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FROM THE EDITOR PUBLISHER

Jason Tanner

IT KEEPS GETTING BETTER

jason@tannerpublishing.com EDITOR

It’s hard to believe, but life in Owensboro just keeps getting better

Steven Wilson

all the time. And here at Owensboro Living, we’re proud to bring you

steven@owensboroliving.com

stories about the best people, places and events that our bustling community has to offer. Take a look inside this issue, and you’ll find:

AD SALES

Brock Quinton brock@tannerpublishing.com

The young man whose spontaneous street dancing has everyone from Owensboro to Lexington buzzing;

Robert Williams robert@tannerpublishing.com LAYOUT & DESIGN

A local woman and a creative collective with a heart for the arts; A high school football coach making waves at the college level; And a musician from the Philippines who found his knack for songwriting and recorded an album in Owensboro. And if that wasn’t enough, you’re just in time for a big story about Owensboro’s newest source of breaking local news – Owensboro Times!

Jamie Alexander Andrea Roberson CONTRIBUTORS

Jamie Alexander Sarah Bishop William Green Cassandra Hamilton Julia Hartz Danny May Taryn Norris Dana Peveler Jaime Rafferty Ashley Sorce Melody Ann Wallace Lora Wimsatt

And did I mention this is our annual food issue? Some of Owensboro’s favorites are featured within our pages, including an exhaustive list of

Online www.owensboroliving.com

every eatery in town. Whether it’s burgers, bread, brews or bar-b-q,

facebook.com/owensboroliving

you’re sure to find a restaurant you’ll love (and maybe even a new

twitter.com/owensboroliving

favorite).

issuu.com/owensboroliving Offline Owensboro Living Magazine

Steven Wilson

PO Box 9503

Editor, Owensboro Living

Owensboro, KY 42302

steven@owensboroliving.com

888-304-5416 Subscribe Delivery of Owensboro Living is available by visiting owensboroliving.com/subscribe

ON THE COVER: Chef Matt Weafer tosses brightlycolored summer vegetables from Cecil Farms in a marinade. Weafer paired the veggies with pan-roasted chicken from Hill View Farms Meats, and also prepared wilted kale and a bourbon beurre blanc. Photos by Jamie Alexander 6 OWENSBORO LIVING

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Advertise Owensboro Living is a FREE magazine because of community support. Thank you to the great group of businesses & organizations who advertise.

TANNER PUBLISHING CO.

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2018

AUG SEPT [10]

THE BUZZ

[55]

THE REAL PEOPLE, PLACES AND EVENTS THAT SHAPE OUR COMMUNITY

FEATURES [16] UNTOUCHABLE COMPASSION [20] TEACHERS’ SUMMER BREAK [22] TAYVHO: JUST DOING MY THING [26] COLLEGE-MINDED COACH [30] SOUTHERN SECRETS: SWEET SISTERS [34] DID YOU EVER PICK A PAWPAW [36] HEALTHY EATING FOR ALL AGES [40] THE TIME(S) IS HERE [44] SAY GOODBYE TO THE POLKA DOTS

[50]

[50] RECORDING THE GOSPEL

[55]

DINING GUIDE

DISCOVER THE FLAVOR OF OWENSBORO [64] RESTAURANT DIRECTORY [70] A FRESH TAKE ON TAKEOUT

[74]

THE DISH

PEACH TEA IN A PINCH

[79]

[30]

THE ARTS

OPEN YOUR HEART TO THE ARTS

[82]

THE GETAWAY

[79]

[22]

36 HOURS IN GLASGOW

[86]

THE STYLE

SUMMER STYLES A SOLID FOUNDATION

[94]

THE SCENE

YOUR GUIDE TO WHAT’S HAPPENING IN AND AROUND OWENSBORO

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BUZZ

PHOTO BY AP IMAGERY

THE

100 MEN WHO COOK On June 16, 2018, Old National Bank held their signature fundraising event at the Owensboro Convention Center. The annual fundraiser features 100 community “chefs” who prepare their favorite appetizers, sides, entrees or desserts. Those “chefs” include some of the community’s most notable men, including business leaders, bankers, attorneys, educators, and physicians. This year’s event benefited the Cliff Hagan Boys and Girls Club and the YMCA. Since its inception, the event has raised over $5.6 million for charities in the Old National footprint.

NICKY HAYDEN STATUE UNVEILED

On May 22, 2017, the world lost the “Kentucky Kid,” Nicky Hayden. With countless fans around the globe, the impact of Nicky’s death was felt far beyond Owensboro, the town he called home. On June 8, 2018, to honor Nicky’s life, the City of Owensboro and the Hayden family unveiled a bronze statue of the champion racer on the front lawn of the Owensboro Convention Center. At the unveiling, Mayor Tom Watson declared the following day, June 9, Nicky Hayden day, in reference to his racing number, 69.

OMU EMPLOYEES WORK OVERTIME TO GET WATER FLOWING

On Monday, July 9 most of Daviess County woke up to dry faucets. The culprit? Two water main breaks left Owensboro without water, and scrambling to stores to stock up on bottles of H2O. Fortunately, OMU crews worked around the clock to resolve the massive problem, and water was restored to most parts of the county by Tuesday evening. We’d like to take this opportunity to extend our gratitude to all of the hardworking men and women at OMU who helped life in Owensboro return to normal.

PHOTO BY AP IMAGERY

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BLUEGRASS MUSEUM ANNOUNCES OPENING DATE

We’ve waited and watched as the beautiful building on Second Street has gone up over the last year. Now we know that the International Bluegrass Music Hall of Fame and Museum will celebrate its grand opening over the weekend of October 18-20. The event will include a private concert on October 18, followed by two more days of live music, featuring Bluegrass legend Sam Bush on Friday. Free concerts will be held on the outdoor stage throughout the day on Saturday, October 20.

PHOTO BY AP IMAGERY

HOGG INDUCTED INTO OWENSBORO WALK OF FAME

BALLOONS OVER THE GARDEN

This year marked the 9th Annual Western Kentucky Botanical Garden Dazzling Daylily Festival with Balloons Over the Garden. The garden boasts over 800 varieties. Combine that with hot air balloon rides, music, and art displays, and the 2018 festival was a huge success, once again.

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Trailblazing football star Houston Hogg, who graduated from Daviess County High School in 1967, and became one of the first African-American football players in the SEC at the University of Kentucky, was inducted into the Owensboro Walk of Fame on Friday, July 27. His induction was part of a two-day event hosted by the Foundation for Daviess County Public Schools to honor Hogg and his achievements on and off the football field.

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PHOTOS BY AP IMAGERY

ROMP Thousands of music fans once again flocked to Yellow Creek Park for the 2018 edition of ROMP. This year’s festival, headlined by Allison Krauss and Sam Bush, broke attendance records for the annual event, with ticket sales topping 27,000. The four-day concert, held each year for the past 15 years at the end of June, draws bluegrass enthusiasts from around the globe. In addition to Krauss and Bush, fans were treated to music from acts such as Ricky Skaggs, Rhiannon Giddens and The Travelin’ McCourys.

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PROMOTIONAL FEATURE

O W E N S B O R O H E A LT H H E A LT H P A R K

The Healthpark

CELEBRATING 20 YEARS! It’s hard to believe that it’s been two decades since the Healthpark first opened its doors, and we’re proud to say that the facility has never been more lively, vibrant and engaging for the communities that Owensboro Health serves. hether it’s the camaraderie and warmth of the

W

mission comes to mind. That’s our future: Working

group exercise classes, the relaxing environment of

tirelessly to improve the health of the communities we

the aquatics area, or the lively sounds of basketball on

serve.

the gym floor, the Healthpark is alive with the sounds

of members who are working to live the best life they

our community to initiate programs to help address the

possibly can.

health risks and needs in our area. If you see a way we

Owensboro Health’s mission is to heal the sick and

can serve you better, let us know. If you know a way we

to improve the health of the communities we serve. The

can do more to meet the health and wellness needs of the

Healthpark is integral to both parts of the mission. Not

community, we want to hear about it. The Healthpark is

only is the Healthpark an outstanding exercise and fitness

a medical-based facility that is here to serve you, and our

facility, it’s also a wellness resource, with dietitians and

success is entirely due to the people we serve. We thank

nutritionists, trainers and exercise physiologists, and

you for helping make us what we are today, and we are

programs for people of all ages. All those facets come

excited about what we can do together in the future.

together in a facility that is dedicated to helping people

live well, no matter where they are in their lives.

forward to many more to come!

Now, the Healthpark and the dedicated, caring staff

We are continuously working with our members and

We’re celebrating the success of 20 years and looking We want to hear from you! If you would like to find out

who run it are looking to the future. How can we best serve

more about what the Healthpark has to offer, call 270-681-

you and the people of our community? When it comes

1115 or follow the Healthpark on Facebook to see all of our

to the future, the second part of Owensboro Health’s

upcoming events.

Join us on September 29 for our annual Run for Your Life and Kids’ Fun Run event. And stay for the kickoff to our 20th anniversary celebration. It’s a day where we can celebrate our commitment to the community’s health and wellness with you!

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UNTOUCHABLE COMPASSION

BY MELODY ANN WALLACE

The 1996 University of Kentucky championship

fact, Father Bradley was quoted in the April 4, 1996 issue

basketball team, also known as “The Untouchables,” has

of the Rochester, New York, Catholic Courier, as saying, “I

undoubtedly made a significant contribution to the legacy

think I have a great relationship with the team. One of the

of Big Blue Nation. However, when team members Tony

great things about this team is that each of them is a fine

Delk, Walter McCarty, and Jeff Sheppard paid a visit to

young man, and they genuinely care about each other…”

Brescia University on Thursday, June 14, 2018, it was

Those sentiments have not changed, for Father Bradley,

about so much more than celebrity meet and greets and

or for the players. Delk said that, in great part due to the

autographed basketballs. It was about supporting a man,

influence of Father Bradley and Coach Rick Pitino, “We

a coach, and a town that they had made a connection with

became a great group of men.”

over 20 years ago.

This legendary group of players came together around

an indelible impact on these three. They all graduated

the same time the Daniel Pitino Shelter was established

from college, and each went on to play in the NBA, as did

in Owensboro. Father Ed Bradley not only founded the

six of their other teammates. Delk jokingly mentioned

Pitino Shelter, but also served as the chaplain for the

how nervous he was the first time he was asked to go out

Kentucky Wildcats during the 1996 season. Tony Delk said

on the floor as an NBA player and guard Michael Jordan.

that the players have always had a strong connection to

“I wore his sneakers. I still wear them to this day,” he

Owensboro through Father Bradley and Coach Pitino. In

laughed. Delk said the nerves didn’t last long. “Coach

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It is evident that their time playing at Kentucky had

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Pitino prepared us to be NBA players.

players to play at the highest level,

He didn’t let us take any days off.”

but also prepares coaches to coach.”

While Pitino seemed to have a knack

McCarty speaks from experience, as he

for transforming these young men into

not only played for Coach Pitino with

better players, and preparing them to

the Wildcats and the Boston Celtics,

be NBA ready, the lessons he taught

but he also coached under him at the

them have transcended the basketball

University of Louisville. McCarty

court.

will now carry the lessons imparted to

It is obvious that Delk, McCarty,

him by Coach Pitino to the University

and Sheppard still hold Coach Pitino in

of Evansville, where he was recently

high regard. Even after his NBA tenure,

named head men’s basketball coach.

McCarty says of Pitino, “He’s the best

Tony Delk said Coach Pitino also

on what made the

coach I’ve played for. He was really

helped the players better understand

1996 Championship

good at motivating you and kicking

the challenge of making sacrifices. “I

Kentucky Wildcat

you in the butt, but he was also good

had to earn what I got. When you earn

basketball team so

at picking you back up. He prepares

it, you get to keep it.”

great

“MOST OF THE OTHER TEAMS HAD THREE OR FOUR GOOD PLAYERS—WE HAD 12.” —Walter McCarty

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HOW YOU CAN HELP While The Daniel Pitino Shelter relies heavily on the generous donations of individuals and businesses throughout the community, there are still several items needed in order to meet the daily needs of the shelter and its residents. Wish list of NEW items needed: Vacuum cleaner Computer – for case management Printer Commercial gas stove for meal preparation Twin sheets – fitted/regular Crib mattress Small $5-$10 gift cards for clothing stores and restaurants to use as incentives for residents

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While

it

was

great

evening

of

become the future site of the Nicky Hayden

reminiscing and learning from those who

Apartments.

played the game with excellence, Father

complex will allow the Pitino Shelter to

Bradley gave a gracious reminder of the true

provide “rapid re-housing” for individuals

purpose of the evening. “We’re here because

in dire situations, educate them about the

of our compassion for the homeless,” he said

necessary resources to eventually secure

as he addressed the crowd. That compassion was evident through the $40,000 raised through ticket purchases and donations. The

evening

also

provided

an

opportunity to honor the memory and service

of

two

generous

community

members, Ben Hartz and Rick Kamuf. During the heartfelt tribute and award presentation, Father Bradley made the

This

12-unit

apartment

permanent housing, and hopefully aid in preventing homelessness.

Both Father Bradley and the executive

director for the Daniel Pitino Shelter, Thad Gunderson, felt the evening was a complete success. Gunderson said that the generous donations allow the shelter “to do what we need and want to do. Overall, as far as

announcement that, due to the donation of

making a difference in people’s lives, we’re

nearby land and a grant from the Kentucky

doing a good job.” A small portion of that

Housing Foundation, another memory

can be attributed to three dynamic players

would be honored in the community.

that selflessly gave of their time to support a

The land across the street from the Pitino

man and a mission that will forever be close

Shelter on Walnut Street is now slated to

to their hearts.

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PHOTO BY JAMIE ALEXANDER

W

hat do teachers do during the summer? Lounge all day by the

pool? Take shopping trips to Nashville or Louisville? Visit Disney World with friends and family? Maybe some do. But what many people don’t realize is that teachers ALWAYS work during the summer. This school break is not three months of continuous vacation with no worries about students, lesson plans, or new teaching strategies. On the contrary, teachers spend a great deal of time in professional development sessions, preparing their classroom climate, and planning lessons with engaging activities for students.

As an educator, I am fully aware that

many teachers must also work additional jobs during the schools’ summer break in order to make ends meet. Within our community, teachers work at Friday After 5, hostess at local restaurants, run fireworks stands, and wait tables. However, when I questioned my friends who are educators in the OwensboroDaviess County area, I found what I had very much expected. A vast number of educators in our area continue following their heart’s passion during the summer by, you guessed it, TEACHING. Let me tell you about some of these individuals who are making our community a better place for our kids. Bayli

Boling,

a

graduate

of

the

University of Alabama who chose to return to

Teachers’

Owensboro to work and live, just completed

BY CASSANDRA HAMILTON

intern for the past four years, and now as

SUMMER BREAK

her first year teaching 8th grade social studies at Owensboro Middle School. However, Bayli, who is also planning her wedding for next summer, has been an educator for much longer than that. Since her freshman year in college, she has worked during the summer at a federally-funded camp provided by Daviess County Public Schools. As a college an instructional assistant, Bayli is spending her summer helping children of migrant parents by supporting them academically and working with others to fulfill the students’

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basic needs. Because she is a secondary social studies major,

her family additional opportunities and experiences. She

teaching math and reading to 3rd grade students is totally out

finds great fulfillment working in the Skill Train program

of Bayli’s comfort zone, but she loves the challenge. According

at Owensboro Community & Technical College’s downtown

to Bayli, the camp is “truly a family,” so she continues to apply

campus, where she tutors English Language Learners as well

year after year.

as individuals working to earn their GED. As an added bonus,

this job has also allowed her to reconnect with and teach

In addition to the summer program, Bayli continues her

volunteerism with the Daviess County Lions Club Fair, an

alongside her former middle school math teacher.

organization she has been involved with for the past 10 years.

This gives Bayli, the 2011 Miss Daviess County and three-year

is teaching English to students in China. Through an

director of the pageant, an opportunity to serve as a role model

organization called QKids, Sandy “meets” with students online

for local young women, ages 16-21. With the help of other

through multiple 30-minute interactive lessons. Working

former queens and community members, Bayli teaches these

mostly with young children, ages 4-5, Sandy not only teaches

women valuable skills that will help them in their futures: how

them the English language, but she also uses stories about her

to conduct themselves in an interview, keep their poise even in

own children to help students relate to the material. Using a

stressful situations, work alongside others while minimizing

map, she demonstrates where Kentucky is located in relation

conflict, persevere with their goals and rally for causes about

to their home country, and shows students the time difference

which they are passionate.

by allowing them to look out her window to see that it is dark

Another opportunity Sandy has taken advantage of

Another new teacher, Misty House, just spent her entire

outside at the same time it is sunny outside in China. Sandy

first year as an educator staying after school each day until

also enjoys meeting the children’s parents, many of whom

5:30 p.m. to work with students through the 21st Century

have attempted to teach her words in their own language. She

Grant. A 3rd grade teacher at Estes Elementary, Misty, along

particularly relished listening to one of her students as they

with 10 other teachers and four assistants, will continue to

serenaded her with “Edelweiss” from The Sound of Music, sung

work with those same students each weekday through the end

completely in Chinese.

of June, bolstering their basic skills and hopefully allowing

them to reach their educational goals, so that they will be on

that teachers spend much of their own money by investing

grade level for the upcoming school year. Misty, a mom with

in materials for their classrooms and incentives for their

two daughters in college, also works alongside other employees

students. Many teachers don’t make enough to take “vacation”

each night at Gary’s Drive-In, preparing the restaurant for the

all summer, and oftentimes they must work to support their

next business day.

family, pay for an upcoming wedding or put their children

It is no secret that teacher salaries are not the greatest, and

Sandy Swift, a 6th grade reading, writing, and leadership

through college. Nevertheless, what I found most rewarding

teacher at College View Middle School has been an educator for

about researching this article was the number of educators

17 years. This summer, not surprisingly, she is also continuing

who, regardless of pay, pour themselves into continuing to

to teach. A mother of two children still living at home, Sandy

educate students and better their community, even during

says she works to supplement her income in order to offer

their summer “break.”

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JUST DOING MY THING I He’s known as “Dancing Guy” or “Happy Feet,” but you can just call him Tayvho. BY DANNY MAY

saw his backwards hat and sunglasses bouncing to the music from a block and a half away as I drove toward the Daviess County Public Library, where I was scheduled to meet Yayvis “Tayvho” Apkan for this interview. You’ve seen the

“dancing guy,” right? I first saw him at the corner of Parrish and Frederica, but I’ve seen him on South Frederica and the 54 overpass, as well.

But he doesn’t call it “dancing;” he calls it “just doing my thing.” That’s

partly because he’s never had dance lessons or any kind of training. It’s also because it’s not a routine. “I don’t know what I’m doing. I just feel it. I get really into the music and I move how I feel. It just happens. I’m just being me,” he explained.

If that leaves you wondering (like I was) what he’s listening to that causes

these spontaneous fits of joy, well that’s an even more interesting part of the story: he’s listening to his own music.

Tayvho is home for the summer from the University of Kentucky, where he

just finished his freshman year. But he also produces music as a hobby. So the beats he’s listening to in those earbuds are songs he produced himself using FL Studio “Fruit Loops” program on his computer. “I start with samples I like, then 22 OWENSBORO LIVING

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PHOTOS BY JAMIE ALEXANDER

add a beat to it, and then throw in some sound effects, too.

bob.” The best way I can describe it is fast crazy legs with arms

When it all comes together, it makes me so happy I just have

gently swinging and doing the hand swoop thing.

to move!”

to hop on in the next time you see him around town.

He let me listen to a song, and I gotta tell you, about 10

So now that you know some of the basic moves, feel free

seconds in, and I was ready to dance, too!

Reactions

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Go ahead. Join in!

So right there on Frederica, he showed me some of his

cause he doesn’t have a license. “I like exploring. I’d rather

favorite moves. I learned the hand swoop thing that doesn’t

just walk and be outside,” he told me. But despite the fact that

have a name but looks like your arms are mimicking waves.

he dances—excuse me—does his own thing, along the busiest

It goes best with a head bob and a shoulder shrug. And he’s

streets in Owensboro, Tayvho claims he doesn’t do it to get

right. With those beats going, you just can’t help it.

noticed. “People say they honk and yell but I can’t hear them

Then there’s the “drive back” as he calls it. That’s where

most of the time because I’m just groovin’ to the music. The

you throw your arm back like you’re pulling a gear shift and

way I see it, I’m just using what God gave me. That’s the most

bounce backward on one leg. It’s ridiculous fun! The hand

important thing. And if that makes somebody else happy, then

stand is another Tayvho favorite, but I didn’t try it. I’m too old

that’s cool, too!”

for all that. (Tayvho is 19.)

If you’re wondering why he walks everywhere, it’s be-

It clearly does. In addition to the honks and “thumbs up”

Next was “the kick,” where you lean back, throw one arm

as people drive by, Tayvho says other people joining him for

straight out to balance, reach your other arm back to catch

some moves on the sidewalk is becoming more common as

yourself with your palm and kick out with the other leg. Mul-

the summer rolls on. Kids. Adults. Whoever. A dance party

tiple times. Or switch legs. Or whatever you feel.    

broke out on the front lawn of Puzzle Pieces one day when

Tayvho was walking by. That day, an AT&T Tech joined in,

But the classic Tayvho move is what he calls the “Sponge-

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which WBKR’s Angel Welsh caught on video.

Will it ever stop?

But his favorite reaction was from an Owensboro Police officer. “He

This is where I have a hard time making sense of all this. Because

stopped me to make sure I was okay. I think he thought I was on drugs

whenever he is “doing his thing,” every head is turning. Some people

or something. But then he asked me what I was listening to, and when I

drive back around to get a second look. People just don’t know what to

told him, he asked if he could listen. So I said ‘sure’ and handed him my

think about a guy who spontaneously dances all over town. The media

earbuds.” Apparently the cop liked what he heard, because before he got

in Lexington and Owensboro have done stories about him because it’s

back in his cruiser, he asked Tayvho for his playlist.

different and interesting. He has basically positioned himself into minicelebrity status. But he says he doesn’t do it for attention.

So where did this come from?

As a young boy here in Owensboro, Tayvho was into video games,

cartoons and Dragon Ball Z. But in middle school, he changed it up and started getting into music. “I was a typical gamer, but I got tired of video games and started learning instruments in orchestra,” he explained. By high school, he started producing his own beats with Garage Band (a digital studio program) on his laptop. Now, he collaborates with other producers online to improve his craft.

So music has been Tayvho’s thing for a long time, but this street

And beyond that, the music he’s listening to he created himself,

which is why it makes him happy enough to break into dancing. Yet he has no intention to ever release it or allow anyone else to listen to it. Other than his producer friends.

Then, when I asked him what’s next in terms of music and dancing,

he says he doesn’t think about it or really even care. “Producing music is fun, but I just do it for me. I’m not trying to make money off of it.”

He went on to say what he really wants to do is work with people

with special needs. “Like working at a place like Puzzle Pieces. That’s what I really want to do, because I like helping people. I want to use what

grooving thing came unexpectedly just a few months ago. “I was walk-

I’ve been through and what I’ve learned to help others.”

ing around Lexington one day, listening to my music, and I just started

grooving. I was surprised, honestly, because I didn’t know I could (move

What I thought was a cry for attention is actually honest self-expression.

like this) . I thought ‘this is fun’ and I’ve been doing it ever since.”

Growing up, he used to be a self-described “shy” kid that always

ing and laughing the whole 40 minutes we were talking. It was authentic.

blended in and didn’t seek attention. In high school, he dealt with loneli-

And contagious. Maybe we should all “dance like nobody’s watching”

ness and depression. But with this new form of expression, he’s becoming

like the popular saying goes. And maybe if we would, our world would be

more outgoing and exudes happiness.

a little happier.

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I walked away realizing my first impression of Tayvho was way off. Maybe this kid is on to something. Because he never stopped smil-

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BY MELODY ANN WALLACE

COLLEGE-MINDED COACH

C

oach Phil Hawkins has quite the resume, and

biggest and best football opportunity was 15 minutes

obviously knows how to make a great first

away.” After playing three seasons for the University of

impression. Coach Hawkins officially became

Washington, he returned home to Kentucky and began

the head football coach at Apollo High School in April of

working in the thoroughbred industry. While working as

2018. On the job just a little over two months, and in a

a horse trainer and owner, he started building his football

span of just 10 days, he managed to secure three Division I

coaching resume.

college football scholarship offers for three Apollo players.

Based on Hawkins’ track record at Doss High School in

with the sole responsibility of raising his son Chris in 1996.

Louisville, that is just the beginning.

Even though it seemed like head coaching opportunities

Phil Hawkins grew up in Frankfort, Kentucky and

were available on a daily basis, Coach felt it best to wait

took an unconventional route to college football himself.

until Chris graduated from high school before he took

After high school, he joined the Navy’s Sea College

on a high school head coaching position. Until that time,

Program, which required two years of active duty service,

Hawkins was the head middle school coach and assistant

in an effort to develop naval officers. While stationed in

high school coach at Oldham County, where he became the

Seattle, Washington, Hawkins soon realized that “the

first inductee into the Kentucky Middle School Football

26 OWENSBORO LIVING

. AUGUST / SEPTEMBER 2018

Hawkins began coaching in 1995, but found himself

www.OwensboroLiving.com


PHOTO BY JAMIE ALEXANDER

Hall of Fame.

at Apollo. Hawkins says, “It seems like I have generated

After coming home from the All-American game in

opportunities fast, but it’s because of the relationships that

2009, Hawkins decided that, if he was going to devote

have been built.” When asked why he chose Apollo High

much of his time to student athletes, it only made sense

School, Coach says that he loved coaching at Doss, but as a

to go back to school to become a teacher. He graduated

coach, there still seemed to be “a piece missing.” Hawkins

with his teaching degree from Kentucky State University

says, “I knew that if I did the same things at Apollo that

in 2012, just six months before Chris graduated from high

I did at Doss, the community would provide the support.

school. Coach received the first high school head coaching

It’s not just about providing financial support. It’s just

job he interviewed for, but it wasn’t until he went to Doss

turning around and seeing people in the stands.” As far

High School in Louisville that he truly realized the impact

as his relationship with the student athletes is concerned,

that he could have on his players and their futures.

Coach says, “I love the kids at this school—the one thing

they are is strong academically. I am armed with the

Throughout his coaching career thus far, Hawkins

has coached four All-American players, as well as four All-

information to send them all off to college.”

State players while at Doss. Last year, his team had eight

One individual who offers a unique perspective

players with Division I offers, including six seniors and two

concerning the hiring process of Coach Hawkins, and

juniors. Hawkins recalls that at one point last spring, “51

the importance of the college recruitment process of

Division I schools came through the building,” including

athletes, is Coach Paul Bates. Coach Bates is not only the

schools such as Stanford and Notre Dame. Next spring,

defensive coordinator and offensive line coach for Apollo,

Coach expects many of those colleges to visit his players

he also serves on the AHS site-based committee. Bates’

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. OWENSBORO LIVING

27


son, Parker, will be a sophomore player on the

answer honestly concerning their feelings about

team this year, and has already received his first

him and if they would make any changes. This

Division I offer from the University of Kentucky.

transparency is not only how Coach Hawkins

Coach Bates says of Coach Hawkins, “He was by

deals with his seniors, it’s how he runs his team

far my favorite of all the candidates. He’s the one

and his locker room. He firmly believes that

I felt would fit the Eagle family the best.” Bates

when kids start signing with colleges, it begins

also noted that Coach Hawkins’ connections and

to motivate them differently, on the field and

knowledge of college recruitment, as well as what

in the classroom. “They are going to play like

he had done with the 2018 class at Doss High

college football players, and practice like it. This

School, “really stuck out to all of us” as coaches. Hawkins’ strength in college recruitment has already paid off for sophomore players Logan Weedman and Parker Bates, as well as senior Gage Hayden. All have received offers to Division

“IF EACH YEAR I CAN SAY THIS MANY KIDS WENT TO COLLEGE — THAT PUTS ME AT THE TOP OF THE GAME IN MY BOOK…I TAKE MORE PRIDE IN THAT THAN WINS AND LOSSES.”

I schools in the time Coach Hawkins has been at

— Coach Phil Hawkins

28 OWENSBORO LIVING

Apollo.

For those who are concerned about the futures

of some of the other talented senior players at Apollo, Coach says, “A senior is a late recruit; you have to take a different path for them.” Coach is eager to help his players navigate that path, so he recently sat down and interviewed each up

translates into wins.” Coach admits, “I don’t know how to do it any different.”

Coach Hawkins says that he has worked

to develop a positive relationship with Coach Brannon at DCHS. The two recently hosted a parent recruitment seminar at Kentucky Wesleyan College, in an effort to educate and inform parents about the college football recruiting process. Coach Hawkins feels that if you “empower the parents—then this process is fun for everybody.” Hawkins hopes to build relationships with the other coaches in

and coming senior. Hawkins says, “They’re the

Owensboro, as well. He says that he is completely

leaders, it’s important for me to get a feel for their

fine with a kid coming out of another high school

expectations…and it allows me to give them some

and getting a college offer because of what is

insight on where they are football-wise.” In the

happening at Apollo. He actually welcomes it.

meetings, he asked them what their plans were

“If we don’t look out for all of these kids, we’re

after high school, if they had a preference where

failing them in some way.” It is clear that Coach

they went to school, if they could—would they

Hawkins is not only a positive addition to Apollo

play college football, and then discussed their

High School, but to the Owensboro community,

GPA and ACT test scores. He also asked them to

too.

. AUGUST / SEPTEMBER 2018

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BY TARYN NORRIS

Southern Secrets SWEET SISTERS 30 OWENSBORO LIVING

. AUGUST / SEPTEMBER 2018

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PHOTOS BY JAMIE ALEXANDER

S

outhern Secrets Pastries and Desserts is one of the quickly-

Mackenzie makes. The three best

rising stars in the local food scene here

hand pies, lemon blueberry bars, and

in Owensboro. At just 14 years old,

lemon blueberry Bundt cakes.

Mackenzie Mahlinger took an online

Southern Secrets is officially

course through the Culinary Institute

Mackenzie’s business, but they keep

of America. That course inspired

it a family affair with her sister, Tay-

her to pursue a passion for baking,

lor, and her mother, Heather, provid-

and then begin her journey into the

ing assistance at the market, on social

world of small business. With help

media, and in the business world.

and encouragement from her family,

“She’s the pastry chef,” says Heather.

Mackenzie started selling her goodies

“We help out with the other aspects of

just over a year ago from a single table

the business.” Mackenzie borrowed

at the Owensboro Regional Farmers’

the name Southern Secrets from her

Market. Today, she has four tables full

mother, who once sold Kentucky-

of products ranging from mini cakes,

crafted items under the same banner.

pies, cookies, sweet breads, tarts,

Now Mackenzie uses the name to sell

and other custom orders. Blackberry

a slightly more delicious type of Ken-

jam cakes, cherry hand pies, lemon

tucky-crafted item: baked goods!

blueberry Bundt cakes, bourbon

pecan tarts, and banana bread are

of her family keeps things running

just a few of the delectable treats that

at Southern Secrets. Her mother,

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sellers at the market are the cherry

Mackenzie says that the support

AUGUST / SEPTEMBER 2018

. OWENSBORO LIVING

31


Heather, provided her with the encouragement and empowerment to open a business, and is instrumental in helping the market run. Her older sister, Taylor, is majoring in Writing, Rhetoric, and Communication at Transylvania University and puts that degree to good use by managing the social media and online presence of Southern Secrets. Her father, Charles, actually created the booth and backdrop that the ladies use at the market. Southern Secrets really is a true family business that began simply as a sister helping a sister, and has quickly grown into an all-hands-on-deck operation. Southern Secrets does not have a permanent, physical store, but Mackenzie and her family are at the Owensboro Regional Farmers Market three times a week selling their goods, taking custom orders, and getting to know their customers who have become like a part of the family. “Treating people like family has helped us build a customer base. We always give more and extra. We keep them happy, and then they tell their friends and family,” says Heather. Mackenzie makes a wide variety of custom orders for customers, including gluten-free, sugar-free, and vegan options. “Everything we can, we get right here in Daviess County,” says Heather. All treats are made the day they are sold and are all-natural, fresh, with no preservatives. The Mahlingers grow their own blueberries and rely on their fellow farmers market vendors for most of the other ingredients used in their products. Southern Secrets is conscientious about giving to local non-profit organizations as much as they can. “We always try to give back. We want everyone to know that they are special,” Heather says. At the end of each day, if there are extra items leftover, they go to organizations like Wendell Foster Campus, Girls Inc., the Red Cross, and various nursing homes around town. Heather is passionate about seeing her girls pursue their dreams. “Don’t think because you’re young you can’t do anything. Teenagers need to know that they can create their own opportunities and follow through with their ideas.” Thanks to her inspiration, the local Daviess County area gets to enjoy the delicious sweets made by her daughter, Mackenzie. You can find the ladies of Southern Secrets along with their tasty pastries at the Owensboro Regional Farmers Market every Tuesday and Thursday from 6:30 a.m. noon and Saturday from 8 a.m. - noon. Trust me, you’ll want to try a sample, or seven! 32 OWENSBORO LIVING

. AUGUST / SEPTEMBER 2018

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G

rowing on roadsides, creek banks, the edges of forests, or maybe even in a wooded area near your home, is one of Kentucky’s native treasures: the pawpaw tree.

The pawpaw is the largest fruit native to the United States.

Maturing around mid-September, these soft, pale green fruits occur alone or in groups. You can tell they are ripe when the skin turns slightly yellow, and the fruit pulls easily off the branch.

BY M WILLIA N E E GR

Some say that a pawpaw is at its best the moment it falls naturally from the tree, but you’ll need to be quick to pick them up before

DID YOU EVER PICK A

Pawpaw? 34 OWENSBORO LIVING

. AUGUST / SEPTEMBER 2018

they are found by forest animals hunting for their soft, sweet flesh.

The texture of a pawpaw is almost jelly-like; it’s no wonder

that one of its nicknames is the “custard apple.” Slicing the fruit in half and eating it with a spoon is probably easier than trying to take a bite out of it. Inside, the sweet, yellow, gooey flesh has a distinct tropical flavor. Hints of banana, pineapple, mango, and melon will have you taking bite after bite to fully experience its complex palette.

The tree itself has a pleasing pyramidal shape when exposed

to full sun. It can tolerate shade, but lack of sufficient light results in leggier growth and fewer fruits. Its bark and twigs contain

www.OwensboroLiving.com


natural insecticides known as acetogenins, which

to see if any of our local suppliers would be able to

are lethal to aphids, midges, and other insect pests.

provide you with a sample.

One notable exception to this is the caterpillar of

the stunning zebra swallowtail butterfly, which

of pawpaw in various products. Craft breweries are

feeds exclusively on pawpaw leaves. The toxins

using the pawpaw’s unusual flavors to add a new

then are transferred to the butterfly, making it

angle to their lines of fruit-inspired beers. Upland

unappetizing to birds or other animals that would

Brewing Company and Jackio’s Brewery, both

eat it. The characteristic black and white striping

in Ohio, produce a pawpaw golden sour ale and a

on the butterfly’s wings are the reason for its name,

pawpaw wheat that are worth a pint or two. Other

and advertise to would-be predators that it is not

uses for the pawpaw include jams, jellies, smoothies,

a tasty meal. It is important to note that, besides

or even ice cream. The thing is, pawpaws spoil very

being harmless to humans, these natural toxins are

quickly, meaning that storing and shipping them is

not present in the fruit.

unfeasible, and therefore unprofitable. It’s unlikely

The Pawpaw Festival, which takes place every

you will see these popping up in supermarkets

September in Albany, Ohio (ohiopawpawfest.com),

any time soon, so foraging in and around Daviess

might be a bit far for you to try a taste of this

County is your best bet. If you’re looking for a

interesting piece of produce, so you might ask

totally different taste this fall, head to your local

around at the Owensboro Regional Farmers Market

woods and pick yourself some pawpaws.

The food industry is currently exploring the use

William Green is an Owensboro native whose passion for nature and conservation has led him to visit botanical gardens and national parks worldwide. Follow him on Instagram @mygreenpets.

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BY DANA PEVELER

Healthy Eating FOR ALL AGES L

ast week at the grocery, I asked my 20-something daughter to pick out some chips. She surprised me

with, “I can’t eat that junk anymore, Mom. I’d rather just have some fruit.” Pouting, I said, “Fine. Grab some Granny Smiths.” I guess it’s time to give up the Cheetos, but it sure is hard to be reminded that I’m not as young as I used to be.

As we age, our bodies change as much on the inside

as we notice on the outside. Our brains, muscles, and organs need more nutrients to function optimally. We don’t always get those nutrients from the foods we choose, and natural changes in appetite and digestion make it important to stay mindful of what we are eating.

There are “smart” foods we can eat to keep our brains

healthy, and maybe even help with memory. Blueberries can help with motor skills and our ability to learn; deepwater fish, like salmon, have those important omega 3’s to reduce inflammation in the body; nuts and seeds give us the vitamin E that helps reduce cognitive decline; and avocados are a fatty fruit, but not in a bad way. They can actually help lower blood pressure. Whole grains such as oatmeal or brown rice can reduce the risk of heart disease. Beans are good for helping with maintaining glucose levels; pomegranate juice is a great antioxidant (the 36 OWENSBORO LIVING

. AUGUST / SEPTEMBER 2018

fruit is just as good, but there are lots of seeds). Freshly brewed tea, either hot or cold, can enhance memory and increases blood flow, and tea’s antioxidants can even help with focus and mood. It has caffeine in it, though, so be mindful of that. All the smart foods in the world can’t help us, though, if we encounter barriers. Dental problems can make it a real struggle to eat properly. When it’s tough to chew, it’s easy to just stop eating or to limit our food selections to a few soft choices. If that’s the case for you, talk to your dentist. As we age, sometimes our saliva production decreases, making it hard to swallow. Remember to drink plenty of liquids while you are eating to counteract that. What if your food doesn’t taste quite like it used to? Try adding herbs and spices. Not necessarily salt, as that can raise blood pressure, but there are so many delicious options that can enhance the flavors. Emotional changes have an effect, too. If you’re sad or depressed, you may lose your appetite. Talk to your doctor if this happens. And sometimes, we just don’t feel hungry. When this happens, increase physical activity a bit to stimulate appetite. Some people just do not want to eat alone. We had an Austrian neighbor who was in her 90s who found a soluwww.OwensboroLiving.com


tion to this problem – and her solution was a great blessing for my

drated. Drink frequently, but avoid liquids with excess sugars.

family, too! She loves cooking authentic native dishes, but doesn’t

enjoy cooking for one. One night each week, she would suggest

taste differently, reducing the appeal. Tell your doctor if that is

a side dish for my family to prepare and we visited her to enjoy a

happening; they may be able to offer alternatives.

delicious meal – and stories of her life. She even taught me how

to make a few dishes! There are other things you can do, too, if

tion guide online or at your doctor or dietician’s office. When I

you prefer company and conversation while dining. Invite friends over for pot luck! The Munday Activity Center and other senior centers offer lunches on a donation-only basis. They also offer a nutrition risk assessment to help you evaluate your diet. What a great way to enjoy a meal and conversation without having to cook or do the dishes!

I never have any trouble getting enough calories, but some

people do. If that is the case, try some healthy snacks. If you’re losing too much weight, talk to your doctor about some protein drinks or energy supplements. Dieticians are a tremendous resource, too, for helping you develop a plan that works best for your specific needs. Your physician’s office can help make those con-

Medications and some medical treatments can make food

Know how much you should be eating. You can find a por-

eat out, often I’ll ask the server to box up half the meal before they even bring it out to me.

Aging isn’t for sissies, a good friend used to say. So many

changes! Digestion can slow down, muscles become weaker. Our nutrition needs stay the same, but our caloric needs decrease. It almost seems impossible – but it isn’t! With proper nutrition, we can maintain a healthy immune system, keep our muscle mass, and help to maintain healthy brain function. Discuss with your physician the changes you’re seeing. Often they can introduce the dietary supplements your body is craving over and above what you are able to get through your food alone. For me, I guess that also

nections for you.

means listening to my daughter, and leaving the Funyuns on the

shelf.

Have physical problems that make eating difficult? Your phy-

sician may refer you to an occupational therapist who can work with you. There are assistive devices, too, which can help one eat

Dana Peveler is the executive director of the Munday Activity Center,

independently.

which provides services, support and resources for seniors age 60 and older

in Owensboro-Daviess County and the surrounding region.

Not thirsty? You’re not alone, but it’s important to stay hy-

www.OwensboroLiving.com

AUGUST / SEPTEMBER 2018

. OWENSBORO LIVING

37


PROMOTIONAL FEATURE

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Does Urinary Incontinence

KEEP YOU FROM LAUGHING? D

o you leak urine when you cough, sneeze or laugh? As a woman who suffers with incontinence, you are

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not alone. More than 13 million Americans, most of them

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Harnessing the power of HIFEM (High-Intensity

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equivalent to 11,200 Kegels, an important exercise many

often a result of childbirth and/or the natural aging process, and can have a dramatic effect on a woman’s quality of life. Women often report having to give up exercise, as well as a decrease in self-confidence and intimacy as a result of incontinence.

Now there’s a solution! Rejuve Medical Spa is launching

a new treatment, BTL EMSELLA™. BTL EMSELLA™ is a groundbreaking and completely non-invasive treatment for women in Owensboro suffering with incontinence. This new and unique treatment is painless, quick, and can be performed while you are relaxing at Rejuve, fully clothed. You no longer need to suffer with leakage, stress about urinary incontinence, or worry about laughing, coughing or exercising, because BTL EMSELLA™ is the solution.

Dr. Vora states, “We’re thrilled to be able to offer our

patients the BTL EMSELLA™ treatment, because it offers maximum results. This is truly revolutionary, as up until

women practice to strengthen the pelvic floor. The medical providers at Rejuve, Victor Dunn, PA and Stacy Head, APRN, MSN, BSN, have been working in the field of women’s wellness for many years. They are experienced in administering treatments such as BHRT, ThermiVa and O-shot, which are geared towards women’s sexual wellness. Now BTL EMSELLA™ is the new feather in Rejuve’s cap. Head says, “BTL EMSELLA™ is a great option at any age for men or women suffering from incontinence who want to improve their quality of life.” A recent clinical study demonstrated that 95% of patients treated reported satisfaction and significant improvement in their quality of life following six treatments with BTL EMSELLA™. Additionally, 67% of treated patients totally eliminated or decreased the use of hygienic pads in day-today life.

now, invasive treatments have been the only option to

Don’t suffer in silence. Call 270-663-7546 today for

effectively address these serious issues, so we’re delighted

more information, and to schedule your complimentary

to finally have an efficacious treatment solution that is

consultation.

38 OWENSBORO LIVING

. AUGUST / SEPTEMBER 2018

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AUGUST / SEPTEMBER 2018

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. AUGUST / SEPTEMBER 2018

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BY ASHLEY SORCE

THE TIME (S ) IS HERE! C

ryptic billboards have been popping up over Ow-

This Owensboro-centric news will be delivered in

ensboro, creating quite the buzz in the commu-

a number of platforms, including a website, an app

nity. Just what does “hey, owensboro, get with the

(with alerts), daily email newsletter, video, podcast

times” mean? And what is happening on August 2,

and a strong social media presence. Owensboro Times

2018?

will feature:

• Breaking News

We have heard lots of great guesses. Cork & Cui-

sine is at the Owensboro Convention Center that eve-

• Features

ning. There is a Rooster Booster that morning. We

• Sports

even heard that Owensboro must be joining Eastern

• Business, Finance & Economy

Standard Time. While all of those are good guesses

• Arts & Entertainment

(well, that last one may be stretching just a bit),

• Editorial & Opinion

Owensboro Living wants to give you the scoop if you

• Health & Wellness

haven’t heard what all the commotion is actually all

• Education & Culture

about.

• Politics

• Obituaries

Owensboro Times a new daily, online news source

will launch on August 2. The Times will cover Owens-

• Weddings, Engagements & Anniversaries

boro and Daviess County stories as well as national

• Records

and regional stories that have a local connection.

• Classified Listings

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AUGUST / SEPTEMBER 2018

. OWENSBORO LIVING

41


• Business Directory

ries. From the beginning they set their sights and

• Live Streaming Local Events

their standards high, creating their own version of

the Golden Rule they call the “Widmer Way.”

And while The Times will cover every news sto-

ry Owensboro needs to read, one thing it is not is

a newspaper. They plan to utilize video as often as

that died in a single vehicle accident on August 7,

possible and gain a significant social media follow-

2014. His mother, Andrea Widmer, learned of her

ing through Instagram, Facebook, Twitter and Snap-

son’s death when she was scrolling through Face-

chat.

book and saw Taylor’s car, upside down in a corn-

field, in a news source’s post. The post read: “Coro-

Owensboro Times founders, Jason Tanner and

Taylor Widmer was a 16-year-old young man

Christy Chaney, both believe that The Times will

ner called to the scene of single car accident.”

reach a demographic of this community that is cur-

rently underserved, saying that Owensboro citizens

have to go through that,” Andrea said. “My vision of

currently receive news from the same printed source,

his passing was taken away from me. It still haunts

another city, or have decided not to get local news at

me.”

all. “We believe it’s time for a change,” the two said.

(Hence their billboard marketing campaign.)

not OK to be the story. And Chaney wants to echo

Tanner and Chaney are also very vocal about

that principle. “Owensboro Times will cover all local

what Owensboro Times will stand for. “Daily, local

news in an unbiased manner, but also in a positive

news should be accessible to everyone,” said Jason,

light,” Chaney said. “We understand Taylor’s wreck

who is the owner and founder of Owensboro Living.

was a news story, but there is a way to cover news

“Owensboro Times will be the easiest way to get Ow-

that maintains journalistic integrity while respect-

ensboro news and it will be written by Owensboro. It

ing those involved.”

will be people from this community telling Owens-

boro’s story.”

forward-thinking staff of editors, writers, photog-

Chaney, who owns Studio Slant and worked in

raphers and videographers to deliver daily, digital

her family’s business for 18 years, believes that cre-

news to OBKY. And they have only one clear mes-

ativity is key. But more than that, Christy says The

sage for Owensboro Living readers -- it’s time to get

Times will bring a positive light to Owensboro sto-

with The Times!

42 OWENSBORO LIVING

. AUGUST / SEPTEMBER 2018

“I would never want anyone else’s loved ones to

Widmer said it is OK to tell the story, but it’s

Tanner and Chaney have formed a creative and

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43


BY DANNY MAY

SAY GOODBYE

to the POLKA DOTS

44 OWENSBORO LIVING

. AUGUST / SEPTEMBER 2018

GET YOUR BAKERS RACK GIFTS BEFORE THEY’RE GONE! AFTER 44 YEARS IN BUSINESS, THE BAKERS RACK WILL CLOSE ITS DOORS FOREVER ON AUGUST 30, 2018. www.OwensboroLiving.com


B

ut don’t expect owner Anne Baker Leazenby

ly,” Anne said. “She has always stayed very honest with

to be sad about it. Quite the opposite. Between

the customers, and that’s why we have the customers we

the thinning shelves in the stockroom, Leazenby is all

have today.”

smiles as she looks back on her family’s four-plus decades of setting the standard for customer service and

COMMUNITY BECOMES FAMILY

high-quality home furnishings, decor, gifts, and acces-

sories.

but Anne says employees and customers have become

“My mother always said to leave on a high note.

like family, as well. “Loyalty is what built this store. It’s

This is the time,” Leazenby said, with the satisfaction

why we grew from selling 50 cent plants, which is how

of someone finishing a job well done. “For the first time

we started, to selling gifts, because that’s what our cus-

in 44 years, I’ll get to have Christmas with my family.

tomers wanted, to delivering, because that’s what they

I’ll get to do the wrapping for my own family instead of

asked for, to everything else we do.”

wrapping for everybody else’s. Which I love to do! But

now I’m looking forward to retirement.”

they also tried other subtle improvements, like offering

Hard to argue that.

free gift wrapping and recycling packaging material be-

The Bakers Rack began when Anne’s mother, Mary

fore it was ever popular.

Not only has direct family been involved in the store,

As The Bakers Rack adapted to customer demand,

Dixon Baker, was looking for something to do and de-

cided to open a store. “She believed in doing things to

those very customers when the store burned in 2002.

the best of her ability and always doing things correct-

“We had customers bringing us meals, offering trucks

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Loyalty also explains the outpouring of support by

AUGUST / SEPTEMBER 2018

. OWENSBORO LIVING

45


“STAY POSITIVE, AND YOUR BUSINESS WILL STAY POSITIVE.”

to move inventory, donating office space and

roll of wrapping paper with white polka dots

telephone lines so we could keep working off

on clearance in a discount bin at a wholesale

site. It was incredible!” Anne remembers.

store. She bought the last four rolls because

“We had suppliers saying ‘What can we do?’

she recognized any ribbon could go with that

Manufacturers saying ‘We’ll bring inventory

pattern. Obviously, it stuck, and today The

to get you back going.’ Our insurance paid us

Bakers Rack polka dot pattern is copyrighted

in under 60 days. Owensboro supports small

and bought by the caseload. “We started with

businesses more than anywhere I’ve ever

brown and white, but we also use white with

seen or been a part of.”

brown, red with white at Christmas, graduation colors, and white on white for wed-

THE FAMOUS POLKA DOTS

dings,” Leazenby said.

In case you’re wondering, the iconic

The gigantic bows on top of the polka dot

polka dot wrapping paper design, which car-

delivery cars were created by local artist Gary

ries through the theme of the whole store and

Bielefeld. But the polka dot cars can be at-

— Anne Baker

even onto the delivery cars, came about from

tributed to Leazenby. Well, sort of. “I got the

Leazenby

a happy accident out of necessity. As Anne

idea in the middle of a sermon at church,”

recalls it, Mary Dixon Baker found a brown

she remembers, laughing. “I guess you could

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say it was divine intervention. I drew our polka dot pattern

on a sketch of a car. The lady next to me drew a great big bow

customer loyalty is still shining through. The day The Bak-

on it. And a man at the end of the pew just happened to be a

ers Rack announced their decision to close happened to be

car salesman, and he made it happen.”   

a Thursday, with going-out-of-business sales beginning that

And even in the midst of shutting down the business,

Monday. But on Friday morning, workers were surprised to GET IT WHILE YOU CAN

see a line stretching from both registers out the front door

and the back door with customers willing to pay full price for

From now until August 30, all items in the store will be

discounted progressively until everything is gone. At the

items and gifts they didn’t want to miss out on.

time of this writing, everything in the store was marked down

30%.

“This city has provided us with 44 years of business. And

Besides the normal inventory, all display cases, tables,

we’ve done what a small business should always do - provide

and fixtures will also be sold in hopes of helping another local

great service and invest everything back into the business.

small business get started. Yet another example of their care

We’ve done that correctly, and now after 44 years we’re able

for the community.

to walk away and retire comfortably because of that great cus-

As for the employees, the Leazenby’s ensure they’ll find

tomer loyalty. That’s our reward. So now our reward to our

every employee another job in the community before the

customers is to greatly discount our inventory to thank them

store closes.

for their business. We couldn’t be happier.”

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“This community is spectacular,” Anne said, proudly.

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PROMOTIONAL FEATURE

WKU PUBLIC BROADCASTING

FROM ROOTS MUSIC TO CLASSICAL TO JAZZ

N

A RADIO STATION WITH AN ECLECTIC MUSICAL LINEUP

ormally when you turn on a radio station, you expect to hear just one type of music – maybe it’s country or Top 40 or oldies. But if you turn on WKU Public Radio (89.5 FM) at night or on the weekends you could hear Bob Dylan or Bill Monroe, Regina Spektor, Miles Davis or Chopin. It’s a diverse lineup of music that starts with Sound Opinions on Saturday mornings at 10 a.m. Sound Opinions, produced by public radio station WBEZ in Chicago, is a blend of a music and talk show in which hosts Greg Kot and Jim DeRogatis discuss new albums, talk about their old favorites and welcome artists for in-studio performances. Kot is a longtime music critic from the Chicago Tribune; DeRogatis is a lecturer in the English department at Columbia College Chicago and is a former music critic with the Chicago Sun-Times. The day of music continues with Fiona Ritche’s The Thistle & Shamrock. The show highlights music from Celtic roots. WKU Public Radio’s longtime locally produced roots music program, Barren River Breakdown, begins at noon on Saturdays and Sundays. Erika Brady, a folk studies professor at Western Kentucky University is celebrating her 20th year of hosting the program. Each week she guides listeners through “American music with roots” that spans the spectrum from bluegrass to folk to gospel and rock-n-roll. Barren River Breakdown is one of WKU Public Radio’s most popular shows and attracts online listeners from around the world. Brady and co-host David Baxter alternate Saturdays and Sundays hosting Barren River Breakdown. American Routes continues the musical schedule on WKU Public Radio Saturdays at 2 p.m. The show, based in New Orleans, is hosted by Nick Spitzer, who like Brady, is a folklorist. He teaches at Tulane University. American Routes certainly has a distinctive New Orleans flare and often spotlights Cajun and zydeco music. But it also features

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rock-n-roll, Tejano, soul, jazz and country. The music goes live on Saturday nights with Live From Here. The show is in its second season with host – and Kentucky native – Chris Thile. Thile, a renowned mandolin player from Nickel Creek and The Punch Brothers, actually appeared on the show as a 15-yearold in 1996. As host, he has put his stamp on the musical aspect of the show – bringing in a new generation of artists like Chris Stapleton, The Avett Brothers, Jack White and Sara Watkins. On select Thursday nights, WKU Public Radio listeners are treated to Lost River Sessions, a locally produced program featuring emerging artists from our region in the world of Folk, Bluegrass and Americana music. The show has featured artists like Willie Watson, Billy Strings, Joan Shelley, Becca Mancari, Lillie Mae and Devon Gilfillian. Lost River Sessions is presented as a monthly live concert series at the Capitol Arts Center in Bowling Green. Those shows are broadcast live on WKU Public Radio and recorded performances are also featured as part of Lost River Sessions Radio. Saturday nights are for jazz on WKU Public Radio. Christian McBride highlights performances from around the country with Jazz Night in America. That show is followed by Jazz Happening Now and jazz throughout the night. On Sundays, Old Scratchy Records offers a tour through the history of recorded music. Host Nolan Porterfield of Bowling Green, brings decades of experience in music radio – and his extensive record collection to the program. That’s followed by Pipedreams – a radio program featuring organ music from around the world. WKU Public Radio 89.5 FM provides a wide variety of musical programming for those looking for old favorites or new musical discovery. For a full program lineup and to stream online, visit wkyufm. org.

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Recording THE

GOSPEL BY DANNY MAY

PHOTO BY JAMIE ALEXANDER

What do Cagayan de Oro City (Philippines), Hong Kong (China), and Owensboro have in common? A ball of energy named Randy Banas. At first it almost seems too crazy to believe. An American, on his way out the door for a month’s vacation, hands over his house keys to a Filipino he’s never even met. A worship pastor who’s never written a song suddenly gets inspired, and writes 100 songs in less than a year - eight of which have been recorded, published, and distributed worldwide in a matter of months. »

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“The only way I can explain it, I could really feel the Lord was working in me,” says Randy Banas, an Owensboro worship leader who can now add songwriter and composer to his list of accomplishments. Before coming to the States, Randy was a successful businessman in the Philippines, where he volunteered as the worship leader at his home church in Cagayan de Oro City. Randy developed a love for music when his uncle gave him his first guitar at 11 years old. Later, he worked as a disc jockey at a local radio station and had a career in marketing and public relations. Fast forward several years, and Randy’s sister, who had relocated to Owensboro, invited him to visit her in Kentucky. “I had been to many places and other states, but I immediately felt connected to Owensboro,” he remembers. During his three-month visit with his sister, Randy joined her for worship services at Church For All. When pastor Garswa Matally found out Randy was a worship leader back home, he offered Randy an

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internship. After returning home, Randy says he felt the Lord calling him back to Owensboro, and Church For All offered him a position as worship leader in February of 2018. All he needed was a place to stay. That’s where Aubrey Nehring comes into this amazing story. Nehring is retired, attends River City Church, and says he’s just looking for ways to be used by the Lord. “We have a mutual friend who worships at Church For All, and she explained that the church was looking for a host home for Randy,” Aubrey recalled, laughing about their first meeting when he gave free reign of his house and the keys to his car to a total stranger for a month. “I trusted my friend. I felt in my spirit it was the right thing to do. It’s amazing how God brings people together.” The two are inseparable now, laughing and shaking their heads at the way things have transpired. Up to that point, Banas had never written a song. But as Randy explains it, living in America with no worries freed his mind to think and be inspired. The first song, “I Will Rejoice,” was written at 9:15

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“FOR ME, I APPROACH SONGS AS A LISTENER. IT’S ABOUT SIMPLE LYRICS. A GOOD MELODY THAT’S EASY TO SING WITH. THAT’S WHAT MAKES A GOOD SONG. AFTER ALL, THE LORD WASN’T COMPLICATED.” - Randy Banas

in the morning, and finished the same day.

launch party. “I wanted my friends and

“Healer of My Soul” came to him the next

family to see how the Lord is blessing my

day. The title track was written after a Bible

music ministry.”

study. And the songs just kept coming.

Aubrey was usually the first to hear

Gospel message through songs. “More than

those new songs, and was impressed by

anything I want people to know that God is

each one. “When I heard ‘I Will Rejoice,’

always in control of everything. God is alive!

tears came to my eyes. I knew this was an important thing, and that other people needed to hear it,” he recalled. So the next day, Aubrey called his friend, Jody Hulsey, of Double Windsor Records, who introduced them to Matt Gray of Gray Sky Music. With Aubrey’s enthusiasm, Jody’s experience in Nashville, and Matt’s technical skills, a solid team was in place to record and publish Randy’s first album, The Gospel.

The entire album, start to finish, was

“AS FAR AS WE KNOW, THERE’S NEVER BEEN A FILIPINO ARTIST WHO HAS WRITTEN, RECORDED AND PUBLISHED AN ALBUM IN AMERICA AND SANG IT IN ENGLISH.”

completed right here in Owensboro. Banas

- Aubrey Nehring

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composed the lyrics and arranged the music to the songs on acoustic guitar. Matt Gray produced the songs in his studio, adding drums, piano, bass, additional guitar and backing vocals. Jody published the songs

The goal, he says, is to share the

God is here.”

What’s next? Since he’s employed by

Church for All, the church is applying for a religious visa on Randy’s behalf so he can move his wife and children to Owensboro permanently. “I really do see Owensboro as my home now. When I went to the worship leader conference in Nashville, I told them I’m from Owensboro. My past led me here, but this place has become part of my journey. And my songs were born here. This is where my ministry is now.”

Randy plans to continue writing and

performing songs in any church or venue that will have him, which is where the Hong Kong connection comes in. Worship

and began working on distribution through

Leader Magazine recognized “Healer of My

Double Windsor, making them available

Soul” as a “Discovery Song” for a new artist,

through iTunes, Spotify, Pandora, Google

and invited Banas to perform the song at

Play, and just about every other outlet.

a conference in Hong Kong in 2019. “I’m

For the record release party, Banas flew

blessed. Humbled. I never expected all this.

back to the Philippines, where he was able

I’m just letting God control it. And now I

to leverage some of his old DJ connections

can’t wait to take a little bit of Owensboro

and business acquaintances to promote the

outside the U.S.!”

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SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION PHOTOS BY JAMIE ALEXANDER

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Legends Sports Bar & Grill 4431 Springhill Dr Suite E // (270) 240-5360

Looking for a great spot to watch the big game? Or maybe a local place to grab a casual lunch with friends? Then look no further than Legends Sports Bar & Grill. Located conveniently in Lake Forest Town Center on Highway 54, Legends has something for everyone. With more than 20 TVs, every seat has the perfect view to watch your favorite team. Have a big group? Legends has plenty of room to accommodate your parties. Thirsty? Legends offers more than 40 beers on tap, and plenty of drink options to satisfy everyone in your party. And did we mention that Legends has a great outdoor patio? If the weather’s right, you can take in the game on the TV outside. Throw in tasty bar fare, plenty of appetizers, live music, and a great atmosphere, and Legends is your go-to destination for the next big game.

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Old Hickory Bar-B-Que

338 Washington Ave // (270) 926-9000 Some things are better left unchanged. Old Hickory Bar-B-Que has been in business for 100 years, but our pitmasters still use the same method of slow-cooking: 22 hours over hickory wood to infuse that familiar smokey flavor we are known for. We use the same recipes, the same sauce, the same dip, and the same attention to detail to produce quality, traditional barbecue that has become an Owensboro tradition six generations strong. Come dine-in or carry-out and you’ll see why Old Hickory consistently wins the “Reader’s Choice Award” and “Best of Owensboro Living” for best barbecue. Mutton, pork, chicken, ribs, beef or custom cooking, we do it all.

Thai Food Owensboro 1401 Carter Rd // (270) 478-4334

If you’ve never tried Thai Food, now’s your chance! Thanks to Nang Crowe, a native of Thailand who has called Owensboro home since 1999, our city finally has an authentic Thai restaurant. Located in the former PizzARoma at 1401 Carter Road, the business has thrived since it began in February 2017. But it wasn’t always Nang’s plan to open her own restaurant. After 10 years participating in the Multicultural Festival, Nang sought to purchase a food truck. Different obstacles prevented the food truck from becoming a reality, but thanks to Nang’s persistence, and the opportunity to move into a building that previously housed a restaurant, Thai Food Owensboro was born. Nang says customers love the food for its delicious flavors, spice, and even its health benefits. In addition to tasting great, Nang says that many of the ingredients in Thai food provide vitamins, antioxidants and fiber. And Pad Thai noodles, one of the cuisine’s staples, are gluten free! Nang and her staff are also sensitive to each customer’s needs, catering to those with specific allergies and vegetarian diets. Thai Food Owensboro welcomes those who have never tried Thai food to come and explore the tastes of Thailand! 58 OWENSBORO LIVING

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Burger Theory

701 W 1st St // (270) 683-1111 At Burger Theory, enjoy breakfast, lunch or dinner on the inside or on the famed patio with scenic views of the Ohio River. No matter your choice; your dining experience will be fun for all! You’ll enjoy the fire pits, televisions, comfortable seating, water feature, and panoramic views. Located in the Holiday Inn Owensboro Riverfront, Burger Theory serves sandwiches, salads, wings and delicious appetizers, in addition to their gourmet burgers. You can’t go wrong with one of their “House Burgers”—custom creations from the Burger Theory Kitchen. Or maybe you’re in the mood for breakfast? Burger Theory also serves up the first meal of the day from 6:30-11 a.m., with offerings such as tailor-made 3-egg omelets and shrimp and grits! Try Burger Theory’s “Hoppy Hour” with half-price appetizers and $3 draft beers. And don’t forget, Burger Theory has something for the whole family! Kids eat free every Wednesday night, with two free children’s meals for every adult entrée purchase. So if you’re looking for a great view, burgers, and brew, head to Burger Theory at the Holiday Inn Riverfront.

Real Hacienda

3023 Highland Pointe Dr // (270) 684-5595 4820 Frederica St // (270) 685-5950 Armando Ortiz, owner of Real Hacienda Mexican Restaurant, certainly knows a thing or two about the restaurant business. Among Armando and his siblings, the Ortiz family runs 43 restaurants, with locations in Kentucky, Indiana, Michigan, Ohio, and Pennsylvania. Since 1995, when he came to Owensboro from Mexico, Armando has consistently given our city a true taste of his home country’s culinary culture. With two restaurants on Frederica and Highway 54, the locally famous eatery has become one of Owensboro’s favorites. Loyal customers keep coming back for dishes like burritos, arroz con pollo, and Armando’s famous queso for nachos. In addition to the delicious offerings at their brick and mortar locations, Real Hacienda also rolled out its food truck last year, which can be found all around town, including the riverfront for events such as Friday After 5. So if you’re in the mood for a mouthwatering Mexican meal, Real Hacienda is never far away.

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Great Harvest Bread Co. 3211 Frederica St G // (270) 691-0093 4431 Springhill Dr // (270) 240-5554

Greg, Alan, and their staff deliver a terrific product and a great experience, earning Great Harvest the “Best Sandwich” in the Best of Owensboro Living for four years running. They have also been recognized as one of the outstanding Great Harvest franchises in the country, winning the “Phenomenal Bread Award” five times. Those accolades come with a lot of hard work. Things get started at both Great Harvest locations (Frederica St. and Hwy. 54) extra early in the morning, when the bakers arrive to begin preparing those delicious breads, cookies, muffins, scones and other scratch made sweets. Soon after, prepping begins for the many varieties of sandwiches, soups and salad orders that will occur throughout the day. Stop by and find out for yourself why they were voted “Best Sandwich” in Owensboro! At Great Harvest Owensboro, they believe in preparing phenomenal food from simple, natural ingredients. Their award-winning yeast breads are made using only wheat flour, honey, water, yeast and salt. With this simple approach to all of their products and hard work you have Great Harvest Owensboro’s recipe for success!

Mellow Mushroom 101 W 2nd St // (270) 684-7800

Our missions is to provide delicious food in a fun and creative environment. We are originators of classic southern pizza and our unique and flavorful crust is a true original. We began from humble roots, born out of the free-wheelin’ hippy culture of the 1970’s. The idea back then was the same as it is now, to make the most delicious, craveable slice of pizza on the planet. The Mellow founders dreamed of a world where happiness could be found in the simplest things; like a mouthwatering slice of pizza and an ice cold beer. Come see us and enjoy the experience.

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Wine Room

3830 hwy 54 #201 // (270) 297-3031

Kick back and relax at Owensboro’s premiere, upscale wine bar, SIP! SIP is a one-of-a-kind establishment offering new levels of experience from the novice to the sommelier. Let our friendly, knowledgeable staff help you select a wine, or taste at your leisure from our state-of-the-art digital wine dispensers. Order one of SIP’s famous cheese and charcuterie trays to pair with the wines that you sip through. If wine is not your “thing,” SIP also serves a wide assortment of bourbons and craft beers—all in a chic yet casual setting. Find a favorite among SIP’s 100+ wine options? Take home a bottle! We are also a wine shop, and provide all our wines for purchase to go! Pop in during the day and browse through our selections. We will help you find the perfect wine. Our wines or our SIP cards make wonderful gifts! Come to SIP to unwind after work, take that special someone out, meet up with a group of friends, or hang out for the evening! You can choose SIP for your event, bridal shower, or birthday party. Come get your SIP on! PHOTO BY TAYLOR WEST

Gene’s Health Food 1738 Sweeney St. // (270) 684-5052

Brother and sister team Andrew Keller and Karissa Costello bought Gene’s Health Food from their grandfather in 2013 to carry on the family business. Now Costello and Keller are taking the deli inside the store to the streets with the “SupaFresh” food truck called “Fresh By Gene’s,” which has been making its way around town at company events, community events, weddings, and festivals. Fresh by Gene’s has taken 1st Place in the Evansville Food Truck Festival in 2017 and 2018. With Fresh by Gene’s, customers can expect to see popular items from the store deli, but most menu items will be new offerings. Smoked Brisket Grilled Cheese is one of the food items that made them stand out in the crowd of 23 trucks in the competition. In addition to the deli and food truck, Gene’s now offers cooking classes in their teaching kitchen, The Galley. To book a class, go to geneshealthfood.com and purchase your space today!

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Owensboro has labeled ourselves the Bar-B-Que Capital of the World, and we were even named Fast Food Capital of the World (per capita) in the late ‘80s. Here is a list of restaurants that Owensboro Living compiled for this special dining edition. Full disclosure though: with new restaurants popping up every day and longstanding restaurants changing locations, a list like this is difficult to maintain. Openings,

rant r e s ta u o r y direct

Asian Chopsticks 3023 Highland Pointe Dr (54) Chinese hibachi grill. Fuji of Japan 4028 Frederica Street Full hibachi menu plus sushi bar. Gangnam Korean BBQ 3332 Villa Point Korean BBQ, sushi and other house specials. Ginza Japanese & Asian Bistro 2601 W Parrish Ave Great mix of Chinese and Japanese cuisines in a terrific atmosphere. Hajimari Sushi Bar 118 W. 2nd Street Downtown sushi restaurant and bar. Hong Kong Chinese Restaurant 1650 Starlite Drive Authentic Chinese cuisine. Mr. Wok Express 3435 Frederica Street Eat in or take out. Szechuan, Hunan, and Mandarin style cuisines. New China Buffet 4768 Frederica Street Largest buffet in town, featuring Szechuan, Hunan and Mandarin cuisines. Dine-in or carryout.

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closings, and relocations are subject to change. That being said, if you notice any updates we need to make on this list, please email steven@owensboroliving.com.

Pan Asian Chinese Food 2656 Frederica Street Chinese, Japanese, sushi. Shogun of Japan 5010 Wildcat Way (South Frederica) Hibachi meals prepared on grills at the tables. Also offers a full bar service as well as sushi bar. Thai Food Owensboro 1401 Carter Rd. Authentic and delicious Thai dishes. Tokyo Japanese Restaurant 3415 Frederica Street Japanese-themed restaurant with hibachi meals prepared in the kitchen, plus sushi at affordable prices. Wasabi Wasabi Express: 636 Southtown Blvd. Wasabi 54: 238 Kidron Valley

Italian Fazoli’s Italian Restaurant 5060 Frederica Street Reasonable prices, food quality traditionally associated with casual dining and quick service; they’ve got something for everyone! Niko’s Italian Cuisine 2200 E. Parrish Avenue Fine dining, wine and spirits with an emphasis on Italian cuisine. Locally-owned.

Olive Garden 5204 Frederica Street Casual Italian dining featuring authentic entrees, soups, desserts, wines and more.

Mexican Don Mario Taqueria 2100 W. 2nd St. El Bracero 2945 Wimsatt Court Owensboro’s newest Mexican restaurant. El Mezcal 2100 W. 2nd St. One of Owensboro’s not-so-hidden secrets. Ernesto and his staff provide great food and a great experience. El Toribio’s 3034 E 4th St Locally-owned. Authentic Mexican cuisine with daily lunch and Happy Hour specials. Mexican and American beers. El Tucan Mexican Restaurant 3600 Frederica St Locally owned restaurant specializing in authentic Mexican cuisine. Los Cabos 2845 W. Parrish Avenue Mi Ranchito 2425 W. Parrish Avenue Locally owned, authentic Mexican cuisine.

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Papa Grande 544 Southtown Blvd 3830 Hwy 54, Unit 203 Locally owned restaurant specializing in authentic mexican cuisine, drink special, and guacamole made right at your table! Real Hacienda 4820 Frederica Street 3023 Highland Pointe Drive (54) Authentic Mexican cuisine, serving real southof-the-border dishes with great atmosphere and fair prices. Salsaritas 3500 Villa Point (54) Casual restaurant serving fresh Mexican foods, including tacos, burritos, quesadillas, nachos and salads. El Sol Mexican Restaurant 1846 Triplett St

Greek

Rocky’s Bar & Grill 819 Crittenden Street Plate lunches, sandwiches, side items and homemade pies.

with gourmet coffees, specialty drinks, desserts, soups, and panini sandwiches, all in an historic downtown building. Reception space for up to 30 people.

Sandbar 1108 W. 9th Street

The Spot Coffee and Finery 217 Williamsburg Square Live music, great drinks, local art and food.

Taylor’s Bar & Grill 2509 W. Parrish Avenue

Barbecue

Dee’s BBQ & Diner 1362 E. 4th Street Locally-owned diner offering plate specials and barbecue. Buffet on Fridays and Saturdays. Moonlite Bar-B-Q Inn 2840 W. Parrish Avenue Locally-owned with a world-famous buffet with homemade sides, burgoo, and desserts, plus a full salad bar. Dine-in or carryout. Board Room with meeting space for 40 people. Oak Room with seating space for 100 people.

Famous Bistro 102 W. 2nd Street Locally-owned, serving lunch and dinner, everything from sandwiches to fine dining with a Mediterranean emphasis on Greek cuisine.

Old Hickory Bar-B-Q 338 Washington Avenue Locally-owned with dine-in, carryout, drive-thru and gift certificates. Celebrating 100 years of serving slow-cooked mutton, chicken and ribs.

Sports Bars

Ole South Barbecue 3523 Hwy 54 Serving great barbecue with a lunch and dinner buffet, and Owensboro’s best breakfast.

Beef O’Brady’s Family Sports Restaurant 3189 Fairview Drive Family sports pub and restaurant to enjoy good food and sports in a friendly atmosphere. Buffalo Wild Wings 4736 Frederica St Lively sports-bar chain dishing up wings and other American pub grub amid lots of largescreen TVs. Legends Sports Bar & Grill 4431 Springhill Dr., Ste E Great place to watch the game. They put the “happy” in happy hour!

Coffeehouses

Dunkin’ Donuts 3011 Frederica Street Donuts, coffee, teas, sandwiches and pastries. Joe Muggs Cafe 4606 Frederica Street Specialty coffee and tea drinks. Located inside Books-A-Million. Overflow Café 3232 Villa Point (54) Located inside Don Moore.

Maloney’s Pizza & Wings 3030 Highland Pointe Drive Restaurant has a seperate, sound proof sports bar with over 30 flat screen TV’s, serving pizza, wings, salads and more.

Starbucks 2402 Frederica Street 5151 Frederica Street (inside Target) 2951 Heartland Crossing (Inside Meijer) Heartland Crossing (on 54)

O’Bryan Bar & Grill 7006 Highway 815 Family sports bar. Live music.

The Creme Coffee House 109 E. 2nd Street Locally-owned offering a relaxed atmosphere

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Delis

Colby’s Deli & Cafe 401 Frederica Street Locally-owned, offering great breakfast items, sandwiches, salads, cookies and ice cream. Can accommodate up to 65 people. Dalishas Desserts 1010 Allen Street, Ste. 200 Dine-in bakery and dessert cafe, with an emphasis on artistic specialty cakes. Gene’s Health Food, Inc. 1738 Sweeney Street Deli with sandwiches, organic salads, juice, smoothies and more. Great Harvest Bread Co. & Cafe 3211 Frederica Street 4431 Springhill Drive (54) Locally-owned, serving fresh-made breads, scones, coffees and teas, signature sandwiches, Paninis, soups-of-the-day, and salads. Lic’s Deli & Ice Cream 2120 W. Parrish Avenue Complete line of hand-dipped ice cream and deli sandwiches in the style of an oldfashioned soda fountain shoppe; also bread, cakes, cookies, and chili. Panera Bread 4600 Frederica Street Bakery offers freshly-baked breads, bagels, baked egg souffles, pastries and sweets. Café offers sandwiches, soups, Crispani, handtossed salads, beverages, kids’ menu. Trunnell’s Farm Market & Gourmet Deli 4399 Springhill Drive, Suite A Great sandwiches, fresh produce, and other Kentucky Proud products.

Pizzerias

54 Pizza Express 1700 Starlite Drive (Off Parrish) 3101 Alvey Park Drive (54) Locally owned pizzas, sandwiches and salads. Brick House Pizza 3188 Alvey Pk Dr E Authentic hand-tossed pizzas made from

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scratch cooked in stone deck ovens! Hot gourmet sandwiches, fresh salads, baked pastas, wings and more!

JJ’s Pizza 5615 KY-144 Community pizza shop in Thurston area.

Cadillac Restaurant & Grecian Pizza 1315 W. 2nd Street Diner meals, pizza and plate specials.

Little Caesar’s Pizza 3429 Frederica Street 1650 Starlite Drive

Chef’s Pizzeria 636 Southtown Blvd, Suite 6 Donato’s Pizza 2601 W Parrish Ave Domino’s 3333 Frederica Street 1003 Burlew Boulevard Fetta Specialty Pizza 118 St. Ann Street Italian for “slice,” Fetta serves delicious specialty pizza hand tossed right before your eyes!

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Maloney’s Pizza & Wings 3030 Highland Pointe Drive (54) Serving pizza, wings, salads and more. Mellow Mushroom 101 W. 2nd St. Delicious food in a fun and creative environment. We are the originators of Classic Southern Pizza, and our unique and flavorful crust is a true original. MOD Pizza 2710 Heartland Crossing, Suite C Counter-serve chain featuring build-your-own pizza.

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Papa John’s Pizza 2510 Frederica Street 3332 Villa Point (54) Papa Murphy’s 3211 Frederica Street Take and bake pizza. Pizza By The Guy 3115 Commonwealth Court (54) Pizza Hut 4127 Frederica Street 1331 Frederica Street (take out only) 3189 Fairview Drive (54) PizzAroma 3020 E. 4th St 611 Emory Drive (Wesleyan) Locally owned pizzas, sandwiches, calzones and Italian specialties.

Fine Dining/Upscale Casual Bill’s Restaurant 420 Frederica Street

Lunch served Tue-Fri, dinner served Tue-Sat. Seasonal menus offering appetizers, entrees and desserts. Briarpatch 2760 Veach Road Owensboro’s finest locallyowned steakhouse since 1971. Large soup and salad bar, with full bar service and fine wines. Colby’s Fine Food & Spirits 202 W. 3rd Street Colby’s offers available space for meetings and banquets. Additional patio space available, and full-service food and bar for catering. Famous Bistro 102 W. 2nd Street Locally-owned, serving lunch and dinner, everything from sandwiches to fine dining with a Mediterranean emphasis on Greek cuisine.

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Lure Seafood & Grille 401 W. 2nd Street Fresh seafood and more prepared with great expertise and precision with a green conscience. Niko’s Italian Cuisine 2200 E. Parrish Avenue Fine dining, wine and spirits with an emphasis on Italian cuisine. Locallyowned. The Miller House 301 E. 5th Street The Miller House offers a unique opportunity to dine on three levels in an elegant yet casual atmosphere. Located in one of downtown Owensboro’s beautifully restored older homes. Open for lunch, dinner and Sunday brunch, they also offer a full-service conversation bar. The Pearl Club Grille 6501 Summit Drive Appetizers, entrees, burgers and wraps.

Diners, Cafes & Family Restaurants

Applebee’s Neighborhood Grill & Bar 5120 Frederica Street American classics, also offering a Weight Watchers Menu. Separate bar area. Bar Louie 234 Frederica Street Upbeat grill chain with American grub, martinis and microbrews, plus happy-hour deals. Bee Bop’s 122-A W. 2nd Street 50’s-style diner offering great diner food and daily specials. Beef O’Brady’s Family Sports Restaurant 3189 Fairview Drive Family sports pub and restaurant to enjoy good food and sports in a friendly atmosphere. Big Dipper 2820 W. Parrish Avenue Opened in April 1954, the Dipper offers real old-fashioned drive-in burgers, fries, shakes, and ice cream treats.

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Burger Theory 701 West 1st St. Located in Holiday Inn Downtown. SFG Artisan Cafe 501 W. 2nd Street Inside Owensboro Convention Center Open Monday thru Friday 10am to 3pm Cheddar’s Casual Cafe 3040 Highland Pointe Drive Family dining at affordable prices. Chef’s Kitchen 636 Southtown Blvd Buffet, Salad Bar, Soup of the Day! And a small “cook to order” menu featuring steaks and other options. Colby’s Deli & Café 401 Frederica St #101B 7am-2pm Country Ham Restaurant 5421 US Highway 60 W. Great country-style cooking. Cracker Barrel 5311 Frederica Street Homestyle cooking, down-home service. Sit and rock a spell on the front porch in a comfy wooden rocker. Or browse the country store. Dee’s BBQ & Diner 1362 E. 4th Street Locally-owned diner offering plate specials and barbecue. Buffet on Fridays and Saturdays. Del’s Place 7478 US Highway 60 W. Deloris’ Cafe 2123 Triplett Street Down-home-friendly diner where you can feel at home with a homecooked meal. Denny’s Restaurant 4545 Frederica Street Breakfast served 24 hours a day. Full menu also offered. Dinner Bell Restaurant 6057 Highway 2830 Diner meals and plate specials.

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Firehouse Subs 5150 Frederica St Made-to-order hot and cold subs, plus a variety of hot sauces. Gary’s Drive In 2220 Veach Road Burgers, homemade soups, ice cream and specialty items such as salmon, turkey and veggie burgers. Grandy’s 5000 Frederica Street Breakfast, lunch and dinner served. Dine in, carryout, or drive-thru. Chicken, countryfried steak, and cinnamon rolls. Hayden’s Drive-In 9209 Highway 56 Burgers, sandwiches and sides. Huddle House 3248 Mt Moriah Suite C (54) Casual chain offering all-day breakfast, plus other hearty American eats in dinerlike digs. JD’s Restaurant 1420 Breckenridge Street Locally owned diner, breakfasts and plate lunch specials. Jimmy John’s 2300 Frederica St Freaky fast sandwiches. Longhorn Steakhouse 2974 Heartland Crossing Casual steakhouse chain known for grilled beef and other American dishes in a ranch-style space. Madewell’s Corner Cafe 924 E. 2nd Street Home-cooked diner meals. Mendy’s Kitchen 924 Crabtree Avenue Burgers, sandwiches, sides and ice cream treats. Norman McDonald’s Country Restaurant 6161 Highway 54 Burgers and sides, take out only.

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O’Charley’s Restaurant & Lounge 5205 Frederica Street Menu with an emphasis on fresh preparation, featuring several specialty items such as hand-cut and aged steaks, seafood, fresh chicken, homemade yeast rolls, a variety of fresh-cut salads with special-recipe salad dressings and their signature caramel pie. Penn Station 3525 Frederica Street 3023 Highland Pointe (54) Made-to-order East Coast grilled sandwiches and sides. Red Lobster 3410 Frederica Street Family restaurant specializing in seafood dishes. Serving for lunch and dinner, a full menu of appetizers, salads, soups, entrees and desserts is offered. Shoney’s 4710 Frederica St (Towne Square) Family-oriented chain serving an all-American diner-style menu for breakfast, lunch and dinner. T.G.I. Fridays 5135 Frederica Street Family dining offering a full menu, including Atkinsapproved, low carb items. Texas Roadhouse 943 Moseley Road Fresh-cut steaks, made-fromscratch side dishes, fall-off-thebone ribs, fresh-baked breads and lively atmosphere. Happy hour specials. The Local Kitchen and Bar 3118 Alvey Park Dr (54) A modern restaurant with a cool rustic vibe. Windy Hollow Restaurant 8260 Highway 81 Open Sundays 7a.m. to 1:30 p.m., brunch buffet featuring country ham, fried chicken, red eye gravy and biscuits, fried potatoes, and their famous homemade doughnuts.

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Fast Food

Arby’s 2960 W. Parrish Avenue 3401 Villa Pointe Drive (54) 4614 Frederica Street Large variety of sandwiches and sides. We have the meats! Burger King 1738 Triplett Street 2944 W. Parrish Avenue Clean restaurant, friendly employees, fast service. Drivethru open 24 hours.

Long John Silver’s 2519 W. Parrish Avenue 2770 Frederica Street (Wesleyan) 3005 E. 4th St Fast seafood, fish and chicken. Dine in, carryout, or drive-thru. McDonald’s 3328 Highway 54 324 Wesleyan Plaza 2306 E. 4th Street 2730 W. Parrish Avenue 4800 Frederica Street

Chick-Fil-A 4601 Frederica Street Chicken sandwiches, salads, shakes and sides.

Popeye’s Chicken 2906 Highland Pointe (54) “New Orleans-style” menu featuring spicy chicken, chicken tenders, fried shrimp and other seafood.

Culver’s Frozen Custard & Butterburgers 3020 Highland Pointe Drive Frozen custard treats, burgers, salads, kids’ meals, chicken to go.

Rally’s 1301 Frederica Street Burgers, sandwiches and sides, fresh and hot.

Dairy Queen 1715 Frederica Street 3022 E. 4th St 3224 New Hartford Road Soft-serve ice cream treats, cakes, brazier food and beverages. Five Guys Burgers and Fries 3248 Mount Moriah Ave (54) Made-to-order burgers, fries and hot dogs, plus free peanuts while you wait. Freddy’s Frozen Custard & Steakburgers 4641 Frederica Street Hardee’s 2705 W. Parrish Avenue 3101 Frederica Street Burgers, ham, chicken, roast beef sandwiches, and sides. Kentucky Fried Chicken 3212 Highway (54) Chicken dinners, snacks, and sides for dine in or carryout. Lee’s Famous Recipe 1800 Carter Road 1001 Burlew Boulevard Chicken dinners for one or for a family. Dine in, carryout, or drive-thru.

Ritzy’s 4527 Highway 54 4925 Frederica Street Burgers, fries, and ice cream. Sonic Drive-In 3107 Frederica Street Old-time drive-in offering burgers, sandwiches, sides, and frozen treats. Subway 2425 W. Parrish Avenue 3119 Frederica Street 3124 Highway 54 3739 E. 4th Street 636 Southtown Boulevard 3470 New Hartford Road 3151 Highway 54 (inside Walmart) Taco Bell 3335 Villa Point (54) 4620 Frederica Street 2500 W. Parrish Avenue Wendy’s 2934 Highway 54 4545 Frederica Street Zaxby’s 5030 Frederica Street Located in front of Towne Square Mall, Zaxby’s offers a variety of chicken and wings.

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Ice Cream & Sweets Andria’s Candies 217 Allen St. Andria’s Candies had a tradition of making fine chocolates and candies that traces back to Greek candy-makers coming to U.S. in 1906. Baskin Robbins 3245 Mt Moriah Ave (54) Colorful ice cream parlor chain known for its many flavors plus sorbet and yogurt. Cold Stone Creamery 5140 Frederica Street 112 Allen Street (Downtown. Spring and Summer) From unique ice cream creations to smoothies, cakes and shakes. Nobody serves up the ultimate indulgence like Cold Stone. Cup Cakery 231 Williamsburg Square

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112 Allen Street (Downtown, Spring and Summer) Cakes, cupcakes, cookies, and lunch options. Dairy Queen 1715 Frederica Street 3030 E. 4th St 3224 New Hartford Road Soft-serve ice cream treats, cakes, brazier food and beverages. Dalishas Desserts 1010 Allen Street, Ste. 200 Dine-in bakery and dessert cafe, with an emphasis on artistic specialty cakes. The Family Bakery 3152 Commonwealth Court (54) Dunkin’ Donuts 3011 Frederica Street Donuts, coffee, teas, sandwiches and pastries.

Frailley’s Dari Cream 7140 Highway 81 Soft-serve ice cream treats. Great American Cookie Company 5000 Frederica Street Located inside Towne Square Mall. Cookies ready-made or made-to-order, large or small. Koehler’s Bakery 1801 Carter Road Full line retail bakery offering donuts, pies, cakes, cookies, and breads. Lic’s Deli & Ice Cream 2120 W. Parrish Avenue Complete line of hand-dipped ice cream and deli sandwiches in the style of an old-fashioned soda fountain shoppe; also bread, cakes, cookies, and chili. Maggie’s Cakes & Deli 4399 Springhill Dr, Suite B (54)

Specialty cakes, wedding cakes, desserts and gourmet deli. We also have delicious lunch and catering! Orange Leaf Frozen Yogurt 4431 Springhill Dr (54) Frozen yogurt, specially selected toppings. Rolling Pin Pastry Shop 1129 E 18th St 20 kinds of donuts, plus pies and pastries.

Smoothie & Juice Bars Wheatgrass Juice Bar 3500 Villa Point Raw juice, salads, smoothies, juice cleanses, vegan food, wheatgrass shots.

Gene’s Health Food, Inc. 1738 Sweeney Street Deli with sandwiches, organic salads, juice, smoothies and more.

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H

ow many times have you come

A Fresh Take on Takeout

home from work and found yourself too tired to cook? But

you also don’t feel like going out. And you really don’t want pizza again.

That familiar struggle is what drove

Owensboro entrepreneurs Devin Taylor and Jonathan Brandle to start Big O

BY DANNY MAY

Takeout. As husbands, business owners, and fathers of young children, Devin and Jonathan thought finding a way to provide local food delivery options would be a marketable solution. “People

need

variety,”

Taylor

explained. “We knew similar models worked in larger cities, and we thought Owensboro was ready for something like this, so we jumped on it.” After looking at some major market models and talking with other businesses in similar sized towns, Taylor and Brandle adapted their own model specifically for the Owensboro market.

Turns out they were right in a big

way. Big

O

Takeout

launched

in

February 2017 with six participating restaurants. Today, there are nearly 30 Owensboro restaurants participating and another six in the Henderson market. But that number fluctuates because new restaurants are added every day. Fazoli’s, for example, signed on the morning of this interview.    PHOTO BY JAMIE ALEXANDER

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Taylor says the concept brings value

to both customers and business owners. Customers love the convenience of having hot food delivered to their home or office. The model is perfect for busy families, or for having food delivered for

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office meetings.

information for your first order, but

Business owners love Big O Takeout

then all information is stored in a secure

because Taylor and Brandle have

system. Then you choose a restaurant,

streamlined the process with their own

look at the menu, and add your order to

delivery drivers. All the restaurants get

your “cart.” You can choose to pay with

free marketing and advertising through

cash on delivery or by credit card online.

the site and phone app, and at-home customers free up table space in the restaurants.

Rising sales numbers help explain

why restaurants are jumping on board left and right. “We’ve tracked 3,500 orders to the most popular restaurant alone through our site since we began,” Taylor said, adding that several other

As soon as you click “send,” your order

Here’s a list of participating restaurants in Owensboro

(but check the site for the most up-to-date listing):

is sent to dispatch, a delivery driver is notified, and the order is prepared at the

BEE BOPS

chosen restaurant. The customer pays

BEEF O’BRADY’S

normal menu price, plus a $4.99 delivery

BERNIE’S BBQ

fee and a tip for the delivery driver.

CHOP STICK

And here are a few little inside

tips: group orders can be split between

EL TORIBIO FAZOLI’S

restaurants have seen orders well into the

multiple credit cards if it’s a large

thousands.

gathering or office meeting, but there is

Despite the volume, customers

still only one delivery fee of $4.99 for the

usually have hot food at their door

order.

FUJI OF JAPAN

within 30 minutes to an hour of placing

Also, downloading the app is

GANGNAM KOREAN BBQ

their order (through the app or online)

recommended for ease and accessibility.

GENE’S HEALTH FOODS

thanks to a dedicated staff of available

The app lets you store your favorite

GENUINE BROASTER CHICKEN

delivery drivers who are cued at precisely

orders, which allows repeat orders with

the right time to be waiting at the

HUDDLE HOUSE

one click.

restaurant before the food comes off the

Ordering

line. That little trick, Taylor says, is the difference between Big O Takeout and other national food delivery models. “We work with the restaurants to know food prep times so our drivers are ready and waiting. They put the food in insulated bags to keep it warm. And depending on where the customer lives, food typically arrives from the restaurant to their front

ahead

of

time

is

recommended. You can even order days in advance by choosing a day and time

FETTA FIREHOUSE SUBS

LURE MALONEY’S MARATHON 54 FOOD CENTER

for your delivery under “delivery time”

MIKATO STEAK AND SUSHI

in the order window at checkout.

PAN ASIAN

PENN STATION

By the way, if you’re looking for

a part-time, seasonal, or full-time job

PIZZAROMA

where you can set your own schedule,

POPEYE’S

Big O Takeout is always hiring drivers.

door in 8-10 minutes.”

So the next time you don’t feel like

going out; or the next time you’re craving

How it works

something from 54 or downtown, but you

RITZY’S TGI FRIDAY’S THAI FOOD

you

don’t want to drive to 54 or downtown; or

WHEATGRASS JUICE BAR

through the whole process. It takes

the next time co-workers decide to order

THE HAJIMARI SUSHI BAR

a few minutes to enter your account

out; remember, you now have options.

BigOTakeout.com

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PROMOTIONAL FEATURE

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THE

DISH

Peach Tea

IN A PINCH!

PHOTOS AND RECIPE BY JAMIE ALEXANDER

There is a great debate between southerners over the perfect time to eat a peach. While many say the peak flavor rests in July, peach season can still last as late as the end of September! If you want to keep enjoying peaches yearround, try freezing or canning some to enjoy this refreshing summer drink as an autumn (or even winter) treat.

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Peach tea is easily made by brewing your favorite tea and creating a peach simple syrup to mix in. I recommend brewing a nonsweetened tea (I used black tea) since you get your sweetness from the peach syrup. Once your tea is brewed and cooled, you can mix your syrup in to your own liking. If you like a tea that isn’t too sweet, just mix in less syrup. If you make some tea for a get-together, you can serve your iced tea separate from the peach syrup, so that everybody can add their own level of sweetness! You can also switch out the sugar for a natural granulated sweetener to make it a healthier option - I just wouldn’t tell your fellow southerners that you did.

INGREDIENTS 3-4 peaches 1 cup sugar (or natural sweetener) 1 cup water brewed tea

INSTRUCTIONS Brew your preferred tea and allow it to cool to room temperature. Slice peaches and place them in a sauce pan along with sugar and water. Bring your stove to a medium-high heat until your ingredients boil, then turn the heat down to medium. Stir the mixture to dissolve the sweetener, and crush up your peaches a bit in the process. Once the sweetener is dissolved, turn off heat and allow the mixture to sit, covered, for 30min. Strain sugar to remove all of the fruit pieces. Pour desired level of peach syrup into your tea over ice and garnish with peach slices!

Jamie Alexander is a nationally-published portrait and commercial photographer, Tanner Publishing Co. staff photographer, and owner of JAA Studios. She is also a recipe developer and blogger for “Lavender and Lenses” - a blog focused on healthy recipes and international travel. Follow her culinary instagram at @lavenderandlenses

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PROMOTIONAL FEATURE

CASA

A Voice for the VOICELESS

Court Appointed Special Advocates (CASA) have been the voice for abused and neglected children in our city for the past 22 years and counting. Owensboro Living sat down with Rosemary Conder, Executive Director of CASA, to share the action Owensboro can take to partner with this valuable organization.

Owensboro Living: What is the mission of CASA? Rosemary Conder: To provide trained, caring, adult volunteers to be a voice for abused and neglected children.   OL:  How does CASA serve Owensboro, specifically? RC: “Court Appointed Special Advocates” (CASA) are trained to advocate on behalf of an abused and/or neglected child to the Family Court Judge. Despite the dedicated attorneys, social workers, law enforcement, therapists, school personnel, and others who care about the children, large caseloads prevent them from knowing each child personally. By taking the time to get to know each child personally, CASA volunteers are able to communicate how each child is coping with their family’s trauma and provide another set of eyes and ears to help the Judge make decisions based on the best interest of the child.   OL:   How can Owensboro -Daviess County support the work of CASA?   RC:  1. Volunteer. CASA currently has more than 50 volunteers advocating for over 100 children, but dozens more children are on a list waiting to be appointed to a volunteer. We welcome adults from every walk of life who can use their life experiences with our training to make a difference for a child.  Volunteers devote a minimum of 10 hours per month visiting their CASA child and reporting to the Court. 2. Donate: As a 501c3 nonprofit organization, CASA is dependent on individual and business donations, grants and fundraisers. 3. Educate yourself and share what you know about the signs of abuse and neglect. Creating awareness in Owensboro protects the lives of children.

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OL: What are the requirements to become a CASA volunteer? RC: Each volunteer must: 1. Be at least 21 years old 2. Have an approved background check 3. Complete CASA training 4. Dedicate 10-12 hours each month to advocating for your appointed child (each case lasts 12-14 months)   OL:  What are the benefits of becoming a CASA volunteer? RC:  The thought of advocating for a child who is suffering can be overwhelming and intimidating.  However, Advocates often say they actually get more than they give because they see how much the children need them. Many children are betrayed by the people they are supposed to be able to trust.  Then they are forced to move from home to home and school to school and are in the middle of a complicated social service and legal system. They are scared and confused.  Emotional trauma can negatively impact their entire lives. CASAs help break the cycle by being a champion for the child.  Because our advocates become “trusted adults” for these children, they report “My CASA child calls me when she’s scared or worried. She calls me when she has good news. She trusts me to be there for her and speak up for what she needs” or “He lights up when I walk in his foster mom’s house. It took a few visits for him to warm up to me, and know I am here to help and that he can trust me.” OL:  How do I report suspected child abuse? RC:  If you have reason to believe a child is a victim of abuse or neglect, immediately call 1-800-752-6200 Kentucky Child Abuse Reporting Hotline, which offers 24/7 availability. If you cannot get through to this number for any reason, call Child Protective Services Office (Health and Family Service Office) the local police, or the County or Commonwealth Attorneys’ Office.

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ARTS

PHOTOS BY JAMIE ALEXANDER

THE

BY JAIME RAFFERTY

Open your heart

TO THE ARTS S

o many possess the desire to be creative

tering a word, she can bring people together with

through art and music, or appreciate the

art. Now she has brought that love right here to

artistic talents of their peers, and would

Owensboro.

like to do so without leaving Owensboro. Until a

couple of years ago, opportunities were limited for

where it was hosted at the Daviess County Public

local artists to display such creativity.

Library. The vision was to unite various artists that

Local artist, philanthropist and event coordi-

could express their specific talents and creativity

nator Leeza Dukes and Director of Art, Pamela

through performances and exhibits. The festival’s

Glen have the passion and talent to bring the art

continued growth has led to a change of venue at

and music to you, in conjunction with the Daviess

Towne Square Mall, where it will be held on Sep-

County Public Library and Towne Square Mall.

tember 15, 2018 from Noon to 6 p.m.

Leeza has a degree in Fine Arts and Textile

The first “3 Hearts of the Arts” began in 2016,

The festival has blossomed into a non-profit

Designing. Throughout her life and career, she

organization that serves the community by increas-

has traveled overseas and received inspiration

ing awareness of the importance of arts and expres-

from the various cultures she’s encountered. Her

sion in our community. Leeza says with the talent

experiences have taught her that without even ut-

they see, they are “spreading the word that art is

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alive and well in Kentucky”.

egory for those ages 10-16, who are eligible for a cash prize.

3 Hearts of the Arts wants to showcase the artistic

gifts of all. At the festival, there will be demonstrations and live performances throughout the day in music, and other entertainers will also be performing. Items featured by local artists will include: sculptures, pottery, drawings, photography, painting, jewelry, mixed medium and many

Space is limited, and interested artists should visit 3

Hearts of the Arts on Facebook, or for more event information, contact them at 3heartsofthearts@gmail.com.

Show your support and make Saturday, September 15

a family affair as the 3 Hearts of the Arts Art and Music

others. The festival’s committee will be awarding prizes in

Festival brings an ever-growing culture of art to the Ow-

the adult age category for best in show after the close of the

ensboro/Daviess County community. Open your heart to

exhibition. The festival also features a special youth cat-

the arts!

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THE

FINE ARTS BISTRO // PHOTOS BY KATIE STARKS

GETAWAY

36 HOURS in Glasgow

BY SARAH BISHOP

T

he quintessential small town, Glasgow is less than a

Steakhouse & Grill, where you can kick back, relax and

2-hour drive, southeast of Owensboro. A quick trip

throw your empty peanut shells on the floor. Choose

down the Cumberland Parkway will land you in

from a variety of steaks, chicken, salads and more.

the heart of cave country surrounded by historic homes, buildings, museums, unique eateries and a charming

7 p.m.

downtown.

After dinner, head over to the Historic Plaza Theatre,

FRIDAY

a restored 1930s movie house that now hosts plays,

5 p.m.

series. The theatre’s architecture, including the seats,

Start your weekend at a Glasgow favorite: Colton’s

are original to its early 20th-century beginnings.

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national tours, local performance groups and a film

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SATURDAY 9 a.m.

A Saturday in Glasgow begins at the Fine Arts Bistro with coffee and a simple, yet oh-so-satisfying breakfast. Carefully crafted, fresh roasted coffee might be hard to find in small Kentucky towns, but here, it’s an art form. For breakfast, try the buttery blueberry pancakes, veggie omelet or sourdough French toast. For accomodations, stay in the overnight loft upstairs.

10 a.m. Just a short drive south, spend your morning at Kenny’s Farmhouse Cheese, a 200-acre dairy farm in southeast Barren County. Here, discover the quality of authentic, artisanal, hand-crafted cheese made from fresh milk and natural ingredients.

Noon

ANNIE’S COUNTRY COOKING

History nuts will want to hit up the South Central Kentucky Cultural Center located just a block from Glasgow’s downtown square. Exhibits span two floors featuring displays from 12,000 BC to frontier days to the Civil War to Desert Storm. For those who love research, the Mary Bridges Jones Genealogy Library houses family history books, census and marriage records and more than 80 years of newspaper archives.

2 p.m. A day of exploring will surely stir up an appetite. PLAZA THEATRE

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FINE ARTS BISTRO

BRIGADOON STATE NATURE PRESERVE

Annie’s Country Cooking offers true, Southern, no-

mature woods and old fields bordering the backwaters of

frills goodness like country fried steak, yeast rolls, green

Barren River Reservoir.

beans and mashed potatoes—all served on a paper plate. If you’re feeling BBQ, grab a tray at Rib Lickers Smoke

7 p.m.

Shack and walk through the cafeteria-style line for ribs,

A busy day calls for a nice dinner at Anna’s Greek

pulled pork, brisket and all the sides your heart desires. On select nights, pull up at one of their picnic tables for an evening of live music.

Restaurant, renowned for authentic Mediterranean cuisine. Peruse the gourmet spot’s exquisite wine collection and choose from Greek, Italian, German, French or Turkish entrees.

3 p.m. A trip to Barren County isn’t complete without soaking in the beautiful outdoors, regardless of time of year. Part of

SUNDAY

the Green River Valley, Mammoth Cave National Park is

11 a.m.

the world’s longest known cave system, with more than

As your trip comes to a close, your last stop should be

400 miles of explored caves. Hop on a variety of tours or

Kanha Kafe, specializing in a unique assortment of

walk the miles of trails on your own. Or, visit the lesser-

Asian food from spicy Thai noodles to a warm bowl of

known Brigadoon State Nature Preserve for 181 acres of

pho to chicken stir fry with Jasmine rice.

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RIBLICKERS SMOKE SHACK

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THE

STYLE

When Target starts putting out school supplies, I start getting nervous that summer is coming to an end. The good news is, it's only the beginning of August, and judging by the heat wave we've had this season, we'll still have at least a month left of summertime fun. I always love the outfits I wear from boutiques for this

Summer STYLES BY JULIA HARTZ highheelsandhappyhartz.com

article, but I am really really loving them this time especially!

We'll start with this amazing striped jumpsuit from Bella Ragazza. The vertical stripes elongate even the shortest of figures, (even on those of us that are 5'2� on a good day) and the leg slits add such a fresh twist to the look. Also, those leg slits let a little breeze in which was so nice in this heat! This jumpsuit is ideal for a poolside party, a wedding, or even just a night out on the town. The moment you try it on you will want to take it home! I've been all about the basket bag trend this summer, and the shape of this one is so unique. I love the color because you could even take it into early fall. It has a neutral pouch inside to keep all of your goodies hidden so no one can see your wallet, or the candy bar you hide in your purse for emergencies.

Jumpsuit: $64 Bag: $66 Sunglasses: $85 Earrings: $18 Bella Ragazza Boutique 120 W 2nd St. 270-926-9546

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PHOTOS BY KRISTIN BIVINS

Dress: $40 Shoes: $28 Bag: $52 Earrings: $22 Bracelets: $24 each

Blush Boutique 1020 Halifax Drive Suite 101 270-240-1974

Let's talk about this girly pink gingham ruffle dress from Blush Boutique. When I saw it I instantly fell in love. It's casual enough to wear during the day, but special enough to dress up for a night look. I paired it with these silver slides, which are super comfortable, and this adorable bamboo handle box purse that can be worn with just about anything. Throw on and go dresses have been my go-to this summer since it's been so unbearably hot out, and this is a great look you can take from work to play with ease.

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I knew I wanted a swan to be in this photo shoot somehow, and after it was blown up, it made the most sense to hop on! My photographer Kristin was terrified I was going to fall in—mostly because she was in on a little surprise for our next outfit that I didn't know about yet. When I tried on this dress from Anagayle Boutique, I knew it would be the best pool dress! Throw it on as a coverup, or dress it up for a party with some cute wedges and a clutch. You guys know I love tassels, and the tassels on this dress match the blue tassel earrings perfectly.

Dress: $48.99 Earrings: $15 Bracelet set: $20 Kentucky Bracelet: $20

AnaGayle’s Boutique 5000 Frederica St. Towne Square Mall 270-313-6262

Last, but certainly not least, is this little white dress from Peacocks and Pearls. Little did I know that I was going to get proposed to during this very photoshoot for Owensboro Living, and in this perfect white dress that I was already so in love with! We were shooting this look at my parents house, and my now fiancé, Drew, came out of the front door and got down on one knee while both of our families watched from inside. It was most definitely the happiest day of my life. This further proves my original idea that this white dress would be incredible for all of those brides-to-be out there, just dress it up or down with sandals or wedges. We paired the blue Kendra Scott earrings with it to add a hint of “something blue” and had no idea I would be matching Drew!

Dress: $83 Shoes: $73 Bag: $54 Earrings: $75 Peacocks & Pearls Boutique 4431 Springhill Dr 270.926.SHOP (7467)

Needless to say, this issue of Owensboro Living is extra special to me, and I'm so excited that I get to share my love of fashion and a bit about my life with you guys. Every boutique was beginning to get fall merchandise in, so be sure and follow all of them on Instagram to keep up with new arrivals, and check back here in the next issue for some local fall fashion.

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THE

STYLE

A SOLID FOUNDATION BY TARYN NORRIS

When Allison and Trey Truett bought their

still much work to be done to turn this house into

home in 2003, they wanted a place of their own

a home. Over the past 15 years, the Truett family

where they could have room to spend time with

has added to and repurposed areas of their house

family and also have space for independence and

to transform it into a place that perfectly fits their

privacy. Another important factor in selecting their

needs.

home was centrality and convenience. Trey is a

dermatologist at Owensboro Dermatology, and the

all at once, the Truetts have approached the project

family wanted to find a house in the nearby area.

in stages. “Very few people can just walk into a

Their search was successful, and they found a place

house and say it’s the most perfect house ever,” said

close enough for Trey to bike to work! With three

Allison. “We agreed this house had the structural

children, the open-concept plan on the ground

bones that we needed for our family.” Gary Cecil, of

floor of their house was an attractive feature that

CR Contracting, handled all of the house additions

would allow the family to spread out for privacy and

and renovations to existing areas. Shortly after the

also come together for family time. However, even

Truetts moved in, they planned to create a semi-

with a great layout and a perfect location, there was

attached garage and a separate office for Trey,

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Rather than conducting massive renovations

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PHOTOS BY AP IMAGERY

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then repurpose the former garage. To pull it all

to the oven were measured to house the large

together, Cecil created a brick archway attached

containers of spices Allison buys from Sam’s

to the former garage that leads to a semi-detached

Club to accommodate her guests. Overall, the

building containing two custom areas for the

kitchen renovation helped give functionality and

Truetts: an office for Trey and a comfortable

ease of access while preparing meals.

guest suite for visitors. Meanwhile, the former

garage space was turned into a mudroom that

during a pop-up storm and hit the master

would help organize the dirty clothes, uniforms,

bathroom and closet area. This prompted a

and equipment that amass from having three

complete renovation of Allison’s bathroom and

children in various sports. “Sometimes, all of

closet. “This is where Amy came in!” Allison said.

the uniforms disappear in bedrooms!” Allison

With the help of Pinterest and plenty of meetings,

laughed. “So, the mudroom has really helped us

interior designer Amy Strode helped create a

stay organized.”

functional, trendy bathroom and walk-in closet

Next on the list of renovations: custom

for Allison. “When you realize how much time

adjustments to the kitchen, including upgrading

you spend in there and how significant that time

kitchen appliances, adding an island, and creating

is in making the rest of your day work, it’s money

custom cabinets. Bigger burners allow Allison to

well-spent,” said Allison. Amy helped Allison in

use larger pots and pans and prepare for more

the conceptual stage by creating an overall vision

guests. A new steam oven keeps food moist and

for the space and then helping pick out cabinetry,

delicious while retaining more vitamins and

faucets, etc. to fit their budget. The two stayed in

minerals. Special customized cabinets adjacent

regular contact by sharing Pinterest boards and

Two years ago, a massive oak tree fell over

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PHOTOS BY AP IMAGERY

“The house has developed with us. The main areas have been the living spaces, and we wanted them to be for the whole family.”

photos to develop a clear plan of what the area should look

functionality and trend – which helped pull the whole room

like. The finished product is a sleek, inviting room with

together.

space to get ready, relax in the tub, and store clothing and

accessories. “Fehrenbacher did my cabinets and helped me

two large living areas, a sunroom, an open-plan kitchen, a

save money by conserving space and customizing the area to

dining room, a mudroom, a study, a fitness area, and the

what I use it for,” Allison said.

master bedroom with two attached his-and-her bathrooms

Accentuated with unique pieces like an elegant marble

and closets. The sunroom is at the heart of the house, looking

slab in the shower, African headdresses on the wall, and

out onto the back yard, which includes an elaborate outdoor

specially crafted equestrian design in the closet, Allison’s

patio on which the Truett family can enjoy their evenings

master bathroom is personalized to her passions and

together. “The house has developed with us,” Allison said.

functionality. “I just love marble,” Allison gushed. “That’s an

“The main areas have been the living spaces, and we wanted

art piece in itself.” Both Allison and her youngest daughter,

them to be for the whole family. Everyone can be together

Chloe, are “horse crazy” and have been riding for years, so

downstairs, and then they all have their own individual

the subtle horse bit design in the closet is an elegant nod

spaces.”

to Allison’s love of horses. Allison’s oldest daughter, Sara,

aspires to be an interior designer, so she was instrumental

Truett to their house 15 years ago. Through years of hard

in adding remarkable touches, like the black and white

work, they’ve taken that solid foundation and transformed it

artwork in the closet and the striking African headdresses in

into a dazzling space that is perfectly suited to their family’s

the bathroom. Allison describes her personal style as more

unique needs. It’s an ideal blend of family practicality and

traditional, but with the help of her daughter, Sara, and

stunning beauty, and is a wonderful picture of what it looks

designer, Amy, the room became more about a balance of

like to truly take a house and make it into a home.

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The ground floor of the house contains a game room,

Good bones—that’s what attracted Allison and Trey

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THE

SCENE

DOWNTOWN

2018 OWENSBORO AIR SHOW WITH THE NAVY BLUE ANGELS

September 14 – 16 | Downtown Owensboro Don’t miss your chance to get up close and personal to a wide range of military and civilian aircraft on static display. Friday will be your chance to meet some of the pilots of these aircrafts and experience a taste of the Owensboro Air Show.  As the sun begins to set, several performers will take to the sky to entertain the crowds with an evening spectacle of nighttime air show performances followed by fireworks to conclude the night.

DOWNTOWN CRUISE IN

August 4 & September 1 | 2nd Street  Downtown Cruise In comes to downtown on the first Saturday of each month April through October with monthly themes.  One block from the beautiful Owensboro riverfront close to shopping, restaurants.  There will be chances to win door prizes, and theme winners!  Check us out on Facebook for specific details of each event.

FRIDAY AFTER 5

Fridays | Downtown Riverfront FRIDAY AFTER 5 is a summer-long series of free outdoor concerts held every Friday on the eight block, stunningly beautiful Owensboro, Kentucky riverfront. FRIDAY AFTER 5 was again named one of the “Top Ten Summer Festivals” in Kentucky and just won the prestigious Reader’s Choice Platinum Award for “Best Community Event” of the year.  The festival includes live bands, family events, food trucks and entertainment.  Our signature “Toast to the Sunset” takes

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place right on the riverfront at each Friday After 5.   From the RiverPark Center through Smothers Park  to the Owensboro Convention Center downtown on the Owensboro Riverfront on the Ohio River each Friday from 5 p.m. until Midnight. Visit fridayafter5.com for complete schedule of entertainment and weekly events!  Come join in the FREE, FAMILY, FUN each Friday night in downtown Owensboro! Be sure to check us out on Facebook!

LIVE ON THE BANKS

Saturdays | Smothers Park Overlook Stage LIVE on the Banks is a FREE Outdoor Concert Series. The Overlook Stage at Smothers Park in Downtown Owensboro will feature some of the finest LOCAL and REGIONAL Performing Arts & Entertainers, every Saturday evening, May 19 through September 29.   LOB is a FREE, family event, open to the public, for all ages, and is presented by the City of Owensboro.  Join us on Saturday evenings at the Overlook Stage at Smothers Park and the Allen Street Pavilion.  

BLUEGRASS ON THE BANKS

second and fourth Thursdays | Smothers Park Overlook Stage The series will showcase a variety of bluegrass music on the second and fourth Thursdays of each month from May through September, and some extras Fridays in September. Performances will be from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. at the Smothers Park

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Overlook Stage at the north end of Frederica. This is a free event!  

CHEERS ON THE PIER

August 18 from 3 – 7 p.m. | Owensboro Convention Center Cheers on the Pier is back! Bring your friends, meet new ones and craft beer fans alike at the CHEERS on the PIER Craft Beer Festival. Featuring over 30 Craft Breweries, some local wines and a bourbon too! Enjoy all the libations and  LIVE Music on the Pier Stage. Breweries located in an air-conditioned Convention Hall and outside with the sunshine on the pier.  Educational and most enjoyable—Cheers! Proceeds benefit the Cliff Hagan Boys and Girls Club of Owensboro.

2018 RIVER VALLEY CLUSTER DOG SHOW

August 23 | Owensboro Convention Center The 4th Annual River Valley Cluster Dog Show sponsored by the Owensboro River City Kennel Club, Southern Indiana Kennel Club, and Evansville Kennel Club is August 2326th. AKC judges officiate the competition of conformation, obedience and rally trials.  Come enjoy the competition, watch the grooming process and learn more about dogs of many breeds. The show starts each day at 8 a.m. and ends after Best in Show is announced.  There will be vendors present with dog and non-dog items, raffles with prizes and much more fun!

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KIDS

FREE STORYTIMES Mondays & Thursdays Daviess County Public Library Baby/Toddler Storytime at 9:30 a.m. Our youngest guests (ages 0-2) and their caregivers are invited to join us for stories, songs, and movement to help them prepare for a life of learning. Stay to play and socialize with a craft or other activity. Preschool Storytime at 10:30 a.m. Young learners (ages 3-5) and their caregivers are invited to join us for stories, songs, and movement to help them prepare for school. Stay to play and socialize with a craft or other activity.

TAKE A KID OUTDOORS DAY August 25 from 9 a.m. – 12 p.m. | Daviess County Gun Club Join us to learn hunter safety, ATV safety, shoot live firearms, archery, and learn animal tracks and much more. Only the first 120 preregistrations accepted, a parent or guardian must accompany their child.  See daviesscountyconservation.com for more details and registration information.

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dinner, competition, and open dancing. Tickets are on sale now at boulwaremission.org with voting information and further details.  All proceeds benefit the Boulware Mission of Owensboro.

4TH ANNUAL EMERGENCY SERVICES GALA August 25 from 6 – 11 p.m. | Owensboro Convention Center The Annual Emergency Services Gala is a fun filled evening open to the public to honor the region’s emergency personnel.  Men and women who give of themselves 24/7/365 to ensure our community is safe and healthy.  The evening is filled with dinner, dancing, tons of door prizes, and a really good time. Tickets are on sale now, can be purchased online.

WENDELL FOSTER’S NEW ORLEANS SOIREE’ September 8 from 6 – 9 p.m. | Owensboro Convention Center Celebrating the 15th Benefit Auction, Wendell Foster invites everyone to join them as the Owensboro Convention Center is transformed into a fun New Orleans Soirée! There will be incredible New Orleans cuisine, toe-tapping music, and of course, wonderful items to bid on including vacations, unique experiences, and more. Join us September 8th!

SOCIAL

20TH ANNUAL MULTICULTURAL FESTIVAL August 18 from 10 a.m. – 4 p.m. | First Presbyterian Church 20th Annual Owensboro Multicultural Festival is an event planned to inform the community of diverse cultures and traditions in our community.  We have over 30 informational booths, more than eight food booths featuring ethnic foods and entertainment featuring dance, music, demonstrations and fashions.

DANCING WITH OUR STARS OWENSBORO STYLE August 11 | Owensboro Convention Center The 6th Annual Dancing With Our Stars Owensboro Style will feature local celebrities who will partner with local dancers to perform one routine in competition for the mirror-ball trophy and to benefit Boulware Mission! The evening includes a sit-down

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BOILIN’ IN THE ‘BORO MAKE-A-WISH BENEFIT September 16 from 6 – 9::30 p.m. | Reid’s Orchard Join Make-A-Wish Kentucky for a fun, casual evening dedicated to sharing the magic of a wish come true. The event is a low country boil, catered by Steamer Seafood with a bourbon tasting, live and silent auction, raffle and live entertainment.  Guests will also hear stories of inspiration from children who have received a wish and meet families whose lives have been forever changed by a granted wish. Make-A-Wish grans the wishes of children with life-threatening medical conditions to enrich the human experience with hope, strength and joy.  All donations from this event will help grant the wishes of Bluegrass children in the Owensboro, Daviess County area.  For information and tickets call Lisa Reeves, Senior Development Officer,  (502) 272-4375.

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ARTS

JUSTIN MOORE WITH SPECIAL GUEST, DAVID LEE MURPHY September 28 | Owensboro Convention Center Fresh off his third consecutive No. 1 debut album, country superstar Justin Moore and special guest, David Lee Murphy will be in concert at the Owensboro Sportscenter on Friday, September 28 at 7:30 p.m.  After a decade in the business and more than a dozen hit songs, Moore’s brand of  “real country” music continues to resonate among a wide array of his millions of fans. Moore’s current album Kinda Don’t Care carries on that tradition, including the smash hit singles “You Look Like I Need A Drink” and “Somebody Else Will.” Singersongwriter David Lee Murphy has been a staple on the country music scene since the 90’s and is best known for his brand of cleverly written country anthems – including ‘Dust On The Bottle’ and ‘Party Crowd’. The million-selling star recently released his newest album No Zip Code, which includes the Top 10 duet hit with friend Kenny Chesney ‘Everything’s Going To Be Alright.’ Tickets are $39.75 and $59.75  may be purchased online at the Owensboro Convention Center Ticket Office, online at OwensboroTickets.com or by phone at 270-297-9932.

CONCERT ON THE LAWN August 4 | Kentucky Wesleyan College Pack a picnic, grab your lawn chairs and blankets, and head to the lawn for this FREE community concert by the Owensboro Symphony Orchestra! Enjoy a beautiful evening of wonderful music with family and friends presented by the brilliant Owensboro Symphony Orchestra!

MACBETH

September 7, 8, 14 & 15 at 7:30 p.m.; September 9 & 16 at 2 p.m. | Empress Theater Shakespeare’s classic tragedy of a Scottish warrior mad with ambition. To what lengths will the general go to become king?  More importantly, should he listen to his wife?  This harrowing story features murder, insanity, ghosts and witches.  Something for everyone!  Tickets in advance are $18.00 for adults, $12.00 for students on sale now.  There will be a $2.00 surcharge for all tickets purchased on the door.

EASTBRIDGE ART FESTIVAL

September 8 - 9 | Mount St. Joseph The Ursuline Sisters of Mount Saint Joseph have partnered with Studio Slant to host the former East Bridge Art Festival at Maple Mount on September 8 & 9, 2018. This two-day festival showcases more than 70 artists from around the region.  The event also features family activities, food trucks and souvenir vendors for a weekend full of fun surrounded by the beauty of Maple Mount. 

BACKROADS BASH WITH SAMMY KERSHAW

September 29 | Whitaker Guns Sammy Kershaw LIVE in concert! Come join us for a night of great music, fun, and spirits as we close out our annual Guntoberfest event!! An outdoor event for the whole family! Gates open at 6pm, Opening Act (TBD) takes the stage at 7 p.m. and Sammy Kershaw will take the stage at 8:30 p.m. rain or shine! Food and beer will be available for purchase! Cash Only! VIP Tickets include: VIP ONLY seating, Stage Front access, VIP only bar, complimentary snacks, VIP bathrooms. General Admission- Bring a chair or a blanket (large hill side with a great view).  Contact: 270-229-4304 or 270-228-0190 or info@whittakerguns.com. TICKETS ON SALE NOW!

ACTIVE

BOURBON & BLUEGRASS RIDE August 4 | O.Z. Tyler Distillery O. Z. Tyler Kentucky Bourbon Distillery is the host site for the Third Annual Bourbon & Bluegrass Century Ride. Event day registration is online. The cycling event will consist of three distances; the 100-mile century, the 62 mile metric century and a 30 mile ride.  The ride will take you through the rural farmland of western Kentucky along the Ohio and Green Rivers.  The ride will be supported with SAG stops

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every 15 to 20 miles. There will be an early packet pick up Friday night August 3, 2018 at O.Z. Tyler.   A tour of the O.Z. Tyler distillery is included with your registration.  We will be open at 6:30 a.m. with the ride beginning at 7 a.m. Please join us at the early packet pick up and mixer Friday August 3, 2018 at O.Z. Tyler Distillery. Enjoy a pre-ride continental breakfast Saturday morning and a post-ride meal with live bluegrass music for your enjoyment. All proceeds benefit Dream Riders of Kentucky, Inc.  Registration is now open, visit BicycleOwensboro.org for details and links to registration.

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FAMILY

FARMERS MARKET

Saturdays 8 a.m. – Noon and Tuesdays and Thursdays 6:30 a.m. – Noon

Find out why fresh is best! The Market features locally grown vegetables, flowers, meats and baked goods.

FESTIVAL SEASON AT TRUNNELL’S

throughout August & September | both Utica and Hwy 54 Markets

Be sure to check out the fun that Trunnell’s offers families at both of their locations! There is something for everyone!

REID’S ORCHARD REIDLAND

throughout June & July | Reid’s Orchard

Be sure to check out the play area at Reid’s, with special weekends of additional family activities!

PRESERVATION STATION PRESERVATION STATION MARKET DAYS August 4 – 5 & September 1 - 2

Held the first full weekend of every month. Sat. 10

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a.m. – 5 p.m. and Sunday noon to 5 p.m. with over 100 vendors of antique, vintage, handcrafted, and boutique items, live music, and food.  Preservation Station Market and Event Center, 9661 Hwy 56.  Also open daily Tues-Sat 10 a.m. -5 p.m. and Sunday Noon -5 p.m.  Call 270-993-7532, go to visitpreservationstation.com, or find us on Facebook.

FAMILY FREEDOM FIREWORKS FESTIVAL September 2 from 6 – 10 p.m. | Panther Creek Park

Bring your lawn chairs, sit back and relax as we celebrate America’s Freedom with entertainment, food vendors and a spectacular fireworks display. It’s family fun and FREE.

MOVIES ON THE RIVER: CARS 3

September 2 from 7 – 9 p.m. | RiverPark Center

Come enjoy Cars 3 an animated comedy, produced by Walt Disney Pictures, in the film Lightning McQueen sets out to prove to the new generation of high tech race cars that he is still the best race car in the world!!  Concessions will be available, please do not bring coolers or pets! 

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THE LAST WORD UNPLANNED SUMMERS

H

ow is it possible for summer to be over when it only just began? There was almost no spring at all; maybe a few warmish days following a long, dreary, grey winter, and then finally it was summer. But only for a moment. We barely had time to consider the heat index and the humidity, with a sprinkling of those intense summer storms with dark clouds, booming thunder and bright lightning, before the page of the calendar turned again and now summer is over. Summer is the season for plans and projects, but somehow there is never time enough to accomplish them. All throughout my childhood, I had big plans, big ideas, big dreams as each summer drew near. I would learn to ride a bike. I would learn to swim. I would lay out for hours every day and finally get a golden tan. But I didn’t have a bicycle. My little brother had one, but my knees bumped the handlebars on those few occasions when I would wobble around the front yard on it. And it was a long, hot walk to the Sportscenter pool, and an even longer, hotter walk back home. The misery of the effort was only rarely worth the reward of cooling off in the blue chlorinated waters in between. And I never managed to lay out on a towel spread across the backyard grass for more than 15 minutes before I was driven back indoors by the sun, the sweat and the insects. So I returned to school every September, my legs pale and my cheeks pink from embarrassment as I lost every contest in which girls held their forearms against one another to see who had the deeper tan. I dragged those same goals into all the summers of my youth. I never accomplished a single one of them a single time, but always told myself that next summer – next summer would be different. The summers were never different – but everything else has changed. I did finally learn to ride a bike, at least well enough to weave 100 OWENSBORO LIVING

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BY LORA WIMSATT

my way slowly around the Greenbelt. If you see me coming, however, it would be wise to move out of my way as my steering is not as dependable as you might hope it would be. I still can’t swim, but the water at Holiday World isn’t over my head so who cares. And on those few occasions when I have the opportunity to go into deeper water, there are two words that make all the difference: Life. Jacket. And not getting a tan when I was younger was smarter than anyone would have guessed. …As for the time I spent not learning to ride a bike, not learning to swim and not getting a tan – well, that turns out to have been time well spent; very well spent indeed. I read. Sometimes I started a book early in the morning and finished it late at night. I read mysteries and adventures that kindled a spark of curiosity and courage within my own spirit. I read – don’t laugh – I read books on etiquette. I don’t know why they intrigued me so, but they did. I studied the rules for a proper table setting, even though I was skeptical that so many forks actually existed. I memorized how, whether and when to stand when someone else entered the room; how to introduce myself or others; how to write a proper thank-you note to my hostess after a visit. Not that I ever saw or did any of these things in real life, but I’ve never regretted learning what would be correct if I ever needed it. I wrote. A lot. Short stories and books, filling entire spiral notebooks with ridiculously melodramatic tales of action and adventure, and melancholy poems. They were awful. I never let anyone read them then, and I sure wouldn’t now. But here’s the thing. My summers never turned out the way I expected them to, the way I wanted them to. But neither did my life. And as it turned out, my unplanned summers prepared me for all the seasons of my unplanned life, after all. www.OwensboroLiving.com


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Owensboro Living - August / September 2018  
Owensboro Living - August / September 2018