2021 - 22 Annual Report

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2021–22 ANNUAL REPORT


CONTENTS VISION, PURPOSE AND STRATEGIC INTENT

3

PRESIDENT’S REPORT

4

CEO’S REPORT

6

FINANCE RISK AND AUDIT CHAIR’S REPORT

8

PROMOTING THE PROFESSION

10

ADVOCATING FOR THE PROFESSION

12

DRIVING QUALITY AND STANDARDS

14

FACILITATING AND PROMOTING EVIDENCE-BASED PRACTICE WITHIN THE PROFESSION

18

FACILITATING PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT OPPORTUNITIES

20

DELIVERING MEMBER VALUE & SUPPORT

24

NURTURING A GREAT ORGANISATION TO BELONG TO

26

RECOGNISING AND REWARDING OUTSTANDING SONOGRAPHERS

28

DIRECTORS’ REPORT

34

FINANCIALS

44

NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

49


VISION, PURPOSE AND STRATEGIC INTENT

T

he ASA Strategic Intent 2021– 2023 sets the direction and priorities for the association. The ASA is committed to fostering a sonography profession that delivers high quality ultrasound by promoting and advocating for the advancement of the sonography profession; driving the quality and standards of sonography practice; facilitating comprehensive skills and professional development opportunities in ultrasound; innovating and evolving to deliver organisational excellence, sustainability and value for members; as well as nurturing a great organisation to belong to.

OUR VISION

A HEALTHIER WORLD THROUGH SONOGRAPHER EXPERTISE

OUR PURPOSE

FOSTERING A SONOGRAPHY PROFESSION THAT DELIVERS HIGH QUALITY ULTRASOUND

ASA ANNUAL REPORT 2021-22

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I Ian Schroen, President, ASA

t is my privilege to present the Australasian Sonographers Association Annual Report for 2021– 2022, as we end another challenging year. COVID-19 continues to place such disruption on all our lives. Yet I continue to be impressed by the commitment of sonographers to patient care and clinical excellence despite the many challenges. I am immensely proud of the actions and efforts of all the ASA office team, led by our CEO Jodie Long, given the ongoing challenges of hybrid meetings, COVID-19 restrictions, as well as their own changing work conditions and restrictions such as working from home. Again, this financial year has required significant focus on the association’s planning and management of events to ensure financial stability. A huge thanks and congratulations to Jodie, the office team, and the ASA Board of Directors for this focus. The financial report identifies the commitment to financial responsibility and oversight throughout the management team and the Board. Excepting the poor performance of the investment portfolio due to global forces, the ASA has performed exceedingly well while investing back to the membership and meeting our strategic aims throughout the year.

PRESIDENT’S REPORT Promote and advocate for the advancement of the sonography profession Jodie and the Policy Team continue to pursue our significant agenda of sonographer regulation with the ongoing and direct engagement of the Federal Health Department and Chief Allied Health Officers. These essential steps continue the development of a thoroughly critiqued proposition to be presented to the State Health Ministers. In October 2021, the office team launched a consumer website enabling consumers to easily find information on ultrasound imaging, as well as details on the role and skills of sonographers.

Drive the quality and standards of sonography practice Accomplishing a number of significant achievements in a range of portfolios, the ASA has built on the past strength of our member resources. Thank you to the many members involved in this work across a range of committees, such as the Sonographer Policy and Advocacy Committee and the Research SIG Committee. Thank you as well to Dr Kerry Thoirs, our Sonography journal editor, for the commitment to our flagship journal. These achievements include: n delivering a new ASA Code of Conduct n developing and publishing new position statements and clinical statements revisions n awarding Research Grant 2021 – Jacqueline Roots (Host organisation: Queensland University of Technology) ‘Shear Wave Elastography to assess the change in stiffness of muscles in the acute stage post-stroke’

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PRESIDENT’S REPORT

... our commitment to member value is clear, and as we have grown our membership to over 7000 members, we have added to our member services and education team

n growing Sonography – Submissions to Sonography showed a solid increase of 41.7% compared with last year. There were more than 110,000 downloads of articles from Sonography in 2021.

Facilitate comprehensive skills and professional development opportunities in ultrasound You would have recognised how difficult planning and holding face-to-face events became over the past year due to the ongoing concerns of COVID-19. Therefore, we made the decision in August 2021 to cancel our face-to-face events and focus solely on the conference to be held in Melbourne in May 2022. This proved an outstanding decision with our largest conference ever of 2000 attendees split between online and in person. The 28th ASA Annual International Conference was a fantastic education event, demonstrating the engagement and enthusiasm of sonographers in our profession. At the conference, we were able to publicly recognise 10 Awards of Excellence winners, along with five ASA Fellows and award Michelle Fenech the Pru Pratten Memorial Lifetime Achievement Award. Additionally, our CPD team introduced further innovative methods for diverse online learning via interactive modules and ongoing podcast episodes. The past investment in our new website and fully integrated learning management system proved invaluable to our members with over 35,000 ASA online CPD points issued throughout the year. The ASA Board agreed to continue to extend our support for Radiology Across Borders (RAB) as a major partner. This partnership advances ultrasound education across less developed communities for improved health outcomes. This important commitment allows our members to make a significant contribution to global health.

Innovate and evolve to deliver organisational excellence, sustainability, and value for members As indicated within the financial report, our commitment to member value is clear, and as we have grown our membership to over 7000 members, we have added to our member services and education team. There has been significant value for members offered across many areas over the past year. In addition, the Board has approved the investment into research on examination times. This is a consistent question among sonographers on ultrasound examination scheduling. This project will review examination scan times along with ‘Do ultrasound examination times correlate with quality outcomes?’ Work is expected to commence in November 2022 and be completed by late 2023.

Nurture a great organisation to belong to In our strategic planning meeting earlier in the year, the Board identified a gap in our strategic focus. We have added a new pillar – Nurture a great organisation to belong to. This is probably one of the most important aspects of the association for all members – our staff. This pillar guides the Board and the organisation on the importance of our people and culture. It targets our employee health and wellbeing, and an inclusive, diverse, and caring culture. It is transparent to everyone and an important part of our values and what we aspire to as an organisation. As part of this pillar, the Board has added a new subcommittee to focus on people matters across our office team and Board Directors. The ASA Board underwent significant change with the resignations of Dr Jennifer Alphonse and Rona Girdler as Board Directors. On behalf of all members, I would like to thank Jennifer and Rona for their dedication, wisdom, and investment of time into the Board and the governance of the association. Our Board and association are in a better position following your work. To fill these vacancies, the Board undertook an expression of interest from members, and I would also like to acknowledge and thank Brooke Osbourne and Kosta Hellsmann, who have been casual Board Directors during the past year. They have both made a positive impact in a short time. I would like to thank the ASA Board for their ongoing commitment to our strategy, for their expertise and skills, and for their integrity in leading the ASA forward in these challenging times. Thank you to Jodie Long, who continues to provide the leadership, vision and management of our organisation and who worked tirelessly throughout the difficult past year, along with the entire office team. I look forward to the continued growth of the ASA. Thank you to all our sonographer members for your dedication to our profession and the association.

Ian Schroen President, Australasian Sonographers Association

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I

n last year’s annual report, I spoke of the extraordinary resilience of the sonography profession, as well as the ASA staff and Board of Directors, and I have seen this continue over the last year in more trying times.

Jodie Long, CEO, ASA

The ASA spent much of this year centred on nurturing a great organisation to belong to by taking care of its people and focusing on the health and wellbeing of its members, its employees, and volunteers. This year can be summed up in a message we received from a member. ‘The organisation continued to invest and reach out to its members to support them and reassure them. There’s an increased sense of belongingness when an organisation supports its team members as a family.’ Throughout the year we recognised and thanked sonographers for their outstanding hard work, dedication, and personal sacrifices in continuing to provide high quality ultrasounds for patients during very difficult and unrelenting times. This resonated with a large number of people, as our highest engaged social media post was, ‘We see you behind the mask’, posted in January when the Omicron wave was peaking, where we informed sonographers and the public that we recognised and understood the challenges and struggles they were facing. As the wellbeing of sonographers is important to the ASA, we engaged a market research agency to survey sonographers on their workplace health and safety issues. The report

CEO’S REPORT investigated sonographer workflow and their experiences with reporting of physical pain; aspects that impact on mental health and burnout (including discrimination and harassment); and the support systems that are in place. The report highlighted that 82% had experienced some form of sonographer-related pain in the last 12 months and suggested that there may be a high proportion of the workforce who are either experiencing burnout or potentially vulnerable to it, which is why the ASA will continue to invest in providing support in these areas. The ASA also financially supported important research examining the impact of COVID-19 on sonographers, measuring the changes in scan numbers and sonographer work hours, changes to sonographic examination protocols and access to personal protective equipment, as well as sonographer professional, personal, and social wellbeing. Three articles from this research project have been published and were recognised by the World Health Organisation (WHO) with their inclusion in the Coronavirus Disease Database on the WHO website. We faced uncertain times, having to constantly change or postpone our events and, as cancellation fatigue set in for the ASA team and our speakers, we made the decision in August 2021 to cancel most of our face-to-face events and focus solely on the conference to be held in May 2022, creating some certainty for everyone. While we couldn’t support sonographers in person, we moved to running a series of ‘Wellness Wednesdays’ webinars on resilience, motivation and how to take care of yourselves. In addition, we did hold several online events to support sonographer and student learning throughout the year. These events included a Cardiac Seminar, the introduction of

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CEO’S REPORT

‘The organisation continued to invest and reach out to its members to support them and reassure them. There’s an increased sense of belongingness when an organisation supports its team members as a family.’ a new Fundamental Ultrasound Seminar tailored for students and recent graduates, and a Trivia Night for Australasian Sonographers Day. Self-directed online learning was again in high demand with over 34,000 online activities undertaken, which saw a 70% increase from the previous year. However, at the end of 2021, many sonographers were fatigued with webinars and online presentations. As such, we diversified our content by offering learning in bite-size pieces designed with the busy sonographer in mind. We introduced podcasts covering a range of topics beyond just scanning, as well as online learning modules that included activity components designed for an immersive and engaging experience across many different clinical areas. Despite the continual challenges of running face-to-face events, we hosted the biggest and most successful ASA Annual International Conference to date in Melbourne, with 2000 attendees. The conference boasted 10 rooms running concurrently, with both lecture presentations and live scanning workshops spanning three days. We made the decision to run a fully hybrid experience so we could support the learning and development of those who could not attend due to restrictions, and through our outreach program partner Radiology Across Borders, we offered free online conference registration for health professionals in Tier Four countries. The highlight of the conference was having so many people together again, networking, socialising, and interacting with each other. For the first time, the ASA honoured all award recipients at the Gala Dinner to celebrate the achievements of the standout sonographers for the year. With over 700 people in the room, and others online, it was truly an amazing night shining a light on those who go above and beyond in creating better healthcare outcomes. At the ASA, we are driven by creating a healthier world through sonographer expertise, and as such we invested in supporting the community by launching the consumer website ultrasound. org.au where members of the public have access to easyto-understand, accurate information on what to expect from a scan performed by a sonographer, as well as the role of a sonographer. We also worked tirelessly to create a finalised submission for sonographers to become regulated in Australia to ensure there are nationally consistent standards of practice and nationally consistent safeguards to assure patient safety and care. Having the finalised submission to present to Health Ministers is the first step towards achieving this. We commissioned a new sonographer code of conduct, which underpins the practice of all sonographers in Australia and New Zealand, sets the benchmark for sonographer professional standards, and informs the community on what to expect from sonographers. It is important that we not only drive the quality and standards across Australasia, but that we also advance the education of those performing ultrasound in less developed communities to improve their health outcomes.

This year, the ASA extended its major partnership with RAB, aiding and advancing education on ultrasound across the world. With border restrictions still in place, we worked with RAB to deliver content online, which has enabled us to reach many more health professionals across the world. The ASA extended free overseas membership to health professionals attending these events from Tier Four countries. Being inclusive is extremely important, and this year, a Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion Statement was added to our scientific journal Sonography to engage a diverse group of authors, readers, reviewers, and editorial board members. The past year has seen the journal increase by 42% in articles published. As an organisation, we continue to transform digitally. The website continues to be a great source of information with close to 900,000 page views, which is a 15% increase in activity. We also relaunched the ASA App with additional features, providing members with the ability to receive the latest news, register for events and have access to ASA online, at their fingertips, anywhere, anytime. Volunteers are the backbone of the organisation and without them the ASA could not provide this level of support. I would like to thank the Board of Directors for their hard work, dedication and support, as well as those who give up their time to serve on our committees. The ASA could not achieve all that it does without you. Our corporate partners have continued to support us by working and adapting with us throughout the year as we navigated the changes and uncertainty together, and for this I am very grateful. While enduring another year of lockdowns, working from home, being isolated from each other, constantly dealing with change and uncertainty, the ASA staff still achieved so much. I am immensely proud of the ASA staff and and how they have worked together and supported each other over the year, and I cannot thank them enough for their contribution and for always going above and beyond. As we move now into a new year, we move into a new era of hybrid living where we find ourselves navigating to find a balance with combining online and face-to-face interaction. I am excited to be moving into this next chapter, where the ASA will continue to look to providing diverse content in new and innovative ways, with a combination of face-to-face and online activities. With our dedicated volunteers, especially our Board of Directors, corporate partners and staff, the ASA is well placed to continue to create a healthier world through sonographer expertise.

Jodie Long CEO, Australasian Sonographers Association

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T Alexandra Bell, Finance Risk and Audit Committee Chair, ASA

he ASA delivered an operating surplus before investment movements of $71,603 for the year ended 30 June 2022. Poor investment performance, in line with challenging market conditions, reduced the net result for the year to a deficit of $108,904. Many people have contributed to this solid operational result, including our members, corporate partners, the ASA staff and my fellow directors, and I thank everyone for their ongoing support. Significant impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic persisted during the year. The unpredictable conditions required the ASA to continue to change and cancel events. The cornerstone annual conference in May 2022 was successfully delivered in a hybrid format for the second year running with the largest number of registrations to date (2000 in person and online delegates).

Revenue The ASA’s revenue in 2022 was $4.4m, a decrease of 4.6% on the 2021 financial year. The variance was largely driven by lower event revenue (down 13.9%), as there were two conferences in 2021. Other contributing factors were the 1.7% decrease in membership fees earned due to the freezing of membership fees and a reduction in insurance premiums, as well as the cessation of the government cash boost stimulus, which was received in 2021 but not repeated in 2022.

FINANCE RISK AND AUDIT REPORT Expenses The ASA makes all expense decisions with the best interests of members in mind. Expenses overall were up 14.4% on the previous year, largely due to costs associated with additional staff employed to better serve the organisation and our membership (including a new professional development manager, a new member services officer, and a new digital marketing coordinator). The ASA also invested in new content and for it to be delivered in more diverse ways to our membership. This included a robust work health safety survey, with the results included in a special edition of Soundeffects news online magazine, a series of Wellness Wednesdays webinars for five weeks on topics such as resilience and mental support, the launching of a consumer website, the introduction of online learning modules, podcasts, relaunching of the ASA App, finalising the sonographer regulation submission, releasing the revised code of conduct for sonographers, as well as a number of revised clinical statements and position statements. The association also extended our RAB major partnership and continued to allocate funds to the Sonographer Awareness Campaign, which promotes the expertise of sonographers to the public.

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PRESIDENT’S REPORT Investment performance The 2022 financial year was a volatile one for investment markets with interest rates at all-time lows, making the generation of returns on investments particularly challenging. The ASA sought investment advice to reposition its portfolio out of direct share holdings into a diversified portfolio of managed funds to better safeguard these funds for member benefits. Unrealised fair value losses in the year were $297,039, which was the primary driver of the total investment loss result for the year of $180,507.

Assets and cash reserves

Many people have contributed to this solid operational result, including our members, corporate partners, the ASA staff and my fellow directors, and I thank everyone for their ongoing support.

The ASA finished the year in a strong financial position with net assets of $3.0 million as at 30 June 2022. Following an International Financial Reporting Interpretations Committee (IFRIC) ruling in 2021, the capitalisation of software as a service (SaaS) intangible assets has been reassessed. This resulted in costs associated with the membership software systems being expenses in 2022 and the impact on 2021 being restated. The ASA delivers valued services to members in a way which is sustainable through periods of uncertainty and change; it is financially set up to be able to continue to do this for many years into the future.

Alexandra Bell Director and Finance Risk and Audit Committee Chair Australasian Sonographers Association

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PROMOTING OF THE PROFESSION Public knowledge and understanding of sonographers and what they do is low. One of our aims at the ASA is to increase public awareness that sonographers are experts in ultrasound. The ASA continued its promotion of the profession in 2021–22 through social media and the launch of a new consumer website – ultrasound.org.au #proudtobeasonographer #supportingsonographers 10 | ASA ANNUAL REPORT 2021-22


In 2021–22, the ASA launched its consumer website – ultrasound.org.au – specifically designed for the public audience. The website’s objective is for the public to have easy access to accurate information from a reputable source about what to expect from a specific scan, as well as what a sonographer is and what they do. The website formed a part of the Sonographer Awareness Campaign that ran for one week in October on social media, increasing public awareness of the sonography profession.

PROMOTION OF THE PROFESSION

Consumer Website

SONOGRAPHER AWARENESS CAMPAIGN

Social Media In 2021–22, the ASA increased engagement on all social media platforms, building followers through social ‘stories’, highlighting exceptional sonographers, promoting events and thanking frontline sonographers for all the hard work they do through the pandemic. This enables the ASA to reach a broader public audience and increase public awareness of sonography. Our social media audience engaged the most with posts that shone a light on the hard work, dedication and achievements of sonographers.

OVER 1,500,000 IMPRESSIONS

3,000 NEW USERS

to ultrasound.org.au over the one-week campaign

We See You Behind the Mask COVID-19 severely impacted sonographers who are on the frontline. In January 2021, the Omicron variant caused a surge in cases causing governments and hospitals to react with a rare Code Brown alert. This alert brought many challenges for sonographers including cancellation of leave and being placed on standby. We used this post to let sonographers and the public know that we recognised and understood the challenges and struggles they were facing.

SOCIAL MEDIA ENGAGEMENT INCREASED BY

Conference International Speakers

SOCIAL MEDIA INCREASE IN FOLLOWERS:

The ASA’s Annual International Conference created a lot of buzz in early 2022, with the announcement of 18 international presenters. The conference is the largest gathering of sonographers in the southern hemisphere, and attracts speakers leading research, scientific advancements and technology from around the world. This post with exceptional expert speakers created a high level of engagement across all channels.

Awards and Recognition Announcing Michelle Fenech as the 2022 Pru Pratten Memorial Lifetime Achievement Award recipient was naturally one of the biggest posts of the year. Michelle, along with our Awards of Excellence recipients and Fellows, are the shining lights of our profession who go above and beyond to deliver high quality care to patients.

28%

LINKED IN 20% INCREASE IN FOLLOWERS FACEBOOK

21% INCREASE

IN FOLLOWERS

INSTAGRAM 33% INCREASE IN FOLLOWERS TWITTER 10% INCREASE IN FOLLOWERS

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ADVOCATING FOR THE PROFESSION The ASA is the trusted voice of sonographers advocating on behalf of the profession to highlight issues affecting sonographers and the public. These issues include increasing public safety through pursuing the regulation of Australian sonographers, ensuring the general public have timely access to high quality ultrasound performed by expert sonographers, including enforceable standards of practice and a sustainable workforce. The ASA met with government representatives, health and regulatory agencies and key stakeholders to raise awareness and advocate on these issues throughout the year. 12 | ASA ANNUAL REPORT 2021-22


In 2021–22, the ASA continued its work for the profession to be added to the National Regulation and Accreditation Scheme in Australia for the safety and protection of the public. Throughout the year, the ASA team worked with government health departments, incorporating their feedback to finalise the submission against the six criteria used for assessing additional professions for inclusion in the National Registration and Accreditation Scheme (NRAS). The next step will be for the submission to be accepted to go on the agenda of the Health Ministers Meeting with a request for agreement that it be referred to the Health Chief Executives Forum (HCEF) for preliminary assessment.

Engagement With COVID-19 an ongoing issue of concern for industry heads and health officials, the ASA was still able to participate in a total of 15 meetings to highlight and discuss issues facing sonographers.

ADVOCATING FOR THE PROFESSION

Through finalising a submission for regulation in Australia

THE ASA PARTICIPATED IN

15

STAKEHOLDER MEETINGS

THE ASA PARTICIPATED IN

6

INDUSTRY CONSULTATIONS

THE ASA PROVIDED

5

SUBMISSIONS TO GOVERNMENT

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DRIVING QUALITY AND STANDARDS The ASA is committed to advancing the quality and standards of sonography. We achieve this by supporting and investing in clinical research, undertaking studies on the state of the profession, as well as supporting evidence-based research published in the ASA’s scientific journal Sonography. The ASA also sets the benchmark for sonographer professional standards through its Sonographer Code of Conduct and its production and endorsement of statements and guidelines.


DRIVE QUALITY AND STANDARDS

Supporting and Investing in Research The ASA has supported and invested in research that assists in progressing and strengthening the profession through:

Research Grants Through the annual ASA Research Grant, funding of AU$30,000 is available to support one or more research projects each year. This grant encourages and supports sonographers to undertake new quality research that will lead to publications and contribute to the evidence-based practice of sonography. In 2021, the ASA funded one research grant to the value of $30,000. The Research Grant Recipient 2021: Jacqueline Roots (Queensland University of Technology) Shear Wave Elastography to assess the change in stiffness of muscles in the acute stage post-stroke

The Impact of COVID-19 on the Australasian Sonographic Community The ASA has financially supported important research on examining the impact of COVID-19 on sonographers, conducted by the University of South Australia (UniSA). Researchers have surveyed Australasian sonographers at four different time points during the pandemic to measure the changes in scan numbers and sonographer work hours, changes to sonographic examination protocols, and access to personal protective equipment, as well as sonographer professional, personal and social wellbeing. Australasian sonographers and Sonography journal were recognised by the World Health Organisation (WHO) in June when the COVID-19 Global Literature on Coronavirus Disease Database included the UniSA’s initial research findings in three parts. The initial findings from Survey One (parts two and three) were published in Sonography journal in July. Survey Two results were presented in a webinar by Dr Jessie Childs and hosted on the ASA website. Dr Childs presented the findings from Survey Three at the ASA’s Annual International Conference in May. The findings of the final survey on the Omicron outbreak are yet to be reported and published with the survey finishing in July 2022.

Australasian sonographers and journal Sonography were recognised by the World Health Organisation in June.

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Sonographer Code of Conduct

ASA Sonographer Code of Conduct Date of issue: Effective from March 2022. Last reviewed: May 2022.

Level 2, 93-95 Queen Street, Melbourne, VIC 3000

T: +61 3 9552 0000

www.sonographers.org May 2022

SEPTEMBER 2021

soundeffectsnews

Work Health & Safety

JULY 2022

Making waves IN SONOGRAPHY RESEARCH

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In 2021–22, the ASA commissioned a new Sonographer Code of Conduct for the profession. The Sonographer Code of Conduct underpins the practice of all sonographers in Australia and New Zealand and sets the benchmark for sonographer professional standards. It establishes the required standards of professional conduct, ethics and other principles for safe and effective practice by sonographers. It also outlines the standards of sonographer professional conduct to inform the community about what to expect from sonographers. The ASA distributed the new Sonographer Code of Conduct to health departments across Australia and New Zealand to broaden the recognition of the standards of the sonography profession.

Sonographer Work Health and Safety In late 2021, the ASA reported the results of the Work Health and Safety survey published in the September issue of Soundeffects news. Work health and safety (WHS) is an extremely important issue for ASA members because sonographers deal with a variety of physical and emotional pressures as a part of their everyday practice. The report highlighted that four in five sonographers (82%) had experienced some form of sonographer-related pain in the last 12 months and that many sonographers were uncomfortable raising WHS issues. The results suggested that there may be a high proportion of the workforce who are either experiencing burnout or potentially vulnerable to it.

Making Waves Making Waves is a publication that provides a review of the most current sonography research worldwide. Research is reviewed by a member of our Special Interest Group Committees and presents findings and clinical applications in a more accessible format. In 2021–22, the ASA moved to hosting Making Waves on the digital platform Issuu in January, which made the publication easier to read, as well as providing busy sonographers with how long each article would take to read.


DRIVE QUALITY AND STANDARDS Developing Recommendations for Sonography The ASA produced five important resources this year, building upon our work to advocate for the profession and to provide clinical guidance and standards for sonography issues. The ASA produces position statements to provide members and the public with the association’s view on topics and issues relevant to sonographers and sonography practice. ASA clinical statements form a vital part of the association’s dedication to promoting best practice in medical sonography.

Position Statements n Sex determination by ultrasound in the first trimester n Student sonographers paying for clinical training placements n Mitigating sonographer distractions in obstetric ultrasounds

The ASA produced five important resources this year, building upon our work to advocate for the profession and to provide clinical guidance and standards for sonography.

Clinical Statements n Disinfection of intracavity ultrasound transducers n Early pregnancy loss

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FACILITATING AND PROMOTING EVIDENCEBASED PRACTICE WITHIN THE PROFESSION

It is important for the ASA to continually improve and enhance the quality standards of ultrasound. We promote sonographic excellence through the publication of articles in our scientific journal Sonography to improve clinical sonographic/ultrasound practice, test new equipment/techniques and promote best sonographic/ultrasound practice within healthcare.


Sonography is the ASA’s international peer reviewed journal and seeks articles and manuscript submissions on all areas of diagnostic medical sonography from authors around the world. This year, a Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion statement was added to our scientific journal to engage a diverse group of authors, readers, reviewers and editorial board members.

FACILITATE AND PROMOTE EVIDENCE-BASED PRACTICE

Sonography Journal

41.7% 42%

INCREASE IN SUBMISSIONS

INCREASE IN ARTICLES PUBLISHED

TOP COUNTRIES READING SONOGRAPHY:

USA 30% • CANADA 21% AUSTRALIA 20% UK 9% • INDIA 8%

110K OVER

DOWNLOADS

SECOND HIGHEST IN THE JOURNAL’S HISTORY

Abstracts In 2021–22, the ASA received 73 abstracts for inclusion in the 28th Annual International Conference. Sixty-six were accepted for inclusion as part of the conference program – our highest number ever.

66 ABSTRACTS

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FACILITATING PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT OPPORTUNITIES The ASA continues to provide members with the largest selection of sonographer CPD opportunities in Australasia. With lockdowns, restrictions, the stress of COVID-19, and cancellation fatigue still impacting the way we delivered events, the ASA postponed all faceto-face events except the conference to next financial year. High quality CPD activities were added, including an online wellness series, which opened an opportunity to offer members something different and focus on mental health. ‘Wellness Wednesdays’ was born, a live seminar series covering themes of resilience, motivation and self-care from some of the top public speakers in the country.


28th Annual International Conference – ASA2022 Melbourne In May 2022, the ASA hosted the biggest and most successful Annual International Conference to date in Melbourne. The conference boasted 10 rooms running concurrently with both lecture presentations and live scanning workshops spanning three days. On Saturday, the conference hosted a dedicated ‘Cardiac Day’, a program focused on cardiac presentations and live scanning. Delegates had the opportunity to attend the conference online, with all lecture presentations live-streamed and available to all delegates for three months after the conference. A special thank you to Guild Insurance for supporting five sonographers to attend the annual conference from rural and remote areas, including those affected by the floods – covering their flights, accommodation and conference registration to increase their knowledge to take back to their communities.

ASA2022 Conference Feedback

You are helping sonographers in more dire situations and circumstances is very kind. Just had to let you know.’ I am always amazed at the information gained from attending the conference. I was so pleased with the calibre of the presenters, their interesting topics and quality images. ASA continues to be the best in providing sonographers with exceptional learning experiences.

PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT

ASA offers a broad range of opportunities for sonographers to advance their professional knowledge

2000 ATTENDEES

7

NATIONAL KEYNOTE SPEAKERS

18

INTERNATIONAL SPEAKERS

338

TOTAL PRESENTATIONS

85

INTERACTIVE WORKSHOP SESSIONS

ASA2022 was excellent! All-round, terrific presentations and speakers with highly informative and valuable content. It was my first ASA, so seeing the enthusiasm for the profession (in the form of new research, new techniques) from all the delegates really excites me for the future of sonography. The conference itself was an amazing learning opportunity. I particularly enjoyed the scanning workshops. As well as learning some new things, I was also reassured that my practice was similar to what was being presented.

471,000

VIRTUAL HOURS VIEWED

The trade exhibition and social events were fantastic opportunities to meet other sonographers.

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34,400 CPD POINTS ISSUED

20,700 WEBINAR VIEWS

10,500

COMPLETED ONLINE TESTS

2,300

EDUCATIONAL VIDEO VIEWS

600

PODCASTS LISTENS

900

WELLNESS WEDNESDAYS REGISTRATIONS

1,000

ONLINE LEARNING MODULES COMPLETED

22 | ASA ANNUAL REPORT 2021-22

ASA Online In the absence of face-to-face events in 2021–22, the ASA supported our membership with their professional development through an extensive online offering. Namely, webinars, CPD tests, educational videos and modules, as well as the introduction of Wellness Wednesdays and a new podcast series. The total number of CPD points issued through ASA Online was close to 34,400.

‘So impressed with the support given by ASA to sonographers both from a professional point of view and from a health and wellness perspective ... shown so amazingly well over the last two years with Covid.’ ‘I just wanted to thank you so much for the Wellness Wednesdays. They are amazing webinars and so incredibly uplifting and helpful when we are working under such difficult times with Covid and lockdowns. It has made my approach to working through and understanding myself so much easier and so helpful to be able to obtain the mental tools to cope better. It’s also been great to be able to offer empathy and better understanding towards others – our patients, our colleagues, our families at home who are also struggling through trying and anxious times. Your professional support in offering these webinars is highly commendable. I feel really lucky to belong to ASA.’


PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT

ASA Events A number of online events supported sonographer and student learning throughout the year. These events included a Cardiac Seminar, the introduction of a new Fundamental Ultrasound Seminar tailored for students and recent graduates, and a Trivia Night for Australasian Sonographers Day. Between the restrictions we were still able to hold four branch events for over 130 members.

‘Thank you for extending access to the ASA 2021 Conference and providing extra CPD content and access to top speakers on subjects to help navigate life during the COVID-19 pandemic.’ ‘So many great things you are planning and doing for sonographers … 100% classy and outstanding organisation to belong to.’ Advance the Education of Those Performing Ultrasound, Particularly in Less Developed Communities for Improved Health Outcomes In 2021–22, ASA continued its support of RAB by extending its major partnership for another two years. Partnering with RAB supports our vision of promoting ‘a healthier world through sonographer expertise’, by aiding and advancing the education of those performing ultrasound in less developed communities to improve health outcomes for their patients. This year, the ASA extended free overseas membership to health professionals from Tier Four countries and offered free ASA2022 Melbourne Conference online registration for health professionals in Tier Four countries.

130

FUNDAMENTAL ULTRASOUND SEMINAR REGISTRATIONS

120

VIRTUAL CARDIAC SEMINAR REGISTRATIONS

140

AUSTRALASIAN SONOGRAPHERS DAY TRIVIA NIGHT REGISTRATIONS

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DELIVERING MEMBER VALUE & SUPPORT Despite the challenges faced by our members and the profession throughout the year, the ASA continued to grow its membership. The ASA invested in innovative and diverse ways to deliver organisational excellence, sustainability and value for members.


VALUE & SUPPORT

Digitally transformed: The ASA increased its member engagement across our digital channels

91K 884K USERS

OVER

Member Website The ASA website continues to be the main platform members use to source their information. Members head to the ASA website to access their ASA Account to find all their membership information, including CPD tally and recent CPD Activity. Members also turn to our website to access our variety of CPD offerings, career and student information. ASA publications are also accessed via the digital platform Issuu including, Making Waves, Soundeffects news and our annual report.

ASA App The ASA App continues to provide members with easy access to the latest news, CPD tally, podcasts, event registration, and more. In 2021–22, the ASA App was downloaded over 1600 times by members.

VISITS TO THE ASA WEBSITE

1600 OVER

DOWNLOADS

Corporate Partnerships The ASA corporate partners were committed to supporting the association through another tough year of lockdowns, restrictions and limited face-to-face events. Even in these difficult times, we increased the number of corporate partnerships to 48. Their continued support and investment in the professional development of sonographers is a testament to the strong relationships we have built. The ASA is extremely grateful to all our partners for their continued support.

48

CORPORATE PARTNERSHIPS

Sonographer Employment and Salary Survey In late 2021, ASA members took part in the biennial Sonographer Employment and Salary survey. The results will provide up-to-date information on sonographers’ employment conditions, entitlements and remuneration for both Australia and New Zealand. An industry report was generated from the findings and then provided to all corporate partners to assist with workforce planning and recruitment.

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NURTURING A GREAT ORGANISATION TO BELONG TO The ASA is resourced by quality people made up of permanent staff, volunteers and contractors, with a diverse, inclusive and caring culture that enables our people to be their best.


ASA STAFF

A huge thank you to all our volunteers for dedicating their time and expertise to the organisation. In addition to our ASA committees, our volunteers also include our speakers, student volunteers, and volunteer patients, who all contributed to supporting the ASA and its members over the past year.

As the organisation has grown significantly in the last few years, and to better support members, the ASA has invested in creating a larger team, including an additional member services officer, two dedicated professional development managers and a digital marketing coordinator. These additions allow the association to deliver better member support, innovative and diverse CPD offerings, and expand our digital transformation.

The ASA is supported by volunteer committees and panels, including the ASA Board, the Sonographer Policy and Advisory Committee, Education Advisory Committee, Fellowships Panel, Sonography Editorial Board, Special Interest Groups, Branches and Conference Program Committees.

NURTURING A GREAT ORGANISATION TO BELONG TO

VOLUNTEERS

BRANCH COMMITTEES Alice Springs Chair Ashtyn Lee Auckland-Waikato Chair Scott Allen Australian Capital Territory Chair Teri Carmody Central West NSW Chair Jacqueline Spurway Darling Downs Chairs Haidee Janetzki, Kristine Lawless Far North Queensland Chair Lara Andrews Gippsland Chair Tania Waixel Goulburn Valley Chair Kristy Thomas Illawarra Chair Lauren Dwight Mackay Chair Ainslie Heinke

BOARD

SPECIAL INTEREST GROUPS

Mid Central NZ Chairs Melissa Westwood Deb Mackintosh Amanda Radic

Board Chair Ian Schroen

SIG General Chair Jane Keating

Moreton Bay Chair Chris Edwards

Governance Committee Chair Ian Schroen

SIG Cardiac Chair Anthony Wald

Finance Risk and Audit Committee Chair Alexandra Bell

SIG Musculoskeletal Chair Michelle Fenech

ADVISORY COMMITTEES Sonographer Policy and Advisory Committee Chair Anthony Wald Education Advisory Committee ASA Fellowship Panel Chair Jessie Childs Sonography Journal Editorial Board Editor-in-Chief Kerry Thoirs Annual Conference Program Committee

SIG Paediatric Chair Cain Brockley SIG Research Chair Afrooz Najafzadeh SIG Vascular Chair Matt Adams SIG Women’s Health Chair Sarah Srayko SIG Sonographer Health and Wellbeing Chair Peter Esselbach SIG Emerging Technologies Chair Caterina Watson

Newcastle Chair Greg O’Connor New South Wales Secretary Sarah Skillen Queensland Chair Chris Gilmore Riverina Chair Simone Francis South Australia Chair Sandhya Maranna South West Western Australia Chair Natalie Clements Sunshine Coast Chair Jacinta Sporton Tasmania Chairs Emma Brodribb Kathryn O’Driscoll Zara Ramm Victoria Chair Lynne Johnson Wellington Chair Paula Carryer

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RECOGNISING AND REWARDING

OUTSTANDING ACHIEVEMENT IN SONOGRAPHY In late May 2022, Australasian sonographers were honoured by their peers at the Gala Dinner as a part of our Annual International Conference in Melbourne. In the first face-toface ASA conference in over two years, sonographers took the opportunity to reconnect with their colleagues and peers in what was a joyful celebration of the achievements of the standout sonographers for the year. The awards and recognition announced on the night included the Awards of Excellence, Pru Pratten Memorial Lifetime Achievement Award and the ASA Fellow inductees.

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RECOGNISING AND REWARDING

FELLOWS Fellowship is the highest grade of membership for the ASA. It is a significant professional achievement, and all ASA Fellows have made invaluable contributions not only to the ASA, but to the sonography profession. The ASA thanks all Fellows for their hours of dedication and effort over the years. This year, the ASA inducted a special group of prominent members into our Fellows honour roll.

Alison Deslandes

Brooke Osborne

Chris Gilmore

Debbie Slade

Jennifer Alphonse

Paula Kinnane

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AWARDS OF EXCELLENCE The ASA Awards of Excellence honours outstanding achievements in sonography and recognises excellence, best practice and contribution to the sonography profession. It is these sonographers, along with the exceptional list of nominees, who are the pillars of the sonography profession. Ten sonographers were bestowed with Sonographer of the Year Awards in the following categories: NSW, Vic, Qld, SA, WA, ACT and New Zealand, as well as Researcher of the Year, Tutor of the Year and Volunteer of the Year. Join us in congratulating our 2022 Awards of Excellence recipients:

Sonographer of the Year (Vic)

Carolynne Cormack

Sonographer of the Year (Qld)

Chris Gilmore

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Sonographer of the Year (NSW)

Jacqueline Spurway

Sonographer of the Year (SA)

Angela Farley

Sonographer of the Year (NZ)

Nicole Curtis

Sonographer of the Year (WA)

Natalie Clements


RECOGNISING AND REWARDING Sonographer of the Year (ACT)

Claire Kelso

Researcher of the Year

Jessie Childs

Tutor/Clinical Supervisor of the Year

Donna Oomens

The Sue Caitcheon Memorial Award Volunteer of the Year

Daniel Rae

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PRU PRATTEN MEMORIAL LIFETIME ACHIEVEMENT AWARD

Michelle Fenech, 2022

The Pru Pratten Lifetime Achievement Award recognises a member’s significant contribution to the profession and the ASA over their entire career. The recipient of the 2022 Pru Pratten Memorial Lifetime Achievement Award is Michelle Fenech. Michelle has made significant contributions to the ASA and the sonography profession over her career. She has a passion for extending her own knowledge, completing a Master of Medical Ultrasound, as well as a PhD, and teaching others. Her dedication to sharing her knowledge with sonographers is extensive. She has presented over 35 times at international, national, and local events and conferences over the last 20 years and has numerous publications. She has volunteered her time on numerous ASA committees, as well as volunteering on international committees. She also has significant years of service on ASA branch committees, special interest groups and numerous program committees. Michelle enjoys empowering sonographers with improved knowledge in our neighbouring developing countries such as Fiji, Papua New Guinea (PNG), and the Solomon Islands. In 2016, she was invited by RANZCR to provide training to radiologists and sonographers from all over Fiji. She also brought sonographers and doctors who perform

32 | ASA ANNUAL REPORT 2021-22

sonographic examinations from Fiji, PNG, and the Solomon Islands to Australia for practical sonographic training for a week under her guidance. Michelle uses innovative teaching practices to enhance student learning, incorporating a constructivist approach using playful, interesting, socially driven, and memorable learning activities to enhance engagement and learning experience. This is evidenced by student feedback saying that she has a knack for explaining anatomy in her lectures in such a way that pulls you in and makes you want to learn more. She has incorporated this into all the units (over 15 of them), which she has developed and designed a curriculum for. Michelle has received a number of teaching awards over the years, including Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy UK as well as a Fellow of the ASA. Her passion, love and dedication to teaching and giving back to the sonographic community sees her mentor others in becoming better teachers as well as improving and enhancing student learning to shape the next generation of sonographers. The ASA is proud to bestow this prestigious award on Michelle and thank her for her continued service to the ASA, her peers and her profession.



DIRECTORS’ REPORT The directors present their report, together with the financial statements, on the company for the year ended 30 June 2022.

ASA ANNUAL ANNUALREPORT REPORT 2021 – 2022 34 | ASA 2021–22


DIRECTORS’ REPORT

Directors The following persons were directors of the company during the financial year and up to the date of this report, unless otherwise stated:

Ian Schroen

Anthony Wald

BAppSc (Medical Radiations), Dip Medical Ultrasound (Vasc), M Medical Ultrasound

B Tech , ACCP (Cardiac), AMS, PDM, MClinEd

Ian’s career to date has been diverse and challenging, centred around ultrasound. Ian first gained a passion for vascular ultrasound during the 1990s and after a number of years in clinical ultrasound, he moved to a corporate role. Well known for his work at Philips Healthcare, Ian returned to clinical ultrasound and completed the Master of Medical Ultrasound. Engaged in clinical ultrasound, research and teaching opportunities and has a passion for all aspects of ultrasound. Ian presents regularly in various forums across a range of clinical and nonclinical topics. He has been a board director since 2017 and the President of the ASA since December 2019. Special Responsibilities • P resident and Board Chair • C hair, Governance Committee • M ember, Finance Risk and Audit Committee

Anthony qualified as a cardiac sonographer in South Africa. Since relocating to Melbourne almost 20 years ago he has spent the majority of his career in public health care. He was the chief cardiac physiologist for Monash Heart from 2004 until 2015. From 2015 to 2022 he worked as an educator in the Point of Care Ultrasound program at Monash Health.  He is now a member of the transition management team for the Victorian Heart Hospital, which opens in February 2023. He has been a board director since 2017 and the Vice President of the ASA since November 2020. Special Responsibilities • Vice President

Jennifer Alphonse (resigned 27 October 2021)

PhD, Grad.Dip.App.Sc. Medical Ultrasound, B.App.Sc (Medical Radiation Science) Nuclear Medicine, Ass.Dip Nuclear Medicine, AFASA Jennifer is an accredited medical sonographer, specialising in obstetric and gynaecological (O&G) ultrasound at a tertiary private O&G practice in Sydney. Having completed her PhD in 2015, Jennifer held an Adjunct Lecturer appointment at UNSW (ceased 30th June 2022) with extensive experience in research and is co-author on 18 scientific publications and is a regular reviewer for multiple local and international journals. In August 2020 Jennifer was appointed as a Senior Lecturer with CQ University having been a casual external marker since 2017. Jennifer has completed her Foundations of Directorship with the Australian Institute of Company Directors. Jennifer has been a member of the ASA Board of Directors since September 2015, was elected President in February 2017 before stepping down as President in November 2019, taking up the role of Vice-President. Special Responsibilities Member, Finance Risk and Audit Committee until October 2021

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Alexandra Bell

Michele Dowling

BSc Economics and Accounting with Law Fellow Institute of Chartered Accountants of England and Wales Member of Chartered Accountants Australia and New Zealand

GradDipAppSc Medical Ultrasound, BAppSc Diagnostic Radiography, Dip Radiography, Therapy

Alexandra is a Chartered Accountant and recently joined KPMG as a Partner responsible for the Sydney CFO Advisory team which provides advisory and assurance services to CFOs across all sectors. Alexandra has over 20 years’ experience in financial services with senior finance roles at AXA, Westpac and Challenger. Alexandra is a longstanding mentor of the UNSW Finance graduate programme and a Graduate of the Australian Institute of Company Directors. Alex was appointed to the ASA Board in May 2021. Special Responsibilities • C hair, Finance Risk and Audit Committee (appointed November 2021)

Michele is currently a senior sonographer at a Private Imaging Group in Sydney, having begun her career in London as a radiation therapy radiographer, and then as a diagnostic radiographer in Sydney, Australia. She has extensive clinical management experience as a group practice Chief Sonographer, managing a large team of sonographers and students across nine locations. Michele has been a member of the ASA Board of Directors since November 2016. Special Responsibilities • Member, Governance Committee

Company Secretary The following persons held the position of company secretary during the reporting period:

Anthony Wald

Appointed 11 September 2021

Tanya Tran

Resigned 23 June 2022

36 | ASA ANNUAL REPORT 2021–22

Rona Girdler

(resigned 17 January 2022) BAppSc (MRT) DiagRad DMU General Ultrasound Dip Share Trading & Investment GradCertCustSuccMgt Rona is a general sonographer with more than 17 years of experience having worked in the ultrasound field both clinically and administratively, along with experience in the disruptive area of blockchain and the not-forprofit membership sector. Currently the customer advocate working with a behavioural economist, tokenomics specialist and blockchain strategist to design blockchain business customer centric solutions for industry clients. Prior to this Rona was the Chief Sonographer at Royal North Shore Hospital (2006-2015) and part time Acting Assistant Chief Radiographer (2014-2015). During this time, she also served on the ASA NSW committee (2011-2013) and on the ASA convening committee for the Special Interest Group Symposium held in Sydney (2010). Rona was appointed to the ASA Board in October 2020. Special Responsibilities • I nterim member, Finance Risk and Audit Committee until January 2022


DIRECTORS’ REPORT Kelly Griffiths Australian legal practitioner, LLB Hons, BA, GradDip Intellectual Property Laws Kelly is a Partner and Deputy Head of the Disputes and Investigations practice of Gadens, a leading Australian law firm. Prior to this role, Kelly was Head of Government Affairs and Policy and Chief Legal Counsel for GSK, one of the world’s largest biopharmaceutical companies, in Australia and New Zealand. Kelly has also formerly worked for top tier law firms and in enforcement at the Australian Securities and Investments Commission. Kelly advises companies operating in highly regulated industries, with particular expertise in the healthcare and life sciences sectors. Kelly has served as a non-executive director on two not-for-profit boards; Youth Empowerment against HIV/Aids Ltd (including as company secretary) and Ranters Theatre Inc. Kelly was appointed to the ASA Board in 2018. Special Responsibilities • M ember, Governance Committee

Kosta Hellmanns

(appointed 18 February 2022) Graduate Diploma Medical Ultrasound. Bachelor of Medical Radiation Science (Medical Imaging) with first class honours. Kosta is a Specialist Sonographer and Radiographer at the Women’s and Children’s Hospital (WCH) in Adelaide where he acts as one of the core paediatric specialists within the ultrasound department. Prior to this and over the last 10 years, he provided ultrasound and x-ray services at a number of medical imaging sites within South Australia’s public sector. During this time and beyond his clinical role, he has acted as Head Sonographer for the Royal Adelaide Hospital (RAH), has been involved in a number of non clinical workplace initiatives for the WCH and RAH, and has presented at a number of local ASA meetings. Kosta is passionate about both patient centred healthcare and sonography, so has used opportunities these positions have provided to improve the delivery and quality of imaging services, improve patient outcomes and support fellow sonographers. Kosta was appointed as a casual director of the ASA board in February 2022.

Narelle Kennedy Doctor of Philosophy (Medicine) Graduate Diploma of Applied Science (Medical Ultrasonography) Bachelor of Applied Science Medical Radiation Technology (conversion) Diploma of Applied Science Medical Radiation Technology (Diagnostic Radiography) Narelle is a Senior Research Sonographer specialising in Obstetrics and Gynaecology at South Western Sydney District Obstetric Research unit at Liverpool Hospital and as had over 25 years’ experience working in ultrasound in both private and public sectors in both clinical and administrative positions. She completed her Philosophy Doctorate in 2018 completing her original research on obesity in pregnancy. She has extensive experience in research and is a member of the editorial board for Sonography and has reviewed manuscripts for several national and international journals. She continues her research as an affiliate of the University of Sydney and the Ingham institute of applied medical research with an honorary position of Research Fellow. Narelle is also a casual academic at Central Queensland University, mentoring and marking into two Sonography research subjects since 2018. Narelle was appointed to the ASA Board in October 2020. Special Responsibilities • M ember, Governance Committee

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Roger Lee GradDip in Medical Ultrasound Bachelor of Radiography and Medical Imaging Certificate in Leadership and Management Roger is a Regional manager for Capital Radiology with a keen interest in the US profession and building a strong quality focussed culture in the sonography space. With numerous years spent as a tutor Sonographer and over 10 years of clinical experience in both public and private sectors he has a deep understanding of the industry both in Australia and abroad. He has a special interest in MSK imaging with a passion to expand the MSK skillset of general sonographers. Roger was appointed to the ASA Board October 2020. Special Responsibilities • M ember, Finance Risk and Audit Committee

38 | ASA ANNUAL REPORT 2021–22

Brooke Osborne

SFHEA FASA (appointed 18 February 2022) GradDipEd MMedSon BHlthSc(Hons) BMedRad PhD Candidate Brooke is an accredited medical sonographer, with experience mainly in tertiary referral hospitals and specialising in obstetric and gynaecological ultrasound within a maternofetal medicine unit. Brooke left clinical practice to complete an education degree, following which she started her academic career. Brooke is currently the Program Director for the medical sonography programs at the University of South Australia. Brooke is about to complete her PhD candidature which has focused on education research in the area of clinical skills development and continues to contribute to research and consultancy work across a range of ultrasound and allied health projects. Brooke was appointed as a casual director of the ASA board in February 2022.

Julie Toop Australian Legal Practitioner Notary Public LLB, GradDip Notarial Studies Julie is currently a Legal consultant. She has over 14 years’ experience in the financial services sector, having worked in a variety of both legal and business roles in the Commercial and Retail segments at ANZ. Julie has considerable expertise in the health sector, having set up ANZ’s specialised Health segment in Business Bank in 2014. Julie is a Notary Public and lawyer who has spent many years in private practice, including over 11 at top tier law firm Allens Linklaters. Julie has sat on a number of not for profit boards and is presently the Chair of the Ovarian Cancer Research Foundation. Julie was appointed to the ASA Board in 2018. Special Responsibilities • I nterim Chair, Finance Risk and Audit Committee (ceased November 2021) • M ember, Finance Risk and Audit Committee



OBJECTIVES OF THE AUSTRALASIAN SONOGRAPHERS ASSOCIATION Principle activities The purpose of the Australasian Sonographers Association Ltd is to foster a sonography profession that delivers high quality ultrasound with a vision of creating a healthier world through sonographer expertise. The company is a notfor-profit organisation and is a registered charity working to advance the health of the public and to advance the education for those performing ultrasound. The principal activities of the company during the reporting period included advocating for the profession to become regulated to protect the public and prevent harm, increase the recognition of sonographers being experts in ultrasound as well as focussing on increasing sonographers’ professional development opportunities and supporting evidencebased research which will help to deliver better health care outcomes. No significant changes in the nature of the entity’s activity occurred during the financial year.

Strategic Intent and Short-term Objectives The strategic plan 2021-2023 was amended with four similar strategic objectives and an additional objective of nurturing a great organisation to belong to: • P romote and advocate for the advancement of the sonography profession by positioning the sonographer as the expert and principal provider of diagnostic medical ultrasound, advocating and influencing the transition of the profession to the National Registration and Accreditation

40 | ASA ANNUAL REPORT 2020–21

Scheme in Australia for the safety and protection of the public, taking the lead in establishing a sustainable future workforce supply and clinical placement pathways in Australia and New Zealand so that all patients can have access to sonographer performed ultrasound and ensuring sonographers are part of the conversation involving new and emerging technologies. • D rive the quality and standards of sonography practice by contributing to high quality professional practice through the development of recommendations for sonography, facilitating and promoting evidence-based practice within the profession, supporting and investing in research that assists in progressing and strengthening the profession as well as contributing to safe, appropriate, effective, and equitable care for all people from socially, culturally, and linguistically diverse, and disadvantaged backgrounds. • F acilitate comprehensive skills and professional development opportunities in ultrasound by providing a broad range of opportunities for sonographers to advance their professional knowledge, digital literacy, and careers as well as collaborating with key stakeholders to increase other professions knowledge of ultrasound and advancing the education of those performing ultrasound particularly in less developed communities for improved health outcomes. • I nnovate and evolve to deliver organisational excellence, sustainability, and value for members by, delivering and communicating practical and tangible value to members throughout their career, adapting and collaborating to provide members with a personalised and valuable experience, prioritising membership growth within the sonography profession, locally and internationally as well


DIRECTOR’S REPORT as actively growing our partnerships with aligned corporate partners that deliver value to members. • N urturing a great organisation to belong to by committing to living our values, being resourced by quality people, systems and operations as well as providing easily accessible resources to promote health, safety, and wellbeing, creating a diverse, inclusive, and caring culture that supports high performance for all and empowering and enabling our people to be at their best.

Long-term Objectives The company’s long-term objectives are to continue to operate as the professional association furthering, the sonography profession, the interests of all sonographers and the health outcomes for their patients across Australasia by:

• f acilitating professional development opportunities through conferences, meetings, workshops and online activities; • o ffering a broad range of opportunities for sonographers to advance their professional knowledge; • a dvancing the education of those performing ultrasound and other people involved in sonography, including in less developed communities for improved health outcomes; and • u ndertaking other actions or activities necessary, incidental, or conducive to advance these objects.

Key Performance Measures

• s upporting and disseminating research that contributes to the sonography profession’s body of knowledge;

Each year Key Performance Indicators are set cross the business based on the strategic intent and the short-term goals of the organisation. Individual performance plans are agreed to by each staff member with clear performance and behavioural targets outlined in July, a half yearly review performed in December and a final appraisal performed at the end of the financial year.

• p ositioning sonographers as the experts and principal providers of diagnostic medical ultrasound;

Operating Results

• c ontributing to the quality and standards of sonography practice by developing recommendations for sonographers and the sonography industry;

The (deficit) / surplus of the company for the reporting period after provision for income tax and before other comprehensive income was:

• p romoting and advocating for the advancement of the sonography profession;

• e ngaging with Government and other health care providers to improve the quality and accessibility of sonography services and the future supply of sonographers in the workforce;

2022 $

Restated 2021 $

(108,904)

887,178

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For the year ended 30 June 2021, the restatement had the effect of reducing the surplus for the 2020-21 financial year by $31,491. Refer to Note18 to the financial statements.

Meetings of directors The number of meetings of the company’s Board of Directors (‘the Board’) and of each Board committee held during the year ended 30 June 2022, and the number of meetings attended by each director were: Finance Committee

Board Attended

Held

Attended

Held

Jennifer Alphonse

1

1

2

2

Alexandra Bell

5

6

3

3

Michele Dowling

6

6

Rona Girdler

2

2

2

2

Kelly Griffiths

3

6

Kosta Hellmanns

4

4

Narelle Kennedy

6

6

Roger Lee

6

6

3

3

Brooke Osborne

4

4

Ian Schroen

6

6

3

3

Julie Toop

4

6

2

3

Anthony Wald

6

6

Held: represents the number of meetings held during the time the director held office or was a member of the relevant committee.

Environmental Regulation The company is not subject to any significant environmental regulation.

Members’ Guarantee At the end of the reporting period Australasian Sonographers Association Ltd had 7,194 members (30 June 2021: 7,233 members) Australasian Sonographers Association Ltd is a company limited by guarantee. In the event of, and for the purpose of winding up of the company, the amount capable of being called up from each member and any person or association who ceased to be a member in the year prior to the winding up, is limited to $20, subject to the provisions of the company’s constitution. At 30 June 2022 the collective liability of members was $143,880 (30 June 2021: $144,660).

Auditor’s independence declaration A copy of the auditor’s independence declaration as required under section 60-40 of the Australian Charities and Not-forprofits Commission Act 2012 is set out on page 43. This report is made in accordance with a resolution of directors, pursuant to section 298(2)(a) of the Corporations Act 2001.

On behalf of the directors

Significant Changes in the State of Affairs In the opinion of the directors there were no significant changes in the state of affairs of the company that occurred during the financial year under review not otherwise disclosed in this report or the financial statements.

Matters Subsequent to the End of the Financial Period There are no matters or circumstances that have arisen since the end of the financial period that have significantly affected or may significantly affect the operations of the company, the results of those operations or the state of affairs of the company, in future years.

Likely Developments Likely developments in the operations of the company and the expected results of those operations in future financial years have not been included in this report as the inclusion of such information is likely to result in unreasonable prejudice to the company.

42 | ASA ANNUAL REPORT 2021–22

Ian Schroen Director 10th September 2022 Melbourne


DIRECTORS’ REPORT

Auditor’s independence declaration

Level 6, 30 Collins Street Melbourne Victoria 3000 TELEPHONE +61 3 8899 6199 FACSIMILE +61 3 9650 5751 www.dfkkidsons.com.au

AUDITOR’S INDEPENDENCE DECLARATION TO THE DIRECTORS OF AUSTRALASIAN SONOGRAPHERS ASSOCIATION LTD In accordance with the requirements of section 60-40 of the Australian Charities and Not-for-profits Commission Act 2012, I declare that, to the best of my knowledge and belief, during the year ended 30 June 2022 there have been: (i)

no contraventions of the auditor independence requirements as set out in the Australian Charities and Not-for-profits Commission Act 2012 in relation to the audit; and

(ii) no contraventions of any applicable code of professional conduct in relation to the audit.

Michael L Port Partner Melbourne 10 September 2022

Liability limited by a scheme approved under Professional Standards Legislation A member firm of DFK International, a worldwide association of independent accounting firms and business advisers

ASA ANNUAL REPORT 2021–22

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FINANCIALS The financial statements cover Australasian Sonographers Association Ltd as an individual entity. The financial statements are presented in Australian dollars, which is Australasian Sonographers Association Ltd’s functional and presentation currency. Australasian Sonographers Association Ltd is a not-for-profit unlisted public company limited by guarantee. Registered office Level 2 93-95 Queen Street Melbourne VIC 3000

Principal place of business Level 2 93-95 Queen Street Melbourne VIC 3000

A description of the nature of the company’s operations and its principal activities are included in the directors’ report, which is not part of the financial statements. The financial statements were authorised for issue, in accordance with a resolution of directors, upon the date of signing this report. The directors have the power to amend and reissue the financial statements.

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FINANCIALS

AUSTRALASIAN SONOGRAPHERS ASSOCIATION LTD STATEMENT OF PROFIT OR LOSS AND OTHER COMPREHENSIVE INCOME FOR THE YEAR ENDED 30 JUNE 2022 Notes

Revenue

2022 $

Restated 2021 $

4,337,737

4,545,741

1,815,828

1,471,329

Events and meeting expenses

921,232

850,748

Members insurance

410,968

391,594

Printing, stationery and industry journal

147,576

132,191

Office expenses

84,120

47,568

IT and Website

152,087

154,313

Software development costs

140,497

91,510

3

Expenses Employee benefits expense

Depreciation and amortisation Depreciation of plant and equipment

7

47,621

45,152

Amortisation of right of use building asset

8

100,491

100,491

Amortisation of intangible asset

10,221

Grants, research and sponsorship

100,666

113,941

Professional fees

169,796

140,158

Subscriptions

73,485

66,026

Bank and merchant fees

36,587

40,745

9,679

16,023

Marketing expenses

31,373

43,610

Other expenses

24,128

14,535

4,266,134

3,730,155

71,603

815,586

116,532

1,970

Net fair value gains / (losses) on investments

(297,039)

69,622

Total investments gains / (losses)

(180,507)

71,592

(Deficit) / Surplus for the year

(108,904)

887,178

(108,904)

887,178

Finance cost on lease liability

Total expenses Surplus before investment movements Investment gains / (losses) Profit on sale of investments

Other comprehensive income/(loss) for the year Total comprehensive (loss)/income for the year

Refer to Note 18 for details on the retrospective restatement The above statement of profit or loss and other comprehensive income should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes

ASA ANNUAL REPORT 2021–22

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STATEMENT OF FINANCIAL POSITION AS AT 30 JUNE 2022 ASSETS

Notes

2022 $

Restated 2021 $

Current Assets Cash and cash equivalents

4

3,859,340

3,222,717

Trade and other receivables

5

51,646

24,736

Financial assets

6

2,067,796

2,082,715

96,963

65,940

6,075,745

5,396,108

Prepayments Total Current Assets Non-current Assets Financial assets

6

169,262

169,063

Property, plant and equipment

7

93,323

101,384

Right of use assets

8

92,118

192,609

354,703

463,056

6,430,448

5,859,164

Total Non-current Assets Total Assets

LIABILITIES

Current liabilities Trade and other payables

9

423,519

241,728

Provisions

10

95,122

106,761

2,703,275

2,082,111

Income received in advance Lease liabilities Total Current Liabilities

121,436

121,403

3,343,352

2,552,003

71,628

61,521

Non-current Liabilities Provisions

10

121,268

71,628

182,789

Total liabilities

3,414,980

2,734,792

Net Assets

3,015,468

3,124,372

Lease liabilities Total Non-current Liabilities

EQUITY

Accumulated surplus Members indemnity insurance reserve Total Equity

11

2,805,468

2,914,372

210,000

210,000

3,015,468

3,124,372

Refer to Note 18 for details on the retrospective restatement The above statement of financial position should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes

46 | ASA ANNUAL REPORT 2021–22


FINANCIALS

STATEMENT OF CHANGES IN EQUITY FOR THE YEAR ENDED 30 JUNE 2022 Accumulated Surplus $

Balance at 1 July 2020 (restated)

Reserves $

Total Equity $

2,027,194

210,000

2,237,194

887,178

887,178

Balance at 30 June 2021 (restated)

2,914,372

210,000

3,124,372

Balance at 1 July 2021 (restated)

2,914,372

210,000

3,124,372

(108,904)

(108,904)

2,805,468

210,000

3,015,468

Surplus for the year (restated)

Loss for the year Balance at 30 June 2022

Refer to Note 18 for details on the retrospective restatement The above statement of changes in equity should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes

ASA ANNUAL REPORT 2021–22

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STATEMENT OF CASH FLOWS FOR THE YEAR ENDED 30 JUNE 2022 Cash flows from Operating Activities

Note

Receipts from operations Dividends received Interest received Interest paid on lease liabilities

Net GST paid

17

Restated 2021 $

5,377,989

4,458,425

50,365

56,470

4,115

6,200

(9,679)

Payments to suppliers and employees

Net cash provided by operating activities

2022 $

(16,023)

(4,289,889)

(3,859,929)

(169,696)

(202,830)

963,205

442,313

526,297

453,892

Cash flows from Investing Activities Proceeds from investments Payments for investments Payments for property, plant and equipment

Net cash (used in) / provided by investing activities

(692,084)

(1,065,239)

(39,560)

(6,955)

(205,347)

(618,302)

Repayment of lease liabilities

(121,235)

(109,855)

Net cash used in financing activities

(121,235)

(109,855)

636,623

(285,844)

Cash flows from Financing Activities

Net (decrease) / increase in cash and cash equivalents held

Cash and cash equivalents at the beginning of the financial year Cash and cash equivalents at the end of the financial year

4

Refer to Note 18 for details on the retrospective restatement The above statement of cash flows should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes

48 | ASA ANNUAL REPORT 2021–22

3,222,717

3,508,561

3,859,340

3,222,717


Note 1. Significant accounting policies The principal accounting policies adopted in the preparation of the financial statements are set out below. These policies have been consistently applied to all the years presented, unless otherwise stated.

New, revised or amending Accounting Standards and Interpretations adopted The company has adopted all of the new or amended Accounting Standards and Interpretations issued by the Australian Accounting Standards Board (‘AASB’) that are mandatory for the current reporting period. The adoption of these Accounting Standards and Interpretations did not have any significant impact on the company. The following Accounting Standards and Interpretations are most relevant to the company: Conceptual Framework for Financial Reporting (Conceptual Framework) The company has adopted the revised Conceptual Framework from 1 July 2021. The Conceptual Framework contains new definition and recognition criteria as well as new guidance on measurement that affects several Accounting Standards, but it has not had a material impact on the company’s financial statements. AASB 1060 General Purpose Financial Statements Simplified Disclosures for For-Profit and Not-for-Profit Tier 2 Entities The company has adopted AASB 1060 from 1 July 2021. The standard provides a new Tier 2 reporting framework with simplified disclosures that are based on the requirements of IFRS for SMEs.

Basis of preparation These general purpose financial statements have been prepared in accordance with Australian Accounting Standards - Simplified Disclosures issued by the Australian Accounting Standards Board (‘AASB’), the Australian Charities and Notfor-profits Commission Act 2012 and the Corporations Act 2001, as appropriate for not-for-profit oriented entities. Historical cost convention The financial statements have been prepared under the historical cost convention. Critical accounting estimates The preparation of the financial statements requires the use of certain critical accounting estimates. It also requires management to exercise its judgement in the process of applying the company’s accounting policies. The areas involving a higher degree of judgement or complexity, or areas where assumptions and estimates are significant to the financial statements, are disclosed in note 2.

Revenue recognition The company recognises revenue as follows: Revenue from contracts with customers (member subscriptions, sponsorship income, event revenue, advertising income, education registrations) Revenue is recognised at an amount that reflects the consideration to which the company is expected to be entitled in exchange for transferring goods or services to a customer. For each contract with a customer, the company: identifies the contract with a customer; identifies the performance obligations in the contract; determines the transaction price which takes into account estimates of variable consideration and the time value of money; allocates the transaction price to the separate performance obligations on the basis of the relative stand-alone selling price of each distinct good or service to be delivered; and recognises revenue when or as each performance obligation is satisfied in a manner that depicts the transfer to the customer of the goods or services promised. Variable consideration within the transaction price, if any, reflects concessions provided to the customer such as discounts, rebates and refunds, any potential bonuses receivable from the customer and any other contingent events. Such estimates are determined using either the ‘expected value’ or ‘most likely amount’ method. The measurement of variable consideration is subject to a constraining principle whereby revenue will only be recognised to the extent that it is highly probable that a significant reversal in the amount of cumulative revenue recognised will not occur. The measurement constraint continues until the uncertainty associated with the variable consideration is subsequently resolved. Amounts received that are subject to the constraining principle are recognised as a refund liability. Interest Interest revenue is recognised as interest accrues using the effective interest method, which for floating rate financial assets is the rate inherent in the instrument. Dividend revenue Dividend revenue is recognised when the right to receive a dividend has been established. Other revenue Other revenue is recognised when it is received or when the right to receive payment is established.

Income tax As the company is a charitable institution in terms of subsection 50-5 of the Income Tax Assessment Act 1997, as amended, it is exempt from paying income tax.

ASA ANNUAL REPORT 2021–22

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NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMEMENTS FOR THE YEAR ENDED 30 JUNE 2022

Note 1. Significant accounting policies


Note 1. Significant accounting policies

Current and non-current classification Assets and liabilities are presented in the statement of financial position based on current and non-current classification. An asset is classified as current when: it is either expected to be realised or intended to be sold or consumed in the company’s normal operating cycle; it is held primarily for the purpose of trading; it is expected to be realised within 12 months after the reporting period; or the asset is cash or cash equivalent unless restricted from being exchanged or used to settle a liability for at least 12 months after the reporting period. All other assets are classified as non-current. A liability is classified as current when: it is either expected to be settled in the company’s normal operating cycle; it is held primarily for the purpose of trading; it is due to be settled within 12 months after the reporting period; or there is no unconditional right to defer the settlement of the liability for at least 12 months after the reporting period. All other liabilities are classified as non-current.

Cash and cash equivalents Cash and cash equivalents includes cash on hand, deposits held at call with financial institutions, other shortterm, highly liquid investments with original maturities of three months or less that are readily convertible to known amounts of cash and which are subject to an insignificant risk of changes in value.

Trade and other receivables Other receivables are recognised at amortised cost, less any allowance for expected credit losses.

Financial Assets The company classifies its financial assets between current and non-current assets based on the purpose for which the assets were acquired. Management determines the classification of its financial assets at initial recognition.

Other financial assets are required to be measured at fair value through profit or loss unless they are measured at amortised cost or fair value through other comprehensive income.

Property, plant and equipment Plant and equipment is stated at historical cost less accumulated depreciation and impairment. Historical cost includes expenditure that is directly attributable to the acquisition of the items. Depreciation is calculated on a straight-line basis to write off the net cost of each item of property, plant and equipment (excluding land) over their expected useful lives as follows: Office equipment 3 – 5 years Leasehold improvements 5 years The residual values, useful lives and depreciation methods are reviewed, and adjusted if appropriate, at each reporting date. An item of property, plant and equipment is derecognised upon disposal or when there is no future economic benefit to the company. Gains and losses between the carrying amount and the disposal proceeds are taken to the statement of profit or loss.

Right of use assets A right-of-use asset is recognised at the commencement date of a lease. The right-of-use asset is measured at cost, which comprises the initial amount of the lease liability, adjusted for, as applicable, any lease payments made at or before the commencement date net of any lease incentives received, any initial direct costs incurred, and, except where included in the cost of inventories, an estimate of costs expected to be incurred for dismantling and removing the underlying asset, and restoring the site or asset.

The company assesses at each balance sheet date whether a financial asset or group of financial assets is impaired. All financial assets except those measured at fair value through profit or loss are subject to annual review for impairment.

Right-of-use assets are depreciated on a straight-line basis over the unexpired period of the lease or the estimated useful life of the asset, whichever is the shorter. Where the Company expects to obtain ownership of the leased asset at the end of the lease term, the depreciation is over its estimated useful life. Right-of use assets are subject to impairment or adjusted for any remeasurement of lease liabilities.

Impairment of financial assets

Impairment of non-financial assets

At the end of each reporting period the company assesses whether there is objective evidence that a financial asset or group of financial assets is impaired. All financial assets, except those measured at fair value through the Statement of Profit or loss and other comprehensive Income, are subject to annual review for impairment. In order to determine an appropriate fair value as at 30 June 2022 for its portfolio of financial assets, the company used the market value of investments held.

Financial assets at fair value through profit or loss Equity instruments (managed investment portfolio) that are held for trading as well as derivative instruments are classified as fair value through profit or loss.

50 | ASA ANNUAL REPORT 2021–22

Non-financial assets are reviewed for impairment whenever events or changes in circumstances indicate that the carrying amount may not be recoverable. An impairment loss is recognised for the amount by which the asset’s carrying amount exceeds its recoverable amount. Recoverable amount is the higher of an asset’s fair value less costs of disposal and value-in-use. The value-in-use is the present value of the estimated future cash flows relating to the asset using a pre-tax discount rate specific to the asset or cash-generating unit to which the asset belongs. Assets that do not have independent cash flows are grouped together to form a cash-generating unit.


Trade and other payables

Fair value measurement

These amounts represent liabilities for goods and services provided to the company prior to the end of the financial year and which are unpaid. Due to their short-term nature they are measured at amortised cost and are not discounted. The amounts are unsecured and are usually paid within 30 days of recognition.

When an asset or liability, financial or non-financial, is measured at fair value for recognition or disclosure purposes, the fair value is based on the price that would be received to sell an asset or paid to transfer a liability in an orderly transaction between market participants at the measurement date; and assumes that the transaction will take place either: in the principal market; or in the absence of a principal market, in the most advantageous market.

Employee benefits Short-term employee benefits Liabilities for wages and salaries, including non-monetary benefits, annual leave and long service leave expected to be settled wholly within 12 months of the reporting date are measured at the amounts expected to be paid when the liabilities are settled. Other long-term employee benefits The liability for annual leave and long service leave not expected to be settled within 12 months of the reporting date are measured at the present value of expected future payments to be made in respect of services provided by employees up to the reporting date using the projected unit credit method. Consideration is given to expected future wage and salary levels, experience of employee departures and periods of service. Expected future payments are discounted using market yields at the reporting date on national government bonds with terms to maturity and currency that match, as closely as possible, the estimated future cash outflows. Defined contribution superannuation expense Contributions to defined contribution superannuation plans are expensed in the period in which they are incurred.

Lease liabilities A lease liability is recognised at the commencement date of a lease. The lease liability is initially recognised at the present value of the lease payments to be made over the term of the lease, discounted using the interest rate implicit in the lease or, if that rate cannot be readily determined, the Company’s incremental borrowing rate. Lease payments comprise of fixed payments less any lease incentives receivable, variable lease payments that depend on an index or a rate, amounts expected to be paid under residual value guarantees, exercise price of a purchase option when the exercise of the option is reasonably certain to occur, and any anticipated termination penalties. The variable lease payments that do not depend on an index or a rate are expensed in the period in which they are incurred.

Fair value is measured using the assumptions that market participants would use when pricing the asset or liability, assuming they act in their economic best interests. For non-financial assets, the fair value measurement is based on its highest and best use. Valuation techniques that are appropriate in the circumstances and for which sufficient data are available to measure fair value, are used, maximising the use of relevant observable inputs and minimising the use of unobservable inputs.

Goods and Services Tax (GST) Revenues, expenses and assets are recognised net of the amount of associated GST, unless the GST incurred is not recoverable from the tax authority. In this case it is recognised as part of the cost of the acquisition of the asset or as part of the expense. Receivables and payables are stated inclusive of the amount of GST receivable or payable. The net amount of GST recoverable from, or payable to, the tax authority is included in other receivables or other payables in the statement of financial position. Cash flows are presented on a gross basis. The GST components of cash flows arising from investing or financing activities which are recoverable from, or payable to the tax authority, are presented as operating cash flows. Commitments and contingencies are disclosed net of the amount of GST recoverable from, or payable to, the tax authority.

Lease liabilities are measured at amortised cost using the effective interest method. The carrying amounts are remeasured if there is a change in the following: future lease payments arising from a change in an index or a rate used; residual guarantee; lease term; certainty of a purchase option and termination penalties. When a lease liability is remeasured, an adjustment is made to the corresponding right-of use asset, or to profit or loss if the carrying amount of the right-of-use asset is fully written down.

ASA ANNUAL REPORT 2021–22

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NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMEMENTS FOR THE YEAR ENDED 30 JUNE 2022

Note 1. Significant accounting policies


Note 2. Critical accounting judgements, estimates and assumptions

Note 2. Critical accounting judgements, estimates and assumptions The preparation of the financial statements requires management to make judgements, estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts in the financial statements. Management continually evaluates its judgements and estimates in relation to assets, liabilities, contingent liabilities, revenue and expenses. Management bases its judgements, estimates and assumptions on historical experience and on other various factors, including expectations of future events, management believes to be reasonable under the circumstances. The resulting accounting judgements and estimates will seldom equal the related actual results. The judgements, estimates and assumptions that have a significant risk of causing a material adjustment to the carrying amounts of assets and liabilities (refer to the respective notes) within the next financial year are discussed below. Estimation of useful lives of assets The company determines the estimated useful lives and related depreciation charges for its property, plant and equipment. The useful lives could change significantly as a result of technical innovations or some other event. The depreciation charge will increase where the useful lives are less than previously estimated lives, or technically obsolete or non-strategic assets that have been abandoned or sold will be written off or written down. Impairment of non-financial assets other than goodwill and other indefinite life intangible assets The company assesses impairment of non-financial assets other than goodwill and other indefinite life intangible assets at each reporting date by evaluating conditions specific to the company and to the particular asset that may lead to impairment. If an impairment trigger exists, the recoverable amount of the asset is determined. This involves fair value less costs of disposal or value-in-use calculations, which incorporate a number of key estimates and assumptions. Lease term The lease term is a significant component in the measurement of both the right-of-use asset and lease liability. Judgement is exercised in determining whether there is reasonable certainty that an option to extend the lease or purchase the underlying asset will be exercised, or an option to terminate the lease will not be exercised, when ascertaining the periods to be included in the lease term. In determining the lease term, all facts and circumstances that create an economical incentive to exercise an extension option, or not to exercise a termination option, are considered at the lease commencement date. Factors considered may include the importance of the asset to the company’s operations; comparison of terms and conditions to prevailing market rates; incurrence of significant penalties; existence of significant leasehold improvements; and the costs and disruption to replace the asset. The company reassesses whether it is reasonably certain to exercise

52 | ASA ANNUAL REPORT 2021–22

an extension option, or not exercise a termination option, if there is a significant event or significant change in circumstances. Incremental borrowing rate Where the interest rate implicit in a lease cannot be readily determined, an incremental borrowing rate is estimated to discount future lease payments to measure the present value of the lease liability at the lease commencement date. Such a rate is based on what the company estimates it would have to pay a third party to borrow the funds necessary to obtain an asset of a similar value to the right-of-use asset, with similar terms, security and economic environment. Employee benefits provision As discussed in note 1, the liability for employee benefits expected to be settled more than 12 months from the reporting date are recognised and measured at the present value of the estimated future cash flows to be made in respect of all employees at the reporting date. In determining the present value of the liability, estimates of attrition rates and pay increases through promotion and inflation have been taken into account. Lease make good provision A provision has been made for the present value of anticipated costs for future restoration of leased premises. The provision includes future cost estimates associated with closure of the premises. The calculation of this provision requires assumptions such as application of closure dates and cost estimates. The provision recognised is periodically reviewed and updated based on the facts and circumstances available at the time. Changes to the estimated future costs for sites are recognised in the statement of financial position by adjusting the asset and the provision. Reductions in the provision that exceed the carrying amount of the asset will be recognised in profit or loss.


Note 3. Revenue

2022 $

2021 $

Member subscriptions

2,984,110

3,038,616

Sponsorship income

270,977

185,742

Event income

948,803

1,102,602

61,841

48,310

5,317

6,736

Advertising income Education registrations Interest income Dividends and distributions

4,115

6,200

50,365

56,470

Government cash boost stimulus

50,000

12,209

51,065

4,337,737

4,545,741

2022 $

2021 $

Sundry income

Note 4. Cash and Cash Equivalents

NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMEMENTS FOR THE YEAR ENDED 30 JUNE 2022

Note 3. Revenue / Note 4. Cash and Cash Equivalents / Note 5. Trade and Other Receivables / Note 6. Financial Assets

Current Cash on hand Cash at bank

Note 5. Trade and Other Receivables

500

500

3,858,840

3,222,217

3,859,340

3,222,717

2022 $

2021 $

Current Trade debtors

12,936

8,972

Other receivable

38,710

15,764

51,646

24,736

Note 6. Financial Assets

2022 $

2021 $

1,455,852

1,472,715

Current Managed investment portfolio Term deposits

611,944

610,000

2,067,796

2,082,715

169,262

169,063

Non-current Term deposits restricted * * Term deposits are restricted assets in the form of bank guarantees held with the Bendigo Bank Movements in carrying amounts Movement in the carrying amounts for managed investment portfolio between the beginning and the end o f the current financial year: Balance at 1 July 2021 Purchases during the year Disposal (Proceeds) Net profit on sales Net fair value gains / (losses) on investments Balance at 30 June 2022

1,472,715 689,941 (526,297) 116,532 (297,039) 1,455,852

ASA ANNUAL REPORT 2021–22

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Note 7. Property, plant and equipment / Note 8. Right of use assets

2022 $

2021 $

171,014

162,602

(126,847)

(93,999)

44,167

68,603

Office equipment - at cost

126,073

94,925

Less: Accumulated depreciation

(76,917)

(62,144)

49,156

32,781

93,323

101,384

Note 7. Property, plant and equipment Non-current Leasehold improvements - at cost Less: Accumulated depreciation

Movements in carrying amounts Movement in the carrying amounts for each class of property, plant and equipment between the beginning and the end of the current financial year: Leasehold Improvements $

Balance at 1 July 2021 Additions Depreciation expense Balance at 30 June 2022

Note 8. Right of use assets

Office Equipment $

Total $

68,603

32,781

101,384

8,412

31,148

39,560

(32,848)

(14,773)

(47,621)

44,167

49,156

93,323

2022 $

2021 $

502,458

502,458

(410,340)

(309,849)

92,118

192,609

Non-current Right of use asset – property lease Less: Accumulated depreciation

Movements in carrying amounts Movement in the carrying amounts of each right of use asset between the beginning and the end of the current financial year: Property Lease $

Total $

Balance at 1 July 2021

192,609

192,609

Depreciation expense

(100,491)

(100,491)

92,118

92,118

Balance at 30 June 2022

54 | ASA ANNUAL REPORT 2021–22


2022 $

Note 9. Trade and Other Payables

NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMEMENTS FOR THE YEAR ENDED 30 JUNE 2022

Note 9. Trade and Other Payables / Note 10. Provisions/ Note 11. Reserves

2021 $

Non-current Trade creditors

93,564

21,294

Accrued expenses

62,765

33,882

209,041

146,679

58,149

39,873

423,519

241,728

GST payable Other payables

2022 $

Note 10. Provisions

2021 $

Current Provision for Annual leave

84,585

75,139

Provision for Long service leave

10,537

31,622

95,122

106,761

Provision for make good - leased premise

42,200

42,200

Provision for Long service leave

29,428

19,321

71,628

61,521

210,000

210,000

Non-current

Note 11. Reserves Members indemnity insurance reserve The Company established a reserve for future potential insurance premium increases. Movement in reserves Total Reserves

Opening balance at start of financial year

210,000

Closing balance at end of financial year

210,000

Note 12. Related parties and related party transactions Directors’ compensation The directors act in an honorary capacity and receive no compensation for their services other than honorarium claims. 2022 $

Short-term benefits – honorarium claims

3,150

2021 $

4,550

Key management personnel compensation The aggregate compensation made to members of key management personnel (other than directors) of the company is set out below: Aggregate compensation

294,464

334,723

ASA ANNUAL REPORT 2021–22

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Note 12. Reserves (continued) / Note 13. Related parties and related party transactions / Note 14. Contingent liabilities / Note 15. Commitments / Note 16. Events subsequent to the end of the financial year

Transactions with related parties Other than amounts paid to key management personnel there were no transactions with related parties during the current and previous financial year. Receivable from and payable to related parties There were no trade receivables from or trade payables to related parties at the current and previous reporting date. Loans to/from related parties There were no loans to or from related parties at the current and previous reporting date.

Note 13. Remuneration of auditors

During the financial year the following fees were paid or payable for services provided by DFK Kidsons Partnership, the auditor of the company: Audit services – DFK Kidsons Partnership

2022 $

Audit of the financial statements

16,000

2021 $

16,000

Note 14. Contingent liabilities The company had no contingent liabilities as at 30 June 2022 and 30 June 2021.

Note 15. Commitments Other commitments for expenditure (including journal publishing) Payable – minimum payments

2022 $

2021 $

Not later than 1 year

92,928

94,380

Between 1 and 5 years

15,072

94,380

108,000

188,760

Note 16. Events subsequent to the end of the financial year No matters or circumstances have arisen since 30 June 2022 that has significantly affected, or may significantly affect the company’s operations, the results of those operations, or the company’s state of affairs in future financial years.

56 | ASA ANNUAL REPORT 2021–22


Note 17. Reconciliation of result for the year to net cash inflow / (outflow) from operating activities 2022 $

Comprehensive result for the year

Restated 2021 $

(108,904)

887,178

Depreciation and amortisation

148,112

155,864

Unrealised (gain) / loss of financial assets

180,507

(69,622)

(Increase)/decrease in receivables

(26,910)

(19,786)

(Increase)/decrease in prepayments

(31,023)

45,373

Increase/(decrease) in payables

181,791

(114,125)

Increase/(decrease) in prepaid income

621,164

(440,398)

(1,532)

(2,171)

963,205

442,313

Non-Cash Movements

Movements in assets & liabilities

Increase/(decrease) in provisions Net Cash Inflow in Operating Activities

Note 18. Retrospective restatement During the 2019-20 and 2020‑21 financial years, the company capitalised software, configuration and customisation costs incurred in developing a membership software system as an intangible asset. Upon further review, as a result of an International Financial Reporting Interpretations Committee (IFRIC) ruling in March 2021, it was determined the membership software system is dependent on a third party licence to operate. Consequently, the company does not control the intangible asset previously recognised in the financial statements and costs should have been expensed as incurred. As at 30 June 2020, the restatement has the effect of decreasing intangible assets and the accumulated surplus by $232,780 and increasing software development expenses by $232,780 for the 2019-20 financial year. As at 30 June 2021, the restatement has the effect of decreasing intangible assets and the accumulated surplus by $264,271 and decreasing the surplus for the 2020-21 financial year by $31,491. The comparative figures for 2021 have been restated as follows: 2021 $

Adjustment $

Restated 2021 $

Statement of financial position – (extract) Intangible assets Accumulated surplus

264,271

(264,271)

3,178,643

(264,271)

2,914,372

91,510

91,510

70,240

(60,019)

10,221

918,669

(31,491)

887,178

Statement of profit or loss and other comprehensive income (extract) Software development costs Amortisation of intangible asset Surplus for the year

ASA ANNUAL REPORT 2021–22

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NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMEMENTS FOR THE YEAR ENDED 30 JUNE 2022

Note 17. Reconciliation of result for the year to net cash inflow / (outflow) from operating activities / Note 18. Retrospective restatement


Directors’ Declaration

In the directors’ opinion: • the attached financial statements and notes comply with the Corporations Act 2001, the Australian Accounting Standards - Simplified Disclosures, the Australian Charities and Not-for-profits Commission Act 2012, the Corporations Regulations 2001 and other mandatory professional reporting requirements; • the attached financial statements and notes give a true and fair view of the company’s financial position as at 30 June 2022 and of its performance for the financial year ended on that date; and • there are reasonable grounds to believe that the company will be able to pay its debts as and when they become due and payable.

Signed in accordance with a resolution of directors made pursuant to section 295(5)(a) of the Corporations Act 2001. On behalf of the directors

Ian Schroen Director

Alexandra Bell Director

10 September 2022 Melbourne

10th September 2022 Melbourne

58 | ASA ANNUAL REPORT 2020–21


NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMEMENTS FOR THE YEAR ENDED 30 JUNE 2022

Independent Auditor’s Report

INDEPENDENT AUDITOR'S REPORT TO THE MEMBERS OF AUSTRALASIAN SONOGRAPHERS ASSOCIATION LTD Opinion We have audited the financial report of Australasian Sonographers Association Ltd which comprises the statement of financial position as at 30 June 2022, the statement of comprehensive income, statement of changes in equity and statement of cash flows for the year then ended, and notes to the financial statements, including a summary of significant accounting policies, and the directors' declaration. In our opinion, the accompanying financial report of Australasian Sonographers Association Ltd, is in accordance with the Australian Charities and Not-for-profits Commission Act 2012, including: (a) giving a true and fair view of the company's financial position as at 30 June 2022 and of its financial performance for the year then ended; and (b) complying with Australian Accounting Standards – Simplified Disclosures and Division 60 of the Australian Charities and Not-for-profits Commission Regulation 2013. Basis for Opinion We conducted our audit in accordance with Australian Auditing Standards. Our responsibilities under those standards are further described in the Auditor's Responsibilities for the Audit of the Financial Report section of our report. We are independent of the Company in accordance with the auditor independence requirements of the Australian Charities and Not-for-profits Commission Act 2012 and the ethical requirements of the Accounting Professional and Ethical Standards Board's APES 110 Code of Ethics for Professional Accountants (the Code) that are relevant to our audit of the financial report in Australia. We have also fulfilled our other ethical responsibilities in accordance with the Code. We believe that the audit evidence we have obtained is sufficient and appropriate to provide a basis for our opinion. Responsibilities of the Directors for the Financial Report The directors of the Company are responsible for the preparation of the financial report that gives a true and fair view in accordance with Australian Accounting Standards - Simplified Disclosures and the Australian Charities and Not-for-profits Commission Act 2012 and for such internal control as the directors determine is necessary to enable the preparation of the financial report that gives a true and fair view and is free from material misstatement, whether due to fraud or error. In preparing the financial report, the directors are responsible for assessing the Company's ability to continue as a going concern, disclosing, as applicable, matters related to going concern and using the going concern basis of accounting unless the directors either intend to liquidate the Company or to cease operations, or have no realistic alternative but to do so. Those charged with governance are responsible for overseeing the Company's financial reporting process

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Auditor's Responsibilities for the Audit of the Financial Report Our objectives are to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the financial report as a whole is free from material misstatement, whether due to fraud or error, and to issue an auditor's report that includes our opinion. Reasonable assurance is a high level of assurance, but is not a guarantee that an audit conducted in accordance with the Australian Auditing Standards will always detect a material misstatement when it exists. Misstatements can arise from fraud or error and are considered material if, individually or in the aggregate, they could reasonably be expected to influence the economic decisions of users taken on the basis of this financial report. As part of an audit in accordance with the Australian Auditing Standards, we exercise professional judgement and maintain professional scepticism throughout the audit. We also: •

Identify and assess the risks of material misstatement of the financial report, whether due to fraud or error, design and perform audit procedures responsive to those risks, and obtain audit evidence that is sufficient and appropriate to provide a basis for our opinion. The risk of not detecting a material misstatement resulting from fraud is higher than for one resulting from error, as fraud may involve collusion, forgery, intentional omissions, misrepresentations, or the override of internal control.

Obtain an understanding of internal control relevant to the audit in order to design audit procedures that are appropriate in the circumstances, but not for the purpose of expressing an opinion on the effectiveness of the Company's internal control.

Evaluate the appropriateness of accounting policies used and the reasonableness of accounting estimates and related disclosures made by the directors.

Conclude on the appropriateness of the directors' use of the going concern basis of accounting and, based on the audit evidence obtained, whether a material uncertainty exists related to events or conditions that may cast significant doubt on the Company's ability to continue as a going concern. If we conclude that a material uncertainty exists, we are required to draw attention in our auditor's report to the related disclosures in the financial report or, if such disclosures are inadequate, to modify our opinion. Our conclusions are based on the audit evidence obtained up to the date of our auditor's report. However, future events or conditions may cause the Company to cease to continue as a going concern.

Evaluate the overall presentation, structure and content of the financial report, including the disclosures, and whether the financial report represents the underlying transactions and events in a manner that achieves fair presentation.

We communicate with the directors regarding, among other matters, the planned scope and timing of the audit and significant audit findings, including any significant deficiencies in internal control that we identify during our audit. We also provide the directors with a statement that we have complied with relevant ethical requirements regarding independence, and to communicate with them all relationships and other matters that may reasonably be thought to bear on our independence, and where applicable, related safeguards.

DFK Kidsons Partnership Chartered Accountants

Michael L Port Partner

Melbourne 10 September 2022

MONTH 2015

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RADIOLOGY ACROSS BORDERS The ASA is a major partner of Radiology Across Borders (RAB), and together we are working to create a healthier world through sonographer expertise and to advance the education of those performing ultrasound, particularly in less developed communities, for improved health outcomes. Radiology Across Borders believes that if you have the ability to save a life, you have the responsibility to do so, and trains local healthcare staff in developing nations in radiology to detect and treat illnesses which helps save lives.

Level 2, 93–95 Queen Street, Melbourne 3000, Victoria, Australia T +61 3 9552 0000 W www.sonographers.org 62 | ASA ANNUAL REPORT 2021–22