hill Middle School as its principal. He makes the move from his role as principal at Mountain Valley Middle School. The district has its first director of staff development and accountability. She is Tammy Lind, returning to the district from her most recent job as principal of Spring Branch Middle School in Spring Branch ISD. She initially came to Comal ISD in 1996 as a fifth grade teacher at the former Aaron Seay Intermediate School, subsequently serving as an assistant principal and principal of that school

before making the transition to Spring Branch ISD. Jon Lindholm is transitioning from assistant principal of Canyon Lake High School to academic dean of the school. He has been with the district since 2007. Betsy Nash, principal of Freiheit Elementary School, is moving on to serve as principal of Clear Spring Elementary. Allen Pooley, who has been serving as an assistant principal of Canyon Lake High, is joining Clear Spring Elementary School as the new assistant principal. Alan Reeves, assistant principal of Canyon Lake High, is taking the assistant principal job at Rahe Bulverde Elementary School. Another district administrator, Sandra Shelton, takes on new duties as executive director of technology; she most recently served as director of accountability and instructional services. She began her career in Bay City ISD as an elementary and special education teacher. Chris Smith will step into the role of principal of Spring Branch Middle School. He began his career as a teacher with New Braunfels ISD in 1996; he most recently was the assistant principal of Comal ISD’s Smithson Valley High School. Conroe ISD The Woodlands High School Ninth Grade Campus has a new principal. He is Chris Povich, who will take the helm upon the retirement of Marguerite Weatherall. Until accepting his new position, he was associate principal of The Woodlands High School for five years. An educator for 16 years, he came to that school in 1997 as a math teacher, subsequently serving as math department chair, assistant principal and summer school principal. Before arriving in Texas, Povich was a teacher assistant at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign; his first assignments in Texas were in Houston ISD and Lamar CISD. He earned a bachelor of science degree in math from The University of Texas and a master of education See WHO’S NEWS on page 24 April 2010 • Texas School Business

23


Who’s News WHO’S NEWS continued from page 23

degree in math education from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. His doctorate in administration and supervision is from the University of Houston. Marguerite Weatherall brings her 30-year career as an educator to a close with her retirement. She began as an English teacher in Port Arthur ISD. She spent the past 29 years in Conroe ISD,

first as a high school English teacher and then as an assistant principal, an associate principal and principal of The Woodlands High School Ninth Grade Campus, Marguerite where she has served Weatherall since 2005. Weatherall has a bachelor of arts degree in English from Lamar University. Her master’s de-

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gree and administrative certification are from Sam Houston State University. Cypress-Fairbanks ISD Secondary Music Director Larry Matysiak was recognized by the University of Houston’s Moores School of Music as its 2009 Outstanding Alumnus in Music Education. The award was Larry Matysiak presented at an alumni reception for the University of Houston School of Music during the Texas Music Educators Association convention in San Antonio in February. Now in the fourth year of his position with the district, Matysiak has been a music educator for 34 years. Before coming to Cypress-Fairbanks ISD, he spent 23 years as head band director at Fort Bend ISD’s Clements High School. During his tenure in Fort Bend ISD, the band won numerous state and national awards, and Matysiak was named Teacher of the Year. He also was recognized by Texas Christian University and The University of Texas as an Outstanding Teacher. He holds both a bachelor of music degree and a master of education degree from the University of Houston. Leslie Thomas will be principal of Rennell Elementary School, which will open in August for the 20102011 school year. She has served as principal of Reed Elementary for the past eight years; she Leslie Thomas has 30 years of experience in public education. Before coming to the district, she was an elementary teacher, assistant principal and principal in Lewisville ISD. Thomas earned her bachelor of science degree in elementary education from Texas Tech University and her master of education degree in administration from the University of North Texas. Anne Wilcox will lead Emery Elementary School as its principal when it opens next school year. Currently principal of Sheridan Elementary, she has


Who’s News spent all of her education career with CypressFairbanks ISD. She was a teacher at Francone Elementary for 13 years, and then she served as an assistant principal at Anne Wilcox that school. She was assistant principal at Sheridan before being promoted to principal, a role in which she has served for seven years. Wilcox has a bachelor of science degree in elementary education from Sam Houston State University and a master of education degree in administration from Stephen F. Austin State University. Del Valle ISD Jill Dworsky is Del Valle Middle School’s new principal. She began her career as a middle school English/language arts teacher, reading teacher and coach. She served 15 years in those capacities in Friendswood, Yorktown, Ferris and Victoria ISDs. An administrator for 13 years, Dworsky spent five years as a high school assistant principal in Ingram and Pine Tree ISDs, and eight years in her most recent position as a middle school principal in Ingram ISD. Dworsky’s bachelor of science degree is from Southwest Texas State University (now Texas State University), and her master’s degree in curriculum and instruction is from the University of Houston at Victoria. She also earned her mid-management administrator and superintendent certifications there. Fort Bend ISD Thomas Heinly has assumed the principal’s role at Quail Valley Middle School. A native of Florida, he spent 12 years in the Broward County school system. He began as a teacher, spending nine years at Sandpiper Elementary School, before moving on to an administrative career as an assistant principal. He relocated to Texas in 2006, accepting the position of assistant principal of Drabek Elementary. Within a year, he was named principal of Oyster Creek Elementary, where he has spent the past three years. Heinly earned a bachelor’s degree in education and a

master’s degree in educational leadership from Florida Atlantic University. Gainesville ISD Lance Gary has been promoted to the position of athletic director and head coach at Gainesville High School. He moves into his new roles from serving as defensive coordinator at that school, a job he has held for the past two years.

Georgetown ISD After 15 years with Bandera ISD, Brad Domitrovich has joined Georgetown ISD as its director of school and community relations. Initially a computer lab technician at Hill Country Elementary, Brad Domitrovich he joined Bandera ISD’s See WHO’S NEWS on page 26

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Who’s News WHO’S NEWS continued from page 25

central office three years later as an instructional technologist. Since 2001, he has led the communications and public relations department for the district. He was president of the Texas School Public Relations Association during the 2008-2009 school year; he now is serving his last term on the organization’s

executive committee as the immediate past president. Graham ISD The district has a new head football coach. He is Kenny Davidson, formerly defensive coordinator. He began his public school career in 1984 as a defensive line coach for Georgetown ISD, mov-

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1 10:30 AM Page 2:Layout 1 11/25/09

ANTS UADR FOUROUQ NEED THE SO T STUDENT RTING By Jim Walsh

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tions, L.P., Place Publica P.C. © 2009 Park e & Gallegos, on, Brown, Aldridg may be and Walsh, Anders No part of this publication ed. consent of All Rights Reserv t the express reproduced withouPublications, L.P. Park Place

cts. in all other respe Quadrant One the quadrants lines between Note that the scientific in the law with are not described to be made on ents judgm are precision. There nts could fit basis. Some stude an individual nding on depe , rants rent quad into two diffe the students’ school interprets how the local and the law. ct’s services, needs, the distri

be used is intended to is not to This publication ation only and for general inform advice. If specific legal be considered , consult advice is sought specific legal an attorney.

Texas School Business • April 2010

The Four QuadranTs: Sorting Out Student Need by Jim Walsh The Four Quadrant Chart is a useful way to explain and diagram how and why students qualify for specially designed instruction. • QUADRANT ONE: General Education • QUADRANT TWO: Section 504 • QUADRANT THREE: At Risk • QUADRANT FOUR: IDEA-Eligible Jim Walsh has used this analysis for decades to train educators on the proper implementation of federal law. Now, in an easy reference chart, this analysis can be readily available to any educator. Perfect for all school administrators. This reference chart measures 17” x 22” and is laminated. Price: $12.95

place your order online: www.legaldigest.com

ing to Amarillo’s Highland Park ISD for two years as head football coach before serving a year as defensive coordinator for Borger ISD. He then served as head football coach and athletic director at Fort Worth Christian School from 1990 to 2004. That year, he accepted the position of assistant coach for Graham ISD, where he served until taking on his new position. Davidson earned a bachelor of science degree from Abilene Christian University. He has done work on his master’s degree in educational leadership at Texas Woman’s University. Henderson ISD The Henderson ISD trustees have chosen Kerrie Forrester to serve as communications officer and executive director of the Henderson ISD Education Foundation. She graduated from Henderson High School and earned a bachelor’s degree from Stephen F. Austin State University. Forrester joined Henderson ISD as a teacher in 1991. She continued there as a teacher and reading specialist until 1999, when she left the district to serve as the children’s minister and preschool director at Henderson First Baptist Church. She worked at the church until accepting her new role with the district. Houston ISD Sam Sarabia is the new chief officer for elementary schools. He most recently served as Houston ISD’s East Region superintendent. He was also an executive principal in that area and was principal of Roberts and Port Houston Sam Sarabia elementary schools. The Association of Hispanic School Administrators named Sarabia 2005 Principal of the Year. David Simmons is the new chief officer of high schools. He David Simmons comes to Houston from Richardson ISD, where he was superintendent. See WHO’S NEWS on page 28


TASBO hosts annual conference in Fort Worth

Stella Mendoza and Lucia Campuzano of Eagle Mountain-Saginaw ISD.

Greg Buchanan of Forney ISD and Susan England of Garland ISD.

Reagan Ratcliff of Central ISD and Misty Pena of Hudson ISD.

Dianne Lamb and Toni Murray of Allen ISD.

Mary Ramirez and Fay Watson of Keller ISD.

Michael Griffin and Ada Griffin of Energy for Schools.

Molly Dunlap, Rachel Watson and Daena Walther of Coppell ISD.

Joyce Roberts, Beverly Stahl and Misty Fisher of Mansfield ISD.

Crystal Shirley of Richardson ISD, Nikki Hamblin of Pilot Point ISD, Karren Koch of Richardson ISD and David Pate of Garland ISD.

Pam Bishop and Pat Wade of Grand Prairie ISD. April 2010 • Texas School Business

27


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Texas School Business • April 2010

Who’s News WHO’S NEWS continued from page 26

Ingram ISD Ingram Middle School students have a new principal, Therese Schwarz, who has been a member of the Ingram ISD team for the past 10 years. She was a classroom teacher at Ingram Elementary Therese Schwarz School for seven years. She served as Ingram Middle School’s assistant principal from 2008 until being promoted to her new position. Schwarz earned her master’s degree and principal certification from Schreiner University in Kerrville. Marshall ISD Melinda McGinnis is now the district’s executive director of finance. In addition to being a teacher for three years, she previously was the business manager for Union Grove ISD. Midland ISD Sylvester Perez, superintendent of Midland ISD since 2006 and an educator with 38 years of experience, will retire at the end of the school year. Perez, who earned a doctorate in education from Sylvester Perez Texas A&M University, was the first Hispanic superintendent of Midland, Mathis and Clint ISDs. A coach for 13 years, he was the first Hispanic to serve as head coach at Holmes High School in San Antonio’s Northside ISD, the first Hispanic head coach in Judson and North East ISDs and the first Hispanic athletic director in Harlandale ISD. Perez attended school in Harlandale ISD and then went on to St. Phillip’s College in San Antonio. He graduated from New Mexico Highlands University in Las Vegas, N.M. He then coached for a year in Lubbock ISD, before being hired as head baseball coach at Taos High School in New Mexico. He returned to San Antonio in 1974, serving as a coach and


Who’s News then an administrator in 1985. He led MacArthur, Madison and Judson high schools to district championships. He was an assistant principal at Nimitz Middle School in North East ISD and MacArthur High School in Harlandale ISD, before taking on the head coach position in Harlandale ISD in 1988. He then served as principal at Midland ISD’s McCollum High School before becoming the district’s superintendent. Palestine ISD Lance Angel is the new athletic director and head football coach. A graduate of Sam Houston State University, he began his 17-year career in Wink ISD, where he taught economics, government and world geography and coached the district’s current events team for UIL competition. In Elgin and Aledo ISDs, Angel served as head freshman and junior varsity boys’ basketball coach, varsity secondary and running backs’ coach, head boys’ and girls’ golf coach, head track coach and offensive coordinator. During his time as

offensive coordinator with Aledo ISD, the district took home a state championship in 1998. Angel’s first assignment as head coach and athletic director was with Cooper ISD, where he spent four years. His most recent position was with Canton ISD, where he served for four years before taking his new job in Palestine ISD. Pasadena ISD A new athletic director/head football coach has been named for Dobie High School. He is Jim Phillips, who most recently held the same position at Greenville High School in Greenville ISD. A coach for 32 years, he had an 18-year tenure with Waller ISD and had worked for two years with Emory Bellard as offensive line coach at Spring ISD’s Westfield High School. He was offensive line coach in Clear Creek ISD. In addition to his time with Texas schools, Phillips spent four years as head football coach at Oklahoma Panhandle State

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Who’s News WHO’S NEWS continued from page 29

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Pearland ISD Ben Pardo, who served as Pearland High School’s head baseball coach from 2003 to the time of accepting his new position, has been named the district’s director of athletics. A native of Havana, Cuba, he immigrated with his family to the United States as an infant. Early in his career, he came to Pearland ISD in 2002 from Dickinson ISD, where he spent 10 years as head baseball coach and an English teacher. In addition to his coaching duties at Pearland High, he has taught English and health at the school. Pardo earned both his bachelor’s and master’s degrees from the University of Houston. Richardson ISD Kay Waggoner is the district’s new superintendent. An educator with 28 years of experience, 21 of those in administration, she served as superintendent of Grapevine-Colleyville ISD from 2004 until acKay Waggoner cepting her new position in Richardson ISD. Waggoner also led Red Oak ISD from 1997 until 2004. She began her career as a teacher in Nacogdoches ISD, moving to her first administrative role as an assistant principal in Eanes ISD in Austin. She then was curriculum director and assistant superintendent of Joshua ISD. In addition to her work in public schools, Waggoner was an educational specialist with the Texas Education Agency. The 2006-2007 president of the Texas Association of School Administrators, she holds a bachelor’s degree and a master’s degree from Stephen F. Austin State University. She earned a doctorate at The University of Texas at Austin. Socorro ISD (El Paso) Two principals have been named to lead new schools that open in August. Troy Byrne will have the top job at the El Dorado Ninth Grade Academy. See WHO’S NEWS on page 32

30

Texas School Business • April 2010


TSPRA annual conference held in Austin

Allison Miller of Frisco ISD and Valerie Foster of Sanger ISD.

LaVonna Carew and Jocelyn Nichols of Pasadena ISD.

Oscar Salinas and Judith Garcia of La Joya ISD. Brad Press of Greenville ISD and Scott Milder of Cambridge Strategic Services.

Donna Zambiasi and Jane Whitledge of Frisco ISD. Sharon Cox of Denton ISD and Lynda Queen of ESC Region 16.

Mark Vasquez and David Bourbois of Pharr-San Juan-Alamo ISD.

Andy Elizarraraz of Duncanville ISD and Jana Hathorne of Midlothian ISD.

Phillip Sulak of Lamar CISD and Candace Ahlfinger of Pasadena ISD.

Jamie Mount and Robin McAdams of Humble ISD. April 2010 • Texas School Business

31


Who’s News WHO’S NEWS continued from page 30

With 19 years in education, six of those as an administrator, he was most recently secondary mathematics and science instructional coordinator for El Paso’s Clint ISD. Before becoming an administrator, he taught math at Clarke Middle Troy Byrne

School and science at Americas High School, both in Socorro ISD. His bachelor’s and master’s degrees were earned at The University of Texas at El Paso. Angelica Ramsey will be at the helm of Eastlake High School. She began her career as a teacher and coach in Socorro ISD, taking her first administrative position as assistant principal of Socorro High School, her most recent assignment. Ram-

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Texas School Business • April 2010

sey’s bachelor’s degree is from the University of the Pacific, and her master’s degree in educational administration is from The University of Texas at El Paso. She is Angelica Ramsey working on her doctorate in educational leadership through Liberty University. Juan I. Martinez comes to the district as chief human resources officer from El Paso’s Clint ISD, where, for the past six years he has been director of personnel services. He began his career in 1995 Juan I. Martinez as an elementary teacher. His first administrative assignment came three years later, serving as an assistant principal for three years before being promoted to principal. Four years later, Martinez took his first central office assignment when he became manager of the district’s personnel services. He earned a bachelor’s degree in business administration and a master’s degree in education administration from The University of Texas at El Paso. His superintendent certification is from Angelo State University. Waller ISD Danny Twardowski is the new superintendent. He served as Waller High School’s principal from 1997 to 2002. That year, he became the district’s assistant superintendent for administration. Before arriving in Waller ISD, he spent 20 years with Spring ISD, first as a coach and teacher of physical education, business law and personal business management and then as an assistant principal at Westfield High School. Twardowski then was named the district’s assistant athletics director, a position he held for two years until he was appointed principal of Wells Middle School, where he remained until his move to Waller ISD in 1997. Twardowski has an associate’s degree in business administration from Blinn College, a bachelor’s degree in physical education from Texas Christian University and a master’s degree in education administration from Sam Houston State University. TSB


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I’ve known the “Law Dawg” for most of the 36 years I’ve served as a school superintendent in Texas. He is issueoriented and refuses to haul the wood for political hacks of either the left or the right. That said, his excellent piece, “Why not race to the top?” (“The Law Dawg – unleashed,” March 2010), was right on. All this Washington-bashing of late here in the “People’s Republic of Texas” is almost frightening, especially when it comes from the governor himself or highoctane educational sycophants. In the U.S. Constitution, the founders established a system of shared power between federal and state governments. Sharing anything requires teamwork and collaboration, not public cheap shots. We teach Texas youth to believe in the American system. Let’s practice what we preach. Charles Hundley Superintendent Crowell ISD

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33


THE BACK PAGE Advertiser Index

by Riney Jordan

If only we lovingly were ‘in loco parentis’

D

o you ever get the feeling that everyone you meet these days is an expert on all issues? It doesn’t matter if it is politics or religion or education; it seems more people than ever are challenging what we do in public education. From talking to teachers and administrators, I feel like much of the pressure is coming from parents and legal guardians who are telling the professional educators how they should teach, how they should run the schools, and how they should treat their children. “The parents are driving me crazy,” one teacher told me recently. “I get notes from some of them every single day, and they’re complaining about something I said, or did or didn’t do. I’m spending more time addressing the parents than I am teaching their children.” What has happened? What has caused this sudden explosion of excessive parental harassment? Well, for one thing, far too many educators have lost the respect and dignity they once had. I know. We don’t like to hear this, but it is the truth. Most any day when we pick up the newspaper or turn on the television, we learn of another teacher or administrator involved in criminal behavior. It sends a frightening message and alerts us as parents that we need to make sure our children are safe when they’re at school. Forgive me for so many references to the way “things used to be,” but teaching was at one time a most revered profession. Teachers dressed as professionals. They were exemplary role models in the community. They were truly “in loco parentis.” This remarkable and applicable Latin term means “in the place of the parent” or “instead of a parent.” What a testament to the educator! We have been given, by law, the responsibility to act in the best interest 34

Texas School Business • April 2010

of the students, just as their parents would do. Unfortunately, some people in our profession have forgotten this. Think about it: We are to serve, provide for, love and care for the students as if we were the parents! I wrote an article years ago about how critical it is for educators to care genuinely about children. I went so far as to say that I thought it was the single-most important “ingredient” for a teacher to possess. A teacher, whose principal gave her a copy of the article, wrote a scathing letter to me about how foolish I was. She stated something to the effect that she did not love her students. That was not why she was hired. Her task was to teach her students mathematics — nothing else! Upon reading that letter, my heart ached for both her and her students. I realized that she was not happy in her job, and I strongly suspected that the students in her classroom were just as miserable. Today, for a moment, ponder the idea that you are the parent of a very large family. Focus on the idea that you want the best for “your children.” Imagine what your school or your classroom would look like if the people in charge really did love the children enough to provide what was best for each child. Would some of the teachers remain on your staff? Would courses be added to encourage the special gifts some children have been given? Would you really want your children in a classroom where academics were more important than acceptance? If you truly cared as much as a loving parent, would things remain the same? I wonder. I really do wonder. RINEY JORDAN, whose best-selling book, “All the Difference,” is now in its sixth printing, is an international speaker and humorist. He can be reached at riney@htcomp.net or by visiting www.rineyjordan.com.

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Vernon ISD Neches ISD Northwest ISD Overton ISD Palestine ISD Paradise ISD Pearsall ISD Pittsburg ISD Plano ISD Riesel ISD Rockdale ISD Rockwall ISD Rogers ISD D Royse City ISD S&S CISD Salado ISD Springtown ISD Sulphur Springs ISD Taylor ISD Terrell ISD Troy ISD Van Alstyne ISD Whitesboro ISD Alvarado ISD Anna ISD Bland ISD Bridgeport ISD Brownsville ISD Caddo Mills ISD Cam e ISD Celina ISD Center ISD China Spring ISD Chisum ISD Clifton ISD Clint ISD Comanche ISD Commerce ISD Connally ISD Cooper ISD Copperas Cove ISD Corsicana ISD Decatur ISD DeSoto ISD Durant ISD Elgin ISD Elkhart ISD Fa ose ISD Greenville ISD Groesbeck ISD Hays CISD Kaufman ISD Kemp ISD Krum ISD Leonard ISD Lewisville ISD Livingston ISD Lone Oak ISD Lytle ISD Mabank ISD Melissa ISD Meridian ISD Mildred ISD Mt. Vernon ISD Neches ISD N verton ISD Palestine ISD Paradise ISD Pearsall ISD Pittsburg ISD Plano ISD Riesel ISD Rockdale ISD Rockwall ISD Rogers ISD Rosebud-Lott ISD Royse City ISD S&S CISD Salado ISD Springtown ISD Sulphur Springs ISD Taylor ISD T D Van Alstyne ISD Whitesboro ISD Alvarado ISD Anna ISD Bland ISD Bridgeport ISD Brownsville ISD Caddo Mills ISD Campbell ISD Celeste ISD Celina ISD Center ISD China Spring ISD Chisum ISD Clifton ISD Clint ISD Comanche ISD Connally ISD Cooper ISD Copperas Cove ISD Corsicana ISD Decatur ISD DeSoto ISD Durant ISD Elgin ISD Elkhart ISD Fairfield ISD Glen Rose ISD Greenville ISD Groesbeck ISD Hays CISD Kaufman ISD Kemp ISD Krum ISD Le ille ISD Livingston ISD Lone Oak ISD Lytle ISD Mabank ISD Melissa ISD Meridian ISD Mildred ISD Mt. 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Vernon ISD Neches ISD Northwest ISD Overton ISD Palestine ISD Paradise ISD Pearsall ISD Pitt SD Riesel ISD Rockdale ISD Rockwall ISD Rogers ISD Rosebud-Lott ISD Royse City ISD S&S CISD Salado ISD Springtown ISD Sulphur Springs ISD Taylor ISD Terrell ISD Troy ISD Van Alstyne ISD Whitesboro ISD ISD Alvarado ISD Anna I dgeport ISD Brownsville ISD Caddo Mills ISD Campbell ISD Celeste ISD Celina ISD Center ISD China Spring ISD Chisum ISD Clifton ISD Clint ISD Comanche ISD Commerce ISD Connally ISD Cooper ISD Copperas Cove ISD Cors r ISD DeSoto ISD Durant ISD Elgin ISD Elkhart ISD Fairfield ISD Glen Rose ISD Greenville ISD Groesbeck ISD Hays CISD Kaufman ISD Kemp ISD Krum ISD Leonard ISD Lewisville ISD Livingston ISD Lone Oak ISD Lytle ISD Mabank D Meridian ISD Mildred ISD Mt. Vernon ISD Neches ISD Northwest ISD Overton ISD Palestine ISD Paradise ISD Pearsall ISD Pittsburg ISD Plano ISD Riesel ISD Rockdale ISD Rockwall ISD Rogers ISD Rosebud-Lott ISD Royse City ISD ISD Springtown ISD Sulphur Springs ISD Taylor ISD Terrell ISD Troy ISD Van Alstyne ISD Whitesboro ISD Alvarado ISD Anna ISD Bland ISD Bridgeport ISD Brownsville ISD Caddo Mills ISD Campbell ISD Celeste ISD Celina ISD C Spring ISD Chisum ISD Clifton ISD Clint ISD Comanche ISD Commerce ISD Connally ISD Cooper ISD Copperas Cove ISD Corsicana ISD Decatur ISD DeSoto ISD Durant ISD Elgin ISD Elkhart ISD Fairfield ISD Glen Rose ISD Gree eck ISD Hays CISD Kaufman ISD Kemp ISD Krum ISD Leonard ISD Lewisville ISD Livingston ISD Lone Oak ISD Lytle ISD Mabank ISD Melissa ISD Meridian ISD Mildred ISD Mt. Vernon ISD Neches ISD Northwest ISD Overton ISD radise ISD Pearsall ISD Pittsburg ISD Plano ISD Riesel ISD Rockdale ISD Rockwall ISD Rogers ISD Rosebud-Lott ISD Royse City ISD S&S CISD Salado ISD Springtown ISD Sulphur Springs ISD Taylor ISD Terrell ISD Troy ISD Van Al boro ISD Alvarado ISD Anna ISD Bland ISD Bridgeport ISD Brownsville ISD Caddo Mills ISD Campbell ISD Celeste ISD Celina ISD Center ISD China Spring ISD Chisum ISD Clifton ISD Clint ISD Comanche ISD Commerce ISD Con r ISD Copperas Cove ISD Corsicana ISD Decatur ISD DeSoto ISD Durant ISD Elgin ISD Elkhart ISD Fairfield ISD Glen Rose ISD Greenville ISD Groesbeck ISD Hays CISD Kaufman ISD Kemp ISD Krum ISD Leonard ISD Lewisville ISD L ne Oak ISD Lytle ISD Mabank ISD Melissa ISD Meridian ISD Mildred ISD Mt. Vernon ISD Neches ISD Northwest ISD Overton ISD Palestine ISD Paradise ISD Pearsall ISD Pittsburg ISD Plano ISD Riesel ISD Rockdale ISD Rockwall IS sebud-Lott ISD Royse City ISD S&S CISD Salado ISD Springtown ISD Sulphur Springs ISD Taylor ISD Terrell ISD Troy ISD Van Alstyne ISD Whitesboro ISD Sulphur Springs ISD Taylor ISD Terrell ISD Troy ISD Van Alstyne ISD Whitesboro D Anna ISD Bland ISD Bridgeport ISD Brownsville ISD Caddo Mills ISD Campbell ISD Celeste ISD Celina ISD Center ISD China Spring ISD Chisum ISD Clifton ISD Clint ISD Comanche ISD Commerce ISD Connally ISD Cooper ISD SD Corsicana ISD Decatur ISD DeSoto ISD Durant ISD Elgin ISD Elkhart ISD Fairfield ISD Glen Rose ISD Greenville ISD Groesbeck ISD Hays CISD Kaufman ISD Kemp ISD Krum ISD Leonard ISD Lewisville ISD Livingston ISD Lon D Mabank ISD Melissa ISD Meridian ISD Mildred ISD Mt. Vernon ISD Neches ISD Northwest ISD Overton ISD Palestine ISD Paradise ISD Pearsall ISD Pittsburg ISD Plano ISD Riesel ISD Rockdale ISD Rockwall ISD Rogers ISD Rose yse City ISD S&S CISD Salado ISD Springtown ISD Sulphur Springs ISD Taylor ISD Terrell ISD Troy ISD Van Alstyne ISD Whitesboro ISD Alvarado ISD Anna ISD Bland ISD Bridgeport ISD Brownsville ISD Caddo Mills ISD Campbell IS lina ISD Center ISD China Spring ISD Chisum ISD Clifton ISD Clint ISD Comanche ISD Commerce ISD Connally ISD Cooper ISD Copperas Cove ISD Corsicana ISD Decatur ISD DeSoto ISD Durant ISD Elgin ISD Elkhart ISD Fairfield D Greenville ISD Groesbeck ISD Hays CISD Kaufman ISD Kemp ISD Krum ISD Leonard ISD Lewisville ISD Livingston ISD Lone Oak ISD Lytle ISD Mabank ISD Melissa ISD Meridian ISD Mildred ISD Mt. Vernon ISD Neches ISD Nort n ISD Palestine ISD Paradise ISD Pearsall ISD Pittsburg ISD Plano ISD Riesel ISD Rockdale ISD Rockwall ISD Rogers ISD Rosebud-Lott ISD Royse City ISD S&S CISD Salado ISD Springtown ISD Sulphur Springs ISD Taylor ISD Terrel n Alstyne ISD Whitesboro ISD Alvarado ISD Anna ISD Bland ISD Bridgeport ISD Brownsville ISD Caddo Mills ISD Campbell ISD Celeste ISD Celina ISD Center ISD China Spring ISD Chisum ISD Clifton ISD Clint ISD Comanche ISD C nnally ISD Cooper ISD Copperas Cove ISD Corsicana ISD Decatur ISD DeSoto ISD Durant ISD Elgin ISD Elkhart ISD Fairfield ISD Glen Rose ISD Greenville ISD Groesbeck ISD Hays CISD Kaufman ISD Kemp ISD Krum ISD Leonard IS D Livingston ISD Lone Oak ISD Lytle ISD Mabank ISD Melissa ISD Meridian ISD Mildred ISD Mt. Vernon ISD Neches ISD Northwest ISD Overton ISD Palestine ISD Paradise ISD Pearsall ISD Pittsburg ISD Plano ISD Riesel ISD Roc all ISD Rogers ISD Rosebud-Lott ISD Royse City ISD S&S CISD Salado ISD Springtown ISD Sulphur Springs ISD Taylor ISD Terrell ISD Troy ISD Van Alstyne ISD Whitesboro ISD Alvarado ISD Anna ISD Bland ISD Bridgeport ISD Brown Mills ISD Campbell ISD Celeste ISD Celina ISD Center ISD China Spring ISD Chisum ISD Clifton ISD Clint ISD Comanche ISD Commerce ISD Connally ISD Cooper ISD Copperas Cove ISD Corsicana ISD Decatur ISD DeSoto ISD D D Elkhart ISD Fairfield ISD Glen Rose ISD Greenville ISD Groesbeck ISD Hays CISD Kaufman ISD Kemp ISD Krum ISD Leonard ISD Lewisville ISD Livingston ISD Lone Oak ISD Lytle ISD Mabank ISD Melissa ISD Meridian ISD Mildre n ISD Neches ISD Northwest ISD Overton ISD Palestine ISD Paradise ISD Pearsall ISD Pittsburg ISD Plano ISD Riesel ISD Rockdale ISD Rockwall ISD Rogers ISD Rosebud-Lott ISD Royse City ISD S&S CISD Salado ISD Springtown ISD s ISD Taylor ISD Terrell ISD Troy ISD Van Alstyne ISD Whitesboro ISD Alvarado ISD Anna ISD Bland ISD Bridgeport ISD Brownsville ISD Caddo Mills ISD Campbell ISD Celeste ISD Celina ISD Center ISD China Spring ISD Chisum ISD C D Comanche ISD Commerce ISD Connally ISD Cooper ISD Copperas Cove ISD Corsicana ISD Decatur ISD DeSoto ISD Durant ISD Elgin ISD Elkhart ISD Fairfield ISD Glen Rose ISD Greenville ISD Groesbeck ISD Hays CISD Kaufman I um ISD Leonard ISD Lewisville ISD Livingston ISD Lone Oak ISD Lytle ISD Mabank ISD Melissa ISD Meridian ISD Mildred ISD Mt. Vernon ISD Neches ISD Northwest ISD Overton ISD Palestine ISD Paradise ISD Pearsall ISD Pitt SD Riesel ISD Rockdale ISD Rockwall ISD Rogers ISD Rosebud-Lott ISD Royse City ISD S&S CISD Salado ISD Springtown ISD Sulphur Springs ISD Taylor ISD Terrell ISD Troy ISD Van Alstyne ISD Whitesboro ISD Alvarado ISD Anna I dgeport ISD Brownsville ISD Caddo Mills ISD Campbell ISD Celeste ISD Celina ISD Center ISD China Spring ISD Chisum ISD Clifton ISD Clint ISD Comanche ISD Commerce ISD Connally ISD Cooper ISD Copperas Cove ISD Cors r ISD DeSoto ISD Durant ISD Elgin ISD Elkhart ISD Fairfield ISD Glen Rose ISD Greenville ISD Groesbeck ISD Hays CISD Kaufman ISD Kemp ISD Krum ISD Leonard ISD Lewisville ISD Livingston ISD Lone Oak ISD Lytle ISD Mabank D Meridian ISD Mildred ISD Mt. Vernon ISD Neches ISD Northwest ISD Overton ISD Palestine ISD Paradise ISD Pearsall ISD Pittsburg ISD Plano ISD Riesel ISD Rockdale ISD Rockwall ISD Rogers ISD Rosebud-Lott ISD Royse City ISD ISD Springtown ISD Sulphur Springs ISD Taylor ISD Terrell ISD Troy ISD Van Alstyne ISD Whitesboro ISD Alvarado ISD Anna ISD Bland ISD Bridgeport ISD Brownsville ISD Caddo Mills ISD Campbell ISD Celeste ISD Celina ISD C Spring ISD Chisum ISD Clifton ISD Clint ISD Comanche ISD Commerce ISD Connally ISD Cooper ISD Copperas Cove ISD Corsicana ISD Decatur ISD DeSoto ISD Durant ISD Elgin ISD Elkhart ISD Fairfield ISD Glen Rose ISD Gree eck ISD Hays CISD Kaufman ISD Kemp ISD Krum ISD Leonard ISD Lewisville ISD Livingston ISD Lone Oak ISD Lytle ISD Mabank ISD Melissa ISD Meridian ISD Mildred ISD Mt. Vernon ISD Neches ISD Northwest ISD Overton ISD radise ISD Pearsall ISD Pittsburg ISD Plano ISD Riesel ISD Rockdale ISD Rockwall ISD Rogers ISD Rosebud-Lott ISD Royse City ISD S&S CISD Salado ISD Springtown ISD Sulphur Springs ISD Taylor ISD Terrell ISD Troy ISD Van Al boro ISD Alvarado ISD Anna ISD Bland ISD Bridgeport ISD Brownsville ISD Caddo Mills ISD Campbell ISD Celeste ISD Celina ISD Center ISD China Spring ISD Chisum ISD Clifton ISD Clint ISD Comanche ISD Commerce ISD Con r ISD Copperas Cove ISD Corsicana ISD Decatur ISD DeSoto ISD Durant ISD Elgin ISD Elkhart ISD Fairfield ISD Glen Rose ISD Greenville ISD Groesbeck ISD Hays CISD Kaufman ISD Kemp ISD Krum ISD Leonard ISD Lewisville ISD L ne Oak ISD Lytle ISD Mabank ISD Melissa ISD Meridian ISD Mildred ISD Mt. Vernon ISD Neches ISD Northwest ISD Overton ISD Palestine ISD Paradise ISD Pearsall ISD Pittsburg ISD Plano ISD Riesel ISD Rockdale ISD Rockwall IS sebud-Lott ISD Royse City ISD S&S CISD Salado ISD Springtown ISD Sulphur Springs ISD Taylor ISD Terrell ISD Troy ISD Van Alstyne ISD Whitesboro ISD Alvarado ISD Anna ISD Bland ISD Bridgeport ISD Brownsville ISD Caddo bell ISD Celeste ISD Celina ISD Center ISD China Spring ISD Chisum ISD Clifton ISD Clint ISD Comanche ISD Commerce ISD Connally ISD Cooper ISD Copperas Cove ISD Corsicana ISD Decatur ISD DeSoto ISD Durant ISD Elgin IS irfield ISD Glen Rose ISD Greenville ISD Groesbeck ISD Hays CISD Kaufman ISD Kemp ISD Krum ISD Leonard ISD Lewisville ISD Livingston ISD Lone Oak ISD Lytle ISD Mabank ISD Melissa ISD Meridian ISD Mildred ISD Mt. Ve s ISD Northwest ISD Overton ISD Palestine ISD Paradise ISD Pearsall ISD Pittsburg ISD Plano ISD Riesel ISD Rockdale ISD Rockwall ISD Rogers ISD Rosebud-Lott ISD Royse City ISD S&S CISD Salado ISD Springtown ISD Sulphur Sp SD Terrell ISD Troy ISD Van Alstyne ISD Whitesboro ISD Alvarado ISD Anna ISD Bland ISD Bridgeport ISD Brownsville ISD Caddo Mills ISD Campbell ISD Celeste ISD Celina ISD Center ISD China Spring ISD Chisum ISD Clifton ISD che ISD Commerce ISD Connally ISD Cooper ISD Copperas Cove ISD Corsicana ISD Decatur ISD DeSoto ISD Durant ISD Elgin ISD Elkhart ISD Fairfield ISD Glen Rose ISD Greenville ISD Groesbeck ISD Hays CISD Kaufman ISD Kemp onard ISD Lewisville ISD Livingston ISD Lone Oak ISD Lytle ISD Mabank ISD Melissa ISD Meridian ISD Mildred ISD Mt. Vernon ISD Neches ISD Northwest ISD Overton ISD Palestine ISD Paradise ISD Pearsall ISD Pittsburg ISD Plan D Rockdale ISD Rockwall ISD Rogers ISD Rosebud-Lott ISD Royse City ISD S&S CISD Salado ISD Springtown ISD Sulphur Springs ISD Taylor ISD Terrell ISD Troy ISD Van Alstyne ISD Whitesboro ISD Alvarado ISD Anna ISD Bland ISD B ownsville ISD Caddo Mills ISD Campbell ISD Celeste ISD Celina ISD Center ISD China Spring ISD Chisum ISD Clifton ISD Clint ISD Comanche ISD Commerce ISD Connally ISD Cooper ISD Copperas Cove ISD Corsicana ISD De o ISD Durant ISD Elgin ISD Elkhart ISD Fairfield ISD Glen Rose ISD Greenville ISD Groesbeck ISD Hays CISD Kaufman ISD Kemp ISD Krum ISD Leonard ISD Lewisville ISD Livingston ISD Lone Oak ISD Lytle ISD Mabank ISD Melissa IS Mildred ISD Mt. Vernon ISD Neches ISD Northwest ISD Overton ISD Palestine ISD Paradise ISD Pearsall ISD Pittsburg ISD Plano ISD Riesel ISD Rockdale ISD Rockwall ISD Rogers ISD Rosebud-Lott ISD Royse City ISD S&S CISD S | DALLAS | AUSTIN | www.claycomb.net | town ISD Sulphur Springs ISD Taylor ISD Terrell ISD Troy ISD Van Alstyne ISD Whitesboro ISD Alvarado ISD Anna ISD Bland ISD Bridgeport ISD Brownsville ISD Caddo Mills ISD Campbell ISD Celeste ISD Celina ISD Center ISD Chi isum ISD Clifton ISD Clint ISD Comanche ISD Commerce ISD Connally ISD Cooper ISD Copperas Cove ISD Corsicana ISD Decatur ISD DeSoto ISD Durant ISD Elgin ISD Elkhart ISD Fairfield ISD Glen Rose ISD Greenville ISD Groe ISD Kaufman ISD Kemp ISD Krum ISD Leonard ISD Lewisville ISD Livingston ISD Lone Oak ISD Lytle ISD Mabank ISD Melissa ISD Meridian ISD Mildred ISD Mt. Vernon ISD Neches ISD Northwest ISD Overton ISD Palestine ISD Pa l ISD Pittsburg ISD Plano ISD Riesel ISD Rockdale ISD Rockwall ISD Rogers ISD Rosebud-Lott ISD Royse City ISD S&S CISD Salado ISD Springtown ISD Sulphur Springs ISD Taylor ISD Terrell ISD Troy ISD Van Alstyne ISD Whitesbo ISD Anna ISD Bland ISD Bridgeport ISD Brownsville ISD Caddo Mills ISD Campbell ISD Celeste ISD Celina ISD Center ISD China Spring ISD Chisum ISD Clifton ISD Clint ISD Comanche ISD Commerce ISD Connally ISD Cooper ISD SD Corsicana ISD Decatur ISD DeSoto ISD Durant ISD Elgin ISD Elkhart ISD Fairfield ISD Glen Rose ISD Greenville ISD Groesbeck ISD Hays CISD Kaufman ISD Kemp ISD Krum ISD Leonard ISD Lewisville ISD Livingston ISD Lon D Mabank ISD Melissa ISD Meridian ISD Mildred ISD Mt. Vernon ISD Neches ISD Northwest ISD Overton ISD Palestine ISD Paradise ISD Pearsall ISD Pittsburg ISD Plano ISD Riesel ISD Rockdale ISD Rockwall ISD Rogers ISD Rose yse City ISD S&S CISD Salado ISD Springtown ISD Sulphur Springs ISD Taylor ISD Terrell ISD Troy ISD Van Alstyne ISD Whitesboro ISD Alvarado ISD Anna ISD Bland ISD Bridgeport ISD Brownsville ISD Caddo Mills ISD Campbell IS lina ISD Center ISD China Spring ISD Chisum ISD Clifton ISD Clint ISD Comanche ISD Commerce ISD Connally ISD Cooper ISD Copperas Cove ISD Corsicana ISD Decatur ISD DeSoto ISD Durant ISD Elgin ISD Elkhart ISD Fairfield D Greenville ISD Groesbeck ISD Hays CISD Kaufman ISD Kemp ISD Krum ISD Leonard ISD Lewisville ISD Livingston ISD Lone Oak ISD Lytle ISD Mabank ISD Melissa ISD Meridian ISD Mildred ISD Mt. Vernon ISD Neches ISD Nort

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