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Guide for Academics & Student Life 2019-2020


A PL ACE TO: think Where a rigorous grounding in skills and knowledge is just the beginning – where teachers and students share inquiry, reflection and analysis on the path to personal understanding. create Where people celebrate the imagination in geometric proofs and formal essays, on canvas, computer and stage, in poetry readings and morning assemblies. be yourself Where people respect differences and can find their place in a diverse community. aspire to excellence Where students develop winning attitudes in academics, athletics and arts. go beyond Where Florida Keys, North Carolina mountains, museums, concert halls and community service become classrooms that foster deeper understandings of one’s self, others and the world.

MORE THAN JUST A COLLEGE PREPARATORY SCHOOL… A PREPARATION FOR LIFE WITH A HIGHER PURPOSE THAN SELF


2019-2020

GUIDE FOR ACADEMICS AND STUDENT LIFE Tampa Preparatory School 727 WEST CASS STREET TAMPA, F LORIDA 33606

www.tampaprep.org TEL 813.251.8481 • FAX 813.254.2106 CEEB SCHOOL CODE 101729

THE SCHOOL’S PHILOSOPHY Founded in 1974, Tampa Preparatory School is a coeducational college preparatory institution enrolling more than 670 students. It exists to provide young men and women in grades six through twelve with rigorous intellectual training, and to instill values of fairness, decency, honor, diligence, and academic curiosity within an orderly and humane environment. The School is first of all a diverse community of people. It possesses a special quality arising from its relative smallness, with all that this implies in developing close personal relationships. The faculty is composed of high-caliber teachers who assist the students in achieving the greatest personal growth. In addition to fine scholarship and enthusiasm for their fields, they have an abiding interest in young people and their influence extends far beyond the classroom. The opportunity for students and teachers to know and to respect one another as individuals is one of the greatest strengths of independent education in general, and of Tampa Preparatory School in particular. Classes are taught as seminars, labs, and lectures in which students form and express ideas rather than merely receive and dispense information. Classes frequently are taught in the Socratic manner so that maximum participation is encouraged. The School stresses the development of self-confidence, a sense of worth, and the importance of a sense of humor and of having fun in the pursuit of one’s goals. This approach provides a fertile environment for the growth of academic excellence, and encourages students to develop life-long habits of industry and intellectual curiosity through the discovery of new interests. In an age that demands instant answers, liberal education cannot demonstrate immediate results, but can stress the values and standards that provide structure for living. The School’s goal is to develop the academic, intellectual, moral, emotional, and physical potential of each student, and to prepare each student as an individual to live a creative, productive, humane, and compassionate life. Tampa Preparatory School is accredited by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools and the Florida Council of Independent Schools. Additionally, the School is a member of the National Association of Independent Schools, the College Board, the Secondary School Admissions Test Board, the National Association of College Admissions Counseling, the Southern Association of College Admissions Counseling, and the Educational Records Bureau.

GUIDE FOR ACADEMICS AND STUDENT LIFE | 1


HONOR CODE: A COMMITMENT TO HONOR As

a

member

of

the

Tampa

Prep

Community, I am responsible for upholding and promoting honesty, trust, respect and fairness in all venues of school life. I pledge to maintain personal and academic integrity and support it in others. I

solemnly

promise

to

uphold

commitment to honor this code.

CORE VALUES curiosity

honesty

respect

2 | GUIDE FOR ACADEMICS AND STUDENT LIFE

kindness

responsibility

my


TABLE OF CONTENTS About our School. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Honor Code and Core Values . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Purpose of This Guide. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Non-Discrimination Policy. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Where Students Go With Questions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Faculty and Staff. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Academic Information and Policies. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 Honors Attitude. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 Academic Integrity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 Tampa Prep Grading Overview. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 Upper School Add/Drop Policy. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 Other Academic Policies. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 Policy for English as a Second Language (ESL) Students. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 Academic Probation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 Academic Policy for Suspended Students. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 Academic Levels of Courses. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 AP Student Qualifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 AP Exam Policy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 Opportunities for Accelerated Study. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 Arts, Global Studies, Humanities and STEM Concentrations. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 Honor Societies. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25 Registration for Classes. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25 Tampa Prep Graduation Requirements. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 Disabilities Policy. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 Philosophy. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 Services for Students with Disabilities. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 General Policy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 Process for Request and Documentation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 Release for Communications with Physician. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 Assessment of Request. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 Limitations on Requests. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 Commonly Asked Questions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 Experiential Learning and Extended Trips. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28 Field Trip Standards. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29 Senior Internship and Service Program. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29 International Students. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29 Semester Programs and School Year Abroad. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 Year-Long Program for Juniors and Seniors. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 Semester Programs for Juniors and Seniors. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 Semester Program for Sophomores. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 Commonly Asked Questions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 Attendance Policies. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31 Response for Repeated Absences from School . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32 Long-Term Medical Leave . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32 Tardiness. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32 Leaving the School Campus. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33 GUIDE FOR ACADEMICS AND STUDENT LIFE | 3


TABLE OF CONTENTS College Guidelines. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33 College Counseling. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33 College Admission . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33 College Visits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33 Policy for Reporting Information to Colleges. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34 SAT II Subject Tests . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34 Course Minimums for Florida's State Schools. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34 Student Records and Transcripts. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34 Florida's Bright Futures Scholarship Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34 Athletics and Activities. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34 Athletic and Activity Eligibility. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34 Participation in Non-Academic Events . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34 Student Organizations. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35 Student Fundraising. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35 Character Expectations and Development. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35 The Peer Counseling and Mentoring Program. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35 Tampa Prep Core Values. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35 Community Service. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36 Student Government. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36 Guiding Students. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36 Advising. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36 Weekly Meetings - Advising and Class Seminar. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36 My BackPack. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36 Limits of Advising and the Role of the School Counselor. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37 Counseling. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37 Course Selection Assistance. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37 Student Conduct and Discipline . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37 General Disciplinary Guidelines. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37 Types of Infractions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37 Disciplinary Consequences. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38 Concern for Students. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39 Conduct Review Board. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39 Conduct Policies. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40 Animal Policy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40 Book Bags . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40 Cleanliness and Litter. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40 Criminal Activity. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40 Dress Code . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40 Drugs, Alcohol, and Tobacco Policy. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41 Eating in the Buildings. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41 Elevator Use . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42 Fights or Horseplay. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42 General Conduct. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42 Harassment/Bullying. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42 Hazing. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42 Identification Cards. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42 4 | GUIDE FOR ACADEMICS AND STUDENT LIFE


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Illness. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43 Laptop and Mobile Device Security . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43 Laser Pointers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43 Lockers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43 Off Campus Behaviors. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43 Posting Signs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43 Public Displays of Affection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43 Student-Adult Interactions and Communications. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44 Weapons and Threats. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44 Technology Policies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44 Technology Mission Statement. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44 Technology Acceptable Use Policy. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44 Technology, Electronic Devices, and Computer Systems Usage Policy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44 Parking and Transportation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47 Automobiles and Parking. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47 Transportation to and From School-Sponsored Events. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48 Other Information. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48 Child Abuse Reporting. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48 Child Safety from Sexual Offenders and Predators. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48 Communications from School. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48 Evacuation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49 Faxing and Email. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49 Health Information Sharing. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49 Inspection Policy. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49 Interpretation, Modification, Amendment. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49 Investigations. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49 Lunch Service. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50 Parent/Family Cooperation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50 Payment of Tuition and Fees . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50 Re-Enrollment Considerations. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50 Student Records and Information. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50 Library Policies. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50 Peifer Library . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50 Challenged Book and Other Library Materials Policy. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50 Course Descriptions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52 Appendix. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78 Daily Schedule. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78 Planned Absence Form. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79 Middle School Three-Year Plan Sheet. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80 Upper School Four-Year Plan Sheet. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .81 Mathematics Course Flow Chart. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82 Science Options. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83 World and Classical Languages Options. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84 Add/Drop Form. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85

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PURPOSE OF THIS GUIDE The purpose of this Guide is to serve as a reference for a wide variety of student information. A primary purpose is to share the School’s Mission, Philosophy, Honor Code and Core Values. These serve as the guiding principles for everything else shared in the Guide. Guidelines are shared for acceptable student conduct in a variety of specific situations in which students need to know what is expected of them. A later section informs students of what likely will happen if they violate rules or the concepts established under the School’s Honor Code. The Guide also contains reference sections about the teaching faculty and where to go for help. The second half of the Guide contains a wealth of information about academic offerings, graduation requirements, course selection planning, and additional information. (Revised 7-19) Some of the guiding principles in this Guide also govern expectations of parents and guardians within our community. Therefore, parents and students are responsible for knowing its contents. Because it is impossible to consider every possible situation, especially in an ever-changing environment, we want to stress that none of the stated rules or procedures precludes the School from taking disciplinary action if students are involved in activities, on or off campus, that the School considers detrimental to other students or contrary to the general expectations of the School community. The Administration, in consultation with the Head of School, has the right to make final decisions in all matters involving student and parent rules. (Revised 7-19) The School reserves the right to interpret the content of this Guide, including the rules and regulations governing the academic and non-academic conduct of students. This Guide is not a contract, nor is it intended to be so construed. Our School reserves the right to modify and/or amend the content of this Guide at any time during the year. Please consult the most updated version of the Guide on the School website at www.tampaprep.org

NON-DISCRIMINATION POLICY Tampa Prep is an inclusive and open-minded environment that does not discriminate according to race, color, national origin, religion, gender, sexual orientation, gender identity or matters of individual choice. Tampa Prep does not engage in personnel practices prohibited by federal law. This policy extends to all activities and aspects of the School and specifically to the practices of faculty and staff hiring and management, in student admissions, student evaluation, discipline and student life. Tampa Prep will encourage and promote non-discrimination among all of its faculty, staff, students and parents. Discriminatory actions contrary to this policy, which adversely affect the environment, image, or student life of the school by any member of the faculty or staff, will be considered grounds for dismissal. Discriminatory actions contrary to this policy by a student, whether or not such action takes place on school grounds, will be considered a disciplinary problem and will be subject to such disciplinary actions as determined by the Head of School. (On January 19, 2017 the Board of Trustees voted to adopt this amendment of existing School Policy which was previously adopted by the Board of Trustees on May 23, 2007.)

6 | GUIDE FOR ACADEMICS AND STUDENT LIFE


WHERE TO GO WITH QUESTIONS

WHERE STUDENTS GO WITH QUESTIONS DESCRIPTION

UPPER SCHOOL

MIDDLE SCHOOL

Absence, Tardy, Leaving Early & Illness Mrs. Zollinger

Mrs. Zollinger

Academics

Mr. Fenlon

See your Grade-Level Dean (9) Mrs. Jisha (10) Mr. Clements (11) Mr. Morrison (12) Mr. Carlson

Academic Concentrations

Arts - Ms. Calandra Global Studies - Mrs. Pereira Humanities - Mr. Hill STEM - M ​ rs. Beekman

Ms. Johnson/Ms. Greseth

Ms. Johnson/Ms. Greseth

Athletics

Mr. Lavoie

Mr. DeTringo

Clubs & Student Organizations

Mr. Clements

Ms. Souza

Campus Store

Mrs. Thomason

Mrs. Thomason

College Counseling

Ms. Leonhardt

Mrs. J. Rodriguez

DH (Disciplinary Holdover)

Mr. Clements

Mrs. Embry

Dress Code

Mr. Clements

Mrs. Embry

Educational Concerns

Advisors

Advisors

Academic Support & Accommodations

General Questions

Mrs. Steel

Ms. Souza

Locker Assignments

Mrs. Steel

Ms. Souza

Lost & Found

Jewelry - Mrs. Thomason

Jewelry - Mrs. Thomason

Technology - Ms. Lassacher

Technology - Ms. Lassacher

Other - Bins in Lobby & Gym

Other - Bins in Lobby & Gym

Parking Decals

Mrs. Zollinger

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

Schedule Adjustments

Mrs. Jisha

Mr. Fenlon

Senior Internships

Mrs. Steel

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

Social & Emotional Support

Mrs. Cole

Mrs. Cole

Student Records/Transcripts

College Requests -Ms. Leonhardt

Ms. Souza

Technology

Textbooks

All Other Requests - Mrs. Jisha iPad - Ms. Lassacher

iPad - Ms. Lassacher

Lost & Found - Ms. Lassacher

Lost & Found - Ms. Lassacher

My BackPack - Mr. Couchman

My BackPack - Mr. Couchman

PowerSchool Learning - Ms. Lassacher

PowerSchool Learning - Ms. Lassacher

Individual Classroom Teacher

Individual Classroom Teacher

GUIDE FOR ACADEMICS AND STUDENT LIFE | 7


FAC U LT Y A N D S TA F F LYNN D. ASHWORTH Arts Arts Department Chair Savannah College of Art and Design, M.A. Virginia Commonwealth University, School of the Arts, B.F.A. DERRICK B. AUSTIN Custodian KIMBERLY A. BAGGETT Director of Human Resources St. Leo University, B.A., M.B.A.

WESLEY M. BURNS Bus Fleet Manager JESSICA L. CALANDRA Arts Arts Concentration Coordinator University of South Florida, B.M. STEPHANIE A. CARDILLO English English Department Chair Florida State University, B.S.

MICHELLE T. BAHTIC English University of South Florida, B.A., M.A.

CARL C. CARLSON Head of the Upper School Senior Class Dean Wesleyan University, B.A. Harvard University Graduate School of Education, Ed.M.

EDSEL R. BAKER, JR. Mathematics Morehead State University, B.S. Northern Illinois University Applied Prob and Stats, M.S. Duke University, M.Div.

MARGARET CARRAWAY History Wofford College, B.A.

M. JOHN BAMFORD English Harvard University, B.A. New School For Social Research, M.A. RAJESH BARNABAS Arts Geneseo University, B.A. Nazareth College, M.Ed. SUZANNE L. BEEKMAN Science STEM Concentration Coordinator University of South Florida, B.S., M.A. University of Tampa, M.S. HAROLD BONO Facilities Helper EDWARD A. BOWDEN Security ROBERT W. BRADSHAW Faculty Advisor - Senior Class Projects Yale University, B.A. Temple University, J.D. ANDY V. BRICKER Physical Education Campbell University, B.S. LAURA M. BRIDGES-PEREIRA World and Classical Languages World and Classical Languages Department Chair Global Studies Concentration Coordinator Virginia Commonwealth University, B.A. Pennsylvania State University, M.A. 8 | GUIDE FOR ACADEMICS AND STUDENT LIFE

SANTIAGO L. CARREÑO World and Classical Languages History and the Social Sciences University of Morelos (Mexico), B.A. GEORGIANNA CAYON Science University of South Florida, B.S., M.A.T. VIRGINIA R. CHAPMAN Science Gettysburg College, B.A. University of Tampa, M.Ed. MICHAEL P. CIRCLE Facilities Director RYAN J. CLEMENTS Upper School Dean of Students Sophomore Class Dean State University of New York, College at Oswego, B.S. D. MICHELE COLE School Counselor Cornerstone University, B.A. Liberty University, M.A. SAMANTHA M. COOK History and the Social Sciences Florida State University, B.S. SUSANA F. COONER Assistant to the Head of School International Student Support University of South Florida, B.A.


FAC ULT Y A ND STAF F DAVID J. COUCHMAN Director of Systems Management University of Florida, B.F.A. Tulane University, M.F.A. SARA J. CRAWFORD Physical Education Science Athletic Trainer University of South Florida, B.S., M.S. MARTHA M. DEAMBROSE Arts University of Tampa, B.A. JOHN N. DETRINGO, III Mathematics Middle School Athletic Director SUNY At Potsdam, B.S., B.A. JACOB W. DE WEERD Director of the Annual Fund Virginia Tech, B.S. University of Florida, M.Ed.

DONNA H. FOWLER Mathematics Colby College, B.A. MARIA M. FRANZ English University of Virginia, B.A. Indiana University, M.F.A. FRANK J. FREN Building Engineer LAURA J. FREN Database Management and Development Assistant MERY GARCIA Custodian J. ODELL GILBERT Head Custodian JOSEPH B. GILL Science University of South Florida, B.A, Ph.D.

AGYEI DOMFEH Mathematics London South Bank University, B.S. Norfolk State University, M.A.

JENNIFER GRESETH Academic Support Counselor St. Cloud State University, B.S. Barry University, M.S.

PATRICIA G. EMBRY Associate Head of the Middle School Mathematics Mathematics Department Chair University of South Florida, B.A., M.A.

KERRI-ANN GROSSO Science The College of William and Mary, B.S. Texas A&M University, M.S.

I. ENAYE ENGLENTON History and the Social Sciences Golden Gate University, B.A. University of San Francisco, M.A. W. DENNIS FACCIOLO Director of Admissions University of Delaware, B.A. Johns Hopkins University, M.I.A. JOSEPH R. FENLON Associate Head of School Head of the Middle School University of Wisconsin at Lacrosse, B.S. University of Tampa, M.Ed. NILDA FIGUEREDO Custodian AMANDA L. FONTANA Assistant Director of Stewardship and Constituent Relations University of Tampa, B.S.

KRISTIN GROSSO Assistant Director of College Counseling State University of Cortland, B.S. The College of New Rochelle, M.S. BENJAMIN T. HALL Science Arts Brigham Young University, B.S. University of Florida, Ph.D. LISA M. HARMAN History and the Social Sciences Dickinson College, B.A. WILLIAM HARVARD World and Classical Languages University of the South, B.A. St. John's College, M.A. ROSA B. HARWELL Mathematics University of South Florida, B.A.

GUIDE FOR ACADEMICS AND STUDENT LIFE | 9


FAC U LT Y A N D S TA F F AMANDA HELIP-WOOLEY Science University of Florida, B.S. Tulane University, Ph.D. ADRIAN J. HENDRIX Mathematics Indiana University, B.S. ANDREW C. HILL History and the Social Sciences, Humanities Concentration Coordinator University of Montana, B.A. MARY BETH HILL World and Classical Languages University of Richmond, B.A. TAMRA D. HONEGGER Associate Director of Admissions Director of Financial Aid Director of Summer Programs Eastern Illinois University, B.S. STACIA P. HOTTLE Science Arts Science Department Chair Sigety Family Academic Chair University of Miami, B.S. ANDREW D. HOY Arts Sigety Family Academic Chair University of South Florida, B.M., M.A. CHRIS S. HUGHES Building Engineer MEG E. HUNTLEY Director of Stewardship and Constituent Relations California State University, B.A. KIM M. JAGO '81 History and the Social Sciences University of the South, B.A. University of South Florida, M.A. EUGENE R. JALBERT Mathematics Boston College, B.A., M.A. CHRISTINE D. JISHA Upper School Academic Dean Freshman Class Dean Skidmore College, B.A. University of Virginia, M.Ed. SARAH R. JOHNSON Academic Support Counselor Northwestern University, B.S., M.A. 10 | GUIDE FOR ACADEMICS AND STUDENT LIFE

JANICE JONES Bus Driver BRADLEY P. KACZMARSKI Physical Education Science Weight Room Supervisor Southern Illinois University, B.S. JENNIFER L. KELLER Mathematics University of South Florida, B.A. JOHN E. KELLY, IV Pool Technician Indiana University of Pennsylvania, B.S. HEATHER L. LAMBIE Director of Strategic Marketing University of Florida, B.S. JANET LAINÉ World and Classical Languages Wofford College, B.A. Columbia College, M.Ed SUZANNE LASSACHER '85 Student Technology Support Coordinator Science Arts Florida State University, B.A. Montana State University, M.S. CHRISTOPHER LAVOIE Director of Athletics University of Vermont, B.S. Southern New Hampshire, M.S. CHERYL A. LEONHARDT Director of College Counseling University of Scranton, B.A., M.S. Saint Joseph's University, M.Ed. EDWARD A. LEDESMA Security CHAD M. LEWIS Director of Technology Ohio State University, B.A. Western Governors University, M.B.A. VICTORIA G. LEWIS Technology Integration Specialist Karelian State Pedagogical University (Russia) B.A., M.Ed Western Governors University, M.Ed. SARAH R. LONETTO English Florida State University, B.A, M.S.


FAC ULT Y A ND STAF F RICHARD LOWRY Bus Driver DAVID R. MANN Arts New York University, B.F.A. The Old Globe Theatre/University of San Diego, M.F.A. CHRISTOPHER A. MARAGHY Science Eckerd College, B.S. CARLOS MARCHENA Custodian JAIME MARQUEZ Controller KEVIN W. MCENDREE Technology Support Hillsborough Community College, A.S. ERIN Y. MONA English University of North Florida, B.A. NOËL H. MONEA-DEJONGE English Calvin College, B.A. DONALD D. MORRISON '86 Dean of Faculty History and the Social Sciences Junior Class Dean Haverford College, B.A. University of Victoria (Canada), M.A. Columbia University, Teachers College, M.Ed. MAGGIE MORRISON Director of Donor Engagement Wellesley College, B.A. LATONIGI C. NEMBHARD Daytime Security CELIA NUFLO Custodian BARRY R. PARKS History and the Social Sciences University of South Florida, B.A., B.S., M.A. ALFREDO A. P. PEREIRA World and Classical Languages Universidade Novade Lisboa, Portugal B.S. Universidade De Granada, M.A. FELIX E. PEREZ Custodian

KI PERRY-COONEY Director of Development Lafayette College, B.A. Boston University, M.B.A. JOHN H. PHELPS, JR. Daytime Security Leary Institute, A.A. KEVIN M. PLUMMER Head of School Colby College, B.A. Columbia University, Teachers College, M.A. K. K. QUAH Science Arts University of Wisconsin, B.S. American Graduate School of International Management, M.B.A. BRUNO A. QUATTRONE Physical Education Ithaca College, B.S. LINDA Y. QUINN Assistant to the Director of Admissions University of South Florida, B.S. DIANA L. RENDINA Teacher Librarian University of South Florida, B.A., M.A. JODY B. RODRIGUEZ Middle School and 9th Grade College Counselor Emory University, B.A. University of Tennessee, M.A. LAZARO RODRIGUEZ Custodian MELANIE L. RODRIGUEZ Assistant to the Director of Finance and Operations University of South Florida, B.A. GUILLERMO RUIZ DE SOMOCURCIO World and Classical Languages University of Central Florida, B.S., B.A. Universidad De Salamanca, Spain M.S. HEIDI SABEAN World and Classical Languages University of New Hampshire, B.S., M.S. SCOTT M. SANDOVAL English University of South Florida, B.A., M.A.T. University of Florida, Ed.S. KIMBERLY J. SANFORD History and the Social Sciences University of South Florida, B.S. GUIDE FOR ACADEMICS AND STUDENT LIFE | 11


FAC U LT Y A N D S TA F F

BRIAN D. SARKOZY Mathematics Central Connecticut State University, B.A., M.A.

MELISSA S. THOMASON Receptionist St. Leo University, B.A.

DAVID SCHINTZIUS Director of Finance and Operations State University of New York At Buffalo, B.S.

ELHADJI Y. TOURE Network Manager Hillsborough Community College, A.S.

JOHN S. SEARY World and Classical Languages University of South Florida, B.A.

AARON TURNER Assistant Director of College Counseling Old Dominion University, B.S.

ANDREA R. SEYMORE Assistant to the Director of Facilities University of Tampa, B.A.

CHRIS VAN DYCK English Dartmouth College, B.A. The University of Groningen, M.A.

BRIAN M. SMALLHEER Arts Polk State College, A.A. DOUGLAS A. SMITH History and the Social Sciences History and the Social Sciences Department Chair University of Maryland, B.A. Cleveland-Marshall College of Law, J.D. ERIC D. SNOW Assistant Athletic Director University of Tampa, B.S. KIMBERLY A. SOUZA Assistant to the Head of the Middle School University of Florida, B.S. ABBY STAFFORD Content Creator University of Florida, B.S. KRISTY J. STEEL Assistant to the Head of the Upper School University of Florida, B.S. ROBERTO SUAREZ Custodian ANDREW R. SUFFICOOL Physical Education Science Athletic Trainer Catawba College, B.S. University of South Florida, M.A. MYCHAEL SUMBY Assistant Director of Admissions Florida State University, B.S. University of Tampa, M.Ed. JAN A. TAYLOR Lunch Coordinator

12 | GUIDE FOR ACADEMICS AND STUDENT LIFE

KEVYN VAZQUEZ Bus Driver CHELSEA WIELOSZYNSKI English Arts Florida State University, B.A. C. BRIAN WILLIAMS Mathematics Science University of Southampton (England), B.S., Ph.D. ELIZABETH W. ZOLLINGER Health Coordinator Assistant to the Dean of Students State University of New York At Plattsburgh, B.S.


ACA D EM I C I NFORM AT I ON A ND P O LICIES Tampa Prep has always offered a demanding college preparatory curriculum that has encouraged its students to perform well in the most competitive of college environments. The School realizes, however, that education goes well beyond a simple preparation for college and incorporates the education of the whole child—encouraging each to discover, develop and maximize his or her inner strengths and capacities. Tampa Prep’s curriculum allows opportunity for individual growth, independent research and some subject specialization. To ensure that it does this most effectively, the School’s curriculum, using as its minimum standards the guidelines published by the Florida Council of Independent Schools, is reviewed annually by the Curriculum Committee, Academic Leadership Committee and Head of School, and is updated according to current needs. Changes in the curriculum will be reflected in the Course Description section of this handbook. Tampa Prep strongly believes in the sanctity and standards of its most important community values and norms. Among these values and norms are: Academic Honesty and Integrity, Artistic Integrity, Athletic Integrity, an appreciation for diversity and acceptance, a community free from harassment, a drug and alcohol-free campus and adherence to the policies and procedures of Tampa Preparatory School. In 2009, the following Honor Code was developed and adopted: THE HONOR CODE: A COMMITMENT TO HONOR As a member of the Tampa Prep Community, I am responsible for upholding and promoting honesty, trust, respect and fairness in all venues of school life. I pledge to maintain personal and academic integrity and support it in others. I solemnly promise to uphold my commitment to honor this code.

HONORS ATTITUDE Tampa Prep encourages each student to develop an “honors attitude” which is reflected in all areas— academic, social, physical, and moral. The School strongly believes that an honors attitude is important for all students, regardless of their level of aptitude. Students who aspire to an “honors attitude” may look to the following as a model: Seriousness of purpose.  A student with an honors attitude tries to produce the best work that he or she can. When confused about an academic matter, or when missing a class, a student with an honors attitude takes responsibility for successfully learning or producing the required material. Class contributions. A student with an honors attitude contributes to a positive learning environment through class discussion, attentive listening, well-planned oral reports, cooperative group work, and thorough preparation for class. Effective management of course requirements. A student with an honors attitude manages time wisely to keep track of and meet deadlines and produces his or her best work by devoting sufficient time to homework and study. Emotional maturity.  As appropriate to the grade level, a student with an honors attitude discusses controversial or challenging ideas with emotional maturity. Such a student also strives for excellence in all assignments, even those which may be of less personal interest.

Academic integrity. A student with an honors attitude takes responsibility for his or her learning, completes in-class and out-of-class assignments according to the Honor Code and works cooperatively and respectfully with teachers and other students.

ACADEMIC INTEGRITY Education presupposes a context in which honesty is a cardinal virtue. Truthfulness, respect of work and integrity are fundamental expectations for academic integrity and to the Honor Code. Departure from this standard constitutes a violation of the School Honor Code and causes the student to be liable for major disciplinary action. All homework, tests, quizzes, examinations and papers are written under the Honor Code. EXAMPLES OF ACADEMIC DISHONESTY

Actions that fall below the expectations of trust, honesty, respect and fairness, as established by the Honor Code, will also constitute a violation of the Honor Code and result in disciplinary action. Examples include, but are not limited to: • Lying. • Using notes, calculator memory, or other unauthorized aids in a quiz, test, examination or paper, or copying from or being influenced by another student’s work. • Giving unauthorized aid to another student: allowing another student to copy or use one’s test, paper, project or notebook, or giving answers to tests or quizzes. • Using a cell phone or any unauthorized electronic device during a quiz or examination. GUIDE FOR ACADEMICS AND STUDENT LIFE | 13


AC A D E M IC I N F ORM AT I ON A ND P OL I C I ES • •

Obtaining help on homework or on take-home tests that is beyond the limit specified by the teacher. Plagiarizing: presenting work as one’s own, in part or full from some other source (be it published work, a parent, another student’s work, an Internet site, Spark Notes, or any similar aid).

AVOIDING PLAGIARISM

In most written work, one can avoid the charge of plagiarism or unauthorized aid by acknowledging sources in the following ways: • Formal footnoting – many guides are available; consult your M.L.A. handbook section 1.6; • Formal or informal bibliography – listing at the end of the paper any sources you have consulted while writing; • Internal citation – giving credit in your text to the original source for a direct quotation or paraphrase (restating the text in another form or in other words); • Checking with your class teacher when in doubt. DISCIPLINARY ACTION FOR ACADEMIC DISHONESTY

Academic honesty violations will be addressed by the Dean of Students and/or administration directly. Major violations, as determined by the administration, will be referred to the Conduct Review Board for assessment and recommendation. In all cases (minor and major violations), disciplinary action will be determined by the severity of the infraction, the student’s prior record of similar violations, and the student’s cooperation and honesty in the investigatory process. Penalties for Honor Code violations may include one or more of the following: • An “F” on the test, quiz, examination or paper in which the violation occurred. • Lowering of the student’s final grade. • Failure in the course involved. • Suspension from School. • Expulsion from School. Students who are suspended for Honor Code violations will be required to make up all academic work missed while on suspension.

TAMPA PREP GRADING OVERVIEW Grades and comments are issued to parents four times a year, at the middle and end of each semester. Parents are encouraged to discuss their student’s progress with the student’s advisor. Should further concern arise, appointments should be made with Mr. Fenlon (for Grades 6, 7, 8) or Mrs. Jisha (Grade 9), Mr. Clements (Grade 10), Mr. Morrison (Grade 11), or Ms. Leonhardt (Grade 12). In addition, teachers and advisors are encouraged to communicate with parents regarding overall school performance.

14 | GUIDE FOR ACADEMICS AND STUDENT LIFE

TAMPA PREP UNWEIGHTED GRADE SCALE LETTER POINTS GPA

LETTER POINTS GPA

A+ 97-100 4.33 C+ 77-79 2.33 A 93-96 4.00 C 73-76 2.00 A- 90-92 3.67 C- 70-72 1.67 B+ 87-89 3.33 D+ 67-69 1.33 B 83-86 3.00 D 63-66 1.00 B- 80-82 2.67 D- 60-62 0.67 F <60 0.00 CLASS RANK

Because of the highly academic nature of the School, Tampa Prep does not rank students numerically. Instead, the School reports individual grade point averages to colleges. HEAD'S LIST

Those students who have a semester unweighted average of A- (3.67) or higher (no rounding) attain the Head’s List. In the Middle School, PE class are not included in calculations for Head’s List candidacy. HONORS LIST

Those students who have a semester unweighted average of B (3.0) or higher (no rounding) attain the Honors List. In the Middle School, PE classes are not included in calculations for Honors List candidacy. CREDITS

A passing average at the end of each semester earns a student one-half credit for each semester of a year-long course and one-half credit for a one semester course. No fractional credit is awarded for partial completion of courses. GRADE POINT AVERAGE (GPA)

The unweighted and weighted cumulative Grade Point Average (GPA) is calculated using semester grades beginning with the freshman year and includes only courses taken in grades 9 through 12. In order to determine a weighted GPA, the following points are added to the unweighted GPA of these classes: • Honors (H) courses: 0.5 points • Advanced Honors (ADV) courses: 0.75 points • Advanced Placement (AP) courses: 1.0 points • College Placement (CP) courses are not weighted

UPPER SCHOOL ADD/DROP POLICY When adding or dropping a course or changing sections, students must complete an Add/Drop Form and return it to the Upper School Academic Dean. Forms can be found in the Upper School Academic Deans' office and in the Appendix. a. Signatures are always required from the teacher, student, parent/legal guardian, advisor and Head of the Upper School. Seniors must also obtain the College Counselor's signature. b. If a student participates in a Concentration, the


ACA D EM I C I NFORM AT I ON A ND P O LICIES Concentration Coordinator's signature is required. c. Changing teachers of the same course also requires the Dean of Faculty’s signature. d.  Switching from one level of a discipline to another level of the same discipline (for example, Spanish 2 to Spanish 1) also requires the signature of the Dean of Faculty. DEADLINES FOR DROPPING CLASSES

Classes may be dropped without penalty within five school days after the School posts mid-semester grade updates. Transcripts of classes dropped after these dates and through either November 15 or April 15 will indicate that the student has “withdrawn passing” or “withdrawn failing.” Classes may not be dropped after either November 15 in the first semester or April 15 in the second semester. Seniors who drop classes are responsible for notifying the colleges to which they have applied if those colleges already possess the seniors’ transcripts. DEADLINE FOR ADDING CLASSES

No class, other than a class comparable to one in a student’s current schedule, may be added after its 12th meeting. TRANSFER DEADLINES AND GRADE TRANSFER POLICIES BETWEEN COMPARABLE CLASSES

Students may transfer from one level of a comparable class to another (i.e. classes with decidedly similar content but taught at different academic levels, such as AP US History and US History Honors, or Algebra 2 Advanced Honors and Algebra 2 Honors) up to and including the 12th meeting day of the new class. In this scenario, students will begin the new course without a grade. If students choose to transfer after the 12th meeting date up to the end of the fifth week of classes, then students' grades would transfer with them. In both scenarios, teachers are permitted to have students make up work for the class that has been added. After the fifth week of classes, students may not transfer between comparable classes. If students wish to change from one comparable yearlong class to another after the first semester, they should speak with their advisor and the appropriate Grade-Level Dean before second semester classes begin. Should questions about comparable classes arise, the Head of the Upper School/Middle School will determine whether one course is comparable to another. MAKE-UP WORK

Any student switching into a class already in progress may be asked to make up all significant work (i.e., required reading, tests, papers, projects, labs, reports, etc.) assigned before his or her transfer. This work should be completed according to a calendar agreed upon by the student and teacher. In certain situations, the Head

of the Upper School/Middle School may mitigate the amount of work to be made up.

OTHER ACADEMIC POLICIES POLICY FOR MAJOR ASSIGNMENTS

1. Schedule with the Head of the Upper School/ Middle School.  To distribute student work loads and school resources as effectively as possible, the Head of the Middle School coordinates and approves all Middle School major assignment due dates and the Head of the Upper School coordinates and approves all Upper School major assignment due dates. 2. Identify as “major.”  “Major assignments” are those that require substantial extra and extended time and independent work. Examples: Grade 11 Synthesis Project, Middle School Portfolio Presentation, research papers, etc. Teachers designate relevant assignments as “major” and make certain that all students understand their designation at the time the assignments are made. 3. Collect at 8:50 a.m. To discourage students from missing school to complete homework, all major assignments are due at 8:50 a.m. Teachers usually make their major assignments due on Mondays. 4. Grade reduction if late.  If a student is absent on the due date of a major paper, project, or report, he or she must send the assignment to school with someone else. Major assignments not received by 8:50 a.m. on the due date are automatically turned in to the Head of the Upper School/Middle School who will determine a grade penalty. NUMBER AND VARIETY OF TESTS

To help students perform well academically, teachers should do their best to schedule tests so that students have no more than two tests in one day. Students who are unable to rearrange the dates of more than two tests in a day should see the Head of the Middle School (MS) or the Head of the Upper School (US). To help students maintain academic integrity, teachers of multiple sections of the same course are encouraged to vary their tests and quizzes when all sections do not take the test on the same day. TESTS AND MAJOR ASSIGNMENTS BEFORE EXAMS

To ensure quality evaluation and optimum benefit for exam preparation, all major assignments must be due no later than two weeks before the start of exams. Unless pre-approved by the Head of the Upper School/Middle School, feedback and grades for all but the smallest quizzes and homework assignments must be collected from and returned to students at least five school days before exams begin.

GUIDE FOR ACADEMICS AND STUDENT LIFE | 15


AC A D E M IC I N F ORM AT I ON A ND P OL I C I ES EXAMS

With some exceptions, Tampa Prep classes include exams. These are weighted 15% of the semester’s total grade. Two hour exams are administered over a three-hour period at the end of each semester. Arts performances are considered exams. Seniors who have more than eight unexcused absences from any class during the second semester will be required to take the second semester final examination and be required to attend all meetings for that class prior to the final exam. EXEMPTION FROM EXAMS

Because each Tampa Prep academic discipline offers only one exam each year, and because exams serve as a valuable preparation for college assessments, all students, except second semester seniors who are not failing a class, are required to take the exam for each class in which they are enrolled. (Revised 7-19) ARTS EXAMS

Arts major performances are considered exams. All Arts faculty will notify their students of these dates during the first month of classes. INCLUDING OTHER ASSESSMENTS AS PART OF AN EXAM

Other culminating requirements such as class presentations, term papers, oral examinations and projects may be considered a portion of a course’s examination grade. Whether simply a two-hour final or a multi-faceted assessment that incorporates a final with other culminating assignments, the total exam grade equals one-quarter of the student’s semester grade. OPEN BOOK EXAMS

Open book exams may be given if 1) logistically their administration site can be isolated from other exam sites, and 2) the Head of the Upper School/Middle School approves the teacher’s request to give such an exam. REPEATED COURSES

Students may repeat a class in Tampa Prep’s Summer School or during the next school year. Upon completion of the repeated course, the grade of the first class is deleted from the student’s official school transcript and replaced with the new grade if higher. If not higher, then the original grade will remain. Please note: Tampa Prep grades will not be replaced with grades earned at any other academic institution. Students may only repeat a class at Tampa Prep during the following periods: 1) During the summer after the class was first completed; 2) During the subsequent school year; 3) During the second summer after the 16 | GUIDE FOR ACADEMICS AND STUDENT LIFE

course was first completed. Upon completion of the repeated course, the grade of the first class is deleted from the student’s official school transcript and replaced with the new grade if higher. If not higher, then the original grade will remain. Courses with grades of Bor higher may not be replaced. Please note: Tampa Prep grades will not be replaced with grades earned at any other academic institution. EXTRA HELP

With minor exceptions, faculty members are available in their classroom for extra help from 3:30-4:15 p.m. each day and at other times during the day as designated by the teacher. Students may be required by faculty to attend these sessions. In addition, faculty may make some time available each week in the classroom for review and for working individually with students. Students who have teachers who coach need to make special arrangements for extra help sessions. Coaches try to ensure that they are available at least one afternoon per week and other mutually agreed upon times. National Honor Society members volunteer as tutors for other students during the school day. Appointments with these students should be made through the National Honor Society Advisor. Students must seek help from their teachers before seeking student tutors. The Writing Center, staffed by students recommended by their teachers, is located in the library. Students are encouraged to sign up for appointments using the online format. In addition to the appointment calendar, staffers will be in the library from 3:30-4:15 daily. STUDY HALLS

Most students choose to attend Study Hall for one of their scheduled periods. The purpose of this is to allow time during the class day for students to complete a portion of their homework or to seek assistance from a teacher. Unless otherwise designated, all Study Halls meet in the Peifer Library. Students are expected to be on time, and tardies and absences will be recorded like other classes. The Study Hall monitor will take attendance, maintain a productive study environment, and address any student issues. Guidelines: • Students should come to Study Hall prepared with sufficient work to occupy them for the entire period and should not be excused from the room to retrieve additional materials. • Phones and other electronic devices should be used for academic purposes. Under no circumstances should a student talk on their phone in the library. • A student is permitted to listen to music if he or she is wearing headphones at a volume that cannot be heard by other students. • Leaving the library to see a faculty or staff member (to take a test, see the Health Coordinator, etc.) requires a note from the faculty member


ACA D EM I C I NFORM AT I ON A ND P O LICIES (notes furnished upon return to the library are acceptable.) Seniors who did not receive any grade below C- in the previous set of quarterly grades, and who are responsible Tampa Prep citizens are excused from Study Hall. However, they must remain on campus in designated academic locations. Juniors who are on the Head’s List during the first semester are exempt from study hall in the second semester. • All students who are exempt from Study Hall must check in with the Health Coordinator if their Study Hall occurs at 8:50 a.m. (the beginning of the class day) or 1:30 p.m. (the first period after lunch). • A student who has been suspended at any point in the previous year may not be excused from study hall. TESTS AND WORK MISSED DUE TO ABSENCE

All missed or due quizzes, tests, labs, and assignments must be completed and turned in on the day the student returns to school, even if that student’s class does not meet that day or if that student arrives at school after that class has met. Teachers may penalize assignments received beyond their due dates according to individual teachers’ policies. Under extenuating circumstances such as prolonged absences or religious holidays (see below), students must complete and turn in assignments within five school days of returning to school. No work should be accepted for credit beyond that time unless approved by the Head of the Upper School/Middle School. Refer to “Policy for Major Assignments” as well.

activities. c. If the physical restrictions are to exist for an extended period of time, a conversation with the class instructor, the Dean of Students and the Head of the Upper School/Middle School will be initiated to determine if the student will be able to meet the expectations of the class. If the student is unable to meet the expectations of the class, a schedule change will likely be required. 2. The student must make every effort to participate in class activities in some manner. Whenever possible, the School expects the student to meet basic expectations for the class and to stay engaged in the learning environment. This includes dressing out for class and participating in any way that is possible given the illness/injury constraints. For example, students may be asked to complete the following activities while injured/ill: officiate contests, keep score, engage in alternative exercises (appropriate to the injury/illness), write research papers and other assignments that the instructor feels reasonable. Students who fail to meet these requirements will have participation points deducted from their grade. TUTORING

Tutoring may be appropriate when students need special, continuing, individualized assistance, but it should be considered only after the teacher has provided extensive extra help. Teachers should consult with the Head of the Upper School/Middle School before pursuing tutoring options or recommendations. Tampa Prep faculty may not tutor or give private athletic coaching to Tampa Prep students for pay.

PHYSICAL EDUCATION PARTICIPATION POLICY

Participation is a key component of Tampa Prep's Physical Education Department curriculum. As such, the following policy ensures that those students who cannot physically participate in class due to injury or illness are able to continue their engagement with the learning process. If a student is physically unable to participate in class due to injury or illness, the School asks the student and his/her family to adhere to the following guidelines to help ensure that the educational experience remains positive and productive: 1. A non-parent, physician's note must be turned in to the school's Health Coordinator outlining the student's physical restrictions. Teachers are generally not health care professionals who are qualified to diagnose injuries and illness. As such, we need to rely on the guidance of a qualified doctor, physician's assistant or athletic trainer. a. The note from the qualified health-care professional must be turned in as quickly as possible after the injury/illness occurs. b. A student will not be allowed to return to participation until a non-parent, physician's note is turned in to the school's Health Coordinator stating that the student can resume physical

INCOMPLETE GRADES

If a student has not completed all work for a grading period, his or her teacher comment may include an expected date of completion. If more make-up time is needed, the teacher should arrange a make-up schedule with the advisor and Head of the Upper School/Middle School. RELIGIOUS HOLIDAYS

Religious holidays are not formally recognized on the Tampa Prep calendar. In setting the academic calendar for each year, conflicts with these holidays may occur. In consideration of their significance for many students, tests and work missed due to absences for major religious holidays falls under this policy. Students who plan to miss three or more classes due to a religious holiday must submit an Planned Absence Form in advance of the date. See Attendance Policies for more details on completing an Planned Absence Form. In addition, they must notify their teachers in advance of the upcoming absence. Students who miss school for a religious holiday will not be required to turn in any assignments or take GUIDE FOR ACADEMICS AND STUDENT LIFE | 17


AC A D E M IC I N F ORM AT I ON A ND P OL I C I ES any assessments on the day of the holiday or the day following the religious holiday. Furthermore, they will be allowed five school days after returning from a religious holiday to complete and turn in all missed assignments and assessments. HOMEWORK OVER THANKSGIVING/SPRING BREAK

No homework is to be assigned over Thanksgiving or Spring Break. No assignments can be due on the day of return from either Break. No major projects can be due during the first week back from Spring Break. CALCULATOR POLICY

Scientific calculators may be used throughout the Science and Mathematics curriculum at the discretion of the instructor. A calculator application on the iPad may often be appropriate. However, in testing situations students will be required to bring their own TI-35 scientific calculator. In advanced classes, a TI-84 graphing calculator may be required. Use of more advanced calculators such as the TI-89 and TI-92 are prohibited.

POLICY FOR ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE (ESL) STUDENTS 1. As individual teachers deem appropriate, they may be flexible with the assessment of assignments for ESL students as a way to facilitate these students’ efforts to master material. 2. Ultimately, however, Tampa Prep’s ESL students are to be held to the same academic standard on their transcripts as all other Tampa Prep students. For instance, on the transcript a teacher’s “B” should represent the same level of academic accomplishment for ESL and native-English speaking students alike. 3. Tampa Prep’s teachers are not required to provide any more out-of-class help to ESL students than they would to native-English speaking students. ACADEMIC PROBATION Any student who earns two D’s or one F, or worse, in any semester will be placed on Academic Probation for the next semester. Each student on Academic Probation may meet within two weeks of the release of grades with his or her Academic Probation Advisory Committee (APAC) to discuss definite actions to help the student improve his or her academic performance (unless a parent/teacher conference was previously held). These actions may include, but are not restricted to, extra help, tutoring, diagnostic testing, counseling, removing school privileges, and suspending school activities (clubs, arts, sports). A letter will be sent home informing each student and parent(s) of the student’s probationary status. Each student’s progress will be monitored closely by the Head of the Upper School/Middle School and the 18 | GUIDE FOR ACADEMICS AND STUDENT LIFE

Advisor. At other intervals during the semester, the student will meet with the Head of the Upper School/ Middle School, Dean of Faculty, Upper School Academic Dean, or the Advisor, and as needed, specific teachers. The results of these meetings will be communicated to parents. The number of follow-up meetings will be determined by the Head of the Upper School/Middle School and Advisor. Students on Academic Probation who earn improved grades (no more than one D) for the next semester will be removed from Academic Probation. Any student remaining on probation for the next semester may be subject to separation from the school. The Head of School or Head of the Upper School/Middle School will inform the parent(s) and the student of the School’s final decision. NOTE: 1. The determination of Academic Probation status relies only on semester grades, not cumulative grades. 2. Tampa Prep Summer School grades may be used to replace grades. The new grade following Summer School) may remove the student from Academic Probation. APAC COMPOSITION

The Academic Probation Advisory Committee comprised of the student’s: 1. Grade-Level Dean 2. Advisor 3. School Counselor (as needed) and 4. Teachers

is

ACADEMIC POLICY FOR SUSPENDED STUDENTS 1. Suspended students must make up all academic work missed while serving the suspension; 2. Teachers must give that work full academic credit; 3. All suspensions will be reported to colleges during the admission process. ACADEMIC LEVELS OF COURSES HONORS COURSES

Most classes at Tampa Prep are taught at an honors level appropriate to the grade or level of the course. ADVANCED HONORS COURSES

Advanced Algebra 2, Advanced Precalculus, Calculus, Advanced Chemistry, Advanced Physics, Advanced Spanish 3 and Spanish 4 are designated as “Advanced Honors” classes and require academic dedication beyond those necessary for success at the Honors level. ADVANCED PLACEMENT COURSES

Tampa Prep offers a wide selection of Advanced Placement courses for students who wish to engage in college-level study while still in high school. These


ACA D EM I C I NFORM AT I ON A ND P O LICIES courses demand time, study, and specialized abilities above the normal rigors of the School’s other classes. Therefore, students wishing to enroll in more than three AP courses for any one year must obtain permission from the Head of the Upper School.

to sit for either of the two aforementioned Tampa Prep assessments will result in a zero for an exam grade. This policy applies to all students, including second semester seniors.

Admission to AP classes requires the permission of the courses’ instructors, who base their decisions on teacher recommendations and past academic performances in the relevant discipline. The Head of the Upper School has the final say in all AP placements.

If a student is taking an AP exam, he or she may be excused from classes (or internship) on the half-day prior to the exam. Arrangements to make up missed work must be made in advance with the teachers whose classes are missed. Students who take an exam in the morning are expected to attend afternoon classes (or internship).

AP STUDENT QUALIFICATIONS Strong candidates for AP courses typically possess the following qualities: Intellectual interest.  Strong AP candidates display an intellectual curiosity and motivation for the subject matter of the course beyond merely meeting grade requirements. Strong skills.  Strong AP candidates should not require basic level work in reading, writing, vocabulary, or computation. AP courses focus on subject matter and higher level skills. Developed capacity for abstract thinking. Strong AP candidates should be able to move beyond the literal or concrete level of thinking and reading to cope with abstraction, implication, discovery, metaphor, irony, and similar secondary levels of meaning. Strong AP candidates should be able to analyze coherently and to draw supportable conclusions from facts and data. AP teachers require prospective students to indicate written interest in taking future AP courses. While teachers may use slightly different methods for determining an AP class roster, using the parameters listed above, these teachers generally consult with colleagues, refer to student transcripts and may even speak with students before making decisions on course suitability. Faculty have the prerogative to admit students selectively into AP classes based on both prior academic and standardized test performance as well as an “honors attitude.”

AP EXAM POLICY All students enrolled in an AP course are required to take the AP exam. Exceptions may only be granted with the approval of both the instructor and the Head of the Upper School. If a student is granted an exemption from the AP exam, then s/he must take an alternative assessment at a predetermined time that is comparable in nature to an AP exam. If a student misses the AP exam, s/he will be required to take a final exam. Failure

Students who are taking an AP exam but are not enrolled in that exam’s AP class must take the final exam for their non-AP course. (Revised 7-19)

OPPORTUNITIES FOR ACCELERATED STUDY CRITERIA TO ADVANCE IN MIDDLE SCHOOL MATHEMATICS

A student who would like to accelerate in mathematics in the Middle School must: achieve an ERB Percentile of 90% in Quantitative Reasoning and Mathematics 1 & 2 using the Independent Norms; maintain a mathematics average of A+ during the current year, receive the recommendation of the instructor and satisfactorily complete the appropriate placement test. Any decision for acceleration is made with the counsel of all current teachers. MIDDLE SCHOOL MATHEMATICS REQUIREMENTS

Middle School students must have a B average for the second semester in Algebra 1 in order to advance to Geometry. In addition, any Algebra 1 student who intends to accelerate his or her mathematics during the summer must have an A average for the second semester. DOUBLED MATHEMATICS COURSES

Students should seek the counsel of their instructor to take any mathematics courses concurrently. Students with an A- average in Algebra 1 may enroll in Geometry and Advanced Algebra 2 concurrently, subject to the approval of the Algebra 1 instructor. If either course’s average drops below a B by the end of the semester, the student will be counseled by the Head of the Upper School/Middle School, instructor and Department Chair about the possibility of continuing the course. Students wishing to accelerate in mathematics during Summer School should seek the counsel of their instructor. ADDITIONAL WORLD AND CLASSICAL LANGUAGE REQUIREMENTS

All Middle School students must have a B- average or higher for the second semester of their level 1B language course in order to advance to level 2. In addition, level 1B students who wish to accelerate over the summer by taking a level 2 course for the first time must have GUIDE FOR ACADEMICS AND STUDENT LIFE | 19


AC A D E M IC I N F ORM AT I ON A ND P OL I C I ES an A- or higher in their level 1B course for the second semester.

prescribed curriculum and additional requirements during high school.

TAMPA PREP SUMMER SCHOOL

While participating students are required to take a minimum of three years of arts classes, they are encouraged to take arts classes during all four years of high school. Because Arts Concentration students will often forego study halls, they should carefully manage additional after-school activities in order to perform well academically. Students involved in intensive after-school, year-round athletic or other extracurricular commitments must carefully consider their ability and desire to dedicate further time and energy towards the Arts Concentration. Rising 10th grade students must apply to join the concentration at the end of their 9th grade year.

Upper School students wishing to accelerate their studies may choose from an assortment of academic courses in Tampa Prep’s credit-granting Summer School. (Consult the Summer Programs brochure or the Director of Summer Programs for more details.) Such courses appear on the Tampa Prep transcript and count toward the student’s GPA and graduation requirements. INDEPENDENT STUDY

On a limited basis, students may design an independent study program with a faculty sponsor. All requests for independent study must be approved by the Curriculum Committee in a timely manner. Petitions should be given to the Dean of Faculty and should include 1) specific objectives; 2) methods and criteria for assessment of learning; 3) meeting times; 4) a week-by-week syllabus; and 5) as appropriate, a reading list.

ARTS, GLOBAL STUDIES, HUMANITIES AND STEM CONCENTRATIONS Tampa Prep offers four dedicated programs for rising tenth grade students: an Arts Concentration for those who want to specialize in an artistic discipline, a Global Studies Concentration for those who are passionate about international issues, a Humanities Concentration for students who are passionate about the study of the humanities, and a STEM Concentration for those who relish the study of science, technology, engineering and mathematics. Each of these programs requires students to select classes from a body of relevant coursework that lie at the heart of each focus. In addition, students must participate in one of several extracurricular activities that complement each program. Participants must also attend a manageable selection of related events. The underlying goal of each Concentration is to equip graduating students with a range of experiences that prepares them for further opportunities in these fields, while also completing Tampa Prep’s graduation requirements. Students who successfully complete all requirements for a Concentration will be recognized at graduation. Below, please find the details of each Concentration. ARTS CONCENTRATION

The Arts Concentration mission is to provide students with a rigorous, arts-focused curriculum that will engage, inspire, and celebrate creativity, emphasizing commitment and discipline, while encouraging a lifelong appreciation of the arts. In support of Tampa Prep’s Mission Statement, the Arts Concentration is designed to present a unique opportunity for Upper School students to earn an Arts Concentration Scholar certificate along with their diploma by completing a 20 | GUIDE FOR ACADEMICS AND STUDENT LIFE

Summary of requirements Students select from one of five art disciplines for an Arts Concentration. The criteria for each Arts Discipline is outlined below. BAND AND STRINGS CRITERIA Prerequisite •• An audition is required. Auditions will be scheduled individually by the Instrumental Music Instructor after applications are received. Commitment •• Complete three years of Instrumental Music classes. Music Literacy •• Complete AP Music Theory. Advanced Musicianship •• Participate in three years of solo and ensemble competitions. •• Fulfill All-State Band audition requirements involving scales, etudes and sight reading. •• Perform a Senior Recital. Leadership •• Become a Tri-M Music Honors Society member. •• Bring arts as a service to the community. Participate as artists in the Tampa Bay area by performing approved, public recitals, concerts, etc. Arts Advocacy •• Attend two Tampa Prep performing arts events outside of one’s discipline per year, and write a 100-word reflection about each event. •• Attend one approved, professional orchestra or band concert each year and write a 100-word reflection about each event. Grade Point Average •• Students must maintain a minimum 3.0 GPA in their Concentration courses. FILM AND VIDEO CRITERIA Prerequisite - Literacy •• Complete at least three years of the following courses: Introduction to Video, Creative Video,


ACA D EM I C I NFORM AT I ON A ND P O LICIES and/or Broadcast Journalism. Advanced Arts Discipline •• Complete one year of a guided Advanced Study. This involves advanced techniques in directing, filming, lighting and editing. Leadership/Community Service •• Produce a short film and submit it to a Film Festival in Tampa. •• Bring arts as a service to the community. Participate as artists in the Tampa Bay area by producing videos for local businesses that specialize in serving the community at large. Advocacy •• Attend an approved film festival, and write a 100-word reflection of the experience. Grade Point Average •• Students must maintain a minimum 3.0 GPA in their Concentration courses. FINE ARTS CRITERIA Commitment •• Complete three years of fine arts studio classes. Literacy •• Complete AP Studio Art: 2-D, AP Studio Art: 3-D, or AP Art History. Advanced Arts Discipline •• Participate in a gallery show each year. •• Produce a culminating show during the 12th grade. •• Participate in approved, scholastic art competitions each year. •• Participate in a fine arts critique every semester. Leadership/Community Service •• Become a National Arts Honor Society member. •• Bring arts as a service to the community. Participate as artists in the Tampa Bay area in approved service projects. Advocacy •• Attend one off-campus fine arts event per semester, and write a 100-word reflection about each event Grade Point Average •• Students must maintain a minimum 3.0 GPA in their Concentration courses. THEATRE CRITERIA Prerequisite - Literacy •• An audition is required. Auditions will be scheduled individually by the Theatre Instructor after applications are received. •• Based on the audition, students will be placed into one of the following courses: Acting, Musical Theatre, or Advanced Musical Theatre. Commitment •• Complete three years (six semesters) of Theatre classes, which may include Dance, Chorus and Theatre Tech, but must include at least two semesters from the following classes: Acting, Musical Theatre and Advanced Musical Theatre.

Advanced Arts Discipline •• In preparation for college and beyond, at the end of the 11th grade or at the beginning of the 12th grade each student will perform an audition before a panel of college professors and/or industry professionals for review and guidance. •• Either attend or be involved in every Mainstage (Tampa Prep production) show, including Middle School shows. Arts Advocacy/Community Service •• Attend two off-campus theatre events (play or musical) per semester. Some outings will be organized through the school, while others require students to attend on their own. Write a 100-word reflection about the event. •• Attend at least one New York City theatre trip organized by Tampa Prep. Trips will usually take place over a long weekend. They will be held every other year, alternating with the Chorus trip. •• Bring arts as a service to the community. Participate as artists in the Tampa Bay area by performing public theatrical works. Grade Point Average •• Students must maintain a minimum 3.0 GPA in their Concentration courses. VOCAL ARTS CRITERIA Prerequisite •• An audition is required. Auditions will be scheduled individually by the Vocal Arts Instructor after applications are received. Commitment •• Complete three years of choral classes (either Concert Chorus or Chamber Chorus). Music Literacy •• Complete AP Music Theory. Advanced Musicianship •• Participate in three years of solo and ensemble competitions. •• Fulfill All-State Chorus audition requirements. •• Participate in the Music Performance Assessment choral competition. •• Perform a Senior Recital. Leadership/Community Service •• Become a Tri-M Music Honors Society member. •• Bring arts as a service to the community. Participate as artists in the Tampa Bay area by performing external recitals, concerts and other performances. Arts Advocacy •• Attend two Tampa Prep performing arts events outside of one’s discipline per year, and write a 100-word reflection about the event. •• Attend one approved, professional concert per year, and write a 100-word reflection about the event. Grade Point Average •• Students must maintain a minimum 3.0 GPA in their Concentration courses. GUIDE FOR ACADEMICS AND STUDENT LIFE | 21


AC A D E M IC I N F ORM AT I ON A ND P OL I C I ES GLOBAL STUDIES CONCENTRATION

Summary of requirements 1. Application and acceptance into the Concentration 2. Completion of the core curriculum 3. Completion of two additional Global Studies credits 4. Regular participation in an approved activity 5. Attendance of at least one Model United Nations conference before graduation 6. Attendance of all planned on-campus Global Studies events and one off-campus Global Studies event per semester 7. Hosting of an international student 8. Participation in at least one approved study/travel abroad program 9. Completion of an approved culminating research project 10. Maintain a minimum overall unweighted 3.0 GPA in Global Studies Courses (pertains to the Class of 2017 and beyond) 11. All exceptions to these requirements must be approved by the Global Studies Committee 1. Application •• Rising tenth grade students must submit an application by a pre-determined deadline to the Global Studies Committee, stating their desire to participate in the Concentration and agreeing to the terms of the program 2. Participating students must complete the following core curriculum by graduation •• History ▫▫ World History 1 ▫▫ World History 2 or AP World History ▫▫ US History or AP US History •• English ▫▫ English 9 ▫▫ English 10 ▫▫ English 11 ▫▫ English 12 •• Languages ▫▫ Four-year minimum ▫▫ Can be three years in one language and one in a second language, or four in the same language 3. Participating students must complete at least two credits of these courses by the end of twelfth grade: •• AP Art History (1.0) •• Economics (1.0) •• AP Economics (1.0) •• AP European History (1.0) •• Estudios Latinoamericanos (0.5) •• Latin American Studies (0.5) •• Francophone Studies (0.5) •• Advanced French Conversation Through Film (0.5) •• World Religions (0.5) •• Contemporary Issues (0.5) •• Cultural Anthropology (0.5) •• Other courses approved by the Global Studies 22 | GUIDE FOR ACADEMICS AND STUDENT LIFE

Committee 4. Students must be a regular, yearly participant in one of the following activities: •• International Club •• Environment Club •• STAND •• Model United Nations (M.U.N.) •• A Tampa Prep foreign language club •• Any additional club approved by the Global Studies Committee 5. Students must attend at least one Model United Nations conference before graduation 6. Students must attend all planned on-campus Global Studies events and one off-campus Global Studies event per semester •• There will be a variety of offerings each semester •• After each event students must submit an artifact from the event (if off-campus) and a written reflection of the event to the Global Studies Committee within five days of attending the event 7. Students must host an international student at least once during their Global Studies Concentration (by the end of twelfth grade) •• May be housing a Tampa Prep international student for a semester or a year (Host families will be provided with a monthly stipend to defer costs of hosting a student) •• May be a shorter-term hosting arrangement of a Tampa Prep program 8. Students must participate in at least one approved study/travel abroad program during their Global Studies Concentration (by the end of twelfth grade) •• Program must be a minimum ten days in length and cultural in focus ▫▫ Any exceptions must be approved by the Global Studies Committee 9. Students must complete a culminating Global Research Project that is approved by the Global Studies Committee •• Students must present their research in a public forum 10. Students are encouraged to pursue a global studies oriented Senior Internship HUMANITIES CONCENTRATION

In support of the school's mission statement, Tampa Prep offers an interdisciplinary Humanities Concentration for rising 10th grade students who are passionate about the study of the humanities. Humanities—“the branches of learning that investigate human constructs and concerns” (Merriam-Webster)—are an integral part of a well-rounded education and are part of each Tampa Prep student’s course of study. The Humanities Concentration goes beyond that threshold and provides select students with a challenging, nurturing and structured program in which they can further their understanding and appreciation of


ACA D EM I C I NFORM AT I ON A ND P O LICIES the discipline. Exposure to high-level course work in both the English and the History departments, enrollment in a broad selection of elective courses along with participation in civic, off-campus educational and service activities combine to create a deeper understanding and greater appreciation of this important field of study that those graduating from the program will draw upon as they move forward. PROGRAM OVERVIEW & CURRICULUM CRITERIA: Humanities 1. Application and acceptance into the Humanities Concentration 2. Successful completion of all core courses, including the Humanities Seminar(s) semester courses 3. Successful completion of elective courses (AP-level and others) 4. Attendance at all required events (emphasis-specific, if applicable) including at least two on- or off-campus events per semester that may include speakers, film screenings, civic forums, governmental meetings, service activities, etc. 5. Participation in clubs and activities (emphasis-specific, if applicable) 6. Successful completion of culminating 12-15 page research project (emphasis-specific, if applicable) written senior year (or junior year with prior approval) 7. Participation in designated service activities 8. Maintain a minimum overall unweighted 3.0 GPA in Humanities courses. Any grade below a B (or B- in AP-level courses) will not count toward completion of the concentration's requirements 9. Any and all exceptions to these requirements must be approved by the Humanities Concentration Committee. APPLICATION • Rising 10th grade students must submit an online application to the Humanities Concentration Coordinator, stating their desire to participate in the Concentration and agreeing to the terms of the program. • Applicants must have demonstrated a high level of success and responsibility in English and History courses. • Recommendations from 9th grade History and English Teachers are mandatory. • Students will be notified of acceptance by the end of their 9th grade school year. PARTICIPATING STUDENTS MUST COMPLETE THE FOLLOWING CORE CURRICULUM BY GRADUATION Core AP Course Requirements Each student must complete three (3) of the following AP-level courses: (Selections must include at least one History and one English course.)

• • • • •

AP English Language and Composition/11th grade AP English Literature and Composition/12th grade (required for Art and Literature Emphasis) AP World History AP United States History (required for Policy Emphasis) AP European History

Additional AP-Level Study Each student must also complete at least one additional AP-level course for a total of four (4) chosen either from those listed in the core requirement or from this list: • AP Spanish Language • AP Spanish Literature • AP Economics (required for Humans and Society Emphasis) • AP Art History (required for Art and Literature Emphasis) • AP Government and Politics (required for Policy Emphasis) • AP French • AP Latin • AP Psychology • AP Statistics Remaining Course Requirements In addition to the four (4) required AP courses, each student must also complete the equivalent of three, year-long courses (6 semester equivalents) from the Humanities Concentration course lists. Courses will be counted toward the concentration requirement according to the following values: • AP Course = 3 semester equivalents • Full-year course = 2 semester equivalents • Half-year course = 1 semester equivalent Non-AP Study Remaining credits (after AP elective and any additional AP courses) of the year total must come from the following list. * indicates a semester course • Book Arts* • Introduction to Law* • Presidential Elections* • World Literature* • Words, Sights and Sounds* • Creative Writing* • Film Criticism* • Journalism • Latin American Studies* • French Conversation and Cinema* • Cultural Anthropology* • World Religions* • True Crime Literature* • Psychology (non-AP)* • Economics (non-AP) • Bioethics* GUIDE FOR ACADEMICS AND STUDENT LIFE | 23


AC A D E M IC I N F ORM AT I ON A ND P OL I C I ES Sample Course Selections (assuming completion of the four required AP courses): Student A • AP Psychology 3 • Bioethics 1 • Film Criticism 1 • U.S. Politics: Presidential Elections 1 TOTAL: 6 (semester equivalents) Student B • World Religions 1 • Latin American Studies 1 • Film Criticism 1 • Journalism 2 • Psychology (non-AP) 1 TOTAL: 6 Areas of Emphasis Students who have a particular area of interest within the broader humanities context may wish to concentrate their studies further. To be recognized for this in-depth study, students will be required to select certain courses from the list of elective courses. Students are not required to choose an emphasis. Decisions regarding the selection of an emphasis and choosing courses should be made in consultation with the Humanities Concentration advisor. Potential areas of emphasis are: • Policy (including contemporary policy based on contemporary research and / or contemporary policy based on historical research) • Art and Literature (including visual arts and written arts of contemporary and historical authors or artists) • Writing (creative or fiction and journalism or nonfiction) • Humans and Society (anthropology, psychology, sociology, philosophy, and economics) General Guideline for Emphasis Option: Participating students, along with their Humanities Advisor, should select a majority of courses (wherever possible) that will coincide with the specific sub-concentration selected by the student. The student’s culminating project, senior internship and required activities would also be expected to enhance their emphasis. CLUB PARTICIPATION It is expected (and required) that each participant in the Humanities Concentration will contribute and become an active member of the school community. All participants must maintain active membership and regular participation in at least one of the following, academic/service activities: • Writing Center 24 | GUIDE FOR ACADEMICS AND STUDENT LIFE

• • • • •

Creative Writing Club Graham Tutoring Teen Court NHS Tutoring (must be actively engaged) Other active academic participation (approval required)

STEM CONCENTRATION

Summary of requirements 1. Application and acceptance into the STEM Concentration 2. Completion of the core curriculum 3. Regular participation in an approved activity 4. Attendance of all planned on-campus STEM events each semester and one off-campus STEM event per semester 5. Completion and presentation of an approved culminating research project 6. Undertake a STEM-oriented Senior Internship 7. Maintain a minimum overall unweighted 3.0 GPA in STEM courses 8. All exceptions to these requirements must be approved by the STEM Committee 1. Application •• Rising tenth grade students must submit an application to the STEM Committee, stating their desire to participate in the Concentration and agreeing to the terms of the program •• Applicants must at least be entering into Advanced Algebra 2 in tenth grade •• Applicants must have demonstrated a high level of success and responsibility in prior math and science classes 2. Participating students must complete the following core curriculum by graduation •• Math ▫▫ Algebra 1 ▫▫ Geometry ▫▫ Advanced Algebra 2 ▫▫ Advanced Precalculus ▫▫ Calculus or AP Calculus AB •• Science (at least four credits) ▫▫ Biology ▫▫ Chemistry, Advanced Chemistry or AP Chemistry ▫▫ Physics, Advanced Physics or AP Physics ▫▫ At least one AP science course •• Engineering and Technology ▫▫ Introduction to Engineering Design ▫▫ Principles of Engineering ▫▫ Aerospace Engineering OR Computer Science and Software Engineering •• Art ▫▫ At least one half-credit Visual Arts course 3. Students must be a regular, yearly participant in one of the following activities •• Environment Club


ACA D EM I C I NFORM AT I ON A ND P O LICIES Math Club/Mu Alpha Theta National Science Honor Society Robotics Club Science Olympiad Virtual Reality Development Club Makers Club (makerspace) Other Club that must be approved by the STEM Committee (Revised 7-19) 4. Students must attend all planned on-campus STEM events and at least one off-campus event per semester •• After each event students must submit a picture from the event along with a written reflection to the STEM Committee (Revised 7-19) 5. Students must complete a culminating STEM Research Project as part of the Engineering Design and Development course •• Students must present their research in a public forum 6. Students must pursue a STEM-oriented Senior Internship

cumulative weighted GPA group are determined by a student’s Senior year weighted GPA. Seniors must have attended Tampa Prep for at least the entire eleventh and twelfth grade.

Applications and deadlines for these programs are available on Tampa Prep’s website. General questions should be directed to Mr. Morrison, Arts Concentration to Ms. Calandra, Global Studies Concentration to Ms. Bridges-Pereira, Humanities Concentration to Mr. Hill and the STEM Concentration to Mrs. Beekman.

The National Junior Honor Society recognizes students who reflect outstanding accomplishments in the areas of scholarship, character, leadership, citizenship, and service. Eligible candidates are seventh or eighth grade students, who have attended Tampa Prep for at least two semesters and attained a cumulative grade point average of 3.0. Interested candidates may submit an activities form to the Faculty Council. The form lists their activities and accomplishments during Middle School. The Faculty Council reviews the forms along with teacher recommendations and invites qualifying students to join the National Junior Honor Society. The Induction Ceremony takes place in May.

•• •• •• •• •• •• ••

HONOR SOCIETIES CUM LAUDE

The Cum Laude Society was founded in 1906. Its purpose is to promote learning and scholarship in secondary schools. The presence of a Cum Laude chapter at Tampa Prep is an indication that superior scholastic achievement is valued by the School. Students are inducted to the Society through the following parameters. According to the Society’s guidelines, junior membership cannot constitute more than 10% of the eleventh grade class. Inductees are chosen based on a student’s cumulative weighted GPA. If several students with identical cumulative weighted GPAs drive this group to exceed 10% of the Junior class, then the final selections from the identical cumulative weighted GPA group are determined by a student’s junior year weighted GPA. Juniors must have attended Tampa Prep for at least the entire tenth and eleventh grade. According to the Society’s guidelines, senior induction may not constitute more than 20% of the twelfth grade class, including those students inducted as juniors. Qualified seniors are awarded membership upon consideration of a student’s cumulative weighted GPA. If several students with identical cumulative weighted GPA’s drive this group to exceed 20% of the Senior class, then the final selections from the identical

NATIONAL HONOR SOCIETY

The National Honor Society was founded in 1921 as an organization for secondary schools, which recognizes and encourages academic achievement, and develops other characteristics essential to citizens in a democracy. These ideals are scholarship, character, service, and leadership. Students are inducted to the Society through the following parameters. Sophomores, juniors and seniors with a cumulative unweighted GPA of 3.0 are invited to submit an activities sheet to the Faculty Council. The student lists those things which he or she has done while in high school that show leadership and service and that contribute to school and community life. There is an induction ceremony in April for successful candidates from all three classes, and for seniors in December. NATIONAL JUNIOR HONOR SOCIETY

REGISTRATION FOR CLASSES MIDDLE SCHOOL

1. Review Middle School course requirements and options. 2. Complete your course registration form and return it to the Head of the Middle School.

UPPER SCHOOL

1. Review graduation requirements for Tampa Prep. 2. Review Florida Scholars Program requirements. 3. Review Florida state college admissions requirements. 4. With your Faculty Advisor, complete and/or revise your Four-Year Plan. Include courses you have completed, refresh your memory regarding courses you intend to take, and monitor your progress toward graduation and scholar requirements. Important advice for ALL grades: Keep in mind that selective colleges and universities expect you to challenge yourself with a demanding academic schedule in secondary school. Tampa Prep advises you to plan a high

GUIDE FOR ACADEMICS AND STUDENT LIFE | 25


DISA B ILITIE S P OL I CY

5.

6. 7. 8.

school career that challenges you according to your own abilities. Select your courses according to your Four-Year Plan. The School reserves the right to add or delete courses without notice due to such matters as class enrollments. Consult with your college counselor. Ask your parents to review your choices and to sign your registration form. Then, return your registration form to the designated administrator. The Head of the Upper School and the Upper School Academic Dean register all students new to the Upper School.

TAMPA PREP GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS CLASS OF 2020-2022 All students must satisfactorily complete 22.5 high school credits to graduate. Students entering as sophomores must earn a minimum of 15 Tampa Prep credits to graduate, those entering juniors 10 Tampa Prep credits, and those entering seniors 5 Tampa Prep credits. DEPARTMENT

SPECIFIC COURSE REQUIREMENTS CREDITS

English

English 9, English 10, English 11 and English 12 or AP English

Mathematics Through Precalculus, Advanced

Precalculus or Stats/Prob

Science

Biology, year-long Chemistry or Physics, one other science credit or Public Health

History

World History 1, WH 2 or AP WH, and U.S. or AP U.S. History

4

4*

3

3

TAMPA PREP GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS CLASS OF 2023 AND LATER All students must satisfactorily complete 22.5 high school credits to graduate. Students entering as sophomores must earn a minimum of 15 Tampa Prep credits to graduate, those entering juniors 10 Tampa Prep credits, and those entering seniors 5 Tampa Prep credits. DEPARTMENT

SPECIFIC COURSE REQUIREMENTS CREDITS

English

English 9, English 10, English 11 and English 12 or AP English

Mathematics Through Precalculus, Advanced

3*

Arts

Choose from Dance, Digital Arts Music, Studio Arts and Theatre Arts

2

Physical Ed.

4*

Precalculus or Stats/Prob

Science

Biology, year-long Chemistry or Physics, one other science credit or Public Health

3

History

One semester of Big History,

3

full year of World History, full year of U.S. History, one semester of Civics (in grades 11 or 12)

Languages Through the 3rd level of French, Spanish, or Latin

3*

Arts

Choose from Dance, Digital Arts Music, Studio Arts and Theatre Arts

2

Physical Ed.

Physical Education, Health, one other semester course

1.5

Freshman Transitions Student’s Choice

0.5 1.5

Other

Languages Through the 3rd level of French, Spanish, or Latin

4

TOTAL 22.5

Physical Education, Health, one other semester course

1.5

Other

Student’s Choice

2

TOTAL 22.5 *Upper school credits awarded in middle school for these departments are recognized for course placement, count toward the department required number of credits, but do not count toward the 22.5 credits required for high school graduation. (Revised 7-19)

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*Upper school credits awarded in middle school for these departments are recognized for course placement, count toward the department required number of credits, but do not count toward the 22.5 credits required for high school graduation. (Revised 7-19)

DISABILITIES POLICY PHILOSOPHY Tampa Prep recognizes that students learn in different ways and that sound teaching includes awareness of those differences when designing lessons and assessments. Tampa Prep also recognizes that students with mildly disabling learning conditions may do well academically at our school. When deemed appropriate, the School will offer such students certain accommodations. Our goal is to help these students adjust to, and thrive in, our demanding college preparatory environment. Tampa Prep may be unable to offer accommodations in some circumstances.


D I SA BI L I T I ES PO LICY SERVICES FOR STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES We understand that there may be circumstances when a parent may request that the School provide an adjustment or accommodation for a student’s medical needs or physical, mental, or learning differences. As the range of requests have grown over the years, the School believes that it is appropriate at this time to outline the School’s policy and general guidelines for addressing such requests. GENERAL POLICY In general, it is the School’s policy to provide accommodations or adjustments for a student’s minor needs in circumstances in which the administration determines, in its sole discretion, that doing so is within the reasonable ability of the School and/or its staff and will not result in an unacceptable impairment to the rights of other students (or employees) or a fundamental change to our educational environment or mission. We also ask parents to realize that, given the size of our school and our available resources, we may not be able to provide all requested accommodations. To the extent we agree to provide accommodations, we may require a sharing of responsibility for the accommodation. PROCESS FOR REQUEST AND DOCUMENTATION For any type of accommodation (including administration of medication at school), the parent must alert the Head of the Upper School/Middle School of the need. Tampa Prep reviews each request for accommodation individually and follows an established process to ensure consistent and fair treatment of each student. The Head of the Upper School/Middle School along with the Academic Support Counselor will then advise the parent of the type of medical documentation needed, which generally will state the student’s diagnosis, how the condition limits the student, the recommended accommodations, and the length of time that the accommodation(s) will be needed. In some situations, the documentation may include a psycho-educational evaluation. The Academic Support Counselor will communicate any appropriate accommodations to the teachers and parents, and the list of accommodations will be filed in the student’s Tampa Prep record. Requests for changes in the accommodations may come from the student’s teachers or parents, from the Academic Support Counselor or from the consulting psychologist, and should be presented to the Head of the Upper School/Middle School. Teachers who suspect that a student has an undiagnosed learning disability may ask the Head of the Upper School/Middle School to grant temporary accommodations in order to gain additional information about how that student learns or performs on assessments.

RELEASE FOR COMMUNICATIONS WITH PHYSICIAN Sometimes, the documentation received from the physician may raise questions or be unclear as to the recommendations. For that reason, the parent(s) must sign a Release of Information form, permitting the School to contact the medical professional, when necessary. In addition, if there is any cost associated with the physician’s cooperation (i.e., to answer a set of questions submitted, etc.), the parent must agree to bear the cost of such process. ASSESSMENT OF REQUEST Once the parent’s request and medical documentation have been received by the School, appropriate persons within the administration will meet with the parents to clarify information and to discuss whether the School will be able to implement the accommodation requested. In some cases, the parent may be asked to provide (at the parent’s cost) any special equipment needed, training for the school’s staff, or other associated matters. In addition, the School may advise the parent that the School will allow a particular accommodation, but the full responsibility for doing so will rest with the parent. For example, if the student needs to be tested or have certain types of medicines administered during the day that the School, Head of the Upper School/ Middle School, Academic Support Counselor, or Health Coordinator believe are beyond the scope of the School’s responsibility, the School may allow the parent to make arrangements to visit the campus for the purpose of testing and administering. LIMITATIONS ON REQUESTS Please understand that the School is not a medical facility and does not have the personnel, training, or equipment to handle certain types of medical procedures best left to the student, parent, or physician. Examples of accommodations made for students include appropriate classroom locations, extended time on tests, use of computers, and/or dispensing with medication through the Health Coordinator. COMMONLY ASKED QUESTIONS How does my child apply for accommodations at Tampa Prep? Any student with mildly disabling learning conditions at Tampa Prep is eligible to receive certain academic accommodations, provided the School has a current, complete psychological evaluation of the student on file that indicates a need for the accommodations or has received approval for disabilities accommodations from The College Board Services for Student Disabilities (SSD). Approval for disabilities accommodations from The College Board also permits disabilities accommodations on the PSAT/NMSQT, the SAT, and the AP exams.

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EXPE R IE NTI AL L E ARN I N G A ND EXT END ED T RI P S If my child has accommodations at Tampa Prep, does that mean they automatically have accommodations for the PSAT, SAT, and AP Tests? No. The College Board recommends that SSD Student Eligibility Forms be submitted at the conclusion of the students’ first year in high school. Information about this application process is available from the Academic Support Counselor. Tampa Prep expects students who request academic accommodations to apply for accommodations with The College Board for PSAT, SAT, and AP testing. Does Tampa Prep accept a student’s IEP or 504 Plan for receiving accommodations? School plans such as Individualized Education Program (IEP) and 504 Plans are by themselves insufficient documents for accommodation at Tampa Prep. The student’s documentation for learning disability accommodation must: 1. State the specific disability as diagnosed. 2. Be no more than three years old for initial qualification. Thereafter, a new or updated assessment may be necessary to determine the current need for accommodation if the existing documentation is deemed outdated or if the student’s observed performance indicates that significant changes may have occurred since the last assessment was conducted. 3. Describe the presenting problem(s), a diagnostic interview, and relevant educational, developmental, and medical history. 4. Include comprehensive testing, the tests’ date(s), and the actual test results with subtest scores from measures of intelligence, cognitive ability, current academic achievement, and information processing. 5. Include an interpretive summary that integrates assessment data, background information, observations of the student during the testing situation, teacher observations and ratings, evidence that the evaluator has ruled out alternative explanations for academic problems, and the current context. The summary also should indicate how patterns in the student’s cognitive ability, achievement, and information processing reflect the presence of a learning disability and describe the student’s functional limitations resulting from the disability, as supported by the test results. 6. Describe the specific recommended accommodations and provide a rationale explaining how the accommodations address the student’s functional learning limitations. 7. Be conducted by a qualified professional and include information about this person’s license or certification and area of specialization.

Who is responsible for helping teachers implement student accommodations? Teachers of students with learning accommodations are informed about those students by the Head of the Upper School, Head of the Middle School, and the Academic Support Counselor. The general responsibility for helping teachers implement the accommodations resides with the Head of the Upper School, Head of the Middle School, and the Academic Support Counselor. What are the responsibilities of students with accommodations? Learning accommodations often require the student to assume extra responsibilities, such as: 1. Personally arranging in advance with the teacher for test or quiz accommodations. When tardiness or absence from another academic or extra-curricular commitment is possible due to an accommodation, the student must discuss this possibility in advance with the faculty who may be affected. 2. Dependable fulfillment of all arrangements for accommodation, including punctuality to specially arranged accommodations and to any school commitments which may follow these accommodations. 3. Impeccable integrity when taking a quiz or test before or after other students have done so, or when an accommodation otherwise makes unsanctioned assistance possible. 4. Complete adherence to school policies before, during and after the accommodation. What are some of the standard accommodations granted at Tampa Prep? Tampa Prep regards the following accommodations as reasonable given its academic mission and may be granted to students who have satisfied the School’s established approval process. • Extended time on specified subjects’ quizzes, tests, and exams • Word-processing on computer because of dysgraphia • Photocopying another student’s notes • Recording class lectures and discussions • Supervised study after school • Opportunity to clarify information and instructions with teacher • Preferential seating • Preferential scheduling • Laptop computer in class • Low-stimulus test environment • Alternative to scan-type answer sheets

EXPERIENTIAL LEARNING AND EXTENDED TRIPS All grades at Tampa Prep extend education beyond the traditional classroom. The goal is to deepen the

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E X P E RI E NT I A L L EA RNI NG A ND EXT END E D TR IPS student’s appreciation for, and understanding of, academic studies and to foster a deeper understanding of the self, the world, and other people. Individual classes may use guest speakers, take local field trips, role-play mock trials, or otherwise incorporate non-traditional ways of learning. The following programs, regardless of the student’s particular classes, occur school-wide each year.

SENIOR INTERNSHIP AND SERVICE PROGRAM Most students spend the last three weeks of their senior year participating in this Program. Seniors who do not elect to participate in the Program remain in their classes and take their courses’ exams with the rest of the School during exam week. All seniors receive a comprehensive packet of information, which includes the following rules:

• FIELD TRIP STANDARDS Day and overnight field trips are part of the educational process. It must be stressed, however, that only those students who, in the administration’s sole discretion, have demonstrated good conduct at school and • school-sponsored events will be permitted to attend. Proper behavior during the trip continues to be of utmost importance. Parents of any student who fail to follow the given guidelines will be notified. In severe cases, the parent will be requested to come and/or provide transportation home for the student. A condition of a student’s or parent’s participation in any field trip is the execution of the School’s standard Participation Release. For any students whose parents have not executed the release, the student will not be allowed to participate in • the field trip. Parents who are interested in volunteering to assist on field trips must have been cleared through the School’s criminal background process. This process is for the protection of all students and is not intended to hinder volunteerism or embarrass any family. We hope that families understand our concern for student safety and will willingly cooperate in this process. MIDDLE SCHOOL

Sixth graders spend three days in Central Florida visiting Kennedy Space Center and other Florida landmarks. Seventh graders culminate their study of marine science in the Florida Keys. Eighth graders visit Boston, Massachusetts to further enhance their study of American History and American Literature. UPPER SCHOOL

At the beginning of the academic year, freshmen, sophomore and senior classes engage in a variety of school-related activities. These on and off-campus experiences are designed to re-engage students in school activities and experiential learning. Juniors spend four days and three nights camping and hiking in Pisgah National Forest in western North Carolina. The Junior Pisgah Trip is a Tampa Prep graduation requirement. Please note the Junior Trip to Pisgah National Forest is required of all juniors. Juniors who are unable to attend must write a research paper (details upon request) to be submitted before students are allowed to begin classes for their senior year.

Full Program participation is a minimum of seventy (70) hours, beginning Monday, April 27. Partial participation, to be approved on a case by-case basis, includes time spent in class. Participants may conclude their non-AP courses prior to beginning their internship. All coursework for these classes must be completed before the internship begins. Participants can expect these courses to conclude with some kind of final assessment to be decided by the course’s teacher. Possible examples include: a unit test, a small project or report, a short paper, a lesson taught to a class, etc. Participants must continue to fulfill any remaining school obligations and to schedule their internships around these obligations. Participants must attend all scheduled AP classes until the AP exam. Participants must attend any class in the second semester in which they have a failing grade or have missed eight or more times due to illness or any other reason unrelated to a school-sponsored event. Participants must attend such classes for the remainder of the course and take their exams with the rest of the Upper School students.

INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS With its rich mosaic of students, Tampa Preparatory School celebrates diversity of all forms and strives to be a place of compassion, understanding, empathy and learning. We celebrate the individual differences of our students, faculty and staff and honor the human dignity and worth of each member of our community. Like many of our peer NAIS schools, Tampa Preparatory School provides international students and families with a number of unique opportunities: attendance at a first-rate college preparatory school; participation in championship interscholastic athletics, exploring a stellar fine arts program and an array of social events; education in self-discipline, personal organization and self-reliance; and lastly, the opportunity to build enduring friendships with American students and teachers, as well as with students from around the world. A unique emphasis is put on providing a supportive atmosphere that allows international students to confidently gain the skills, abilities and habits necessary to be successful in an American college preparatory school. GUIDE FOR ACADEMICS AND STUDENT LIFE | 29


EXPE R IE NTI AL L E ARN I N G A ND EXT END ED T RI P S

A tailored academic schedule, weekly advisor meetings, and academic counseling help prepare these young men and women to better benefit from, as well as contribute to, the total life of the school community. Specific staff members are assigned to the supervision of these students. Tampa Preparatory School is proud that so many international families and exchange students are attracted to our fine educational institution. Our student body includes students from around the globe. We feel that one of the greatest benefits for all students attending Tampa Prep is the opportunity to experience the rich culture of students from other countries. As educators, it has become apparent that learning to adapt to and work with people from other parts of the world is essential in the workplace. Because of the international experience, we feel that Tampa Prep students have a distinct advantage over other children without this opportunity. In order to assist in the special needs of the international students, each student will be assigned to an advisor who will assist the international student in course selection, scheduling, and other academic concerns. A tailored academic schedule, weekly advisor meetings, and academic counseling help prepare these young men and women to better benefit from, as well as contribute to, the total life of the school community. International students needing assistance with any issues should see the Assistant to the Head of School.

SEMESTER PROGRAMS AND SCHOOL YEAR ABROAD Many high schools around the country, both independent and public, enthusiastically cooperate with the following programs. Upper School students are able to participate in year-long and semester-long programs such as: YEAR-LONG PROGRAM FOR JUNIORS AND SENIORS School Year Abroad. This program was first organized by Phillips Academy (Andover) in 1965. Choose between year-long study in France, Spain, Italy, or China, with some courses taught in the native language and some in English (in Italy, all courses are taught in English but Latin language and culture is the emphasis; in China, all but the Chinese course are taught in English). Ph: 978/725-6828 Email: mail@sya.org Web: www.sya.org. SEMESTER PROGRAMS FOR JUNIORS AND SENIORS • Maine Coast Semester.  Near Wiscasset on the coast of Maine. Exclusively for juniors. Ph: 207/882-7323 Web: www.chewonki.org • The Mountain School. In the Vermont mountains southeast of Montpelier; initiated and still 30 | GUIDE FOR ACADEMICS AND STUDENT LIFE

• •

sponsored by Milton Academy. Mainly for juniors, but some seniors admitted for the fall semester. Ph: 802/685-4520 Web: www.mountainschool.org City Term.  Located just outside New York City and associated with The Masters School. For juniors and seniors. Ph: 914/693-1400 Web: www.cityterm.org Rocky Mountain Semester. Outside of Leadville, Colorado. Designed for juniors but can accept a few seniors. Ph: 719/486-8200 x104 Email: rms@hminet. org Web: www.hminet.org Alzar School. Idaho/Chile. Semester school based in Cascade, Idaho that serves sophomores and juniors. Students live on campus in Idaho but also spend six weeks living abroad in Chile. Ph: 208/639-9891 Email: admissions@alzarschool.org Web: www.alzarschool. org

SEMESTER PROGRAM FOR SOPHOMORES • The Outdoor Academy of the Southern Appalachians Near Brevard, N.C. in Pisgah Forest. Ph: 828/877-4349 Web: www.enf.org (Eagle’s Nest Foundation) COMMONLY ASKED QUESTIONS: What about academics?  All of the programs feature innovative, highly experiential curricula that usually enable students to return to their “home” schools on pace with, and sometimes even ahead of, their peers. All of the programs are for students of proven academic ability and personal maturity; they are not for “problem” students. The student who truly wants four uninterrupted years of traditional lab science should probably not enroll in a semester program, although studying abroad through School Year Abroad might suffice. The student who desires a heavy load of AP courses might decide, depending on the specific courses and the program, not to participate in a semester program as a junior or senior.

Do their courses match Tampa Prep’s? The semester programs typically tailor their science, history, English, art, and PE curricula to fit with their particular environments. Participants might return to Prep having studied different novels or aspects of history than the classmates they left behind, but the School recognizes that their scholarship, skills, and minds will be well prepared to continue their more traditional studies once they return to Tampa. The semester programs tend to teach mathematics and foreign language in a less integrated, more traditional manner. In all cases, Tampa Prep will count the grades earned during the time away from school towards Tampa Prep’s graduation requirements and they will be included in the student’s GPA.


AT T ENDA NC E P O LICIES What about college? Colleges like to see applicants who have taken risks, done something different, or somehow distinguished themselves from other applicants with the same standardized test scores and GPA. These programs can bolster a college application. This should not be the reason to opt for off-campus study; however, choosing not to participate in these programs will not keep high-achieving students from getting into a good college or university. What about money? Students do not pay tuition to Tampa Prep for the time they are enrolled in one of these off-campus programs. Some financial aid is available through the individual programs. If a student wishes to enroll in an off-campus program for his or her senior year and still receive a diploma for graduating from Tampa Prep, then a small fee will be applied by the Head of School.

How do I apply?  Admission to these programs is competitive, and the application deadlines range from mid-February to mid-March. All applications must be mailed through the Head of the Upper School's office.

ATTENDANCE POLICIES Perhaps the most important determinant of high academic performance is contact between the student and teacher. Class time is essential for students to participate in class activities, ask questions, interact with the teacher and process information. When a student is absent from a class, there is a direct cost to both the student and teacher, as well as indirect costs to other students in the class. While there will likely be occasions during a year when a student must miss class, these should be rare and confined to unavoidable situations such as illness, serious injury, religious observance or major family event (weddings, funerals, etc.) Tampa Prep does not differentiate between excused or unexcused absences. Any time away from class has a negative impact, and as such, if a student is not present at school, he or she will be marked as absent. Study halls, advising periods, middle school athletics and class assemblies are considered important parts of the school day and will be treated the same as academic classes under the absence policy. If a pattern of absence develops, the School will investigate why the student is missing. It is essential that families communicate openly and regularly with the School if a student needs to miss class for any reason. We want to support students and families while balancing the clear expectation that each student must attend school regularly. •

On the day a student is absent, parents are asked to notify Mrs. Zollinger (bzollinger@tampaprep.org or 813-251-8481 ext. 4031) by the time classes begin at

8:50 a.m. For any planned absences (such as school-sponsored events, religious observances, college visits or major family events) that require a student to miss three or more classes, a Planned Absence Form must be submitted. This form requires the student to obtain signatures from teachers of any missed classes, the Head of the Upper School/Middle School and a parent. It is the responsibility of the student to see each teacher for information on assignments prior to the day of the absence. The Planned Absence Form should be turned in to Mrs. Zollinger at least one day before any absence. Students are required to make up all work they miss during an absence. The amount of time allowed for make-up work will be decided by each instructor, but may not exceed five days. Work not made up within the time specified will receive a zero. It is the student's responsibility to see each teacher following an absence. For pre-arranged absences (athletic events, field trips, college visits, etc.), it is the responsibility of the student to see each teacher for information on assignments prior to the day of the absence.

NOTE: If a student is absent for a portion of the school day, he or she may be required to make up any tests missed and turn in any work that is due by 4:15 p.m. that same day. Any major research project must be given to the assigning teacher by 8:50 a.m. on the day it is due, whether or not the student is present or the class is held.

• •

If a student is absent during any portion of the academic day, he or she may not participate in any after-school activities, including athletic and social activities, without permission from the Head of the Upper School/Middle School. Parents are expected to make every effort to schedule medical, dental and other appointments so that they do not conflict with class time. If this is impossible, a note from the medical professional is required on the student's return to school. For extensive illness involving several days of absence, parents are asked to keep regular communication with the school. Whenever a student feels ill and wants to leave school before the end of the day, he or she must visit the Health Coordinator before contacting the parents. If a student comes to school and then needs to miss any part of the school day, a parent must communicate via an email, note or phone call (813-251-8481 ext. 4031) before the student is permitted to leave campus. The student must sign out with Mrs. Zollinger then sign back in upon return to campus. If a student is truant from school, there will be disciplinary consequences including the likelihood of suspension from school for a period of time. GUIDE FOR ACADEMICS AND STUDENT LIFE | 31


AT TE NDA N C E P OL I C I E S RESPONSE FOR REPEATED ABSENCES FROM SCHOOL • If a student misses a class five times in a semester, an email from the advisor will be sent to the student and parents indicating that he or she has missed the class five times. The School's attendance policy will be attached. It is the expectation of the School that the student and family will take every possible measure to address the attendance issues. • If a student misses a class ten times in a semester, the Grade-Level Dean will call home and discuss the situation with the family. The attendance policy will be discussed and other consequences may be imposed, such as a restriction from extracurricular activities or the assignment of one or more disciplinary holdovers. • If a student misses a class fifteen times in a semester, the parents will be asked to come to school for a conference with the advisor, Grade-Level Dean and/ or Head of the Upper School/Middle School. In this meeting possible consequences will be discussed and a plan will be made to help the student going forward. • If a student misses class twenty times in a semester, he or she will not earn a grade for the class. The Dean of Students or the Head of the Upper School/ Middle School will communicate with the family and discuss possible alterations to the schedule or other alternatives. If a student has twenty or more absences in multiple classes, the School reserves the right to dismiss the student. • If a student has chronic attendance issues, the School reserves the right to withhold or not renew the enrollment contract for the following year.

will convene to determine whether it is appropriate for the student to remain enrolled in the School. Although the student and parent will share in the discussions about educational options as the student moves forward, the approval of an extended medical leave is at the discretion of the Head of the Upper School/ Middle School. It is unlikely that students will be able to earn academic credit if they miss more than half of the classes in a semester.

LONG-TERM MEDICAL LEAVE In some circumstances, it is necessary for a student to miss an extended period of time due to a medical condition. If this situation arises, the School asks parents to keep open lines of communication regarding their child's health and ability to complete work. We will make every effort to help the student keep up with his/her studies. During an absence, students and families must make arrangements for the completion of required course work with the Grade-Level Dean. If necessary, families will need to identify a responsible third party to administer tests and exams. Students are eligible for academic credit when they have completed all of the required assignments in each class. If a student misses more than twenty classes in a particular course, he or she will be ineligible to receive a letter grade. In such cases, the student may receive credit for the course by successfully completing all assignments and passing the final exam.

When a student requires a leave that exceeds fifty percent of the semester, the Head of the Upper School/ Middle School, Dean of Students, and Grade-Level Dean 32 | GUIDE FOR ACADEMICS AND STUDENT LIFE

TARDINESS Class time is an essential part of the educational experience. Students who arrive late to class negatively affect the learning environment both for the student who misses class time and for the other students in the class. It is the student’s responsibility to communicate with the teacher to make up any work missed while he or she is out of class. Students who accumulate excessive tardies will face a disciplinary response as described below. Tardies will be entered by the responsible teacher during each period of the academic day. The Assistant to the Dean of Students will track whether a tardy is excused or not. Tardies will be excused under the following circumstances. •

If a student arrives to school with a note from a non-parent doctor indicating that he or she was at an appointment. Prescriptions or copies of prescriptions will not be accepted as proof of a medical appointment. If a student arrives to class with a note from another faculty member indicating that the student was detained. If a student arrives after 8:50 a.m. but traffic has delayed a significant portion of the student body. In such cases, the arrival of the last Tampa Prep bus to campus will serve as the time that separates an unexcused from an excused tardy.

Students who are late to school under any circumstance must check in with the Assistant to the Dean of Students to get a tardy slip. All students who arrive late to school must check in with the teachers of the classes that they missed that day in order to make arrangements for any missed work. (See “Tests and Work Missed Due to Absence” in Academic Information and Policies section.) Tardies will be tracked cumulatively each semester. The system builds in a cushion for students who are late infrequently. It is possible for the alarm clock to not go off, and a student will not be punished for a random tardy. However, if a pattern of tardiness emerges, the following disciplinary responses from the School will be enforced. •

If a student reaches a sixth unexcused tardy (overall,


COL L EG E G UI DELIN ES

not per class) in a semester, he or she will be required to serve a DH in the nearest possible time frame. If the student is a senior, he or she will also lose off-campus lunch privileges for one week. If a student reaches a total of ten unexcused tardies in a semester, the student will serve two additional DHs in the nearest possible time frame. In addition, the Grade-Level Dean will call the student's parents to discuss the infractions. If the student is a senior, he or she will also lose off-campus lunch privileges for two additional weeks. If a student reaches a total of fifteen unexcused tardies in a semester, the student will serve a Friday DH in the nearest possible time frame. In addition, the Grade-Level Dean will call the student's parents to discuss the infractions. A formal disciplinary letter will be written to document the pattern of unexcused tardies. If the student is a senior, he or she will also lose off-campus lunch privileges for the remainder of the semester. If a student reaches a total of twenty tardies, the student will serve an additional Friday DH in the nearest possible time frame. In addition, a parent conference with the Dean of Students and/or the Upper School/Middle School Head will be requested. If a student reaches a total of twenty five tardies, the student will serve a three hour Saturday morning DH. Additional consequences may be imposed including academic probation, suspension or dismissal from the School.

LEAVING THE SCHOOL CAMPUS All Upper and Middle School students leaving early must use the sign-out sheet located at the Assistant to the Dean of Student’s desk. Upon signing out, students will be given a pass to submit to security allowing them to leave campus. Students are only permitted to sign out with parental permission in the form of a note, email or phone call. Middle School students must be met at the front circle by the parent for pick-up. Ongoing absences must be approved by the Upper School/Middle School Head. Students are expected to try to make medical appointments that do not interfere with school activities or classes. Due to the limited time for lunch and the traffic congestion at that time of day, students may not leave campus unless given permission by the Upper School/Middle School Head. If a student has engaged in misconduct off campus, engages in behavior that raises a concern of drug or alcohol use, or leaves campus without permission, he or she is subject to being sent for testing under the School’s Drug and Alcohol Policy.

COLLEGE GUIDELINES

The college counseling office strives to be a resource to students and families providing programing and information sessions for both the middle and upper schools. Formal college counseling activities and structured college counseling will begin in grade 9, becoming more directed as students progress through their high school years. College counselors, along with advisors encourage their advisees to strive for good academic, extra-curricular, and community service credentials as well as leadership opportunities.

COLLEGE ADMISSION College Counseling at Tampa Prep is an individualized and student-centered program. Our students have been admitted to many different types of colleges and universities from all parts of the country as well as internationally. The School believes the college process should be a positive experience where students are encouraged to be independent and self-reliant in their college search. The college counselors work one-on-one with students to select colleges and/or universities that are best suited for their individual needs and desires. Students are mentored throughout their four years at Tampa Prep by faculty, advisors, college counselors, coaches and Grade-Level Deans. Each student is advised throughout the Upper School to pursue a course of study that emphasizes his or her particular interests, talents and strengths. Furthermore, they are encouraged to become involved in the life of our community in areas that reflect their unique set of skills and talents. For more information about the college counseling process, please refer to the College Counseling Guide found online on the School's website.

COLLEGE VISITS College visits are considered to be an important part of the college admissions process and are given high priority. It is necessary, however, to balance these visits against the academic responsibilities of each student. Therefore, our policy is: 1. Whenever possible, travel should be done on weekends, in conjunction with school holidays and during the summer. 2. A maximum absence of three (3) school days without special permission will be allowed. 3. In extenuating circumstances and with clearance from the Head of the Upper School, extensions beyond the three (3) days may be granted. 4. All class assignments should be picked up by the student prior to leaving. The instructor will give the student instructions as to when these assignments are due.

COLLEGE COUNSELING GUIDE FOR ACADEMICS AND STUDENT LIFE | 33


ATH LE TICS AN D AC T I V I T I E S POLICY FOR REPORTING INFORMATION TO COLLEGES Tampa Preparatory School is a member of the National Association of College Admission Counseling (NACAC) and as such supports NACAC’s “Code of Ethics and Professional Practice.” Accordingly, Tampa Prep College Counseling will provide information requested by any college to which a student applies. We will submit a student’s current academic transcript including grades earned through June of junior year and their senior class schedule. Any changes made to a senior's academic record after January 1 must be reported to colleges. If requested on an application, students are responsible for reporting disciplinary matters to colleges as well as circumstances under which a student is withdrawn from Tampa Prep regardless of the reason. (The student must also provide evidence of this communication to Tampa Prep. It is important for the student and parent to realize that Tampa Prep may also inform the college of such incidents.) In the case where a disciplinary action (or withdrawal) has occurred after the college decision has been made, the student is expected to inform the respective college. Tampa Prep may report any change in a student’s status between the time of application and graduation. This includes, but is not restricted to, a change to a senior’s schedule, withdrawal from a Concentration, a drop in grades, an honor violation, harm to self or other, and alcohol and/or drug use.

SAT II SUBJECT TESTS Several selective colleges request applicants to take SAT II subject tests. Each year Tampa Prep advises its juniors and some science and foreign language students (see below) to take spring SAT II’s. Science: Accomplished AP students in Biology, Chemistry, and Physics should consider taking the relevant SAT II subject tests. Foreign Language: Accomplished level 4 or higher students should consider taking the SAT II foreign language subject test.

COURSE MINIMUMS FOR FLORIDA'S STATE SCHOOLS All Tampa Prep students meet Florida State Schools guidelines by completing the Tampa Prep graduation requirements. All Florida public universities add GPA points for Honors and AP courses. Please contact the individual universities for their policies. STUDENT RECORDS AND TRANSCRIPTS Requests for student records and transcripts should be 34 | GUIDE FOR ACADEMICS AND STUDENT LIFE

made online. Please consult the school's website. Tampa Prep reserves the right to withhold student transcripts and records for non-payment of tuition or fees. (Revised 7-19)

FLORIDA'S BRIGHT FUTURES SCHOLARSHIP PROGRAM The Florida Bright Futures Scholarship information is accessible at www.floridastudentfinancialaid.org/ ssfad/bf/. (All students should independently research the requirements for these scholarships.) Students are responsible for keeping track of community service hours and entering them into SCOIR. Every Tampa Prep student will complete their Bright Futures application with the assistance of college counseling during their senior year.

ATHLETICS AND ACTIVITIES ATHLETIC AND ACTIVITY ELIGIBILITY Students are expected to meet all athletic and activity responsibilities unless excused by a doctor. Tardiness or absence from an athletic or activity responsibility will be treated in the same manner as that for classes. In order to be eligible for athletics, students must maintain a 2.00 cumulative unweighted GPA on a 4.00 scale. Freshman and sophomore students may be eligible on a semester basis without a 2.00 cumulative unweighted GPA. Additionally, students have to arrive at school by 8:50 a.m. in order to participate in any school activities. See the Head of the Upper School or the Athletic Director for details. ATHLETICS

Fall Bowling (B,G) V, MS Diving (B,G) V, MS Rowing (Club) Swimming (B,G) V, MS Winter Basketball (B,G) V, JV, MS Wrestling (B) V, MS Spring Baseball (B) V, JV, MS Rowing (B,G) V, JV, Novice Tennis (B,G) V, MS

Cross-Country (B,G) V, MS Golf (B,G) V Soccer (B) MS Volleyball (G) V, JV, MS Soccer (B,G) V, JV (G) MS

Lacrosse (B) V, MS Softball (G) V, M Track & Field (B,G) V, MS

PARTICIPATION IN NON-ACADEMIC EVENTS Students must meet all academic and school requirements on the day of an athletic event or activity in order to participate in that event or activity. In order to participate in a game or activity on a given day, a participant must arrive at school by 8:50 a.m. and meet all appointments on the day of the game, unless specifically excused in advance or excused


CHARACTER EXPECTATIONS AND DEVELOPMENT by a non-parent doctor’s note. The same policy will apply to any person participating or performing in any special events, such as a play or concert. Any special circumstances will be handled by the Dean of Students in advance of the absence. Students participating in athletics or non-academic events are expected to turn in all assignments on time.

using their time and energy, rather than raising money or conducting drives to bring in items that cost money. Fundraising projects should be at a level appropriate for students and their limited financial resources.

STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS A number of student organizations are active at Tampa Prep. These activities open new areas of interest, permit a different kind of valuable association with classmates and faculty, provide opportunities for students to develop leadership and help give a total sense of school community.

1. In order to provide appropriate guidance, each student project must be adopted by a recognized entity within the School and must have a faculty sponsor. 2. All proposed fundraising projects must be submitted to the Head of the Upper School/ Middle School for approval before initiating the project. 3. Use of any Tampa Prep logos, graphics or other branding must be approved by Mrs. Lambie, Director of Strategic Marketing. 4. Proposals for fundraisers involving privileges that break from school regulations (such as t-shirt days) must be approved by the Dean of Students or the Head of the Upper School/Middle School. (Revised 7-19)

Examples of these activities include: Student Council, National Honor Society, Mu Alpha Theta, Cum Laude, Tri-M Music Society, STAND, Teen Court, Peer Counseling, Conduct Review Board, National Art Honors Society, Debate, Prom Committee, various language clubs, Key Club, newspaper, and yearbook, in addition to other athletic, art, music, and interest groups. Community Service opportunities in the Upper School are facilitated through Key Club. All students are encouraged to volunteer both at school and in the community. Middle School clubs include Chess, Latin, French, SAC (Student Action Committee), Art, Terrapin Times, Robotics, Sunshine Readers, and Eighth Grade Leadership. Students are prohibited from holding any two or more of the following positions simultaneously: Student Council President, Editor of the Yearbook, Editor of the Newspaper, Key Club President, or any other leadership combinations that might represent a conflict of interest or overburden a student as determined by the Head of School. All clubs must be sanctioned by the Dean of Students (or designee) and/or the Head of the Middle School who will help select appropriate faculty advisors. Any special activity or program which will use school facilities must be cleared and scheduled in advance with the appropriate faculty. Any fundraising requests must be approved by the Head of the Upper School and/or the Head of the Middle School.

STUDENT FUNDRAISING From time to time, students may wish to engage in fundraising activities, either to benefit Tampa Prep and its students or for the benefit of a cause outside the School community. Proposed student projects will be evaluated for learning potential. Projects that encourage students to take responsibility, work with a group, promote school spirit, learn valuable business lessons and further the School’s mission are preferred. Students are encouraged to seek out opportunities for service,

Prior to initiating any fundraising activity, the guidelines below are to be followed:

CHARACTER EXPECTATIONS AND DEVELOPMENT THE PEER COUNSELING AND MENTORING PROGRAM A select group of juniors and seniors are chosen to serve as role models and peer counselors for the Middle School. In addition, a select group of seniors are chosen as senior mentors to serve as role models and peer leaders for ninth grade students. These peer counselors meet with a group of younger students on a monthly basis during the Advising period. This provides a unique opportunity for our older students to practice leadership and experience the role of mentoring. Our younger students benefit from a non-threatening forum to discuss social issues, academic concerns, and peer relations with a responsible and respected older student. This program promotes a sense of community between the Upper School and Middle School, as well as a sense of accountability and responsibility toward one another. TAMPA PREP CORE VALUES In support of the Tampa Prep mission, our character education program has elected to highlight the following character attributes. We encourage the following values to be manifested in our attitudes and behavior towards ourselves, others and the community in which we live. Curiosity. Members of the Tampa Prep community have a deep and persistent desire to acquire knowledge. We are inquisitive and have a strong desire GUIDE FOR ACADEMICS AND STUDENT LIFE | 35


GUIDING STUDENTS to learn. We are empowered to ask questions and to explore all of the possible answers to our queries.

Honesty. Members of the Tampa Prep community tell the truth and act with integrity and honor. We do not mislead, cheat or steal. Kindness. Members of the Tampa Prep community exhibit caring and compassionate behavior in all aspects of daily life. We are not mean. We do not harass, nor act in a cruel manner. By our positive example, we discourage unkind behavior in others. Respect. Members of the Tampa Prep community affirm the intrinsic dignity of all people. We act with tolerance, courtesy, and thoughtful regard for all persons, for property, for the environment, and for ourselves. Responsibility. Members of the Tampa Prep community are reliable and hold themselves and others accountable for their actions. We do not make excuses, blame others, or take unwarranted credit.

COMMUNITY SERVICE As evidenced by Tampa Prep's motto, "A Higher Purpose Than Self", the School deeply values community service. Although Tampa Prep does not maintain a community service requirement, most students participate actively in the community service program. Key Club serves as the umbrella organization for community service, and several different clubs are active at school. Through the variety of service-oriented clubs, students are encouraged to volunteer both on campus and in the community. As a school Tampa Prep commits one day a year, called Terrapin Day, to participate in community service projects in and around Tampa. In order for hours to be calculated towards Florida's Bright Futures Scholarship Program, students must enter information into their SCOIR accounts starting in ninth grade. Questions can be directed to Tampa Prep College Counseling. Students should also keep track of their own community service hours. (Revised 7-19) STUDENT GOVERNMENT In the spring, elections are held for class representatives to the Student Council. The President of the Student Council is a rising senior elected by the student body at large. The ninth grade class will elect its four representatives in the fall. In order to be eligible to run for or hold office, a student must have a cumulative grade point average of C- or better and must have never been subject to major school discipline. The Student Council organizes student events, promotes school spirit, works with the Tampa Prep Parents Alliance, and acts as student advisors to the administration.

36 | GUIDE FOR ACADEMICS AND STUDENT LIFE

GUIDING STUDENTS ADVISING One of the most important facets of Tampa Prep is its intensive advising program. Many parents cite it as influential in their enrollment decisions, and come to depend on it to keep them informed of both existing and possible or anticipated problems. The goal of Advising is to create a safe space for community. The advisor’s job is a complex one that requires considerable commitment and conscientiousness. He or she provides a reliable, communicative link between the advisee and his or her parents/guardians and teachers, particularly for students with a grade of C or below in a course. In addition, the advisor functions as the advisee’s advocate, and monitors and promotes the advisee’s academic and personal growth. Ninth grade teachers and advisors are particularly sensitive to the academic and social adjustments involved in being an Upper School student. They communicate early and frequently when concerns arise about these matters. An open, communicative relationship between parents/ guardians and advisors is important.

WEEKLY MEETINGS - ADVISING AND CLASS SEMINAR Once each week in both the Middle School and Upper School, advisors meet with their advisees in assigned locations to address a wide variety of student-related concerns or issues. While the tenor of these gatherings may vary according to grade level, advisors use this time for positive interactions with their students. These meetings are viewed as opportunities for interactions outside the traditional classroom where advisors help students uncover solutions to their concerns, or discuss matters of importance to the community. In the Upper School there is a weekly meeting called Class Seminar. Each grade level meets separately, sometimes as a whole class and sometimes in smaller groupings. These meetings are used to help share information specific to the age and grade of the students. The goal is to provide exposure to a variety of topics relevant to students' lives that are not covered in traditional classes. A partial list of the topics includes time management, organization, digital citizenship, drug & alcohol awareness, driving safety, SAT prep, financial literacy, legal issues, and the transition to college.

MY BACKPACK My BackPack is a secure online web portal through which families and advisors can view student grade reports, attendance, class schedules, homework assignments,


ST UD ENT COND UC T A ND D I SCIPLIN E as well as access an online parent directory. One of the great benefits of My BackPack is the communication it fosters between parents and children. Parents who have questions about particular assignments or grades are encouraged to speak with their child before contacting the School. If a grade appears on a My BackPack report, chances are the student already has the graded quiz, test, essay, project, etc. in his or her possession. Conversing with the student should encourage him/her to strategize and to move forward. If further information is still desired, parents should communicate with either the advisor or the teacher. Please note that the final grade calculation on the My BackPack report may not seem logical for some classes. In all likelihood this is because grades are being weighted in a class. Weighting occurs when teachers allot a certain percentage of the overall grade to specific facets of the class such as quizzes, tests, homework, projects, etc. One should refer to the course syllabus for more information on weighting percentages for a particular class.

LIMITS OF ADVISING AND THE ROLE OF THE SCHOOL COUNSELOR Advisors are aware of their limits and recognize when an advisee’s issues require additional professional assistance. Teachers and advisors are not trained psychologists and are not expected to offer counsel or advice on family or other personal matters. Some “light” advising in this area is appropriate to the degree to which the advisor feels comfortable. However, more in-depth matters are referred either to the Head of the Upper School, Head of the Middle School or the School Counselor. COUNSELING The School Counselor is on campus full time. In addition to meeting with individual students about specific problems, she also is considered a resource for the School community. She also creates special programs for students, teachers and parents.

these are submitted to the Dean of Students. Students or parents may not request specific teachers. The following individuals are responsible for course selection in each grade: Mr. Fenlon (6, 7, 8), Mrs. Jisha (9), Mr. Clements (10), Mr. Morrison (11) and your College Counselor - Ms. Leonhardt, Ms. Kristin Grosso or Mr. Turner (12).

STUDENT CONDUCT AND DISCIPLINE GENERAL DISCIPLINARY GUIDELINES When a student deviates from the norms of acceptable behaviors, as outlined in the Four Pillars of Character Education and in our conduct policies and guidelines, the student should expect some type of disciplinary consequence. The administration will determine the appropriate disciplinary consequences for each particular situation. For many types of major disciplinary matters in the Upper School, the Conduct Review Board provides advice to the Administration. The level of disciplinary response for any violation of School rules will depend on a variety of circumstances, including but not limited to: • Whether any person was harmed; • Whether there was property damage or other loss of property; • The level of any class or School disruption caused by the student’s behavior; • The number, if any, of prior infractions of School rules and regulations; • Whether the student has been previously disciplined; • Whether there were illegal substances (for example, drugs, alcohol, cigarettes, etc.); • Whether the student had been earlier warned about the same or similar conduct; • Whether there was a weapon or other dangerous item involved; • Whether the conduct is of the kind also prohibited by criminal law; and/or • Whether the student was honest and cooperative in connection with the investigation of the behavior.

Students and parents should be aware that conversations with the School Counselor may be privileged and confidential, unless the nature of the communication reveals the immediate risk of harm to the student or others, or a violation of the child abuse laws.

TYPES OF INFRACTIONS Minor Infractions. Dress code, eating/drinking in the building, littering, minor profanity, general incivility, missed commitments, and other similar behaviors will result in the imposition of one or more Disciplinary Holdovers, as determined at the discretion of the administration.

COURSE SELECTION ASSISTANCE Grade-Level administrators help students select their classes for the following year. In doing this, they ensure that course selections 1) are appropriate to the student's abilities, and 2) will continue the student's smooth progress toward fulfillment of Tampa Prep’s graduation requirements. Students, parents, Grade-Level administrators and Concentration Coordinators (if necessary) must sign students’ registration forms before

Major Infractions. Tampa Prep has several major school rules that are essential to maintaining a healthy academic and social environment. The following are examples of behaviors that are forbidden at school, at any school-sponsored event, or on the Tampa Prep campus, and are grounds for disciplinary action, which may include expulsion. In addition, some behaviors may have occurred away from school but may impact the GUIDE FOR ACADEMICS AND STUDENT LIFE | 37


S TU D E N T CO N D UC T AN D D I SC I P L I NE individual’s ability to continue at school, or may impact other students’ or employees’ ability to be comfortable at school. This list does not include a listing of all actions that may result in serious disciplinary action and/or expulsion. The administration always retains the right to assess any individual circumstance and determine the appropriate disciplinary action. The following are always prohibited on campus: • Smoking, vaping or possession of any nicotine or tobacco product or paraphernalia • Infliction of bodily harm • Consensual or non-consensual sexual activity • Harassment, bullying, hazing, threats, intimidation, disrespect, defiance, incivility • Possession of any type of weapon or fireworks • Damaging the school property or property of others • Irresponsible use of an automobile or riding on/in a vehicle in an unsafe way • Theft • Violation of the School’s Drug and Alcohol policy • Violation of the School’s Technology and Computer policy • Leaving school property/event without permission • Repeated minor infractions

is held in the assigned proctor's classroom. • A student must complete the DH within one week of its assignment. Failure to complete the DH in the required time will result in a Friday DH from 3:35-5:05 p.m. A Friday DH takes precedence over all other commitments (sports, rehearsals, club meetings, etc.) and a student will not be allowed to participate in after-school activities during that time. Accumulated Upper School DHs will be treated according to the following schedule (per semester): Number of DHs

DISCIPLINARY CONSEQUENCES The range of possible disciplinary consequences include one or more of the following:

2

Communication home via student’s advisor

4

Letter to parents with DH policy

6

Letter to parents, assignment of a Saturday morning DH, and a phone call home to parents from the Dean of Students

8

Letter to parents and parent/ student conference with the Dean of Students

10

Letter to parents and a student will appear in front of the Conduct Review Board and will be issued additional sanctions

DISCIPLINARY HOLDOVER (DH)

Disciplinary Holdover is for students who have violated the School’s rules. DH is a required detention period during which students will remain quietly seated. This time is intended to afford the student a chance to reflect upon the consequences of his or her action and serve as full punishment for minor infractions. Conversation, homework, games and sleep will not be permitted. A list of students who have been assigned a DH will be available each day. While it is the responsibility of the student to check the list, the Dean’s office will make every effort to contact the assigned students. In addition, the Dean of Students holds a Friday DH each week from 3:35-5:05 p.m. Students are assigned to this DH by the Dean when deemed an appropriate consequence to a rule infraction. Also, students who fail to serve a DH in a week will be assigned a Friday DH the following Friday. This DH must be served on the date assigned and takes precedence over all other school commitments. • Middle School DHs are held in the computer hub on the first floor during lunch. • In the Upper School, DH is held during lunch Monday through Friday and after school from 3:35-4:05 p.m. Monday through Thursday. If a Friday DH is assigned, it is held from 3:35-4:05 p.m. on Fridays. • Lunchtime DH is held in the library. After school DH 38 | GUIDE FOR ACADEMICS AND STUDENT LIFE

Consequence

DISCIPLINARY WARNING STATUS

Students who have serious or repeat infractions will be placed on disciplinary warning status, which means that further infractions may result in probation, suspension, or expulsion. The administration will determine the term of the Disciplinary Warning Status. A student on Disciplinary Warning Status may not be eligible to participate in School-sponsored activities. PROBATION

A student on probation is in jeopardy of being expelled if found guilty of a major offense. Students on probation may lose privileges (such as participating in extracurricular activities, holding office, participating in student council, off-campus lunch, etc.). IN-SCHOOL SUSPENSION

Students on In School Suspension are required to be on campus at a designated area but are not allowed to attend class or events. Students still have the responsibility to complete and timely submit all class work and to


ST UD ENT COND UC T A ND D I SCIPLIN E arrange to make up examinations. Suspension becomes a permanent part of a student’s record. OUT-OF-SCHOOL SUSPENSION

Students are banned from all School activities, including classes, and are to remain at home. Students still have the responsibility to complete and timely submit all class work and to arrange to make up examinations. Suspension becomes a permanent part of a student’s record. DEAN'S DH

Students who are assigned a Dean's DH are required to be on campus on a day or at a time when classes are not on campus. They will be given work assignments during this time. EXPULSION

Students may be expelled for serious first offenses; repeat infractions (even if not related); conduct resulting in harm, damage, or disruption to self, others, or the educational environment; parent or family member causing disruption to the School or the School’s educational mission; non-payment of tuition or fees; not meeting academic requirements; or not meeting attendance requirements. If a student is expelled, he or she will have the option to petition the Head of School and the Board of Trustees for re-entry the next school year. The student must remain out of school for one year. Students are prohibited from campus until the end of the year or for six months, whichever is longer. Students returning from expulsion will remain on probation for the duration of their enrollment at Tampa Prep. In order to maintain common trust and to provide an environment of mutual respect, tolerance, and sensitivity, it is important that every member of the community recognizes guidelines for appropriate behavior. Honest communication, courteous and respectful interactions with all members of the community, and responsible actions are behaviors valued at Tampa Preparatory School. Inappropriate behavior, either verbal or physical, that disregards the self-esteem of others is unacceptable, including unwelcome physical advances, unwarranted verbal remarks, profanity, and derogatory or discriminatory comments. Providing a safe and secure environment for all our students and our staff is a primary goal of the School. No set of policies and procedures, however, can or should replace trust, goodwill, and the judgments of reasonable people. It is expected that parents will notify the School if they have reasonable cause to believe that a student has been the victim of discrimination or sexual harassment. Upper School students who are suspected of breaking a major school rule will be called before the Dean

of Students who will gather all relevant information, including a statement from the student, if he or she so desires. If it is determined that there has been a violation, the student will usually appear before the Conduct Review Board; however, the school reserves the right to resolve disciplinary matters in whatever manner it deems appropriate. The Conduct Review Board may then recommend to the Head of School and to the Head of the Upper School/Middle School the appropriate disciplinary action to be taken. The parents of the student will be notified. Since violation of the Honor Code or the breaking of a major school rule is a very serious offense, there is no warning for the first offense. Each case is treated individually and the penalty is assessed according to the circumstances of the individual case. Out of respect for the privacy and the sensitivity of some of the issues that accompany student conduct and discipline, the school may not publicly discuss or share the discipline decisions of the school. There may be times when a matter needs to be discussed. At those times, the information may be presented in conceptual terms to preserve the privacy of the student(s) involved.

CONCERN FOR STUDENTS The School continues to be concerned about the development of the whole child, and offers educational programs, discussion opportunities, and access to counseling in order to encourage wise behavior choices, provide a basis for decision-making and serve as a forum for the possible consequences of irresponsible behavior. While the School holds all students accountable for any and all actions that occur during the school day or during a school-sponsored activity or event, the School cannot be responsible for students 24 hours a day and relies on parents to set appropriate guidelines and codes of behavior for their children. The School does reserve the right to discipline the students for off campus activities. Parents are expected to monitor parties and the other activities in which they allow their children to participate. A positive and constructive working relationship between the School, the student and/or the student’s parents/guardian is essential to the accomplishment of the School’s mission. The School accordingly reserves the right to terminate or not renew a student’s enrollment contract if the School reasonably concludes that the actions of a student or a parent or guardian make such a positive and constructive relationship impossible, or otherwise seriously interfere with the School’s accomplishment of its purposes. There will be no response from Tampa Preparatory School to unsigned letters or anonymous phone calls. CONDUCT REVIEW BOARD The Conduct Review Board, comprised of students, faculty, and administrators, advises the administration GUIDE FOR ACADEMICS AND STUDENT LIFE | 39


S TU D E N T CO N D UC T AN D D I SC I P L I NE regarding Upper School disciplinary matters. The Board meets as necessary to respond to student infractions of major disciplinary violations. In the administration’s discretion, certain matters may not be referred to the Conduct Review Board. Family members or other outside parties are not permitted to attend meetings of the CRB.

CONDUCT POLICIES ANIMAL POLICY Due to concerns about the health, safety, and welfare of people in the School community, no animals are allowed on School property or at School-related events without the express, written permission of the Head of School. This means that animals may not be brought onto School property for any reason (even if the animal remains in a vehicle or on a leash), including drop off, pick up, parties, games, and activities, and may not be brought to School-related events on or off campus. BOOK BAGS Fire Department regulations require that book bags may not be left in the hallways, but must be carried to class or placed in lockers or book cubbies. Book bags left in the hall may be picked up. To prevent theft, we strongly advise all students to either place their valuables in their locked locker or simply leave them at home. CLEANLINESS AND LITTER All students are expected to eat in the Student Center or in the courtyard. Receptacles are provided in hallways, classrooms and the patio areas for disposal of litter and trash. Please help keep your campus clean by using the marked receptacles and cleaning your place at the lunch tables. Students may not eat inside any buildings unless accompanied by a faculty or staff member. CRIMINAL ACTIVITY A student engaging in conduct that is defined under law as a serious misdemeanor or felony (whether charged by law enforcement or not) is susceptible to expulsion. Violations of law that occur off-campus during the school day will be subject to review under school rules. Violations of law that occur after the school day may also be subject to review under school rules. In the case of offenses that occur at the end of the school year, the school may require punishments to be served during the summer. Transcripts and other reports pertaining to the student’s academic standing will be withheld until the completion of the assigned punishment. All decisions involving suspension or expulsion are subject to the final approval of the Head of School and the Head of the Upper School/Middle School. DRESS CODE The dress code exists to encourage students to dress 40 | GUIDE FOR ACADEMICS AND STUDENT LIFE

simply and attractively. In addition to being asked to change, a DH may be issued. Tampa Prep’s dress requirements stress modesty, decency, common sense, neatness and good taste. Not all of society’s fashions are appropriate for school. All clothing should be clean, in good repair (no holes, tears, patches, frays or cutoffs) and sensible for the season. All students are expected to arrive at school dressed appropriately and to remain so throughout the day. Parents are expected to make sure that their students are properly dressed for school. Students not adhering to dress code will be seen by the Dean of Students in the Upper School and by the Head of the Middle School in the Middle School. The Upper and Middle School Offices have clothing available for students to change into. The Dean also has disposable razors and shaving cream available for boys who need to shave. Repeated offenses will result in communication with the parent/guardian and the chance of additional consequences issued by the Head of the Upper School or Head of the Middle School Office. All clothes must be neat and in good repair (no rips or frays). Athletic clothing such as sweatpants, leggings, joggers, warm-up suits, swimwear and athletic shorts are not permitted. Appropriate shoes for school include loafers, deck shoes, athletic shoes, sandals, or dress shoes. Shoes must be worn at all times. For safety purposes, feet must be completely covered in the science labs. Facial hair (beards, mustaches and goatees) and unusually long sideburns are not permitted. No extreme hairstyles and colors are allowed. Earrings or a small stud in the nose is permitted. No visible tattoos are permitted. Hats are not allowed during the school day. BOYS DRESS CODE TOPS • All shirts must have a collar. • Shirts with buttons must be buttoned within the first two buttons. • No other shirts are acceptable unless there is a designated t-shirt day at school. • UPPER SCHOOL ONLY: Henley (non-collared) shirts are permitted. BOTTOMS • Bermuda-length shorts, jeans, khakis and dress pants. Undergarments must not be visible. • No athletic shorts except on designated days or for athletics. GIRLS DRESS CODE TOPS • All shirts must have a collar and sleeves (or a jacket or sweater must be worn over a sleeveless shirt at all times). • Shirts with buttons must be buttoned within the first two buttons and must cover midriff and midchest area. • No other shirts are acceptable unless there is a


ST UD ENT COND UC T A ND D I SCIPLIN E designated t-shirt day at school. Undergarments must not be visible, and seethrough or mesh fabrics may not be worn unless a student has an appropriate shirt or slip underneath. • UPPER SCHOOL ONLY: Blouses or appropriately tailored (non-collared) shirts may be worn. BOTTOMS • Skirts, Bermuda-length shorts, jeans, khakis and dress pants. • Yoga pants and jeggings are not permitted at any time. • No athletic shorts except on designated days or for athletics. • Dresses may be worn as well, as long as they have sleeves and an appropriate neckline (or if a jacket or sweater is worn over a sleeveless dress at all times). • Skirts, dresses and shorts must come within 5” of the top of the knee. • Leggings and tights may only be worn if under a skirt or dress of appropriate length. •

DRUGS, ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO POLICY GENERAL

Our students are prohibited from possessing, using, selling or purchasing any alcoholic beverages or other mind-altering substances on or near School property or at School-related activities. Off-premises possession, use, sale or purchase of mind-altering substances and off-premise alcohol abuse is also prohibited. Possession and or use of tobacco products is also expressly prohibited on campus or at any School-sponsored event. Possession of drug paraphernalia is also prohibited. SMOKING/VAPING/TOBACCO PRODUCTS

School policy expressly forbids students from smoking, vaping, or using tobacco products, as well as possessing such products, at any time in or on School property, buses or other School vehicles, adjacent properties, or School-sponsored trips. All cigarettes (including electronic), vaping devices, smokeless tobacco, lighters, matches, etc. or other devices similar to cigarettes, lighters, matches, etc. brought on campus by students will be confiscated. Discipline will be imposed based on the circumstances existing at the time and may include suspension, probation, or expulsion. TESTING

Students may be required to submit to urinalysis drug screens, blood alcohol tests, breathalyzer tests and medical examinations under the following circumstances: (a) when a student is suspected of attending School or School-related activities with intoxicants or mind-altering substances in his or her system; (b) when a student suffers an injury or is involved in an accident while at School; (c) on a periodic or random basis, including but not limited to, in connection with the student’s participation in extracurricular activities; or

(d) when a student is placed under disciplinary contract and such screenings or examinations are terms of the contract. The presence of 0.02% alcohol or the presence of any other intoxicants or mind-altering substances in the body is a violation of this policy. Refusal of a student (by the student or the student’s parent) to undergo testing or to cooperate fully with any of these tests (including signing consent forms or providing testing results promptly to the school) is also a violation of our policy and will result in expulsion. This policy does not prohibit the proper use of medication under the direction of a physician. However, the misuse or abuse of such drugs is prohibited. Students who are taking prescription or nonprescription drugs, which could affect their ability to function in a safe and efficient manner, must notify an administrator in the School Office of this fact when they report to School. CONSEQUENCES

In addition to determining the appropriate disciplinary action pursuant to the School’s Disciplinary Rules, the School reserves the right to impose the following additional or different requirements as appropriate for the circumstances: determination of possible legal action; required professional counseling approved by the administration; removal from all elected or appointed positions of leadership in the School; required random and/or regularly scheduled drug and/or alcohol testing at a School-approved local clinic or doctor’s office for a time period and at intervals to be determined by the School’s administration. Refusal of a student (directly or through a parent/guardian) to undergo testing or to cooperate fully with any of these tests will be considered a positive result and will result in automatic expulsion (and will not be referred to the Conduct Review Board). SELF-REPORTING AND SEEKING ASSISTANCE

If a student and/or the student’s family recognizes an ongoing problem with alcohol, tobacco, or drugs and (1) initiates a meeting with a school counselor prior to an observable infraction, (2) volunteers to undergo professional evaluation chosen by an agency approved by the School, and (3) agrees to undergo treatment, if recommended, the School will do all that is reasonable and appropriate to help such a student and his/her family.

EATING IN THE BUILDINGS Proper hydration and healthy eating are important components for academic success. As such, students are permitted to eat snacks in most public areas of school including the hallways and near lockers. Most teachers also permit snacking in their classrooms at appropriate times of day such as the breaks between classes. Students are permitted to drink water at all times in the buildings, and we encourage the use of reusable water bottles. The Student Center is the only place inside the GUIDE FOR ACADEMICS AND STUDENT LIFE | 41


S TU D E N T CO N D UC T AN D D I SC I P L I NE school buildings where students are always permitted to eat food and drink beverages. For safety reasons, food is not permitted in science classrooms at any time. Food is also not permitted in the library at any time.

ELEVATOR USE Students are prohibited from using the school elevators at all times. Ill or injured students may receive special permission from the Health Coordinator to use the elevators for a designated period of time. All students who need to use the elevator for more than one day are required to provide a non-parent doctor's note to the Health Coordinator. (Revised 7-19) FIGHTS OR HORSEPLAY Fights and physical horseplay of any kind are prohibited and may lead to disciplinary consequences for all of the individuals. GENERAL CONDUCT Students and parents should be considerate and show respect toward other students, faculty, all guests and visitors. Students should respect School property and the personal property of other people. Students and parents, whether as participants or spectators, are required to show good sportsmanship and courtesy at all School-sponsored events (on and off campus). Any person showing unsportsmanlike conduct may be asked to leave the event and may not be allowed to attend future events. HARASSMENT/BULLYING The School is dedicated to fostering an environment that promotes kindness, acceptance, and embraces differences among individuals. Therefore, the School will not tolerate any type of harassment or bullying. Harassment includes, but is not limited to, slurs, jokes, and other verbal, graphic, or offensive conduct relating to gender, race, religion, color, sex, sexual orientation, national origin, citizenship or disability. Harassment also includes unwanted, offensive sexual conduct. Bullying includes, but is not limited to, physical or verbal aggression (hitting, kicking, taunting, teasing, threatening, ridiculing, etc.), relational aggression (harming or threatening to harm relationships or acceptance, friendship, or group inclusion), emotional aggression (teasing, threatening, intimidating others). The School also prohibits cyber-bullying (creating websites, instant messaging, email, using camera phones, or other forms of technology to engage in harassment or bullying). Any of these types of offensive conduct, whether on or off campus, on a school bus, or at a School-related event, can create an uncomfortable School environment. All concerns relating to harassment or bullying should be reported immediately to School officials. We also expect that anyone, whether student, faculty, staff 42 | GUIDE FOR ACADEMICS AND STUDENT LIFE

or family member who witness, or has knowledge of an incident of bullying or harassment, will report the incident to administration immediately. When the School administration becomes aware of harassment or bullying, the situation will be promptly investigated. Any student found to have violated this policy will be subject to disciplinary action, including dismissal from school for serious violations. No adverse action will be taken against any person who makes a good faith report of harassment or bullying. Retaliation in any form against anyone for making a good faith complaint under this policy or for participating in an investigation is strictly prohibited. Any retaliation should also be reported pursuant to this policy and is itself a cause for disciplinary action.

HAZING Although we encourage students to participate in School-related athletics, clubs, associations, organizations and other groups, the School prohibits all forms of hazing. Hazing refers to any activity expected of a student to join or to continue membership or participation in any group where the activity produces or could be expected to produce mental, emotional or physical discomfort, humiliation, embarrassment, harassment, or ridicule to the student, regardless of the student’s willingness to participate. Hazing activities include, but are not limited to, acts of personal servitude (i.e., forced labor or service), sleep deprivation, restrictions on personal hygiene, yelling, swearing, insulting or demeaning verbal abuse, being forced to wear embarrassing or humiliating attire, consumption of vile or other non-food substances, consumption of alcohol, smearing of skin with vile substances, brandings, writing or marking on one’s skin or clothes, physical beatings, paddling or other physical abuse, performing sexual simulation or sexual acts, stunts or dares that could result in physical injury or harm to a person’s mental, emotional or social well-being, any act in violation of the law or School policy, and any other activity that could fall within the definition of hazing. If you are not sure if an activity is hazing, then you need to contact School officials and ask. A student violates this policy whenever he or she engages, assists, or attempts to engage or assist in the planning or committing of any hazing activity, whether on or off School property. Each student is also responsible for immediately reporting any hazing activity or plans for any hazing activity to School officials. The failure to make such a report is also a violation of this policy. When the School administration becomes aware of any actual or planned hazing activity, the situation will be promptly investigated. Any student found to have violated this policy will be subject to disciplinary action, including dismissal from the School for serious violations. No adverse action will be taken against any person who makes a good faith report of hazing activity.

IDENTIFICATION CARDS In order to protect the safety of all who attend the


ST UD ENT COND UC T A ND D I SCIPLIN E School, identification cards have become a fact of life. It is expected that all students will carry their Tampa Prep ID card whenever they are on campus. Students may be asked to produce their card by School personnel for a variety of reasons, such as but not limited to: campus security checks, athletic and other school-sponsored events, and book checkout.

ILLNESS Prior to the beginning of School, a physical examination must be completed or transferred for each student entering the School. Immunization or a certificate of waiver is required for all students. Immunizations must be kept current, and a Certificate of Immunization, signed by a physician, or an immunization waiver must be kept on file in the School office. Students may not attend School without an appropriate immunization record. The Health Coordinator is available to students daily. If a student is not feeling well, he or she should inform the classroom teacher and ask to be excused to go to the Health Coordinator's office. Students will be released for medical reasons only with permission from the parent/guardian or from the person designated on the student's emergency card. If a parent cannot pick up a sick child, the child will be sent home by taxi at the parent’s expense. Many students must have medication available at School for certain illnesses and conditions. School personnel cannot administer medication, including pain relievers, without explicit written parental/guardian permission. A permission form completed by the parent/guardian is required in the event a student must receive medicine at School. The medicine, in its original container, labeled with the student's name, name of medicine, dose and time to be given, doctor's name (if prescribed) and possible side effects, must be given to the Health Coordinator together with the signed permission form. Parents are not to give medication to students to administer to themselves. Students who are absent from School for the following reasons require a physician's statement confirming the student's ability to return to School and any necessary limitations or restriction: •• Measles, mumps, chicken pox, ringworm, scarlet fever •• Strep infection, mononucleosis, hepatitis, pink eye •• Students who may not participate in sports or gym classes following an extended illness, surgery or concussion

LAPTOP AND MOBILE DEVICE SECURITY Students may choose to have an assigned locker capable of holding their iPads as well as books. iPads should not be left anywhere on campus unattended; the aforementioned locker option should be used. The School does not assume or accept any responsibility for

loss or damage to iPads.

LASER POINTERS Laser pointers are prohibited on School grounds at all times. LOCKERS Students may be assigned a locker and are expected to use either a lock provided by the School or to provide their own lock to secure their possessions. When not in use, lockers should be kept locked. Students may not move to any other locker other than the one that has been assigned to them. Students may not write on lockers or affix any stickers to lockers. Lockers are School property and are loaned to students. The School reserves the right to enter and search lockers. The School assumes no financial responsibility for items taken from lockers. OFF CAMPUS BEHAVIORS As stated elsewhere in this Guide, the School does not wish to unnecessarily involve itself in a student’s off campus behaviors. However, the School reserves the right to take action to the extent that off campus behaviors impact the individual’s ability to continue at school or impact other students’ or employees’ ability to be comfortable at school. We expect students to avoid all types of behaviors, including behaviors that may be harmful to one’s body, self-esteem, or health. As examples, off campus Internet activity, criminal activity, sexual activity, use of drugs, alcohol, or tobacco, may result in a student receiving disciplinary action, up to and including dismissal from school. POSTING SIGNS Signs posted by students around campus may be attached only using blue masking tape (available at the reception desk). Students must remove all signs immediately after the announced event is completed. Any damage to School property will be repaired and billed to a student’s account. All postings should maintain decency, common sense and good taste, or they will be removed. PUBLIC DISPLAYS OF AFFECTION In keeping with the School’s emphasis on modesty and decency, public displays of affection (i.e. kissing, extended embraces, etc.) between students are not permitted on campus. In addition, any type of sexual conduct anywhere on campus, on School buses, or at a School-sponsored event is prohibited. Any unwanted or offensive sexual conduct occurring on School property or at a School event must be immediately reported in accordance with the Harassment and Bullying Policy.

GUIDE FOR ACADEMICS AND STUDENT LIFE | 43


TECHN O LO GY P OL I C I E S STUDENT/ADULT INTERACTIONS AND COMMUNICATION Our students and adults (teachers, administrators, staff members, parents, and visitors) are expected to interact with each other in a professional and respectful manner. Although our adults can and should be friendly with the students, becoming too friendly with each other sometimes results in confusion and anxiety. If a student or the student’s parents become aware of any adult’s communications or actions toward one or more students that seems unusual, overly friendly, or otherwise inappropriate, such information should immediately be reported to the School Counselor or the appropriate Head of the Upper School/Middle School. Some examples of behaviors that should not occur and which should be reported include school employees: • Calling students at home for a non-school matter • Touching students or their clothing in non-professional ways or inappropriate places, or touching a student with aggression or in frustration • Making comments that are too personal (about a student’s clothing, hair, personal habits, etc.) • Sending emails, texts, or writing notes to students of a personal nature • Flirting or asking a student on a date • Visiting students to “hang out” in their hotel rooms when on field trips or sporting events or when the student’s parents are not at home • Asking or permitting students to sit on a teacher’s lap • Telling secrets or telling the student not to tell something that’s a secret • Swearing, making inappropriate sexual, racial or ethnic comments • Inviting students to visit the adult’s social networking profile or become a “friend” on a social network • Telling off-color jokes • Dating or engaging in consensual relationships with students Similarly, we expect that our parents will not take it upon themselves to address a situation with a student relating to a disagreement with the student or the student’s parents. Loud, angry, or aggressive language or actions will not be tolerated. Any such interaction should be reported under this policy.

WEAPONS AND THREATS The School takes a zero tolerance position on threats and weapons, even when students make comments in jest, on email, or away from School toward or about another student, employee, or the School. Students are prohibited from bringing any type of weapon to School or School-sponsored events, including knives, guns, fireworks, etc. Any such item may be confiscated and, if appropriate, turned over to law enforcement. Any pictorial depictions of weapons or verbal or written 44 | GUIDE FOR ACADEMICS AND STUDENT LIFE

comments that the administration determines in its discretion appear to be threatening in nature will result in disciplinary consequences.

TECHNOLOGY POLICIES TECHNOLOGY MISSION STATEMENT Tampa Preparatory School provides access to technology and training for students and faculty alike in order to provide the most appropriate tools available to support higher level learning and instruction. Technology is viewed as an important enhancement to the rigorous academic curriculum taught at the School. We believe that technological skills are valuable as they pertain to sound pedagogy, not as an end in themselves. To this end, the school is committed to making available proven technologies and training to the students, faculty, staff and administration, and to provide opportunities for growth on a continuing basis. TECHNOLOGY ACCEPTABLE USE POLICY Tampa Preparatory School has ample technological resources including computer labs, desktop computers, laptops, interactive displays and digital research tools. It is assumed that everyone at Tampa Preparatory School (that is students, faculty, staff, administrators and parents) will use computers in an ethical, responsible manner. All computers are to be used for academic purposes first and foremost. There may be times when students are allowed to use technology for recreational use, but students should not visit sites that have objectionable content or use technology to view objectionable material. Students should not attempt to bypass the technological blocks that have been placed on the network to filter content that the School has classified as objectionable. All computers and technological resources are to be handled with care and consideration and be used for academic purposes. While the School does not actively pursue or routinely view personal social networking sites, when objectionable or disrespectful material is brought to the attention of the School or School personnel, or experiences are placed on a site, the school reserves the right to examine the content and address the conduct if it creates a hostile or disrespectful environment. The School also reserves the right to address the student who placed the content on the site. The School does encourage parents to routinely view their child’s social media accounts to ensure that information and content shared does not place a student at risk.

TECHNOLOGY, ELECTRONIC DEVICES, AND COMPUTER SYSTEMS USAGE POLICY All persons using the School’s computers, the School’s network, or personal computers on School property or over the School’s systems are required to abide by the


T EC H NOLOGY P OLICIES following rules. This policy also applies to the use of any personal electronic devices (computers, laptops, iPads, cameras, video cameras, phones, etc.) on School property or at a School-related event. Failure to abide by these rules will result in appropriate disciplinary action determined by the School administration. All computers should be used in a responsible, ethical and legal manner and in compliance with the Honor Code. Violations of the following guidelines may result in the revocation of access privileges and possible disciplinary responses, including expulsion for serious offenses.

Internet Access: Tampa Preparatory School provides wireless connectivity for students. Students are allowed to use personal digital communication devices between classes and in the classroom at the classroom instructor’s discretion. Users of the Tampa Preparatory School network are expected to act as responsible digital citizens and conduct themselves in compliance with the School's Honor Code. Furthermore, accessing or passing on any material that is pornographic, violent in nature, or otherwise harassing is totally unacceptable and will be dealt with immediately by the appropriate administrator. Students are expected to abide by the same policy whether using personal or School-provided devices, and whether on a cellular or School-provided network. In addition, the creation or utilization of personal Wi-Fi Hotspots while on campus is strictly forbidden. Internet Safety: Students should never give out personal information (address, telephone number, name of School, address of School, date of birth, Social Security Number, credit card number, etc.) over the Internet. Students also should not meet with someone that they have contacted on-line without prior parental approval. Safety is the responsibility of the parent and student. The School is not liable in any way for irresponsible acts on the part of the student. Pirated Software: The term “pirated software” refers to the use and transfer of stolen software. Commercial software is copyrighted, and each purchaser must abide by the licensing agreement published with the software. There is no justification for the use of illegally obtained software. The School will not, in any way, be held responsible for a student’s own software brought to School for personal use. In addition, usage of peer-to-peer file sharing software or bit torrent trackers while on campus is prohibited. Network Access/Passwords: Accessing the accounts and files of others is prohibited. Attempting to impair the network or to bypass restrictions set by the network administrator is prohibited. Obtaining another’s password or rights to another’s directory or email on the network is a violation of School rules as well as a form of theft. Taking advantage of a student who inadvertently leaves a computer or iPad without logging out is not appropriate. Using someone else’s password or posting a message using another’s log-in name is

a form of dishonesty, just as is plagiarism or lying, and will be treated as an Honor Code violation. Guard your password, as you will be responsible for any activity done on the School’s system under your password.

School’s Right To Inspect: The School reserves the right to inspect user directories for inappropriate files, to remove them if found and to take other appropriate action if deemed necessary, including notification of parents. The School also reserves the right to inspect any personal electronic devices brought onto campus. Do not assume that any messages or material on your computer or the School’s systems are private. Email, Chat Rooms, Instant Messaging, and Social Networking Sites: Email cannot be used to harass or threaten others. The School reserves the right to randomly check email or text messages. Email messages must not include personal attacks and should follow the normal rules of appropriate public language. They should not contain any language or content that the author would not be willing to share from the podium at a School meeting. While the School does not actively pursue or routinely view personal social networking sites, when objectionable or disrespectful material is brought to the attention of the School or School personnel or experiences are placed on a site, the School reserves the right to examine the content and address the conduct if it creates a hostile or disrespectful environment. Any person who believes that he or she has been harassed or threatened by any of these methods of communications should immediately report the concern in accordance with the School’s No Harassment/No Bullying policy. Students should not be “friends” with any faculty member on any of these social networking sites. Any violation of this prohibition must be reported to the Administration immediately. Postings on social networking or other Internet sites of students engaging in inappropriate behavior (such as drinking, smoking, sexual actions, etc.) is prohibited. Students are expected to cooperate in investigations by providing access to such sites.

Viruses: Every effort is made by the School to keep our system virus-free. Even with the best techniques, however, computer viruses can be transmitted to and from any computer, including those in the computer center. The School is not responsible for the transmission of any virus or for damage suffered from a virus. Computer Care: Members of the School community will not abuse, tamper with, or willfully damage any computer equipment, use the computer for other than appropriate work, or bring food or drink into any computer area. Any intentional acts of vandalism will result in discipline, and students will be held responsible GUIDE FOR ACADEMICS AND STUDENT LIFE | 45


TECHN O LO GY P OL I C I E S for replacement or repairs.

Reporting Requirements/Discipline: Any student who accesses inappropriate material on the Internet, receives harassing, threatening, or inappropriate materials via email, cell phone or on the Internet, must immediately report the concern to the teacher who is supervising the activity or to School officials so that the situation can be investigated and addressed appropriately. Students who violate any aspect of this Computer and Systems Usage Policy will be subject to appropriate discipline. PERSONAL ELECTRONIC DEVICES

The use of any and all electronic devices while on School grounds or in attendance at School-sponsored events is bound by the School’s rules for Honor Code and Student Conduct and Discipline, including the Technology, Electronic Devices, and Computer Systems Usage Policy. Accessing inappropriate content on the Internet or on any device is strictly prohibited.

CARE OF THE IPAD

Students are responsible for the care and safekeeping of their iPads and related peripheral devices (styli, keyboards, headphones, etc.) Student iPads are the property and responsibility of the student and his or her family. Insurance against damage, theft or other loss is highly recommended. The School will not be responsible for repairing or replacing broken or stolen iPads. Families are responsible for furnishing the student with a protective case for the iPad, and students must keep the iPad in this protective case at all times. All iPads and related accessories should be clearly labeled. (Revised 7-19) Not having an iPad or not having a working iPad does not excuse the student from participating in class or completing assignments. If students leave their iPad at home, they are still responsible for getting coursework completed on time. Coursework not completed due to not having an iPad will be subject to the same consequences as other incomplete work.

The use of personal or School-provided electronic communication devices, including cellular phones, is permitted before and after school, during lunch and between classes. The use of any electronic device within the classroom is permitted at the discretion of the classroom teacher, Study Hall proctor, or Dean of Students. Any usage of electronic devices that causes a disturbance to the educational process is forbidden and may cause the student to face disciplinary action from either the Head of the Upper School/Middle School or the Dean of Students.

Upon receipt of a parental signature, a loaner iPad will be made available for students while their iPad is being repaired or replaced. The iPad will only be loaned out for one week and the student is responsible for any damage/theft/loss incurred. Students will be able to access documents stored in Google Drive, iCloud or other "cloud"-based applications, as well as having access to their apps. Other than iBooks, student ebooks may not be accessible to the student, depending on the type of electronic resource.

As stated in our Inspection Policy, the School reserves the right to inspect any item or place on School campus or School-sponsored events, which includes the right to inspect a student’s electronic device and to take disciplinary action for any information or materials found on such devices.

Screens should be kept clean with a soft cloth such as those used for cleaning eyeglasses. Do not set iPads near food, liquid or sources of heat. Keep iPads away from extreme heat. iPads should not be left at school overnight and should be secured in the student's locker at all times when not in use.

Parents who need to contact a child in an emergency should call the school, not the student. Urgent messages will be relayed appropriately, while normal telephone messages for students will be announced via the intercom at lunch and after school.

If carrying an iPad in a backpack, take care that it is placed flat against other items and that the cover of the iPad case is closed over the screen with no pencils or pens pressed against the screen.

A student phone is available at the Health Coordinator's desk. It is available for use during breaks and lunch, as well as before and after school hours. This telephone is to be used for school business only and is limited to placing calls within the Tampa Bay calling area. Use of imaging devices, such as camera phones, iPads, video camera’s, etc., is prohibited in gym locker rooms and School restrooms. In addition, students may not use such devices in classes without the express permission of the teacher. Any videos or photos permitted to be taken during class may not be placed on the Internet. 46 | GUIDE FOR ACADEMICS AND STUDENT LIFE

iPad Security and Identification: iPads must be secured in the student’s locker when not in the student's possession and should be taken home at night and fully charged. iPads should not be stored in vehicles and should never be left in view inside a vehicle. Students should set up the automatic passcode lock on their iPads. Students should share the passcode with their parents and no one else, unless required to do so by School personnel. The iPad should be clearly named with the student's name. The iPad is the sole responsibility of the student and under no circumstances should the iPad be left unsupervised. Students should never loan their iPad to another student for any reason. Any iPad left


PA RK I NG A ND T RA NSP ORTATIO N unattended is at risk of being stolen or damaged. If an iPad is found it will be taken to the Student Technology Support Coordinator. (Revised 7-19)

above conditions are met, still shot photos of materials on classroom boards are permitted unless explicitly prohibited by the teacher.

iPad Content Management: Apps and iPad updates should be downloaded while off campus or before/after school hours. Students are prohibited from downloading movies, music or other bandwidth intensive resources while on campus, unless explicitly directed by a faculty member. Inappropriate media may not be stored on the iPad at any time. Inappropriate media includes but is not limited to: pornographic materials, inappropriate language, and references to tobacco, alcohol, drugs or firearms.

Use of the iPad falls within the guidelines of the Tampa Preparatory School Honor Code. The iPad is a learning tool intended for academic use during the School day and is subject to inspection at any time. Students are limited to using their iPad while on the School Wi-Fi network. Students may choose to bring styluses, Bluetooth keyboards, headphones and other accessories if they wish. These devices are the sole responsibility of the student. Tampa Prep will not be responsible for lost, stolen, or damaged devices. All accessories should be clearly labeled with the student's name. (Revised 7-19)

Students will not be permitted to print from the iPads. Assignments will be distributed and collected via the iPad using Google Drive and the PowerSchool Learning Management System. If printing is necessary, students may use the computer labs to print from the desktop computers.

iPad Device Backup: Students should conduct regular backups of their iPads using iCloud or via iTunes while connected to a home computer. The Find My iPhone app is highly recommended for students to download onto their iPads. Students are required to bring the iPad to school every day. Students should save all work to their Google Drive and iCloud for backup. The School does not take responsibility for any loss of student data. Students should assume that none of their data is private or confidential. Any communication or data may be reviewed by School administration. iPad Appropriate Use: Activities not directly related to teacher-directed classroom activities are considered inappropriate use. These activities include but are not limited to: texting, social networking, FaceTime, etc., and are not permitted during class time. Students must bring the iPad to all classes unless specifically instructed not to do so. iPads must be fully charged by students at home each evening. iPads that have been "jailbroken" are not permitted on the School network. Changing another person's passcode or any unauthorized access to another's iTunes account will be treated as hacking and handled in accordance with the School's Honor Code. Students may record audio or use the camera to record in a classroom or school outing only with prior consent of the teacher, coach or other faculty member. Students are at all times responsible for ensuring that all individuals or groups are aware and agree to the recording or photo. Students must not share any audio, video or photographic likeness without the express consent from all parties involved. Bathrooms and locker rooms are considered private areas. Recording equipment is not to be used in these areas at any time. As long as the

Apps and e-books: At the beginning of the school year, core cross-curricular apps will be distributed to students via their School-provided Gmail accounts. These apps are only to be installed on the students' personal iPads. Students will be given instructions for accessing e-books in teacher syllabi at the beginning of the School year when they go to class. Student iPad support will be available on the third floor. Students should contact the Student Technology Support Coordinator for help. Monitoring: Students should expect that any information created, transmitted, downloaded, received, reviewed, viewed, typed, forwarded, or stored in iPad devices may be accessed by Tampa Prep at any time without prior notice. Students should have no expectation of privacy or confidentiality in such data, messages, or information (whether or not password-protected), or that deleted messages are necessarily removed from the system. Tampa Prep's monitoring policy may include, but is not limited to, physical inspection of iPad devices; review of content passing through the School's network, data lines, and other systems; review of personal email (including personal web-based password-protected email) and text messages accessed using iPad devices and/or School data connections; key loggers and other input monitoring mechanisms; and use of screen monitoring software, hardware, and video drives.

PARKING AND TRANSPORTATION AUTOMOBILES AND PARKING The School does not encourage the use of automobiles. Students are reminded that driving to and parking at school is a privilege. Students who do drive to school must obtain parking permits and park in the Cass Street and Cypress Street parking lots. All non-seniors will park in Cypress Street Lot located between the School and Julian B. Lane Riverfront Park. The School will not be responsible for parking tickets, towing fees, or damage to vehicles. GUIDE FOR ACADEMICS AND STUDENT LIFE | 47


OTHE R INF ORM AT I ON The student parking spaces closest to the school are designated for senior parking on a first-come, first-served basis. Visitors’ parking is available by the baseball field. Numbered parking decals for the current year will be available at a cost of $25.00. All students driving vehicles to school must display a current parking decal in the lower left corner (driver’s side) of the front window. If an occasion should arise where a student is using a vehicle other than the one normally driven to school that displays the student’s decal, a temporary parking permit may be issued for the day only. Students will not be permitted to leave the school campus before they leave for the final time that day unless the student properly signs out and obtains a note from the Assistant to the Dean of Students. The only exception to this policy is seniors leaving for lunch. Parking violations are given to students for the following reasons: 1. Non-seniors parking in a senior space 2. Parking in spaces marked “Handicapped,” “Visitor,” “Faculty,” or “Buses” 3. Parking in fire lanes 4. Parking on the grass or sprinkler system 5. Failure to obtain a parking permit for the current school year 6. Any observance of reckless or discourteous driving (this may also result in the suspension of parking privileges) The parking areas are patrolled by Tampa Prep Security who will issue parking citations ($25 fine for each violation).

TRANSPORTATION TO AND FROM SCHOOL-SPONSORED EVENTS The School will provide transportation for all students participating in normally scheduled extracurricular events, such as athletic contests and drama and music competitions. This transportation will originate and terminate at the School. Students are strongly encouraged to use school transportation for school-sponsored events. Exceptions to this will be discussed with program directors.

OTHER INFORMATION CHILD ABUSE REPORTING School teachers and other personnel are mandatory reporters under the Florida child abuse reporting laws. Please understand that we must take our obligations seriously. If we assess that a situation requires it, we will make a report to child abuse authorities of situations that we reasonably suspect constitute abuse, neglect, or abandonment. Depending on the circumstances, we may not be able to communicate with parents about the 48 | GUIDE FOR ACADEMICS AND STUDENT LIFE

report until authorized by child abuse authorities to do so. We ask for your understanding while we do our best to protect the children under our care.

CHILD SAFETY FROM SEXUAL OFFENDERS AND PREDATORS According to the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children (NCMEC), sexual perpetrators are commonly people the parents/guardians or children know. These people may be in a position of trust or responsibility to a child and family. Because of our concern for student safety, all employees, and those parents who volunteer for overnight field trips, are screened through the School’s criminal background process. To keep their children safe, parents should talk openly to their children about safety issues. Parents should know their children’s friends and be clear with their children about the places and homes that their children visit. Children should be taught that they have the right to say no to any unwelcome, uncomfortable, or confusing touching or actions by others. They should also be taught to get out of those situations as quickly as possible. Parents should regularly visit the public registry to check out individuals for prior criminal records and sex offenses. Information concerning registered sex offenders and predators in Florida may be obtained by visiting http://www.fdle.state.fl.us, the Florida Department of Law Enforcement Sexual Offenders database. Information may also be obtained by contacting the FDLE’s toll-free telephone number: 1-888-FL-PREDATOR (1-888-357-7332). To view a map of registered sex offenders living within a five-mile radius of any given address, parents should visit http:// www.familywatchdog.us. To learn about additional child safety tips and links to child and Internet safety sites and searches, parents should visit the Florida Attorney General website at http://myfloridalegal.com.

COMMUNICATIONS FROM SCHOOL Tampa Prep sends important information about events, activities and policies via email. If we do not have your current email address on file, please update your profile in your My BackPack account. 
Many email providers filter bulk messages as spam or junk, so verify that your settings allow all mail from tampaprep.org. If you are not receiving emails, please make sure your email address is accurate in your My BackPack profile. Need assistance? Contact David Couchman at mbpinfo@tampaprep.org. Information from the School Via the Marketing & Communications Office, the School provides various methods for obtaining information, updated resources, calendar events, student and faculty accomplishments and more.


OT H ER I NFOR MATIO N •

• •

Thursday Newsletter. Every Thursday the Marketing & Communications Office publishes an e-newsletter delivered via email. This e-newsletter is full of information about school events, programs and student, team, faculty and alumni successes. The newsletter is divided by grade and topic for convenience. Head's Message. The Head of School often sends emails to the community regarding current events or traditions. Media and News. The main way for parents to see photos and videos of happenings and accomplishments at school is via the School's social media platforms or through School news on the website. tampaprep.org/discover/media School social media accounts include Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and YouTube. TPTV LIVE. Many events during the year are live streamed so family and friends can enjoy them without coming to campus. Visit https://www. tampaprep.org/discover/media/live for events. TAMPAPREP.ORG. Our website is a marketing tool for prospective families in the decision-making process to learn about our programs, culture, and constituents. School Blog. Bi-monthly. Members of the Tampa Prep community (teachers, staff, parents, or students) write about important educational issues or campus events.

EVACUATION A map can be found in each room showing the quickest and safest route for leaving the building. Please familiarize yourself with these maps. Students should move quickly and quietly to a designated area. Movement and noise during fire drills should be kept to a minimum. Talking is prohibited.

FAXING AND EMAIL Parents and students are discouraged from faxing or emailing schoolwork to Tampa Prep unless specifically instructed by a teacher. We are unable to guarantee the timeliness of receipt of such communications by the teachers. Any assignments that are faxed or emailed are considered submitted when they are received by the teacher making the assignment. Student use of School email is tied to the Honor Code and all students are expected to conduct themselves in compliance with the Honor Code guidelines. Students in grades 6-8 are restricted from sending or receiving emails from outside of the School community, while students in grades 9-12 have full email functionality. If a student’s instructor gives permission, the student may choose to submit assignments digitally via Google Drive or Gmail.

HEALTH INFORMATION SHARING Parents and students agree, as a condition of continued enrollment, to consent to the release of any of the student’s health-related information, including information relating to drug treatment, testing, medical and mental health records, to employees or agents of the School, as determined by the Head of School or his or her designee, to meet the medical or safety needs of the student and the community or the legal responsibilities of the School. The School will maintain appropriate administrative, technical, and physical safeguards to protect the security of all health-related information within its care or custody. While it is the obligation of the School to safeguard student medical information, we must also balance matters of privacy and confidentiality with safeguarding the interests and well being of our students and our community. Thus, parents/guardians and students consent to allow employees and agents of the School, who have a need to know, to receive and/or share medical and/or psychological information necessary to serve the best interests of the student and/or community. In the event of a disclosure required by law, every effort will be made to notify the student and/or parents/guardians in advance.

INSPECTION POLICY The School reserves the right to inspect and conduct a search of any place or item on the School campus or at a School-related event including, but not limited to, a student’s locker, book bag, backpack, vehicle, computer, or personal electronic devices. Inspections and searches may be conducted on a routine or random basis, or as deemed necessary. Furthermore, the School has the right to seize and permanently retain property disclosed by an inspection or search that is considered potentially harmful, dangerous, illegal, or inappropriate, the possession of which is a violation of the School’s rules, community standards, and/or local and state law. INTERPRETATION, MODIFICATION, AMENDMENT The School reserves the right to interpret the contents of this Guide, including the rules and regulations governing academic and non-academic conduct of students. The School reserves the right to modify and/or amend the contents of this Guide at any time during the year. Parents and students should check the School’s intranet periodically to ensure that they are aware of the most recent version of the Guide policies. INVESTIGATIONS Students are expected to cooperate in investigations. Students are expected to be honest, but honesty is not necessarily a mitigating factor and students’ own statements may be used against them. Failure to cooperate with an investigation may be cause for disciplinary action. GUIDE FOR ACADEMICS AND STUDENT LIFE | 49


LIBRA RY POL I C I E S If a student refuses to participate or cooperate at any stage of an investigation, or is unable to do so for whatever reason, including without limitation, pending criminal charges, the School reserves the right to take action, including proceeding without a statement from the student, or to require the student to withdraw from School.

LUNCH SERVICE Details for the daily Tampa Prep lunch service can be found on the Parent Portal via the School's website. PARENT/FAMILY COOPERATION The School believes that a positive and constructive working relationship between the School and parent is essential to the fulfillment of the School’s educational purpose and responsibilities to its students. If the parent’s or other family member’s behavior, communications, or interactions on or off campus (including during school-sponsored events) is disruptive, intimidating, or overly aggressive, or reflects a loss of confidence or serious disagreement with the School’s policies, methods of instruction, or discipline, or otherwise seriously interferes with the School’s safety procedures, responsibilities, or accomplishment of its educational purpose or program, the School reserves the right to dismiss the family from the community. In addition, the School reserves the right to place restrictions on parents’ or other family members’ involvement or activity at school, on school property, or at school-related events if the parent or other family member engages in behavior or has a status (such as a criminal conviction) that would reasonably suggest that such restrictions may be appropriate for the community. PAYMENT OF TUITION AND FEES The School strives to provide the highest quality education while maintaining affordable fees. We depend on the timely payment of tuition and registration fees to cover our obligations. Enrolling your child requires a financial commitment much like any other major purchase. Please make School tuition a budget priority. Failure to make tuition/fee payments by the contractual dates may result in a child being removed from School or not being allowed to take examinations. Transcripts and student records cannot be forwarded to another school if there is an outstanding balance in his/her account, or if there are other outstanding debts. RE-ENROLLMENT CONSIDERATIONS Students are expected to maintain satisfactory academic grades and conduct on semester report cards. Students with less than satisfactory grades, a pattern of behavioral difficulties, excessive absenteeism or tardiness, delinquent accounts, or whose family members have been uncooperative may not be invited back for another academic year. 50 | GUIDE FOR ACADEMICS AND STUDENT LIFE

STUDENT RECORDS AND INFORMATION Requests for student records and transcripts must be directed to the Registrar’s Office. The School reserves the right to withhold student transcripts and records for non-payment of tuition or fees. The School makes reasonable efforts to ensure that both natural parents (or legal guardians) receive substantially the same information (transcripts, records, appointments, etc.). The School must rely upon the correctness and completeness of parental information when the student is enrolled. In situations of divorced or separated parents, if one parent believes that the other parent is not entitled to receive certain information, the parent wishing to restrict information provided by the School must provide the School with a court order that is still in effect that specifically restricts the other parent from receiving such information.

LIBRARY POLICIES PEIFER LIBRARY The Peifer Library, located on the third floor, under the dome, contains books, videos and student-accessible computers equipped with various software applications, and access to the Internet. Tampa Prep students will receive orientation to the library from Mrs. Rendina. The library is open from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. on most school days. Faculty and staff, as well as students with proper I.D., may check out books from the library. Laptops may also be checked out by Upper School students and returned the same day by 4:00 p.m. If laptops are not returned by 4:00 p.m. on the day of checkout, students will lose laptop checkout privileges for the rest of the school year. (Revised 7-19) Students may use the library for reading, research, and may check out five volumes at a time for a period of three weeks. Abuse of Library books and Library materials or other misconduct will result in the loss of Library privileges. All overdue or lost book charges must be paid to the library by the end of the school year. Each student will receive a picture I.D. issued by Tampa Prep at the beginning of the school year. In order to check out a Library book or use the athletic facilities, a student must present his or her I.D. card. (Revised 7-19) Students are responsible for good behavior on School Computer networks just as they are in a classroom or School hallway. Communications on the network are often public in nature. General school rules for behavior and communications apply. Students are responsible for knowing school computer use guidelines.

CHALLENGED BOOK AND OTHER LIBRARY MATERIAL POLICY Any library book or other library material that is


L I BRA RY P OLICIES challenged as to its appropriateness for Tampa Prep will be handled in the following manner: 1. A written statement from the challenger must be submitted to the Head of School as to why the book or library material is being challenged with specific information as to why the challenger feels the book or other library material is inappropriate for Tampa Prep students. 2. This statement will be sent to the Challenged Book and Other Library Material Committee. This Committee is composed of the Head of School, the Library Media Specialist, the English Department Chair, selected Middle School and Upper School English and History Department faculty members, another Senior Administrator, and the Student Council President. 3. Each Committee member will receive a copy of the written statement about the challenged book or other library material. The Committee will meet and make its decision on the appropriateness of the book or other library material for Tampa Prep. 4. A letter will be sent to the challenger informing him or her of the decision made by the Challenged Book and Other Library Material Committee.

GUIDE FOR ACADEMICS AND STUDENT LIFE | 51


CO U R S E D E S C RI P T I ON S - 9 TH G RA D E T RA NSI T I ONS | A RT S While the School will attempt to provide students every year with a wide variety of course selections, we prioritize the offering of graduation-required courses. Therefore, please note that not all of the semester electives listed in the Guide are available for students on a yearly basis. 

9TH GRADE TRANSITIONS

Transitions (9) The Transitions course is taught in the first semester to all 9th grade students. Students learn essential skills for success in high school and beyond. Students also engage in thematic units addressing study skills, note-taking strategies, self-advocacy, school history, health and wellness, character education, community service, civics, navigating social situations, ethics, financial literacy, and digital citizenship. These topics connect with additional programming completed during advising and 9th Grade Class Seminar sessions. This is a required course for all 9th Grade students beginning with the Class of 2023. 

ARTS 

Unless otherwise indicated, all courses listed below are one semester in length. Students enrolled in performance courses are expected to participate in all class events. Performances are considered final exams. Beginning with the Class of 2023, all students must complete at least two Arts credits in a non-cross-listed Arts class. (Revised 7-19)

DANCE Dance Style 1 (6-12) A year-long elective dance course in which students learn the fundamentals of ballet, jazz and modern dance. Students take ballet two days per week and take jazz and modern dance on the alternate days. They learn terminology, an overview of dance history and stretch/conditioning in addition to working on dance steps in the studio. Emphasis is placed on technique, correct body placement, coordination, flexibility and endurance. The course culminates in a showcase at the end of the school year.

DIGITAL ARTS Introduction to Journalism (9-12) This year-long course serves as a foundation for students with an interest in journalism, mass media, and multimedia. This is a prerequisite for students who are interested in joining Journalism or Yearbook. The first semester of the course focuses on writing for mass media and the ethics that come with it, while the 52 | GUIDE FOR ACADEMICS AND STUDENT LIFE

second semester focuses on design for multimedia platforms as well as photography and digital design and editing software.

Digital Photography (9-12) Digital Photography is a year-long, one credit art course in which students will explore not only how to take a good photo, but what the digital SLR camera can do. Students will “process” photos using Adobe Lightroom 3 as well as Adobe Photoshop. Once the concepts of shutter speed, ASA, aperture, multiple exposures, and the difference between shooting in jpeg vs RAW have been mastered, students will integrate these photos into podcasts using iPads. Requirements: a digital SLR camera. Tripods will be provided. Journalism (9-12) Students in this year-long course produce the School’s student newspaper, the Terrapin Times. The course focuses on journalistic writing styles, interview techniques, layout and design and production mechanics using a Macintosh computer and desktop publishing software. Students must apply to enter the course, meet certain criteria, and complete an interview. The course requires additional extracurricular time. Prerequisite: Instructor’s approval Video Production (8) This course gives students a beginners’ look at the video production process. During the semester students learn the basics of video production, to include script writing, pre-production, proper shooting and lighting techniques, and post-production. The students have hands-on learning with the equipment in labs, help with projects to support the School, and have the chance to produce their own projects. Introduction to Video (9-12) This semester class serves as an introduction to the world of video. Students will learn the basics of video production including technical specifications, basic shot composition, how to work with cameras and equipment, and editing with Final Cut Pro. The course will consist of lectures, labs with equipment and editing software, and projects to reinforce course content. Creative Video (9-12) This year-long class allows students to make videos from their own creative ideas and stories. Participants will also assist with the production of school marketing videos. The videos that this class produces will be shown during regular TPTV episodes. Students will also be encouraged to enter their creations in public contests. Prerequisite: Introduction to Video or the instructor's approval


COURSE D ESC RI P T I ONS - AR TS Advanced Film and Video (10-12) Students in this year-long course will study all aspects of creating visually stimulating short films. The class will explore lighting schemes, cinematography, directing, editing, basic vfx and clean up work, color correction, sound mixing, and finishing. Class projects are vital in the development of student portfolios, which are necessary for film school applications. Prerequisites: Introduction to Video, Creative Video, and instructor’s approval Broadcast Journalism (9-12) This year-long, news-based video course will produce content for regular TPTV episodes. Students will report on and create video segments that highlight school activities in the arts, athletics, clubs, etc. The course runs through an organizational hierarchy that puts more responsibility and control in the hands of the students. Prerequisite: Completed application and the instructor’s approval Yearbook (9-12) Students in this year-long course produce the School’s yearbook. The course teaches the latest trends in journalism, design, and graphics. To enter the course, students must complete an application, meet certain criteria, and receive the instructor’s permission. The course requires additional extracurricular time. Prerequisite: Instructor’s approval Web Design with HTML5 and CSS3 (9-12) This semester class teaches the basics of designing and creating attractive websites using modern technologies. Students will learn principles of graphic design including color theory, font choice and typography, and proper layout of design elements. Students will also learn the basics of HTML5 and CSS3 as they design and build their own website. Participants should expect a very hands-on class. This course can count as either a science credit or an art credit; as such, the focus will be more on design, layout, and content than on abstract programming. Prerequisite: Algebra 1 App Development (9-12) In this semester-long course, students develop apps for multiple platforms (VR, iOS, etc.) using the Unity Development environment. Students learn about Virtual Reality (VR) and Augmented Reality (AR), types of VR experiences, and how to effectively code 2-D and 3-D experiences. Students also familiarize themselves with the Unity environment by creating scenes and learning how to add components such as shapes, planes, materials, images and color. After experimenting with a graphics program called Blender, and creating objects to import into Unity programs, the class progresses through gaze-based control and

user interfaces. Students also learn how to implement and manage characters in physics and Unity, while rendering and working with 360-degree environments (panoramas, globes, etc.). All the while, students are able to experience their programs in VR.

Film Criticism 1 (10-12) This semester course introduces students to the basics of critiquing, reviewing, and authoring motion pictures. Students will be exposed to a number of genres and periods in film from Buster Keaton to modern classics like Citizen Kane, Sunset Boulevard, and A Beautiful Mind. Students will spend the great majority of time in class viewing, talking about, and writing about film through a number of different critical lenses, while utilizing knowledge gained from significant writings about the film industry. Prerequisite: English 9 Film Criticism 2 (10-12) This semester course is intended to deepen students’ understanding of the nuances of critiquing and reviewing motion pictures. As is the case in Film Criticism 1, students will be exposed to a number of genres and periods in film from its earliest days up to contemporary times. Students will spend the majority of class time viewing, talking about, and writing about film through a critical lens that they develop throughout the course. Students will ultimately compile a portfolio of their work that encapsulates their own, unique perspective on film. Prerequisite: Film Criticism 1

MUSIC Beginning Chorus (6) This elective is designed for sixth grade students who have had little to no background with singing in a choral setting. During the course, students will sing a variety of repertoire. The students will learn basic musical skills in theory, history, and reading notation. Students will also participate in a group project making their own music video. Chorus (7,8) This performing vocal ensemble meets four hours each week and is offered as an Arts semester elective in the seventh and eighth grades. Students are not auditioned; the course is open to all interested students. Students learn standard sacred and secular choral literature with a multicultural emphasis as recommended by the American Choral Directors’ Association, the Music Educators’ National Conference and the Florida Vocal Association. Emphasis is placed on ear training, proper breathing, diction, tone color, developing a sense of ensemble and blend, musicality, dynamics, line, et al. Attention is paid to the historical context in which the music was composed and students become familiar with choral composers. The class musicians GUIDE FOR ACADEMICS AND STUDENT LIFE | 53


CO U R S E D E S C RI P T I ON S - ART S will perform in Arts concerts, various school functions and in the larger community, at the discretion of the instructor. Participation in all ensemble rehearsals and performances is an expectation of the course and is required.

Beginning Band (6) This course is designed for the sixth grade student with no previous experience playing a wind instrument. Students will play one of the following instruments: flute, clarinet, alto saxophone, trumpet, or trombone. During the semester students will develop the fundamentals of music: music theory, history of their instrument and learn how to read musical notation according to their instrument. Grading is entirely based upon participation. Middle School Band (7,8) This performing wind and percussion ensemble meets four hours each week during a regularly scheduled period and is offered as a one-semester Arts elective in the seventh and eighth grades. Students are not auditioned; the course is open to all interested students. Students learn basic skills on a wind and percussion instrument of their choosing. Emphasis is placed on music reading, proper breathing, intonation, tone, developing a sense of ensemble and blend, musicality, dynamics, line, et al. The class’ musicians will perform in Arts concerts, various school functions, and in the larger community, at the discretion of the instructor. Chamber Strings (7-12) This is a performing string ensemble for violin, viola, cello, and bass. Students in this year-long class learn music from several genres including classical, pops music, and chamber music works. The class’ musicians perform in Arts concerts, various school functions, and in the larger community. Prerequisites: 3 year minimum background/expertise in string performance or with Chamber Strings, and instructor’s approval. Students interested in auditioning should contact the Music Director for details. Upper School Beginning Band (9-12) This is a year-long course for students with minimal or no instrumental music experience. The instruments taught in this course are flute, clarinet, bass clarinet, alto saxophone, tenor saxophone, trumpet, French horn, trombone, euphonium, tuba, guitar, and bass guitar. Students who take this class will be required to rent or to purchase their own instrument, and to purchase the required method book. Students will be assessed by completing weekly practice assignments and taking regular performance quizzes. There will be a performance assessment at the end of the first semester, and a required concert at the end of the second semester. 54 | GUIDE FOR ACADEMICS AND STUDENT LIFE

Upper School Advanced Band (9-12) This year-long course hones the skills of a performing wind band, with rhythm section, including percussion, piano, and guitar. Students learn music from several genres, focusing on jazz, popular music, and classical. The musicians perform in Arts concerts, various school functions, and in the larger community. Prerequisites: minimum of two years experience in instrumental music performance, strong sight reading skills, and instructor's approval. An audition may be required. Piano Lab (9-12) Students in this year-long course learn to read music and play piano by chord charts. A traditional piano curriculum is supplemented with additional repertoire supplied by the instructor. All participants perform each semester at a recital. One need not have any piano experience to take the class. The first spaces in the class are given to students in either the Band and Strings Arts Concentration or the Vocal Music Arts Concentration. Students in these programs may take Piano Lab or AP Music Theory to satisfy curricular obligations. Guitar Lab 1 (9-12) This year-long course is intended for students with minimal or no experience playing the guitar. Students enrolled in this class are required to rent or purchase their own instrument, and purchase the required method book. Students are assessed through weekly practice assignments and through regular performance quizzes. There is a performance assessment at the end of the first semester, and a required concert at the end of the second semester. Guitar Lab 2 (9-12) This semester-long course is intended for students who have taken Guitar Lab 1 and want to continue refining their guitar skills. Students enrolled in this class are required to rent or purchase their own instrument, and purchase the required method book. Students are assessed through weekly practice assignments and through regular performance quizzes. There is a performance assessment at the end of the first semester, and a required concert at the end of the second semester. Digital Music Studio (9-12) This is a semester-long course for students who want to learn to create their own digital music. Students learn fundamental composition methods to help them lay the foundation for their own music composition and mixing projects. Students use a digital audio workstation made up of digital music software, a midi keyboard, and basic recording equipment. Past musical experience is beneficial, but not required. Concert Chorus (9-12) The Concert Chorus is open to all students without


COURSE D ESC RI P T I ONS - AR TS audition. In this year-long course, students learn standard sacred and secular choral literature with a multicultural emphasis as recommended by the American Choral Directors’ Association, the Music Educators’ National Conference and the Florida Vocal Association. Emphasis is placed on ear training, proper breathing, diction, tone color, developing a sense of ensemble and blend, musicality, dynamics, line, et al. Attention is paid to the historical context in which the music was composed and students become familiar with choral composers. Several concerts are presented and there is a performing tour outside of Florida each year. Participation in all ensemble rehearsals and performances is an expectation of the course and is required. Students may elect to participate in this ensemble as an independent study and permission of the instructor is required.

Chamber Chorus (9-12) The Chamber Chorus is open to all interested students by audition. In this year-long course, students learn standard sacred and secular choral literature with a multicultural emphasis as recommended by the American Choral Directors’ Association, the Music Educators’ National Conference, and the Florida Vocal Association. Emphasis is placed on ear training, sight singing, proper breathing, diction, tone color, developing a sense of ensemble and blend, musicality, dynamics, line, et al. Attention is paid to the historical context in which the music was composed, and students become familiar with choral composers. Members of this chorus will learn the same literature as the Concert Chorus, and will perform with them; in addition they will learn more difficult works which they will perform as a group - a fair number of these will be unaccompanied, and sung from memory. Several concerts are presented, the Chorus may enter the District and State All-State Choral festivals, and there is a performing tour outside of Florida each year. Participation in all ensemble rehearsals and performances is an expectation of the course and is required. AP Music Theory (10-12) In this year-long course, students focus on the basics of music notation and learning to read and write music. Concepts studied include note values, steps of the scale, key signatures, melodic dictation and four-part harmony.  Students become familiar with the piano keyboard and learn to sight-sing. This course prepares students for the Advanced Placement Music Theory examination. Recommended Prerequisite: One year of a music history or performance course.

VISUAL ARTS Middle School Art (6-8) The Middle School visual art program teaches art techniques of drawing, painting, sculpture, and

printmaking through a variety of media that are appropriate for each level. Sixth Grade Art focuses on the developmental skills of the grade level. Art 1 and Art 2 are sequential courses; Art 1 is prerequisite to enrollment in Art 2.

Sixth Grade Art Ceramics Relief and pinch technique, glazing and firing Drawing Gesture, contour line, perspective, texture, portraits Painting Tempera Printmaking Relief prints of styrofoam and collé Sculpture Papier maché Middle School 2D Art (7,8) Ceramics Pinch and coil techniques, surface design and decoration, glazing and firing Drawing one-point

Contour line, color, perspective, portraits

value

studies,

Painting

Watercolor and tempera

Printmaking

Relief prints, styrofoam and glue

Sculpture Assemblage

Middle School 3D Art (7,8) Students will design and construct realistic and abstract sculptural forms using a variety of materials, tools and techniques. They will examine, analyze, and interpret traditional and contemporary works of art and artifacts while their understanding of the elements and principles of design are reinforced. Individual and group experiences will promote problem-solving, creative thinking, and formal expression. Studio Art 1 (9-12) This entry-level semester course is designed for students who wish to study and produce visual art. The major portion of the course is experiential and will include involvement in two- and three-dimensional design. Utilizing the language of art, students will study the various media of drawing, ceramics, and painting as a means of visual communication. Techniques and skills of each medium will be taught through demonstrations, slide lectures, and museum visits. Each student will maintain a sketchbook in which all class notes, sketches, and occasional homework assignments will be kept. Artwork will be evaluated through group discussion and individual critiques. Studio Art 2 (9-12) This semester course provides further study in drawing and sculpture and an introduction to printmaking. Drawing will include gesture and figure studies, portraiture, and landscapes through the use of GUIDE FOR ACADEMICS AND STUDENT LIFE | 55


CO U R S E D E S C RI P T I ON S - ART S advanced media such as pen and ink, pastels, colored pencil, and oil pastel. Carving techniques will involve the students in the processes related to subtractive sculpture. Printmaking will include the relief process and collé, which will include the production of an edition of an original print. Each student will maintain a sketchbook in which all class notes, sketches, and occasional homework assignments will be kept. Artwork will be evaluated through group discussion and individual critiques. A continuing emphasis will be placed upon the formal aspects of design and the production of unique artworks which are developed through direct observation. Prerequisite: Studio Art 1 or instructor’s approval

Ceramics 1 (9-12) This one-semester course provides an introduction to various methods of fabrication in clay. Students are exposed to the history of clay within various cultures and eras. They learn handbuilding techniques (such as pinch, coil, slab and drape), surface designs, and glazing methods. Unique works of three-dimensional art are designed and produced through technical research samples and final projects. Prerequisite: instructor’s approval Ceramics 2 (9-12) Students in this one-semester course increase their knowledge of clay history and handbuilding skills, while also learning to throw on the wheel. Participants explore the sculptural form and the functional form of clay. This class further introduces glaze techniques and surface designs for the body of work produced. Prerequisite: Ceramics 1 and instructor's approval Ceramics 3 and Ceramics 4 (10-12) Backed by historical research, these one-semester courses allow students to begin to mold and adapt to the method of construction that most interests them. Students will concentrate on concept, form, shape, and surface for each piece created. Students will immerse themselves in technical research samples and ideation development. The collection fabricated in these classes can be applied towards an AP Studio Art 3-D Design portfolio. Prerequisites: Ceramics 1 and Ceramics 2 and instructor's approval Printmaking 1 (10-12) This advanced semester class introduces students to various drawing techniques and to the study of the formal considerations of two-dimensional design that are relevant to the involvement and success of printmaking processes. Relief printing (linoleum, woodcut, wood engraving, and collograph) as well as intaglio (engraving, monotypes, and collé) will be explored. Students will produce several small editions and will complete a major edition in the technique of 56 | GUIDE FOR ACADEMICS AND STUDENT LIFE

their choice. Prerequisite: Art Appreciation or Studio Art 1

Printmaking 2 (10-12) This semester course builds upon Printmaking 1 fundamentals. Printmaking 2 introduces higher level print processes and techniques while encouraging individual expression and creativity. At this stage students are expected to research and practice printmaking techniques within the scope of their own creative interest while developing more mature designs. Prerequisite: Printmaking 1 Drawing and Painting 1 (9-12) This advanced semester class examines the depiction of the three-dimensional world on a two-dimensional surface. Subject matter includes still life and nature, figures, portraits and objects in linear perspective. Drawing techniques of contour, gesture, modeling in value and painting is taught with watercolor and acrylic paint. A strong emphasis is placed upon the design of the two-dimensional surface and the production of unique art works which are developed through direct observation. Students create a final exam project and write a final exam. Prerequisite: One full year of Visual Art or portfolio review Drawing and Painting 2 (9-12) Students will work for a semester with advanced techniques of drawing and painting that are currently not taught in the first semester including landscapes, advanced figure study and enlargements, and they will have an opportunity to become proficient with Watercolor and Acrylic or Oil paint. A strong emphasis will be placed upon the design of the two-dimensional surface and upon the student’s unique aesthetic growth. Development of work for the AP Art portfolio will be encouraged; therefore presentation (matting or framing for exhibit) of the students’ work is a requirement of the class. Prerequisite: Drawing and Painting 1 or instructor's approval Crafts 1 and Crafts 2 (9-12) These are hands-on, semester-long courses designed to give students an opportunity to develop skills in a variety of craft techniques. These art forms expose students to international cultures, history, and the production of objects created throughout time, while better understanding their application in today’s society. Students experiment with new processes and mediums through technical research samples. Fibers, metals, wood, glass, and leather are some of the materials used. Weaving, leatherwork, enamel, embroidery, and sewing by hand and machine are some of the methods studied. Processes and mediums are subject to change each semester. Prerequisite: instructor’s approval


COURSE D ESC RI P T I ONS - AR TS Crafts 3 and 4 (10-12) These advanced, one-semester courses provide a deep study of the practices and techniques students have learned in Crafts 1 and Crafts 2. The classes allow students the opportunity to investigate different craft histories, methodologies and media. By choosing a focus of interest, students push and polish their own abilities through technical research samples. They will work on concept and ideation development, towards a stronger body of crafts work. The collection fabricated in these classes can be applied towards an AP Studio Art 3-D Design portfolio. Prerequisites: Crafts 1 and Crafts 2 and instructor's approval Sculpture 1 and Sculpture 2 (9-12) These hands-on, one-semester courses are designed to give students the opportunity to develop skills in a variety of three-dimensional techniques, through technical research samples and final studio projects. As students are exposed to sculptural facets of art history, they become familiar with the tools and techniques used during fabrication, including bas-relief, sculpture in the round, subtractive, and additive methods of production. Media may include, but not be limited to, clay, metal, stone, wood, paper, and found objects. Prerequisite: instructor’s approval Sculpture 3 and Sculpture 4 (10-12) These one-semester classes allow students to continue to explore the historical aspects of the three-dimensional world in art. Students immerse themselves in a given media or technique through continued technical research samples. By choosing a three-dimensional focus of interest, they further explore and refine their own sculptural abilities, while also beginning to work on concept and ideation development for a stronger body of sculptural work. The collection fabricated in these classes can be applied towards an AP Studio Art 3-D Design portfolio. Prerequisites: Sculpture 1 and Sculpture 2 and instructor's approval Cultural Art Studies 1, 2,3, and 4 (9-12) In these one-semester courses, students explore the history of different cultures and societies to learn about the functionality of their art, the belief systems behind the products, and the tools used to craft them. This process deepens the understanding of how and why art was produced throughout human history. Once students have researched the artistic practices of the culture selected by the class, they begin to create art using the methods of that culture. Student projects can either reproduce what other cultures have developed, or lead to new works inspired by the arts under investigation. Advanced Art Studies (11,12) This advanced semester course is designed for the student who wishes to continue with problems in

visual art in which there is no existing advanced class. A student may enroll in Advanced Art Studies following a successfully completed semester of the beginning class in that particular area of art, such as Painting, Printmaking or Sculpture, or art medium, such as Ceramics. The student will attend class with the beginning class. Prerequisite: One semester of the beginning level course in which the student will work

The Chemistry of Art (11,12) In this one-semester course, students experience the interaction between science, technology and art as they investigate chemical interactions involved in the creation, authentication, restoration, and conservation of works of art. By creating works of art, students practice techniques such as fresco, Egyptian paste, and metal etching. By conducting chemical experiments, students explore fireworks, paints and alloys. Class discussions and lectures connect chemical concepts with the students’ experiences in the lab and art room. After studying about forgery detection techniques and art restoration, students write a research paper to analyze the authenticity of an infamously debated work of art. Prerequisite: Any year-long Chemistry or Physics course AP Studio Art 2-D Design (11,12) Advanced Placement Studio Art 2-D Design is a year-long course designed for the student who is willing to make a strong commitment to Visual Art. A rigorous curriculum will culminate in the development of a 2-D portfolio, which will consist of three sections: breadth, concentration and quality. Due to the amount of time it may take to compile a high-quality portfolio, the course may be taken over one or two years, at the end of which students will be required to submit their portfolio for review by the College Board. Students who do not submit a portfolio by the time they complete the course will not receive the AP designation on their transcripts. The instructor will determine by the end of the first semester whether a graduating student's portfolio is on track for completion during that academic year. Graduating students who have already sent transcripts to colleges who ultimately do not complete their portfolios will be required to notify colleges through the College Counseling Office of their change in status in this course. Prerequisites: One full year of Visual Art; instructor’s approval is required AP Studio Art 3-D Design (11,12) Advanced Placement Studio Art 3-D Design is a year-long course designed for the student who is willing to make a strong commitment to Visual Art. A rigorous curriculum will culminate in the development of a 3-D portfolio, which will consist of three sections: breadth, concentration and quality. Due to the amount of time it may take to compile a high-quality portfolio, the course may be taken over one or two years, at the end of which students will be required to submit their GUIDE FOR ACADEMICS AND STUDENT LIFE | 57


CO U R S E D E S C RI P T I ON S - E NG L I SH portfolio for review by the College Board. Students who do not submit a portfolio by the time they complete the course will not receive the AP designation on their transcripts. The instructor will determine by the end of the first semester whether a graduating student's portfolio is on track for completion during that academic year. Graduating students who have already sent transcripts to colleges who ultimately do not complete their portfolios will be required to notify colleges through the College Counseling Office of their change in status in this course. Prerequisites: One full year of Visual Art; instructor’s approval is required

AP Art History (11,12) Through slide lectures, discussion groups, and library resources, this year-long course focuses on major developments in visual thought and expression. The course strives to develop an understanding of history through art and art through history and to analyze the form and nature of art works. Students write numerous short essays in this class. Prerequisite: World History 2 Introduction to Engineering Design (10) This year-long elective course focuses on the design process and its application. Students will learn AutoDesk Inventor and use it to design solutions to proposed problems, document their work using an engineer’s notebook, and communicate solutions to peers and members of the professional community. Please note: This course is the first of a three-year engineering sequence. In order to enroll in these successive classes, students must first complete Introduction to Engineering Design. Prerequisites: Algebra 2 (concurrently) and instructor’s approval

THEATRE ARTS Middle School Theatre Arts (7,8) This semester course focuses on the fundamentals of acting and the theatrical process. Students explore creativity through scene development, script writing, character building, monologue work, ensemble acting, and improvisational exercises. The course concludes with a performance at the end of the semester. Acting (9-12) This one-semester course covers the basics of acting in plays. Using improvisation and theatre games, students are introduced to foundational elements such as collaboration, creativity, mind-body connectivity, and emotional awareness. They then apply these components to the analysis and acting of scenes from plays. Depending on the semester, each play, musical or theatrical event such as a cabaret is a part of the curriculum, with students required to attend. Other areas covered may be stage combat, acting on film, mask and clowning, Shakespeare, or others. 58 | GUIDE FOR ACADEMICS AND STUDENT LIFE

Musical Theatre (9-12) In this one-semester, introductory course, students are exposed to foundational elements such as collaboration, creativity, mind-body connectivity, and emotional awareness using improvisation and theatre games. The basics of vocal production are explored through warm-ups and vocal projection development. Students study musicals together as a class, as well as individual solos, duets, and small group numbers from a variety of sources. Solo work is not a necessity, as the class emphasizes working with each student’s comfort level. Depending on the semester, each play, musical or theatrical event such as a cabaret is a part of the curriculum, with students required to attend. Advanced Musical Theatre (10-12) This year-long course emphasizes advanced vocal production, with students expected to sing from a wide range of the musical theatre canon. Solo work is a major element in this class. Acting work is also covered in depth. Regular cabarets for the public are performed. Dance is also explored in depth and complexity. Other areas covered may be stage combat, acting on film, mask and clowning, Shakespeare, or others. Prerequisites: Musical Theatre or an audition. Technical Theatre (9-12) Technical Theater students learn all aspects of stagecraft in this year-long course. Topics may include set construction, painting, properties, costuming, stage lighting, sound design, and stage management. Students are required to participate as tech crew for all Tampa Prep Arts Productions and are assessed on daily effort, attention to detail, project completion and production participation. May be repeated. Theatre Production (10-12) This semester-long course covers a number of areas not included in Performance or Technical Theatre classes. These may include: Costume, Props, Marketing, Stage Management, Dramaturgy, or others. The course is closely linked to the school plays and musicals produced during the year. After learning the basics in a particular area, a student or group of students will be assigned to work on a show. Interested students should be aware that there might be substantial extracurricular time involved, as they will be expected to attend rehearsals and performances. Prerequisite: at least one semester of any Theatre course, including Technical Theatre. 

ENGLISH 

English 6 Sixth grade English lays the foundation for language arts skills that build as students progress in the English program. The course strives to develop an appreciation of reading, skills in writing for a variety of purposes,


COURSE D ESC RI P T I ONS - EN GLISH and an understanding of the structure, vocabulary, and grammar of the English language. Students read adolescent literature appropriate in content and level of difficulty for their age. The course literature gives students a wider understanding of the world around them, as well as a way to reflect on their own personal experiences as adolescents. They begin the first level in a sequence of vocabulary books that continues through eleventh grade.

English 7 This course is guided by the following principles: writing is a means of discovering and examining thoughts, feelings, experiences, and ideas; reading allows us to explore our own humanity and the depth and breadth of the human heart, mind, and spirit; and the study of grammar, vocabulary and style provides insight into the art and craft of written expression. The course literature includes a novel, a play, short stories, and a collection of poetry. Writing instruction emphasizes writing as a process. Students are introduced to analytical writing for a specific purpose.

skills. Ongoing study of vocabulary and grammar is also emphasized.

English 11: American Literature and Composition This course provides students with a general survey of American literature, including works from both the classic canon and contemporary selections. The course focuses on students’ active reading skills by requiring seminar-style discussions, and develops their critical and analytical writing and thinking skills with a series of essay assignments. The American Decades Project requires students to research a decade in American life and write a major paper that focuses on a specific feature within that period. Ongoing study of vocabulary and grammar is also emphasized.

English 8 Building on the foundation from the sixth and seventh grade English courses, the eighth grade English course reinforces and further develops students’ skills of comprehending and interpreting literature, through discussions and various activities. The course literature ranges from Shakespeare to contemporary works, and includes poetry, plays, and fiction. The study of grammar, vocabulary, and style enhances students’ growing awareness of the English language. Students continue to work on the writing process through both creative and analytical writing.

English 11: AP Language and Composition This college-level course surveys American literature from the Colonial period to the present and emphasizes the skills of analytical reading, critical thinking, and persuasive writing. Students’ daily responsibilities include text annotation, the preparation of reading response journals, and participation in seminar-style discussions of literature. Writing instruction focuses on the process of composition and revision as a means of thinking critically and communicating effectively. Research skills are honed with the Synthesis Project, for which students research a decade in American life and write a major paper that includes their independent analysis of a novel. Weekly vocabulary quizzes reinforce SAT preparation. In the second semester, students’ study of rhetoric and their practice with timed writing and multiple-choice exercises supplement their preparation for the AP Language and Composition exam. Prerequisites: English 10 and instructor’s approval

English 9: Genres of Literature and Composition Through the study of various genres of literature, this course focuses on the skills of literary interpretation, analytical and creative thinking, and clear and well-organized oral and written expression. English 9 students also study grammar, vocabulary, and the effective use of language. Students work through a range of written assignments, including analytical essays and creative writing. In conjunction with their World History 1 course, students learn the research process and submit a culminating paper. Various genres are covered in this course, including short stories, novels and poetry.

English 12: English Literature and Composition Literature study in this course emphasizes critical reading to analyze, interpret and evaluate major works of Western literature including both classic and contemporary choices. Writing assignments include the college application essay, essays of literary analysis, and reflective responses to literature. Students also participate in the Three Pound Project (3#P), which allows them to choose a topic of study and work towards mastery of their subject. Numerous written and oral reports on the 3#P process provide interim checks on students’ progress and culminate in an evening exhibition of the projects.

English 10: World Literature and Composition This course provides students with a broad, historical survey of world literature ranging from authors such as Sophocles and Shakespeare to Mathabane, Tsukiyama and Hosseini. The study of these authors, ancient and contemporary - and of other thinkers and artists serves as a springboard for seminar-style discussions, for extensive reflective and expository writing, and for further development of critical and creative thinking

English 12: AP English Literature and Composition Designed to coordinate with AP Modern European History, this college-level course emphasizes the critical reading and analysis of some of the great works of European and British writers. The course also emphasizes appreciating and understanding literature as well as honing writing skills. In addition, students complete a major writing project each semester. During GUIDE FOR ACADEMICS AND STUDENT LIFE | 59


CO U R S E D E S C RI P T I ON S - E NG L I SH the first semester they write an original biography, a research project that develops skills of interviewing, organizing, synthesizing, and editing. In the second semester, each student writes a culminating paper, which requires analysis, in light of a unifying major idea, of four works studied in grades 9-12. Timed writings and multiple-choice exercises during the second semester aid students in preparing for the required AP Literature and Composition Examination. Prerequisite: English 11 and instructor approval

SEMESTER ENGLISH ELECTIVES The following one-semester courses are offered to students in grades 11 and 12. Priority for all of these electives is given to seniors - juniors may only enroll in a course if a space is available after senior schedules have been assigned. Seniors may elect one of these courses for their second semester, if it is offered in their English or Study Hall period, to fulfill their English 12 requirement.

Humanities 1 (10-12) This semester-long seminar serves as the introductory course for students in the Humanities Concentration. Members of the class explore the various disciplines that are collectively referred to as the humanities. The development, importance, and ongoing cultural and academic roles of art, music, language, literature, history, philosophy, and various social sciences such as politics and economics are examined. Classes consist of discussions, lectures, and presentations from visiting faculty, as well as occasional off-campus excursions. Students are assessed based on their class participation, their performance on periodic quizzes, and on the strength of required presentations. The course is only offered in the fall, and is required of all 10th grade students who are enrolled in the Humanities Concentration. Enrollment is open to non-Humanities Concentration students as space permits. Creative Writing (11,12) Students in this one-semester course write imaginative and expressive pieces, including poetry, short fiction, and drama. Students analyze models by both professional and student writers to determine the elements of effective writing. Frequent and varied exercises develop students’ facility with conflict, plot, characterization, point of view, dialogue, theme, tone, imagery, figurative language, and sound devices. Extensive revising and guided editing of classmates’ work help students work toward effective self-editing. Prerequisite: English 10 Film Criticism 1 (10-12) This semester course introduces students to the basics of critiquing, reviewing, and authoring motion pictures. Students will be exposed to a number of genres and periods in film from Buster Keaton to modern classics like Citizen Kane, Sunset Boulevard, and A Beautiful 60 | GUIDE FOR ACADEMICS AND STUDENT LIFE

Mind. Students will spend the great majority of time in class viewing, talking about, and writing about film through a number of different critical lenses, while utilizing knowledge gained from significant writings about the film industry. Prerequisite: English 9

Film Criticism 2 (10-12) This semester course is intended to deepen students’ understanding of the nuances of critiquing and reviewing motion pictures. As is the case in Film Criticism 1, students will be exposed to a number of genres and periods in film from its earliest days up to contemporary times. Students will spend the majority of class time viewing, talking about, and writing about film through a critical lens that they develop throughout the course. Students will ultimately compile a portfolio of their work that encapsulates their own, unique perspective on film. Prerequisite: Film Criticism 1 English Literature: Renaissance to Twentieth Century (11,12) This semester course continues the study of English literature from the first semester of English 12 Honors, along with the emphasis on critical reading to analyze, interpret, and evaluate major works of English literature. The course literature includes poetry, drama, fiction, and non-fiction by a variety of authors - from Dickens to contemporary authors. Writing includes essays of literary analysis and reflections on literature, as well as creative pieces. Prerequisite: English 10

English 12: Reading and Writing Workshop (11,12) This semester course is designed to do two things: encourage students to find reading material in topics that interest, engage and excite them, and to prepare second semester seniors for the writing assignments they will likely encounter in a typical first-year writing course in college. Students choose works across a wide variety of genres including the article and essay, short fiction, poetry, graphic novels and novels. Students are assessed on their performance in their writing journals and reading logs, in weekly Harkness discussions, in their declamation, and in several finished and polished writing assignments for the course. These assignments cover narratives, analytical and persuasive essays, and college level research essays. English 12: Poetry in Motion (11,12) This semester course is divided into four main units. In the beginning weeks, students study traditional forms, rhythm, meter, and formal poetry explication. The next unit focuses on how poetry has been used as a vehicle for protest, activism and social/political commentary. Students then move into a unit that seeks to answer the essential question, “Is music poetry?” In this unit, students explore lyrics of different musical genres, including blues, hip-hop, and country western. The course ends with a unit on spoken word poetry, with


COURSE D ESC RI P T I ONS - EN GLISH careful attention paid to how all of the previous units converge within this specific form. Prerequisite: English 10 Honors

English 12: Topics in World Literature (11,12) This semester course focuses on the analysis of various historically based topics in World Literature. Course topics rotate each year between crowd theory, human rights and identity in a post-colonial world. This discussion-based class mirrors the structure of a college English course and allows for deep analysis of texts and their use of rhetorical and literary devices. Students apply critical theories when analyzing the authors’ commentaries on society. Students are required to read several novels in addition to supplemental articles that support the purpose of the course. Harkness discussions and short written responses comprise the majority of the course’s grades. Prerequisite: English 10 English 12: Mysteries, Thrillers, and Killers (11,12) People read and watch stories about crime, mystery, thrillers, horror, and detection not only to see bad guys get arrested. Perversely, it seems, one also reads and watches for the lawlessness, the transgressions, and seemingly unspeakable acts of violence nonetheless spoken and enacted on page or screen. Indeed, reading and watching also renders criminality knowable; it treats violence as a problem in everyday living. So as one asks how and why crime stories do their work, how storytelling brings structure and reason to bear upon chaos and bloodlust, how a mystery yields to the work of detection and discovery, one becomes a student of this mode of storytelling art. And as one analyzes how different stories in these various subgenres use the conventions of character, narration, and plot, one learns to differentiate the main types: classic mystery tales and novels, detective novels, thrillers, horror, and true crime narratives. By tapping into these darker stories, humans are able to reaffirm the need for heroes. People need individuals who make difficult choices and make sacrifices for the good of others. Thrillers and the like push readers to rise to the best within themselves for the better of their communities. By closely examining evil, one is better able to shed light on the good. English 12: Words, Sights and Sounds (11,12) This second-semester course focuses on applying analysis across three distinct layers. Students will study how words, images and sounds are layered in order to create more depth of purpose and understanding. This course will challenge participants to transition their skills from the analysis of words on paper in a theoretical setting to the analysis of a more dynamic, three-dimensional world. Students will have the means to practice thinking through multiple perspectives and multiple dimensions in the hopes of developing into more effective global thinkers. Music videos, short films and film clips are the media that students will use

to complete their study in this course. Grades will be comprised of daily participation in Harkness discussions, participation in digital forums, reading quizzes, and writing. Prerequisite: English 10 English 12: True Crime Literature: A Mysterious Appeal (11,12) With the 1966 release of In Cold Blood, Truman Capote effectively launched a new literary genre. Crime novels existed before, and true crime stories have been told since, but the art of Capote’s storytelling captivated readers. Today, new media, such as docu-series and podcasts, have sought to recapture the allure of a well-told crime story. In doing so, some mysteries of the genre itself remain unsolved: Is true crime a viable literary genre?; Can a storyteller’s obligations to telling the truth and telling a good story coexist?; Is the storyteller qualified to decide whodunnit? This one-semester course seeks answers to these and many other questions. Students will use the landscape of crime writing to practice persuasive, creative, and descriptive writing, and to apply principles of sound research methods. This course is designed to approximate and to give students experience in the methodology and format of an interdisciplinary, college-level course. Prerequisite: English 10

English 12: Graphic Novels (11,12) In this semester-long course, students explore a frequently marginalized genre that is rapidly gaining in popularity and artistry. Beginning by examining the genre’s origins in comics, and building a vocabulary by which to analyze visual text, students read and analyze a variety of graphic novels, that, in turn, explore a range of voices, traditions, artistic styles, historical contexts, and characters. There are opportunities for students to explore manga and serial comics as a sub-genre of the graphic novel and to choose their own readings for a final project. Assessments include discussion, writing, and a visual art-based final project. However, being an accomplished artist is not a prerequisite—an appreciation and a willingness to experiment is all that is needed! Prerequisite: English 10 English 12: Frankenstein and the Modern Vampire (11,12) On a dark and stormy night in 1816, a group of young literati held a contest to see who could compose the most frightening story. The result: the creation of two of the most enduring literary horrors—the Vampyre, and Frankenstein’s monster. In this semester-long course, students explore both of these narratives, first by reading and discussing the original texts (Mary Shelley’s novel Frankenstein and John Polidori’s story “The Vampyre”), and then by tracing the influences that created these stories and the influence that they, in turn, have had on centuries of popular culture. Research and discussion take students into the realms of science, religion, ethics, GUIDE FOR ACADEMICS AND STUDENT LIFE | 61


CO U R S E D E S C RI P T I ON S - HI STORY A ND T H E SOC I A L SC I ENCES folklore, and feminism. Readings of these foundational texts are supplemented with a graphic novel, several films, TV episodes, and other assorted readings, both fiction and non-fiction. Assessments include reflective writing, analytical writing, and research-based writing, in addition to discussions and a final project. Prerequisite: English 10

English 12: Shakespeare in Depth - Hamlet (11,12) This semester-long course covers the origin, history, and legacy of one of Shakespeare’s most widely known plays. In addition to reading the original text, students view and analyze multiple versions of the production, from traditional to experimental. They also explore the cultural impact of the play, its historical context, and its influence on modern art and literature. This course is designed to approximate and to give students experience in the methodology and format of an interdisciplinary, college-level course. Prerequisite: English 10

HISTORY AND THE SOCIAL SCIENCES 

Geography (6) This course encourages students to develop a global perspective and an understanding of the fundamental themes important to geography. Students will study physical features and culture aspects from around the world. The course focuses on the following questions: Where is it? What is it like? What is the relationship between people and their environment? How and why do people, ideas, and goods move from place to place? In what ways do areas of the world share similar characteristics? Basic note taking, research techniques, map skills, and class discussion are constant focal points throughout the course. Civics (7) This course strives to show students the value in being a good citizen. Students will study and analyze the structure and workings of the local, state, and national government. Students will learn the roots and principles of the Constitution and their rights and responsibilities this living document puts forth for them. Throughout the year, students will continue to sharpen their basic note-taking and discussion skills while also engaging in more group assignments and experiential education opportunities. American History Survey (8) This course explores several periods of the American experience from historical and cultural perspectives. These periods include Colonial America, the Revolution, the growth of Nationalism, the Civil War/Reconstruction, and selected events of the twentieth century. Basic note taking and writing techniques, class discussion, and map skills form a regular part of the course throughout 62 | GUIDE FOR ACADEMICS AND STUDENT LIFE

the year. Individual projects assist in developing an appreciation of American culture, government, and the free-enterprise system.

Foundations of Historical Thinking: A Big History Approach (9) This course uses an inquiry-based, multidisciplinary approach to explore the history of the universe from the early evolution of humans through the post-classical era of civilizations. The Big History perspective challenges students to think critically and broadly. Students practice critical reading and writing skills through investigations, projects, and engagement in class discussions, and gain a strong interdisciplinary foundation, which will provide a useful context for understanding world events in the past and present. This work serves as a foundation for either World History II or AP World History. World History 2 (10) This course explores the great ideas, events, art, and movements of the world from 1500 to modern times. Through this study, students have the opportunity to think deeply about such ideas as identity, government, religion, art, culture, and ethics. This course emphasizes the historian’s most important tools: inquiry, research, analysis, synthesis, and persuasive prose. Other skills fostered within the course include reflective writing, constructive critiquing, effective dialogue, map skills, and oral communication. This course is partly designed as a complement to the sophomore English course. AP World History (10) This year-long course will examine major transitions over time and their impact on a variety of regions throughout the world. The course is shaped by the six themes of world history and the ‘habits of mind’ as outlined by the College Board. Using a periodization approach to analyzing events and interactions from the foundations of history to the present, the course is designed to challenge students to develop independent ideas using Harkness methodology. A strong emphasis is placed on the improvement of analytical abilities and critical thinking skills in order to understand historical and geographical context, make comparisons across cultures, use documents and other primary sources, and recognize and discuss different interpretations and historical frameworks. The course necessitates a significant reading and writing load equivalent to a full-year introductory college course. Prerequisites: World History I and instructor’s approval United States History (11) Eleventh Grade United States History examines the main currents of American political, social, cultural, and economic life in the context of the country’s historical evolution, starting with the first colonies to its Progressive era, emergence as a world power, and recent role in the Middle East. The course, while allowing


CO U R S E D E S C RI P T I ON S - H I STORY A ND T H E SOC I A L SCIEN CES the students to concentrate on United States History in the twentieth and early twenty-first centuries, also complements the students’ study in American Literature. United States History focuses not only on the historical events of the text, but also on their relevance to current issues. Students must fulfill several requirements, including daily reading assignments, frequent essays, and occasional projects.

AP United States History (11) This college-level course is designed to prepare students both for the Advanced Placement United States History examination and for some of the skills and knowledge they will need in other academic classes and life experiences. The intensive curriculum surveys the history of the United States from before the arrival of Europeans to the early twenty-first century. A discussion format used in class is fueled by students’ responses to assigned readings and daily primary sources. A strong emphasis is placed on the instruction, training, and practice in the composition of college-level essays. Writing objectives include the formulation and development of thesis statements in response to questions based upon the analysis, understanding, interpretation, and reconciliation of historical documents. Political, social, economic, literary, and artistic aspects of American history are integrated to the greatest extent possible throughout the course. Prerequisites: World History 2 or AP World History, and instructor’s approval AP American Government (11,12) This course will give students, in line with the AP specifications, an “analytical perspective on government and politics in the United States. It includes both the studies of general concepts used to interpret United States politics and the analysis of specific examples. The course requires familiarity with the various institutions, groups, beliefs and ideas that constitute United States politics. The following themes are examined: Constitutional Underpinnings of United States Government; Political Beliefs and Behaviors; Political Parties, Interest Groups and Mass Media; Institutions of National Government; Public Policy; Civil Rights and Civil Liberties. Skills expected of the students are: knowledge of facts, concepts, and theories; understanding of typical patterns of political processes and behavior and their consequences; analysis and interpretation of data and relationships in government and politics; written analysis and interpretation of the subject matter; careful attention to the specific free-response question posed; and ability to stay on task.” Prerequisite: Instructor’s approval AP Art History (11,12) Through slide lectures, class discussions, and library resources, this year-long course focuses on major developments in visual thought and expression. The

course strives to develop an understanding of history through art and art through history and to analyze the form and nature of art works. Students write numerous short essays in this class. Prerequisite: World History 2 or AP World History, and instructor’s approval

AP European History (12) This intensive, college-level course is intended to provide preparation for the AP European History exam. Students read and write extensively and are responsible for comprehending, analyzing, and discussing the major political, economic, social, and religious events of the entire European continent from the formative era of the Renaissance to contemporary Europe. Excerpt reviews and Document Based Questions provide additional writing practice. Prerequisite: World History 2 or AP World History, United States History and instructor’s approval AP Economics (11,12) This course focuses on the factors at work in the marketplace, affecting both consumer and producer behavior. Microeconomics will emphasize the concepts of demand and supply, elasticity, production theory, cost theory, market structures, market failure, factor markets and the application of theory to contemporary issues. Additionally, the student is introduced to the workings of the aggregate economy. In analyzing the “health” of the economy, students will explore the importance of certain measures including inflation, unemployment, Gross Domestic Product, and economic growth. This course will also examine the impact of international trade given the current global market. This is an upper level course and recommended for juniors and seniors only. AP Psychology (11-12) This college-level course is designed to introduce students to the systematic and scientific study of human behavior and mental processes. Students will learn about psychologists who have made profound contributions to their discipline with theories, concepts and observed phenomena of cases. Along with the historical development of the psychological field, students will also learn about topics including behavior, sensation, perception, learning, cognition, motivation and development. Students will also employ aspects of the scientific method with respect to contemporary research and studies, as they analyze bias and evaluate claims and evidence.

HISTORY ELECTIVES Humanities 1 (10-12) This semester-long seminar serves as the introductory course for students in the Humanities Concentration. Members of the class explore the various disciplines that are collectively referred to as the humanities. GUIDE FOR ACADEMICS AND STUDENT LIFE | 63


CO U R S E D E S C RI P T I ON S - HI STORY A ND T H E SOC I A L SC I ENCES The development, importance, and ongoing cultural and academic roles of art, music, language, literature, history, philosophy, and various social sciences such as politics and economics are examined. Classes consist of discussions, lectures, and presentations from visiting faculty, as well as occasional off-campus excursions. Students are assessed based on their class participation, their performance on periodic quizzes, and on the strength of required presentations. The course is only offered in the fall, and is required of all 10th grade students who are enrolled in the Humanities Concentration. Enrollment is open to non-Humanities Concentration students as space permits.

Government and Civics (11,12) This semester-long course exposes students to the American federal government, the Bill of Rights, and a host of other political topics and issues related to American civic values. Through an emphasis on current events, students create and implement a political-action project. Classes are taught in a discussion-based environment. Students should leave this course as more knowledgeable citizens who possess a practical understanding of their rights, liberties, and responsibilities under the law. Contemporary World Affairs (11,12) This one-semester course introduces students to contemporary issues in global affairs. The course examines problems facing the global community, as well as the prospects for governments, individuals, and international groups to address those problems. Issues include population and demographics, natural resources and the environment, the globalization of the economy, terrorism and threats to security, development and technology, global security, ethics, human rights, and the role of the United States and other regional powers in world affairs. Students will research topics in current periodicals and other source materials, deliver oral reports on assigned topics, and write comprehensive reports that examine the roots and ramifications of these issues. The course will be conducted as a Harkness Seminar. It is an upper level course and recommended for juniors and seniors only. Cultural Anthropology (11,12) This semester course introduces students to a selection of world cultures and examines some of the various and integrated ways in which humans respond to their environment. Through essays, reflective writing, tests, projects, field trips, and guest lecturers, students are encouraged to seek a deeper awareness of others in order to better understand themselves and the cultures in which they reside. Cultural Anthropology is recommended for juniors and seniors only. African American History (11,12) This one-semester course explores the history of 64 | GUIDE FOR ACADEMICS AND STUDENT LIFE

African Americans in the United States. Though specific topics of study may vary from one semester to the next, in general the fall semester investigates African American history prior to 1865, while the spring semester focuses on the period since 1865. Classes are conducted in a Harkness seminar format. Students are expected to write two to three short essays, and reflect regularly on their learning. In addition, they contribute to one class-wide project.

Economics (11,12) This year-long course explores a wide range of general topics of economics. Topics include an introduction to supply and demand, inflation, unemployment, and fiscal policy by governments. Students will review selected readings that pertain to these areas of study during the first semester. During the second semester, students will spend time developing a business plan for the annual cookie company project. Students will pitch their business plan to the Head of School and CFO of Tampa Preparatory. Students will then market and sell their product for several weeks. Financial literacy is the final component of this course. Students will learn all the information required to be successful in personal finance as they head off to university studies. Latin American Studies/Estudios Latinoamericanos (11,12) This one-semester course will provide an overview of Latin America, including its history from the pre-Colombian era to the present. Latin America’s past and present can be understood as a series of struggles or “culture wars” along a set of fault lines that center around the concepts of race, class, culture, development, and social justice. Course objectives include an understanding of the causes behind these struggles and how they have shaped modern Latin America. By studying Latin America’s history, students will frequently draw parallels to the present in order to understand how a particular issue continues to find relevance in contemporary times. This course will be taught in English for one semester, and in Spanish (as Estudios Latinoamericanos) for one semester. Prerequisite for Estudios Latinoamericanos: Advanced Spanish 3, Spanish 4 or AP Spanish and instructor’s approval Francophone Studies (10-12) This semester course will provide students the opportunity to explore and research French-speaking countries. Students will study the history of Francophone countries in order to understand current event topics that relate to these countries. Students will participate in and lead group discussions, present research topics that apply to current trends and issues in the French-speaking world, and explore the cultural importance of French in a global society. This course affords students a half-credit in history.


COURSE D ESC RI P T I ONS - M AT H E MATICS Psychology (11,12) Students in this semester course will be presented with an introduction to psychology. The course is designed to explore the systematic and scientific study of the behavior and mental processes of human beings and other animals. Students are exposed to the psychological facts, principles, and phenomena associated with each of the major sub fields within psychology. The course will also address the ethics and methods psychologists use in their science and practice. Class will consist of lectures, discussion, readings, videos, guest speakers, writing, and research and group projects. Critical thinking skills are enhanced as students analyze personal and social implications of psychological findings. Performance Psychology (9-12) This semester-long course is designed to expose students to the foundations of psychology with a strong emphasis on practical topics relevant to human performance (e.g., competitive athletics, performing arts, etc.). These topics include—among others—motivation, anxiety, concentration/focus, and confidence, as well as group development, team cohesion, and leadership. The class is largely discussion-based, and students’ grades are based primarily on projects of their choosing. Bioethics (11-12) This one-semester course explores ethical questions related to the life sciences. In a scientific world that is continuously changing, it is important for individuals to establish parameters, points of view, and personal decisions. With the advent of new technologies and the discovery of new procedures in the fields of science and medicine, it is imperative that students acquire not only a general understanding of these topics, but also a clear opinion of them. The course includes reading assignments, clinical cases, and activities such as group discussions and role-playing. Prerequisites: Biology and Chemistry. Introduction to Law (11,12) This one-semester course is designed to allow students to acquire a greater understanding of constitutional law, criminal law, traffic law, civil law (including torts and contract law) and a host of other legal topics and issues that may be of particular interest to young adults. Students will learn the curriculum primarily through an examination of legal opinions (or other primary sources) in a discussion-based classroom environment. Students, moreover, will learn how to properly "brief" a legal case, engage in legal research, and participate in mock trials. Students should leave this course with a greater understanding of their rights, liberties, and responsibilities under the law.

United States Politics: Presidential Elections (11,12) Offered every four years This one-semester course will consider various aspects of the American electoral system with emphasis on the candidates and issues of the United States presidential elections. In addition, students will learn about American government and political culture more broadly. Political institutions and the election process will be studied from a political science perspective. This course will be conducted as a Harkness Seminar and students will be expected to produce several short position papers on the dominant issues as well as one final research paper (in lieu of an exam) that analyzes the outcomes of the election. It is an upper level course and recommended for juniors and seniors only. Prerequisite: World History 2 or AP World History World Religions (11,12) This semester course is designed to give students an understanding of the history, doctrines, meanings, rituals and possible future developments of the world’s major religions. Daily discussions and reflective writings are supplemented with guest lecturers, oral presentations, and field trips to local religious centers. It is an upper level course and recommended for juniors and seniors only. 

MATHEMATICS 

MATHEMATICS COURSE SEQUENCES For a diagram of the possible course sequences in middle school and upper school mathematics courses, please refer to the Mathematics Course Flow Chart in the Appendix. Middle School students wishing to accelerate in mathematics should refer to Academic Information and Policies - Opportunities for Accelerated Study.

Mathematics Designed as a preparation for Pre-Algebra, sixth grade mathematics focuses on mastery of computation skills and the four basic operations. This course of continuous review includes fractions, decimals, integers, percents, and ratios. Concepts, procedures, and vocabulary that students will need in order to succeed in Upper School mathematics courses are introduced and developed incrementally. Additionally, fundamental geometry, data analysis, and probability are included in this course. Pre-Algebra This course lays the foundation for the studies of algebra, geometry, and statistics. Students are provided continual opportunities to review operations with Rational Numbers. Using these skills, students then learn to solve and graph linear equations and inequalities, and word problems. Additional topics GUIDE FOR ACADEMICS AND STUDENT LIFE | 65


CO U R S E D E S C RI P T I ON S - MAT H EM AT I C S include number theory, slope, probability, geometry concepts and calculations, and statistics.

Algebra Concepts (Introduction to Algebra) This course is designed for students who have experienced some difficulty in Pre-Algebra, yet still introduces most concepts taught in the Algebra 1 course. This course allows for more flexible pacing and individualized instruction. Topics to be covered include: integer operations, solving of linear equations, proportions, graphing linear equations, slope of a line, powers and exponents, systems of equations. Students who complete this class will have all of the tools necessary to excel in Algebra 1 as a freshman. Algebra 1 Algebra 1 provides the foundation for more advanced mathematics courses. This course features the use of a graphing utility to develop an understanding of the concepts behind mathematics and to prepare students for the graphical nature of higher-level mathematical analysis. Topics studied include: solving and graphing linear equations and functions, solving and graphing inequalities, exponents, operations with polynomials, and solving and graphing quadratic equations and functions using a variety of techniques. Prerequisite: Pre-Algebra Geometry Geometry is designed to develop reasoning and logic skills, along with spatial acuity, which are useful in critical thinking and problem solving. Exploration and inductive reasoning are used throughout, with an emphasis on real world situations. Deductive reasoning will be used to learn fact-based thinking and necessary conditions through formal and informal proofs. Topics studied include lines and the angles they form, polygons and circles, polyhedrons, congruence and similarity, area, and volume. Algebra I concepts will be reviewed throughout the course. Prerequisite: Algebra I Algebra 2 This course is designed for the student who is interested in forming a firm mathematical foundation before pursuing higher-level mathematics. Affording students a solid background while moving at a relatively measured pace, the course begins with a thorough review of Algebra 1 before covering most of the traditional topics in Algebra 2. Students study functions and graphs while focusing on the traditional study of number systems, including imaginary and complex numbers, inequalities, systems of equations and inequalities, radical functions and other topics as time allows. This course continues to develop students’ understanding of Algebra through both traditional learning methods and through interactive applications and exploratory lessons created for iPads. Prerequisite: Geometry and current instructor’s approval 66 | GUIDE FOR ACADEMICS AND STUDENT LIFE

Advanced Algebra 2 This course is designed for the student who demonstrates a higher aptitude and passion for mathematics and who will be pursuing advanced courses, including AP Calculus. Moving at an accelerated pace with in-depth analysis, and through the use of graphing applications, students study functions and graphs in depth while still focusing on the traditional study of number systems, including complex numbers, inequalities and equations of the first and second degree, exponents, polynomial and rational expressions, radicals, logarithms, and conic sections. Throughout the course, students focus on demonstrating their understanding through application. Prerequisites: Algebra 1, Geometry and current instructor’s approval Algebra 3 with Financial Applications (11,12) Algebra 3 with Financial Applications reinforces topics from Algebra 1 and Algebra 2, and also introduces new Algebra topics. Real-world applications are emphasized when covering each topic, encouraging students to make the connection between Algebra and its usefulness in the business and financial sectors. The second semester consists of personal finance topics. Students learn about the complicated financial world they will inevitably be a part of as they enter adulthood. Prerequisite: Algebra 2 Statistics and Probability This year-long course focuses on the underlying concepts of statistics and statistical analysis. Students take an in-depth look at issues involved in gathering data from surveys to experiments, including data ethics. Other topics include exploring gathered data, and an introduction to statistical inference. The probability portion of the course is centered on understanding the theory that connects data-gathering and statistical inference. Course concepts will be applied in a culminating project. Prerequisite: Algebra 2 Precalculus This course is designed for students who are interested in forming a firm mathematical foundation before pursuing higher-level mathematics. Affording students a solid background while moving at a relatively measured pace, the course covers most of the traditional topics in advanced algebra and trigonometry. This course continues to develop students’ understanding of algebraic concepts through both traditional learning methods and through interactive applications and exploratory lessons created for iPads. Prerequisites: Algebra 2 Advanced Precalculus This course is designed for students who demonstrate a higher aptitude and passion for mathematics and who will be pursuing advanced courses, including AP Calculus. Moving at an accelerated pace with deeper


COURS E D ESC RI P T I ONS - P H YSI C A L ED UCATIO N analysis, students study advanced algebraic concepts and trigonometry through the use of graphing applications. Throughout their study, students focus on demonstrating understanding through application. Prerequisite: Advanced Algebra 2 and current instructor’s approval

Calculus In this introductory course, differential and integral calculus are explored through the interpretation of graphs as well as analytic methods. By integrating technology, students are expected to investigate and solve problems using algebraic, numerical, graphical, verbal and written methods. The course is rich not only in theoretical problems, but also in life applications including physics, economics, engineering, finance, and the social sciences. This course covers the traditional curriculum of college level Calculus 1. Prerequisite: Precalculus AP Calculus-AB Approaching calculus from a theoretical and a graphical perspective, this college-level course utilizes the graphing calculator to solve problems, and to analyze real-life data. Topics studied include finding regression curves, properties of functions and graphs, limits (from an intuitive approach) and continuity, the derivative and its applications, and the integral and its applications. This course prepares students for the AB level of the Advanced Placement Examination. Prerequisites: B or better in Advanced Precalculus, consideration of PSAT scores, and instructor’s approval AP Statistics The AP Statistics course is a secondary school equivalent to a one-semester, introductory, non-calculus based, college course in statistics. This year-long course introduces students to the major concepts and tools for collecting, analyzing and drawing conclusions from data. Exploring data, planning a study, anticipating patterns and statistical inference are the four major topics that are studied. Emphasis is placed on the communication of ideas based on statistical analysis. Prerequisites: Precalculus or Statistics and the instructor’s approval AP Calculus-BC Designed to follow AP Calculus-AB, the course includes the study of vector and polar topics, more advanced techniques of integration, arc length, surfaces of revolution, work, improper integrals, and sequences and series. This course prepares students for the BC level of the Advanced Placement Examination. Prerequisites: Satisfactory completion of the AP Calculus-AB course and instructor’s approval Calculus III with Analytical Geometry This is a college-level math course that challenges outstanding mathematics students. Topics include:

vectors and the geometry of space, vector–valued functions, functions of several variables, multiple integration, and vector analysis. The course provides a strong foundation in multivariable and vector calculus that will be useful in future college mathematics courses. Prerequisites: AP Calculus BC, or concurrently taking AP Calculus BC with instructor’s approval. 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

Middle School Athletic Requirement All Middle School students are required to participate in athletics during the school year. Students will be allowed to select from a list of options each athletic season to fulfill this requirement. Please keep in mind the following when making your selections: 1. Each student must participate on at least one team during the school year. 2. A student may choose the Study Hall option only once per school year. Middle School Athletic Options: 1. Athletic Team •• Each student must participate on at least one team during the school year •• Options ▫▫ Fall - Boys Soccer, Bowling, Cross Country, Girls Volleyball, Swimming ▫▫ Winter - Basketball, Cross Country Training, Girls Soccer, Wrestling ▫▫ February Intersession - Rowing, Track & Field ▫▫ Spring - Baseball, Boys Lacrosse, Cross Country Training, Softball, Tennis, Rowing 2. Physical Education •• Offered in Fall and Spring seasons •• Not offered during the Winter Athletic season •• This option ends at the end of each academic school day 3. Study Hall Athletic Conditioning (SHAC) •• Space is limited to 30 students •• This option ends at the end of each academic school day 4. Study Hall •• A student may choose the Study Hall option only once per school year •• This option ends at the end of each academic school day When participating on an athletic team, student-athletes are expected to do the following: 1. Attend and participate in all team practices during seventh period 2. Attend each contest for which their team is scheduled GUIDE FOR ACADEMICS AND STUDENT LIFE | 67


CO U R S E D E S C RI P T I ON S - PH YSI C A L ED UC AT I ON Physical Education/Personal Fitness & Health (9) This required course aims to encourage our students to pursue a healthy, physically active lifestyle. Traditional team sports and lifetime sports including badminton, team handball, floor hockey, indoor soccer and water polo make up the physical education component. The personal fitness/health semester will include reading assignments and quizzes, cardiovascular, strength and flexibility training as well as studies in all areas of health and nutrition. Guest speakers from Tampa General-More Health will cover topics in HIV/AIDS, hepatitis, eating disorders, trauma and decision-making skills. Dance Style 1 (6-12) A year-long elective dance course in which students learn the fundamentals of ballet, jazz and modern dance. Students take ballet two days per week and take jazz and modern dance on the alternate days. They learn terminology, an overview of dance history and stretch/conditioning in addition to working on dance steps in the studio. Emphasis is placed on technique, correct body placement, coordination, flexibility and endurance. The course culminates in a showcase at the end of the school year. Athletic Conditioning (10-12) This course offers students a guided weight training program for the casual or the serious athlete. Participants learn a wide variety of appropriate weight training techniques and study basic nutrition, anatomy, and exercise physiology. Participating in a regular program of health enhancing exercise, students learn the benefits of exercise first-hand. Students are assessed through quizzes, participation and improvement. Athletic Conditioning is taught as a one-semester course but is open to students as a year-long course. Introduction to Sports Medicine and Athletic Training (10-12) This one-semester course will provide students with an introduction to the care and prevention of athletic injuries and to the duties of an athletic trainer. The course will emphasize anatomy as it relates to physical activity and sports, and will require some out-of-class assistance to the athletic trainer at home sports events. Students will be able to demonstrate knowledge of injury prevention, assessment and rehabilitation techniques. Some knowledge of anatomy is preferred but is not required. This course will earn students a 1/2 credit applicable toward satisfying the Physical Education graduation requirement. Prerequisite: Biology Emergency Medical Response (10-12) This semester-long course provides students with the knowledge and skills necessary to help sustain life, reduce pain, and minimize the consequences of 68 | GUIDE FOR ACADEMICS AND STUDENT LIFE

injury or sudden illness during out-of-hospital medical and traumatic emergencies—while either awaiting or assisting higher-level personnel at the scene. Some of the core skills include: performing a primary assessment, CPR, using an AED, airway ventilation, medical and trauma emergencies, EMS operations, and pharmacological intervention. Prerequisite: Biology

Performance Psychology (9-12) This semester-long course is designed to expose students to the foundations of psychology with a strong emphasis on practical topics relevant to human performance (e.g., competitive athletics, performing arts, etc.). These topics include—among others—motivation, anxiety, concentration/focus, and confidence, as well as group development, team cohesion, and leadership. The class is largely discussion-based, and students’ grades are based primarily on projects of their choosing. Fitness for Life (10-12) Fitness for Life is a semester-long course that teaches students how to maximize their health through fitness games and healthy life strategies. Half of each week will be dedicated to learning how to design workout programs, arrange weekly workouts, and improve a student’s fitness for the rest of his/her life. The other half of each week will concentrate on basic and advanced life strategies to avoid common pitfalls and to work toward the student’s own personal goals. The overall goal of this class is to promote lifestyle education while having fun with a variety of aerobic and non-aerobic activities. We will use many resources, including those of Tampa Preparatory School, Bayshore Boulevard, and health food stores. Applied Anatomy and Kinesiology (10-12) This semester course focuses on human anatomy— specifically the origin, insertion, and function of muscles. This information is applied to a deeper understanding of human movement. Students explore the vast connections that exist between muscle, fascia, nervous, motor control and movement systems. Lectures and discussions are supplemented with human movement labs. Students are assessed throughout the course on their ability to identify muscles and their functions, on their understanding of regional interdependence of body systems, on their use of screening techniques that evaluate movement, and by applying movement screen outcomes to training along with a final case study project. Prerequisite: Biology Applied Physiology and Neurology (10-12) This one-semester course focuses on human anatomy and physiology, as applied to a deeper understanding of both human movement and how learning occurs in the brain, in physiology, and in the physical body. Students explore the autonomic nervous system


COURSE D ESC RI P T I ONS - SCIEN CE and its integration with the living, moving body. Students develop an understanding of the regional interdependence of internal systems, use screening techniques to evaluate physiology adaptations, and apply screens to determine best outcomes. Prerequisite: Applied Anatomy and Kinesiology 

SCIENCE 

UPPER SCHOOL SCIENCE OPTIONS For a table of the possible course options in the Upper School science curriculum, please refer to the Science Options table in the Appendix.

MIDDLE SCHOOL OVERVIEW The science curriculum in the sixth, seventh, and eighth grades is a three-year, integrated, activity-oriented approach to the world of science. The integration of literature, geography, and history provide a deeper understanding of science’s relationship to other disciplines. Field trips to such places as Cape Canaveral, the Florida Keys, and the Museum of Science and Industry broaden and enhance the learning of the student.

Science 6 (6) The sixth grade curriculum is an integrated course in which students learn about the disciplines of Earth, Life, and Physical Science. In order to accomplish this task, students are motivated to appreciate science through cooperative learning, hand-on activities, lecture information, real-life studies, and problem-solving activities. Topics covered in sixth grade include the Cell, Cell Theory, Human Body, Weather, Climate, Energy, Force and Motion. Science 7 (7) The seventh grade curriculum is an integrated course in which students continue their journey through the disciplines of Earth, Life, and Physical Science. The students learn in a dynamic classroom with lectures, cooperative learning, hands-on activities, projects, and lab activities. Topics covered in 7th grade include Earthquakes, Interdependence of Organisms, Light Energy, and Thermal Energy. The students apply their knowledge on their grade level trip to the Florida Keys. Science 8 (8) The eighth grade science course completes the three-year integrated cycle with continued emphasis on topics in Earth, Life and Physical Science. The students learn through lectures, cooperative learning, hands-on activities, projects, and lab activities. Topics covered in eighth grade include the Solar System, Earth, Moon, Energy and Life, Properties of Matter, Chemical Changes, and Structure of Matter.

Robotics (6) Sixth graders will gain an understanding of simple machines including the lever, wheel and axle, and pulleys. Students will gain an understanding of the problem-solving process and will be required to document their findings. A second unit will focus on robots using the LEGO MINDSTORMS system. Problem-solving skills are applied to robots allowing them to find solutions to specific missions. A systematic approach and quantitative solutions will be utilized for robot missions. Students gain an understanding of the use of light and ultrasonic sensors to solve mission problems. Intermediate Robotics (7,8) The fall semester will concentrate on complex sensors like the infra-red sensor, the magnetic sensor, the compass sensor and the accelerometer (gyroscopic sensor). More complex missions for problem solving will be introduced using flowcharts as a means of planning a complex program. During the spring semester, students will work on a large project called the SeaPerch Underwater robot. Class topics will include submersibles and how they work, concepts of buoyancy, fluids, simple circuits and waterproofing. Students will learn the following skills: basic cutting using ratchet and PVC cutters, drilling, filing and soldering. Teams of two students will journal the entire process and any problems or improvements they discover. Biology (9) This survey course investigates life on the cellular, organismic, and community levels. Major topics include cell structure and function, genetics, natural selection and evolution, classification. Students utilize problem-solving skills, research skills, technical and creative writing, and conventional laboratory techniques as they apply learned principles to everyday experience. AP Biology (11,12) This college-level course encompasses the entire range of the discipline, from molecular biology through population dynamics, and requires the assimilation of a large amount of factual material at a rapid pace. Laboratory experience focuses on the topics designated by the College Board in order to prepare the students for the mandatory national examination in May. Successful completion of the course provides a thorough preparation for college biology courses. Prerequisites: Biology, year-long Chemistry course (preferably Advanced Chemistry) and instructor’s approval Chemistry (10-12) Focusing on environmental issues, this curriculum developed by the American Chemical Society GUIDE FOR ACADEMICS AND STUDENT LIFE | 69


CO U R S E D E S C RI P T I ON S - SC I ENC E emphasizes how chemistry is related to every-day life. Students develop a chemical vocabulary and an understanding of chemical concepts while participating in laboratory exercises, individual and group projects, and decision-making activities. Topics studied include water, chemical resources, petroleum, food, nuclear energy, the atmosphere, and the chemical industry. Prerequisite: Algebra 1

Advanced Chemistry (10-12) This course develops a student’s critical and analytical thinking by stressing the concepts that explain atomic and molecular interactions. The course emphasizes understanding chemistry both mathematically and conceptually and features extensive qualitative laboratory experiments. Topics studied include elements, compounds, the physical phases, solutions, bonding, thermodynamics, reaction rates and equilibrium, electrochemistry, acids and bases, and organic chemistry. Students will be required to use a graphing calculator during class and on homework assignments. Prerequisites: Algebra 2 concurrently; instructor’s approval AP Chemistry (11,12) This college-level course emphasizes an extensive mathematical appreciation of chemical phenomena and a quantitative laboratory experience. Following the demands of the AP curriculum, the course includes rigorous study of atomic theory, chemical bonding, gases, liquids and solids, thermodynamics, kinetics and equilibrium, electrochemistry, and descriptive chemistry. Each student is expected to take the AP Chemistry exam in May. Students will be required to use a graphing calculator during class and on homework assignments. Prerequisites: Advanced Chemistry; Precalculus (concurrently); instructor’s approval Physics (10-12) This course strikes a balance between the principles and concepts of physics and the mathematical solutions of problems. Course topics include: measurements, motion, forces and gravitation, energy and work, momentum, rotational motion, waves and sound, light, electricity and magnetism. Laboratory investigations that include the use of scientific inquiry, research, measurement, problem solving, laboratory apparatus and technologies, experimental procedures, and safety procedures are also an integral part of this course. Prerequisite: Algebra 2 (concurrently) Advanced Physics (10-12) This course attempts to make mathematical sense of the universe and to pique the student’s curiosity about our surroundings. The class combines lectures, problem solving, laboratory work, computer simulations, and various projects. One major project is completed at Busch Gardens. Students explore topics of classical 70 | GUIDE FOR ACADEMICS AND STUDENT LIFE

mechanics, including vector math, kinematics, Newton’s Laws, momentum, conservation of energy, projectile motion, and rotational inertia. Additional topics include wave phenomena, oscillatory motion, electricity, light, and magnetism. Prerequisites: Precalculus (concurrently); instructor’s approval

AP Physics 1 (10-12) This algebra-based, introductory college-level physics course explores topics such as Newtonian mechanics (including rotational motion); work, energy, and power; mechanical waves and sound; and introductory, simple circuits. Through inquiry-based learning, students develop scientific critical thinking and reasoning skills. Lectures are supplemented with laboratory experiments, demonstrations, and computer simulations. This course requires that 25 percent of the instructional time be spent in hands-on laboratory work, with an emphasis on inquiry-based investigations that provide students with opportunities to apply scientific principles. No prior course work in physics is necessary, although Advanced Physics or a higher-level physics course would give students a useful background. Prerequisites: Advanced Precalculus (concurrently) and instructor’s approval AP Physics 2 (10-12) This algebra-based, introductory college-level physics course explores topics such as fluid statics and dynamics; thermodynamics with kinetic theory; PV diagrams and probability; electrostatics; electrical circuits with capacitors; magnetic fields; electromagnetism; physical and geometric optics; and quantum, atomic, and nuclear physics. Through inquiry-based learning, students develop scientific critical thinking and reasoning skills. This course requires that 25 percent of the instructional time be spent in hands-on laboratory work, with an emphasis on inquiry-based investigations that provide students with opportunities to apply scientific principles. Prerequisites: Advanced Physics or AP Physics 1, Advanced Precalculus (concurrently) and instructor’s approval AP Physics C (11,12) Two AP Physics C courses—Mechanics, and Electricity and Magnetism—are taught in this year-long course. Mechanics explores kinematics; Newton’s laws of motion; work, energy and power; systems of particles and linear momentum; circular motion and rotation; and oscillations and gravitation. Electricity and Magnetism examines electrostatics; conductors; capacitors and dielectrics; electric circuits; magnetic fields and electromagnetism. Because each topic is covered in one semester, students will take two separate AP exams in May. These calculus-based, college-level physics classes are especially appropriate for students planning to specialize or major in college in physical science or engineering. Students spend a minimum of 20 percent of instructional time engaged in hands-on


COURSE D ESC RI P T I ONS - SCIEN CE laboratory work. They ask questions, make observations and predictions, design experiments, analyze data, and construct arguments in a collaborative setting. Each student completes a lab notebook or portfolio of lab reports. Introductory differential and integral calculus are used throughout both courses. Prerequisites: Honors or AP Calculus (concurrently) and instructor’s approval

AP Environmental Science (11,12) This college-level course provides an interdisciplinary look at the complex factors that interact in the environment. Concepts from Biology, Chemistry, Geology, Engineering and the Social Sciences will be used to identify and evaluate both natural and human-made environmental concerns. Additionally, students will create solutions to resolve or prevent these problems and use technology to communicate their ideas. Current events and literature reviews will supplement the course material. Laboratory experiences, fieldwork, and field trips will also comprise a significant component of the course. Topics will include Earth systems and resources, the living world, population, land and water use, energy resources and consumption, global change and pollution. Each student is expected to take the AP exam in May. The course will meet four times per week and will require one weekend field trip per semester. Prerequisites: Successful completion of Biology, Chemistry and Algebra 1; instructor’s approval Introduction to Engineering Design (10) This year-long elective course focuses on the design process and its application. Students will learn AutoDesk Inventor and use it to design solutions to proposed problems, document their work using an engineer’s notebook, and communicate solutions to peers and members of the professional community. Please note: This course is the first of a three-year engineering sequence. In order to enroll in these successive classes, students must first complete Introduction to Engineering Design. Prerequisites: Algebra 2 (concurrently) and instructor’s approval Principles of Engineering (11) This year-long course exposes students to major concepts that they will encounter in a post-secondary engineering course of study. Topics include mechanisms, energy, statics, materials, and kinematics. Students will develop problem-solving skills and apply their knowledge of research and design to create solutions to various challenges, document their work and communicate solutions. Prerequisite: Introduction to Engineering Design Aerospace Engineering (12) This year-long course propels students' learning in the fundamentals of atmospheric and space flight. As

they explore the physics of flight, students bring the concepts to life by designing an airfoil, a propulsion system and rockets. Students learn basic orbital mechanics using industry-standard software. They also explore robot systems through projects such as remotely operated vehicles. This class serves as one of two capstone courses in the three-year STEM Concentration sequence. Prerequisites: Introduction to Engineering Design and Principles of Engineering

Computer Science Principles (11,12) Using Python® as a primary tool, and incorporating multiple platforms and languages for computation, this year-long class aims to develop computational thinking, generate excitement about career paths that utilize computing, and introduce professional tools that foster creativity and collaboration. This course can be a student’s first course in computer science. The class helps students develop programming expertise and explore the workings of the Internet. Projects and problems include app development, visualization of data, cybersecurity, and simulation. This class may constitute as either the capstone course in the three-year STEM Concentration sequence, or it may be taken independently of the STEM Concentration. Priority will be given to STEM Concentration students who use this as their capstone course. Prerequisite: Algebra 1 and any year-long Chemistry or Physics course

SCIENCE ELECTIVES Organic Chemistry (11,12) This semester-long course is designed to provide a fundamental overview of organic chemistry to students interested in pursuing science in college. Through this class, students understand the relationship between the structure and function of molecules, the major classes of reactions, reaction energetics and mechanisms, and synthesis of organic compounds. Several themes are prevalent in each unit of study: nomenclature, chemical and physical properties, structures, mechanisms, common molecules, and the diversity of organic molecules in plants, bacteria, and animals. Class discussion, lecture, and in-depth laboratory experiments form the basis for student conceptual mastery, culminating with the presentation and analysis of a peer-reviewed article from a recent Organic Chemistry journal. Prerequisite: Advanced Chemistry. Food Chemistry (11,12) In this semester-long course, students learn about issues in nutrition and health through the behavior of the substances in food. This is accomplished through class discussions, lectures, and projects. Students use the scientific method to explore the chemical makeup of the macromolecules found in food and GUIDE FOR ACADEMICS AND STUDENT LIFE | 71


CO U R S E D E S C RI P T I ON S - SC I ENC E how the structure of the compound affects human biology. Practical and inquiry-based research is a major theme for the course, culminating in the presentation of a complete recipe through the complex chemical reactions and processes that are responsible for the creation of the food. Prerequisites: Biology and any year-long chemistry course

The Chemistry of Art (11,12) In this one-semester course, students experience the interaction between science, technology and art as they investigate chemical interactions involved in the creation, authentication, restoration, and conservation of works of art. By creating works of art, students practice techniques such as fresco, Egyptian paste, and metal etching. By conducting chemical experiments, students explore fireworks, paints and alloys. Class discussions and lectures connect chemical concepts with the students’ experiences in the lab and art room. After studying about forgery detection techniques and art restoration, students write a research paper to analyze the authenticity of an infamously debated work of art. Prerequisite: any year-long Chemistry or Physics course Environmental Science (11,12) This one-semester course is an introduction to the principles of ecology with an emphasis on the ecosystems of Florida. Students will learn about the biological, chemical, and physical features that make Florida unique. Students will examine how humans have impacted Florida’s environment and discuss many of the environmental issues that affect Florida’s ecosystems. Lectures will be supplemented with labs and field trips in which students will learn basic ecological sampling methods. Prerequisite: Biology Forensic Science (11,12) Forensic Science is the application of science to matters of law. This one-semester course is multidisciplinary and encompasses concepts in biology, chemistry, and physics. The history of forensic science as well as various techniques and procedures used in crime scene investigations will be examined. Topics covered will include: physical and chemical analysis of evidence, serology, bloodstain pattern analysis, fingerprint analysis, forensic entomology, hair and fiber analysis, and careers in forensic science. This course utilizes class discussion, lecture, laboratory investigations, and case study analysis. Prerequisites: Biology; and any year-long Chemistry or Physics course Introduction to Sports Medicine and Athletic Training (10-12) This one-semester course will provide students with an introduction to the care and prevention of athletic injuries and to the duties of an athletic 72 | GUIDE FOR ACADEMICS AND STUDENT LIFE

trainer. The course will emphasize anatomy as it relates to physical activity and sports, and will require some out-of-class assistance to the athletic trainer at home sports events. Students will be able to demonstrate knowledge of injury prevention, assessment and rehabilitation techniques. Some knowledge of anatomy is preferred but is not required. This course will earn students a 1/2 credit applicable toward satisfying the 1-1/2 credit physical education graduation requirement. Prerequisite: Biology

Emergency Medical Response (10-12) This semester-long course provides students with the knowledge and skills necessary to help sustain life, reduce pain, and minimize the consequences of injury or sudden illness during out-of-hospital medical and traumatic emergencies—while either awaiting or assisting higher-level personnel at the scene. Some of the core skills include: performing a primary assessment, CPR, using an AED, airway ventilation, medical and trauma emergencies, EMS operations, and pharmacological intervention. Prerequisite: Biology Marine Biology: Oceans and Life (11,12) This first semester course is a fast-paced introduction to marine biology. The start of the course focuses on the physical and chemical features of the oceans before progressing into the structural, functional and behavioral characteristics of marine flora and fauna. The course will include class discussion, an on-going project throughout the semester, a comprehensive paper, tests and lab work. Prerequisites: Biology; any year-long Chemistry or Physics course Marine Biology: Resources and Conservation (11,12) This second semester course is intended for students who wish to continue their studies of the oceans from Marine Biology: Oceans and Life or those who want to learn about resources the oceans provide, the influences humans have on the oceans and its inhabitants, and what is conservation, why is it important and how is it done. While the majority of the course is a global look, we will also explore the organisms and environments of Tampa Bay as well as the groups that affect or are affected by them. Aside from class discussions, the course will include an on-going project of hot topics, a field conservation project and a cumulative multimedia project. Recommended Prerequisite: Marine Biology: Oceans and Life Applications in Physics (11,12) In this hands-on semester course, students will explore the "real world" side of physics. They will apply physics concepts to practical problems and build on their understanding of the concepts and analytical techniques learned in physics. Practical applications may include airplane dynamics, structural design,


COURSE D ESC RI P T I ONS - SCIEN CE self-powered vehicles and roller coaster thrills. Students will complete independent research projects (including experimentation) on physics topics. Prerequisite: Either Physics year-long course

Introduction to Python Programming (9-12) This one-semester elective course is designed to teach students the basics of computer programming. Students will design and implement solutions to problems by writing, running and de-bugging computer programs, and use and implement commonly used algorithms and data structures to solve problems. iOS App Development and Student Help Desk (9-12) In this semester course students explore real-world applications of software/product development (such as design, scope and process), project management and product support. Students learn the intricacies of developing and programming apps for the iPad/ iPhone using the Objective-C programming language, XCode, and the rest of the iOS Software Development Kit. Concurrently, students provide the Tampa Prep community with iPad support in the form of a help desk located in the STEM classroom. During both class and regularly scheduled lunches, students answer iPad technical support requests from the Tampa Prep community. Additionally, students post blogs, and develop screencasts and other educational content for consumption by the Tampa Prep community. Class size is restricted to ten students per semester. Students may enroll for both semesters. Prerequisite: Instructor’s approval Web Design with HTML5 and CSS3 (9-12) This semester class teaches the basics of designing and creating attractive websites using modern technologies. Students will learn principles of graphic design including color theory, font choice and typography, and proper layout of design elements. Students will also learn the basics of HTML5 and CSS3 as they design and build their own website. Participants should expect a very hands-on class. This course can count as either a science credit or an art credit; as such, the focus will be more on design, layout and content than on abstract programming. Prerequisite: Algebra 1 App Development 1 (9-12) In this semester-long course, students develop apps for multiple platforms (VR, iOS, etc.) using the Unity Development environment. Students learn about Virtual Reality (VR) and Augmented Reality (AR), types of VR experiences, and how to effectively code 2-D and 3-D experiences. Students also familiarize themselves with the Unity environment by creating scenes and learning how to add components such as shapes, planes, materials, images and color. After

experimenting with a graphics program called Blender, and creating objects to import into Unity programs, the class progresses through gaze-based control and user interfaces. Students also learn how to implement and manage characters in physics and Unity, while rendering and working with 360-degree environments (panoramas, globes, etc.). All the while, students are able to experience their programs in VR.

App Development 2 (10-12) In this semester-long course, students learn to develop apps for multiple platforms using the Unity Development environment. Students also learn about Virtual Reality (VR), Augmented Reality (AR), types of VR experiences, and how to effectively code for 2D and 3D. Participants continue their exploration of the Unity environment by creating advanced scenes and learning how to add components such as video, and custom assets, in addition to experimenting with 360 degree video and creating custom objects to import into Unity programs. This course delves deeper into user experience, understanding, implementing and managing characters in Unity, physics, lighting, and working with 360 degree environments. Students are responsible for customized projects and must be highly motivated. Prerequisite: Successful completion of App Development 1 with a grade of B of higher. Applied Anatomy and Kinesiology (10-12) This semester course focuses on human anatomy— specifically the origin, insertion, and function of muscles. This information is applied to a deeper understanding of human movement. Students explore the vast connections that exist between muscle, fascia, nervous, motor control and movement systems. Lectures and discussions are supplemented with human movement labs. Students are assessed throughout the course on their ability to identify muscles and their functions, on their understanding of regional interdependence of body systems, on their use of screening techniques that evaluate movement, and by applying movement screen outcomes to training along with a final case study project. Prerequisite: Biology Applied Physiology and Neurology (10-12) This one-semester course focuses on human anatomy and physiology, as applied to a deeper understanding of both human movement and how learning occurs in the brain, in physiology, and in the physical body. Students explore the autonomic nervous system and its integration with the living, moving body. Students develop an understanding of the regional interdependence of internal systems, use screening techniques to evaluate physiology adaptations, and apply screens to determine best outcomes. Prerequisite: Applied Anatomy & Kinesiology

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CO U R S E D E S C RI P T I ON S - WORL D A ND C L A SSI C A L L A NG UAGES Human Medical Disorders (11,12) The purpose of this semester course is to promote the understanding of medical disorders. Students will acquire a basic knowledge of common diseases including the causes, signs, symptoms and modes of treatment. Class lectures and discussions will be supplemented with case studies and student projects. Prerequisites: Biology and Chemistry or Physics Bioethics (11,12) This one-semester course explores ethical questions related to the life sciences. In a scientific world that is continuously changing, it is important for individuals to establish parameters, points of view, and personal decisions. With the advent of new technologies and the discovery of new procedures in the fields of science and medicine, it is imperative that students acquire not only a general understanding of these topics, but also a clear opinion of them. The course includes reading assignments, clinical cases, and activities such as group discussions and role-playing. Prerequisites: Biology and Chemistry Public Health (10-12) Tampa Prep has partnered with the Global Public Service Academies–a nonprofit organization administered by Duke University and Johns Hopkins University medical professors–to offer a hybrid classroom and international trip course on public health. The classroom component of this course explores the differences between public health availability in Tampa, Florida, Xela, Guatemala, and other parts of the world, in addition to covering health concerns faced by some rural Guatemalans. Students are also trained on how to conduct basic medical screenings. This class is only offered over the summer. The weeklong, early summer classroom program is immediately followed in June by a two-week trip with Tampa Prep science faculty to rural Guatemala, where students work alongside medical students in health care clinics while living with local families. With the successful completion of this course, students are awarded 0.5 science credits; however, these credits may not be applied to the three science credits required for graduation. The course is graded in a pass/fail format. The cost of this course is not covered by Tampa Prep’s tuition. Prerequisite: Successful completion of Biology

WORLD AND CLASSICAL LANGUAGES 

Students who earn lower than a B in the first semester of language study and lower than a C in the second semester are at risk of decreasing success if they move on to the next level. As such, all at-risk students, but most especially those in level 1, are strongly encouraged to follow teacher recommendations regarding retaking the course prior to moving ahead.

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Prima Lingua (6) Prima Lingua is a course designed for students who are about to begin their first year of foreign language study. Prima Lingua familiarizes students with key grammatical concepts that English shares with other languages, and introduces grammatical elements that are not present in English but that students will encounter when they begin foreign language study. Prima Lingua also gives students an understanding of linguistic terms, a strong foundation in derivatives across many languages, an appreciation of the cultural aspect of language, and knowledge of the historical development of language groups, particularly French, Latin, German, Greek, and English. French 1A (7) This course is designed to introduce students to the Francophone world. Students will study basic French structures and explore cultural themes. A major emphasis is placed on developing listening, reading, writing and speaking skills. Students will take the AAPPL (The ACTFL Assessment of Performance toward Proficiency in Languages) in French in the spring and each student will receive a comprehensive report explaining his/her proficiency level. This is not an exploratory course, but the first half of level one French. It is intended to prepare the students for continuing on to French 1B in the eighth grade. Students who take French 1A in the seventh grade are expected to take French 1B in the eighth grade. French 1B (8) This course is a continuation of French 1A. This is not an exploratory course but the second half of level one French. Students will review content learned in French 1A. Advanced grammar concepts will be presented and cultural themes relating to the Francophone world will be explored. There will be a continued emphasis on listening, reading, writing and speaking skills. Students will take the AAPPL (The ACTFL Assessment of Performance toward Proficiency in Languages) in French in the spring and each student will receive a comprehensive report explaining his/her proficiency level. It is the recommendation of the department that a student with a grade below B- at the end of this course repeat French 1 in the ninth grade. French 1 (9) French 1 develops the linguistic skills of reading, writing, speaking, and listening via task-oriented thematic units. Students learn the present and passé composé tenses while developing a strong vocabulary through activities and assessments that focus on interpersonal, interpretive, and presentational proficiency. French 1 students take Le Grand Concours Level 1 examination in the spring. It is the recommendation of the department that a student with a grade below B- at the end of this course repeat French 1. French 2 (9,10) French 2 continues to develop the linguistic skills of reading, writing, speaking, and listening via task-oriented thematic units. Culture and vocabulary are integrated


CO U R S E D E S C RI P T I ON S - WORL D A ND C L A SSI C A L L A NGUAGES to reflect the daily lives of Francophone speakers in the world. Students will demonstrate interpersonal, interpretive, and presentational proficiency of present, imperative, and past (passé composé and imparfait) tenses. French 2 students will take the Level 2 Le Grand Concours examination in the spring.

French 3 (10,11) This course builds on the foundation of French 2 while introducing increasingly advanced vocabulary and grammar structures. Students will use authentic source materials to develop their level of French proficiency in three different ways: interpersonal, interpretive, and presentational. This is an immersion course in which students are expected to speak French with the teacher and their peers. Students will explore examples of contemporary Francophone culture and language through literature excerpts, newspapers, movies, videos, and web resources. French 3 students will take the Level 3 Le Grand Concours examination in the spring. French 4 (11,12) The focus of the course will be on developing students’ capacities to use the French language in both oral and written expression, and to appreciate Francophone culture, its history and its influence in the world. This course is designed to build the proficiency of intermediate to advanced learners of French. It is a good resource for students who have taken French for three years and would like to continue learning the language. However, this is a course that would also be suitable for students who have already taken the AP French-Language course. Students will take the level 4 Le Grand Concours examination in the spring. Prerequisite: French 3 AP French Language (11,12) This course prepares students to take the Advanced Placement French Language and Culture Exam. This course for students in their fourth year of study in French focuses on refining speaking, writing, reading and listening skills at an advanced level. Students will have the opportunity to develop their level of French proficiency in three different ways: interpersonal, interpretive, and presentational. The course is one of total immersion in French. Students will take the Level 4 Le Grand Concours examination and the Advanced Placement French Language and Culture Exam in the spring. Prerequisite: instructor’s approval Les Études Francophones (10-12) This semester, French immersion course will provide students the opportunity to explore and research French-speaking countries. Students will study the history of Francophone countries in order to understand current event topics that relate to these countries. Students will participate in and lead group discussions, present research topics that apply to current trends and issues in the French-speaking world, and explore the cultural importance of French in a global society. Prerequisite: AP French Language and Culture

Advanced French Conversation Through Film (10-12) This French language immersion semester course will be organized around common themes of interest to adolescents and focuses on developing listening and speaking skills in French. Well-known Francophone films are presented for vocabulary development, conversational activities, and class discussions. Students will also develop critical viewing skills in order to appreciate the Francophone culture and customs. Assessment will focus on students’ listening and speaking skills in French. Students will continue to review the main structures of French through writing and reading activities. Prerequisite: AP French Language and Culture Latin 1A (7) This course introduces the student to Latin and to Roman culture and customs, providing some of the fundamentals of grammar and forms while enabling the student to read simple stories. The approach is inductive, plunging the student immediately into the reading of Latin paragraphs and then gradually explaining the grammar and syntax. Creative projects help students immerse themselves in Roman culture, and students participate in the regional Latin Forum, which consists of written, oral, artistic, and athletic contests. Latin 1B (8) This course completes the foundation in Latin. Students read increasingly longer and more difficult passages that introduce new grammar and syntax. The study of Roman culture, history, customs, mythology and literature is expanded through stories set in Rome's golden age. Creative projects help students immerse themselves in Roman culture. Students also participate in the regional Latin Forum, which consists of written, oral, artistic and athletic contests. Latin 1 (9) This course focuses on the elements of Latin language: vocabulary, forms, and syntax. Through a variety of student activities and frequent quizzes, the course places particular emphasis on sentence structure and the relationship between English and Latin, both in syntax and vocabulary. Latin 2 (9,10) After intensive review, Latin 2 builds on Latin 1’s fundamentals by adding more advanced grammar and composition. The goals of the course are to master the essential components of the literary language, to expand the understanding of English, and to advance the student’s ability to translate. By the end of the course, students read extended passages in Latin, especially from Caesar’s Gallic War. Latin 3 (10,11) Latin 3 focuses on extensive translation and comprehension using a variety of techniques. Grammar is reviewed both through formal exercises GUIDE FOR ACADEMICS AND STUDENT LIFE | 75


CO U R S E D E S C RI P T I ON S - WORL D A ND C L A SSI C A L L A NG UAGES and in context. By concentrating on Pliny’s Letters, students begin to consider the society of the Romans and many surprisingly modern concerns. When study of Ovid’s Metamorphoses begins in the last quarter, the techniques of Roman poetry are introduced, preparing students for the Advanced Placement level.

AP Latin (11,12) This course focuses on selections from Julius Caesar's Gallic Wars and Vergil's Aeneid in Latin and in English, emphasizing themes of globalization and leadership. The study of the Latin language in vocabulary, grammar, reading proficiency, translation, rhetorical appreciation, and, in the Vergil, metrical analysis is continued and reinforced. Students are also expected to develop an analytical approach to the literature as a whole through frequent essay writing. The course covers the College Board's syllabus for the Advanced Placement examination in Latin. Other authors may be included either as sight translation exercises or as time permits. Prerequisite: instructor's approval Advanced Readings in Latin Literature (12) This year-long, half-credit course is intended as a bridge year for students who have completed AP Latin at the end of their junior year. It meets twice weekly. The curriculum will be drawn from the extant Latin Literature based on student interest and will focus on translation and discussion at the higher level as literature and as a lens on Romanitas and humanity. Prerequisite: instructor's approval Spanish 1A (7) This course is designed to introduce students to the Hispanic world. Students will study basic Spanish structures and explore cultural themes. A major emphasis is placed on developing listening, reading, writing and speaking skills. This is not an exploratory course, but the first half of level one Spanish. Students will take the AAPPL (The ACTFL Assessment of Performance toward Proficiency in Languages) in Spanish in the spring and each student will receive a comprehensive report explaining his/her proficiency level. It is intended to prepare the students for continuing on to Spanish 1B in the eighth grade. Students who take Spanish 1A in the seventh grade are expected to take Spanish 1B in the eighth grade. Should a student have a grade below a B-, it will be recommended that the student repeat Spanish 1A in the following year and take the second semester of Spanish 1 during the summer in order to continue on to Spanish 2. Spanish 1B (8) This course is a continuation of Spanish 1A. This is not an exploratory course but the second half of level one Spanish. Students will review content learned in Spanish 1A. Advanced grammar concepts will be presented and cultural themes relating to the Hispanic world will be explored. There will be a continued emphasis 76 | GUIDE FOR ACADEMICS AND STUDENT LIFE

on listening, reading, writing and speaking skills. Students will take the AAPPL (The ACTFL Assessment of Performance toward Proficiency in Languages) in Spanish in the spring and each student will receive a comprehensive report explaining his/her proficiency level. It is the recommendation of the department that a student with a grade below B- at the end of this course repeat Spanish 1 in the ninth grade.

Spanish 1 (9,10) Spanish 1 develops the linguistic skills of reading, writing, speaking, and listening via task-oriented thematic units. Students learn the present tense and begin to experience the preterite (past) tense while developing a strong vocabulary through activities and assessments that focus on interpersonal, interpretive, and presentational proficiency. Students will take the AAPPL (The ACTFL Assessment of Performance toward Proficiency in Languages) in Spanish in the spring and each student will receive a comprehensive report explaining his/her proficiency level. It is the recommendation of the department that a student with a grade below B- at the end of this course repeat Spanish 1. Spanish 2 (9-11) Spanish 2 continues to develop the linguistic skills of reading, writing, speaking, and listening via task-oriented thematic units. Culture and vocabulary are integrated to reflect the daily lives of Spanish speakers throughout the world. Students will demonstrate interpersonal, interpretive, and presentational proficiency of present, and past (preterite and imperfect) tenses. Students will take the AAPPL (The ACTFL Assessment of Performance toward Proficiency in Languages) in Spanish in the spring and each student will receive a comprehensive report explaining his/her proficiency level. Spanish 3 (10-12) This course builds on the foundation of Spanish 2 while introducing increasingly advanced vocabulary and grammar structures. Students will use authentic source materials to develop their level of Spanish proficiency in three different ways: interpersonal, interpretive, and presentational. This is an immersion course in which students are expected to speak Spanish. Students will explore examples of contemporary Hispanic culture and language through literature excerpts, newspapers, movies, videos, and web resources. Students will take the AAPPL (The ACTFL Assessment of Performance toward Proficiency in Languages) in Spanish in the spring and each student will receive a comprehensive report explaining his/her proficiency level. Spanish 4 (10-12) This year-long, Pre-AP level class will focus strongly on developing the vocabulary necessary to be successful


CO U R S E D E S C RI P T I ON S - WORL D A ND C L A SSI C A L L A NGUAGES in an AP Spanish course. This class is typically the continuation of study for students who plan to take the AP course and exam the following year, and will continue to develop proficiency in interpersonal, interpretive and presentational skills. This is an immersion course in which students are expected to speak Spanish with the teacher and their peers. Students who have excelled in Spanish 2 may proceed directly to this class with the recommendation of the current teacher and the second semester of Spanish 3 in summer school. Students will take the AAPPL (The ACTFL Assessment of Performance toward Proficiency in Languages) in Spanish in the spring and each student will receive a comprehensive report explaining his/her proficiency level. Prerequisites: Students in Spanish 2 and Spanish 3 who wish to enroll in Spanish 4 must be recommended by their current instructors.

Spanish Language and Culture (10-12) This course is designed for students who wish to continue their studies of Spanish, but who do not wish to take the AP level class. Students are encouraged to speak Spanish to the teacher and to their peers. In this class, students will be exposed to authentic resources from a variety of different topics and media. Highlights include writing an article in Spanish for the student newspaper, participating in an informational scavenger hunt in Ybor City, and spending 4-5 hours in a mini-Spanish internship in the spring. Students will also take the AAPPL (The ACTFL Assessment of Performance toward Proficiency in Languages) in Spanish in the spring and each student will receive a comprehensive report explaining his/her proficiency level. Students who wish to enroll in this course must have a recommendation from their current instructor.

analyzing how a given theme or topic is treated in one work, or comparing such a treatment in two works from the list. Other sections of the exam will require students to be able to identify literary techniques and to make inferences about different passages presented. Because the study of literature at the college level implies going beyond the literal meaning of literary works, they will learn to make appropriate inferences while analyzing the works. Although being able to discuss the works on the list is one of the course objectives, another goal of the AP Spanish Literature course, as with introductory-level literature classes in colleges and universities, is to prepare students to approach works of literature in the future, in subsequent courses and on their own. Prerequisites: instructor's approval

Estudios Latinoamericanos (11,12) This one-semester Spanish immersion course will provide an overview of Latin America, including its history from the pre-Colombian era to the present. Latin America’s past and present can be understood as a series of struggles or “culture wars” along a set of fault lines that center around the concepts of race, class, culture, development, and social justice. Course objectives include an understanding of the causes behind these struggles and how they have shaped modern Latin America. By studying Latin America’s history, students will frequently draw parallels to the present in order to understand how a particular issue continues to find relevance in contemporary times. This course will be taught in English for one semester, and in Spanish (as Estudios Latinoamericanos) for one semester. Prerequisites: Spanish 3, Spanish 4 or AP Spanish and instructor’s approval

AP Spanish Language (10-12) This course prepares students to take the Advanced Placement Spanish Language and Culture Exam. This course for students in their fourth year of study in Spanish focuses on refining speaking, writing, reading and listening skills at an advanced level. Students will have the opportunity to develop their level of Spanish proficiency in three different ways: interpersonal, interpretive, and presentational. The course is one of total immersion in Spanish. Students will take the AAPPL Diagnostic examination and the Advanced Placement Spanish Language and Culture Exam in the spring. Prerequisite: instructor’s approval AP Spanish Literature (10-12) In the AP Spanish Literature classroom, students will read from a broad spectrum of works written in various times and places and representing different literary genres. By the time that students are ready to take the AP Exam, they will have acquired an in-depth familiarity with all of the works on the list, and they will also have command of a variety of skills. Students will be expected to write analytical essays which may involve GUIDE FOR ACADEMICS AND STUDENT LIFE | 77


AP PE NDIX

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A PPEN DIX This form can also be found via the Student Resources link in MyBackpack.

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AP PE NDIX

MIDDLE SCHOOL THREE-YEAR PLAN SHEET Sixth graders take a set curriculum consisting of six classes (English, Prima Lingua, history, mathematics, science, and an elective) plus sports or PE. Seventh and eighth graders take a set curriculum consisting of six classes (English, foreign language, history, mathematics, science and an elective) plus sports or PE. Those students who have shown the proficiency to accelerate in mathematics and foreign language will be afforded the opportunity to accelerate on a case by case basis.

SUBJECT

GRADE 6

ENGLISH English 6 English 7 English 8

MATHEMATICS Mathematics Pre-Algebra Algebra Concepts Algebra 1

SCIENCE Earth Life Physical

HISTORY Geography Civics US Survey

WORLD AND CLASSICAL LANGUAGES

Prima Lingua French 1A, 1B Latin 1A, 1B Spanish 1A, 1B

ARTS

Art, Band, Chorus, Dance, Theatre, Robotics, Video Production

SPORTS & PHYSICAL EDUCATION

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GRADE 7

GRADE 8


A PPEN DIX

UPPER SCHOOL FOUR-YEAR PLAN SHEET Ninth graders typically have six classes, including PE. In grades 10, 11, and 12, the minimum course load is 5 nonPE classes; many students take 5 1/2 or 6 courses. List all courses you already have received credit for and those you likely will receive credit for this spring. In pencil, fill in the courses you plan to take during your remaining year(s) at Tampa Prep. Be sure your Plan fulfills the School’s graduation requirements, and consider the impact your courses will have on your applications to colleges. Discuss your Plan with your parents/guardians and your advisor before signing up for classes.

SUBJECT / CREDITS

GRADE 9

GRADE 10

GRADE 11

GRADE 12

ENGLISH 4 English 9-11; English 12 or AP English

MATHEMATICS

4

Through Precalculus, Advanced Precalculus, or Statistics and Probability

SCIENCE 3 Biology, year-long Chemistry or Physics, one other Science credit, or Public Health

HISTORY 3 One semester of Big History, full year of World History, full year of U.S. History, one semester of Civics (in grades 11 or 12)

WORLD & CLASSICAL LANGUAGES 3 Levels 1-3 of French,Spanish, or Latin

ARTS PHYSICAL EDUCATION

2 1.5

Phys. Ed. (grade 9 or 10), & other semester Phys. Ed. course

OTHER

2

Freshman Transitions (.5) Student’s Choice (1.5)

TOTAL CREDITS REQUIRED 22.5

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Algebra 1

Upper School

Math 6

Middle School

Geometry

Pre-Algebra

Advanced Algebra 2

Honors Algebra 2

Advanced Pre-Calculus

Honors Pre-Calculus

Algebra 1

Algebra Concepts

AP Calculus AB

AP Statistcs

Calculus

Statistics & Probability

Algebra 3

AP Calculus BC

Tampa Preparatory School Mathematics Course Flow Chart

Advanced Calculus with Vector Analysis

AP PE NDIX


Science Electives (see list below)

AP Environmental Science (Chem or Adv Chem)

AP Biology (Chem or Adv Chem)

AP Chemistry (Adv Chem; PreCal concurrent)

AP Physics 1 (Adv PreCal concurrent) AP Physics 2 (Adv Phys or AP Phys 1; Advanced PreCal concurrent) AP Physics C (Calculus concurrent)

AP Physics 1 (Advanced PreCal concurrent) AP Physics 2 (Adv Phys or AP Phys 1; Advanced PreCal concurrent) AP Physics C (Calculus concurrent)

AP Physics 1 (Advanced PreCal concurrent)

Honors Physics (Algebra 2 concurrent) Advanced Physics (PreCal concurrent)

Honors Physics (Algebra 2 concurrent) Advanced Physics (PreCal concurrent)

Honors Physics (Algebra 2 concurrent) Advanced Physics (PreCal concurrent)

Science Electives (see list below)

AP Environmental Science (Chem or Adv Chem)

AP Biology (Chem or Adv Chem)

AP Chemistry (Adv Chem; PreCal concurrent)

Honors Chemistry Advanced Chemistry (Algebra 2 concurrent)

Honors Chemistry Advanced Chemistry (Algebra 2 concurrent)

Honors Chemistry Advanced Chemistry (Algebra 2 concurrent)

12th grade

11th grade

10th grade

Science Electives (one semester--offerings and topics are subject to change) Forensic Science App Development 1 and 2 Human Medical Disorders Applied Anatomy and Kinesiology Applied Physiology and Neurology Introduction to Engineering Design (full year) Bioethics Marine Biology: Oceans and Life Chemistry of Art Marine Biology: Resources and Conservation Computer Programming Organic Chemistry Sports Medicine Computer Science Principles (full year) Web Design with HTML5 and CSS3 Emergency Medical Response Food Chemistry

9th grade Honors Biology

Prerequisites are listed following a course in parenthesis.

SCIENCE OPTIONS

A PPEN DIX

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MIDDLE SCHOOL LANGUAGE

UPPER SCHOOL SPANISH

Spanish 1

6th Grade Prima Lingua

I

/

7th Grade Latin 1A 8th Grade Latin 1B

8th Grade French 1B

7th Grade French 1A

Spanish 3

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Spanish 2

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8th Grade Spanish 1B

7th Grade Spanish 1A

Spanish Language & Culture

STOP

Spanish 4 (Pre AP)

Upper School Level 2

AP Spanish Language

AP Spanish Literature

AP PE NDIX


A PPEN DIX

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NOT ES

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