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FRO M THE E D I TOR HOME SWEET HOME

PUBLISHER

Jason Tanner jason@tannerpublishing.com

Bowling Green Living is now in its fourth issue, and our team is humbled and honored to serve our community each month. To every reader, business and follower: Thank you for joining us on this journey. Our May/June issue is founded on the idea of home and what it means to each of us.

EDITOR

Sarah Bishop sarah@tannerpublishing.com AD SALES

Sarah Bishop Brock Quinton brock@tannerpublishing.com

When my husband and I purchased our first house I didn’t realize how heavy my heart would feel to move out of our little one-bedroom apartment. It was the first place we shared together, where we returned from our honeymoon as newlyweds, where we hosted our very best friends for gatherings, where we shared arguments and laughter and lazy Sundays. And I didn’t want to leave it. But now after just a couple of years in our 130-year-old downtown Victorian, I know when the day comes, this home will be even harder to leave. Which makes me realize that my homes are so special to me because of the person (and four-legged friend!) I share it with. And the very word is different to each of us. For some, home can mean independence or refuge or starting anew. In this issue, our special “Home Tips from the Pros” section offers readers insight and advice on all things related to buying, selling, remodeling, updating and maintaining your home.

LAYOUT & DESIGN

Andrea Roberson Jamie Alexander CONTRIBUTORS

Crystal Akers Jamie Alexander Crystal Bowling Caitlin Greenwell Andrea Hampton Linda Hitchcock Natalie Martin Monica Ramsey Katie Starks Leigh Ann Tipton Alex Trabue COVER PHOTO

Brandon Hesson

This issue also explores how home looks different to each of us, like a group of people living in community while recovering from addiction (page 16) or a homeless mother of four who finally secured a place of her own with the help of local nonprofit HOTEL INC (page 32) or a young couple, fresh out of college, who breathed new life into their downtown fixer-upper (page 48). Whatever home looks like for you, I encourage us all to think about the good things it’s comprised of—and may you cling to that wherever you go. Sarah Bishop Editor, Bowling Green Living

Online www.bgkyliving.com facebook.com/bglivingmagazine issuu.com/tannerpublishing

Offline Bowling Green Living PO Box 9503 Owensboro, KY 42302 888-304-5416

Advertise Bowling Green Living is a FREE magazine because of community support. Thank you to the great group of businesses and organizations who advertise.

TANNER PUBLISHING CO.

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2018

MAY . JUNE [08]

THE BUZZ

THE REAL PEOPLE, PLACES AND EVENTS THAT SHAPE OUR COMMUNITY

THE PULSE

[10]

HOW TO SURVIVE IN THE STROKE BELT

[12]

THE ARTS

OF WOOD & CLAY

FEATURES [16] GROUP LIVING IN BOWLING GREEN [22] THE WORLD AROUND US

[44]

[24] SOUTHERN KENTUCKY BOOK FEST [28] PUTTING THE GREEN IN BOWLING GREEN [32] RINGING THE BELL [36] A LOOK BACK: BOWLING GREEN HOT RODS USHER IN 10TH SEASON

[42]

HOME TIPS FROM THE PROS

YOUR ESSENTIAL GUIDE TO YOUTH SPORTS AND RECREATION IN BOWLING GREEN

[58]

THE GETAWAY

36 HOURS IN OWENSBORO KENTUCKY

[62]

[12]

[48]

[68]

[36]

THE STYLE

A SEASON OF CHANGE OFF TO THE RACES

[68]

THE DISH

THE EASIEST, CREAMIEST COCONUT CHICKEN CHICKPEA CURRY

[70]

THE SCENE

YOUR GUIDE TO WHAT’S HAPPENING IN AND AROUND BOWLING GREEN

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BUZZ PHOTO BY THE BOWLING GREEN AREA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE

THE

HOUCHENS SUBSIDIARY, SOUTHERN RECYCLING, BREAKS GROUND ON PROCESSING FACILITY In March, Southern Recycling, LLC, along with officials from Warren County, the City of Bowling Green, the Bowling Green Area Chamber of Commerce and Houchens Industries celebrated the groundbreaking of the company’s newest processing facility on Louisville Road. The facility will include state-of-the-art scrap processing equipment, which will increase the company’s capacity for paper, plastic and scrap metal recycling for the region. “Houchens is excited about this expansion and what it will mean to the Bowling Green and Warren County communities,” said Spencer

WARREN COUNTY WINS ECONOMIC ENGINE AWARD

Coates, president of Bowling Green-based Houchens Industries. “We are grateful for the support this community has shown us.” Southern Recycling was founded in Warren County in 1985 and is the main recycling service provider for South Central Kentucky’s residential and rapidly growing industrial and manufacturing sectors. Southern Recycling serves over 50,000 customers across the region. Since its founding, the company has expanded to employ 117 people across five, full-service, processing facilities.

Warren County was recently awarded the Kentucky Travel Industry Association’s Economic Engine Award, given to those whose tourism efforts have had a significant impact on their local economies. Warren County stands out with one of the highest rates of tourism revenue generation and job creation statewide. Warren County tourism has created over 4,500 tourism jobs and generated more than $435 million in economic impact annually. KTIA CEO and President Hank Phillips presented the Economic Engine Award to Vicki Fitch, executive director of the Bowling Green Area Convention and Visitors Bureau. “We thank our tourism-related businesses for their tremendous contributions to Warren County’s economy,” Fitch said. “Without their efforts, we would not be standing here today, honored, to accept this award on behalf of our community. Warren County and Bowling Green are a wonderful destination, and the employees of our attractions, restaurants, hotels, shops and other tourism entities are tremendous ambassadors for our community.”

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UNITED WAY’S FEED THE NEED COLLECTS MORE THAN 100K ITEMS United Way of Southern Kentucky collected more than 100,000 items through its Feed the Need food drive, which spanned Allen, Barren, Butler, Hart, Logan, Simpson and Warren counties. Since its inception 10 years ago, Feed the Need has collected more than 675,000 items, coming in at a little more than 43,000 items its first year. This year, more than 70 companies and organizations participated by holding internal food drives.

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VISITORS BUREAU LAUNCHES CULINARY VIDEO SERIES In March, the Bowling Green Area Convention & Visitors Bureau launched a new video series: BGKY Eats! These short, engaging videos will explore our region’s intricate food scene and will highlight some of the area’s best restaurants.

declaring 2018 the “Year of Kentucky Food.”

The series’ launch comes on the heels of Kentucky Department of Tourism

To follow along, visit the CVB’s blog at visitbgky.com.

The CVB’s inaugural BGKY Eats! video takes a look at legendary cake mix king Duncan Hines, along with the area’s very own Boyce General Store.

CANDLEWOOD SUITES CELEBRATES 10 YEAR ANNIVERSARY This year, Candlewood Suites, an IHG hotel, is celebrating 10 years in its Bowling Green location on Scottsville Road. Since its beginning, this all-suite hotel has assisted many local companies and visitors with accommodation needs, specializing in extended stay. With the hotel’s wide range of accommodations and genuine staff, the company has been successful in making its guests feel at home. “My wife and I are proud of the team at Candlewood for their accomplishments over the past 10 years,” Andy Vanmali of Three Springs Hospitality. “And we are excited to continue to be a resource to our community.” Over the years, Candlewood has graciously received many awards from IHG including the Torch Bearer Award (Top 10 of all Candlewood Suites nationwide) in 2012 and Quality Excellence Award (Top 10 percent of all Candlewood Suites nationwide in 2010 and 2011).

TREK @ THE TRACK OPEN FOR SEASON If you’ve been looking for the perfect place to take a jog, walk, go on a bicycle ride or inline skate, the NCM Motorsports Park is open on Tuesday evenings for Trek @ the Track. The 3.15 mile paved road course offers light elevation changes and a number of configurations so that visitors can pick the length of their trek.

to 7 p.m. in April, May and September and from 5 to 8 p.m. in June, July and August.

Trek @ the Track is free and offered every Tuesday (weather pending) from 5

For more information, visit motorsportspark.org/trek-at-the-track.

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Pets on leashes are welcome as long as owners clean up after them. No skateboards or motorized vehicles allowed. Helmets required for skaters and cyclists.

In 2017, Candlewood Suites went through a complete renovation, updating its design and providing guests with refreshed and modern accommodations. Candlewood Suites and the Bowling Green Area Chamber of Commerce cordially invite you to the hotel’s 10-year anniversary ribbon cutting on Thursday, June 21 at 4 p.m., with refreshments and hors d’oeuvres to follow. Follow Candlewood Suites on Facebook or visit bgchamber.com for further event details.

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THE

BUZZ

PHOTOS BY CLINTON LEWIS

CELEBRATION OF THE ARTS Kentucky Museum Hosts Annual Exhibit

On March 2, the Kentucky Museum hosted the 31st annual exhibit opening of the US Bank Celebration of the Arts, with over 800 in attendance. The show continues to be a strong and active presence in South Central Kentucky, serving artists and art lovers of the region. This annual competitive art exhibition is open to all professional and amateur artists 18 and older living in Kentucky within a 65-mile radius of Bowling Green. Categories include painting, watercolor, works on paper, mixed media, fiber arts, ceramics and glass, sculpture and photography. Exhibit dates were March 3 through April 7. “This exhibit is a wonderful opportunity for regional artists to show their artwork,” said Collections Curator Sandy Staebell. “This year’s show was the largest ever, with 412 pieces by 218 professional and amateur artists.” The record-breaking number of opening night attendees were welcomed by WKU President Tim Caboni. “Through exhibits like this, we celebrate all artists in our community, the seasoned professionals as well as the fledgling amateurs,” Caboni said. “And we do it in a supportive way and in an inclusive way.” In his opening remarks, Museum Director Brent Bjorkman also reflected on the importance of such events to the community. “The Museum is a place to explore and celebrate community expression and our connection to the world,” he said. Following welcoming remarks, Bjorkman and US Bank Regional President Craig Browning presented awards to artists in eight categories, as well as other special awards such as Best in Show. During its month on display, the exhibit has been visited by a variety of campus and community audiences, including WKU art students and K-12 groups. The exhibit also was featured as part of the March 16 Bowling Green Gallery Hop. With each year’s show, many visitors are pleasantly surprised by the incredible and diverse artistic talent in our region. “It was so amazing to see all this great local artwork in one place,” said WKU Cultural Anthropology major Kelley Eads. “We’re 31 years into this thing,” Browning said. “But, I honestly believe 31 years in the future, someone else will be standing here talking about the Celebration of the Arts and the 62-year history.” In addition to Celebration of the Arts, the Museum also hosted the unveiling of the HAD Artist Collective murals on the same evening. As part of WKU’s International Year of Bosnia and Herzegovina, the WKU Art Department worked to bring the Bosnian HAD Artist Collective to Bowling Green. From Feb. 27 to March 1, artists from HAD created two murals in the Museum courtyard. The group’s artistic process involves cutting into wall-like surfaces, creating powerful portraits—often of those lost during the Bosnian War. To learn more about US Bank Celebration of the Arts, the HAD Artist Collective and all featured exhibits, visit wku.edu/kentuckymuseum. 8 BOWLING GREEN LIVING

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THE

PULSE

How to survive in

THE STROKE BELT

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BY MED CENTER HEALTH

You might joke about losing brain cells when you forget to water a plant or misplace your keys, but losing brain cells because of a stroke is no laughing matter. A stroke occurs when a blood vessel that carries oxygen and nutrients to the brain is either blocked by a clot or bursts. When that happens, part of the brain cannot get the blood and oxygen it needs, so it starts to die. According to the Centers for Disease

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Control and Prevention, stroke accounts for almost 133,000 deaths a year—and, more than 795,000 people experience a stroke each year and nearly 185,000 of those are recurrent strokes. “Kentucky sits atop the nation’s ‘stroke belt’ and is ranked 12th nationally for the highest number of stroke-related deaths,” said Bill Singletary, RN, stroke program director at The Medical Center, which is certified as a Primary Stroke Center by The Joint Commission. “Not surprisingly, we can attribute these disturbing statistics directly to the high number of risk factors in our state population such as smoking, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, diabetes and obesity. The keys to improving the health of our state are to modify our risk factors for stroke, to recognize the signs of stroke when we see it and to take immediate action by calling 911.” To recognize the signs of stroke, think B.E. F.A.S.T.* When you can spot the signs, you’ll know that you need to call 911 for help right away. B.E. F.A.S.T. is: • Balance: Is the person having trouble walking? Loss of balance or coordination, dizziness? • Eyes: Is the person having trouble seeing? Change in vision in one or both eyes? • Face drooping: ask the person to smile. Does the smile look even? Does the face look uneven, droopy or numb? • Arm weakness: Ask the person to raise both arms. Does one arm drop down? Weakness or numbness in one arm or leg? • Speech difficulty: Does the person have trouble speaking or seem confused? • Time to call 911: If someone shows any of these symptoms, even if the symptoms go away, call 911 immediately. Check the time so you’ll know when the first symptoms appeared. Time lost equals brain lost.

be changed, treated or controlled:

How can you avoid a stroke in the first place? There are some risk factors, like age, heredity, race, sex and medical history, that can’t be changed; but many risk factors can be improved or controlled by lifestyle changes or by medical treatment. According to the American Stroke Association, the following are some of the risk factors that can

having a stroke. If you have risk factors for stroke, see your doctor as

High blood pressure

Cigarette smoking

Alcohol abuse

Drug abuse

Diabetes: Many people with diabetes also have high blood pressure, high blood cholesterol and are overweight, which increases risk even more.

Heart disease: People with coronary heart disease or heart failure have a higher risk of stroke than those with hearts that work normally.

High blood cholesterol

Poor diet: A diet containing five or more servings of fruits and vegetables per day may actually reduce the risk of stroke. Foods high in saturated fat, transfats and salt increase your risk.

Physical inactivity and obesity: Being inactive, obese or both can increase your risk of high blood pressure, high blood cholesterol, diabetes, heart disease and stroke.

The Medical Center at Bowling Green, flagship hospital of Med

Center Health, is dedicated to achieving the best outcomes for those who suffer a stroke. As a Joint Commission certified Primary Stroke Center, The Medical Center is a leader in stroke care, providing advanced care for patients in our community. In addition, The Medical Center is a member of the UK/Norton Stroke Care Network, a collaboration designed to provide the highest quality clinical care as well as educational programs to physicians, hospital staff and community members.

Call 911 immediately if you think you or someone you know is

soon as possible. No matter your age, you can reduce your risk with your doctor’s guidance.

For more information about how The Medical Center is leading

the way in stroke prevention and care, visit The MedicalCenter.org.

*B.E. F.A.S.T. was developed by Intermountain Healthcare as an adaptation of the FAST model implemented by the American Stroke Association.

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THE

ARTS

of wood

& CLAY BY LINDA HITCHCOCK

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PHOTOS BY LOREN GIFFORD

B

en and Laura Beth Fox-Ezell are imaginative practitioners in the flourishing Kentucky renaissance, celebrating and preserving traditional arts and crafts. These visionary artisans work in wood and clay to create beautiful everyday objects destined to become cherished heirlooms. Ben, the visionary behind The Walking Shed, is a woodworker/woodturner who creates walking sticks, bowls, finely balanced rolling pins, cutting boards, ornaments, bottle openers, wine stoppers, the occasional Diagon Alley inspired wands and custom commissioned projects. The beer taps and the courtyard countertop at Spencer’s Coffee are also his creations. Laura Beth, of Stone Cold Fox Ceramics, is a ceramicist and jewelry maker who designs and creates pottery, including cups, mugs, planters, vases, terra cotta pendant diffusers with glazes and incised designs. “There is joy in the beauty of everyday objects,” Laura Beth said. “I like making art, like mugs and cups with a utilitarian purpose, that you can hold in your hand every morning and enjoy instead of pure abstractions.” “My work is designed to be used,” Ben says. “Not put on a shelf, untouched for display,” he said. “To be sure there is intrinsic aesthetic beauty.” Like many professional artisans, they must balance full-time

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careers with creative time in their respective workshops. Ben is accustomed to hard work and long days after years of working on a dairy farm in high school. He works more than 40 hours weekly at Spencer’s as a barista and member of the management team. Laura Beth is a full-time librarian at Warren County Public Library, with diverse responsibilities as the education delivery services coordinator, in-house yoga instructor and is formulating a Teen Advisory Board while completing her master’s in Library Science. “There are limits to what I can produce right now as I do have some time constraints,” she said. “Creating ceramic work is meditative, relaxing.” Ben and Laura Beth met several years ago at Spencer’s when they were Western Kentucky University students. They married in 2016 in their home barn surrounded by family and friends. Their legally adopted blended surname Fox-Ezell nearly stumped government officials at the Social Security office. It wasn’t a problem for Laura Beth, but Ben was required to sign an affidavit attesting he would not sue to restore his name. Their home in Auburn, situated on two picturesque acres adjacent to Ben’s dad’s farm, doubles as a studio. Ben’s shop was formerly the stripping shed side of his family’s old tobacco barn while Laura Beth throws pots in their kitchen. The workshop contains essential costly woodworking tools that have been slowly

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acquired. There is little waste as the huge amount of sawdust generated by woodturning is recycled into compost, and larger chunks of wood feed the fireplace. They dream of building a larger workshop with a cement floor and an area divided with glass partitions to accommodate both ceramics and woodworking studios while isolating the sawdust particles. Laura Beth said they are able to fund their passions by setting up their work at festivals and artisans’ shows. “Neither of us can afford to quit our day jobs, which fortunately we love,” Ben said. “I sell stuff to buy more tools and more wood.” Ben was encouraged to try woodturning by his late great uncle Carl and his uncle Ernie, who taught woodshop at Bowling Green University in Ohio and helped him acquire his first mid-sized lathe several years ago. Commissioned projects may require exotic woods from Asia, Africa and South America ordered from a company in Indiana. The Woodworks, a hardwood flooring supplier in Bowling Green, supplies domestic woods like cherry, walnut, maple, sassafras, persimmon, Osage orange and oak. He also enjoys working with salvaged and spalted wood, or wood naturally colored by fungi. “Everything else is in my backyard,” Ben said. “I’ve even used a chunk of reddish-hued wood retrieved from my parents’ woodpile.” Laura Beth began taking pottery classes about two years ago 14 BOWLING GREEN LIVING

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and quickly demonstrated considerable talent for ceramics which has been nurtured by her husband. “Ben bought me a potter’s wheel for a birthday present; the first major step in being able to cultivate my art at home,” she said. “A generous friend offered to let me ‘kiln sit’ lending a kiln she had in storage. Now, when I’m not at the library, I’m throwing clay.” The fabrication processes in woodturning and ceramics bear similarities as dried blocks or blanks of wood or clay are slowly turned on wood lathes or potter’s wheels. An artist’s eye, talent, training and tremendous patience are necessary to turn a finely balanced wooden object or create finished, glazed ceramic vessels. Insufficiently dried wood will warp. Pottery rushed to kiln will collapse. Ben and Laura are each other’s most honest critics and laugh at failures. For a summer art show, Ben plans to make a display of ruined bowls to show “the birth and death of a bowl.” They are working on a logo that can be branded or stamped into each creation. Sales come from referrals, arts and craft shows and social media. Ben and Laura Beth are active members of BG Makers, a coalition of artists who produce arts and crafts shows. They participate in pop-up shows such as WCPL’s sale on May 26, seasonal fairs at The A-Frame and will participate in a month-long arts show in August at Art Matters. “With our crazy schedules,” Laura said. “It’s great to be able to set up our booths and spend the day together at a crafts show.” www.bgkyliving.com


For more information, visit thewalkingshed.bigcartel.com.

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BY CAITLIN GREENWELL

The Road to Recovery:

GROUP LIVING IN BOWLING GREEN T

hose who traverse downtown Bowling Green on a regular basis may see groups of men walking together, traveling from the north end of town. To the average person, it may seem as though the men are simply taking a stroll, enjoying fellowship. But there is more than meets the eye. These men are completing the second step of a life-changing recovery process at Men’s Addiction Recovery Campus. “They call it trudging,” said Nicole Frields, vice president of recovery services at MARC. “They go to off-site classes. That is to promote camaraderie amongst everybody and to get to know each other. The trudging part is to show the motivation.” On the other hand, those traveling through Bowling Green may pass by a seemingly regular home, unaware that women’s lives are being transformed inside its walls. That’s because private recovery homes are nondescript, preserving the anonymity of its residents. One such home is Vision of Hope, which has received renovation and repair help from the men at MARC. MARC, which opened its doors in June 2016, is a

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state-run inpatient substance abuse recovery program for adult men and utilizes a social model of recovery. “We’re a peer-driven program, so all of our staff are people that are in recovery,” Frields said. “This shows that, ‘Hey, if he can do it, I can do it,’ and they’re going to respect what that person says because they’ve been down the same road.” While at MARC, clients must adhere to a long list of stringent rules, which include random alcohol and drug testing, a 10 p.m. curfew and being smoke-free during program hours. The program at MARC includes four steps, beginning with Safe off the Streets, Frields said. During SOS, clients become acclimated to group living and the structure of the recovery program. “They stay in SOS for at least 10 days,” Frields said. “We have someone here 24 hours a day that makes sure that if they’re experiencing any sort of withdrawal symptoms that we can be there and treat those.” After SOS, men move onto the second step known as Motivational Track. In MT, residents continue to www.bgkyliving.com


PHOTOS BY AÜS ANTONINI

live at the facility but spend the majority of the day off-site in educational classes and attending support group meetings. Once Motivational Track is completed, clients begin the penultimate step of the program: Phase One. “Phase One is kind of the meat and potatoes of the program,” Frields said. During this phase, residents begin to work in depth with the Twelve Steps of Alcoholics Anonymous and meet with their peers three times per week. Frields said the Twelve Steps can be applied to all addictions. “The way that we explain addiction is in regard to the alcoholic personality,” Frields said. “So everybody has kind of the same thinking, and the Twelve Steps seem to work with everybody.” After Phase One, clients enter Phase Two. The men in the final phase are still accountable for abiding the rules and the curfew of MARC, but are able to drive and get jobs if they wish. To stay at MARC, they must pay rent, Frields said. “As long as we don’t feel it’s hindering their recovery, we’ll allow them to stay as long as needed,” Frields said. “At the end of Phase Two, they petition their community and ask their peers to approve their plan to go home, and if everyone

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approves their plan then they go home.” Once a year, MARC invites their alumni back for a funfilled and celebratory homecoming. “We have an alumni picnic where we bring everybody back together and we have pony rides, cotton candy, a dunking booth and bouncy castles, and they’re welcome to bring their children,” Frields said. On any given day, MARC is at or over its capacity of 107 beds. “We stay full all the time,” Frields said. “If we have somebody that desperately needs to get in, we have cots. That’s just on an emergency basis. We don’t like to turn anyone away because a lot of times it’s life or death. This person may not have anywhere else to turn.” Frields said that MARC clients come from all over the country—not just the Bowling Green area. “We’ve had clients from Arizona, California and Virginia from just word of mouth,” she said. “Somebody knows somebody that knows somebody that knows about us.” At MARC, each client must pull his weight around the facility. Frields said the men in the program represent many different skill sets. “Everybody has a job in the house,” Frields said. “Our

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men mow the grass, they do the laundry, they cook all the food, they do all the housekeeping. If we need a coat of paint somewhere, they’ll paint. If we have a toilet that needs to be snaked, somebody here knows how to do that.” While at MARC, clients are also afforded opportunities to volunteer around the community at organizations such as the Salvation Army and Habitat for Humanity. At times, the men take on renovation or repair projects at private recovery homes in the community. “They do a little bit of everything,” Frields said. “This teaches them that they need to give back. Addicts and alcoholics are very selfish people. And the guys love it.” Amenities at MARC include a chapel, dining hall, dormitories and individual apartments. “We have something going on all of the time—it’s constantly moving here,” Frields said. “The chapel was put in for prayer and meditation because that’s a big part of the recovery program. So they have a quiet place to go during the hustle and bustle of the day.” In the beginning stages of development, MARC encountered some pushback from existing area organizations, citing safety concerns. But since its opening, no complaints have been filed against the organization. “We have not had one ounce of trouble,” Frields said. In fact, Frields said MARC and other Recovery Kentucky programs have seen great success rates. According to the University of Kentucky Center on Drug and Alcohol Research, Recovery Kentucky clients reporting use of any illicit drugs and/or alcohol at intake is 84.4 percent, but at follow-up is just 6.3. MARC’s counterpart, Women’s Addiction Recover Manor, in Henderson, Ky., is where Frields got her start. “You get people from all walks of life,” Frields said. “I was in treatment myself in 2006. I was at the Hope Center in Lexington. (Recovery Kentucky) centers are basically models of the Hope Center. I applied for a job while I was in Phase Two, and I got hired at WARM to work at the front desk.” Eventually, Frields moved to her current position, splitting her time between MARC and WARM. “I wear a lot of hats,” she said. “I’ve got a lot of irons in the fire. I’m basically the problem solver.” Frields said she believes there is a need for a large center that caters to women recovering from addiction in the Bowling Green community. Currently, she said more than 15 women from the Bowling Green area are residents at WARM. There are a handful of private recovery homes for women in the community. Amber Hamm is Vision for Hope’s owner and livewww.bgkyliving.com

in director. She is looking forward to the home moving locations this year. The new home, which will increase its size from six to seven beds for women in recovery, will also include amenities like a fenced-in backyard and patio. Hamm said the new house is currently undergoing renovations, getting repainted and new carpet. Vision of Hope, formerly known as Her Path, was founded in July 2014 by Rachel Wheat. At its first location, Wheat and her two children lived on the first floor and had eight beds upstairs for women looking to recover. “I thought, ‘We’ll move in and then we’ll fill it in like a month,’ ” Wheat said. “In four days, I had people sleeping on the floor. There was just that great of a need for beds.” What compelled Wheat to undertake such a project? When she was going through her own struggles of addiction, she had a support system in her family. But not everyone going through addiction has that, she said. “Where are they going to go?” Wheat said she asked herself. “Where do you go when you need a soft place to land but a firm enough place to start from?” And Her Path became that place to go, she said. “We got to be a part of really neat things,” Wheat said. “We’ve been a part of women’s lives and see families come back together—moms learn how to be moms again or for the first time even.” Hamm, who is now 15 months clean, first found sobriety at Her Path before taking on her new role. In 2016, Hamm said she was in her 16th treatment center and was finally referred to Wheat. “I can say personally that Rachel came and got me out of a motel room,” Hamm said. “If I had not come to a recovery home from the motel room—had I not taken that continuum of care—I would be dead.” Hamm said sobriety can be lonely and that having a support system helps. “I spent a lot of time alone when I first got sober,” Hamm said. “I went through some really, really heavy stuff. Having a house director I could reach out to was a big deal. I want that with them. Things happen that are unexpected. We’re going to experience death. We’re going to experience loss. Having support from Rachel and my sponsor was great. They were always my first two phone calls. Having that—that’s what these places are for.” Hamm said there is high demand for women’s recovery homes in Bowling Green. “We could keep a waiting list 365 days a year,” Hamm said. “There’s always a need. I hope we get more women’s houses. It’s not a competition.” Unlike Recovery Kentucky programs like MARC, M AY / / J U N E 2 0 1 8

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independently run recovery homes typically charge rent. Hamm said current rent at Vision of Hope is $105 per week, and the cost covers all utilities. Typically, the program lasts 12 months. “I don’t know anyone who can get their life together in just six months,” Hamm said. She said the women must learn accountability during their recovery by keeping up rent payments, making money and saving money. Then, they are ready to graduate. All residents are required to have a sponsor, Hamm said. “We do check-ins every week,” Hamm said. “Sponsors have to sign a sheet of paper saying they’ve met in-person once and have had three phone calls. If they’re working (the twelve) steps, working with a sponsor and attending meetings, everything else will fall into place.” Hamm said she stays on a twin bed and has a small space in the fridge just like the other women in the home. “I don’t consider this house to be mine,” Hamm said. “This is our house. We’re doing this together. We’re all dealing with one thing, and that’s addiction.” Hamm said she is working to make every woman who comes from the program capable of living on her own. “The goal is to come in here, get sustainable and move out,” Hamm said. “Not to move from one recovery home to

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another. But they have to be taught that. I had to learn that.”

There is a screening process to be accepted at Vision of

Hope.

“I do get to be selective about who I take,” Hamm said.

“All it takes is one person to come in here to really cause some damage. I’ve seen it happen, and it creates a domino effect.”

Wheat said there will always be those who aren’t aware

of how a recovery home like Vision of Hope operates. In fact, she said there was an individual initially opposed to Hamm opening at the new location.

The home’s residents take great pride in their yard work

and house upkeep, Wheat said. The neighborhood now looks forward to welcoming the home.

“There is a stigma that comes along when people hear, ‘Oh,

did you know that it’s going to be a recovery home?’ ” Wheat said. “Everybody’s been affected in some way by addiction. And it’s still scary. If it’s done right, the neighborhood is benefitted from us.”

After being passed the torch from Wheat, Hamm is certain

that running a women’s recovery home is her calling.

“This is what I’m supposed to be doing,” Hamm said.

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PHOTOS BY RENÉE DEEMER

BY CRYSTAL BOWLING

The World Around Us MONTESSORI ELEMENTARY SCHOOL OF BOWLING GREEN IS TRANSFORMING THE WAY CHILDREN THINK, LEARN AND PERCEIVE THEIR SURROUNDINGS

T

he Montessori Elementary School of Bowling Green, located in a historic home in downtown Bowling Green, has offered a

caring and nurturing environment for elementary students since 2012.

Their mission follows a child’s natural pace and

the joy of learning by his or her capacity. Students in grades one through seven learn together in a shared space, follow an agenda through guided collaboration and are free to study and learn their preferences at their own pace.

With a small staff, including two assistants,

a Chinese instructor and the director, Benedicte Bossut, the school is focused on the child’s progress

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in terms of successes, allowing learning obstacles to be removed through additional reviews and alternative lessons. The Montessori educational approach was introduced and made popular by Dr. Maria Montessori and has been used for over 100 years to further the education of children with the understanding that children have a natural desire to learn about the world around them. The role of the adult in the classroom is to entice the child’s interests in many topics, to offer lessons that will engage the reasoning and imaginative capacities of the child and to guide the child to make decisions in choosing, practicing and creating from lessons

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PHOTOS BY RENÉE DEEMER

available in and outside the classroom. “The goal is not to have too many adults in the classroom at any time,” Bossut explained. “Because we want the children to rely on each other and to learn from each other, and that’s where the mixed age group allows for that. We don’t separate by grade, and that’s really key to the Montessori environment.” The Montessori Elementary School resides in a threefloor historic home on Main Avenue and provides a learning experience for six to 12 year olds. Shelves and cubbies are located throughout the building, with an assortment of learning tools and resources for the students. “We want the room to be inviting and to say, ‘These are the lessons, and you should choose from them’ because it’s part of limiting the environment so the child knows where to go, to saying ‘You know, there is still a lot of empty spaces on the shelf. Your mind can ask more questions.’ ” The school strives to encourage wonder, imagination and a love of learning for its students. The rooms flow into one another and provide the students with an opportunity to converse and to learn and question freely. “There is no stopping,” Bossut said. “There is not just exactly 45 minutes (to a class period). We don’t ask questions waiting for the answer. In this environment, you have various resources. If it’s not in the classroom, we can research outside. Let’s go outside, let’s learn more from the people who are really in the field.” After-school programs and clubs are available to students, including knitting, dance, cooking, art, running and equestrian. Graham, a fifth-grader, has been a student at the school for four years. He enjoys math and art and wants to be an www.bgkyliving.com

artist when he grows up. Among his favorite activities that he has participated in at the Montessori school are “playing the playground like an instrument at recess” and, on a slightly gory note, dissecting a cow eye. He is active in the school’s equestrian club and zine club, a creative language group. According to Graham, both groups are “really great.” “My favorite things about the Montessori are the independence and citizenship skills that the students learn,” Graham’s father, Todd, said of the school. “I also appreciate the amount of time spent on field trips, as well as the fact that there is no homework. Small group and individual lessons let students pursue their interests and learn how to work with others for a common goal.” “Our main mission is to follow the child and to bring in the child the joy of learning by discovering one’s capacities for freedom and responsibility,” Bossut said. “Learning is self-discovery. Education is self-construction in a guided environment. As the primary (three to six years old) environment supports the child toward autonomy and functional independence, the elementary Montessori (six to 12 years old) environment prepares the child’s intellect and fosters self-confidence in the learning process for life. Through insightful lessons, guided practices, collaborative and individual work, the child’s emotional, spiritual and intellectual needs are met. The child readies for the next stage of development—adolescence,” Bossut said. The Montessori Elementary School of Bowling Green is a beautiful addition to learning in Warren County. With small class sizes and a focus on the needs of its students, the school brings the vision of Dr. Montessori to South Central Kentucky and the 21st-century. M AY / / J U N E 2 0 1 8

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PHOTOS BY ISAAC RUSSELL OF WKU LIBRARIES

H

BY AL CRYST G IN BOWL

SOUTHERN KENTUCKY

Book Fest CELEBRATING 20 YEARS 24 BOWLING GREEN LIVING

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eading into its 20th year, the Southern Kentucky Book Fest shows no signs of slowing down. With over 140 authors in attendance this year from all genres, two days of writing workshops and a headliner whose Series of Unfortunate Events has been turned into a film starring Jim Carrey and a Netflix hit, SOKY Book Fest has aged well the past 20 years. This year will undoubtedly be one for the books. Held at the Knicely Conference Center, the Book Fest has brought some big-name authors of the time to meet fans and book lovers. Recent headlining authors have included Diana Gabaldon, Nicholas Sparks, Henry Winkler and Terry Brooks. Loren Long, author and illustrator of the

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bestselling Otis series, will be headlining this year’s event. Long has illustrated books for former President Barack Obama, Madonna and Watty Piper. He will be discussing his latest book, Love, Friday, April 20 and Saturday, April 21 at 10 a.m. This year’s Book Fest will host Maggie Stiefvater, whose wildly popular Raven Cycle series has recently been optioned into a television program. Stiefvater will speak at 11 a.m. April 21 and will sign books after her presentation. Other authors of note this year include Phil Bildner, Debbie Dadey, former Kentucky Gov. Steve Beshear, Rebecca Costa, Mitali Perkins, Molly Harper, Alma Katsu and Ann Gabhart. From children’s fiction to romance novels to historical nonfiction, there is an author for every genre, age and taste. This year’s Book Fest will be the first to feature two days of writing workshops. Attend panels as authors such as Courtney Stevens, Kristen Tubb and Max Garland discuss and offer advice on the highs and lows of publishing, poetry and prose. Just like the Book Fest, the Kentucky Writers Conference is a free event, though online registration for Friday’s event is

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encouraged at sokybookfest.org. Teen & Children’s Day is held on April 20 as well. More than 60 authors attend as elementary, middle and high school students attend presentations, panels and participate in activities. Other writers featured on Teen and Children’s Day are the winning authors from the 212 Academy, a gifted and talented program for fourth- to sixth-graders. “Each fall semester, a selection of students from 212 Academy take a publishing course in which they learn the ins-and-outs of what it takes to publish a book from idea to final printed material,” said Sara Volpi, literary outreach coordinator for WKU Libraries. “Final books are read by a committee who choose two winners to be featured at Book Fest. Students often choose to illustrate their own work, as one of our winners, Haley Graham, did this year in the second installment of her Phantom Trilogy (yes, she already has plans for a third book!). A duo, Bella Wahbeh and Virginia Stewart, took the other Book Fest spot for their book, Quest for the Gemstone. The authors will be signing and selling their books alongside adult authors on Teen & Children’s Day—a coveted spot.”

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Also on Friday, April 20, from 5 to 7 p.m. is the Meet the Authors Reception, a ticketed that event allows book lovers the opportunity to meet their favorite authors in a more intimate setting, complete with appetizers and drinks. “Our generous sponsors, such as Jim Johnson Nissan, Dollar General and Walmart, make Book Fest events possible year after year, and we’re lucky that the SOKY Book Fest partnership and the volunteers who assist in our efforts is a strong team with shared goals,” Volpi said. A partnership between Warren County Public Library, Barnes & Noble Booksellers and WKU Libraries, SOKY Book Fest is proud to offer events and programs throughout the year to promote literacy within the community. SOKY Reads events and the SOKY Book Fest Used Book Sale promote the Book Fest as well as encourage literacy and a love of reading. “We’re always trying to stay ahead of the curve in the

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literary community, and we welcome feedback,” Volpi said. “We’re excited to offer some new opportunities at our 20th anniversary, and we’ve even partnered with Book Fest favorite Mark Wayne Adams to design a one-of-a-kind commemorative T-shirt to celebrate this milestone. There will also be an interactive mural painting session Friday morning with Andee Rudloff, a Bowling Green native who has toured the U.S. adding her signature style and vibrant color to hundreds of locations.” As always, SOKY Book Fest is free and open to the public. Held at the Knicely Conference Center, SOKY Book Fest is Saturday, April 21 from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. The Kentucky Writers Conference, sponsored by Dollar General, is Friday, April 20 at WKU’s South Campus from 9 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. For more details and lists of authors and events, visit sokybookfest.org.

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PROMOTIONAL FEATURE

A L L C R E AT U R E S A N I M A L H O S P I TA L

PREVENTING OBESITY

in our pets BY DR. VICKY MCGRATH

S

pring is in full bloom, and now is a great time to

Separating pets at mealtime by feeding in another room

evaluate your pet’s lifestyle and body condition.

also helps to halt begging. Diversions like food balls

With warmer weather, we all like to get out and get

or puzzles work as well to engage our pets mentally. It

moving, and our pets are no exception.

is easy to fall into the trap of showing our love to our

According to the American Animal Hospital

pets in the form of excess food when those sad eyes are

Association, up to 59 percent of dogs and cats are

begging.

overweight. As with their human counterparts, obesity

can decrease lifespan and quality of life. Many skin,

involve food helps to increase metabolism and ensures

metabolic, endocrine and joint diseases as well as

they get the attention they need. Walking, ball and

certain cancers are associated with excess weight.

frisbee throwing, laser pointers and kitty tease toys are

all great ways to help get humans and pets moving.

If you can feel, but not see, your dog’s backbone

Creating a new activity with your pet that does not

and ribs with the flat of your hand, this is normal. If

you have to really hunt for those ribs and backbone,

routines early on. Growing animals need appropriate

your dog likely has too much fat cover. Cats put on fat

nutrition but need to be monitored to prevent gaining

in a different way, so if you notice a “paunch” on your

weight too quickly. Starting good play and exercise

cat’s belly or a waddle in their walk, chances are kitty

routines with puppies and kittens helps to create

is overweight. Your veterinarian can determine Body

habits that can prevent obesity as they age. After spay

Condition Score and the Daily Energy and Resting

or neuter surgery is another time the metabolism may

Energy requirements for your dog or cat. They can also

change in some pets, and their caloric needs may go

help you formulate a nutrition plan and target body

down.

weight to get you started.

Daily exercise is crucial for our pets to expend

energy, build muscle and use excess calories taken in.

Begging is a tough behavioral issue to overcome. As

If you have a new puppy or kitten, establish good

long as your pet’s nutritional needs are met, begging

is not hunger related. You can give substitutes such

pets, but if we can show our love with extra cuddles

as green beans, carrots or apples if your pet must be

and time exercising together instead of extra treats,

fed from the table. Limiting treats and knowing the

it will go a long way toward keeping your dog or cat

calorie content of the treats you are using is key as well.

healthy.

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We all know losing weight is hard. We all love our

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PUTTING THE GREEN in Bowling Green WKU OFFICE OF SUSTAINABILITY IS TRANSFORMING THE WAY OUR CAMPUS, COMMUNITY CONSUMES ENERGY

BY MONICA RAMSEY

C

hristian Ryan didn’t expect her graduate thesis to lead to a job at Western Kentucky University, much less to the creation of a

new office, but that’s what happened in 2008.

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PHOTOS BY RENÉE DEEMER

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Ryan is the sustainability coordinator for

community garden, which includes an olive tree,

the Office of Sustainability (OoS). After writing

kiwi, malabar spinach, edible flowers (such as

her thesis about how WKU could improve its

dahlias and nasturtium), herbs and hops. Solar

sustainability, Ryan said her hiring was “almost

panels don the roof. Rain barrels dot the property.

like saying, ‘Make it so.’” She occupied an office

in the Department of Facilities Management

as much (energy) as we use,” Ryan said.

until the opportunity arose in 2013 to move and

In 2008, Ryan said the OoS was mainly

expand the OoS to an old house WKU owned at

concerned

503 Regents Ave.

consumption on campus. Since the office’s

Although the house appears quaint, the

inception, campus electricity consumption has

happenings within the walls—and on nearly

decreased by nearly 30 percent, made possible by

every square inch of the property—are anything

using LED lighting, which reduced parking lot

but. On the main floor is a kitchen, where the OoS

lighting energy consumption by 85 to 95 percent,

hosts various cooking workshops; a room where

and turning off computers at the end of the day.

volunteers perform tasks like assembling seed

In 2009, the OoS spearheaded Conservation

packets; and a food pantry. Below is the basement,

Vacation, which included shutting down things

the shop for Big Red Bikes, which repairs and

like vending machines and unused parking lot

rents bikes that have been donated or abandoned.

lights during school breaks. The initiative saved

more than 1 million kilowatt hours of energy,

A deck at the back of the house overlooks a

“That’s our goal, to be net zero, to produce just

with

energy

efficiency

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and

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Going Green

ON A BUDGET

Ryan said. In addition to ramping up a recycling program, the OoS sought to “reduce waste upstream,” as Ryan put it, and worked to figure out how WKU could reduce its environmental impacts.

“There are some ideas that work really well for other

Christian Ryan, WKU sustainability coordinator,

schools but don’t work as well here,” Ryan said. “One of the

suggested the following ways to “go green”

things I’ve found resonates really well with our students

this summer on any budget:

here is food.”

Students often show interest in learning about organic

Support wildlife by creating a habitat in

foods, buying local and genetically modified organisms,

your yard. This could include planting flowers

or GMOs. That interest led to a partnership with the

that attract butterflies or that provide nectar

Community Farmers Market and greater involvement in

and pollen sources to attract pollinators.

the garden.

More information can be found at the North

American Butterfly Association, National

even offers a source of comfort for students feeling lonely

Pollinator Garden Network and National Wildlife Federation. Build rain barrels. This saves money and conserves water for more sustainable uses. The OoS recommends re-using food grade

Ryan said the garden draws a diversity of students, and

or depressed, which Ryan believes helps with retention.

The garden contributes to the OoS food pantry, which

Ryan said is much more needed than some people may know.

“I don’t think we realized how great food insecurity is

barrels. Visit Better Homes & Gardens for tips

on our campus,” Ryan said. Last year, the OoS food pantry

on how to make a rain barrel.

had 308 visits. Many of those visitors were campus staff.

“The majority of our staff on campus… the folks who

Create a low- or no-mow landscape. This

keep the place running don’t make a living wage, so it’s

reduces maintenance, cost and environmental

kind of heartbreaking to see them needing the food pantry,”

impacts and can include shrubs, flowers and

Ryan said.

rocks. For more information, visit timberpress.

While the food pantry only serves WKU students,

com.

faculty and staff, anyone may donate.

Invest in a smart thermostat like a Nest to help keep cooling costs down. Ryan also encouraged visiting local natural and historic features, eating local, visiting the farmers market, taking family bike rides or volunteering locally, including at the OoS community garden.

The pantry also offers learning opportunities. Ashley Stinnett, assistant professor of folk studies and anthropology at WKU, teaches Foodways, a class that addresses how we think about what is healthy and unhealthy, policy in agriculture and where our food comes from, among other topics. Last year, she took 40 students to the OoS.

“I was looking to get my students engaged outside of

the class and sort of grappling with the realities of things we talk about in class,” Stinnett said. “I was also sort of

“If the only thing you’re going to do is sprinkle

interested in getting my students more plugged into the

some wildflower seeds to help the honeybees,

community and campus.”

that makes a big difference,” Ryan said.

The class discusses worldwide food issues, but the OoS helps show the local level of those issues, along with

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enriching the students’ college experience, Stinnett said. “The Office of Sustainability isn’t just a spot for students to learn how composting works,” Stinnett said. “We’re supposed to help students think critically and actualize that, not just learn theory.” If we remove our own self-judgement and can step back from our own beliefs, we really have the opportunity to learn something new. Those experiences teach us about the world, but they also teach us about ourselves. The Office of Sustainability provides a place for us to think about our presuppositions.”

Alexa Hatcher, a WKU senior from Bonnieville,

got involved with the OoS as a student worker in 2016 and is now an intern.

“In the beginning, I thought (the OoS was) cool,

and I needed a job,” Hatcher said. “Since then, it’s kind of developed into a much deeper, personal thing for me. Even if I wasn’t getting paid, I get paid in how I feel and what I’m learning.” Hatcher

emphasized

that

food

connects

everyone, and that’s why the OoS is important to her and to WKU.

“I’m just proud to be a part of that space where

people are coming together to provide food for everyone,” Hatcher said. “It’s based on something bigger than you.”

On the horizon for the OoS is the Sustainability

Living Learning Community, a class starting next semester in which students will live together and work to address and solve sustainability issues.

Ryan said the OoS will continue to work to make

local food sourcing and renewable energy realities. No matter what initiatives and projects the OoS will take on in the future, the core aim remains the same. “One thing that hasn’t changed is that I do anything and everything I can to make WKU a more sustainable campus,” Ryan said. More information about the OoS, including upcoming events, is available on its Facebook, Twitter and Instagram pages. www.bgkyliving.com

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BY CRYSTAL AKERS

Ringing the Bell HOW HOTEL INC IS PROVIDING OUR COMMUNITY EDUCATIONAL, NUTRITIONAL, FINANCIAL OPPORTUNITIES

A

woman who received new shoes for work for the first time in as long as she could remember. A person struggling with addiction who made the decision to begin treatment. A homeless mother of four who finally secured a home for her family. Each of these people has entered the chapel of the former Little Rock Church in Bowling Green’s Delafield neighborhood, which now houses local nonprofit HOTEL INC. They ring the bell in celebration of their accomplishments, each one

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reached as these individuals navigate a path littered with hurdles. The organization operates on a mission to “provide Warren County citizens with pathways to stable housing, community resources, building relationships, quality food, and serving our neighbors.” Services offered include Life Classes and chaplain services; food pantry Manna Mart; a drop-in center for phone, computer, laundry and shower use, as well as homeless resources; financial

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PHOTOS BY RENÉE DEEMER

assistance on a reciprocal giving system, where for each $10 received recipients must devote an hour of time in Life Classes, church services or volunteering; Short Term Rent Assistance with Case Management; veterans and homeless services; and a street medicine program. “A lot of people ask about our name, and we get a lot of calls asking, ‘Do you have a hotel room available?’ But our name stands for Helping Others Through Extending Love In the Name of Christ,” said Executive Director Rhondell Miller. “The name itself, if you know the acronym, is just a beautiful way of our community being ecumenical. We come together from all walks of life, we serve together and we cheer each other on. That’s part of being in a strong community.” Miller emphasizes the education aspect of the organization’s work. Overcoming financial, housing or food insecurity is often a matter of learning skills many people take for granted. “We’ve done a lot of work here within our organization of discussing charity work versus development work,” Miller said. “I strongly believe in development work. It’s about meeting people where they are; not where we want

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them to be. I think that’s really important in serving, but it’s also about not providing a handout. It’s about helping the person recognize what their barriers or needs are and what their plans are. Where do they plan to be, not where I want them to be or a volunteer wants them to be.” According to 2016 Census data, Warren County’s population stands just above 65,000. But a booming population comes with growth in prosperity and growth in underserved populations. Bowling Green’s poverty level is at about 28 percent. For comparison, Kentucky’s overall poverty rate is about 18.5 percent. “Our wage and cost-of-living gap is growing,” Miller said. “Here in Bowling Green in the city limits we’ve reached about a 70 percent rental market. Of that 70 percent, over 50 percent of them are paying out 60 percent of their bring-home pay in rent. If one thing happens, if your child is sick, if your car breaks down, you don’t have the extra money to make rent. We also don’t want to build dependence on, ‘OK let’s call this church this month and this organization the next month’ and so on and so on, because eventually there will be no one else to call, and you didn’t address anything in the process.”

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Noting a large flow chart hanging on her office wall, Miller explained the process of HOTEL INC’s housing assistance program. “Eighty percent of people who become homeless can solve their own situation of being homeless on their own. Typically that 80 percent is rebounding within two to three weeks.” Some people may need referrals to other services, and some may simply need short-term education to overcome barriers to stable housing. Others may decide not to complete the program because they need to meet other goals before housing becomes an immediate priority. Those who qualify for the housing assistance program develop a plan to achieve their goals, and they receive education, guidance and assistance to get there. “Right now our housing department has 79 active households working through, some form or fashion, on their housing.” In addition to the housing services offered, HOTEL INC’s Manna Mart helps put healthy food in hungry neighbors’ hands. According to the latest organized data from 2016, the food pantry served more than 1,400 different households. Again stressing the education component, Miller says HOTEL INC partners with other entities to help recipients learn meal planning and preparation to stretch their food dollars, have access to nutritious food 34 BOWLING GREEN LIVING

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and make healthier choices. “So one of the things that happens in food insecure homes is that you tend to end up with a lot more chronic conditions because you’re eating the poor man’s diet—a lot of high processed foods, high in sugars. We get a lot of empty calories and not a lot of solid whole nutrients. I want better access for people. I think when I’ve watched a grandma cry because she got grapes in our food pantry and she couldn’t remember the last time she’d ever eaten grapes, that’s important. We don’t want to harm our neighbors. So if our food pantry doesn’t have good quality nutritious food in it, what are we doing? And are we possibly a detriment to their health? So that’s a challenge.” HOTEL INC is now in its 37th year, and goals for the next five years are in development to address those challenges. “I think it is really exciting to see that our organization has evolved as our community has evolved, and we’ve adapted to try to meet the needs of our neighbors but remain to the core of our acronym as well,” Miller said. “To think about where we have been and where we are today and the strategic plan that the board and I and other committees are currently working on for the next five years, to me, is not only inspiring, it’s encouraging.” Miller just celebrated seven years with HOTEL INC. When she began, there were about 60 volunteers; that www.bgkyliving.com


For more information on HOTEL INC, visit hotelincbg.com.

number has grown to nearly 200. The annual budget was $85,000; this year it sits right at $560,000. Community support is what allows the organization to reach so many in need. “The majority of our funding comes from private donations here in our community. We try to write about $100,000 worth of grant funds, but the rest is going to come from undesignated gifts from right here in our community,” Miller explained. Providing assistance and advocacy for others isn’t without its hardships, but Miller and the HOTEL INC team believe wholeheartedly in the work they do. The celebratory chime of the church bells and what that represents is validation of the importance of HOTEL INC’s mission. “When folks have good news to celebrate, we gather. The

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world of HOTEL INC stops and we all go to the chapel— neighbors, volunteers, whoever’s here—we go into the chapel for a bell ringing and give that person the opportunity to share their testimony of what they have overcome to celebrate in ringing that bell,” Miller said. “Not very long ago a lady wanted to ring it because we were able to provide her with new shoes for work, and she couldn’t remember the last time she had new shoes. She said, ‘I just want to thank God for these new shoes.’ We celebrate that, because that is worth it. That’s what living life in community is about. We cry together, we laugh together, we bang our heads together and we celebrate together.”

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A

lot of celebrating will be happening this year at the Bowling Green

Ballpark. That’s because the Hot Rods, Class A affiliate of the Tampa Bay Rays, is honoring its 10th season in Bowling Green,

having

moved

here

from

Columbus, Ga., when investor Art Solomon had a vision for the 4,000plus seat arena being built in downtown Bowling Green. He purchased the team, then known as the Columbus Catfish— and moved the team to Bowling Green.

Now, 10 years later, the Hot Rods have

solidified their place as an institution in the community. “We are unbelievably excited—and thankful for the time we have been in Bowling Green,” said Assistant General Manager Matt Ingram. “It doesn’t feel like it’s been 10 years already.” Ingram

was

attending

Western

Kentucky University when local officials began downtown redevelopment, which included construction of the Ballpark. Ingram started working with the Hot Rods as an intern and had risen through the ranks to the role of director of sales

BY ANN LEIGH N TIPTO

before leaving in April 2016 to join the Cincinnati Bengals as senior account executive and team lead of group sales. The downtown area off Circus Square Park has seen a lot of change

PHOTOS BY STEVE ROBERTS

a look back BOWLING GREEN HOT RODS USHER IN 10TH SEASON

since Ingram’s college days—most of it revolving around the Ballpark and adjacent entertainment and business district.

“The Ballpark is a venue we like to

showcase when we have media from outside the area come to town,” said Beth Noffsinger, public relations manager at the Bowing Green Area Convention and Visitors Bureau. “We value the venue, and we value their partnerships with the

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community.”

In addition to hosting games, the Ballpark plays host

active and involved the Hot Rods are in the community,

to a number of other community events. In March, the

and how much the Ballpark is utilized outside of baseball.

Ballpark hosted the inaugural Hot Rods Classic, a round

robin tournament that included teams from Greenwood

she said. “They’re a great host for the Bourbon and

High School, Adair County High School, Barren County

Brewfest event, which has really taken off. They are a great

High School and DeSales (Lousiville) High School.

community partner to have.”

The Ballpark also serves as a concert venue. On Aug. 30,

The Hot Rods have been assisting organizations in

famed country music singer Jake Owen will make a stop

raising money and awareness for more than nine years

here on his “Life’s Whatcha Make It Tour.” Ingram said

through ticket sales and Fan Pack fundraising campaigns.

it has taken some time, but the Ballpark is finally starting

The venue also serves as a great place for business and

to attract the attention of Nashville event planners and

industry outings.

promoters whose bands can come play a gig—and still

sleep at home that night.

giveaways and events to celebrate their 10th season.

“And Nashville, although known for country music,

On opening night this season, fans received a Hot

is home to many genres these days,” said Noffsinger.

Rods 10th season logo T-shirt as well as a 2018 Quickstick

“So many different genres are bringing their music into

schedule. Fans also enjoyed Braxton Brewing products in

Nashville.”

the Tap Room for a Tap Takeover night. Before first pitch,

She said Bowling Green is hoping to capitalize on its

two former Hot Rods players or coaches were inducted to

proximity to Nashville to attract a wide variety of bands—

the inaugural class of the Bowling Green Hot Rods Hall of

especially to the Bowling Green Ballpark in the summer

Fame.

months.

April 28 will be the ever-popular bootlegger night—

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Noffsinger also said many likely don’t realize just how

“So many of our walks and runs begin and end there,”

The Hot Rods are planning extra special theme nights,

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where the first 500 fans will receive a commemorative hat.

fair, where kids can learn about exciting enrichment

June 2 will be “What Should’ve Been” Night, and the park

opportunities. The venue also hosts school groups and

will host a “Margaritaville” Night and a “What We Were”

field trips and strives to have a positive impact on the

Night, where the park looks back at the many faces of the

community.

Rays Class A affiliate through the years.

“We are always looking for ways to enhance the

“At some point in June, we’re also expecting our 2

experience for the family,” Ingram said. “One of our

millionth fan, if averages align then,” Ingram added. “So

biggest goals is to be family-oriented, family-friendly

we have some celebrations revolving around that, as well.”

entertainment.”

Noffsinger said the Ballpark is a great place for tourists

And what better way to provide it, than through the

to visit in the evening hours when museums and other

all-American sport of baseball.

attractions are closed—and is a great place for locals to

take their families on summer nights and weekends.

returns for his fourth season. Ruiz led the team to a second

That’s news Ingram likes to hear.

half wild card berth.

“One of our biggest goals is to be family-friendly and

The team will be under the helm of Reinaldo Ruiz, who

“We are very excited to have Reinaldo back in Bowling

also to push education and get kids ready for their future,”

Green,” said Hot Rods GM/COO Eric Leach. “He provides

said Ingram, noting the Ballpark has a Roscoe Rewards

great leadership for the team, and we can’t wait to have

reading program and has hosted the summer activities

him back guiding the Hot Rods.”

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2018 GIVEAWAY NIGHTS April 14: Hall of Fame Night (double bobblehead giveaway sponsored by Ashley HomeStore) April 28: Bootlegger Night (hat giveaway sponsored by Reinhart Food Service) May 12: Pink Out the Park (tote bag giveaway) June 2: What Should’ve Been Night (soccer scarf giveaway) June 23: 2 MILLIONTH FAN Night (team card set giveaway sponsored by ISTT, with specialty prizes) July 14: Mini Night (mini bat giveaway) July 28: Margaritaville Night (bucket hat giveaway sponsored by Ashley HomeStore) Aug. 4: Local Matters Night (fan design T-shirt) Aug. 25: What We Were Night: Tribute to the Catfish (camo hat giveaway) Sept. 1: Septembeer (glass giveaway)

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STEVE SHELDON

PROMOTIONAL FEATURE

Out on the Edge B

“Service and faith have always been my priority.”

orn in England and having spent the majority of his childhood on military bases, Bowling Green businessman Steve Sheldon was given a unique opportunity following the death of his father at a young age. “My dad was a military medic and died as a result of the war,” Sheldon said. At the time, Sheldon was living in Owensboro with his mother, and funds for college, or any extracurriculars for that matter, were tight. He worked several odd jobs in various fields to make ends meet. Eventually, the Kentucky Department of Veterans Affairs approached Sheldon with the War Orphan scholarship, offering him free tuition at any in-state school. Having always had an interest in healthcare and sure to not let such an incredible opportunity—made possible by his father’s sacrifice—Sheldon enrolled at Western Kentucky University to pursue his pharmacy career, making him the first in his family to go to college. “While attending school, I made a promise to myself that it would be my mission to give back to the state for the opportunities I have been given and to help anyone along the way,” he said. “Service and faith have always been my priority.” Sheldon attended WKU’s Pre-Pharmacy program and graduated from the University of Kentucky College of Pharmacy in 1983. Upon graduation, he worked as a pharmacist in Madisonville and Owensboro before locating to Bowling Green.

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His business dealings have stretched across Kentucky, Tennessee, Indiana and Illinois, with three Sheldon’s Express Pharmacies right here in Bowling Green. He has opened a variety of businesses including pharmacies, medical equipment supply, battery stores, online retail, dry cleaners, fast-casual restaurants and has been involved with residential and commercial real estate. “I found out a long time ago the Lord won’t let you grow if you don’t stay out on the edge,” he said. “You’ve got to stay out on the edge spiritually.” Sheldon and his wife Terri place deep value in community service and giving back, which led to the founding of Curbside Ministries eight years ago. Curbside is an organization that provides innovative and transforming ways to connect with area youth. The group meets weekly for a short devotion, meal and activities, with the ultimate goal of building relationships and learning about Jesus. Since its inception, Curbside has grown to more than 100 volunteers. “Service and faith have always been my priority,” Steve said. Steve and Terri have been married for 29 years and have five children: Ryan, Seth, Spence, Seaton and Terra. “I want to make sure I can look back on every minute of my life and know I gave back more than I received.”

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SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

Buying, building or modifying a home can be an intimidating, difficult road to navigate. Bowling Green Living wants to make it less stressful on our readers by providing tips you need to know, whether you are buying or building, or somewhere in between. Our vision for the “Home Tips” guide is to provide a resource to help our friends, family and neighbors navigate the home market in Bowling Green, using local businesses that are experts in their respective fields. We are bringing the experts to you in order to simplify the process. These experts offer valuable and reliable insights, pulling years of experience and a wealth of understanding in Bowling Green’s home market. So, sit back, relax and keep this guide handy as you break ground on a new home or projects around the house this spring.

ADVERTISERS

SWEETS DESIGN BUILD SHARLENE GRANT, REALTOR CARPET PLACE OF BOWLING GREEN GUARANTEE PEST CONTROL TOP CUT LAWN SERVICE & LANDSCAPING STACY CARTER, REALTOR LULU’S FINE HOME FURNISHINGS & CONSIGNMENTS SOUTHERN YARD GREETINGS FIRST SECURITY BANK FARMERS NATIONAL BANK PAUL DAVIS RESTORATION & REMODELING

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On the Cover:

A CLASSIC CRAFTSMAN CAPTURES CLEAN LINES & MODERN FEATURES

A

perfectly manicured lawn and slate blue exterior are focal points of the split-level craftsman off Lovers Lane. Owner Bryson Richey purchased the home a couple of years ago when his brother, Ross Richey, decided to sell. “I was about to graduate from Western Kentucky University,” Bryson said. “I knew I wanted to stay in Bowling Green and I knew I would be kicking myself if I didn’t go ahead and buy and keep it in the family.” Darrel Sweets of Sweets Design Build is the mastermind behind the house that Ross built in 2008. The three-bedroom, two-bath house is located on a large corner lot, which is surprisingly quiet and seemingly secluded given its proximity to a busy thoroughfare. Landscaping along the deck and a fenced-in backyard add privacy. Bryson was a music major at WKU and is an associate organist at Brentwood United Methodist Church in Brentwood, Tenn. With music coursing through his veins, he needed a home that could accommodate his two grand pianos. The open

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living and dining room concept does just that. “Sitting in front of the double window at the front of the house, I was able to dovetail my two grand pianos for a perfect look at the entrance,” Bryson said. The home has a large upstairs bonus room, giving it a splitlevel floor plan. Its character is marked by dark, wide-planked hardwood floors, beautiful granite counters and large windows, allowing for natural light to flood in throughout the day. A unique feature of the exterior is the color of the house’s hardy board. “I receive so many inquiries from people interested in the color of paint,” Bryson said. The color is Pacific Blue by CertainTeed, a nod to the classic feel of a Cape Cod. Thick white columns frame the front door, and two rocking chairs are perfectly positioned on the front porch, making the Briteway Drive home just as inviting on the outside as the inside.

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CARPET PLACE OF BOWLING GREEN S

teve and Debbie Drake, owners of Carpet Place of Bowling Green, Inc., purchased Carpet Place, Inc. on March 12, 2015. Carpet Place, Inc. established by former owners, Dewey and Bonita Creek, has been serving Bowling Green and the surrounding counties since 1983. Steve and Debbie, along with their sales staff and team of experienced installers, pride themselves in providing professional, knowledgeable and friendly customer service from the moment you enter the spacious showroom displaying a wide selection of styles and colors, until your beautiful new floors are installed. Carpet Place offers a variety of residential and commercial carpet, pre-finished engineered hardwood, laminate, luxury vinyl tile and plank, resilient vinyl, carpet binding, custom window blinds and custom area rugs. You will find everything you need to make your house the home of your dreams at Carpet Place. Whether you are building a new home, remodeling your existing home or office, visit Carpet Place for all your flooring needs.

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GUARANTEE PEST CONTROL W

armer weather unfortunately often means the return of those ever-present pests. Since 1951, Guarantee Pest Control has been treating—and eliminating—those pests for good. Using state-of-the-art technology, combined with courteous, welltrained employees, Guarantee Pest Control is guaranteed to offer the best possible solution to defend your home against ants, bed bugs, bees, hornets, wasps, flies, mice, rats, mosquitos, roaches, spiders, termites and more. “Guarantee Pest provides excellent service and professionalism,” one customer notes. “Jimmy and his employees can be counted on to deliver great customer service. There is not a bug that Jimmy cannot identify or remove from my home.” The company is also active in the community, including involvement in events, sponsorships and organizations such as REALTORS Hope for Homeless, HOTEL INC, Hope House, Big Brothers Big Sisters and more. No matter what kind of home you live in, it could be attacked by pests at any moment. Often, the pests you don’t see are worse than the ones you do. Guarantee Pest knows where those critters live, where they hide, even when you think they’re gone. The more than 65 year old company turns that knowledge into an effective solution tailored specifically for your home, family and lifestyle.

TOP TRENDS TO INSPIRE YOUR OUTDOOR LIVING MINIMAL MAINTENANCE, O MAXIMUM ENJOYMENT utdoor living spaces rank first among special function rooms desired by consumers, according to the American Institute for Architects, and so homeowners are expected to be going allin for the outdoors in 2018. Trex Company, a maker of premium decking and railing, has gleaned insights from contractors, homeowners and industry experts to compile the following outdoor living trends that will dominate this year.

YEAR-ROUND ENJOYMENT Among the biggest trends is a shift away from seasonality as consumers adopt more of a year-round mindset, no longer restricting outdoor living to spring and summer. Thanks to new high-performance materials and innovative design approaches, homeowners everywhere are transforming their outdoor spaces into multi-seasonal extensions of their homes. For example, Trex contractors have reported an uptick in requests for its RainEscape deck drainage system by clients looking to add multi-seasonal living space underneath an elevated deck.

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Just because people are spending more time outdoors doesn't mean they're willing to put in extra hours for upkeep. In fact, high-maintenance materials like wood are seeing a decrease in demand as people are opting for offerings that deliver better performance and sustainability. Unlike wood, high-performance composites resist fading, staining, scratching and mold—and won't rot, warp, crack or splinter. No sanding, staining or painting is required, and food and drink spills wash off easily with just soap and water.

COMFY COZY Among the hottest design influences right now is “hygge” (pronounced hoo-gah)—the Scandinavian term for a feeling of coziness and comfort. This year, outdoor spaces will beckon homeowners and their guests to relax and rejuvenate with hyggeinspired accents, from plush cushions and throws to protective pergolas, cozy warming features and outdoor lighting.

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TOP CUT LAWN SERVICE & LANDSCAPING

N

ow is the perfect time to get your yard prepped for warmer weather. Since 2013, locally owned and operated Top Cut Lawn Service has been a complete lawn care and landscape maintenance company. Services we provide include but are not limited to: • Weekly Lawn Maintenance: We mow your lawn, edge along sidewalks, driveway and street, trim around trees and landscape beds and blow debris from surfaces. • Fertilization and Weed Control: We offer in-bed weed control shrub trimming, mulching and tree pruning. • Core Aeration: We help relieve soil compaction, allowing your grass to grow deeper roots, making better use of water and fertilizer. • Seeding: We offer over-seeding, spot-seeding and power seeding. • Leaf Removal: Complete removal of leaves from lawn, landscape beds and shrubbery, along with curbside leaf pick-up. • Annual Flower Program: We plant, maintain and fertilize spring and fall annuals. Through our high-quality offerings, Top Cut Lawn Service will turn your landscape dreams into reality. Call us at 270-392-0388 or email at customerservice@topcutlawnsbg.com to get started.

RESIDENTIAL GOES COMMERCIAL While railing matched to the decking remains popular, an increasing number of homeowners are taking advantage of the complementary decking and railing pairings afforded by new railing materials in modern, metal finishes, as well as sleek designs inspired by commercial architecture. More homeowners are inspired by outdoor spaces they find in commercial settings, such as hotels and urban rooftops, and want to replicate those looks in their homes. A prime example of this commercial-toresidential trend is the growing popularity of horizontal railings such as rod rail—a sleek, industrial look that's ideal for optimizing a panoramic view.

HIDE AND CHIC With the increased usage of outdoor living spaces comes higher demand for chic decor and privacy. An easy design trick that adds personal style and functionality, lattice panels are perfect for enhancing privacy and concealing storage areas or unsightly views. With styles ranging from romantic to deco, lattice panels can be integrated into any outdoor area and applied to structures

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such as arbors, trellises and gazebos, or used as decorative wainscoting or deck skirting.

FUN AND GAMES Kids are not the only ones who enjoy playing outside. Outdoor play spaces for all ages are on the rise, including everything from swimming pools and embedded sandboxes to regulation cornhole courts, horseshoe pits and dedicated spaces for volleyball, badminton and bocce ball. Beyond yard games, electronics manufacturers now offer televisions and entertainment systems specifically designed for the outdoors, taking into consideration differences in lighting and outdoor acoustics. Meanwhile, new storage options include durable wall-mounted television and entertainment centers that beautifully protect pricey electronics from the elements, while concealing all of the unsightly—and potentially unsafe—cords and cables. For more information about outdoor living trends, go to trex.com.

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A Downtown Home

With Eclectic Style BY NATALIE MARTIN

W

alking up the steps onto the porch of a house on Park Street, newlyweds Ryan and Charlotte Turtle were surprised by what Bowling Green had to offer. The couple had been looking to purchase a home and move to the Nashville area after college in 2011, but were disappointed with the market. After months of looking turned unsuccessful, they searched for homes in Bowling Green in their price range. It only took one—which happened to be just a few blocks from their apartment. Upon entering the home, they were captured by the original hardwood floors, natural light and tall ceilings. Details like multiple fire places and builtin cabinets made them think twice about trying to get to Nashville. Though the home made a great first impression on the 48 BOWLING GREEN LIVING

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Turtles, there were definitely aspects that needed some drastic improvements. “When we walked in the front door we fell in love with all the original details,” Charlotte said. “But, then as we continued throughout the house, the aesthetics got worse and worse. I think seeing those first few rooms and loving them gave us the courage to see the potential in the rest of the house.” Ryan and Charlotte gradually started the renovation process that consisted of painting, replacing linoleum floors, updating materials and finishes in the kitchen and renovating two bathrooms. The biggest project was turning their then-laundry room into their master bathroom, which Charlotte considers to be most reflective of their style. “We really wanted to create a cozy and creamy space www.bgkyliving.com


PHOTOS BY BRYAN LEMON

to start and end the day,” she said. “In our renovating process, we found out that a lot of our walls had brick hiding behind the drywall. We exposed the brick wall in the bathroom and that became a big inspiration to create a space that blended the farmhouse and industrial style.” The master bathroom, renovated by Clark Built, embodies a light and airy aesthetic. The wood beams and handmade vanity with basin sinks add an element that softens the industrial nature of the space. Each room in the house takes on a different element of the Turtles’ style. One of the most notable examples of their eclectic style is their son’s nursery. The DIY abstract art and peg leg vintage dresser creates a mid-century modern vibe that is unlike any other room in the home. Ryan and Charlotte don’t believe they have one specific style, but instead use sentimental pieces and unique items to fuel the inspiration for each space. www.bgkyliving.com

The historic elements of the house create a common thread throughout the home that give the Turtles freedom to explore different design elements. Charlotte finds that she draws inspiration from pieces passed down from family and through her love of reading design books and blogs. “I inherited lots of my big pieces of furniture from my family members,” she said. “All of them have a funky style that I have always appreciated so lots of those pieces are the anchors of our home.” The Turtles’ home, named “The Shell” by friends and family, has become a place of gathering and a retreat for many. “One of my favorite things about our home is that we have shared it with so many of those we love,” Charlotte said. “It feels like a group space instead of just our home. We always dreamed of having a home where people could come and feel safe and known, a place of refuge.” M AY / / J U N E 2 0 1 8

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SOUTHERN YARD GREETINGS

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ith Christina George’s hospitable nature and warm smile, it’s no wonder she’s in the business of making someone’s day. Christina is the owner of Southern Yard Greetings, a company new to Bowling Green that offers personalized yard greetings for birthdays, graduations, baby arrivals, anniversaries, congratulations and more. Christina delivers and sets up the greeting at the location the night before the event then returns to pick up the greeting at the end of the event. She accommodates her deliveries with her customers’ needs and schedules. “I like to make booking a greeting as simple as I can for my customers,” Christina says. “Our goal is to make people smile.” There is always an occasion to celebrate with a big yard greeting.

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Spring Clean

SIMMER POTS

PHOTOS AND RECIPES BY JAMIE ALEXANDER

I

f you are planning a get-together (or just need to eliminate the ghosts of yesterday's cooked fish), a simmer pot is a wonder-

ful way to fill your house with a pleasing scent. Not only does the great smell quickly spread to your entire home, but it's a healthier alternative to scented candles and sprays—which can contain toxins and pollutants.

My favorite types of simmer pots include citrus, herbs,

and an extra add-in like vanilla extract or some food-grade

berries. Some good extracts to try are orange, vanilla, lemon or almond. Try your favorite combination of these ingredients to get your own custom scent!

These recipes are just guidelines! The great thing about

simmer pots is that you can choose any ingredients that have a scent you love. For the citrus, I use the entire fruit for a stronger scent, but you'll still get great results just by using the peels

extracts. Some great fruits to try are lemons, limes, oranges,

off your leftovers. If you refrigerate your simmer pot, you can

apples, grapefruit, coconut or cranberries. When it comes to

keep reusing it for up to seven days (just make sure to keep add-

herbs or spices, try lavender, mint, bay leaves, star anise, cinna-

ing water so it doesn't boil dry). It's a cost-efficient, healthy way

mon, cloves, eucalyptus, rosemary, rose petals, sage or juniper

to keep your home smelling great!

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Here are some of my favorite recipes for springtime:

LEMON ROSEMARY

• 1 sliced lemon • 1 fresh rosemary sprig • 1 tablespoon vanilla extract • A few mint leaves

CUCUMBER PEPPERMINT • 1 small sliced cucumber • 1 sliced lime • Peppermint leaves

Instructions: Fill a saucepan with water and bring to a boil. Add your favorite naturally-scented ingredients, boil for about a minute, then turn the heat on your stove down to a simmer. You can leave your natural air freshener simmering all day. Just be sure to add more water if it starts to get low.

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ORGANIZE LIKE A PRO BY ALEX TRABUE OF TABULATED

S

ummer is quickly approaching and that means kids are out of school, the weather is beautiful and our schedules

PULL EVERY ITEM OUT OF THE SPACE. You will

are dwindling down. Take this time to organize your home.

everything that is hidden in that space. You will start asking

For most of my clients, the challenge is not the actual process

yourself questions like, “Do I need this?,” “Will I use it?” or

of organizing; it is where to begin. Here are a few tips on how to

“Does it belong in this space?”

make a big mess before it gets better. This will allow you to see

get your organization project started and what to do once you begin.

CATEGORIZE. After you have decided what needs to

START SMALL. Don’t try to tackle the garage one Sunday

or spatulas. This will help with the next step when it comes to

afternoon. Start by decluttering a small section or a drawer. If you take on too large of a project by yourself, you might get tired and discouraged. Small victories are the key to success. Also, give yourself enough time to complete the project. You do not want to get started and have to come back later. A drawer can take 30 minutes to an hour to clean out and reorganize, but a closet can take three or four hours. TACKLE A SPACE THAT HAS A BIG IMPACT ON YOUR LIFE. If this is your first organization project, pick an area that causes the most frustration on a regular basis.

stay, start grouping similar items together like pens, batteries deciding the size container you need. You may also see in this step that you have duplicates. CONTAIN (GIVE IT A HOME) AND LABEL. I am a big fan of putting items in a basket, bin or drawer organizer. When items are in a bin versus sitting on a shelf you have less room for error. It forces you to put it back in the correct spot each time or if your bin is too full it forces you to reevaluate what is in the bin. After your items are in a bin and put back in the space, label everything. Labeling allows you to be held accountable for putting it back correctly and helps family members know where things go.

Yes, your attic may be a pain point but start with an area that you will see on a daily basis and will bring you joy instantly.

Remember: When you invest in getting organized, you save

For example, that utensil drawer that you fight everyday to get

yourself time and money in the long run. Life should be

open and closed.

enjoyed doing the things you love with the ones you love.

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5 OF THE MOST SATISFYING DIY PROJECTS What's your favorite DIY project you've ever completed? Chances are the answer pops right into your mind, and even if you've completed hundreds of DIY projects over the years, you probably have some that truly stand out.

For those that weren't at the top of your list, maybe the result wasn't what you hoped for, the project wasn't particularly rewarding or you've done it before. The following five projects might be new to your list, but they are sure to improve your home and become your new favorite DIY achievement.

1 CWLAETAENR YWOI UT HR A N E W F I LT E R S Y S T E M .

Cut the costs and clutter of bottled water while being environmentally conscious with this project. Breach your current water line to solder in a new shut-off valve, drill a new faucet hole and attach this line to the filter and you'll be enjoying filtered water in no time. U.S. landfills are already overflowing with more than 2 million tons of discarded water bottles. You can enjoy peace of mind knowing that you're not adding to them.

2 BREATHE EASIER.

3

Update and refresh your ceilings. Popcorn is great at the movies. On your ceiling? Not so much. Spray your ceiling with warm water, and scrape away the popcorn itself with a drywall scraper. Collect these contents on a tarp and toss them. You're then ready to patch any holes caused by overzealous scraping before priming and painting your brand-new ceiling.

Why stop at clean water in your home when you can also enjoy cleaner air? Renting an air scrubber can allow you to remove invisible - yet unhealthy - gases, particles and chemicals from your home's air. Your local rental supply store will help you find the right air scrubber for your area to be sure you're removing the pollutants that matter most.

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YOUR 4 GIVE FURNITURE A FACELIFT.

If that upholstered furniture isn't looking as sharp today as it once did, don't settle for it or replace it. Rent an upholstery cleaner instead and give each piece of furniture a once-over. This simple project can dramatically improve the look of your most cherished pieces and save you considerable money over a costly replacement.

THERE 5 LET BE LIGHT.

If natural light is a problem in your home, it could be that your window treatments are to blame. Large drapes and curtains can give your home a dated look and rob your rooms of the light they need. Instead, lose these old window treatments and install vertical blinds or shutters. These new, lighter treatments will give you better control of the light and privacy in your home than their older counterparts.

To find rental locations near you that can supply the tools needed to complete your DIY projects, visit RentalHQ.com.

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THE

GETAWAY

COLBY’S FINE FOOD & SPIRITS // PHOTOS BY JAMIE ALEXANDER

y K , o r o b s n e w O n i 36 HOURS

BY CRYSTAL BOWLING

U

SA Today recently added Owensboro to its list of

7 p.m. – A Southern Dinner

top places where millennials are moving. And with

After you’ve scouted out local bands, grab a bite to

a bursting music, food and craft beer scene, that’s

no surprise. This river city, with a population at right under 60,000, is the perfect weekend getaway for the young and young at heart.

eat at The Miller House in one of Owensboro’s iconic landmarks built in 1905. The Southern-inspired eatery serves refined comfort food like fried green tomatoes, porcini and rosemary rubbed ribeye, lump crab cakes

Friday

and shrimp and grits.

5 p.m. – Live Like the Locals If you’re a local (or want to live like one), Friday after 5 is the place to kick-start your weekend. This summerlong series of free outdoor concerts is held every Friday starting May 18th on eight blocks of the beautiful

9 p.m. – Night Cap Cap off the night at Spirits located directly below The Miller House. This cozy, bourbon-inspired bar has

Owensboro Riverfront. The festival includes live bands,

more than 400 bourbons in stock, along with signature

family events, street vendors and food trucks.

martinis, mixed drinks, beer and wine.

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Saturday 9 a.m. – Fuel Up

You’ll want to begin your Saturday with a dose of caffeine at The Crème Coffee House in Owensboro’s revitalized downtown district. Order a standard cup, latte or cappuccino to go with your muffin, pastry or breakfast cookie.

10 a.m. – Farmer’s Market Coffee in hand, you’re ready to tackle Trunnell’s 54 Market, located on Highway 54. Peruse Kentucky products like ciders, locally-sourced meats, infused oils and more. During the fall, Trunnell’s Family Fun Acre and Farm Market is the place to be, stocked with homemade fudge, pumpkins to pick right from the patch, corn mazes and more.

Noon – A Smokin’ Good Lunch No trip to Owensboro is complete without BBQ. Belly up at the world-famous Moonlite Bar-B-Q Inn for barbecued mutton, or sheep. Then continue your tour de BBQ at Old Hickory Bar-B-Que, and be prepared for a feast of mutton, pork, beef, chicken, ribs, ham, turkey, burgoo, chili or meat stew. Finally, Ole South BBQ, known for

MOONLITE BAR-B-Q INN

their hickory smoked BBQ, is not one to miss.

2 p.m. – Shop ‘til You Drop Owensboro is known for its speciality boutiques and home interior shops, so you’ll want to devote a few hours to exploring all they have to offer. Excursions boasts sophisticated styles, carrying brands such as Brighton, BCBG, Trina Turk and Joseph Ribkoff. Blush Boutique offers the perfect mix of casual and dressier pieces, all

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reasonably priced. And finally, The Bakers Rack: a unique Owensboro gift shop full of home accessories, china, crystal, antique furniture and a variety of gifts.

4 p.m. – Sweet Treats For an afternoon pick-me-up, step back in time at the Big Dipper or Wonder Whip, both walk-up counters known for shakes, ice cream cones and more.

5 p.m. – Walk it Out You’re probably ready to stretch your legs and walk off that afternoon of BBQ and desserts. Hit up Smothers Park on the riverfront, also known as the “Top Playground in the World,” or for a more scenic, greener route, walk along the Greenbelt, a 15-mile long park linking Owensboro neighborhoods, business districts, parks and SPIRITS // PHOTO BY DAVID GRINNELL

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schools.

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7 p.m. – Fine Dining For your final dinner in Owensboro, visit the intimate Colby’s Fine Food & Spirits. Since 1987, they’ve been providing seasonal dishes using aged meats and fresh produce with an extensive, first-class wine selection.

10 p.m. – Local Brews End the night at CYO Brewing, whose impressive craft beer list spans any lager, wheat beer, IPA, ale, porter, stout, sour, cider or mead you could dream of.

EXCURSIONS

Sunday

10 a.m. – Brunch Time Every Sunday should have a good breakfast story, and Owensboro is no exception. For a true “hole in the wall” experience, Dee’s Diner is a must. Get a classic country breakfast with fried eggs, hashbrowns, grits, country ham and pancakes that truly hang off your plate. THE CRÈME COFFEE HOUSE

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THE

STYLE

BY ANDREA HAMPTON // FLIGHTSANDFASHION.COM

W ith spring cleaning upon us, it’s out with the old and in with the new. What better time than now to update your wardrobe with the season’s hottest trends? This month, I’ve teamed up with Steel Mill & Co. to show off a few styles for embracing a season of renewal and change. Steel Mill & Co. is the perfect hodgepodge of old and new. With both a storefront location and online option, Steel Mill & Co. provides locally made hand-crafted gifts, custom home decor and trendy clothing appropriate for all ages—offering everyday pieces from high-quality brands that not only incorporate style, but family and faith as well.

A Season of

CHANGE Dress: $39 Straw Bag: $42

Shirt: $49 Hat: $18 Bandana: $16

Bandanas, or as some call, neckerchiefs, have recently replaced the same ole necklaces and scarfs. These brightly colored, lightweight squares of fabric are a unique and inexpensive way to look on-trend this spring. The key to styling a bandana is all in the fold. To achieve this look, simply take your bandana and fold it into a triangle. Next, with the long end of the bandana in front of you, roll it to a desired width until it forms a long strand. With the long strand in hand, tie it loosely around the neck, then double knot the tails in the front. Ta-da! A perfect neckerchief! 62 BOWLING GREEN LIVING

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This season, one of the most charming, practical ways to accessorize your spring and summer wardrobe is with the straw bag. Straw bags are a popular fashion perennial that add a touch of fantasy, catering to one’s imagination of frolicking through fields of flowers or long walks on the beach at sunset. Whether you choose a basket or shoulder style bag, this romantic accessory has come into its own as this year’s ultimate warm weather purse. www.bgkyliving.com


PHOTOS BY KATIE STARKS

The wrap dress has, without question, quickly become the “it” dress of the moment. First making its appearance in the ’70s, wrap dresses have shown they can withstand the test of fashion time. This classic look features a v-neckline with a tie waist and A-line skirt. Because of these characteristics, wrap dresses have dubbed the title of being the most figureflattering dress option. The tie waist cinches on the slimmest portion of a woman’s torso, giving an ultra-slimming effect. Accompanied with a V-neckline, these dresses enhance the bust, while slenderizing the hips, making them a great option for those who are pear shaped, or others looking to add a few curves. Wrap dresses are timeless and suitable for all age groups. Lastly, they can be worn anywhere at anytime. Paired with the right accessories and shoes, wrap dresses can be styled from a smart office look to chic wedding attire. Dress: $56 Necklace: $18

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Steel Mill & Co. | 651 US-31 BYP | 270.904.7970

Let’s be honest, if spring and summer had a uniform, it would definitely be denim shorts. During the warm weather seasons, denim shorts are a great way to give your legs a breather after being sheltered under pants during the winter months. From classic denim cutoffs to bermudas, there is a pair of shorts that will seamlessly go with your style. Headed to the beach? Denim shorts make a great alternative for a cover-up when paired with a one-piece bathing suit to obtain that classic vacation vibe. Have tickets to CMA Fest or other outdoor concerts? Couple a pair of denim shorts with this off the shoulder top for an effortlessly cool feel.

Top: $49 Shorts: $39 Shoes: $56

Jeans: $48 Shoes: $56

There’s no time like the present to break away from fashion norms and fully embrace new trends. While the tried-and-true “plain Jane” jeans are a must for any gal’s wardrobe, I’m guessing you might already own quite a few pairs. So why not break away from the status quo to try something fresh and new? Over the past year, denim has been given a proverbial facelift, complete with major upgrades in the hem department. Fringe hem jeans are having their moment in the spotlight. They’re a blend of cool and chic that are practically made for spring and summer. The inner bohemian in all of us will squeal when seeing the fringe detail dance whimsically around the ankle. Pair it with a flat or sandal, and you’re equipped and ready to take on any street, making it your own fashion runway.

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Forget alternating between your favorite necklaces and ignore your fear of tangled chains. Layering necklaces has become the new arm candy. This trend is all about having your neckline tell a story. Before you go throwing all the contents of your jewelry box around your neck, a few simple tips and tricks are in order. First, start at the top with the shortest necklace, whether that be a choker or dainty pendant. Next, add necklace No. 2 by choosing one that is an inch or two longer in style. Keep things interesting by selecting chains of different elements, colors or metals. Lastly, make your longest piece on the heavy side with a larger pendant, which adds to the visual appeal of layering. More of a simple style kind of gal? Try a single strand, long-beaded necklace wrapped around the neck, tied at the longer end to create the same sense of layering without all the hassle.

Beaded Necklace: $32 Bralette: $22 Layered Jeweled Necklace: $29 T-Shirt Dresses: $39

Finally, now that the cold weather is behind us, it’s time to bare a little bit of skin. Sleeveless tops are a great way to embrace the warm weather. This olive green tank has a front zipper detail that allows you to flaunt just the right amount of skin without feeling like you’re overexposed. Pair it with some distressed denim, and you’ve created the perfect casually cool, spring look.

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Top: $36 Jeans: $48 Shoes: $56 Necklace: $18

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off to the

RACES

T

he month of May is right around the corner, and for every Kentuckian that means one thing: the Kentucky Derby! The first Saturday in May is on a lot of people’s minds, and not just because of fast horses and mint juleps. Fashion is a staple as well. As a Louisville native, I grew up around Churchill Downs and the Kentucky Derby, thanks to my dad working at the track throughout my childhood. The fastest two minutes in sports and the fashion that goes along with it, is not lost on me. With time dwindling before the most prestigious horse racing event in the world, the real race is finding the perfect hat for the big day. Well, you’re in luck! Prim & Brim, Bowling Green’s newest pop-up hat shop, arrived just in time for your days at the Downs.

When choosing a Derby outfit, I first recommend finding the hat. Go big or go home! Nothing is too outlandish when it comes to hats at this event. People aren’t going to remember the dress you wore, but everyone is going to remember your hat. A Derby hat is the focal point of an outfit, and everything should be tailored around this piece. A wide brim hat with lots of flowers, ribbon and feathers is a classic look. When styling a bold hat such as this one, I recommend coupling it with a subtle print or solid dress.

Hat: $299

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Bowtie: $39 www.bgkyliving.com


PHOTOS BY KATIE STARKS

If a large hat isn’t your thing, let me introduce you to the fascinator. My personal favorite, fascinators are light-weight, decorative headpieces consisting of feathers, flowers and beads attached to a comb or band. Fascinators are the best alternative to hats and are usually budget friendly. Hosting or attending a Derby party? Fascinators are a great option for a backyard bash while watching the races from afar. Who said Derby fashion was only for the ladies? The day is an excuse for men to get just as dressed up and decked out as the women. The modern Derby man’s clothing options are engulfed with an array of bright colors and bold patterns. This tie dons mint juleps, which are—without question—the signature cocktail of the Kentucky Derby. Prim & Brim’s festively printed pastel ties (right) and bowties (left) perfectly capture the spirit of a day at the races.

Hatinator: $195

Fascinator: $69 Tie: $39

Skipping the Derby and heading to Oaks instead? Oaks is the day before Derby, when the spotlight is on the fillies and pink is the color of the day. On Oaks day, fans at Churchill Downs are encouraged to incorporate pink into their attire, in an effort to raise funds and awareness to the fight against breast and ovarian cancer. This hatinator (a hat/fascinator hybrid) is perfect for either day and will have you looking pretty in pink.

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THE

DISH The Easiest, Creamiest

COCONUT CHICKEN CHICKPEA CURRY PHOTOS AND RECIPE BY KATIE STARKS

Fear not: Homemade curry isn’t as daunting as it sounds. Our simple recipe uses spices you probably already have on-hand and crisp, seasonal vegetables, making it just as versatile for a weeknight meal as it is for a well-planned dinner party.

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COCONUT CHICKEN CHICKPEA CURRY

• 2 tablespoons coconut oil • 2 chicken breasts, cut into 1-inch cubes • 1 pound collard greens, stems removed, leaves cut into 1-inch squares • 1 zucchini, sliced in spears • 1-2 carrots, peeled and sliced • 1 yellow onion, diced • 3 cloves garlic, minced • 2 tablespoons fresh ginger, minced • 2 tablespoons curry powder • 1 teaspoon salt • 1/2 teaspoon ground black pepper • 1/2 teaspoon garam masala • 1 teaspoon ground cumin • 1/4 teaspoon cayenne • 1/4 teaspoon red pepper flakes • 1 32ounce can crushed tomatoes • 1 14ounce can lite coconut milk • Juice of 2 limes • 1 can chickpeas, drained and rinsed

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CILANTRO LIME RICE

• 1 cup extra long grain rice or basmati rice • 2 cups water • 2 teaspoons vegetable oil • 1 teaspoon salt • 3 tablespoons fresh chopped cilantro • Juice of 1 lime 1. In a small heavy pot, add rice, water, 1 teaspoon oil and salt and bring to a boil.

1. Heat a wok or your largest skillet over medium-high heat. Add 1 tablespoon coconut oil and cook chicken until golden brown and cooked through, about 8 minutes, stirring occasionally. Transfer the cooked chicken to a plate. 2. With the heat still on medium-high, melt another

2. Once the rice has begun to boil, reduce heat to low and cover for about 15 minutes. 3. Turn off heat and keep covered an additional 5 minutes. 4. In a medium bowl, combine chopped cilantro, lime juice, rice and remaining oil. Toss until completely mixed.

tablespoon of coconut oil in the wok. Add collard greens, zucchini, carrots and onion and season with salt and pepper. Cook the vegetables until slightly brown on the edges, but still crisp, about 6 to 8 minutes, stirring occasionally. Add the garlic and ginger, cooking for 30 seconds or until fragrant. Add the spices and stir to combine. Add tomatoes, coconut milk, lime juice and chickpeas. Stir to combine and cook for about 5 more minutes. Add the chicken back to the pan and cook for another few minutes until heated through.

3. Spoon the coconut chicken chickpea curry over rice and serve warm. For added spice, top with more red pepper flakes or your favorite hot sauce.

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THE

SCENE

ATHLETICS For WKU Athletics ticketing information, call 1-800-5-BIGRED or visit wkusports.com. All games take place at Nick Denes Field. For Bowling Green Hot Rods information, call 270-901-2121 or visit bghotrods.com. All games take place at Bowling Green Ballpark.

WKU BASEBALL VS TENNESSEE TECH April 17 | 5pm

BOWLING GREEN HOT RODS BASEBALL VS SOUTH BEND CUBS April 23-26 | Mon.-Wed. 6:35pm, Thurs. 10:35am

WKU BASEBALL VS LOUISIANA TECH April 27-29 | Fri. 6pm, Sat.-Sun. 1pm

BOWLING GREEN HOT RODS BASEBALL VS LAKE COUNTY CAPTAINS April 27-29 | Fri.-Sat. 6:35pm, Sun. 2:05pm

BOWLING GREEN HOT RODS BASEBALL VS PEORIA CHIEFS May 7-9 | Mon.-Tues. 6:35pm, Wed. 10:35am

BOWLING GREEN HOT RODS BASEBALL VS CEDAR RAPIDS KERNELS May 10-12 | 6:35pm

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BOWLING GREEN HOT RODS BASEBALL VS GREAT LAKES LOONS

WESTERN KENTUCKY UNIVERSITY BASEBALL

RECREATION

May 21-24 | 6:35pm

(For more information on Beech Bend Raceway events call 270-781-7634 or visit beechbend.com.)

BOWLING GREEN HOT RODS BASEBALL VS DAYTON DRAGONS

BEAVER TUESDAY NIGHT STREET DRAGS

May 25-28 | Fri.-Sun. 6:35pm, Mon. 12:05pm

May 1, May 9, May 15, June 5, June 26 Beech Bend Raceway

BOWLING GREEN HOT RODS BASEBALL VS WEST MICHIGAN WHITECAPS

MID SOUTH CONFERENCE BASEBALL CHAMPIONSHIPS

June 1-3 | Fri.-Sat. 6:35pm, Sun. 2:05pm

BOWLING GREEN HOT RODS BASEBALL VS LANSING LUGNUTS

May 3-6 Bowling Green Ballpark

MID SOUTH CONFERENCE SOFTBALL CHAMPIONSHIPS

June 5-7 | 6:35pm

May 4-6 Michael O. Buchanon Park

BOWLING GREEN HOT RODS BASEBALL VS FORT WAYNE TINCAPS

O’REILLY SATURDAY NIGHT GRUDGE RACING

June 12-14 | 6:35pm

BOWLING GREEN HOT RODS BASEBALL VS LAKE COUNTY CAPTAINS June 21-24 | Thur.-Sat. 6:35pm, Sun. 2:05pm

May 5 Beech Bend Raceway

NHRA SUMMIT ET SERIES & SPORTSMAN MEMBER TRACK MADNESS May 6 | 11am Beech Bend Raceway www.bgkyliving.com


LINDSEY WILSON VOLLEYBALL TOURNAMENT

17TH ANNUAL NMCA BLUEGRASS NATIONALS

May 11-13 Ephram White Park, Michael O. Buchanon Park

May 17-20 Beech Bend Raceway

BEST OF THE WEST SOUTH WARREN SOFTBALL TOURNAMENT May 11-13

O’REILLY SATURDAY NIGHT GRUDGE RACING PLUS SS/S COMBO May 12 Beech Bend Raceway

NAIA OPENING ROUND OF SOFTBALL WORLD SERIES May 14-16

Michael O. Buchanon Park

C4 GATHERING May 17-19

National Corvette Museum

Visit corvettemuseum.org.

NHRA JEGS SPORTSNATIONALS May 25-27 Beech Bend Raceway

37TH NATIONAL CORVETTE HOMECOMING May 31-June 2

Visit www.corvettehomecoming.com.

TS PERFORMANCE DIESEL DRAGS June 1-2 Beech Bend Raceway

NHRA SUMMIT ET SERIES & JR DRAGSTER CHALLENGE June 3 | 11am Beech Bend Raceway

HOT ROD POWER TOUR June 9 Beech Bend Raceway

16TH ANNUAL HOLLEY NATIONAL HOT ROD REUNION June 14-16 Beech Bend Raceway

Visit www.nhramuseum.org.

AMRA SUMMER SHOOTOUT RALLY & DRAGS June 22-24 Beech Bend Raceway

OPTIMA SEARCH FOR THE ULTIMATE STREET CAR O’REILLY SATURDAY NIGHT GRUDGE June 2-3 RACING NCM Motorsports Park Visit www.driveoptima.com.

June 30 Beech Bend Raceway

Note: While every effort has been made to ensure the accuracy of this information, all information is subject to change. Please call ahead to verify dates, times and schedules. If you would like your event included in the next issue of Bowling Green Living, please email sarah@tannerpublishing.com.

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CULTURE

RED, WHITE & BREW April 21 | 2-5pm WKU South Lawn

Call 270-745-2586 or visit alumni.wku.edu.

MARSHALL TUCKER BAND // PHOTO PROVIDED BY SOUTHERN KENTUCKY PERFORMING ARTS CENTER

20TH ANNUAL SOKY BOOK FEST

TIM MONTANA IN CONCERT

April 20-21 Knicely Conference Center

April 27 | 7-10pm The Warehouse at Mt. Victor

Call 270-745-4502 or visit sokybookfest.org.

ORCHESTRA KENTUCKY PRESENTS MEN OF MOTOWN

MOTHER’S DAY LULA-PALOOZA AND VENDOR FAIR April 28 | 12:30-4:30pm

Call 270-904-6677 or visit warehouseatm- Historic RailPark & Train Museum tvictor.com. $15 Call 270-746-2014.

THE SYMPHONY AT WKU April 27 | 7:30pm Van Meter Hall

MARSHALL TUCKER BAND: JUKE JAMMIN’ TOUR 2018

PROLES / DOS COBROS / BIOLUMINESCENT

WKU JAZZ BAND

April 27 | 8pm The A-Frame

April 28 | 7:30pm Van Meter Hall

Call 270-745-3751 or visit wku.edu/music. April 28 | 7:30pm Call 270-904-1880 or visit theskypac.com. $10 general, $5 student SKyPAC Call 270-904-1880 or visit theskypac.com. April 21 | 7:30pm

WKU CHOIRS SPRING FINALE April 22 | 3pm Van Meter Hall

Visit wku.edu/music. $5 general, $3 student

THE WIZARD OF OZ

GYPSYMOON MARKETPLACE SPRING 2018

April 27-28 | Fri. Noon-8pm, Sat. 8amApril 24 | 7:30pm 4pm SKyPAC Call 270-904-1880 or visit theskypac.com. Highland Stables

Visit highlandstablesbg.com/gypsymoon. Fri. $10, Sat. $5

“EMBRACE OF THE SERPENT” (COLUMBIA), FARAWAY FLIX SERIES EVENING OF DANCE 2018 April 27 | 6pm WKU Cherry Hall, Room 125

Call 270-745-6121 or visit wku.edu/library.

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April 27-30 | Fri.-Mon. 8pm, Sun. 3pm WKU Russell Miller Theatre in Fine Arts Center

Visit wku.showare.com. $12

Call 270-745-3751 or visit wku.edu/music.

FREE! LAST

CHANCE TO DANCE STUDENT SHOWCASE

May 1 | 7pm Van Meter Hall

Visit wku.edu/theatre-and-dance.

TRACE ADKINS “HOW DID WE GET HERE” TOUR May 1 | 7:30pm SKyPAC

Call 270-904-1880 or visit theskypac.com.

www.bgkyliving.com


“NUNSET BOULEVARD,” FOUNTAIN SQUARE PLAYERS

ORCHESTRA KENTUCKY PRESENTS BACH AND BACHARACH

May 3-6 | Thurs.-Sat. 7:30pm, Sun. 3pm Phoenix Theatre

May 19 | 7:30pm SKyPAC

Call 270-782-3119 or visit fountainsquareplayers.org.

CELEBRATE MOTHER’S DAY May 12 | 2pm Warren County Public Library, Smiths Grove Branch

Registration required at 270-563-6651 or warrenpl.org.

LOST RIVER SESSIONS LIVE! May 12 | 7pm Capitol Arts Center

Call 270-904-1880 or visit theskypac.com. $10

SONGWRITER ROUNDS FEATURING MARC-ALAN BARNETTE, RANDY BROOKS AND DAN MODLIN May 14 Lost River Cave

Call 270-904-1880 or visit theskypac.com.

PUBLIC THEATRE OF KENTUCKY MAINSTAGE: HEATHERS, THE MUSICAL May 31-June 3 | Thurs.-Sat. 7:30pm, Sun. 3pm The Phoenix Theatre

Call 270-781-6233 or visit ptkbg.org.

May 31-June 3 Highway 68/80

FREE! BOWLING

GREEN GALLERY HOP

June 1 | 5-8pm

Visit bggalleryhop.com.

ELIJAH CREEL WITH NED HILL June 9 | 10:30pm The A-Frame

FREE! A

June 11 Lost River Cave

RODGERS + HAMMERSTEIN’S CINDERELLA May 17 | 7:30pm SKyPAC

Call 270-904-1880 or visit theskypac.com.

Call 270-393-0077 or visit lostrivercave. org. $75

JAKE OWEN “LIFE’S WHATCHA MAKE IT” TOUR June 30 | 7:15pm Bowling Green Ballpark

HEALTH & FITNESS

Visit 400mile.com.

SONGWRITER ROUNDS FEATURING ANNE BUCKLE, STEVE GOODIE AND DAN MODLIN

May 16, June 20 | 7-9pm The A Frame.

June 17 | 1-4pm Lost River Cave

400 MILE SALE

Reservations made at 270-782-5263, danmodlin@hotmail.com or lostrivercave.org.

BLUEGRASS JAM HOSTED BY JORDAN RIEHM & FRIENDS

ADULT NATURE PROGRAM: PAST-THE-DAM CAVE WALK

Reservations can be made at 270-782-5263, danmodlin@hotmail.com or lostrivercave. org.

HANGAR PARTY BENEFITING AVIATION HERITAGE PARK June 16 | 5pm Bowling Green Warren County Regional Airport

Visit aviationheritagepark.com.

MONTHLY MINDFULNESS: DIY MANDALA STONES April 18 | 6-7pm Warren County Public Library, Bob Kirby Branch

Registration required at 270-782-0252 or warrenpl.org.

VETTE CITY SHOOTOUT April 20-22 Michael O. Buchanon Park

Visit vettecityshootout.com.

5K TRIPLE CROWN RUN FOR NEW BEGINNINGS THERAPEUTIC RIDING April 28 | Registration 7:30am, Race 9am 600 Bill Ferguson Road

RELAY FOR LIFE June 1 | 5pm Bowling Green High School

Call 270-745-1964

FAMILY

KID’S CAROUSEL SEMI ANNUAL CONSIGNMENT SALE

April 20-21 | Fri. 9am-7pm, Sat. 9am-2pm SOKY Fairgrounds Jaycees Building

JUNIOR NATURALIST PROGRAM: SEE WHAT YOU CAN SEE April 21 | 10am-12pm Lost River Cave

Call 270-393-0077 or visit lostrivercave.org.

www.bgkyliving.com

MISS NELSON IS MISSING!

April 26-29 | Thurs.-Sat. 7:30pm, Sun. 3pm Phoenix Theatre

Call 270-781-6233 or visit ptkbg.org.

SKY SCIENCE FESTIVAL EXPO DAY April 28 | 10am-5pm Circus Square Park

JUNIOR NATURALIST PROGRAM: COLORS TO DYE FOR

June 16 | 10am-noon Lost River Cave

Call 270-393-0077 or visit lostrivercave.org.

“THE HOUSE AT POOH CORNER,” FOUNTAIN SQUARE PLAYERS June 28-July 1 | Thurs.-Sat 7:30pm, Sun. 3pm Phoenix Theatre

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Bowling Green Living - May / June 2018  
Bowling Green Living - May / June 2018