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SERVING EVERY TEXAN EVERY DAY

2016 ANNUAL REPORT


CONTENTS From the Dean........................................................................................................3 CVM Hallmarks.......................................................................................................3 Veterinary & Biomedical Education Complex.....................................................4 Serving Every Texan Every Day.............................................................................6 Serving Texas & Beyond........................................................................................8 Expenditures...........................................................................................................9 Degrees Conferred.................................................................................................9 Professional Students..........................................................................................10 Undergraduate Students.....................................................................................14 Graduate Students...............................................................................................16 Residents & Interns..............................................................................................18 Faculty ...................................................................................................................19 Diversity.................................................................................................................20 Development.........................................................................................................22 Outstanding Alumni & Rising Star......................................................................23 New Small Animal Hospital.................................................................................24 Stevenson Companion Animal Life-Care Center..............................................25 International Programs.......................................................................................26 One Health............................................................................................................28 Equine Initiative....................................................................................................29 Research................................................................................................................30 Veterinary Integrative Biosciences.....................................................................32 Veterinary Pathobiology......................................................................................33 Veterinary Physiology & Pharmacology.............................................................34 Large Animal Clinical Sciences............................................................................35 Small Animal Clinical Sciences............................................................................36 Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital...............................................................37 Diagnostic Imaging & Cancer Treatment Center..............................................40 Veterinary Emergency Team...............................................................................41 Texas A&M Institute for Preclinical Studies.......................................................42 Partnership for Environmental Education & Rural Health..............................43 Center for Educational Technologies.................................................................44 Continuing Education...........................................................................................45 CVM/TVMA Collaborative Leadership ...............................................................46 Administration......................................................................................................47 2 • 2016 CVM Annual Report


FROM THE DEAN The Texas A&M University College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences (CVM) has been building the future of veterinary medicine for 100 years. Since our modest beginnings in 1916, we have been educating exceptional leaders and working on solutions to the most challenging health problems facing the State of Texas, the nation, and the world. The CVM was born because of the need to support the livestock industries of Texas. A century later, we remain united by a common desire to make the world a better place—not only for animals, but also for people and the ecosystem that we share. Throughout our history, we have worked to protect animal health and well-being, eradicate disease, ensure a safe food supply, and transform veterinary medical education. Our reach is global. We pave the way for scholars and teachers from around the world and across disciplines to work as teams. We tackle global health issues together by recognizing the inextricable link between animal, human, and environmental health. We have prepared over 30,000 students to become leaders in veterinary medicine and biomedical sciences. These leaders have impacted communities across Texas, the United States, and the world. Together, we have been on a non-stop journey in search of opportunities to create and share new knowledge with our students, our graduates, our partners in animal industry, our other constituents, and our communities. Through the next 100 years, we will remain committed to maintaining a college that is innovative, collaborative, and transformative. We are reflecting on the past, with a vision for the future. As we create the next chapters in the life of the CVM, we are—and always will be—“Serving Every Texan Every Day!”

Eleanor M. Green, DVM, DACVIM, DABVP The Carl B. King Dean

CVM HALLMARKS • • • • • • •

• •

• • •

• • •

The CVM was established in 1916 to serve the Texas agriculture, livestock, and cattle industry and is the only one in Texas. The CVM is Ranked No. 6 in the world and No. 3 in the United States in 2015 by Quacquarelli Symonds (QS), an educational services firm that rates the top 50 veterinary medicine schools globally. The CVM is ranked among the Top 10 of all colleges of veterinary medicine in the country by U.S. News & World Report. The CVM is one of the largest colleges of veterinary medicine in the United States, with over 527 DVM students annually, and an annual entering class of 132 students—soon to increase to 162. As of May 2016, the CVM has graduated 7,829 DVMs. The CVM is part of a Texas A&M University campus-wide effort to build a $90 million Global Health Research Building. The CVM broke ground on the new $120 million Veterinary & Biomedical Education Complex (VBEC) on April 30, 2014, moved into the complex in August 2016, and celebrated its Grand Opening on November 11, 2016. In 2014, phase I of the Thomas G. Hildebrand, DVM ’56 Equine Complex on the Texas A&M University campus was dedicated. It is a $33 million component of the $80 million Equine Initiative, which is a collaboration between the CVM and the College of Agriculture & Life Sciences. The CVM's Veterinary Research Building was built in two phases totalling $43.1 million between 1993 and 2010. The $10.5 million Diagnostic Imaging & Cancer Treatment Center was built in 2011 at the CVM. In 2014, the CVM becamse the recipient of the first National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS) Center grant at Texas A&M University. The grant provides funding for the Center for Translational Environmental Health Research grant that is a collaboration among Texas A&M, Baylor College of Medicine, and the University of Houston. The CVM student pass rate for the North American Veterinary Licensing Examination (NAVLE) is consistently greater than 95%. The pass rate of CVM residents on their AVMA-recognized veterinary specialty organization certifying examination for specialty board certification is one of the highest in the nation. The Biomedical Sciences program (BIMS) is the largest degree-granting undergraduate program at Texas A&M University, with a student enrollment exceeding 2,200. Over 27% of BIMS majors are first-generation college students. BIMS majors make up a large portion of Aggie students admitted to Texas professional schools: medical (32%), dental (53%), and veterinary (57%). The BIMS program has partnered with 14 community colleges in the State of Texas to create 2+2 admissions agreements that facilitate the admission and academic transfer of qualified students from these community colleges into the BIMS program. CVM researchers have cloned more species than anywhere else in the world (cat, cow, deer, horse, goat, and pig). The first cloned horse in North America was born at Texas A&M University. In collaboration with the Texas Heart Institute, the CVM operates the $14 million Center for Cell and Organ Biotechnology, which includes a $3 million matching state investment through the Texas Emerging Technology Fund. 2016 CVM Annual Report • 3


VETERINARY & BIOMEDICAL EDUCATION COMPLEX 2016 was a grand year for the College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences (CVM). The college celebrated an outstanding centennial year, and we have seen a dramatically positive change to the face of the college in the form of several new buildings and building expansions. In 2016, we saw the completion of the Veterinary & Biomedical Education Complex (VBEC)—adding approximately 330,000 square feet of new classrooms, laboratories, office space, collaboration, and learning space to the college. The VBEC Grand Opening was a successful opportunity to welcome the public and to share what has been given to the CVM by taxpayers to better serve the State of Texas and beyond. Classes were in full swing in August and the facility is preparing to host several large annual meetings this spring—including the Texas Veterinary Medical Association (TVMA) conference, the Student American Veterinary Medical Association (SAVMA) symposium, Open House, and Dr. Adam Little’s Veterinary Innovation Summit (VIS). We are very excited to welcome these groups, as we begin our second century of service to the people and animals of Texas. While 2016 was an exceptional year, 2017 holds great promise. With the move of many of our faculty and staff to the VBEC, newly vacated space in our existing buildings is allowing for the expansion of programs previously restricted by space limitations. Many upgrades are being made to allow the continued growth of these outstanding programs. With the completion of the new home for the Texas A&M Veterinary Medical Diagnostic Laboratory (TVMDL), the CVM will utilize the previous TVMDL building to expand and grow many laboratory-based programs. As the CVM continues to grow and expand in our next century, we look forward to continuing to "Serve Every Texan Every Day."

4 • 2016 CVM Annual Report


VETERINARY & BIOMEDICAL EDUCATION COMPLEX "As a veterinary student, with a passion for large animal veterinary medicine and general manager of the SAVMA Symposium, I have been looking forward to the completion of this building to showcase this facility, as well as our CVM campus to our student peers across the nation in 2017! Our SAVMA Symposium planning team is working hard to develop a program that will be inspiring to our student attendees and showcase our amazing faculty and exceptional facilities­—both of which will impact our careers as future veterinarians." ~ Justin Casares, DVM Class of 2018

"This facility is amazing and the undergraduate Biomedical Sciences (BIMS) students are thrilled to call this new facility home. The learning environment created here is not only warm and inviting, but also inspirational. It facilitates learning AND inspires us to open our minds to the limitless career opportunities available. So, thank you all, for making this building possible!" ~ Madison Bartock, Undergraduate BIMS Student 2016 CVM Annual Report • 5


SERVING EVERY TEXAN EVERY DAY INITIATIVE Culminating a seven-year plan, the Texas A&M University System announced partnerships to expand veterinary education, research, and undergraduate outreach into several regions of the state through four A&M System universities in 2015. The partnerships are between the Texas A&M University College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences (CVM) and West Texas A&M University, Prairie View A&M University, Texas A&M University-Kingsville, and Tarleton State University. The Veterinary & Biomedical Education Complex (VBEC), which opened in the fall of 2016, will allow the CVM to accept more veterinary students and create partnerships that encourage more underrepresented minorities (URM) and rural students, who are more likely to return to their home region, to work as veterinarians who will support the state’s agricultural economy.

The VBEC will: • •

Easily accommodate an initial increased class size of 20 to 30 new veterinary students in each class, as well as increases necessary to meet the needs of Texas into the foreseeable future. Provide new learning opportunities for students who attend the four A&M System universities, as the CVM intends to increase the number of students from those regions.

The CVM intends to initially: • • • •

Add veterinary faculty to teach undergraduate courses, strengthen the curriculum, and expand research partnerships with industry in each region. Offer relevant parts of the veterinary curriculum at sites other than College Station. Hire two faculty members to teach and conduct research at West Texas A&M University. Seek appropriations to add more faculty at West Texas A&M University and duplicate those efforts at Prairie View A&M University, Texas A&M University-Kingsville, and Tarleton State University.

This initiative will allow every Texas community to be better served by excellent educational opportunities for young people, costeffective education and outreach, extension of faculty to meet regional needs, increased veterinary care, and directed research on issues that affect the animal industries throughout the state.

6 • 2016 CVM Annual Report


SERVING EVERY TEXAN EVERY DAY INITIATIVE Leveraging and Synergizing Strengths The CVM is creating an integrated system that connects distant communities and regions of the state through strategic partnerships with A&M System universities around the state. After programs at these pilot sites are in place, remaining needs and opportunities will be assessed. These partnerships will leverage and synergize the strengths of the CVM, the A&M System, and constituencies to: • Impact the health of Texas through advancing animal, human, and environmental health (Global One Health) throughout the state • Invest in the young people of Texas, and therefore, the future of Texas, as they seek professional careers in veterinary medicine, biomedical sciences, and related disciplines • Contribute to the stability and growth of the Texas economy by: -- Supporting and protecting the $15 billion Texas livestock industries, from large operations to small acreage livestock producers -- Enhancing the health and well-being of the $3 billion deer industry and the wildlife species of Texas -- Advancing the $4 billion veterinary profession, which provides jobs for Texans in rural and urban communities -- Encouraging and supporting rural veterinary medicine This cost-effective, graduated approach to expanding veterinary education leverages the state’s assets to their highest and best use, while being mindful of the contributions of Texas taxpayers.

West Texas A&M University

Tarleton State University

Texas A&M University

Prairie View A&M University

Texas A&M UniversityKingsville

2016 CVM Annual Report • 7


SERVING TEXAS & BEYOND We are the only college of veterinary medicine in Texas. The college: • Serves all of Texas and advances animal and human health • Supports the state’s livestock and wildlife industries • Provides viable and diverse professional career paths for Texans • Promotes science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) education • Contributes to the economic viability and job opportunities of local communities • Provides sophisticated disaster and emergency response support for animals throughout the state • Advances the veterinary profession

$15

BILLION livestock

$3

BILLION

wildlife

$4 BILLION veterinarian

Economic Impact

Human Health

Animal Health

ONE HEALTH Human Environments

8 • 2016 CVM Annual Report

Texas is the second most populous state in the nation and is a leader in many aspects of animal agriculture and companion animal care. The inventory of Texas cattle and calves totals 11.8 million. Texas continues to rank first in the nation in total number of cattle and calves with 13 percent of the total United States inventory. When the tens of millions of livestock are considered along with the tens of thousands of dogs and cats and other companion animals in our state, the full economic value of animal health and well-being becomes apparent. The college contributes to the economic strength of Texas through animal health.

One Health: Keeping Texas Healthy by Advancing Animal, Human and Environmental Health The One Health Initiative was started at Texas A&M University in 2011 to improve the health and well-being of humans, animals, and the environments in the ecosystems they share. This initiative is dedicated to preparing students to assume roles in leadership, responsibility, and service to society. It builds on the strength of the university and the State of Texas from discovery to application and commercialization. The college is a major leader in promoting all aspects of One Health.


EXPENDITURES Notable expenditures include support for: • High-impact learning materials and opportunities • Diversity programs • Texas A&M One Health Initiative • International Programs • Veterinary Emergency Team (VET) • Student research activities • Advancement • Improving faculty salaries based on merit and equity • Facilities construction and improvements

FY2016 College Expenditures Facilities & Scholarships & Infrastructure Fellowships 4% 1% Institutional Support Public 7% Service 1% Teaching Hospital 17%

FY2016 College Expenditures Category

Explanation

Teaching Hospital

Operating expenses for the Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital (VMTH).

Teaching & Educational Support

Expenditures directly supporting the teaching and education mission of the college.

Research

Expenditures directly supporting the research mission of the college.

Public Service

Expenditures to support programs such as the continuing education of practicing veterinarians and technicians and the VET.

Institutional Support

Expenditures for clinical laboratories housed within the college. Many of these labs support both the VMTH and research.

Facilities & Infrastructure

Expenditures for maintaining college facilities, landscaping, and custodial services.

Scholarships & Fellowships

Expenditures that directly support our students.

Research 29%

Teaching & Educational Support 41%

Academic Year 2015-16 Degrees Conferred

Graduate Degrees 17% B.S. 58%

DVM 25%

DEGREES CONFERRED Degrees Conferred by Academic Year

Number of Degrees

350 300 250 200

B.S. Ph.D. DVM M.S.

150 100 50 0

2009–10

2010–11

2011–12

2012–13

2013–14

2014–15

2015–16

Academic Year 2016 CVM Annual Report • 9


PROFESSIONAL STUDENTS As one of the largest Doctor of Veterinary Medicine (DVM) training programs in the country, the College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences (CVM) provides a four-year post-undergraduate curriculum based on building a solid foundation of scientific knowledge, experiential learning to master technical and professional skills, and development of competencies required for an entry-level veterinarian in any career path. Upon completion of the veterinary professional program, successful students will have demonstrated competency in each of the 37 domains outlined in the college’s New Graduate Outcomes (NGOs). The NGO document articulates the specific knowledge, skills, and attributes expected of students enrolled in our DVM program at the time of graduation.

Curriculum Review and Renewal Recent review, including stakeholder feedback, identified areas for strengthening the curriculum. A data-driven curriculum renewal was initiated and modifications will be implemented with the incoming class of 2021 in the fall of 2017. These changes ensure the curriculum continues to include extensive, engaging, didactic instruction and hands-on learning opportunities. The first two years provide a foundation in medical science, clinical skills, and clinical reasoning. The third year emphasizes diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment. The student also begins structuring a personalized course selection to direct learning toward Class of 2016 Average DVM Student Educational Debt Upon Graduation Colleges of Veterinary Medicine

National Average

DVM First-Year Orientation 2016

Texas A&M $70,000

$132,901

$80,615 $90,000

$110,000

$130,000

$150,000

$170,000

$190,000

$210,000

$230,000

Debt

Class of 2020 First Year In-State Resident DVM Student Tuition and Fees by Veterinary School Colleges of Veterinary Medicine

National Average

$30,013

DVM White Coat Ceremony 2016 $22,224

Texas A&M

$15,000

$20,000

$25,000

$30,000

Tuiton and Fees

10 • 2016 CVM Annual Report

$35,000

$40,000

$45,000


PROFESSIONAL STUDENTS individual career goals, choosing between small animal species, mixed animal species, large animal species, or alternate career tracks. The student will be assigned to clinical duties in the Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital (VMTH). The fourth year is a full 12 months in length and includes rotations through the VMTH and other venues, including the Houston SPCA, as well as a four-week externship experience at a location of the student’s choice. Unique clinical opportunities in the curriculum include client communication training, rotations focusing on primary care medicine, specialty-intensive experiences, disaster preparedness, and shelter medicine. College faculty are dedicated to providing an inclusive and welcoming learning environment that provides state-of-the-art, comprehensive exposure to the art and science of veterinary medicine. As of May 2016, the CVM has graduated 7,829 DVMs.

Accreditation In 2016, the CVM received full accreditation from the American Veterinary Medical Association Council on Education (AVMA-COE) for an additional seven years. New Graduate Outcomes APRIL 2016 CURRICULUM COMMITTEE

NGO 1:

1

NGO 2:

2

NGO 3:

2

NGO 4:

4

NGO 5:

6

NGO 6:

7

Comprehensive patient diagnosis (problem-solving skills), appropriate use of clinical laboratory testing, and record management

Comprehensive treatment planning, including patient referral when indicated

Anesthesia and pain management, patient welfare

Basic surgery skills, experience, and case management

Basic medicine skills, experience, and case management

Emergency and intensive care case management

NGO 7:

8

NGO 8:

11

NGO 9:

12

NGO 10:

12

NGO 11:

14

NGO 12:

15

NGO 13:

16

GLOSSARY OF TERMS

17

Health promotion, disease prevention/biosecurity, zoonosis, and food safety

Client communications and ethical conduct

Critical analysis of new information and research findings relevant to veterinary medicine

Team collaboration, leadership, and practice management

Multicultural awareness and personal wellness

Legal and regulatory compliance

Animal welfare

DVM Commencement 2016

Terms in blue text correlate with Bloom’s taxonomy of learning outcomes.7

2016 New Graduate Outcomes

AVMA-COE Self Study Report

Hospital Clinical Cases for FY2016

46,405

Texas A&M

National Average

33,506 Hospital Cases by Type

100,000 Texas A&M

# of Cases

10,000

US Average

1,000 100

DVM Commencement 2016

10

Colleges of Veterinary Medicine

1

Equine

Food animal

Shelter

Small animal

Type of Cases

0

10,000

20,000

30,000

40,000

50,000

60,000

70,000

80,000

90,000

Cases

2016 CVM Annual Report • 11


PROFESSIONAL STUDENTS Class of 2016 First Preference of Practice Type

60%

Food Animal (Predominantly or Better) Mixed Companion Animal (Predominantly or Better) Equine Advanced Training or Education Other

50%

40%

30%

20%

DVM Commencement 2016 10%

0%

2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

Source: AVMA Graduating Class Survey (Texas A&M College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences only)

DVM Student Average Salary Upon Graduation $80,000

Salary

$70,000

$60,000

$50,000

$40,000

2005 2006 2007 2008 First-Year Texas A&M DVM Avg. Salary $54,981 $56,519 $55,884 $60,769 National Avg. Starting Salary $53,604 $55,097 $58,365 $61,632 U.S. Median Income $56,224 $56,663 $57,423 $55,376

2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 $55,740 $65,529 $65,871 $70,031 $69,760 $64,585 $67,537 $66,469 $65,404 $66,442 $55,376 $53,568 $53,568 $52,751 $52,666

2014 2015 $73,468 $72,940 $67,479 $70,834 $52,850 $53,718

2016 $77,000 $73,998 $56,516

Sources: AVMA Report on Veterinary Compensation (removing Advanced Education and averaging odd years), AVMA Graduate Survey: TAMU Report, & U.S. Census Bureau

DVM Enrollment – Class of 2020 Ethnicity

Resident Status

2 or more/ excluding Black Unknown or 2% Not Reported Hispanic or Latino 1% of any Race 15%

Gender

Non-Resident 3%

Male 21%

Black only + 2 or more/1 Black 1% Asian Only 6% White Only 75%

12 • 2016 CVM Annual Report

Resident 97%

Female 79%


PROFESSIONAL STUDENTS Special Collaborations 2016 marked the fourth full year of the CVM’s collaboration with the Houston SPCA to provide a clinical rotation for fourth-year DVM students in shelter medicine. The CVM also collaborates with the Texas Department of Criminal Justice (TDCJ), providing not only hands-on training for DVM students, but also veterinary care for animals at TDCJ agricultural units.

Student Leadership Many current CVM students serve in leadership roles for state and national veterinary organizations: • Mike McEntire, a fourth-year DVM student, is a current member of the national Student American Veterinary Medical Association (SAVMA) Executive Board. • Caitlin Conner, a third-year DVM student, is also a current member of the national SAVMA Executive Board. • Erin Black, a fourth-year DVM student, is the current president of the Texas A&M Student Chapter of the Women’s Veterinary Leadership Development Initiative (WVLDI), the Texas A&M chapter liaison for the Veterinary Students as One in Culture and Ethnicity (VOICE) national organization, and a member of Project Diversity, a group that reaches out to undergraduates at historically black colleges and universities, encouraging them to consider a career in veterinary medicine.

The current CVM national SAVMA representatives are: • • • • • •

Garrett Crooks, Senior SAVMA Delegate Taylor Adams, Junior SAVMA Delegate Justin Casares, SAVMA General Manager Nicole Bertolini, SAVMA General Manager Nicole Fierce, SAVMA Treasurer Lauren Thompson, SAVMA Fundraising Chair

Erin Black & Mike McEntire

Caitlin Conner

The current CVM Texas Veterinary Medicial Association (TVMA) representatives are: • • • • • •

Taylor Powell, Senior TVMA Delegate Kelsey Carroll, Junior TVMA Delegate Sadie Sacra, first-year DVM Student TVMA Representative Kameron Soules, second-year DVM Student TVMA Representative Clara Bush, third-year DVM Student TVMA Representative Michael Walker, fourth-year DVM Student TVMA Representative

Garrett Crooks

Taylor Powell

Sadie Sacra 2016 CVM Annual Report • 13


UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS

Dr. Elizabeth Crouch Assistant Dean Dr. Henry Huebner Director

Texas A&M University offers a distinctive undergraduate program in Biomedical Sciences (BIMS) at the College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences (CVM). Biomedical Sciences is a broad field of applied biology that is directed toward understanding health and disease. The curriculum provides a strong four-year education that emphasizes versatility of the graduate in the biological and medical sciences. A highly-effective academic counseling program helps students develop individualized course packages that orient and prepare them for entry into the medical, allied health, or graduate program of their choice. Such an approach enhances their educational experiences, improves their placement in professional and graduate programs, and facilitates their entry into the biomedical science job market. The BIMS Program is the largest degree-granting undergraduate program at the university, with an enrollment of 2,269 students in 2015–16, over 27 percent of whom are first-generation college students in their families. The BIMS International Certificate in Cultural Competency and Communication in Spanish was established to help BIMS students reach one of the goals of Vision 2020—“to diversify and globalize the A&M community.” Students who graduate with the certificate will be functionally bilingual and able to better perform linguistically and in a culturally sensitive manner in the medical environment.

2+2 Articulation Agreements These agreements serve to facilitate the admission and academic transfer of students from participating community colleges throughout Texas into the BIMS Program at the CVM. As students progress successfully toward the completion of the associate's degree, this agreement will ensure a seamless transition of students into the BIMS program according to the provisions and conditions of each respective agreement. There are currently 14 Texas community colleges participating in 2+2 Articulation Agreements.

Professional School Acceptance Outstanding Phi Kappa Phi Junior, Cassie Weyland (left)

BIMS students make up a large portion of Aggie students accepted to Texas medical, dental, and veterinary schools. Of the Aggies accepted to professional schools, BIMS percentages are shown below.

32%

53%

medical

dental

57%

veterinary BIMS Gathright Scholars from left: Madeleine Pohlmann, David Hardin, and Asley Polasek

14 • 2016 CVM Annual Report


UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS First-Generation BIMS Students

27% Fall 2016 Undergraduate Enrollment Ethnicity

Gender

Classification

Native Hawaiian International 2 or more/ Only 0% excluding Black 0% Unknown or American Indian 3% Not Reported Only 0% 0% Hispanic or Latino of any Race 26%

Sophomore 24%

Male 30% White Only 53%

Black only + 2 or more/1 Black 5%

Female 70%

Freshman 28%

Senior 27%

Asian Only 13%

Junior 21%

Number of Students

Undergraduate Student Ethnicity Over Time 1,600 1,400 1,200 1,000 800 600 400 200 0

White Only Non-White

Fall 2006

Fall 2007

Fall 2008

Fall 2009

Fall 2010

Fall 2011

Fall 2012

Fall 2013

Fall 2014

Fall 2015

Fall 2016

Semester

2016 CVM Annual Report • 15


GRADUATE STUDENTS CVM graduate students recite their oath at the inaugural Graduate Student Oath Ceremony on Aug. 25, 2016. CVM Postdoctoral Association (CVM-PDA) •

CVM-PDA is committed to improving the quality of the postdoctoral experience and to facilitating the long-term success of its members, which include all non-tenuretrack postdoctoral appointments consisting of postdoctoral fellows and associates, research assistants and associates, and post-DVM/VMD interns and residents. Monthly meetings are held to discuss relevant topics for professional growth and development and facilitate networking amongst postdocs from CVM departments.

CVM Graduate Student Association (CVM-GSA) • •

CVM-GSA is for all full- and part-time CVM graduate students. The organization is charged with identifying and representing graduate student interests, promoting participation in the policy and decision-making process within the CVM, enhancing the quality and scope of graduate education, and offering programs that benefit its membership.

The College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences (CVM) promotes the advancement of biomedical research and professional practice in the health sciences through Master of Science (MS) and Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) degree programs that enable pre-professionals, early-career scientists, and veterinarians to gain or enhance their background in basic and applied sciences and prepare to excel in various research and professional careers in the academic, public, and private sectors.

Graduate Program Revitalization & Centralized Academic Advising In the last year, the Biomedical Sciences (BIMS) Graduate Program experienced a revitalization in conjunction with implementation of a strategic plan developed by the Office of the Associate Dean for Research and Graduate Studies as well as substantial input from the BIMS Graduate Program Task Force. Notably, the Research and Graduate Studies team and BIMS Graduate Program Task Force focused on maximizing the strengths of the research training already conducted by our faculty while developing a better structure to achieve our mission of preparing students for their future. New graduate students now participate in an intensive orientation week “boot camp” for that includes training in biosafety and compliance, diversity and inclusion, intellectual property and patents, and Texas A&M regulations and requirements for graduate education. The week concludes with the Graduate Oath Ceremony where students receive a white lab coat and recite an oath, which reflects Texas A&M and CVM core values and expectations of graduate students to uphold the highest standards with respect to ethical behavior, integrity, and professionalism. This year graduate academic advising was centralized under the Office of the Associate Dean for Research and Graduate Studies. This facilitates more comprehensive and intensive advising to link students to available career opportunities and training that will best prepare them for their future career path as a biomedical scientist. Students now have access to five graduate advisors with diverse experiences and backgrounds.

Spring Research Symposium & Recruitment Weekend The CVM Graduate Student & Postdoc Association Research Symposium was held on January 28, 2016, the symposium had 80 presentations made by CVM trainees, making it the largest symposium to date. Awards were given to the three best graduate student platform and poster presentations and to the top two postdoctoral platform and poster presentations at the symposium banquet. 2016 Number of Graduate Students at Colleges of Veterinary Medicine Texas A&M

Current Graduate Enrollment by Department Dept.

PhD

MS

MBT

Total

CLVM

3

87

10

100

VIBS

21

52

0

73

VLCS

4

6

0

10

VSCS

11

7

0

18

VTPB

61

26

0

87

VTPP

26

27

0

53

Total

126

205

16 • 2016 CVM Annual Report

10

341

National Average

Colleges of Veterinary Medicine

0

50

100

150

200

250

Number of Graduate Students

300

350

400


GRADUATE STUDENTS Fall 2016 Graduate Enrollment The highlight of the symposium banquet was the keynote address entitled “Adventures in Next Generation Sequencing” by Dr. Jerry Taylor, an endowed professor Ethnicity at the University of Missouri. 2 or more/ excluding Black Concurrent with the Symposium was the CVM Doctoral Student Recruitment 2% Weekend where outstanding applicants from across the country attended programs and events at the college that highlighted the CVM’s strengths and opportunities Hispanic International or Latino Unknown or for research. During this event, doctoral degree applicants interviewed with faculty 18% of any Race Black only Not Reported 15% 1% members and learned about the student experience from current doctoral students. + 2 or more/ 1 Black 7%

BRIDGE Program (vetmed.tamu.edu/bridge) The Biomedical Research Immersion and Diversity for Graduate Education (BRIDGE) program is an eight-week, research-intensive program. It combines a hands-on mentored research laboratory experience and a structured program of training modules, weekly program meetings and journal club sessions, and exciting field trips to different biomedical research facilities in Texas. The BRIDGE program seeks to expose undergraduate students of diverse backgrounds, including underrepresented minorities and students from economically disadvantaged and under-served backgrounds, to graduate and professional programs available at the CVM.

Asian Only 7% White Only 50%

Gender

Male 36%

Graduate Student Ethnicity Over Time (Non-White) 70 Fall 2011 Fall 2012 Fall 2013 Fall 2014 Fall 2015 Fall 2016

Number of Students

60 50 40 30

Female 64%

Resident Status Other 2%

20 10 0 International Unknown or Not Reported

Asian Black only Hispanic American Only + 2 or more/ or Latino Indian 1 Black of any Race Only

2 or more/ excluding Black

Native Hawaiian Only

International 19%

Resident 60%

Non-Resident 19%

Graduate Student Gender Over Time 250

Number of Students

Female 200

Male Classification

150 100 50 0

Doctoral 38%

Fall 2006

Fall 2007

Fall 2008

Fall 2009

Fall 2010

Fall 2011

Fall 2012

Fall 2013

Fall 2014

Fall 2015

Fall 2016

Masters 62%

Semester

2016 CVM Annual Report • 17


RESIDENTS & INTERNS The college offers one-year internship programs to newly graduated veterinarians and three- or four-year residency programs in several clinical disciplines for veterinarians seeking advanced training and board certification. Residents have generally already completed an internship. At the college, residents and interns are exposed to numerous specialties and work side-by-side with experts in their fields. Residents may apply to one of several different areas of specialty including anesthesiology, radiology, cardiology, emergency and critical care, internal medicine, neurology, oncology, surgery, equine theriogenology, and zoological medicine. Interns in four areas (internal medicine, small animal, large animal, and zoological medicine) rotate through different specialties and spend about a fourth of their time on the emergency service. They also have some elective time to spend in an area of interest within the Veterinary medical Teaching Hospital (VMTH).

Current Clinical Residencies & Internships Year 1

Year 2

Year 3

Total

Rotating Large Animal Internships*

3

-

-

3

Equine Practice

0

1

0

1

Internal Medicine

1

1

2

4

Radiology

1

2

1

4

Surgery

1

1

1

3

Theriogenology

1

1

-

2

Large Animal Clinical Sciences Totals

7

6

4

17

10

-

-

10

Cardiology

1

1

1

3

Dermatology

1

0

0

1

Emergency/Critical Care

1

1

1

3

Internal Medicine

2

3

1

6

Neurology

0

1

1

2

Oncology

0

1

2

3

Surgery

2

1

1

4

Zoological Medicine

1

0

0

1

17

9

7

33

Anatomic Pathology

2

1

2

5

Clinical Pathology

1

1

1

3

Comparative Medicine

1

2

1

4

Cardiovascular Pathology

1

0

0

1

Pathobiology Totals

5

4

4

13

29

19

15

63

Emergency/Critical Care

Rotating Small Animal Internships*

Internal Medicine

Small Animal Clinical Sciences Totals

Totals

Surgery

18 • 2016 CVM Annual Report

*Internships are one-year positions and typically do not declare specialties.


FACULTY Faculty by Department & Title Tenure & Tenured-Track Faculty Professional Faculty

Assistant Professor

Veterinary Integrative Biosciences (VIBS)

27

7

6

19

59

Large Animal Clinical Sciences (VLCS)

16

5

5

10

36

Small Animal Clinical Sciences (VSCS)

26

5

8

9

48

Veterinary Pathobiology (VTPB)

17

7

8

20

52

Veterinary Physiology & Pharmacology (VTPP)

10

3

3

12

28

Totals

96

27

30

70

223

Department

Associate Professor Totals Professor

Faculty Demographics Professional Faculty

Assistant Professor

Associate Professor

Professor

Totals

25-34

15

**

**

**

~20

35-44

29

19

8

**

~60

45-54

30

**

14

14

~63

55-64

14

**

6

26

~48

65 and over

8

**

**

27

~39

Unknown

**

**

**

**

**

American Indian or Alaskan Native

**

**

**

**

**

Asian

10

6

**

**

~20

Black or African American

**

**

**

**

**

Hispanic

**

**

**

**

**

Two or More Races

**

**

**

**

**

White

82

16

23

63

184

Female

51

14

16

17

98

Male

24

13

14

53

104

Demographic

Age

Ethnicity

Gender

Categories with less than five are masked with **.

Dr. Beth Scallan (left) & Dr. Alice Blue-McLendon (right)

Dr. Audrey Cook

Dr. Christopher Quick 2016 CVM Annual Report • 19


DIVERSITY A welcoming, inclusive climate and a focus on all aspects of diversity have become guiding principles for the College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences (CVM). A positive climate ensures that the working and learning environments provided for faculty, staff, and students are optimal, that learning is enriched, and that our graduates are culturally competent and ready to serve society. By embracing the full spectrum of diversity attributes, we welcome new energy to the CVM and help our students become caring and compassionate healthcare professionals, scientists, and citizens. Dr. Eleanor M. Green, the Carl B. King dean of veterinary medicine, previously chaired the Texas A&M University President’s Council on Climate and Diversity for five years. Dr. Kenita Rogers, executive associate dean, is the current CVM director for diversity and inclusion and serves on the Texas A&M University Diversity Operations Committee and Diversity Leaders group. During the past five years, Texas A&M has awarded over $800,000 to the CVM in recognition of the college’s leadership and the many initiatives that meaningfully promote diversity within the college, university, and veterinary profession. This campus support has been crucial to the success of a variety of programs including student scholarships; professional development activities for faculty, staff, and students; and engagement in local and national organizations. The CVM has been increasingly successful in recruiting a diverse population of students. The BIMS undergraduate program has over 34 percent underrepresented minority students (URM). The 2015 graduate enrollment class leads its peer institutions with 47 percent URM, while the newest first-year DVM class has 24% URM students. One goal of the "Serving Every Texan Every Day" Texas A&M University System Statewide Initiative is to increase the number of URM and rural students in the DVM applicant pool. Two of the partner schools are Hispanic serving and one is a historically black university. Multicultural awareness is considered a Day One Competency and DVM students receive cultural competency training in a variety of settings throughout the curriculum. Since 2014, the CVM has sponsored 93 staff, faculty, and administrators to attend a 40-hour mediation course, with an additional cohort of 20 scheduled for late spring. The CVM is the only DVM program in the United States with medical Spanish and cultural competency training embedded into required courses. CVM Ethnicity

Texas Ethnicity

While trying to continue a culture of diversity and inclusion excellence in 2016, the CVM chose four specific areas to intentionally address: • Comprehensive training programs for faculty, staff, administration, and students • Wellness awareness and support for individuals with visible and invisible disabilities or special needs • Enhanced recruitment efforts for URM students • Celebration of climate and diversity accomplishments of faculty, staff, and students as they serve the public in the State of Texas

2 or more/ excluding Black 2%

American Indian Only 1% Asian Only 5%

2 or more/ excluding Black 3%

Black only + 2 or more/1 Black 12%

American Indian Only 0% Asian Only 11%

White Only 42% White Only 58% Hispanic or Latino of any Race 38% Native Hawaiian Only 0%

Hispanic or Latino of any Race 23%

Unknown or Not Reported 0%

Texas Gender

Native Hawaiin Only 0%

CVM Gender

Male 29% Female 50%

Male 50% Female 71%

20 • 2016 CVM Annual Report

Black only + 2 or more/ 1 Black 5%


DIVERSITY Under-Represented Minority (URM) DVM Enrollment by Class 20% 18%

Texas A&M URM

16%

National URM (excl. Tuskegee)* National URM

14% 12% 10% 8% 6% 4% 2% 0%

2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

Year

2017

2018

2019

CVM Graduate Students

2020

* Tuskegee Univeristy is excluded here to illustrate the impact it has as a Historically Black University (HBU) on nationally representative numbers.

Undergraduate Enrollment Makeup by Underrepresented Minority Status 2,500

Underrepresented Minority Non-Underrepresented Minorities

2,000

Number of Students

Underrepresented Minority

1,500

VOICE

1,000

Non-Underrepresented Minorities

500

0 Fall 2006

Fall 2007

Fall 2008

Fall 2009

Fall 2010

Fall 2011

Fall 2012

Fall 2013

Fall 2014

Fall 2015

Fall 2016

Semester

Cumulative Yearly Percent Growth of Undergraduate Underrepresented Minority Enrollment 33%

Yoga Wellness Initiative

28% 23% 18% 13% 8% 3% -2%

Fall 2007

Fall 2008

Fall 2009

Fall 2010

Fall 2011

Fall 2012

Semester

Fall 2013

Fall 2014

Fall 2015

Fall 2016

Broad Spectrum 2016 CVM Annual Report • 21


DEVELOPMENT Texas A&M’s third comprehensive fundraising campaign, Lead by Example, is a joint effort between the university and its affiliate organizations: the Texas A&M Foundation, The Association of Former Students, the 12th Man Foundation, and the George Bush Presidential Library Foundation. It is the largest higher education campaign in Texas history and the second largest conducted nationally by a public university.

What does it mean to Lead by Example? At Texas A&M, we believe leading by example means taking initiative. It means demonstrating our commitment to excellence. And, it means exploring, innovating, and effecting change to create a better world. The Lead By Example Campaign started in January of 2012, and publically launched in November 2015, with a goal of $4 billion university-wide. For the next four plus years, former students and friends are uniting with our faculty and staff to enhance the College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences’ (CVM) ability to tackle real-world problems—such as threats of infectious diseases, world hunger, and the advancement of human and animal health—while also preparing future generations of uniquely qualified leaders. The Lead by Example campaign will continue through 2020 with a goal of $200,000,000 for the CVM. As of December 2016, generous donors to the CVM have contributed 69% of the goal, or $138,144,709 in research grants, current gifts and planned gifts to the campaign. These contributions are impacting students, faculty, staff, and research by enriching the academic programs and practical learning experiences at the college.

Lead by Example Campaign Totals by Gift Use Facilities 1%

Students 12% Faculty 7%

Programs 80%

The CVM Development Team from left: Eliana Mijangos-Brown, Noell Vance, Dr. O.J. “Bubba” Woytek, and Chastity Carrigan Lead by Example Campaign Totals by Year for the CVM Year

Current Gifts

Planned Gifts

Private Support to Research

Totals

2012

$6,796,971.26

$19,656,616.70

$2,679,515.27

$29,133,103.23

2013

$7,500,893.20

$9,866,250.00

$2,060,755.34

$19,427,898.54

2014

$5,839,459.09

$20,013,520.79

$1,975,562.72

$27,828,542.60

2015

$3,824,550.48

$29,709,780.57

$2,432,099.12

$35,966,430.17

2016*

$4,674,008.64

$6,124,029.38

$5,053,362.58

$15,851,400.60

Totals

$28,635,882.67

$85,370,197.44

$14,201,295.03

$128,207,375.14

*January 1, 2016 through November 30, 2016

22 • 2016 CVM Annual Report


DEVELOPMENT The CVM Development Team is committed to building relationships between the college and friends of the college, who have an interest in enhancing its financial resources. In the process of carrying out this commitment, the Development Team makes numerous individual and group presentations on the wide variety of activities that take place at the CVM. In response to those efforts, CVM donors provided current and planned giving support of over $33 million in 2016. The total CVM endowment in FY2016 was $80 million.

Scholarships One of the CVM's top priorities is scholarship support for Doctor of Veterinary Medicine (DVM) students, while providing them with an advanced veterinary medical education that utilizes the finest in modern educational methods and technologies. The DVM Endowed Class Scholarship Initiative encourages each graduating class to create an endowed scholarship in its class name. Several graduating classes have already surpassed the $25,000 endowment level. Many former students use this vehicle as a way to memorialize classmates by giving to a deceased classmate’s class scholarship fund in their memory.

DVM Class Endowed Scholarships Class of ’41

Class of ’43

Class of ’51

Class of ’54

Class of ’55

Class of ’56

Class of ’57

Class of ’58

Class of ’62

Class of ’64

Class of ’65

Class of ’66

Class of ’67

Class of ’68

Class of ’69

Class of ’70

Class of ’71 (2)

Class of ’72

Class of ’75

Class of ’76

Class of ’78

Class of ’79

Class of ’80

Class of ’81

Class of ’83

Class of ’84

Class of ’87

Class of ’93

Class of ’94

Class of ’02

Class of ’07 (3)

Class of ’09

Endowment Sources & Market Value

Texas A&M University $25 Million Texas A&M Foundation $55 Million

Class of ’16

OUTSTANDING ALUMNI & RISING STAR The CVM established the Outstanding Alumni Awards in 1980, and the Rising Star Award in 2014, to recognize and honor the accomplishments of its graduates. In 2016, a commitment was made to include a Biomedical Sciences graduate in each year's class of Outstanding Alumni. Nominations of deserving CVM graduates are encouraged and accepted through December of the preceding year. Each year’s recipients are honored at a special dinner and reception during Homecoming Weekend each spring.

Jason D. Jennings ’95 2016 Outstanding Alumnus

Dr. Duane C. Kraemer ’66 2016 Outstanding Alumnus

Dr. Gary L. Norwood ’65 2016 Outstanding Alumnus

Dr. Robert A. Taylor ’70 2016 Outstanding Alumnus

Dr. Casey B. Behravesh ’05 2016 Rising Star

2016 CVM Annual Report • 23


NEW SMALL ANIMAL HOSPITAL For over 100 years, the College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences (CVM) has offered superior clinical services to animals from all over the United States. As the oldest continually operating veterinary practice in Texas, the Small Animal Hospital itself has not changed much since it opened in 1982. However, plans to expand and renovate the hospital to better suit the needs of its patients are underway. The CVM is seeking campus approval for a new fundraising campaign for a new Small Animal Hospital. Architectural renderings and a list of naming opportunities for the new hospital have been drafted. The Development Team is ready to contact friends and supporters to discuss proposals for reaching the $150 million project goal. The new hospital is intended to be a veterinary hospital of the future that takes into account the "quantified patient," the "connected clinic," and the "exponential veterinarian." It will support and lead change in veterinary health care, delivering systems into the futire for better care for more animals. Among specific plans for the new Small Animal Hospital are designs to triple the current capacity of surgery suites and intensive care units for both dogs and cats, as well as other general expansions to meet increases in demand. With this growth and development, animals and their humans will continue to receive the best care possible. 2016 was a banner year in the life of the CVM with the Centennial Celebration and the completion of the new Veterinary & Biomedical Education Complex (VBEC). A new Small Animal Hospital is the CVM’s top priority for the Texas A&M Capital Campaign.

Celebrating

1916-2016 One Hundred

Celebrating

1916-2016 One Hundred Years

Years

College of

Veterinary Med Small Anim icine & Biomedical Sciences al Hospita l

An artist’s rendering of the new Small Animal Hospital

conceptual diagrams

Architectural plans for the new Small Animal Hospital

24 • 2016 CVM Annual Report

The newly-renovated entrance to the current Small Animal Hospital. 91


STEVENSON COMPANION ANIMAL LIFE-CARE CENTER The Stevenson Companion Animal Life-Care Center provides for the physical, emotional, and medical needs of companion animals whose owners are no longer able to provide that care. Clients of the center include pet owners who want to ensure their pet’s future prior to entering a retirement home, being hospitalized for an extended period, or predeceasing their pet. The center was established by the college in 1993 at the suggestion of Dr. E. W. “Ned” Ellett, former head of the Small Animal Clinical Sciences department. Dr. Ellett’s dream became a reality with generous donations from the Luse Foundation and Mrs. Madlin Stevenson. Mrs. Stevenson said she chose to support the center because, “animals are especially important to the elderly and this center is dedicated to them and their pets.” Mrs. Stevenson, a life-long animal lover, passed away in September 2000, and her four cats, seven dogs, pony, and llama came to reside at the center. The center is a focal point of compassion for animals and dedication to their optimum care for life in a home-like environment. Four veterinary students live at the center. In 2014, Reveille VIII came to live at the Stevenson Center after she retired from her duties as the Texas A&M University mascot.

Enrollments Donkeys 1% Horses 4%

Dr. Sonny Presnal Director

Ellie Greenbaum Associate Director

Current Residents Non-resident caregiving humans 11% Resident caregiving humans 9%

Birds 4%

Cats 41%

Cats 46% Dogs 45%

Dogs 39%

Reveille VIII at the Stevenson Center

Stevenson Center residents and staff

Stevenson Companion Animal Life-Care Center 2016 CVM Annual Report • 25


INTERNATIONAL PROGRAMS Mission The International Programs Initiative at the College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences (CVM) encourages faculty and students to look beyond our borders and to be problem solvers on an international scale through education­­—including numerous study abroad courses—and research.

Objectives Objectives of the initiative include encouraging and facilitating our faculty and students to be world citizens through study abroad opportunities, student exchanges and internships, faculty visits and exchanges, international development, and capacity building. Many CVM faculty also collaborate with faculty at universities abroad who share their research and teaching interests. Finally, the initiative seeks to introduce all that the CVM has to offer to a world looking for solutions to problems.

International Program Advisory Committee (IPAC) The IPAC is charged with implementing international grants and programs that strengthen ongoing CVM and Texas A&M programs. The members of the committee are well-informed about international issues and opportunities that affect the educational and research programs of the college.

Study Abroad Opportunities Food Safety in Italy •

Veterinary students interested in learning about food safety and public health can participate in a summer short course in Italy led by Dr. Christine Budke. Students learn about the European Union’s food safety regulatory system and interact with peers in Italy.

Biomedical Sciences (BIMS) in Costa Rica •

South Africa Conservation Medicine

During this semester-long experience, BIMS students live and study at the Soltis Center in Costa Rica under the guidance of Dr. Donald Brightsmith. The trip includes coursework in genetics, microbiology, ecology, Spanish, and biomedical writing. For three weeks, students live with a host family to better understand the local culture.

Public Health in Spain •

This program, led by Dr. Maria Esteve-Gassent, is targeted to professional students interested in careers in veterinary medicine, human medicine, and public health. This immersion-based program focuses on how to communicate about global health within the context of both Spanish language and culture.

Human and Veterinary Medicine in Europe

South Africa Conservation Medicine

26 • 2016 CVM Annual Report

Dr. Jeremy Wasser has developed study abroad experiences in Europe for both veterinary students and undergraduate students. Veterinary students can travel to Germany and the Netherlands with Dr. Michelle Pine for four weeks in summer.

Undergraduates in BIMS and biomedical engineering can study with Dr. Wasser in a semester-long trip to Germany and the Netherlands to explore the history of human medicine. The program is culturally intensive and includes a stay with a German host family.


INTERNATIONAL PROGRAMS South Africa Conservation Medicine These programs, led by Drs. Alice Blue (two programs), Jim Derr and Linda Logan (one program), provide veterinary students with the opportunity to be involved in wildlife darting and conservation management procedures in South Africa. Students will observe and interact with a large number of species such as rhino, leopard, elephant, lion, and more in their native habits.

Current Research Projects

Tambopata Macaw Project in Peru The Tambopata Macaw Project began in 1989 with the goal of conserving large macaws by learning about their basic ecology and natural history. In 1999, Dr. Donald Brightsmith took over the direction and operations of the project. The project develops and evaluates techniques for increasing reproductive output
 of wild macaws, expanding our knowledge of macaw nesting behavior, increasing our understanding of the complexities of clay lick use, tracking macaw movements through satellite telemetry, and evaluating tourism as a method of protecting macaws and their natural habitats.

African Wildlife Conservation: Genomics, Genetics, & Health Project

Tambopata Macaw Project (Peru)

Students finish this experience with a new found appreciation for the role of veterinarians in large landscape wildlife conservation medicine and return to the United States. with newly developed skills to apply to wildlife health and sustainability issues across Texas. Wildlife experts guide participants through activities including animal restraint, administering drugs, field surgery, and darting. Other experiential learning can include interaction with crocodiles, buffalo, and rhinos.

Organizations

International Veterinary Student Association (IVSA) The IVSA benefits animals and people worldwide by harnessing the potential and dedication of veterinary students to promote the international application of veterinary skills, education, and knowledge. With members all over the world, IVSA is constantly seeking to establish links
with non-member countries to encourage the exchange of values and ideas.

Christian Veterinary Fellowship (CVF) The CVF is a student organization that joins members’ faith with serving others through veterinary medicine. Students have traveled to Haiti, Honduras, Mongolia, and Uganda. Through the CVF, students apply their knowledge and skills under the mentorship of veterinarians who are active in the profession on a global scale. Possible work includes spaying and neutering animals, deworming ruminants, and educating local children on animal husbandry and public health.

Tambopata Macaw Project (Peru)

2016 CVM Annual Report • 27


ONE HEALTH INITIATIVE Modern society is faced with grand challenges that include human health epidemics, such as zoonotic pandemics, food security, changing climate, growth of populations, and increased urbanization. One Health is the approach to addressing societal needs through advances in science, technology, and translational research emerging from interdisciplinary programs that span college and departmental boundaries. The College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences (CVM) advances the The Texas A&M University One Health grand challenge through embodiment of a unifying theme for healthy humans, animals, and the environment. Texas A&M University is in a unique position shared by few other institutions in having the full spectrum of expertise and resources of the social sciences including law, business, education, policy, etc., working in concert with the full spectrum of life and natural sciences, including agriculture, veterinary medicine, human medicine, public health, geosciences, etc. The One Health Initiative (http:// onehealth.tamu.edu) builds on the strength of the university, the State of Texas, and national and international partnerships allowing for discovery, learning, and research.

One Health Research Training Programs •

A One Health societal need is accurate diagnosis of cattle disease lesions in resource-poor communities near Mpwapwa, Tanzania. A potential innovative diagnostic solution uses phone app technology. (Left: Dr. Rosina C. Krecek; Right: Dr. Isaac Mengele) (Photo courtesy of A. Arenas)

• •

“Bench to Shop” is a collaborative international biorisk management training program, which was awarded a grant of $1.3 million from the United States Department of Homeland Security Science and Technology Directorate. This training program takes research to technology transition and commercialization in select agent and transboundary animal diseases (http://vetmed.tamu.edu/ benchtoshop). A competitive selection process selected the first cohort of eight next generation scientists from the United States and South Africa. The Grand Challenge Interdisciplinary Research Final Report titled “Texas A&M One Health Grand Challenge Research Initiative: 12-Month Final Report of Five Seed Grants” was submitted to the Texas A&M University Council of Deans. The Center of Excellence in Genomics of Animal, Human, and Plant Pests advanced proposals that resulted in funding for sequencing instrumentation. The Texas A&M Aggie Research Scholars and Aggie Research Leadership Program facilitated endorsement of the One Health and Leadership approach of this program by the CVM. The One Health CVM Summer Veterinary Medical Scientist Research Training Program awarded full scholarships to two next generation students from the CVM and the Texas A&M University School of Public Health. The One Health Research Student Travel Awards were awarded to eleven nextgeneration scientists across six Texas A&M University colleges and schools. These awards fund presentation of research findings at scientific conferences.

One Health Educational Programs •

The One Health Learning Community: Fifty-six undergraduates from six Texas A&M University colleges and schools (veterinary medicine, human medicine, public health, pharmacy, agriculture, and engineering) are enrolled, and seven colleges contributed to the curriculum development.

One Health Outreach Programs •

A One Health societal need is accurate diagnosis of the arthropod vectors of Chagas disease, which is key to unraveling the transmission. Dr Rachel Curtis-Robles is identifying insects. (Photo courtesy of G. Hamer) 28 • 2016 CVM Annual Report

National and International Outreach: Twenty-one invited seminars, lectures, and presentations promoted Texas A&M One Health Initiative research, education, and outreach nationally and internationally. Interdisciplinary Events: Eleven events were co-branded as Texas A&M One Health Initiative events, including the October 2015 Stress Symposium and the October 2016 Sex Symposium with the Texas A&M Institute for Genome Sciences and Society (TIGSS). One Health Survey: A university-wide survey was implemented to a stratified sample of 80,000 faculty, staff, and students to identify activities and successes.

Texas A&M One Health Institute •

The One Health Strategic Plan Task Force included five faculty appointed from three colleges (College of Agriculture & Life Sciences, College of Medicine, and the CVM) and produced a proposed concept for a Texas A&M One Health Institute.


EQUINE INITIATIVE The Equine Initiative is a collaboration between the College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences (CVM) and the College of Agriculture & Life Sciences. As a gateway to equine education, research, outreach, and services at Texas A&M, the Equine Initiative utilizes the expertise of the CVM and the Department of Animal Science, as well as contributions from colleges across campus, to create a program that will educate the industry’s future leaders, as well as generate research and veterinary medical care that will improve the industry and the care and welfare of the horse.

Major Imperatives •

Four major imperatives have been developed to enhance and improve upon Texas A&M’s existing strengths to facilitate the vision of the Equine Initiative. These imperatives are: curriculum enhancement; outreach, engagement, and expansion; facility construction; and partnership development.

Notable Highlights •

In 2014, Texas A&M celebrated the grand opening of the Thomas G. Hildebrand, DVM ’56 Equine Complex. The $33 million facility is the first phase of a planned $80 million capital project of the Equine Initiative.

The complex provides support for teaching, research, extension, and outreach initiatives dedicated to equine programs. These premier facilities also positively influence the recruitment and retention of the best faculty and students.

The campus-wide resource that is the Equine Complex is also home to the Texas A&M NCAA Equestrian Team and the cross-country course for the Texas A&M Track Team.

The Equine Initiative continued their international educational efforts with seminars in Paraguay, Costa Rica, Uruguay, and Argentina supported by the American Quarter Horse Foundation (AQHF).

The first Master of Equine Industry Management cohort will graduate in May 2017.

The Thomas G. Hildebrand, DVM ’56 Equine Complex held or scheduled nearly 250 events with more than 30 thousand participants in 2016. This does not include equestrian and cross-country meets.

Phase II construction will begin in 2017. Included in this phase will be a new nutrition research facility and possibly a new reproduction teaching facility, as well as pastures and paddocks.

Recognizing his contributions to the western lifestyle in Texas, Dr. Jim Heird, Coordinator of the Equine Initiative and the Dr. Glenn Blodgett Equine Chair, is a 2017 inductee of the Texas Cowboy Hall of Fame.

Equine Initiative Development Committee member, Dr. H.B. “Woody” Bartlett was awarded the 2016 Zoetis–AQHA Best Remuda Award for worldwide recognition on outstanding ranch remuda with the Bartlett Ranch. Equine Development Committee member Dr. Charles W. "Doc" Graham ’53 received a 2016 Distinguished Alumnus Award from Texas A&M University.

The Equine Complex hosts many events throughout the year.

“Dash for Cash” Statue at Sunset

Dr. Jim Heird, Texas Cowboy Hall of Fame 2017 Inductee

The Thomas G. Hildebrand, DVM ’56 Equine Complex is a campus-wide resource for events.

Dr. Charles W. “Doc” Graham ‘53 2016 CVM Annual Report • 29


RESEARCH Excellence in research at the College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences (CVM) is partly evident from the millions of dollars obtained annually in extramural funding by our faculty members. For example, our faculty members are lead investigators on the following projects: 1) The 2014 National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS) Center for Translational Environmental Health Research grant that is a collaboration among Texas A&M University, Baylor College of Medicine, and the University of Houston; 2) The ongoing United States Department of Agriculture–Agriculture and Food Research Initiative (USDA–AFRI) $9.2 million animal health grant; and 3) The $4.2 million National Institutes of Health (NIH) National Center for Advancing Translation Sciences (NCATS) Texas A&M Tissue Chip Validation (TEX-VAL) Center grant.

Dr. Scott Dindot and students

Dr. Ken Muneoka

The CVM now has three NIH training grants including two T-32 training grants, one in Comparative Biomedical Research Training for Veterinarians and a second in Regulatory Science in Environmental Health and Toxicology, plus a T-35 training grant that supports the summer Veterinary Medical Student Research Training Program (VMSRTP). Similarly, CVM investigators have obtained significant funding from the NIH, USDA, National Science Foundation (NSF), Department of Defense (DOD), Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), multiple private foundations, and the State of Texas during recent years. Another important measure of research excellence is reflected in the publication of our research in high-impact international journals in veterinary medicine and biomedical sciences. Some of this work has been featured on the cover of journals like Nature, Science, Genomics, and Genome Research. Our research focus is on improving disease resistance in animals, increasing their productivity, enhancing their reproductive ability, and developing cures for human and animal diseases including cancer, heart disease, neurological diseases, and reproductive diseases through basic, translational, and pre-clinical trial-based research.

2016 Total Research Expenditures Texas A&M

National Average

Colleges of Veterinary Medicine $0

$20,000,000

$40,000,000

Funding

30 • 2016 CVM Annual Report

$60,000,000

$80,000,000


RESEARCH Annual research expenditures at the CVM have grown steadily, reaching $30.5 million in 2016. This is due to collaborative discovery and innovation in basic, applied, and translational research, as well as highly successful recruiting of both young and established investigators. These researchers have competed successfully for new individual and interdisciplinary grants totaling over $29.8 million in extramural funding this past year.

Veterinary Medical Student Research Training Program (VMSRTP) •

The VMSRTP introduces first- and second-year veterinary students from Texas A&M and other colleges of veterinary medicine to research by giving them handson experience in research laboratories during the summer. Approximately 16–18 veterinary students per year participate thanks to funding provided by awards from the NIH, the Merial Veterinary Scholars Program, the Texas Veterinary Medical Foundation (TVMF), the William & Doris Klemm Fellowship, and by the CVM.

CVM Signature Research Programs Signature prorams are based upon preeminence, expertise, critical mass, and impact. They are: • Biomedical Genomics • Cardiovascular Sciences • Infectious Diseases & Biodefense • Neuroscience • Reproductive Biology • Toxicology, Oncology, & Environmental Health Sciences • Veterinary Clinical Research

From left: Drs. Threadgill, Rusyn, and Chiu

Interdisciplinary Graduate Degree Programs • • • •

Toxicology Ecology & Evolutionary Biology Genetics Neuroscience

2016 Research Expenditures by Funding Source USDA 6%

EPA 6%

Dr. Katrin Hinrichs and students

Industry/ Private 16%

State 44%

NIH 20%

Other Non-Federal 4%

Other Federal 4%

Dr. Heather Wilson-Robles 2016 CVM Annual Report • 31


VETERINARY INTEGRATIVE BIOSCIENCES Veterinary Integrative Biosciences (VIBS) carries out teaching, research, and service across a wide spectrum of biosciences. Biomedical science represents a vital component of the foundation of medical knowledge and includes investigation at molecular, cellular, organismal, and population levels. The faculty teach anatomy and public health courses in the DVM curriculum, as well as core and elective courses in the undergraduate and graduate curricula. VIBS is home to one of the few programs in science and technology journalism in the country. Faculty and students are engaged in biomedical genetics, neuroscience, reproductive biology, toxicology, epidemiology, and public health. Additionally, through various outreach programs and services, VIBS department members engage and inform local, regional, and international communities. Research in VIBS is predominantly funded by competitive extramural grants from the National Institutes of Health (NIH), with additional funding from the Department of Defense, Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), US Department of Agriculture (USDA), National Science Foundation (NSF), and private foundations. Research expenditures by VIBS faculty from June 2015 through May 2016 were $6.1 million.

New Faculty Dr. Leif Andersson, Professor of Genetics, Foreign Member of the US National Academy of Sciences and Wolf Prize winner Dr. Keri Norman, Assistant Professor of Epidemiology

Faculty Awards/Activities International & National •

Elected to the Board of Directors of the Society for the Study of Reproduction (SSR): Dr. Greg Johnson Served as Chair of the Board of Regents of the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine (ACVIM): Dr. Joe Kornegay Chaired the “Mechanistic and other relevant data” subgroup of the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) Monographs on the Evaluation of Carcinogenic Risks to Humans. Volume 116, Lyon, France: Dr. Ivan Rusyn

Provisional Patents •

US Provisional Patent for a nervous system peptide, Lv peptide: Dr. Gladys Ko US Provisional Patent for an intervention for traumatic brain injury: Dr. Jane Welsh

Dr. Weston Porter was appointed as a member of the NIH ICER Study Section. Drs. Ivan Rusyn, Joe Arosh, Dana Gaddy, Gladys Ko, and Evelyn TiffanyCastiglioni continued to serve as reviewers for NIH and NIOSH study sections. Drs. Sarah Hamer and Vaishali Katju served as grant reviewers for the NSF.

Editorial Assignments: •

32 • 2016 CVM Annual Report

Research and Scholarship •

Grant Review Panels •

Dr. Leif Andersson

the journal Muscle & Nerve. About 20 faculty continued to serve as editors, associate editors or editorial board members of professional journals, including Environmental Health Perspectives, Toxicological Sciences, Environment International, Toxicology & Applied Pharmacology, NeuroToxicology, Genome, BMC Genomics, BMC Evolutionary Biology, Preventive Veterinary Medicine, Reproduction, Reproductive Biology, Biochemical Journal, Breast Cancer Research, Reproductive Biology and Endocrinology, Endocrinology, International Journal of Developmental Neuroscience, ChronoPhysiology and Therapy, Science Editor, and others.

Elected President of Advances in Mineral Metabolism (2017-2019): Dr. Dana Gaddy Travel grant from the Society of Toxicology (SOT), SOT Carcinogenesis Specialty Section Graduate Student Award, and Best Poster Prize at the Epigenetics and Environmental Origins of Cancer Meeting in Lyon, France: Grace Chappell, PhD student of Dr. Ivan Rusyn 2016 AAVP/Merck Outstanding Graduate Student Award: Rachel Curtis-Robles, PhD student of Dr. Sarah Hamer

Dr. William Murphy was named Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Heredity. Dr. Joe Kornegay was named to the editorial board of

Dr. Ivan Rusyn was awarded a $4.2 M U24 NIH grant to develop the Texas A&M Tissue Chip Validation Center. He also leads a new $1.3 M 5-year NIH T32 training grant in regulatory science and toxicology. Drs. Weston Porter, Sakhila Banu, Joe Arosh, and Monique Rijnkles were awarded 4 new R01 grants from the NIH. Several other faculty received NIH R21, USDA, CDC, and other sources. Dr. Barbara Gastel (with Dr. Robert Day, co-author) published the 8th edition of How to Write and Publish a Scientific Paper (Greenwood Press). Drs. Terry Clark (WSU), Louise Abbott, and Lynn Ruoff published Guide to Dissection of the Horse and Ruminants, 2nd edition (Bluedoor Press).


VETERINARY PATHOBIOLOGY Veterinary Pathobiology (VTPB) focuses on mechanisms of disease including host/ pathogen interactions, ecology of antimicrobial resistance, genetics of disease susceptibility and resistance, wildlife diseases, and conservation genetics. Scientists and students investigate the mechanisms of health and disease at the molecular, cellular, organismal, and population levels. Core laboratories housed in VTPB (DNA Technologies, Molecular Genomics, Bioinformatics, and Flow Cytometry) provide research support to scientists in the college and across the campus. Extramural funding for research in VTPB comes from the National Institutes of Health, the US Department of Agriculture, the US Department of Defense, the National Science Foundation, and many private foundations. Several faculty members are working directly with pharmaceutical companies to bring discoveries to the market to benefit animal and human health. Faculty members teach courses to undergraduate, graduate, and veterinary medical students. Residency programs are availalbe in Anatomic Pathology, Clinical Pathology, and Comparative Medicine. Members of the VTPB faculty also serve the Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital (VMTH), providing diagnostic support in Clinical Pathology, Necropsy, Surgical Pathology, Dermatopathology, Osteopathology, Clinical Microbiology/Immunology, and Clinical Parasitology. The Dermatopathology and Osteopathology services also accept samples from veterinarians throughout North America. Our Histopathology/Immunopathology Laboratory supports the clinical diagnostic laboratories, as well as research laboratories across the Texas A&M campus.

New Faculty • •

Dr. Ramesh Vemulapalli, Department Head Dr. Tracy Vemulapalli, Director, Comparative Medicine Residency Training Program Dr. Unity Jeffery, Assistant Professor, Clinical Pathology

Retired Faculty • •

• •

• •

Award (Annual Conference of the Poultry Science Association): Dr. Luc Berghman

University •

Dr. Patricia Holman Dr. Surya Waghela

Faculty Awards/Activities National 2016 AAVMC Public Policy Faculty Fellows: Dr. Jeffrey Musser Dual Purpose Dual Benefit NIH/USDA grant (“Improved Live Attenuated Brucella Vaccines to Reduce Human Diseases”): Dr. Thomas Ficht AAVMC Excellence in Research Award: Dr. James Womack Morris Animal Foundation Student Scholar Grant: Dr. Donald Brightsmith UC Davis 2016 Alumni Achievement Award: Dr. Linda Logan 2016 Zoetis Fundamental Science

Dr. Gwen Levine (right)

Patent and Innovation 2016 Awards Luncheon (Texas A&M Office of Technology Commercialization): Dr. Sanjay Reddy Patent and Innovation 2016 Awards Luncheon (Texas A&M Office of Technology Commercialization): Dr. Blanca Lupiani Patent and Innovation 2016 Awards Luncheon (Texas A&M Office of Technology Commercialization): Dr. Luc Berghman

Dr. Sabrina Clark

College •

Bridges Teaching and Service Award (CVM Honors Convocation): Dr. Gwen Levine VMTH Clinical Service Award (CVM Honors Convocation): Dr. Raquel Rech

College •

An Introduction to Veterinary Immunology. 10th Edition. Oct. 2016. W.B. Saunders Company/Elsevier: Dr. Ian Tizard

Dr. Raquel Rech (right) 2016 CVM Annual Report • 33


VETERINARY PHYSIOLOGY & PHARMACOLOGY Veterinary Physiology and Pharmacology (VTPP) is a multidisciplinary basic science department that seeks to shape the future of research and education in human and veterinary medicine. Research in VTPP is multidisciplinary and recognized internationally for excellence in toxicology, reproductive and developmental biology, cardiovascular biology, regenerative sciences and bone biology. VTPP is a leader in education and research and takes great pride in our exceptionally talented and interactive team of faculty, students, and staff. The high level of cooperation among the various departments within the College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences (CVM) and the Texas A&M University scientific community produces an unparalleled research environment. VTPP faculty participate in a number of the leading research centers both on and off the Texas A&M University campus. The department houses the Interdisciplinary Faculty of Toxicology, the Center for Cell and Organ Biotechnology, the Reproductive Sciences Laboratory, and the Michael E. DeBakey Institute for Cardiovascular Science and Biomedical Devices. VTPP faculty support a diverse group of undergraduate, graduate, and postdoctoral trainees. The multidisciplinary and collaborative nature of VTPP faculty provides a rich environment that drives our commitment to excellence in a highly interactive, collaborative, and multidisciplinary teaching and research environment.

New Faculty •

Faculty Awards/Activities International •

Honorary Degree from Queen’s University, Canada: Dr. Stephen Safe

National •

Dr. James Herman (left) •

Dr. Diarra Williams (left) & Dr. Larry J. Suva (right)

34 • 2016 CVM Annual Report

Dr. Carly Patterson, Clinical Assistant Professor

2 RO1AAO 18282-06, titled “The role of oxidative stress in alcohol induced osteopenia” has been recommended for a Method to Extend Research in Time (MERIT) Award by the Advisory Council of the National Institute of Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism: Dr. Larry Suva NSF Graduate Student Fellowship Award: Karis Tang-Quan (Dr. Lakisha Tate, Mentor) Porter Physiology Development Fellowship: Diarra Williams (Dr. Larry Suva, Mentor) Council Member, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute for Child Health and Human Development: Dr. Ken Muneoka Chair, NIICHD Subcommittee for the National Center for Medical Rehabilitation Research: Dr. Ken Muneoka President, Evidence Based Veterinary Medicine Association: Dr. Virginia Fajt President-Elect, American Academy of Veterinary Pharmacology & Therapeutics: Dr. Virginia Fajt

Chair, AAVMC/APLU Antimicrobial Resistance Core Competencies Working Group: Dr. Virginia Fajt Chair of Board of Directors, American Association of Bovine Practitioners Foundation: Dr. Virginia Fajt

University •

University Presidential Professor for Teaching Excellence: Dr. James Herman Excellence in Innovation–Texas A&M Technology & Commercialization: Dr. Stephen Safe TOP Grant–Aggies Commit to Undergraduate Research & Graduate Leadership: Dr. Christopher Quick Partners in Learning Award of Excellence: Dr. Cristine Heaps

College • • • • •

John H. Milliff Teaching Award: Dr. Shannon Washburn Juan Carlos Robles Emanuelli Teaching Award: Dr. Jayanth Ramadoss Outstanding Young Faculty Research: Dr. Jayanth Ramadoss 2016 Outstanding CVM Alumni Award: Dr. Duane C. Kraemer George Edds Award for Outstanding Graduate Student: Yating Cheng (Dr. Stephen Safe, Mentor) Outstanding Non-Thesis Masters Student Award: Raine Lunde (Dr. Jayanth Ramadoss, Mentor) George Bush Foundation Travel Grant: Jessica Israel (Dr. Cristine Heaps, Mentor)


LARGE ANIMAL CLINICAL SCIENCES Large Animal Clinical Sciences (VLCS) develops excellent large animal veterinarians through outstanding teaching; delivers outstanding veterinary care to our clients’ large animals through our expertly staffed hospital services; and creates, disseminates, and clinically applies impactful knowledge through research and continuing education in large animals. Faculty researchers are recognized leaders in the fields of stallion reproduction, equine infectious diseases, and equine regenerative medicine, and their results have translated from the laboratory to clinical application in patients. Students benefit from the truly unique, experiential learning environment, while providing veterinary care to over 100,000 livestock, poultry, and dogs at the Texas Department of Criminal Justice (TDCJ) agricultural units. The department offers one-year internships, for newly graduated veterinarians, and two- or three-year residency programs in several clinical disciplines for veterinarians seeking advanced training and board certification: • Internships in Large Animal Medicine and Surgery and Equine Field Service • Diagnostic Imaging (Radiology) Residency • Large Animal Surgery Residency • Large Animal Medicine Residency • Theriogenology Residency

New Faculty

State

Dr. Michelle Coleman, Assistant Professor, Large Animal Internal Medicine Dr. Dicky Dee Griffin, Clinical Professor, Food Animal Production Medicine Dr. Cristobal Navas de Solis, Clinical Assistant Professor, Large Animal Internal Medicine Dr. Sarah Sampson, Clinical Assistant Professor, Large Animal Surgery/ Equine Sports Medicine Imaging Dr. Canaan Whitfield-Cargile, Assistant Professor, Large Animal Surgery

Faculty Awards/Activities National •

American Association of Equine Practitioners Foundation Past Presidents’ Research Fellow Award: Dr. Canaan Whitfield-Cargile American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine, Distinguished Service Award: Dr. Allen Roussel American College of Veterinary Surgeons, Resident Clinical Presentation Award: Dr. Kati Glass American College of Theriogenologists/Society for Theriogenology, Bartlett Award for Lifetime Achievement in Theriogenology: Dr. Dickson Varner

Texas Veterinary Medical Association Teaching Award: Dr. Jay Griffin Texas Veterinary Medical Foundation, Johnson Memorial Award for Surgery: Dr. Kati Glass

College •

• •

Association of Former Students University Level Distinguished Achievement Award in Extension, Outreach, Continuing Education and Professional Development: Dr. Wesley Bissett Graduate Student Platform Presentation Competition, First Place: Joana Rocha Graduate Student Platform Presentation Competition, People’s Choice Award: Joana Rocha Outstanding Mentorship Award, Blinn College Veterinary Technician School: Dr. Kevin Washburn Richard H. Davis Teaching Award: Dr. Philippa Gibbons Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital Clinical (VMTH) Service Award: Dr. Michelle Coleman Zoetis Distinguished Veterinary Teacher Award: Dr. Glennon Mays

Dr. Allen Roussel

Dr. Dickson Varner (left)

Dr. Kati Glass (left) 2016 CVM Annual Report • 35


SMALL ANIMAL CLINICAL SCIENCES Small Animal Clinical Sciences (VSCS) has three major missions: innovative education, leading-edge veterinary care, and clinical research and therapeutic trials. Each of these activities is intended to improve the quality of life for companion animals and their owners. The VSCS department provides clinical education in canines, felines, and exotics. The department’s researchers study health issues common to both humans and animals in areas such as cardiology, gastroenterology, neurology, orthopedics, aging, and oncology. In 2016, VSCS developed space for clinical trials and biobanking, received two new endowed chair positions, and focused on innovative teaching through collaborations with the Center for Teaching Excellence, the Center for Educational Technologies, and through departmental grants for scholarship of teaching.

Orthopedics

Ophthalmology

Internal Medicine

36 • 2016 CVM Annual Report

VSCS offers the following one-year internships and three-year residency programs: • Internal Medicine Residency • Internship in Anesthesiology • Neurology Residency • Internship in Internal Medicine • Oncology Residency • Internship in Surgery • Surgery Residency • Internship in Zoo Medicine • Zoological Medicine Residency • Cardiology Residency • Emergency and Critical Care Residency New Faculty • Dr. Kate Creevy, Associate Professor, Internal Medicine • Dr. Sonya Wesselowski, Clinical Assistant Professor, Cardiology • Dr. Christine Rutter, Clinical Assistant Professor, Emergency & Critical Care • Dr. Nick Jeffery, Professor, Neurology/Neurosurgery

Faculty Awards/Activities International • Best Short Scientific Communication, FECAVA Eurocongress: Dr. Jan Suchodolski

College • Katherine and Rebecca Rochelle Chair in Oncology: Dr. Mike Deveau • Dr. Mark Morris Chair in Gastroenterology & Nutrition: Dr. Joerg Steiner • Richard H. Davis Teaching Award: Dr. Johanna Heseltine • VMTH Clinical Service Award: Dr. Medora Pashmakova • Association of Former Students College-Level Award (Teaching): Dr. Ashley Saunders • Zoetis Award for Research Excellence: Dr. Jan Suchodolski • Outstanding Research Leader Award: Dr. Jan Suchodolski • TVMA Faculty Achievement Award (Research): Dr. Heather Wilson-Robles

National • AAVMC One Health Scholar: Dr. Ashley Saunders • Best Research Presentation, Veterinary Orthopedic Society: Dr. W. Brian Saunders • Dr. Paul Dice Memorial Award, American College of Veterinary Ophthalmologists: Dr. Erin Scott • Member, Texas Task Force 1 (TEEX): Dr. Deb Zoran • American Humane Association Hero Veterinarian Award—Top 5 Nominee: Dr. Heather Wilson-Robles • American Men and Women of Science Listing: Dr. Bonnie Beaver

Recognition of Contribution to the Discipline of Veterinary Behavior, American College of Veterinary Behaviorists: Dr. Bonnie Beaver

University • Association of Former Students University-Level Award (Teaching): Dr. Ashley Saunders


VETERINARY MEDICAL TEACHING HOSPITAL The Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital (VMTH) at the Texas A&M College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences (CVM) provides compassionate care for animals and the highest standards of veterinary medical education. It is the first teaching hospital to receive the prestigious American Animal Hospital Association (AAHA) Referral Practice Accreditation.

Clinical Services • • • • •

Treated 20,493 patients in the Small Animal Hospital, and 7,292 patients in the Large Animal Hospital Redesigned the Small Animal Anesthesia Service to be more efficient and responsive in order to better meet the needs of the clinical faculty and our patients Collaborated with clinical departments to recruit strategically relevant clinical faculty in support of teaching and service missions Launched the Equine Sports Medicine & Imaging Service Launched the Ophthalmology Service

Ophthalmology

Client Services • • • • • •

Continued plan to add additional Client Liaison representatives in Small Animal Hospital to improve client experience Planned to add Client Liaisons to Large Animal Hospital Completed substantial renovations to the Small Animal Hospital lobby Planned to renovate Large Animal Hospital lobby in FY17 Expanded ability to accept payments from clients for after-hours admissions and treatment of patients Implemented a VMTH uniform policy so that clients (and staff) can easily identify doctors, technicians, and support staff

Marketing & Outreach Projects • • • •

• •

Launched first referring veterinarian satisfaction survey Delivered first VMTH Provider Directory to referring veterinarians Continued electronic client feedback system (over 15,000 received to date) Participated in community outreach events including (but not limited to): -- Southwest Veterinary Symposium (SWVS) conference in Ft. Worth -- American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA) Conference in San Antonio -- International Veterinary Emergency & Critical Care Society (IVECCS) Symposium in Grapevine -- World Series of Dog Shows in Houston -- Happy Healthy Horse program featuring Chris Cox -- National Cutting Horse Association World Championship in Ft. Worth Community Service -- Meals on Wheels -- FiFi’s Home Continued collaboration with Blinn College to provide hands-on learning opportunities for second-year veterinary technician students Internal marketing: -- CVM Staff Awards (five recipients) -- Clinical Service Awards (three recipients) -- Employee of the Month program (twelve recipients) -- Terry Stiles Service Award (one recipient)

Small Animal Hospital

Ruminant Service

Zoological Medicine 2016 CVM Annual Report • 37


VETERINARY MEDICAL TEACHING HOSPITAL Shaping tomorrow’s veterinarians while providing an unmatched patient and client experience is the hospital’s mission. The entire team of clinicians, staff, and veterinary students are committed to providing state-of-the-art care and making the VMTH a model for excellence in the State of Texas and beyond.

Small Animal Hospital The Small Animal Hospital is home to 16 services. The doctors are leaders in their fields and the collaborative approach used to manage each case provides patients with unmatched comprehensive treatment. Patients have access to the full spectrum of veterinary care­—from annual preventive medicine through the Primary Care Service to comprehensive cancer treatment through the Oncology Service.

Large Animal Hospital The 12 services of the Large Animal Hospital provide the best medicine available for horses, cattle, goats, sheep, swine, and camelids. The Large Animal Hospital is home to world-class veterinarians, technicians, and support staff who work as a team to be hands-on mentors to veterinary medical students. Patients receive the total package of veterinary care both in the hospital through a variety of clinical services and at home or on-farm through Equine and Food Animal Field Services. FY 2016 Clinical Service Activity: Large Animal Hospital

FY 2016 Clinical Service Activity: Small Animal Hospital

Clinical Service Name

Clinical Service Name

Income

Caseload

Income

Caseload

Emergency and Critical Care

$416,857

159

Cardiology

$794,082

874

Equine Community Practice

$271,262

521

Critical Care

$212,169

126

Equine Field Service

$241,693

1,114

Dental

$322,864

409

Equine Internal Medicine

$787,391

490

Dermatology

$251,994

550

Equine Sports Medicine & Imaging

$451,591

385

Emergency

$3,346,522

4,156

Equine Orthopedic Surgery

$1,070,122

621

General Surgery

$292,245

475

Equine Soft Tissue Surgery

$644,369

429

Internal Medicine I

$1,361,558

1,388

Equine Theriogenology

$394,979

268

Internal Medicine II

$957,028

1,075

$52,234

346

Neurology

$2,236,640

1,440

Food Animal Field Services

$108,017

250

Oncology

$1,479,980

1,902

Food Animal Medicine & Surgery

$667,563

1,619

Ophthalmology

$177,305

484

$30,154

1,090

Orthopedic Surgery

$1,667,858

1,221

$5,136,232

7,292

Primary Care

$1,162,747

4,311

$32,547

231

$1,544,228

867

$299,762

983

$635

1

$16,140,164

20,493

Farrier

TDCJ Totals

Rehabilitation Soft Tissue Surgery Zoological Medicine Other Totals

VMTH Revenue + College Support Area

FY2012

FY2013

FY2014

FY2015

FY2016

Large Animal Hospital

$3,274,152

$3,738,209

$3,663,623

$4,253,080

$4,450,376

Small Animal Hospital

$10,104,491

$11,123,191

$11,991,528

$13,270,547

$14,533,673

$256,422

$176,772

$169,442

$150,382

$169,983

Total Revenue

$13,635,065

$15,038,172

$15,824,593

$17,674,009

$19,154,032

Total Revenue + College Support

$16,373,084

$17,776,191

$18,812,374

$20,814,399

$22,512,252

Other

38 • 2016 CVM Annual Report


VETERINARY MEDICAL TEACHING HOSPITAL Small Animal Hospital Caseload* by Species

Large Animal Hospital Caseload* by Species

Exotics/Avian 5% Feline 15%

Bovine 21%

Equine 79%

Canine 80%

Hospital Caseload*

Number of Visits

30,000

Small Animal Caseload

Large Animal Caseload

Total Hospital Caseload

25,000 20,000 15,000 10,000 5,000 0

2006

2007

2008

2009

2010

2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

2013

2014

2015

2016

Year

Hospital Visits

Number of Visits

30,000

Self-Referred Visits

Referral Visits

Total Visits

25,000 20,000 15,000 10,000 5,000 0

2006

2007

2008

2009

2010

2011

2012

Year *Caseload: Each discharged case record is counted as one case. A case record may have multiple animals. Example: a mare/foal, litter, or herd are on a single case record. 2016 CVM Annual Report • 39


DIAGNOSTIC IMAGING & CANCER TREATMENT CENTER The Diagnostic Imaging & Cancer Treatment Center (DICTC) at the college is a stateof-the-art facility with diagnostic and treatment capabilities never before possible in one location. The facility is fully equipped with a TomoTherapy unit, a CT Scanner, and a 3-Tesla MRI unit. Over the last several years, the college has built a powerful team of radiologists and clinicians who are nationally recognized leaders in MRI technology. Why is imaging research and innovation important for the veterinary patients? Simply put, innovation enhances day-to-day image interpretation and recognition of new diseases. Innovations in the area of imaging have the potential to directly and immediately effect treatment. An important component to the MRI program is the center’s team-based approach. It is not a stand alone MRI center or a single clinician rendering diagnoses. Rather, each image is reviewed by a group of radiologists and clinical faculty. This ensures that the appropriate area is imaged, that the correct sequences are run, and that a diagnosis is achieved in order to inform the best possible treatment.

Diagnostic image 2016 Caseload by Species and Therapy Species

TomoTherapy treatment

CT Scanner

MRI Unit

TomoTherapy

Totals

Canine

636

503

95

1,237

Equine

62

190

43

295

Feline

68

19

12

99

Exotic

24

5

1

30

Caprine

2

q

1

4

Ovine

1

0

0

0

Avian

18

q

0

19

Totals

811

722

152

1,684

The MRI at the center is used to diagnose exotic species.

Dr. Michael Deveau, radiation oncologist

40 • 2016 CVM Annual Report


VETERINARY EMERGENCY TEAM The Texas A&M Veterinary Emergency Team (VET) has continued to serve our state and nation every day through deployments of the nation’s largest and most sophisticated veterinary response team in the country. The Texas A&M VET provides service-oriented educational opportunities for veterinary medical students through collaborations with Texas agencies and jurisdictions and builds regional preparedness and response capabilities through partnerships with other Texas A&M University System universities and private-sector veterinary medical professionals. The team is also involved in the development of a federal consortium focused on enhancing federal emergency response capabilities and homeland security. These efforts have had a real and meaningful impact on our state’s citizens, their animals, and our students. In 2016, the Texas A&M VET deployed to Fort Bend and Brazoria Counties as a result of historic flooding along the Brazos River. The team triaged and treated more than 700 animals and worked in collaboration with Texas Task Force 1, the Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service, and the Texas A&M Forest Service to assist these communities as they endured this crisis. These efforts included numerous senior veterinary medical students and were consistent with the traditions of service that is at the heart of the Texas A&M University System—ensuring that this foundation of selfless service will live on in our graduates.

Collaborations The VET has and will continue to work corroboratively with other university entities, state and federal agencies, other colleges of veterinary medicine, and non-governmental agencies to resolve animal suffering and to better prepare communities to prevent and respond on behalf of animals when disaster strikes. This approach has led to the VET's national reputation for excellence in disaster preparedness and response. Key collaborators include: • • • • • •

U.S. Department of Defense Texas Cities and Counties Texas Department of State Health Services Texas Division of Emergency Management Texas State Guard Texas Animal Health Commission

• • • • •

Texas Task Force 1 Texas Veterinary Medical Association Texas A&M AgriLife Extension and Research Texas A&M Engineering & Extension Texas A&M Forest Service

• • •

Supporting Texas During Disasters •

Roberts

Counties – Deployments Counties – Deployments & Emergency Planning Counties – Emergency Planning Parmer

Cities – Emergency Planning as of Sept. 2016 Motley

• Rockwall

University of Florida College of Veterinary Medicine Oklahoma State University College of Veterinary Medicine Virginia-Maryland Regional College of Veterinary Medicine

Providing veterinary medical care and protecting animal welfare during times of disaster Protecting our state and nation’s food supply Reuniting families and their pets after disaster strikes Keeping canine and equine members of search and rescue teams on mission

St. Augustine Angelina

Washington

Presidio

Kendall

Liberty Harris

Chambers

Brazoria

Calhoun

This map of Texas details VET deployments as well as counties and cities where the team has helped develop emergency preparedness plans for animals.

Kenedy

Decontamination unit in use during the Fort Bend and Brazoria Counties deployment 2016 CVM Annual Report • 41


TEXAS A&M INSTITUTE FOR PRECLINICAL STUDIES The Texas A&M Institute for Preclinical Studies (TIPS) is a one-of-kind laboratory engaging in many collaborative research efforts and incorporating the use of spontaneous animal models into clinical trials of new drugs and devices. Its imaging capabilities rank among the best in the world. Housed within the College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences (CVM), TIPS is uniquely qualified and positioned to conduct medical device and combination product safety studies in large animal models in compliance with the United States Food and Drug Administration’s (FDA) Good Laboratory Practice (GLP) regulations.

TIPS Current Collaborative Projects

Veterinary Biology & Imaging 27%

Human Imaging 5%

Medical Device 68%

TIPS imaging capabilities rank among the best in the world.

Texas A&M Institute for Preclinical Studies 42 • 2016 CVM Annual Report


PARTNERSHIP FOR ENVIRONMENTAL EDUCATION & RURAL HEALTH The Partnership for Environmental Education & Rural Health (PEER) provides multifaceted outreach for science and veterinary medical education. Middle and high school curricula, state and nation-wide video conferencing and webcasts, and presentations to K-12 students stimulate career interest in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM). Beginning in the fall of 2016, the PEER Program started a broadcasting partnership with KAMU-TV. This partnership produces high quality, professional presentations and recordings for K-12 students across the nation as PEER reaches out to rural schools and minority populations in its STEM promotion among youth. The weekly broadcast features STEM and veterinary topics presented by renowned scientists and clinicians and are aligned with state science education standards. These live, interactive presentations were viewed by over 25,000 students from 18 states and two other countries. Each presentation is also recorded in high definition and archived on the PEER YouTube channel for future viewing (https://www.youtube.com/channel/ UCS37rGal0BqXemsqj5BNxdQ).

2015–2016 PEER: By the Numbers New lesson files developed

62

Downloads of curricular materials • 1,995 teachers • 187,118 students impacted

50,323

Downloads/views of science videos

12,609

Students participating in video conferences/webcasts • 609 classes • 29 states

21,740

Teachers receiving PEER newsletter (all 50 states)

34,664

Students participating in FFA state veterinary science clinic & competition for Veterinary Assistant Students attending science/veterinary medicine presentations • 51 states (52% of students were minority and/or economically disadvantaged)

Counties with teachers who downloaded resources from the PEER website from 2006 to 2016.

Dr. Larry Johnson interacts with middle school students.

456 3,322

Middle school PEER visit

Counties with teachers who downloaded resources from the PEER website from May 1, 2015 to April 30, 2016.

2016 CVM Annual Report • 43


CENTER FOR EDUCATIONAL TECHNOLOGIES

CET team hosts technology workshop in Calgary, Canada

Murmur Learner, an innovative, new online module developed by the CET

CET partners with USDA to deliver agricultural training in Pakistan

CET launches StepStone software program for faculty use

44 • 2016 CVM Annual Report

The Center for Educational Technologies (CET) partners with subject matter experts across the College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences (CVM) and around the world to develop technology-enhanced educational programs to meet today’s educational challenges. This past year, the CET team collaborated with 17 CVM faculty to develop a wide variety of innovative learning resources to support both the veterinary medical and biomedical sciences programs. In June 2016, the Center launched its online catalog, allowing veterinary colleges to license our award-winning educational modules for use in their curricula. This year, more than 5,000 veterinary students from across 11 veterinary colleges utilized these learning modules. The center also launched its StepStone software system for use by faculty outside of Texas A&M University. Designed to help faculty develop e-learning resources quickly and easily, StepStone is now being used by faculty at Cornell University and the University of California, Davis to develop e-learning materials to support their veterinary courses. The CET is proud of its efforts to support faculty development both at home and abroad. The CET participated in the Veterinary Educator Collaborative Symposium, held at the University of Calgary in June 2016, where Drs. Jodi Korich, Jordan Tayce, and Lisa Keefe facilitated a 90-minute interactive workshop on technology-enhanced instruction. On campus, the team participated in the college’s Teaching Showcase, held in January 2017, highlighting six educational projects co-developed with faculty across the college. Among the exciting new projects featured were examples of adaptive learning (using computer-aided technology to customize students’ learning experiences) and Web 3.0 technologies (combining hardware and software technologies to allow students to manipulate anatomical models in three-dimensional space). The CET also teamed up with the Center for Teaching Excellence to develop an online module to teach faculty how to design high-impact courses using the Course Design Cycle methodology (available online at http://tamucet.org/resources/). This spring, the CET will exhibit at the Association of American Veterinary Medical Colleges (AAVMC) Annual Conference in Washington, D.C. and the Veterinary Innovation Summit (VIS) to be held at the CVM in April 2017. The center also continues to support the college’s veterinary curriculum review and update initiative as part of the Curriculum Review Planning Team. With the first round of curriculum updates scheduled to roll out in fall 2017, the CET is hard at work to support faculty in the design and development of the first-year curriculum. The CET continues to support agricultural programs in collaboration with the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA). The center is currently engaged in five cooperative agreements, totaling more than $1.2 million. The Sanitary and Phytosanitary Standards project is wrapping up its five-year program to train agricultural officials in Pakistan. Based on the success of this project, the CET is now teaming up with the USDA and the United States Agency for International Development (USAID) to implement this innovative, blended-learning program in developing countries around the world. The course is being translated into Spanish and French and preparations are underway to launch the course in West Africa in 2018. Within the United States, the CET is collaborating with the USDA Emergency Management and Professional Development Services units to develop a series of interactive, online case studies that will provide continuing education opportunities to support foreign animal disease and emerging disease incident investigations to help protect the country’s agriculture system. It has been a busy year for the team at the CET and we are excited to be a part of so many new projects and initiatives. We look forward to continuing to serve the educational needs of the veterinary medical, biomedical sciences, and agricultural communities around the world.


CONTINUING EDUCATION The Office of Continuing Education exists to provide the highest quality postgraduate educational opportunities for veterinarians, veterinary technicians, and the animal-owning public. Our offerings include conferences on patient care and management of horses, food animals, companion animals, exotic pets, and exotic hoofstock. Courses taught by our own world-class faculty experts, along with experts that we invite from around the country and the world, offer the latest in advanced postgraduate veterinary continuing education in state-of-the-art facilities. We host conferences that utilize traditional lecture, interactive sessions, and hands-on laboratory experiences. In FY2016, the Office of Continuing Education held 12 conferences and seminars that were attended by 1,044 veterinarians or technicians and provided a total of 95 hours of continuing education credit. Our goal for the future is to provide more opportunities for more relevant educational experiences that will translate into better care for animal patients and more professional satisfaction for the veterinarians and technicians who care for them. We are particularly excited to move our programs into our brand-new, state-of-the-art educational building. We are also excited to begin to partner with organizations and companies outside of the university to create more relevant and practical advanced educational opportunities.

Cargill Equine Veterinary Nurtition Workshop

FY2016 Continuing Education Conference Report Conference/Seminar

Chair(s)

Dates

Participants

Hours

Emergency Medicine & Critical Care Conference

Dr. Stacy Eckman

October 9, 2015

120

17

Cargill Equine Veterinary Nutrition Workshop

Dr. Jim Ward

October 24, 2015

71

8

Anesthesia & Analgesia Conference

Dr. Elizabeth Martinez

November 20–22, 2015

181

12

Feline Forum

Dr. Audrey Cook

April 22–23, 2016

146

15

22nd Annual Veterinary Technician Conference

Paula Plummer, LVT

April 30–May 1, 2016

301

11

Food Animal Conference

Dr. Brandon Dominguez

June 3–5, 2016

89

17

Canine Conference

Dr. Johanna Heseltine

August 26–28, 2016

136

15

Totals

1,044

95

Food Animal Conference

Canine Conference 2016 CVM Annual Report • 45


CVM/TVMA COLLABORATIVE LEADERSHIP

Eleanor M. Green, DVM, DACVIM, DABVP Carl B. King Dean of Veterinary Medicine

The relationship between the College of Veterinary Medcine & Biomedical Sciences (CVM) and the Texas Veterinary Medical Association (TVMA) is treasured and mutually beneficial. The value of what the TVMA provides our students in the way of support and engagement is immeasurable. • TVMA provides numerous scholarships and other financial assistance to CVM students, as well as their ongoing support of programs such as Open House, the Professional Programs Office, and the American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA) Government Affairs Intern at the AVMA office in Washington, D.C. • TVMA donates numerous items to CVM students, such as stethoscopes (for first-year students), scrubs and a copy of Veterinary Drug Formulary (for second-year students), and surgical scissors (for third-year students). • TVMA sponsors a Veterinary Ethics Program dinner for first-year veterinary students and participating veterinarians in both the fall and spring semesters. • Third-year veterinary medical students have the opportunity to attend a “clinic orientation” meeting with TVMA officers. • Governing bodies are open to student members. Each TVMA committee is open to students. • A third-year veterinary medical student serves as a voting member of the TVMA Board of Directors. • A veterinary medical student serves on the Texas Veterinary Medical Foundation (TVMF) Board of Trustees. • TVMA commits close to $32,000 toward student events and activities, and the TVMF commits approximately $24,500. • TVMA supports the new Texas A&M University System-wide veterinary medical education initiative, “Serving Every Texan Every Day.” The opportunities TVMA members gain from engagement with CVM faculty, staff, and students include: • Opportunities for TVMA members to recruit and retain some of the brightest veterinary medical students to work as externs and associates in their veterinary practices. • Being re-energized as they return to practice, industry, or regulatory work. • The support of CVM faculty—100 percent of which are TVMA members—in various TVMA leadership roles. • Opportunities to give input on curriculum changes and student selection, which lets TVMA members have the ability to point out where the CVM is doing a good job and where it could improve as it molds graduates to become the future of the veterinary medical profession. • Opportunities to participate in the multiple mini interviews used as part of the student selection process, giving TVMA members direct influence on the caliber of veterinary medical students that the CVM admits.

Sam Miller, DVM ’91 2016 TVMA President

46 • 2016 CVM Annual Report


ADMINISTRATION

Eleanor M. Green, DVM, DACVIM, DABVP Carl B. King Dean of Veterinary Medicine

Belinda Hale, MBA Assistant Dean, Finance

Kenita S. Rogers, DVM, MS, DACVIM Executive Associate Dean

Karen Cornell, DVM, PhD, DACVS Associate Dean, Professional Programs

Robert Burghardt, MS, PhD Associate Dean, Research & Graduate Studies

C. Jane Welsh, PhD Assistant Dean, Graduate Studies

Elizabeth Crouch, PhD Assistant Dean, Undergraduate Education

Bo Connell, MBA Assistant Dean, Hospital Operations, Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital

Allen Roussel, MS, DVM, DACVIM Department Head, Large Animal Clinical Sciences

Jonathan Levine, DVM, DACVIM Department Head, Small Animal Clinical Sciences

O.J. “Bubba” Woytek, DVM Assistant Vice President of Development (Texas A&M Foundation)

Ramesh Vemulapalli, MA, PhD Department Head, Veterinary Pathobiology

Misty Skaggs Chief of Staff, Office of the Dean

Evelyn Tiffany-Castiglioni, PhD Associate Dean, Undergraduate Education; Department Head, Veterinary Integrative Biosciences

Rosina “Tammi” C. Krecek, FRSSAf, MS, PhD, MAP, MBA Interim Assistant Dean, One Health

Larry J. Suva, PhD Department Head, Veterinary Physiology & Pharmacology

Megan Palsa, PhD Executive Director of Communications, Media, and Public Relations

2016 CVM Annual Report • 47


College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences Texas A&M University | 4461 TAMU | College Station, TX 77843-4461 979.845.5051 | vetmed.tamu.edu


CVM 2016 Annual Report