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2020

REGIONAL EQUITY REPORT

THE 2020 REGIONAL EQUITY REPORT IS PRODUCED BY THE TAMPA BAY PARTNERSHIP FOUNDATION, IN COLLABORATION WITH THE COMMUNITY FOUNDATION OF TAMPA BAY AND UNITED WAY SUNCOAST, AND IS AFFILIATED WITH THE STATE OF THE REGION INITIATIVE. WWW.STATEOFTHEREGION.COM


This Page Intentionally Left Blank


ABOUT THE REPORT

2

INFRASTRUCTURE

54

Introduction

2

Digital Access & The Digital Divide

54

Executive Summary 

3

Black-White Gap: Digital Access & The Digital Divide

55

Indicator Summary 

4

Comparative Digital Access by Race/Ethnicity

56

User Guide 

6

Regional Digital Access by Race/Ethnicity

57

Transportation To Work

58

Black-White Gap: Transportation to Work

59

Comparative Transportation to Work by Race/Ethnicity

60

Regional Transportation to Work by Race/Ethnicity

61

DEMOGRAPHICS

10

Diversity

10

Comparative Diversity

11

Regional Diversity

12

ECONOMIC VITALITY

14

Wages

14

Black-White Gap: Wages

15

Comparative Rate by Race/Ethnicity

16

Regional Wages by Race/Ethnicity

17

Wages & Educational Attainment

18

Wages & Educational Attainment

19

TALENT

22

Dropout Rate

22

Black-White Gap: Dropout Rate

23

Comparative Dropout Rate by Race/Ethnicity

24

Regional Dropout Rate by Race/Ethnicity

25

Youth Disconnection

26

Black-White Gap: Youth Disconnection

27

Comparative Youth Disconnection by Race/Ethnicity

28

Regional Youth Disconnection by Race/Ethnicity

29

Educational Attainment

30

Black-White Gap: Educational Attainment

31

Comparative Educational Attainment by Race/Ethnicity

32

Regional Educational Attainment by Race/Ethnicity

33

Labor Force Participation

34

Black-White Gap: Labor Force Participation

35

Comparative Labor Force Participation by Race/Ethnicity

36

Regional Labor Force Participation by Race/Ethnicity

37

Florida Talent Indicators

39

English Language Arts, Florida Standards Assessment

40

Math, Florida Standards Assessment

42

Science, Florida Standards Assessment

44

Algebra 1 End Of Course Exam

46

Biology 1 End of Course Exam

48

High School Graduation Rate

50

CIVIC QUALITY

CONTENTS

CONTENTS

62

Home Ownership

62

Black-White Gap: Home Ownership

63

Comparative Home Ownership by Race/Ethnicity

64

Regional Home Ownership by Race/Ethnicity

65

Health Insurance Coverage

66

Black-White Gap: Health Insurance Coverage

67

Comparative Health Insurance Coverage by Race/Ethnicity 68 Regional Health Insurance Coverage by Race/Ethnicity

OUTCOMES

69

70

Working Poor

70

Black-White Gap: Working Poor

71

Comparative Working Poor by Race/Ethnicity

72

Regional Working Poor by Race/Ethnicity

73

Poverty

74

Black-White Gap: Poverty

75

Comparative Poverty by Race/Ethnicity

76

Regional Poverty by Race/Ethnicity

77

Child Poverty

78

Black-White Gap: Child Poverty

79

Comparative Child Poverty by Race/Ethnicity

80

Regional Child Poverty by Race/Ethnicity

81

Unemployment

82

Black-White Gap: Unemployment

83

Comparative Unemployment by Race/Ethnicity

84

Regional Unemployment by Race/Ethnicity

85

High School Graduation Rate – Economically Disadvantaged 52

www.stateoftheregion.com

1


ABOUT THE REPORT

INTRODUCTION As we learned from the 2020 REGIONAL COMPETITIVENESS REPORT, Tampa Bay enjoyed a period of unprecedented economic prosperity prior to the COVID-19 crisis. However, the report also revealed that not everyone was able to share in this prosperity and access the opportunities that it created. In recent months, the global pandemic sent shock waves through our region, exposing the vulnerabilities of our population and inequities in our economy. How our residents have weathered this unprecedented crisis correlates strongly with the neighborhood they live in and the color of their skin. Now, more than ever, it is important for us to make a deliberate and coordinated effort to rebuild and reposition our region for future growth that is more inclusive—growth that creates more and better economic opportunities that can be accessed by everyone. Inequity restrains regions as a whole, inhibiting competitiveness with communities that better utilize their full human capacity. The first step is understanding where the gaps exist. The purpose of the 2020 REGIONAL EQUITY REPORT is to examine a set of indicators related to economic opportunity and assess performance and outcomes by race and ethnic groups. This provides us with context for identifying where our weaknesses lie. The report that follows carries over the 19-market peer group from the 2020 REGIONAL COMPETITIVENESS REPORT, as well as the key drivers identified within its framework for prosperity. This Regional Equity Report dives deeper into the indicators to examine the Black-White gap and outcomes relative to peers, regional counties, and race/ethnicity. This analysis will provide necessary insights to help public, private, and nonprofit leaders better understand racial disparities in Tampa Bay and set goals to diminish and, eventually, eliminate them. It’s our hope that, using this information, we can take tangible steps toward creating a more inclusive community—one where every person has equitable access to opportunity and prosperity, regardless of what they look like or where they live. Sincerely,

Rick Homans President and CEO Tampa Bay Partnership 2

2020 REGIONAL EQUITY REPORT

Marlene Spalten President and CEO Community Foundation of Tampa Bay

Jessica Muroff President and CEO United Way Suncoast


The 2020 REGIONAL EQUITY REPORT examines a set of 21 indicators related to economic vitality, talent, infrastructure, civic quality, and outcomes. It measures the gap between the Black population and the White, Non-Hispanic population to highlight the disparity between the two. It looks at the performance of Tampa Bay in six different racial and ethnic categories among a group of 19 other peers across the US, and it also documents differences in performance by race and ethnicity across the eight-county Tampa Bay region. The disparity and differences are stark, not just for the Black population but also for Hispanics and other people of color. People of color in the Tampa Bay region do not appear to be able to access the same opportunities as the White, Non-Hispanic population, and this situation is relatively worse in Tampa Bay than it is in the other peer metros. The economic outcomes for people of color show that they are more likely to be part of the working poor, living in poverty, or unemployed.

ABOUT THE REPORT

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

Furthermore, the indicators related to youth preparedness—the dropout rate, the rate of youth disconnection, and in-school performance—foreshadow that the situation is not likely to improve without intervention. We must seize this opportunity to intentionally reignite our economy in ways that build bridges and scaffolding to lift up our most vulnerable residents.

KEY FINDINGS Median wages for Black workers ($16.42) in Tampa Bay are 21% less than White workers ($20.90), but this gap is the smallest of the 20 competitive markets. Important to note that median wages earned in Tampa Bay – across all races -rank in the bottom quintile among the comparison markets. Among Tampa Bay’s White residents, 30.3% have a bachelor’s degree or higher, compared to 20% of Black residents. The 10.3% gap is the second lowest gap amongst the 20 competitive markets. Educational attainment has been shown to have a strong positive influence on lifetime earnings potential. Tampa Bay’s Black workers earn roughly 20% less than their White counterparts – no matter what education level they attain: • Less than High School: -20.0% difference • High School Diploma: -19.0% difference • Some College: -18.2% difference • Bachelor’s Degree or Higher: -20.2% difference Black students in Tampa Bay are performing markedly below their White peers based on data from Florida schools: • 3rd Grade English Florida Standards Assessment: -32.5% difference • 3rd/8th Grade Math Florida Standards Assessment: -31.9% difference • 5th/8th Grade Science Florida Standards Assessment: -33.7% difference • Algebra I End of Course Exam: -31.0% difference • Biology I End of Course Exam: -34.4% difference • High School Graduation Rate: -9.6% difference Black and Hispanic residents of Tampa Bay are less likely to have a computer and broadband Internet, technology critical to success in education and work. Tampa Bay’s 13.8% gap between White (85.1%) and Black (71.3%) digital access ranks 18th among the 20 competitive markets. Across the region, Blacks, Hispanics, and individuals that fall into the “Other” category are much less likely to own their own home, compared to White residents. Tampa Bay’s 32.5% gap between White (73.3%) and Black (40.8%) home ownership rates ranks 15th among the 20 competitive markets. This gap not only affects housing stability for these families, it also affects the accumulation of wealth from one generation to the next. Black residents of Tampa Bay are more than two times as likely to be living in poverty compared to Whites. Tampa Bay’s 13.7% gap between White (10.6%) and Black (24.3%) poverty rates ranks 16th among the 20 competitive markets. Black children in Tampa Bay are almost three times as likely to be living in poverty, compared to Whites. Tampa Bay’s 22% gap between White (13%) and Black (35%) child poverty rates ranks 14th among the 20 competitive markets.

www.stateoftheregion.com

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The table below summarizes how Tampa Bay ranks among its peers for the measure of disparity for each indicator: the Black-White gap. The Black-White Gap in Tampa Bay, relative to the peer group, is quite low for median hourly wages, educational attainment, labor force participation, and transportation to work. The gap is highest in Tampa Bay, relative to the peer group for digital access, poverty, child poverty, and home ownership. BEST

DROPOUT RATE

YOUTH DISCONNECTION

EDUCATIONAL ATTAINMENT

LABOR FORCE PARTICIPATION

DIGITAL ACCESS

TRANSPORTATION TO WORK

HOME OWNERSHIP

HEALTH INSURANCE COVERAGE

WORKING POOR

POVERTY

CHILD POVERY

UNEMPLOYMENT

Rank 1-4

WAGES

ABOUT THE REPORT

INDICATOR SUMMARY

Tampa Bay Bay ï‚„ Tampa

1

8

12

2

1

18

5

15

9

11

16

14

9

Atlanta

8

4

11

7

6

3

10

6

15

6

3

5

12

Austin

20

9

2

19

17

15

6

1

8

5

6

11

2

Baltimore

15

19

20

13

20

10

20

11

5

1

10

10

13

Charlotte

10

6

13

5

4

7

2

12

12

2

4

3

14

Dallas-Ft. Worth

9

5

10

10

10

17

3

14

17

13

11

7

4

Denver

7

10

4

20

18

11

16

13

7

17

12

12

3

Houston

18

2

3

11

11

13

4

9

18

9

9

9

11

Jacksonville

5

17

16

9

13

16

8

5

1

19

15

15

15

Mpls-St. Paul

16

18

14

15

16

9

18

20

14

20

20

20

18

Nashville

3

7

9

1

12

14

7

8

6

18

14

17

5

Orlando

14

12

8

8

5

6

12

2

13

10

7

4

7

Phoenix

4

13

17

3

3

4

11

19

4

16

8

2

10

Portland

6

14

5

6

14

5

19

17

3

3

18

16

16

Raleigh-Durham

13

15

7

16

15

12

1

4

16

12

2

6

8

San Antonio

2

1

1

4

8

8

9

3

10

7

1

1

1

San Diego

17

3

18

17

7

1

14

10

2

4

5

8

19

Seattle

11

11

6

14

9

2

15

16

11

8

17

18

6

South Florida

19

16

15

18

2

19

13

7

20

14

13

13

17

St. Louis

12

20

19

12

19

20

17

18

19

15

19

19

20

Rank 5-8 Rank 9-12 Rank 13-16

WORST

Rank 17-20

4

2020 REGIONAL EQUITY REPORT


ABOUT THE REPORT www.stateoftheregion.com

5


ABOUT THE REPORT

USER GUIDE THE 2020 REGIONAL EQUITY REPORT, and the data found within, are meant to be a community tool to help identify racial and ethnic disparities in economic opportunity and prosperity. By identifying these gaps and building a common understanding of the issues, we can work together to address some of these challenges. Knowing how to read and analyze the information presented within the pages of this report is key to making it a more useful and relevant tool for everyday use. Here’s what you’ll find inside:

INDICATOR CATEGORY

INDICATOR NAME

WHAT: A description of each indicator, including what it represents and how it is calculated. WHY: Why the indicator was selected, including a description of the indicator’s relationship with economic outcomes, opportunity, and prosperity.

OF NOTE: Key findings or relevant points related to the indicator.

6

2020 REGIONAL EQUITY REPORT


ABOUT THE REPORT

INDICATOR DESCRIPTION DISPARITY MEASURE: The difference between the indicator value for Blacks and White, Non-Hispanics.

TAMPA BAY: Appears in red for easier reference. UNITED STATES DATA: Where available, US data appears in gray to illustrate how Tampa Bay compares to national performance.

SOURCE: Provides attribution and a timestamp for the indicator data. NOTES: A description of the universe used for the indicator and any other relevant information needed for interpreting the indicator.

www.stateoftheregion.com

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ABOUT THE REPORT

RACE/ETHNICITY: Indicates the category of race or ethnicity.

COLOR: A unique color is assigned to the four communities within each quintile, with the darkest color representing the best performance and the lightest color representing the worst.

ABOUT RACE/ETHNICITY IN THIS REPORT: For this report, the racial composition of the population is measured by the share of the population that falls into one of the following categories: ▬ White, Non-Hispanic ▬ Black Alone (includes those who identify as Hispanic) ▬ Asian Alone (includes those who identify as Hispanic) ▬ Other (includes those who identify as White Hispanic, American Indian and Alaska Native, Native Hawaiian and other Pacific Islander, some other race, or two or more races) The ethnic composition of a population for this report is measured by the share of the population that identifies as Hispanic or Latino. For the purposes of this report, “White” refers to “White, Non-Hispanic” and individuals that are classified in the Black, Other, or Hispanic categories are referred to as “people of color” throughout the report.

8

2020 REGIONAL EQUITY REPORT


ABOUT THE REPORT

REGIONAL INDICATOR: A breakdown of the indicator by race and ethnicity for the population in the Tampa Bay region.

COLOR: A unique color is assigned to each county in the Tampa Bay Region.

REGIONAL COMPARISON: A breakdown of the indicator by race and ethnicity for the each of the counties in the Tampa Bay region.

Disclaimer: The Tampa Bay Partnership has, to the best of its ability, compiled the information contained within and used to produce this publication. The data is believed to be the latest available at the time of production, accurate, and from reliable sources. The Tampa Bay Partnership welcomes constructive criticism and corrections of the errors that may appear in a project of this complexity. For more information on the methodology for this report, please contact Dave Sobush at dsobush@tampabay.org. www.stateoftheregion.com

9


DEMOGRAPHICS

DIVERSITY The demographic breakdown in this section serves as a baseline for understanding the racial and ethnic profile of the populations of the peer metro areas and the Tampa Bay region. The Non-White or Hispanic population in Tampa Bay accounts for 34 percent of the population, which makes Tampa Bay more racially diverse than only four of its peers. The Hispanic population in Tampa Bay accounts for 18 percent of the population, which makes it more ethnically diverse, than 10 of its peers. In addition to the race and ethnicity of the population, the nativity of each race and ethnic category is shown, which indicates the share of each population that is US-born or foreign-born. The nativity of the population in each of the categories can influence the indicators and outcomes presented in this report. In Tampa Bay, the Asian population has the largest share of foreign-born followed by the Hispanic and Other categories.

By Race

By Hispanic or Latino

White, Non-Hispanic Tampa Bay Bay  Tampa

66.2%

Atlanta

47.6%

Austin

52.4%

Baltimore

57.0%

Charlotte

61.6%

Dallas-Ft. Worth

46.9%

Denver

64.3%

Houston

36.6%

Jacksonville

63.4%

Mpls-St. Paul

76.1%

Nashville

72.6%

Orlando

47.6%

Phoenix

55.8%

Portland

73.7%

Raleigh-Durham

59.5%

San Antonio

33.9%

San Diego

45.9%

Seattle

64.0%

South Florida

30.9%

St. Louis

73.9%

UnitedStates States United

61.1%

Black

Asian

Other

Non-Hispanic

19.7%

17.8%

82.2%

12.7%

10.6%

89.4%

34.6%

32.3%

67.7%

8.3%

5.6%

94.4%

12.4%

10.0%

90.0%

30.9%

28.6%

71.4%

25.9%

23.0%

77.0%

38.5%

37.0%

63.0%

11.3%

8.5%

91.5%

8.3%

9.2%

5.8%

94.2%

15.2%

9.6%

7.1%

92.9%

31.6%

29.9%

70.1%

34.9%

30.7%

69.3%

17.0%

11.8%

88.2%

13.3%

10.7%

89.3%

56.8%

55.2%

44.8%

37.3%

33.5%

66.5%

17.0%

9.9%

90.1%

45.3%

44.7%

55.3%

5.3%

3.0%

97.0%

20.8%

17.8%

82.2%

11.3% 33.9% 7.3% 29.1% 22.4% 15.5% 5.7% 17.3% 21.5%

16.5% 5.4% 2.8% 21.9% 6.8% 5.0% 12% 5.7% 21.3% 18.3% 12.7%

Hispanic

Source: US Census Bureau, 2018 American Community Survey 5-year estimates, B05003. Notes: Universe includes all people. Labels for values 5 percent and under in the “By Race” chart have been removed for readability.

10

2020 REGIONAL EQUITY REPORT


POPULATION BY RACE/ETHNICITY AND NATIVITY ■ US Born

All Tampa Bay 87.4%  Tampa

■ Foreign Born

White, Non-Hispanic 12.6%

Black

 Tampa Tampa Bay Bay

94.7%

5.3%

Atlanta

89.1%

10.9%

95.8%

4.2%

Atlanta

91.6%

8.4%

Austin

96.2%

3.8%

Austin

91.3%

8.7%

96.5%

3.5%

Baltimore

92.1%

7.9%

97.2%

2.8%

Charlotte

95.6%

4.4%

Dallas-Ft. Worth

96.6%

3.4%

Dallas-Ft. Worth

91.1%

8.9%

96.4%

3.6%

Denver

82.4%

17.6%

90.9%

9.1%

Atlanta

86.3%

13.7%

Austin

85.0%

15.0%

Baltimore

89.7%

10.3%

Charlotte

Baltimore

90.1%

9.9%

Dallas-Ft. Worth

Charlotte

81.7%

18.3%

TampaBay Bay  Tampa

Denver

87.7%

12.3%

Denver

Houston

76.6%

23.4%

Houston

Jacksonville

94.4%

5.6%

Houston

90.9%

9.1%

Jacksonville

95.7%

4.3%

Jacksonville

95.1%

4.9%

Mpls-St. Paul

89.4%

10.6%

Mpls-St. Paul

97.9%

2.1%

Mpls-St. Paul

67.5%

32.5%

Nashville

92.0%

8.0%

Nashville

97.2%

2.8%

Nashville

94.5%

5.5%

77.7%

22.3%

Orlando

82.1%

17.9%

Orlando

93.4%

6.6%

Orlando

Phoenix

85.6%

14.4%

Phoenix

95.2%

4.8%

Phoenix

90.2%

9.8%

Portland

87.4%

12.6%

Portland

95.4%

4.6%

Portland

81.3%

18.7%

Raleigh-Durham

87.9%

12.1%

Raleigh-Durham

96.2%

3.8%

Raleigh-Durham

94.6%

5.4%

San Antonio

88.2%

11.8%

94.9%

5.1%

San Diego

76.6%

23.4%

Seattle

81.8%

18.2%

South Florida

59.6%

40.4%

St. Louis United United States States

95.3%

4.7%

86.5%

13.5%

Asian  Tampa Tampa Bay Bay

29.1%

San Antonio

96.7%

3.3%

San Antonio

San Diego

91.1%

8.9%

San Diego

90.3%

9.7%

Seattle

93.5%

6.5%

Seattle

76.4%

23.6%

South Florida

86.4%

13.6%

South Florida

65.5%

34.5%

97.9%

2.1%

St. Louis

97.9%

2.1%

96.0%

4.0%

United States United States

90.3%

St. Louis United UnitedStates States

Hispanic, All Races 70.9%

Atlanta

29.4%

70.6%

Austin

33.2%

66.8%

Baltimore

31.9%

68.1%

Charlotte

30.0%

70.0%

9.7%

Other

Tampa Bay Bay  Tampa

68.2%

31.8%

Atlanta

 Tampa Tampa Bay Bay

56.6%

43.4%

70.3%

29.7%

Austin

Atlanta

74.0%

26.0%

62.2%

37.8%

Baltimore

Austin

61.6%

38.4%

75.3%

24.7%

Baltimore

Charlotte

72.1%

27.9%

54.5%

45.5%

Charlotte

Dallas-Ft. Worth

62.2%

37.8%

63.3%

36.7%

Dallas-Ft. Worth

Dallas-Ft. Worth

30.7%

69.3%

34.7%

34.9%

65.1%

Denver

65.3%

Denver

73.7%

26.3%

Denver

24.1%

Houston

30.0%

70.0%

Houston

75.9%

61.7%

38.3%

Houston

62.7%

37.3%

Jacksonville

30.3%

69.7%

Jacksonville

70.9%

29.1%

Jacksonville

76.6%

23.4%

62.7%

37.3%

Mpls-St. Paul

Mpls-St. Paul

39.3%

60.7%

Mpls-St. Paul

74.6%

25.4%

Nashville

28.4%

71.6%

Nashville

56.3%

43.7%

Nashville

65.7%

34.3%

Orlando

32.8%

67.2%

Orlando

73.4%

26.6%

Orlando

73.8%

26.2%

Phoenix

31.5%

68.5%

Phoenix

73.0%

27.0%

Phoenix

75.7%

24.3%

65.5%

34.5%

Portland

73.8%

26.2%

Raleigh-Durham

63.3%

36.7%

San Antonio

84.7%

15.3%

San Diego

68.9%

31.1%

Seattle

77.5%

22.5%

South Florida

40.4%

59.6%

St. Louis United UnitedStates States

81.1%

18.9%

Portland

35.1%

64.9%

Portland

Raleigh-Durham

29.1%

70.9%

Raleigh-Durham

San Antonio

55.7%

44.3%

32.6%

67.4%

San Antonio

San Diego

84.5%

15.5%

38.3%

61.7%

San Diego

Seattle

66.3%

33.7%

33.0%

67.0%

Seattle

South Florida

66.4%

33.6%

28.2%

71.8%

South Florida

St. Louis United UnitedStates States

39.3%

60.7%

28.9%

71.1%

70.1%

29.9%

33.7%

66.3%

St. Louis United UnitedStates States

66.1%

DEMOGRAPHICS

COMPARATIVE DIVERSITY

33.9%

70.1%

29.9%

Source: US Census Bureau, 2018 American Community Survey 5-year estimates, B05003. Notes: Universe includes all people. www.stateoftheregion.com

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DEMOGRAPHICS

REGIONAL DIVERSITY POPULATION BY RACE/ETHNICITY AND NATIVITY Tampa Bay Region White, Non-Hispanic Citrus

88.3%

Hernando

78.4%

Hillsborough

49.5%

Manatee

71.5%

Pasco

75.6%

Pinellas

74.3%

Polk

60.0%

Sarasota

83.4%

Black

Asian

Other

Hispanic

2.9% 7.0%

5.5%

94.5%

15.3%

12.9%

87.1%

29.8%

28.0%

72.0%

17.8%

16.2%

83.8%

5.6%

16.3%

14.5%

85.5%

10.3%

12.1%

9.4%

90.6%

23.1%

21.5%

78.5%

9.0%

91.0%

5.1% 16.6% 8.7%

15.2%

4.5% 10.4% ■ US Born

All

Non-Hispanic

■ Foreign Born

White, Non-Hispanic

Black

Citrus

94.3%

5.7%

Citrus

97.1%

2.9%

Citrus

85.6%

14.4%

Hernando

93.1%

6.9%

Hernando

96.5%

3.5%

Hernando

87.5%

12.5%

Hillsborough

83.0%

17.0%

Hillsborough

95.1%

4.9%

Hillsborough

89.0%

11.0%

Manatee

87.4%

12.6%

Manatee

94.2%

5.8%

Manatee

91.0%

9.0%

Pasco

90.3%

9.7%

Pasco

95.5%

4.5%

Pasco

82.4%

17.6%

Pinellas

88.1%

11.9%

Pinellas

92.8%

7.2%

Pinellas

92.0%

8.0%

Polk

90.0%

10.0%

Polk

97.0%

3.0%

Polk

88.4%

11.6%

Sarasota

87.7%

12.3%

Sarasota

92.5%

7.5%

Sarasota

86.5%

13.5%

Asian

Hispanic, All Races

Other

Citrus

21.5%

78.5%

Citrus

75.8%

24.2%

Citrus

81.8%

18.2%

Hernando

31.2%

68.8%

Hernando

79.7%

20.3%

Hernando

82.2%

17.8%

Hillsborough

28.5%

71.5%

Hillsborough

65.4%

34.6%

Hillsborough

66.8%

33.2%

Manatee

26.2%

73.8%

Manatee

62.0%

38.0%

Manatee

65.2%

34.8%

Pasco

33.8%

66.2%

Pasco

75.9%

24.1%

Pasco

77.8%

22.2%

Pinellas

30.3%

69.7%

Pinellas

67.2%

32.8%

Pinellas

71.4%

28.6%

Polk

29.8%

70.2%

Polk

76.4%

23.6%

Polk

77.2%

22.8%

Sarasota

23.6%

76.4%

Sarasota

54.7%

45.3%

Sarasota

59.7%

40.3%

Source: US Census Bureau, 2018 American Community Survey 5-year estimates, B05003. Notes: Universe includes all people. In the Tampa Bay Region chart, labels for values below 4 percent have been omitted for readability.

12

2020 REGIONAL EQUITY REPORT


DEMOGRAPHICS www.stateoftheregion.com

13


ECONOMIC VITALITY

WAGES WHAT

The median hourly wage for full-time civilian workers ages 25 through 64. The values are in 2018 dollars.

WHY

The median hourly wage reflects an economy’s occupational composition and the distribution of economic opportunity between low-wage and high-wage jobs. An economy with many low-wage jobs would have a lower median hourly wage than an economy with more high-wage jobs. Within an economy, the racial and ethnic variation in median hourly wages can indicate differences in access to economic opportunity.

In Tampa Bay, the median hourly wage for Black workers is 21% lower than it is for White, Non-Hispanic workers.

OF NOTE

– The Tampa Bay region has a relatively low median hourly wage as a result of the size of its tourism and hospitality sector. It ranks in the bottom quintile with other tourism economies in the peer group: South Florida, San Antonio, and Orlando. – The difference in median hourly wage between Black ($16.42) and White, Non-Hispanic workers ($20.90) is the lowest among the peer group. – Asian workers in Tampa Bay earn the highest median hourly wage while workers in the “Some Other Race” earn the lowest. Black, Hispanic, and other non-white workers earn the highest median hourly wage in Pasco County. For the most part, non-white workers earn the lowest median hourly wage in Sarasota County. Source: 2018 5-year American Community Survey microdata file from IPUMS USA. Notes: Universe includes civilian full-time wage and salary workers ages 25 through 64. Values are in 2018 dollars.

14

2020 REGIONAL EQUITY REPORT


MEDIAN HOURLY WAGE Disparity Measure Region

Tampa Bay in Context

White

Black

Difference

Tampa Bay

$20.90

$16.42

-21.4%

San Antonio

$23.88

$18.41

-22.9%

Nashville

$21.67

$16.45

-24.1%

Phoenix

$24.66

$18.45

-25.2%

Jacksonville

$22.10

$16.45

-25.6%

Portland

$25.70

$18.92

-26.4%

Denver

$27.42

$19.90

-27.4%

Atlanta

$26.37

$19.02

-27.9%

Dallas-Ft. Worth

$26.45

$19.01

-28.1%

Charlotte

$24.61

$17.48

-29.0%

Seattle

$30.52

$21.40

-29.9%

St. Louis

$24.33

$17.00

-30.1%

Raleigh-Durham

$26.73

$18.51

-30.8%

Orlando

$22.39

$15.42

-31.1%

Baltimore

$31.87

$21.85

-31.4%

Mpls-St. Paul

$27.20

$18.50

-32.0%

San Diego

$30.83

$20.92

-32.1%

Houston

$29.50

$19.90

-32.5%

South Florida

$24.88

$16.03

-35.6%

Austin

$28.27

$17.91

-36.6%

TampaBay Bay ï‚„ Tampa

-21.4%

San Antonio

-22.9%

Nashville

-24.1%

Phoenix

-25.2%

Jacksonville

-25.6%

Portland

-26.4%

Denver

-27.4%

Atlanta

-27.9%

Dallas-Ft. Worth

-28.1%

Charlotte

-29.0%

Seattle

-29.9%

St. Louis

-30.1%

Raleigh-Durham

-30.8%

Orlando

-31.1%

Baltimore

-31.4%

Mpls-St. Paul

-32.0%

San Diego

-32.1%

Houston

-32.5%

South Florida Austin

ECONOMIC VITALITY

BLACK-WHITE GAP: WAGES

-35.6% -36.6%

Source: 2018 5-year American Community Survey microdata file from IPUMS USA. Notes: Universe includes civilian full-time wage and salary workers ages 25 through 64. Values are in 2018 dollars. www.stateoftheregion.com

15


ECONOMIC VITALITY

COMPARATIVE RATE BY RACE/ETHNICITY MEDIAN HOURLY WAGE All

White, Non-Hispanic

Seattle

$28.77

Baltimore

$27.42

Baltimore

$31.87

Baltimore

$21.85

San Diego

$30.83

Seattle

$21.40

$30.52

San Diego

$20.92

$29.50

Denver

$19.90

Houston

$19.90

$25.69

Seattle

San Diego

$24.88

Houston

Denver

$24.64

Austin

Mpls-St. Paul

Black

$28.27

Portland

$24.42

Denver

$27.42

Atlanta

$19.02

Raleigh-Durham

$23.73

Mpls-St. Paul

$27.20

Dallas-Ft. Worth

$19.01

Austin

$18.92

$23.31

Raleigh-Durham

$26.73

Portland

St. Louis

$22.85

Dallas-Ft. Worth

$26.45

Raleigh-Durham

$18.51

Houston

$22.39

Atlanta

$26.37

Mpls-St. Paul

$18.50

Atlanta

$22.19

Portland

$25.70

Phoenix

$18.45

Charlotte

$21.58

South Florida

$24.88

San Antonio

$18.41

Dallas-Ft. Worth

$21.36

Phoenix

$24.66

Austin

$17.91

Phoenix

$21.16

Charlotte

$24.61

Charlotte

$17.48

Jacksonville

$20.35

St. Louis

$24.33

St. Louis

$17.00

Nashville

$23.88

Jacksonville

$16.45

$20.35

San Antonio

Tampa Bay Bay  Tampa

$19.43

Orlando

San Antonio

$19.18

Jacksonville

$22.39

Nashville

$16.45

$22.10

Tampa Bay Bay  Tampa

$16.42

South Florida

$19.07

Nashville

$21.67

South Florida

$16.03

Orlando

$18.93

Tampa Bay Bay  Tampa

$20.90

Orlando

$15.42

Asian

Hispanic, All Races

Austin

$36.99

Raleigh-Durham

$36.62

Charlotte

Seattle Baltimore

$19.43 $19.18

Other Baltimore Seattle

$20.56

San Diego

$17.81

$32.34

Denver

$31.57

St. Louis

$29.86

South Florida

St. Louis

$29.86

Jacksonville

$16.96

Portland

$17.91

Phoenix

$29.14

Portland

$16.78

Jacksonville

$17.48 $17.13

Baltimore Seattle Houston

$33.99

St. Louis

$18.50

$17.80

Denver

$18.21

$17.69

San Diego

$18.15

$17.00

Mpls-St. Paul

$17.97

$27.87

San Antonio

$16.78

Austin

San Diego

$27.67

Austin

$16.65

South Florida

$17.00

Atlanta

$27.13

Phoenix

$16.44

San Antonio

$16.95

Portland

$26.73

Mpls-St. Paul

$16.28

Phoenix

$16.78

Houston

$16.10

Houston

$16.44

Dallas-Ft. Worth

Denver

$25.12

San Antonio

$24.28

Orlando

$15.52

Orlando

$15.77

Jacksonville

$23.65

Dallas-Ft. Worth

$15.42

Dallas-Ft. Worth

$15.68

Mpls-St. Paul

$23.13

Tampa Bay Bay  Tampa

$15.42

Atlanta

$15.54

TampaBay Bay  Tampa

$23.09

Atlanta

$14.93

Tampa Bay Bay  Tampa

$15.43

South Florida

$22.82

Charlotte

$14.93

Charlotte

$15.42

Nashville

$22.20

Raleigh-Durham

$13.93

Nashville

$14.80

$22.12

Nashville

$13.87

Raleigh-Durham

$14.78

Orlando

Source: 2018 5-year American Community Survey microdata file from IPUMS USA. Notes: Universe includes civilian full-time wage and salary workers ages 25 through 64. Values are in 2018 dollars.

16

$20.85

2020 REGIONAL EQUITY REPORT


ECONOMIC VITALITY

REGIONAL WAGES BY RACE/ETHNICITY MEDIAN HOURLY WAGE Tampa Bay Region Asian

$23.09

White, Non-Hispanic

$20.90

All

$19.43

Two or More Races

$17.48

Black

$16.42

Hispanic, All Races

$15.42

Some Other Race

$14.39

All

White, Non-Hispanic

Black

Hillsborough

$20.35

Hillsborough

Pasco

$19.90

Pinellas

$21.15

Hillsborough

Pinellas

$19.90

Manatee

$20.56

Pinellas

$15.98

Sarasota

$19.43

Pasco

$20.55

Polk

$15.26

Sarasota

$20.55

Manatee

$14.60

Sarasota

$14.57

Manatee

$18.71

Hernando

$17.82

Polk

Polk

$17.80

Hernando

Citrus

$24.12

$19.73 $18.45

Citrus

$16.65

Asian

$16.86

Pasco

$29.14

Pasco

$26.73

Pasco

$17.00

$17.00

Citrus

n/d

Hernando

n/d

Hispanic, All Races

Hillsborough

$18.51

Other Pasco

$17.00

Hernando

$16.11

Hillsborough

$16.28

Polk

$21.37

Hillsborough

$15.93

Hernando

$16.11

Manatee

$20.90

Pinellas

$15.43

Pinellas

$15.64

Pinellas

$18.41

Manatee

$14.57

Manatee

$14.57

Citrus

n/d

Polk

$14.57

Polk

$14.57

Hernando

n/d

Sarasota

$14.57

Sarasota

$14.57

Sarasota

n/d

Citrus

n/d

Citrus

n/d

Source: 2018 5-year American Community Survey microdata file from IPUMS USA. Notes: Universe includes civilian full-time wage and salary workers ages 25 through 64. Values are in 2018 dollars. The label “n/d” indicates “non-disclosed” and that the sample size was not big enough to make the calculation. www.stateoftheregion.com

17


ECONOMIC VITALITY

WAGES & EDUCATIONAL ATTAINMENT WHAT

The median hourly wage, in 2018 dollars, for full-time civilian workers ages 25 to 64 by educational attainment level.

In Tampa Bay, the highest pay differential between Black and White, NonHispanic workers is for those with a bachelor’s degree or higher.

WHY

Educational attainment tends to influence lifetime earnings. As such, median hourly wages increase with higher levels of educational attainment. Looking at the variations by race reveals that differences in median hourly wages cannot be explained by differences in educational attainment. It also reveals that disparities in pay persist even at high levels of educational attainment. Quintile:

Top

Bottom

Quintile:

LESS THAN HIGH SCHOOL

Bottom

Top

HIGH SCHOOL DIPLOMA

White, NonHispanic

Black

Difference (#)

Difference (%)

White, NonHispanic

Black

Difference (#)

Difference (%)

Tampa Bay

$14.93

$11.94

-$2.99

-20.0%

$16.95

$13.73

-$3.22

-19.0%

Atlanta

$16.03

$12.21

-$3.82

-23.8%

$18.84

$14.93

-$3.91

-20.8%

Austin

$17.13

n/d

n/d

n/d

$17.98

$14.57

-$3.41

-19.0%

Baltimore

$18.31

$15.54

-$2.77

-15.1%

$22.39

$17.26

-$5.13

-22.9%

Charlotte

$14.93

$10.68

-$4.24

-28.4%

$18.15

$14.24

-$3.91

-21.6%

Dallas-Ft. Worth

$16.61

$11.94

-$4.67

-28.1%

$19.90

$14.93

-$4.98

-25.0%

Denver

$18.20

n/d

n/d

n/d

$20.55

$16.81

-$3.74

-18.2%

Houston

$18.04

$12.86

-$5.18

-28.7%

$21.04

$15.22

-$5.83

-27.7%

Jacksonville

$15.00

$13.22

-$1.78

-11.9%

$17.12

$14.39

-$2.73

-16.0%

Mpls-St. Paul

$17.98

$12.33

-$5.65

-31.4%

$20.55

$15.93

-$4.62

-22.5%

Nashville

$14.39

$12.33

-$2.06

-14.3%

$17.42

$13.87

-$3.54

-20.3%

Orlando

$14.99

$10.70

-$4.29

-28.6%

$17.38

$13.22

-$4.16

-23.9%

Phoenix

$15.92

$13.99

-$1.94

-12.2%

$18.91

$15.41

-$3.50

-18.5%

Portland

$17.94

n/d

n/d

n/d

$19.43

n/d

n/d

n/d

Raleigh-Durham

$14.48

$12.72

-$1.76

-12.2%

$18.82

$14.90

-$3.93

-20.9%

San Antonio

$15.13

n/d

n/d

n/d

$17.35

$13.43

-$3.92

-22.6%

San Diego

$19.43

n/d

n/d

n/d

$21.06

$16.66

-$4.40

-20.9%

Seattle

$20.45

$15.06

-$5.39

-26.4%

$22.89

$17.06

-$5.83

-25.5%

South Florida

$15.82

$11.82

-$4.00

-25.3%

$19.01

$13.70

-$5.31

-27.9%

St. Louis

$15.54

$12.79

-$2.75

-17.7%

$18.91

$14.64

-$4.27

-22.6%

City

Source: 2018 5-year American Community Survey microdata file from IPUMS USA. Notes: Universe includes civilian full-time wage and salary workers ages 25 through 64. Values are in 2018 dollars. The label “n/d” indicates “non-disclosed” and that the sample size was not big enough to make the calculation.

18

2020 REGIONAL EQUITY REPORT


MEDIAN HOURLY WAGE BY RACE/ETHNICITY AND EDUCATIONAL ATTAINMENT

OF NOTE

– In Tampa Bay, the median hourly wage for Black workers with at least a 4-year degree is $5.88, an hour lower than their White, Non-Hispanic counterparts, or nearly 21 percent lower. The lowest pay differential is among those Black and White, Non-Hispanic workers with more than a high school diploma but less than a bachelor’s degree; the median hourly wage for Black workers in this category is $3.66 lower, or 18 percent lower.

ECONOMIC VITALITY

WAGES & EDUCATIONAL ATTAINMENT

– In comparison to its peers, the dollar value of the Black/White pay disparity in Tampa Bay is among the lowest for all educational attainment levels, except for those with less than a high school diploma. – White, Non-Hispanic workers at all educational attainment levels in Tampa Bay earn more than their counterparts in other racial and ethnic categories, with the exception of Asians with a bachelor’s degree or higher.

Quintile:

Bottom

Top

SOME COLLEGE

Quintile:

Bottom

Top

BACHELOR'S DEGREE OR HIGHER

White, NonHispanic

Black

Difference (#)

Difference (%)

White, NonHispanic

Black

Difference (#)

Difference (%)

$20.05

$16.39

-$3.66

-18.2%

$28.27

$22.39

-$5.88

-20.8%

Tampa Bay

$22.39

$17.48

-$4.91

-21.9%

$34.25

$25.70

-$8.55

-25.0%

Atlanta

$22.10

$17.00

-$5.11

-23.1%

$33.84

$23.22

-$10.62

-31.4%

Austin

$27.54

$20.35

-$7.19

-26.1%

$39.37

$31.98

-$7.38

-18.7%

Baltimore

$20.56

$16.45

-$4.11

-20.0%

$33.40

$23.31

-$10.09

-30.2%

Charlotte

$23.63

$17.99

-$5.64

-23.9%

$34.08

$25.43

-$8.65

-25.4%

Dallas-Ft. Worth

$23.22

$18.31

-$4.91

-21.1%

$33.51

$24.88

-$8.63

-25.8%

Denver

$25.43

$18.15

-$7.29

-28.7%

$38.36

$26.87

-$11.49

-30.0%

Houston

$20.56

$16.51

-$4.05

-19.7%

$29.79

$22.39

-$7.39

-24.8%

Jacksonville

$24.11

$17.48

-$6.63

-27.5%

$34.33

$27.23

-$7.10

-20.7%

Mpls-St. Paul

$20.35

$15.92

-$4.42

-21.7%

$28.04

$22.10

-$5.93

-21.2%

Nashville

$20.35

$15.42

-$4.92

-24.2%

$28.86

$22.61

-$6.25

-21.7%

Orlando

$21.92

$17.50

-$4.42

-20.2%

$31.82

$25.69

-$6.13

-19.3%

Phoenix

$22.89

$17.44

-$5.45

-23.8%

$33.40

$27.75

-$5.65

-16.9%

Portland

$21.85

$17.42

-$4.44

-20.3%

$33.00

$23.88

-$9.12

-27.6%

Raleigh-Durham

$20.85

$17.69

-$3.16

-15.2%

$30.52

$25.25

-$5.27

-17.3%

San Antonio

$24.77

$20.20

-$4.57

-18.4%

$38.53

$30.33

-$8.21

-21.3%

San Diego

$25.87

$19.53

-$6.34

-24.5%

$38.84

$31.66

-$7.18

-18.5%

Seattle

$22.28

$16.19

-$6.09

-27.3%

$31.97

$23.12

-$8.85

-27.7%

South Florida

$21.37

$16.19

-$5.19

-24.3%

$30.85

$25.08

-$5.77

-18.7%

St. Louis

City

Source: 2018 5-year American Community Survey microdata file from IPUMS USA. Notes: Universe includes civilian full-time wage and salary workers ages 25 through 64. Values are in 2018 dollars. The label “n/d” indicates “non-disclosed” and that the sample size was not big enough to make the calculation. www.stateoftheregion.com

19


MEDIAN HOURLY WAGE BY RACE/ETHNICITY AND EDUCATIONAL ATTAINMENT Tampa Bay Region White, Non-Hispanic

Black

Asian

Hispanic

Other $33.84

$30.00

$0.00

Less than HS

HS Diploma

$22.39 $16.42

$16.94

$16.44

$16.39

$13.36

$13.36

$12.84

$13.73

$16.95

$11.90

$11.90

$11.85

$5.00

$11.94

$10.00

$14.93

$15.00

$20.05

$20.00

Some College

LESS THAN HIGHSCHOOL

$23.31

$25.00

$23.00

$35.00

$28.27

ECONOMIC VITALITY

WAGES & EDUCATIONAL ATTAINMENT

Bachelors or Higher

HIGH SCHOOL DIPLOMA

White, NonHispanic

Black

Difference (#)

Difference (%)

White, NonHispanic

Black

Difference (#)

Difference (%)

Citrus

n/d

n/d

n/d

n/d

$14.22

n/d

n/d

n/d

Hernando

n/d

n/d

n/d

n/d

$16.66

n/d

n/d

n/d

Hillsborough

$16.45

$12.57

-$3.88

-23.6%

$18.34

$13.87

-$4.47

-24.4%

Manatee

$15.41

n/d

n/d

n/d

$16.28

$11.82

-$4.46

-27.4%

Pasco

$13.88

n/d

n/d

n/d

$16.28

n/d

n/d

n/d

Pinellas

$14.39

n/d

n/d

n/d

$16.70

$14.03

-$2.67

-16.0%

Polk

$15.26

n/d

n/d

n/d

$17.26

$13.70

-$3.56

-20.6%

Sarasota

$15.41

n/d

n/d

n/d

$17.00

n/d

n/d

n/d

County

SOME COLLEGE

BACHELOR'S DEGREE OR HIGHER

White, NonHispanic

Black

Difference (#)

Difference (%)

White, NonHispanic

Black

Difference (#)

Difference (%)

Citrus

$18.36

n/d

n/d

n/d

$24.15

n/d

n/d

n/d

Hernando

$18.31

n/d

n/d

n/d

$23.13

n/d

n/d

n/d

Hillsborough

$21.40

$16.44

-$4.96

-23.2%

$30.52

$22.89

-$7.63

-25.0%

Manatee

$20.55

n/d

n/d

n/d

$27.86

n/d

n/d

n/d

Pasco

$20.55

$18.41

-$2.14

-10.4%

$27.24

$24.88

-$2.36

-8.7%

Pinellas

$19.90

$15.77

-$4.14

-20.8%

$28.99

$22.89

-$6.10

-21.1%

Polk

$19.28

$15.92

-$3.35

-17.4%

$24.77

$19.78

-$4.99

-20.2%

Sarasota

$19.13

n/d

n/d

n/d

$27.97

n/d

n/d

n/d

County

Source: 2018 5-year American Community Survey microdata file from IPUMS USA. Notes: Universe includes civilian full-time wage and salary workers ages 25 through 64. Values are in 2018 dollars. The label “n/d” indicates “non-disclosed” and that the sample size was not big enough to make the calculation.

20

2020 REGIONAL EQUITY REPORT


ECONOMIC VITALITY www.stateoftheregion.com

21


TALENT

DROPOUT RATE WHAT

The share of youth (age 16 to 24) who do not have a high school diploma or equivalent and are not enrolled in school.

WHY

Having a high school diploma is essential to a more secure future. Individuals with no high school diploma earn less, experience higher rates of unemployment, and are more likely to engage in criminal behavior or require social services.1

In Tampa Bay, 1 in 12 Black youth and 1 in 8 Hispanic youth have dropped out of high school.

OF NOTE – In Tampa Bay, the share of Black youth without a high school diploma, not enrolled in school is 1.8 percentage points higher than the share for their White, Non-Hispanic counterparts. – In the peer group, the share of Hispanic youth and youth in the “Other” category without a high school diploma, on average, is almost double that of the youth population overall. – In Tampa Bay, Hispanic youth and youth in the “Some Other Race” category are significantly less likely to have a high school diploma or be enrolled in school than White, Non-Hispanic youth. 1 Economic Impacts of Dropouts.” National Dropout Prevention Center. Accessed 8/7/2020: dropoutprevention.org/resources/statistics/ quick-facts/economic-impacts-of-dropouts/

Source: 2018 5-year American Community Survey microdata file from IPUMS USA. Notes: Universe includes all people ages 16 through 24.

22

2020 REGIONAL EQUITY REPORT


SHARE OF 16-TO 24-YEAR-OLDS NOT ENROLLED IN SCHOOL AND WITHOUT A HIGH SCHOOL DIPLOMA Disparity Measure Region

Tampa Bay in Context

White

Black

San Antonio

2.7%

2.5%

-0.2%

Houston

4.5%

4.6%

+0.1%

San Diego

2.4%

2.9%

+0.4%

Atlanta

4.9%

5.6%

+0.7%

Dallas-Ft. Worth

3.9%

4.7%

+0.8%

Charlotte

4.7%

5.5%

+0.8%

Nashville

3.5%

4.6%

+1.1%

Tampa Bay

6.4%

8.1%

+1.8%

Austin

1.9%

3.8%

Difference

San Antonio -0.2% Houston San Diego

3.8%

5.8%

4.5%

6.7%

+0.4% +0.7%

Dallas-Ft. Worth

+0.8%

Charlotte

+0.8%

Nashville

+1.1%

Tampa Bay Bay ï‚„ Tampa

+1.8%

Austin

+1.9%

+1.9% +2.0%

+2.0% Seattle

Seattle

+0.1%

Atlanta

Denver Denver

TALENT

BLACK-WHITE GAP: DROPOUT RATE

+2.2%

+2.2%

Orlando

3.6%

6.0%

+2.4%

Phoenix

5.2%

7.6%

+2.5%

Portland

4.9%

7.4%

+2.5%

Raleigh-Durham

2.7%

5.2%

+2.5%

South Florida

3.7%

6.3%

+2.6%

Jacksonville

5.6%

8.3%

+2.7%

Mpls-St. Paul

2.6%

5.8%

+3.2%

Baltimore

3.7%

7.5%

+3.8%

St. Louis

3.9%

8.0%

+4.1%

Orlando

+2.4%

Phoenix

+2.5%

Portland

+2.5%

Raleigh-Durham

+2.5%

South Florida

+2.6%

Jacksonville Mpls-St. Paul Baltimore St. Louis

+2.7% +3.2% +3.8% +4.1%

Source: 2018 5-year American Community Survey microdata file from IPUMS USA. Notes: Universe includes all people ages 16 through 24. www.stateoftheregion.com

23


TALENT

COMPARATIVE DROPOUT RATE BY RACE/ETHNICITY SHARE OF 16-TO 24-YEAR-OLDS NOT ENROLLED IN SCHOOL AND WITHOUT A HIGH SCHOOL DIPLOMA All

White, Non-Hispanic

Mpls-St. Paul

3.8%

Austin

San Diego

3.9%

San Diego

2.4%

San Diego

Raleigh-Durham

4.4%

Mpls-St. Paul

2.6%

Austin

Austin

4.6%

San Antonio

2.7%

Houston

4.6%

Nashville

4.7%

Raleigh-Durham

2.7%

Nashville

4.6%

San Antonio

1.9%

St. Louis

5.1%

Baltimore

5.2%

Orlando

Seattle

5.3%

Baltimore

Orlando

5.4%

South Florida 3.7%

Portland

5.8%

Denver

3.8%

South Florida

Nashville 3.5%

2.5% 2.9% 3.8%

Dallas-Ft. Worth

4.7%

3.6%

Raleigh-Durham

5.2%

3.7%

Charlotte

5.5%

Atlanta

5.6%

Mpls-St. Paul

5.8%

3.9%

Denver

5.8%

3.9%

Orlando

6.0%

South Florida

6.3% 6.7%

5.9%

St. Louis

Charlotte

5.9%

Dallas-Ft. Worth

Atlanta

6.0%

Houston

4.5%

San Antonio

6.3%

Seattle

4.5%

Seattle

Denver

6.5%

Charlotte

4.7%

Portland

7.4%

Dallas-Ft. Worth

6.7%

Atlanta

4.9%

Baltimore

7.5%

Jacksonville

6.9%

Portland

4.9%

Phoenix

7.6%

Houston

7.1%

Phoenix

5.2%

St. Louis

8.0%

Jacksonville

5.6%

TampaBay Bay  Tampa Jacksonville

8.1%

Tampa Bay Bay  Tampa

7.6%

Phoenix

8.1%

Asian Austin

0.8%

Tampa Bay Bay  Tampa

6.4%

Hispanic, All Races San Diego

6.0%

8.3%

Other San Diego

5.4% 5.8%

1.3%

South Florida

7.1%

Baltimore

Portland

1.4%

Orlando

7.3%

St. Louis

6.9%

Raleigh-Durham

1.6%

Baltimore

7.4%

South Florida

6.9%

8.2%

Orlando

8.5%

Austin

8.0%

Baltimore

Seattle

1.7%

San Antonio

Phoenix

2.0%

Austin

South Florida

7.4%

2.0%

St. Louis

9.8%

San Antonio

8.1%

Houston

2.0%

Seattle

10.1%

Mpls-St. Paul

8.5%

Tampa Bay Bay  Tampa

2.1%

Mpls-St. Paul

10.2%

Seattle

8.7% 8.9%

San Diego

2.3%

Dallas-Ft. Worth

10.7%

Portland

Dallas-Ft. Worth

2.6%

Raleigh-Durham

10.8%

Jacksonville

9.3%

Jacksonville

9.5%

2.6%

Jacksonville

10.8%

Raleigh-Durham

Orlando

2.8%

Houston

11.0%

Tampa Bay Bay  Tampa

10.3%

Atlanta

3.1%

Tampa Bay Bay  Tampa

11.4%

Dallas-Ft. Worth

10.3%

3.2%

Denver

11.5%

Houston

10.6%

Portland

11.8%

Charlotte

10.6%

St. Louis Mpls-St. Paul

4.1%

Denver

4.8%

Phoenix

11.9%

Denver

10.9%

5.3%

Charlotte

12.4%

Nashville

11.2%

13.0%

Phoenix

11.4%

13.1%

Atlanta

11.4%

San Antonio Charlotte Nashville

5.8%

Nashville

5.9%

Atlanta

Source: 2018 5-year American Community Survey microdata file from IPUMS USA. Notes: Universe includes all people ages 16 through 24.

24

Black

2020 REGIONAL EQUITY REPORT


SHARE OF 16-TO 24-YEAR-OLDS NOT ENROLLED IN SCHOOL AND WITHOUT A HIGH SCHOOL DIPLOMA

TALENT

REGIONAL DROPOUT RATE BY RACE/ETHNICITY Tampa Bay Region Asian

2.1%

White, Non-Hispanic

6.4%

Two or More Races

6.9%

All

7.6%

Black

8.1%

Hispanic, All Races

11.4%

Some Other Race

15.0%

All Hernando

White, Non-Hispanic Hillsborough

5.6%

Sarasota

Pinellas

6.3%

Black Pasco 3.2%

4.0% 5.5%

Pinellas

8.4%

Hillsborough

8.5% 8.6%

Pinellas

6.9%

Sarasota

Hillsborough

7.1%

Hernando

6.7%

Polk

6.7%

Manatee

Polk

8.5%

Polk

Pasco

8.6%

Manatee

Manatee

10.0%

Citrus

11.0%

Asian Hillsborough Pinellas

0.2% 4.9%

6.2%

8.4%

Pasco

9.9%

Citrus

11.8%

Citrus

n/d

Hernando

n/d

Sarasota

n/d

Hispanic, All Races Hernando

Other Hernando 3.3%

4.1%

Pasco

Sarasota

7.4%

Citrus

n/d

Sarasota

Hernando

n/d

Hillsborough

Manatee

n/d

Polk

Pasco

n/d

Manatee

13.3%

Manatee

Polk

n/d

Pinellas

13.3%

Polk

Sarasota

n/d

Citrus

Pasco

8.1% 11.6% 12.6%

n/d

10.3%

Citrus Pinellas

Hillsborough

6.6% 7.0% 7.4% 8.6% 9.4% 10.0% 10.5%

Source: 2018 5-year American Community Survey microdata file from IPUMS USA. Notes: Universe includes all people ages 16 through 24. The label “n/d” indicates “non-disclosed” and that the sample size was not big enough to make the calculation. www.stateoftheregion.com

25


TALENT

YOUTH DISCONNECTION WHAT

The share of youth (age 16 to 24) who are neither enrolled in school nor working. This segment of the youth population is often called “disconnected youth.”

WHY

While reasons and circumstances may vary, these disconnected youth are missing key educational, vocational, and employment experiences and are associated with an increased risk—according to researchers —for a host of negative outcomes, each with significant costs to society: long spells of unemployment, poverty, criminal behavior, substance abuse, and incarceration. Youth of color are far more likely to be disconnected.

In Tampa Bay, the share of “disconnected” Black youth is nearly 6 percentage points higher than the share of White, Non-Hispanic youth.

OF NOTE

– This disparity between the share of Black youth that are disconnected and the share of White, Non-Hispanic youth ranks Tampa Bay 12th out of its 20 peer regions. – Among the peers, the rate of disconnection for White, Non-Hispanic and Asian youth is lowest, and it is highest for Black and Hispanic youth in addition to youth that fall into the “Other” category. – Minneapolis, Austin, Raleigh, and Denver have the lowest rates of youth disconnection overall, while San Antonio, Houston, Phoenix, and Tampa Bay have the highest rates. – Among the eight counties in the region, Sarasota has the lowest rate of disconnection overall, and Pasco County has the highest rate. In Manatee County, 19 percent of Black youth are neither enrolled in school nor working, which is the highest rate of disconnection for any of the youth categories. The lowest rate of disconnection is among Asian youth in Hillsborough County. Source: 2018 5-year American Community Survey microdata file from IPUMS USA. Note: Universe includes all people ages 16 through 24.

26

2020 REGIONAL EQUITY REPORT


TALENT

BLACK-WHITE GAP: YOUTH DISCONNECTION SHARE OF 16-TO 24-YEAR-OLDS NOT IN SCHOOL OR WORK Disparity Measure Region

Tampa Bay in Context

White

Black

Difference

10.7%

11.4%

+0.7%

5.5%

8.3%

+2.8%

Houston

11.3%

14.9%

+3.6%

Denver

7.2%

10.9%

+3.7%

Portland

10.4%

14.3%

+3.9%

Seattle

10.0%

14.6%

+4.6%

Raleigh-Durham

6.3%

11.3%

+4.9%

Orlando

8.4%

13.5%

+5.1%

San Antonio Austin

San Antonio Austin

Dallas-Ft. Worth Atlanta Tampa Bay

9.3% 9.4% 9.9%

14.7% 15.2% 15.7%

+2.8%

Houston

+3.6%

Denver

+3.7%

Portland

+3.9%

Seattle

+4.6%

Raleigh-Durham

+4.9%

Orlando

+5.1%

Nashville Nashville

+0.7%

+5.4%

+5.4% Dallas-Ft. Worth

+5.8%

Atlanta

+5.8%

Tampa Bay Bay ï‚„ Tampa

+5.9%

Charlotte

+6.0%

Mpls-St. Paul

+6.2%

+5.8% +5.8%

11.4%

17.3%

+5.9%

Charlotte

9.6%

15.6%

+6.0%

Mpls-St. Paul

5.5%

11.7%

+6.2%

South Florida

9.4%

16.0%

+6.6%

Jacksonville

11.0%

17.9%

+6.9%

Phoenix

10.5%

18.2%

+7.6%

San Diego

8.3%

16.8%

+8.5%

St. Louis

7.5%

17.2%

+9.7%

Baltimore

8.4%

20.3%

+11.8%

South Florida Jacksonville Phoenix San Diego St. Louis Baltimore

+6.6% +6.9% +7.6% +8.5% +9.7% +11.8%

Source: 2018 5-year American Community Survey microdata file from IPUMS USA. Note: Universe includes all people ages 16 through 24. www.stateoftheregion.com

27


TALENT

COMPARATIVE YOUTH DISCONNECTION BY RACE/ETHNICITY SHARE OF 16-TO 24-YEAR-OLDS NOT IN SCHOOL OR WORK All Mpls-St. Paul

White, Non-Hispanic

7.3%

Austin

Austin

7.5%

Mpls-St. Paul

Raleigh-Durham

7.7%

5.5%

Austin

5.5%

Denver

10.9%

Raleigh-Durham

11.3%

Raleigh-Durham 6.3%

8.3%

Denver

9.5%

Denver

7.2%

San Antonio

11.4%

San Diego

9.7%

St. Louis

7.5%

Mpls-St. Paul

11.7%

St. Louis

10.1%

San Diego

8.3%

Orlando

Seattle

10.4%

Orlando

8.4%

Portland

14.3%

Nashville

10.5%

Baltimore

8.4%

Seattle

14.6%

Portland

11.0%

Nashville

9.3%

Nashville

14.7%

Orlando

11.0%

Dallas-Ft. Worth

9.4%

Houston

14.9%

Dallas-Ft. Worth

13.5%

11.8%

South Florida

9.4%

Dallas-Ft. Worth

15.2%

South Florida

12.0%

Charlotte

9.6%

Charlotte

15.6%

Charlotte

12.1%

Atlanta

9.9%

Atlanta

15.7% 16.0%

Atlanta

12.3%

Seattle

10.0%

South Florida

Baltimore

12.8%

Portland

10.4%

San Diego

16.8%

Jacksonville

12.8%

Phoenix

10.5%

St. Louis

 Tampa Tampa Bay Bay

17.2%

12.9%

San Antonio

10.7%

 Tampa Tampa Bay Bay

17.3%

Phoenix

13.0%

Jacksonville

11.0%

Jacksonville

17.9%

Houston

13.2%

Houston

11.3%

Phoenix

18.2%

San Antonio

13.9%

Tampa Bay Bay  Tampa

11.4%

Baltimore

Asian

Hispanic, All Races

20.3%

Other

Austin

3.9%

Raleigh-Durham

7.5%

Raleigh-Durham

St. Louis

8.8%

Baltimore

7.8%

4.4%

Baltimore

Jacksonville

4.5%

St. Louis

9.7%

Austin

9.7%

Raleigh-Durham

4.6%

Austin

10.2%

San Diego

10.4%

9.2%

Seattle

5.5%

San Diego

10.8%

Nashville

11.1%

Baltimore

5.9%

South Florida

11.3%

St. Louis

11.1%

Nashville

11.4%

South Florida

11.1%

11.9%

Atlanta

11.8%

12.4%

Jacksonville

12.3% 12.6%

Portland 6.2% Orlando

6.5%

Atlanta

Nashville

6.6%

Seattle

6.6%

Orlando

12.6%

Mpls-St. Paul

San Diego 6.7%

Denver

12.9%

Denver

12.7%

Dallas-Ft. Worth

6.9%

Dallas-Ft. Worth

13.2%

Seattle

12.9%

Atlanta

6.9%

Mpls-St. Paul

13.8%

Orlando

12.9%

Houston

7.0%

Jacksonville

14.2%

Portland

13.0%

Tampa Bay Bay  Tampa

8.1%

Tampa Bay Bay  Tampa

14.5%

Dallas-Ft. Worth

13.1%

Denver

8.4%

Houston

14.7%

Tampa Bay Bay  Tampa

13.7%

Mpls-St. Paul

Phoenix

8.6%

Charlotte

14.7%

Charlotte

14.1%

South Florida

8.9%

Phoenix

14.9%

Houston

14.5%

Charlotte

9.0%

San Antonio

15.6%

Phoenix

14.9%

Portland

15.6%

San Antonio

15.4%

San Antonio

11.9%

Source: 2018 5-year American Community Survey microdata file from IPUMS USA. Note: Universe includes all people ages 16 through 24.

28

Black

2020 REGIONAL EQUITY REPORT


TALENT

REGIONAL YOUTH DISCONNECTION BY RACE/ETHNICITY SHARE OF 16-TO 24-YEAR-OLDS NOT IN SCHOOL OR WORK Tampa Bay Region Asian

8.1%

White, Non-Hispanic

11.4%

Two or More Races

12.2%

All

12.9%

Some Other Race

14.0%

Hispanic, All Races

14.5%

Black

17.3%

All

White, Non-Hispanic

Sarasota

10.8%

Hillsborough

Hillsborough

11.2%

Pinellas

Black Pasco

16.3%

10.3%

Hillsborough

16.3%

8.4%

Pinellas

12.4%

Sarasota

10.4%

Pinellas

Manatee

12.5%

Manatee

10.8%

Polk

18.9%

Manatee

19.0%

Hernando

14.1%

Polk

Citrus

15.1%

Citrus

Polk

15.6%

Hernando

Pasco

15.9%

Pasco

Asian Hillsborough

14.5% 15.3% 16.3%

Citrus

n/d

Hernando

n/d

Sarasota

n/d

Hispanic, All Races Sarasota

5.4%

Pinellas

13.4%

13.1%

Hernando

Other Sarasota

10.3%

Manatee

12.5%

17.9%

7.1% 9.1%

Citrus

n/d

Hillsborough

13.2%

Hernando

Hernando

n/d

Manatee

13.3%

Hillsborough

12.1%

Manatee

n/d

Pinellas

Pinellas

12.3%

Pasco

n/d

Pasco

Polk

n/d

Polk

Sarasota

n/d

Citrus

14.4% 17.2% 17.7% n/d

Citrus Pasco Polk

10.1%

12.8% 14.6% 16.0%

Source: 2018 5-year American Community Survey microdata file from IPUMS USA. Note: Universe includes all people ages 16 through 24. The label “n/d” indicates “non-disclosed” and that the sample size was not big enough to make the calculation. www.stateoftheregion.com

29


TALENT

EDUCATIONAL ATTAINMENT WHAT

The percent of the population that is 25 years old or older who has completed at least a bachelor’s degree.

WHY

It is well documented that individuals who have earned at least a bachelor’s degree experience better economic outcomes—higher earnings and lower unemployment— than those individuals with a high school diploma or less. Examining the share of the population with a bachelor’s degree or higher by race and ethnicity can reveal achievement gaps.

In Tampa Bay, the share of Blacks with at least a bachelor’s degree is 10 percentage points lower than that of White, Non-Hispanics.

OF NOTE

– The disparity in 4-year degree attainment between Blacks and White, Non-Hispanics in Tampa Bay is one of the lowest among the group of peers. – Among the peer group and across the region, the rate of degree attainment is highest for Asians and lowest for Hispanics. – In comparison to the peer group, the share of the White, Non-Hispanic population with a bachelor’s degree or higher is lowest in Tampa Bay, which ranks last. In fact, Tampa Bay ranks in the bottom quintile for the following categories: All; White, Non-Hispanic; Black; and Asian. – Across the eight-county Tampa Bay region, the share of the population with a bachelor’s degree or higher varies greatly. In Hillsborough County, 58 percent of the Asian population has at least a bachelor’s degree, while in Sarasota County, less than 12 percent of the Black population has attained that level of education. Source: US Census Bureau, 2018 American Community Survey 5-year estimates, S1501.

30

2020 REGIONAL EQUITY REPORT


TALENT

BLACK-WHITE GAP: EDUCATIONAL ATTAINMENT SHARE OF POPULATION WITH A BACHELOR’S DEGREE OR HIGHER Disparity Measure

Tampa Bay in Context

Region

White

Black

Difference

Nashville

37.0%

26.9%

-10.1%

Tampa Bay

30.3%

20.0%

-10.3%

Phoenix

37.0%

24.7%

-12.3%

San Antonio

40.3%

27.9%

-12.3%

Charlotte

38.3%

25.7%

-12.7%

Portland

40.9%

27.0%

-13.9%

United States

35.2%

21.1%

-14.1%

Atlanta

43.7%

29.3%

-14.4%

Orlando

36.6%

21.9%

-14.7%

Jacksonville

33.2%

18.5%

-14.7%

Dallas-Ft. Worth

42.6%

26.2%

-16.4%

Houston

43.4%

27.0%

-16.5%

St. Louis

36.1%

18.8%

-17.2%

Baltimore

44.4%

25.4%

-19.0%

Seattle

43.9%

24.9%

-19.0%

Mpls-St. Paul

44.0%

21.4%

-22.6%

Raleigh-Durham

52.7%

30.0%

-22.7%

San Diego

47.9%

25.2%

-22.7%

South Florida

42.7%

19.3%

-23.4%

Austin

53.2%

29.4%

-23.8%

Denver

50.9%

26.3%

-24.6%

Nashville

-10.1%

TampaBay Bay Tampa

-10.3%

Phoenix

-12.3%

San Antonio

-12.3%

Charlotte

-12.7%

Portland

-13.9%

United United States

-14.1%

Atlanta

-14.4%

Orlando

-14.7%

Jacksonville

-14.7%

Dallas-Ft. Worth

-16.4%

Houston

-16.5%

St. Louis

-17.2%

Baltimore

-19.0%

Seattle

-19.0%

Mpls-St. Paul

-22.6%

Raleigh-Durham

-22.7%

San Diego

-22.7%

South Florida

-23.4%

Austin

-23.8%

Denver

-24.6%

Source: US Census Bureau, 2018 American Community Survey 5-year estimates, S1501.

www.stateoftheregion.com

31


TALENT

COMPARATIVE EDUCATIONAL ATTAINMENT BY RACE/ETHNICITY SHARE OF POPULATION WITH A BACHELOR’S DEGREE OR HIGHER All

White, Non-Hispanic

Raleigh-Durham

46.1%

Austin

53.2%

Austin

43.9%

Raleigh-Durham

52.7%

Denver

42.9%

Denver

Seattle

42.0%

San Diego

Mpls-St. Paul

41.2%

Baltimore

Baltimore

39.5%

Mpls-St. Paul

44.0%

Portland

38.9%

Seattle

43.9%

50.9% 47.9% 44.4%

San Diego

38.1%

Atlanta

43.7%

Atlanta

37.8%

Houston

43.4%

Nashville

34.8%

South Florida

42.7%

Charlotte

34.7%

Dallas-Ft. Worth

42.6%

Dallas-Ft. Worth

34.4%

Portland

40.9%

St. Louis

33.7%

San Antonio

40.3%

Houston

32.4%

Charlotte

38.3%

United States United South Florida

31.5%

Nashville

37.0%

31.5%

Phoenix

37.0%

Orlando

31.3%

Orlando

36.6%

Phoenix

30.8%

St. Louis

36.1%

Jacksonville  Tampa Tampa Bay Bay

30.5%

United States United

35.2%

28.3%

Jacksonville

33.2%

San Antonio

27.7%

Tampa Bay Bay  Tampa

Asian Raleigh-Durham Austin St. Louis Baltimore Dallas-Ft. Worth Charlotte Phoenix Atlanta Houston Seattle United States San Antonio Denver Orlando San Diego Portland South Florida Nashville  Tampa Bay Jacksonville Mpls-St. Paul

30.3%

Hispanic, All Races 72.7% 70.6% 65.4% 63.4% 60.5% 57.5% 57.2% 56.9% 56.8% 54.4% 53.5% 52.1% 51.9% 51.6% 50.6% 50.4% 50.2% 50.1% 49.8% 48.2% 44.6%

St. Louis 28.9% Baltimore 28.0% Jacksonville 26.9% South Florida 26.7% Orlando 22.4% Austin 22.2% Seattle 21.3% Atlanta 20.0% Tampa Bay  19.7% Portland 19.0% Mpls-St. Paul 18.7% Raleigh-Durham 18.4% San Diego 17.1% Charlotte 17.0% San Antonio 16.6% Nashville 16.1% United States United 15.8% Denver 15.7% Houston 14.3% Dallas-Ft. Worth 13.1% Phoenix 12.5%

Source: US Census Bureau, 2018 American Community Survey 5-year estimates, S1501.

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2020 REGIONAL EQUITY REPORT

Black Raleigh-Durham 30.0% Austin 29.4% Atlanta 29.3% San Antonio 27.9% Portland 27.0% Houston 27.0% Nashville 26.9% Denver 26.3% Dallas-Ft. Worth 26.2% Charlotte 25.7% Baltimore 25.4% San Diego 25.2% Seattle 24.9% Phoenix 24.7% Orlando 21.9% Mpls-St. Paul 21.4% United States 21.1% 20.0%  Tampa Bay South Florida 19.3% St. Louis 18.8% Jacksonville 18.5%

Other Baltimore 32.4% St. Louis 30.1% Jacksonville 27.8% South Florida 27.1% Seattle 25.0% Austin 23.7% Raleigh-Durham 23.6% Atlanta 23.5% Orlando 23.3% Mpls-St. Paul 23.2% Portland 22.5% Nashville 20.9% Tampa Bay Bay  Tampa 20.6% Charlotte 20.2% San Diego 19.1% Denver 18.3% United States United 17.4% San Antonio 17.1% Houston 15.3% Dallas-Ft. Worth 15.0% Phoenix 13.8%


SHARE OF POPULATION WITH A BACHELOR’S DEGREE OR HIGHER

TALENT

REGIONAL EDUCATIONAL ATTAINMENT BY RACE/ETHNICITY Tampa Bay Region Asian

49.8%

Two or More Races

30.5%

White, Non-Hispanic

30.3%

All

28.3%

Black

20.0%

Hispanic, All Races

19.7%

Some Other Race

19.6%

All Sarasota

Manatee Pasco

Hillsborough

34.7%

Hillsborough Pinellas

White, Non-Hispanic 38.6%

Sarasota

32.7% 31.0% 29.3% 23.4%

36.7%

Pasco Hillsborough Pinellas

18.5%

Manatee

32.0%

Citrus

17.9%

Pasco

22.4%

Hernando

17.0%

21.9%

Manatee

15.3%

Polk

Citrus

17.6%

Hernando

Hernando

17.5%

Polk 15.0%

17.5%

Sarasota

Citrus 16.9%

Hispanic, All Races 58.0%

Citrus

52.7%

23.0%

32.6%

20.0%

Hillsborough

30.0%

Pinellas

Polk

Asian

Black

Pinellas

24.5%

11.7%

Other Pinellas

25.3%

Citrus

21.6%

Pasco

22.1%

Pasco

50.9%

Pasco

21.3%

Hillsborough

21.9%

Manatee

49.8%

Hillsborough

20.9%

Sarasota

21.8%

Sarasota

20.6%

Citrus

20.2%

Manatee

17.5%

Manatee

18.0%

Polk

44.1%

Pinellas

40.8%

Sarasota

40.7%

Hernando

33.4%

Hernando 15.7%

Hernando 14.9% Polk

13.6%

Polk

14.4%

Source: US Census Bureau, 2018 American Community Survey 5-year estimates, S1501.

www.stateoftheregion.com

33


TALENT

LABOR FORCE PARTICIPATION WHAT

The percent of the population that is 16 years old or older that is either working or actively looking for work.

WHY

An individual’s decision to participate in the workforce is economic, influenced by financial security, earnings prospects, and labor market dynamics. For example, retirees and certain single-income families contribute to a lower participation rate, because they have achieved a degree of financial security allowing them not to work. Conversely, a discouraged worker lowers the participation rate because the earnings prospects or the labor market are not favorable enough to keep looking for work. Thus, a low labor force participation rate for the population age 16 or older, as opposed to strictly that of traditional working age, could be good or bad, depending on the causes. Yet, racial variations can reflect disparities in economic outcomes when coupled with wage, unemployment, and poverty data.

In Tampa Bay, the labor force participation rate for Blacks is 8 percentage points higher than for White, Non-Hispanics.

OF NOTE

– The difference in Tampa Bay’s labor force participation rate for Blacks and White, Non-Hispanics is the highest among the peer metros. In the context of Tampa Bay’s relatively low wages, this difference may reflect disparities in financial security between these demographic groups. – Overall, Tampa Bay’s labor force participation rate is the lowest among its peers. And it ranks in the bottom quintile for every racial and ethnic category. – White, Non-Hispanics in Tampa Bay have a significantly lower labor force participation rate than every other racial and ethnic category. This may reflect the demographics of the region’s sizable retiree population that is included in this segment of the population. Source: US Census Bureau, 2018 American Community Survey 5-year estimates, S2301.

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2020 REGIONAL EQUITY REPORT


TALENT

BLACK-WHITE GAP: LABOR FORCE PARTICIPATION SHARE OF POPULATION 16 AND OLDER THAT IS WORKING OR LOOKING FOR WORK Disparity Measure

Tampa Bay in Context

Region

White

Black

Difference

Tampa Bay

53.4%

63.1%

+9.7%

South Florida

57.2%

65.7%

+8.5%

Phoenix

59.8%

67.0%

+7.2%

Charlotte

65.1%

70.0%

+4.9%

Orlando

61.8%

65.8%

+4.0%

Atlanta

65.2%

68.6%

+3.4%

San Diego

63.8%

67.1%

+3.3%

San Antonio

61.8%

65.0%

+3.2%

Seattle

67.5%

70.4%

+2.9%

Dallas-Ft. Worth

67.1%

69.9%

+2.8%

Houston

64.7%

67.4%

+2.7%

Nashville

67.1%

69.8%

+2.7%

Jacksonville

62.3%

64.9%

+2.6%

Portland

65.7%

66.9%

+1.2%

Raleigh-Durham

67.1%

68.3%

+1.2%

United States

62.3%

62.5%

+0.2%

Mpls-St. Paul

71.8%

71.6%

-0.2%

Austin

69.4%

69.2%

-0.2%

Denver

71.3%

69.5%

-1.8%

St. Louis

65.6%

63.1%

-2.5%

Baltimore

67.2%

64.5%

-2.7%

Tampa Bay Bay ï‚„ Tampa

+9.7%

South Florida

+8.5%

Phoenix

+7.2%

Charlotte

+4.9%

Orlando

+4.0%

Atlanta

+3.4%

San Diego

+3.3%

San Antonio

+3.2%

Seattle

+2.9%

Dallas-Ft. Worth

+2.8%

Houston

+2.7%

Nashville

+2.7%

Jacksonville

+2.6%

Portland

+1.2%

Raleigh-Durham

+1.2%

United United States

+0.2%

Mpls-St. Paul

-0.2%

Austin

-0.2%

Denver

-1.8%

St. Louis -2.5% Baltimore -2.7%

Source: US Census Bureau, 2018 American Community Survey 5-year estimates, S2301.

www.stateoftheregion.com

35


TALENT

COMPARATIVE LABOR FORCE PARTICIPATION BY RACE/ETHNICITY SHARE OF POPULATION 16 AND OLDER THAT IS WORKING OR LOOKING FOR WORK All

White, Non-Hispanic Mpls-St. Paul

71.8%

Mpls-St. Paul

71.6%

Denver

71.3%

Seattle

70.4%

Austin

69.4%

Charlotte

70.0%

Seattle

67.5%

Dallas-Ft. Worth

69.9%

68.2%

Baltimore

67.2%

Nashville

69.8%

Nashville

68.1%

Dallas-Ft. Worth

67.1%

Denver

69.5%

Raleigh-Durham

68.0%

Nashville

67.1%

Austin

69.2%

Charlotte

67.1%

Raleigh-Durham

67.1%

Atlanta

68.6%

Atlanta

67.0%

Portland

65.7%

Raleigh-Durham

68.3%

Baltimore

66.9%

St. Louis

65.6%

Houston

67.4%

Portland

66.8%

Atlanta

65.2%

San Diego

67.1%

Houston

66.7%

Charlotte

65.1%

Phoenix

67.0%

San Diego

65.7%

Houston

64.7%

Portland

66.9%

St. Louis

65.3%

San Diego

63.8%

Orlando

65.8%

Mpls-St. Paul

72.1%

Denver

71.2%

Austin

70.3%

Dallas-Ft. Worth

68.6%

Seattle

Orlando

63.8%

Jacksonville

62.3%

South Florida

65.7%

San Antonio

63.8%

United UnitedStates States

62.3%

San Antonio

65.0%

Jacksonville

63.7%

Orlando

Jacksonville

United States States United South Florida

61.8%

64.9%

63.3%

San Antonio

61.8%

64.5%

62.9%

Phoenix

Baltimore  Tampa Tampa Bay Bay

Phoenix

63.1%

62.5%

South Florida

St. Louis

63.1%

United States States United

62.5%

Tampa Bay Bay  Tampa

56.8%

Asian Mpls-St. Paul

 Tampa Tampa Bay Bay

59.8% 57.2% 53.4%

Hispanic, All Races

Other

71.6%

Mpls-St. Paul

77.6%

Mpls-St. Paul

Charlotte

69.8%

Baltimore

75.3%

Nashville

74.0%

Nashville

69.5%

Nashville

74.5%

Portland

73.2%

Denver

69.3%

Raleigh-Durham

74.4%

Raleigh-Durham

72.9%

75.9%

Baltimore

69.2%

Portland

74.3%

Charlotte

72.6%

Austin

68.8%

Charlotte

74.0%

Austin

72.5%

Dallas-Ft. Worth

68.1%

Seattle

74.0%

Baltimore

72.4%

Seattle

67.4%

Austin

72.6%

Denver

71.7%

Raleigh-Durham

67.1%

Atlanta

72.1%

Seattle

71.7%

Jacksonville

66.9%

Denver

71.4%

Dallas-Ft. Worth

70.9%

Atlanta

66.8%

Dallas-Ft. Worth

71.2%

Atlanta

70.4%

St. Louis

71.0%

Jacksonville

69.1%

Houston

69.1%

Houston

69.0%

St. Louis

66.4%

Portland

66.2%

Houston

65.5%

Phoenix

64.9%

South Florida

64.9%

United States States United San Antonio

64.9% 64.5%

San Diego

64.5%

Orlando

62.6%

 Tampa Tampa Bay Bay

61.6%

San Diego

68.8%

San Diego

68.6%

Jacksonville

68.7%

St. Louis

68.1%

UnitedStates States United Phoenix

67.4% 67.0%

United States United Phoenix

66.6%

Orlando

66.2%

Orlando

66.5%

2020 REGIONAL EQUITY REPORT

66.8%

 Tampa TampaBay Bay

65.9%

 Tampa Tampa Bay Bay

65.7%

South Florida

65.4%

South Florida

65.6%

San Antonio

65.0%

San Antonio

64.9%

Source: US Census Bureau, 2018 American Community Survey 5-year estimates, S2301.

36

Black


TALENT

REGIONAL LABOR FORCE PARTICIPATION BY RACE/ETHNICITY SHARE OF POPULATION 16 AND OLDER THAT IS WORKING OR LOOKING FOR WORK Tampa Bay Region Hispanic, All Races

65.9%

Some Other Race

65.7%

Two or More Races

65.2%

Black

63.1%

Asian

61.6%

All

56.8%

White, Non-Hispanic

53.4%

All

White, Non-Hispanic

Hillsborough

64.9%

Pinellas

58.0%

Hillsborough

64.0%

Pinellas

56.8%

Black Hillsborough

66.9%

Pinellas

62.9% 62.6%

Polk

55.0%

Polk

53.7%

Pasco

Manatee

53.6%

Manatee

52.3%

Manatee

60.8%

Pasco

53.4%

Pasco

52.2%

Sarasota

59.4% 58.5%

Sarasota

48.6%

Sarasota

47.7%

Polk

Hernando

46.9%

Hernando

46.1%

Hernando

Citrus

Citrus

40.2%

Asian

Citrus

39.6%

Hispanic, All Races

Pinellas

64.9%

52.6% 41.9%

Other

Sarasota

68.4%

Hillsborough

67.6%

Hillsborough

62.1%

Hillsborough

67.8%

Sarasota

67.3%

Pasco

62.0%

Manatee

67.6%

Pinellas

67.3%

Hernando

61.8%

Pinellas

67.6%

Manatee

67.1%

Polk

61.7%

Pasco

Manatee Sarasota Citrus

59.0% 50.3% 43.0%

Polk Hernando Citrus

64.7% 61.3% 54.7% 49.4%

Pasco Polk Hernando Citrus

64.3% 61.9% 54.1% 49.6%

Source: US Census Bureau, 2018 American Community Survey 5-year estimates, S2301.

www.stateoftheregion.com

37


TALENT 38

2020 REGIONAL EQUITY REPORT


TALENT

FLORIDA TALENT INDICATORS WHAT

The following indicators measure a collection of capstone and other assessments generally viewed as markers of academic progress and content mastery.

WHY

Content mastery and passage of the relevant exams allows for progression through the education pipeline. Conversely, failure to meet these standards may preclude student advancement, from one grade to the next, from secondary school to an institution of higher education, and from school into a job with family-sustaining wages. Examining these indicators through a lens of race and ethnicity can uncover achievement gaps.

The Black-White achievement gap in Tampa Bay is significantly larger than the State of Florida’s overall gap, for every indicator but the Science Assessment.

OF NOTE

– The passage rates in Tampa Bay are the lowest among the Florida peers for every measure and for every race/ethnic category except Asian. – In the region overall, White and Asian students’ pass rate is above the regional average in each of the measured subjects, while Hispanic, Black, and Economically Disadvantaged students’ pass rate is below. – The pass rates and performance for Black students is best in Pasco County. The pass rates and graduation rate for Hispanic students is generally best in Citrus County. Source: Florida Department of Education; EDStats Portal, 2018-2019 Academic Year.

www.stateoftheregion.com

39


TALENT

ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS, FLORIDA STANDARDS ASSESSMENT SCORE OF 3 OR BETTER (3RD GRADE)

Tampa Bay in Context

Disparity Measure White, Non-Hispanic

Region Region

Black Black

Difference Difference

Florida

70.6%

40.0%

-30.6%

South Florida

75.5%

43.3%

-32.2%

Tampa Bay

67.9%

35.4%

-32.5%

Orlando

74.5%

40.9%

-33.6%

Jacksonville

72.5%

38.7%

-33.8%

All

Florida Florida

-30.6%

South Florida

-32.2%

Bay  Tampa Bay

-32.5%

Orlando

-33.6%

Jacksonville

-33.8%

White, Non-Hispanic

Black

Jacksonville

59.8%

South Florida

75.5%

South Florida

43.3%

South Florida

58.6%

Orlando

74.5%

Orlando

40.9%

Florida Florida

57.6%

Jacksonville

72.5%

Florida Florida

40.0%

Orlando

56.9%

Florida Florida

70.6%

Jacksonville

38.7%

Bay  Tampa Bay

55.2%

Tampa Bay Bay  Tampa

Asian South Florida

67.9%

Hispanic, All Races 82.1%

South Florida

60.8%

Bay  Tampa Bay

35.4%

Economically Disadvantaged South Florida

50.6%

Orlando

79.4%

Florida Florida

53.8%

Florida Florida

48.0%

Florida Florida

78.8%

Jacksonville

52.7%

Orlando

46.8%

 Tampa Bay

77.4%

Orlando

50.2%

Jacksonville

45.9%

Jacksonville

77.1%

Tampa Bay Bay  Tampa

45.9%

 Tampa Bay

43.7%

Source: Florida Department of Education; EDStats Portal, 2018-2019 Academic Year. Note: Economically disadvantaged students are students determined to be eligible for free and reduced price meals under the National School Lunch Program.

40

2020 REGIONAL EQUITY REPORT


SCORE OF 3 OR BETTER (3RD GRADE)

TALENT

ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS, FLORIDA STANDARDS ASSESSMENT Tampa Bay Region Asian

77.4%

White, Non-Hispanic

67.9%

All

55.2%

Hispanic, All Races

45.9%

Economically Disadvantaged

43.7%

Black

35.4%

All

White, Non-Hispanic

Sarasota

70.5%

Sarasota

78.6%

Black Citrus

50.0% 47.8%

Citrus

60.8%

Manatee

70.8%

Pasco

Pasco

59.9%

Hillsborough

69.9%

Sarasota

Hernando

57.4%

Pinellas

67.1%

Hernando

39.9%

Pinellas

55.9%

Polk

66.1%

Polk

39.2%

44.4%

Hillsborough

52.5%

Pasco

63.8%

Hillsborough

33.4%

Polk

52.1%

Citrus

62.7%

Pinellas

31.3%

Manatee

51.1%

Hernando

60.9%

Manatee

30.7%

Asian

Hispanic, All Races

Sarasota

86.3%

Economically Disadvantaged

Sarasota

57.8%

Sarasota

Hillsborough

81.8%

Hernando

55.4%

Citrus

Manatee

80.0%

Pasco

53.0%

Hernando

Citrus

51.6%

Pasco

Pasco

75.7%

Polk

72.5%

Pinellas

Hernando

72.0%

Polk Hillsborough

Pinellas Citrus

66.4% 58.8%

Manatee

59.7% 56.8% 51.7% 48.2%

Polk

43.3%

44.9%

Pinellas

43.1%

44.9%

Hillsborough

39.7%

Manatee

38.3%

48.8%

34.4%

Source: Florida Department of Education; EDStats Portal, 2018-2019 Academic Year. Note: Economically disadvantaged students are students determined to be eligible for free and reduced price meals under the National School Lunch Program. www.stateoftheregion.com

41


TALENT

MATH, FLORIDA STANDARDS ASSESSMENT SCORE OF 3 OR BETTER (3RD & 8TH GRADE)

Disparity Measure

Tampa Bay in Context

White, Non-Hispanic

Region

Black

Difference

Florida

68.2%

40.2%

-28.0%

Orlando

69.4%

40.2%

-29.2%

Jacksonville

72.8%

41.4%

-31.4%

Tampa Bay

64.8%

33.0%

-31.9%

South Florida

77.9%

45.3%

-32.6%

All

Orlando

60.5%

South Florida

South Florida

59.6%

Jacksonville

56.2%

72.8%

-29.2% -31.4%

TampaBay Bay  Tampa

-31.9%

South Florida

-32.6%

Black South Florida

45.3%

Jacksonville

41.4%

Orlando

69.4%

Orlando

40.2%

68.2%

Florida Florida

40.2%

Orlando

53.4%

Florida Florida

Tampa Bay Bay  Tampa

52.8%

Tampa Bay Bay  Tampa

Asian

77.9%

-28.0%

Jacksonville

White, Non-Hispanic

Jacksonville

Florida Florida

Florida Florida

64.8%

Hispanic, All Races

 Tampa Bay

33.0%

Economically Disadvantaged

South Florida

85.5%

South Florida

Florida Florida

83.1%

Jacksonville

53.8%

Jacksonville

48.9%

Tampa Bay Bay  Tampa

82.6%

Florida Florida

53.7%

Florida Florida

48.0%

Orlando

82.0%

Orlando

Jacksonville

81.7%

Tampa Bay Bay  Tampa

61.3%

48.2% 45.5%

South Florida

52.5%

Orlando

45.2%

Bay  Tampa Bay

43.0%

Source: Florida Department of Education; EDStats Portal, 2018-2019 Academic Year. Note: Economically disadvantaged students are students determined to be eligible for free and reduced price meals under the National School Lunch Program.

42

2020 REGIONAL EQUITY REPORT


TALENT

MATH, FLORIDA STANDARDS ASSESSMENT SCORE OF 3 OR BETTER (3RD & 8TH GRADE) Tampa Bay Region Asian

82.6%

White, Non-Hispanic

64.8%

All

52.8%

Hispanic, All Races

45.5%

Economically Disadvantaged

43.0%

Black

33.0%

All

White, Non-Hispanic

Sarasota

70.4%

Pasco

63.5%

Hernando

57.1%

Sarasota

76.4%

Black Pasco

47.4% 46.5%

Manatee

69.0%

Sarasota

Pasco

67.5%

Citrus

40.4%

Citrus

54.2%

Pinellas

63.1%

Hernando

38.3%

Manatee

53.4%

Hillsborough

62.2%

Manatee

36.4%

Pinellas

52.0%

Hernando

61.9%

Polk

35.9%

61.4%

Hillsborough

29.1%

Polk

48.2%

Polk

Hillsborough

46.7%

Citrus

Asian Sarasota

56.1%

Hispanic, All Races 92.5%

Sarasota

Hillsborough

86.2%

Pasco

Pasco

85.4%

Hernando

Manatee

84.5%

Citrus

61.6%

Pinellas

28.8%

Economically Disadvantaged Sarasota

61.2%

Pasco

52.0%

Hernando

50.4%

49.0%

Citrus

50.1%

47.1%

Manatee

44.1%

57.6% 51.6%

Polk

72.4%

Pinellas

Pinellas

71.0%

Polk

42.5%

Pinellas

42.4% 41.6%

Citrus

n/d

Manatee

42.2%

Polk

Hernando

n/d

Hillsborough

42.1%

Hillsborough

36.3%

Source: Florida Department of Education; EDStats Portal, 2018-2019 Academic Year. Notes: Economically disadvantaged students are students determined to be eligible for free and reduced price meals under the National School Lunch Program. The label “n/d” indicates “non-disclosed” and that the sample size was not big enough to make the calculation. www.stateoftheregion.com

43


TALENT

SCIENCE, FLORIDA STANDARDS ASSESSMENT SCORE OF 3 OR BETTER (5TH & 8TH GRADE)

Disparity Measure

Tampa Bay in Context

White, Non-Hispanic

Region

Black

Difference

Orlando

68.7%

36.5%

-32.1%

Tampa Bay

62.0%

28.3%

-33.7%

Florida

65.0%

31.1%

-33.9%

South Florida

68.3%

32.8%

-35.5%

Jacksonville

68.8%

31.0%

-37.8%

Orlando Tampa Bay Bay  Tampa

-33.7%

Florida Florida

-33.9%

South Florida

All Jacksonville

Jacksonville

White, Non-Hispanic

55.2%

-32.1%

-35.5% -37.8%

Black

Jacksonville

68.8%

Orlando

36.5%

Orlando

51.5%

Orlando

68.7%

South Florida

32.8%

Florida Florida

50.7%

South Florida

68.3%

Florida Florida

31.1%

Tampa Bay Bay  Tampa

50.1%

Florida Florida

Jacksonville

31.0%

South Florida

48.5%

Tampa Bay Bay  Tampa

Asian

65.0% 62.0%

Hispanic, All Races

 Tampa Bay 28.3%

Economically Disadvantaged

Orlando

77.7%

Jacksonville

49.3%

Orlando

40.7%

Florida Florida

76.3%

South Florida

49.3%

Jacksonville

40.2%

Jacksonville

75.9%

Florida Florida

45.2%

South Florida

40.1%

South Florida

75.8%

Orlando

43.2%

Florida Florida

40.0%

Tampa Bay Bay  Tampa

41.4%

 Tampa Bay

38.8%

Tampa Bay Bay  Tampa

71.8%

Source: Florida Department of Education; EDStats Portal, 2018-2019 Academic Year. Note: Economically disadvantaged students are students determined to be eligible for free and reduced price meals under the National School Lunch Program.

44

2020 REGIONAL EQUITY REPORT


TALENT

SCIENCE, FLORIDA STANDARDS ASSESSMENT SCORE OF 3 OR BETTER (5TH & 8TH GRADE) Tampa Bay Region Asian

71.8%

White, Non-Hispanic

62.0%

All

50.1%

Hispanic, All Races

41.4%

Economically Disadvantaged

38.8%

Black

28.3%

All Sarasota

White, Non-Hispanic 63.3%

Sarasota

70.1%

Black Hernando

33.9%

Citrus

55.4%

Hillsborough

66.2%

Sarasota

33.5%

Hernando

54.4%

Pinellas

64.4%

Pasco

33.4%

Pasco

53.4%

Manatee

62.9%

Citrus

32.6%

Pinellas

52.3%

Hernando

58.8%

Hillsborough

29.2%

Pasco

58.6%

Polk

26.8%

Citrus

57.7%

Manatee

23.6%

Polk

57.4%

Pinellas

23.2%

Hillsborough Manatee Polk

49.1% 46.4% 42.8%

Asian Sarasota

Hispanic, All Races 84.0%

Sarasota

51.6%

Economically Disadvantaged Sarasota

50.7% 50.5%

Hillsborough

79.7%

Citrus

47.8%

Citrus

Pasco

78.2%

Hernando

47.0%

Hernando

Polk

73.1%

47.2%

Pasco

44.2%

Pasco

41.2% 39.0%

Manatee

69.6%

Pinellas

43.0%

Pinellas

Citrus

68.3%

Hillsborough

40.8%

Hillsborough

36.0%

Pinellas

68.2%

Polk

34.9%

Manatee

34.0%

Manatee

32.9%

Polk

33.4%

Hernando

65.5%

Source: Florida Department of Education; EDStats Portal, 2018-2019 Academic Year. Note: Economically disadvantaged students are students determined to be eligible for free and reduced price meals under the National School Lunch Program. www.stateoftheregion.com

45


TALENT

ALGEBRA 1 END OF COURSE EXAM SCORE OF 3 OR BETTER

Disparity Measure

Tampa Bay in Context

White, Non-Hispanic

Region

Black

Difference

Florida

70.9%

42.7%

-28.2%

Jacksonville

74.5%

46.3%

-28.2%

Orlando

71.2%

42.0%

-29.2%

Tampa Bay

69.1%

38.1%

-31.0%

South Florida

78.5%

46.0%

-32.6%

All

Florida Florida

-28.2%

Jacksonville

-28.2%

Orlando

-29.2%

Bay  Tampa Bay South Florida

White, Non-Hispanic

Jacksonville

64.9%

South Florida

78.5%

-31.0% -32.6%

Black Jacksonville

46.3%

South Florida

46.0%

South Florida

61.2%

Jacksonville

Florida Florida

60.0%

Orlando

71.2%

Florida Florida

42.7%

Tampa Bay Bay  Tampa

59.1%

Florida Florida

70.9%

Orlando

42.0%

Orlando

56.8%

Tampa Bay Bay  Tampa

69.1%

Bay  Tampa Bay

Asian

74.5%

Hispanic, All Races

38.1%

Economically Disadvantaged

South Florida

87.1%

South Florida

Florida Florida

85.5%

Jacksonville

 Tampa Bay

84.7%

Florida Florida

Orlando

84.2%

TampaBay Bay  Tampa

50.8%

 Tampa Bay

47.6%

Jacksonville

83.9%

Orlando

48.9%

Orlando

46.9%

62.4% 59.6% 56.2%

South Florida

54.1%

Jacksonville

51.6%

Florida Florida

50.6%

Source: Florida Department of Education; EDStats Portal, 2018-2019 Academic Year. Note: Economically disadvantaged students are students determined to be eligible for free and reduced price meals under the National School Lunch Program.

46

2020 REGIONAL EQUITY REPORT


TALENT

ALGEBRA 1 END OF COURSE EXAM SCORE OF 3 OR BETTER Tampa Bay Region Asian

84.7%

White, Non-Hispanic

69.1%

All

59.1%

Hispanic, All Races

50.8%

Economically Disadvantaged

47.6%

Black

38.1%

All

White, Non-Hispanic

Sarasota

72.9%

Black

Sarasota

78.9%

Pasco

47.7% 47.0%

Citrus

66.6%

Manatee

77.0%

Sarasota

Manatee

64.1%

Hillsborough

75.6%

Hillsborough

42.8%

Manatee

41.6% 41.5%

Hillsborough

61.5%

Citrus

Pasco

59.3%

Pinellas

64.0%

Hernando

Hernando

58.2%

Pasco

63.0%

Polk

32.3%

Hernando

62.9%

Pinellas

28.2%

Polk

62.8%

Citrus

Pinellas Polk

54.9% 48.6%

Asian

69.2%

Hispanic, All Races

n/d

Economically Disadvantaged

Sarasota

90.1%

Sarasota

61.1%

Citrus

62.4%

Manatee

90.0%

Citrus

60.5%

Sarasota

61.0%

Hillsborough

89.0%

Hillsborough

54.7%

Manatee

Citrus

88.2%

Manatee

53.2%

Hernando

50.3%

Hernando

86.0%

Pasco

50.8%

Hillsborough

48.9%

Pasco

85.1%

Pinellas

46.7%

Pasco

Polk

84.2%

Hernando

46.6%

Pinellas

41.3%

Polk

40.2%

Pinellas

74.0%

Polk

41.2%

55.4%

46.1%

Source: Florida Department of Education; EDStats Portal, 2018-2019 Academic Year. Notes: Economically disadvantaged students are students determined to be eligible for free and reduced price meals under the National School Lunch Program. The label “n/d” indicates “non-disclosed” and that the sample size was not big enough to make the calculation. www.stateoftheregion.com

47


TALENT

BIOLOGY 1 END OF COURSE EXAM SCORE OF 3 OR BETTER

Disparity Measure

Tampa Bay in Context

White, Non-Hispanic

Region

Black

Difference

Orlando

78.7%

53.3%

-25.4%

Jacksonville

82.0%

54.0%

-27.9%

Florida

77.7%

49.4%

-28.3%

South Florida

83.1%

53.9%

-29.2%

Tampa Bay

75.1%

40.8%

-34.4%

All Jacksonville

Orlando Jacksonville

-27.9%

Florida Florida

-28.3%

South Florida

-29.2%

Tampa Bay Bay  Tampa

White, Non-Hispanic 73.0%

-34.4%

Black

South Florida

83.1%

Jacksonville

54.0%

82.0%

South Florida

53.9% 53.3%

South Florida

67.7%

Jacksonville

Florida Florida

66.9%

Orlando

78.7%

Orlando

Orlando

66.7%

Florida Florida

77.7%

Florida Florida

Tampa Bay  Tampa

64.6%

Tampa Bay  Tampa

75.1%

Bay  Tampa Bay

Asian

-25.4%

Hispanic, All Races

49.4% 40.8%

Economically Disadvantaged

South Florida

89.2%

Jacksonville

69.5%

South Florida

60.8%

Jacksonville

87.6%

South Florida

68.5%

Jacksonville

59.8%

Orlando

86.9%

Florida Florida

63.3%

Orlando

57.6%

Florida Florida

86.7%

Orlando

60.9%

Florida Florida

57.2%

 Tampa Bay

85.8%

 Tampa Bay

56.3%

Bay  Tampa Bay

52.1%

Source: Florida Department of Education; EDStats Portal, 2018-2019 Academic Year. Note: Economically disadvantaged students are students determined to be eligible for free and reduced price meals under the National School Lunch Program.

48

2020 REGIONAL EQUITY REPORT


TALENT

BIOLOGY 1 END OF COURSE EXAM SCORE OF 3 OR BETTER Tampa Bay Region Asian

85.8%

White, Non-Hispanic

75.1%

All

64.6%

Hispanic, All Races

56.3%

Economically Disadvantaged

52.1%

Black

40.8%

All

White, Non-Hispanic

Sarasota

76.1%

Citrus

72.0%

Black

Sarasota

82.3%

Sarasota

49.6%

Manatee

81.1%

Pasco

47.2%

80.6%

Hillsborough

45.6%

Manatee

68.0%

Hillsborough

Hillsborough

66.4%

Citrus

73.8%

Manatee

44.3%

Pasco

66.1%

Pinellas

73.5%

Citrus

43.2%

Hernando

65.9%

Hernando

71.3%

Hernando

38.7%

Pasco

70.4%

Polk

38.0%

Pinellas Polk

62.2%

Polk

54.2%

Asian Manatee

67.1%

Hispanic, All Races 95.6%

Citrus

71.4%

Pinellas

29.5%

Economically Disadvantaged Sarasota

64.8%

Citrus

64.4%

Hillsborough

90.3%

Sarasota

Sarasota

87.7%

Hillsborough

59.9%

Manatee

56.7%

Hernando

86.1%

Pasco

58.9%

Hernando

55.5%

Pasco

83.8%

Hernando

58.1%

Pasco

53.7%

56.3%

Hillsborough

52.7%

Citrus

81.0%

Manatee

Polk

79.9%

Pinellas

Pinellas

79.3%

Polk

65.4%

51.8% 47.4%

Pinellas Polk

47.8% 44.1%

Source: Florida Department of Education; EDStats Portal, 2018-2019 Academic Year. Note: Economically disadvantaged students are students determined to be eligible for free and reduced price meals under the National School Lunch Program. www.stateoftheregion.com

49


TALENT

HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATION RATE SHARE OF STUDENTS WHO GRADUATED WITHIN 4 YEARS OF THEIR INITIAL ENROLLMENT IN 9TH GRADE

Disparity Measure

Tampa Bay in Context

White, Non-Hispanic

Region

Black

Difference

Jacksonville

90.6%

85.2%

-5.3%

Florida

90.2%

81.5%

-8.7%

Tampa Bay

89.3%

79.7%

-9.6%

Orlando

92.8%

82.2%

-10.6%

South Florida

92.3%

81.4%

-10.8%

All

-5.3%

Florida Florida

-8.7%

TampaBay Bay  Tampa

-9.6%

Orlando

-10.6%

South Florida

-10.8%

White, Non-Hispanic

Black

Orlando

89.3%

Orlando

92.8%

Jacksonville

Jacksonville

89.2%

South Florida

92.3%

Orlando

82.2%

Florida Florida

86.9%

Jacksonville

90.6%

Florida Florida

81.5%

South Florida

86.2%

Florida Florida

90.2%

South Florida

81.4%

Tampa Bay Bay  Tampa

86.1%

 Tampa Bay

89.3%

Tampa Bay Bay  Tampa

79.7%

Asian

Hispanic, All Races

Orlando

96.7%

Jacksonville

90.5%

Florida Florida

95.6%

Orlando

89.2%

 Tampa Bay

95.6%

South Florida

86.4%

South Florida

94.9%

Florida Florida

85.9%

Jacksonville

94.3%

 Tampa Bay

83.0%

Source: Florida Department of Education; EDStats Portal, 2018-2019 Academic Year.

50

Jacksonville

2020 REGIONAL EQUITY REPORT

85.2%


SHARE OF STUDENTS WHO GRADUATED WITHIN 4 YEARS OF THEIR INITIAL ENROLLMENT IN 9TH GRADE

TALENT

HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATION RATE Tampa Bay Region Asian

95.6%

White, Non-Hispanic

89.3%

All

86.1%

Hispanic, All Races

83.0%

Black

79.7%

All

White, Non-Hispanic

Black

Sarasota

89.4%

Sarasota

92.1%

Pasco

Pinellas

88.4%

Hillsborough

91.6%

Pinellas

81.3%

Hernando

88.4%

Pinellas

90.5%

Hernando

80.3%

Pasco

88.3%

Hernando

89.4%

Hillsborough

79.8%

Hillsborough

86.2%

Manatee

88.7%

Polk

78.7%

Citrus

86.0%

Pasco

88.4%

Manatee

74.9%

86.4%

Sarasota

74.0%

Manatee

83.2%

Citrus

Polk

81.2%

Polk

Asian

83.6%

Citrus

88.0%

70.0%

Hispanic, All Races

Sarasota

97.7%

Citrus

86.8%

Hernando

96.4%

Pinellas

86.7%

Manatee

96.4%

Pasco

86.7%

Pasco

96.3%

Sarasota

86.2%

Hillsborough

96.2%

Hernando

86.0%

Citrus

95.5%

Hillsborough

83.9%

Pinellas

94.5%

Polk

78.7%

Polk

94.2%

Manatee

77.0%

Source: Florida Department of Education; EDStats Portal, 2018-2019 Academic Year.

www.stateoftheregion.com

51


TALENT

HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATION RATE – ECONOMICALLY DISADVANTAGED SHARE OF STUDENTS WHO GRADUATED WITHIN 4 YEARS OF THEIR INITIAL ENROLLMENT IN 9TH GRADE

Disparity Measure

Tampa Bay in Context

White, Non-Hispanic

Region

Black

Difference

Jacksonville

81.3%

82.4%

1.1%

Florida

82.7%

80.4%

-2.2%

Tampa Bay

81.2%

77.5%

-3.8%

Orlando

86.8%

82.3%

-4.5%

South Florida

85.8%

81.1%

-4.7%

All Orlando

Jacksonville Florida Florida -2.2%

TampaBay Bay  Tampa

-3.8%

Orlando

-4.5%

South Florida

-4.7%

White, Non-Hispanic 86.9%

1.1%

Black

Orlando

86.8%

Jacksonville

82.4%

85.8%

Orlando

82.3%

South Florida

83.7%

South Florida

Jacksonville

83.2%

Florida Florida

82.7%

South Florida

81.1%

Florida Florida

82.9%

Jacksonville

81.3%

Florida Florida

80.4%

Tampa Bay  Tampa

80.5%

 Tampa Bay

81.2%

Tampa Bay Bay  Tampa

Asian Orlando

Hispanic, All Races 97.1%

Jacksonville

89.8% 88.8%

Florida Florida

93.7%

Orlando

Tampa Bay Bay  Tampa

92.9%

South Florida

85.1%

South Florida

92.4%

Florida Florida

84.5%

Jacksonville

77.5%

87.4%

 Tampa Bay

81.0%

Source: Florida Department of Education; EDStats Portal, 2018-2019 Academic Year. Note: Economically disadvantaged students are students determined to be eligible for free and reduced price meals under the National School Lunch Program.

52

2020 REGIONAL EQUITY REPORT


SHARE OF STUDENTS WHO GRADUATED WITHIN 4 YEARS OF THEIR INITIAL ENROLLMENT IN 9TH GRADE

TALENT

HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATION RATE – ECONOMICALLY DISADVANTAGED Tampa Bay Region Asian

92.9%

White, Non-Hispanic

81.2%

Hispanic, All Races

81.0%

All

80.5%

Black

77.5%

All

White, Non-Hispanic

Black

Hernando

86.3%

Sarasota

87.1%

Pasco

Sarasota

84.6%

Hernando

85.9%

Hernando

Citrus

83.7%

Citrus

83.7%

Hillsborough

77.5%

Pasco

83.0%

Hillsborough

83.0%

Pinellas

77.4%

Pinellas

81.5%

Pasco

81.8%

Polk

77.1%

Hillsborough

80.6%

Pinellas

81.1%

Manatee

74.6%

Citrus

73.2%

Sarasota

72.3%

Manatee

77.0%

Manatee

Polk

75.6%

Polk

Asian

77.8% 71.9%

95.5%

Citrus

86.8%

Hillsborough

94.2%

Sarasota

86.6%

Sarasota

93.3%

Hernando

86.5%

Pasco

93.1%

Pinellas

85.1%

Polk

92.7%

Pasco

82.8%

Hernando

92.3%

Hillsborough

81.2%

Pinellas

90.9%

Manatee

77.1%

Polk

76.9%

n/d

82.2%

Hispanic, All Races

Manatee

Citrus

85.8%

Source: Florida Department of Education; EDStats Portal, 2018-2019 Academic Year. Note: The label “n/d” indicates “non-disclosed” and that the sample size was not big enough to make the calculation. www.stateoftheregion.com

53


INFRASTRUCTURE

DIGITAL ACCESS & THE DIGITAL DIVIDE WHAT

The share of households with a computer and a dedicated physical broadband internet subscription using a service such as cable, fiber optic, or DSL.

WHY

Increasingly, modern life requires digital access and basic digital skills. Those households with adequate technology and broadband access are better equipped to participate in activities ranging from school to telemedicine to working from home, and the people in those households will have higher levels of digital literacy. The disparity in access between socio-economic groups and racial and ethnic groups is referred to as the “Digital Divide.”

The disparity in digital access between Blacks and White, NonHispanics in Tampa Bay is one of the highest of its peers.

OF NOTE – Digital access in Tampa Bay is the lowest among its peer group. Tampa Bay ranks in the bottom quintile in all racial and ethnic categories. – While 92 percent of all households in Seattle have broadband internet, less than 83 percent of households in Tampa Bay have it. Among Black households, only 71 percent have broadband access. – Among the eight counties in the Tampa Bay region, Polk County has the lowest share of households with digital access—only about half of the households of color have broadband access. Source: US Census Bureau, 2018 American Community Survey 5-year estimates, B28009.

54

2020 REGIONAL EQUITY REPORT


SHARE OF HOUSEHOLDS WITH A COMPUTER AND A BROADBAND INTERNET SUBSCRIPTION Disparity Measure Region

Tampa Bay in Context

White

Black

San Diego

93.6%

87.3%

-6.3%

Seattle

92.7%

86.0%

-6.7%

Atlanta

90.4%

82.7%

-7.7%

Phoenix

90.4%

82.1%

-8.3%

Portland

91.1%

82.8%

-8.3%

Orlando

90.4%

81.6%

-8.8%

Charlotte

89.4%

80.5%

-8.9%

San Antonio

89.3%

80.4%

Difference

San Diego

-6.3%

Seattle

INFRASTRUCTURE

BLACK-WHITE GAP: DIGITAL ACCESS & THE DIGITAL DIVIDE

-6.7%

Atlanta

-7.7%

Phoenix

-8.3%

Portland

-8.3%

Orlando

-8.8%

Charlotte

-8.9%

San Antonio

-8.9%

-8.9%

Mpls-St. Paul

91.3%

80.9%

-10.4%

Baltimore

90.8%

80.2%

-10.5%

Denver

92.7%

82.1%

-10.6%

Raleigh-Durham

91.6%

80.9%

-10.7%

Houston

91.3%

80.6%

-10.8%

Nashville

87.4%

76.5%

-11.0%

United States

86.6%

75.4%

-11.1%

Austin

92.8%

81.0%

-11.8%

Jacksonville

88.5%

76.0%

-12.6%

Dallas-Ft. Worth

91.3%

77.6%

-13.7%

Tampa Bay

85.1%

71.3%

-13.8%

South Florida

88.5%

74.6%

-13.9%

St. Louis

88.2%

72.3%

-15.8%

Mpls-St. Paul

-10.4%

Baltimore

-10.5%

Denver

-10.6%

Raleigh-Durham

-10.7%

Houston

-10.8%

Nashville

-11.0%

United States United States

-11.1%

Austin

-11.8%

Jacksonville

-12.6%

Dallas-Ft. Worth

-13.7%

Tampa Bay Bay ï‚„ Tampa

-13.8%

South Florida

-13.9%

St. Louis

-15.8%

Source: US Census Bureau, 2018 American Community Survey 5-year estimates, B28009.

www.stateoftheregion.com

55


INFRASTRUCTURE

COMPARATIVE DIGITAL ACCESS BY RACE/ETHNICITY SHARE OF HOUSEHOLDS WITH A COMPUTER AND A BROADBAND INTERNET SUBSCRIPTION All

White, Non-Hispanic

Seattle

91.9%

San Diego

93.6%

San Diego

87.3%

San Diego

91.0%

Austin

92.8%

Seattle

86.0%

Portland

90.4%

Denver

92.7%

Portland

82.8%

Mpls-St. Paul

90.0%

Seattle

92.7%

Atlanta

82.7%

Denver

89.5%

Raleigh-Durham

91.6%

Phoenix

82.1%

Raleigh-Durham

88.4%

Houston

91.3%

Denver

82.1%

Austin

87.7%

Mpls-St. Paul

91.3%

Orlando

81.6%

Baltimore

87.6%

Dallas-Ft. Worth

91.3%

Austin

81.0%

Orlando

87.1%

Portland

91.1%

Raleigh-Durham

80.9%

Charlotte

86.8%

Baltimore

90.8%

Mpls-St. Paul

80.9%

Atlanta

86.7%

Orlando

90.4%

Houston

80.6%

Phoenix

85.9%

Phoenix

90.4%

Charlotte

80.5%

Jacksonville

85.8%

Atlanta

90.4%

San Antonio

80.4%

Nashville

85.4%

Charlotte

89.4%

Baltimore

80.2%

St. Louis

85.2%

San Antonio

89.3%

Dallas-Ft. Worth

77.6%

Dallas-Ft. Worth

85.1%

Jacksonville

88.5%

Nashville

76.5%

Houston

84.6%

South Florida

88.5%

United States United

84.2%

St. Louis

88.2%

Jacksonville United United States

75.4%

South Florida

83.1%

South Florida

74.6%

82.9%

Nashville United United States

87.4%

San Antonio

86.6%

72.3%

 Tampa Bay

82.5%

 Tampa Tampa Bay

85.1%

St. Louis  Tampa Tampa Bay Bay

Asian Baltimore

Hispanic, All Races 95.6%

Seattle

88.2%

76.0%

71.3%

Other Seattle

89.7%

Austin

95.4%

San Diego

86.4%

Portland

87.3%

San Diego

94.6%

Portland

86.2%

San Diego

87.1%

Dallas-Ft. Worth

94.5%

Jacksonville

85.1%

Jacksonville

86.8%

Raleigh-Durham

94.3%

Baltimore

83.6%

Baltimore

86.5%

Houston

94.2%

Orlando

83.3%

Mpls-St. Paul

85.9%

Orlando

94.2%

Mpls-St. Paul

83.3%

St. Louis

84.5%

Nashville

94.1%

South Florida

82.5%

Orlando

84.1%

Phoenix

94.0%

St. Louis

82.4%

Raleigh-Durham

83.6%

Seattle

93.9%

Raleigh-Durham

82.4%

Charlotte

83.0%

Portland

93.7%

Denver

81.6%

South Florida

82.9%

Charlotte

93.6%

Charlotte

81.4%

Denver

82.7%

Atlanta

93.3%

Nashville

80.6%

Nashville

81.5%

Denver

92.9%

United States United

79.6%

Atlanta

80.6%

San Antonio United United States States

92.6%

Austin

79.1%

United States United

80.3%

92.5%

San Antonio

78.6%

Austin

80.1%

South Florida

92.5%

78.4%

79.0%

77.7%

San Antonio  Tampa Tampa Bay

79.0%

77.7%

Phoenix

78.2%

Jacksonville

92.3%

Atlanta  Tampa Tampa Bay

Mpls-St. Paul

91.7%

Phoenix

St. Louis  Tampa Bay

91.4%

Houston

77.6%

Houston

78.1%

91.3%

Dallas-Ft. Worth

76.5%

Dallas-Ft. Worth

77.6%

Source: US Census Bureau, 2018 American Community Survey 5-year estimates, B28009.

56

Black

2020 REGIONAL EQUITY REPORT


SHARE OF HOUSEHOLDS WITH A COMPUTER AND A BROADBAND INTERNET SUBSCRIPTION Tampa Bay Region Asian

91.3%

Two or More Races

89.4%

White, Non-Hispanic

85.1%

All

82.5%

Hispanic, All Races

77.7%

Some Other Race

77.3%

Black

71.3%

All

White, Non-Hispanic

Black

Sarasota

87.1%

Hillsborough

Hillsborough

87.1%

Sarasota

87.7%

Hillsborough

79.4%

Hernando

85.3%

Pinellas

86.0%

Citrus

79.4%

Citrus

84.5%

Manatee

85.0%

Pasco

79.2%

Pasco

84.0%

Hernando

84.7%

Sarasota

78.9%

Pinellas

83.7%

Citrus

84.7%

Manatee

Manatee

82.1%

Pasco

83.7%

Pinellas

Polk

INFRASTRUCTURE

REGIONAL DIGITAL ACCESS BY RACE/ETHNICITY

Polk

66.5%

Asian

90.8%

73.2%

Hernando

Polk

Hispanic, All Races

82.3%

73.0% 67.2% 51.3%

Other

Hillsborough

94.3%

Hernando

89.3%

Hernando

Pasco

93.9%

Citrus

87.1%

Citrus

85.7%

Sarasota

93.0%

Sarasota

84.2%

Sarasota

85.3%

89.7%

Pinellas

90.0%

Pasco

83.6%

Pasco

85.0%

Manatee

88.8%

Hillsborough

83.4%

Hillsborough

84.3%

Polk

83.0%

Pinellas

Hernando

81.1%

Manatee

Citrus

79.3%

Polk

79.8% 73.2% 55.6%

Pinellas Manatee Polk

81.2% 74.0% 57.9%

Source: US Census Bureau, 2018 American Community Survey 5-year estimates, B28009.

www.stateoftheregion.com

57


INFRASTRUCTURE

TRANSPORTATION TO WORK WHAT

The share of workers 16 years old and older that relies on public transit or walking to commute to work.

WHY

A reliable means of transportation is vital to accessing education, social services, and job opportunities. In communities without robust public transit networks, relying on public transportation and walking can be a burden that falls disproportionately on economically vulnerable populations. While in communities with better transit networks, not having personal transportation is a more viable and less burdensome alternative.

Black workers in Tampa Bay are almost three times as likely to rely on public transit or walking to commute to work as White, Non-Hispanic workers.

OF NOTE

– There is wide variation among the peer group in the percent of workers who commute by public transit or walking. However, in the communities with higher ridership, such as Baltimore, Portland, and Minneapolis-St. Paul, the disparities are also some of the highest. In Tampa Bay, where both the supply of transit and ridership are the lowest among the comparison set, the difference between Black and White, Non-Hispanic workers’ reliance on public transit or walking ranks it 5th out of 20. – In the Tampa Bay region, the rates of reliance on public transit and walking vary from a low of 0.2 percent for Hispanic workers in Hernando County to a high of 6.6 percent for Black and Hispanic workers in Pinellas County. Source: US Census Bureau, 2018 American Community Survey 5-year estimates, B08105.

58

2020 REGIONAL EQUITY REPORT


INFRASTRUCTURE

BLACK-WHITE GAP: TRANSPORTATION TO WORK SHARE OF POPULATION COMMUTING VIA WALKING/TRANSIT Disparity Measure Region

Tampa Bay in Context

White

Black

Difference

Raleigh-Durham

2.8%

4.8%

+2.0%

Charlotte

2.0%

4.8%

+2.8%

Dallas-Ft. Worth

2.0%

4.9%

+2.9%

Houston

2.4%

5.4%

+2.9%

Tampa Bay

1.8%

4.8%

+3.0%

Austin

3.4%

6.5%

+3.1%

Nashville

1.8%

5.0%

+3.3%

Jacksonville

1.8%

5.9%

+4.1%

San Antonio

2.3%

6.9%

+4.6%

Atlanta

2.3%

7.1%

+4.8%

Phoenix

2.5%

7.5%

+5.0%

Orlando

1.6%

6.7%

+5.1%

South Florida

2.9%

8.9%

+5.9%

San Diego

4.8%

11.1%

+6.4%

12.1%

19.3%

+7.2%

United States

5.6%

13.1%

+7.5%

Denver

5.6%

13.4%

+7.8%

St. Louis

2.3%

12.3%

+10.0%

Mpls-St. Paul

5.6%

16.3%

+10.6%

Portland

8.5%

19.4%

+10.9%

Baltimore

5.1%

17.6%

+12.6%

Seattle

Raleigh-Durham

+2.0%

Charlotte

+2.8%

Dallas-Ft. Worth

+2.9%

Houston

+2.9%

Tampa Bay Bay ï‚„ Tampa

+3.0%

Austin

+3.1%

Nashville

+3.3%

Jacksonville

+4.1%

San Antonio

+4.6%

Atlanta

+4.8%

Phoenix

+5.0%

Orlando

+5.1%

South Florida San Diego Seattle United United States Denver St. Louis Mpls-St. Paul Portland Baltimore

+5.9% +6.4% +7.2% +7.5% +7.8% +10.0% +10.6% +10.9% +12.6%

Source: US Census Bureau, 2018 American Community Survey 5-year estimates, B08105.

www.stateoftheregion.com

59


INFRASTRUCTURE

COMPARATIVE TRANSPORTATION TO WORK BY RACE/ETHNICITY SHARE OF POPULATION COMMUTING VIA WALKING/TRANSIT All

White, Non-Hispanic Orlando  Tampa Tampa Bay Bay

1.6%

2.7%

Nashville

1.8%

2.8%

Jacksonville

1.8%

Orlando

2.8%

Dallas-Ft. Worth

2.0%

Charlotte

3.0%

Charlotte

2.0%

Houston

5.4%

Houston

3.3%

Atlanta

2.3%

Jacksonville

5.9%

Nashville  Tampa Tampa Bay Bay

2.4%

Dallas-Ft. Worth Jacksonville

2.4%

Raleigh-Durham 4.8% Tampa Bay Bay 4.8%  Tampa

1.8%

Charlotte 4.8% Dallas-Ft. Worth 4.9% Nashville 5.0%

Phoenix

3.5%

St. Louis

2.3%

Austin

6.5%

Raleigh-Durham

3.5%

San Antonio

2.3%

Orlando

6.7%

San Antonio

3.6%

Houston

2.4%

San Antonio

6.9%

Austin

3.9%

Phoenix

2.5%

Atlanta

7.1%

St. Louis

4.2%

Raleigh-Durham

2.8%

Phoenix

7.5%

Atlanta

4.4%

South Florida

2.9%

South Florida

3.4%

San Diego

Austin

South Florida 5.1% San Diego 5.8% Denver Mpls-St. Paul United UnitedStates States Baltimore Portland

San Diego

4.8%

Denver

13.4%

5.6%

Mpls-St. Paul

5.6%

Baltimore

Denver United United States Mpls-St. Paul Portland

9.8% 13.7%

Asian

8.5%

Seattle

12.1%

2.1%

Dallas-Ft. Worth

2.6%

Orlando  Tampa Tampa Bay Bay

2.5%

Nashville

2.6%

Orlando  Tampa Tampa Bay Bay Houston

Nashville

2.9% 3.6%

16.3% 17.6%

Seattle

19.3%

Portland

19.4%

Hispanic, All Races

Jacksonville

Dallas-Ft. Worth

12.3%

5.6%

6.9% 9.0%

11.1%

St. Louis

13.1%

6.3%

5.1%

7.7%

8.9%

United United States States

Baltimore

Seattle

Other Dallas-Ft. Worth

2.6%

2.9%

Orlando

2.8%

2.9%

Nashville

3.1%

3.2%

3.2%

3.2%

Jacksonville  Tampa Tampa Bay Bay

Jacksonville

3.5%

Houston

3.2%

3.2%

Houston

4.2%

Phoenix

4.7%

Charlotte

3.6%

Austin

3.8%

San Diego

4.9%

Raleigh-Durham

3.7%

Raleigh-Durham

3.9%

Atlanta

Austin

3.8%

Charlotte

3.9%

San Antonio

3.9%

San Antonio

4.0%

5.7%

Phoenix

4.1%

Phoenix

4.4%

6.2%

South Florida

South Florida

4.9%

San Antonio

6.4%

Atlanta

Austin

6.6%

Denver

St. Louis

6.8%

4.9%

South Florida

5.4%

Charlotte Raleigh-Durham

Denver

4.9% 5.5%

Atlanta

5.4%

6.5%

San Diego

6.8%

San Diego

7.0%

Denver

6.8%

7.2%

St. Louis United United States States

6.9%

Baltimore

8.8%

St. Louis United United States

Mpls-St. Paul

9.1%

Mpls-St. Paul

9.9%

Baltimore

10.6%

Seattle

10.2%

Mpls-St. Paul

10.7%

Baltimore

10.6%

Portland

Portland United UnitedStates States Seattle

7.8%

12.0% 14.6% 18.6%

Portland

9.8%

14.0%

Source: US Census Bureau, 2018 American Community Survey 5-year estimates, B08105.

60

Black

2020 REGIONAL EQUITY REPORT

Seattle

9.6%

13.6% 14.7%


INFRASTRUCTURE

REGIONAL TRANSPORTATION TO WORK BY RACE/ETHNICITY SHARE OF POPULATION COMMUTING VIA WALKING/TRANSIT Tampa Bay Region White, Non-Hispanic

1.8%

All

2.4%

Asian

2.6%

Some Other Race

3.1%

Hispanic, All Races

3.2%

Two or More Races

4.5%

Black

4.8%

All

White, Non-Hispanic

Black

Citrus

1.2%

Citrus

1.0%

Pasco

Hernando

1.3%

Pasco

1.2%

Polk

Pasco

1.3%

Hernando

1.3%

Citrus

Polk 1.6%

Polk

1.3%

Hernando

Sarasota 1.6%

Sarasota

1.3%

Manatee

3.0%

Manatee

Manatee

Sarasota

3.1%

1.9%

Hillsborough

Hillsborough

3.0%

Pinellas

Pinellas

3.4%

Asian Pasco

Hernando Citrus

1.4%

1.8% 2.4% 2.8%

Hillsborough

1.9%

6.1%

Pinellas

2.6%

Hispanic, All Races

0.7%

Polk

1.6%

1.0%

6.6%

Other Hernando

0.2%

0.9%

Citrus

1.3%

1.5%

Manatee

1.8%

Polk

2.1%

Polk

2.1%

Pinellas

2.1%

Pasco

2.3%

Sarasota

2.2%

Sarasota

2.3%

Pasco

2.2%

Hillsborough

3.5%

Sarasota

5.1%

Citrus Hernando

5.5% n/d

Manatee Hillsborough Pinellas

Manatee

2.8%

Hillsborough

3.1% 6.6%

2.9% 3.2%

Pinellas

6.5%

Source: US Census Bureau, 2018 American Community Survey 5-year estimates, B08105. Note: The label “n/d” indicates “non-disclosed” and that the sample size was not big enough to make the calculation. www.stateoftheregion.com

61


CIVIC QUALITY

HOME OWNERSHIP WHAT

The percent of housing units occupied by owners. This includes only occupied housing units.

WHY

In addition to providing a stable place to live, home ownership is an important way that families build wealth. In particular, it is an important way for families to build and transfer wealth across generations. Many factors contribute to whether or not a family can afford to own a home. However, discriminatory policies, such as redlining, have limited access to homeownership for people of color in the past, and the legacy of these practices still persists today.

In Tampa Bay, Black and Hispanic households have the lowest home ownership rates.

OF NOTE

– The difference in homeownership rates between Black households and White, Non-Hispanic households is stark, ranging from a low 22 percentage point difference in Austin to a high 51 percentage point difference in Minneapolis-Saint Paul. – The Tampa Bay region ranks in the 4th quintile for the disparity measure, or 15th out of 20. – In Tampa Bay, White, Non-Hispanic and Asian households have the highest home ownership rates. – Among the eight counties in the region, Black households in Hillsborough County have the lowest rate of home ownership while Asians in Citrus County have the highest. Source: US Census Bureau, 2018 American Community Survey 5-year estimates, S2502.

62

2020 REGIONAL EQUITY REPORT


CIVIC QUALITY

BLACK-WHITE GAP: HOME OWNERSHIP SHARE OF HOUSING UNITS THAT ARE OWNER-OCCUPIED Disparity Measure Region

Tampa Bay in Context

White

Black

Difference

Austin

64.6%

42.6%

-22.0%

Orlando

70.3%

44.0%

-26.3%

San Antonio

71.0%

44.2%

-26.9%

Raleigh-Durham

72.6%

45.2%

-27.4%

Jacksonville

71.5%

44.1%

-27.4%

Atlanta

75.3%

47.4%

-28.0%

South Florida

73.5%

44.5%

-29.0%

Nashville

72.1%

42.9%

Austin

-22.0%

Orlando

-26.3%

San Antonio

-26.9%

Raleigh-Durham

-27.4%

Jacksonville

-27.4%

Atlanta

-28.0%

South Florida

-29.0%

Nashville

-29.2%

Houston

-29.4%

United States United States

-30.0%

San Diego

-30.7%

Baltimore

-31.4%

Charlotte

-31.5%

Denver

-31.7%

Dallas-Ft. Worth

-32.0%

Tampa Bay Bay ï‚„ Tampa

-32.5%

-29.2%

Houston

71.7%

42.3%

-29.4%

United States

71.8%

41.8%

-30.0%

San Diego

60.9%

30.2%

-30.7%

Baltimore

77.3%

45.9%

-31.4%

Charlotte

75.5%

44.0%

-31.5%

Denver

69.8%

38.1%

-31.7%

Dallas-Ft. Worth

69.4%

37.4%

-32.0%

Tampa Bay

73.3%

40.8%

-32.5%

Seattle

65.3%

31.7%

-33.5%

Portland

65.8%

31.9%

-33.9%

St. Louis

76.6%

40.2%

-36.5%

Phoenix

70.1%

33.2%

-36.9%

Mpls-St. Paul

76.3%

25.2%

-51.0%

Seattle

-33.5%

Portland

-33.9%

St. Louis

-36.5%

Phoenix

-36.9%

Mpls-St. Paul

-51.0%

Source: US Census Bureau, 2018 American Community Survey 5-year estimates, S2502.

www.stateoftheregion.com

63


CIVIC QUALITY

COMPARATIVE HOME OWNERSHIP BY RACE/ETHNICITY SHARE OF HOUSING UNITS THAT ARE OWNER-OCCUPIED All

White, Non-Hispanic

Mpls-St. Paul

70.0%

Baltimore

77.3%

Atlanta

47.4%

St. Louis  Tampa Tampa Bay Bay

68.9%

St. Louis

76.6%

Baltimore

45.9%

66.9%

Mpls-St. Paul

76.3%

Raleigh-Durham

45.2%

Baltimore

66.4%

Charlotte

75.5%

South Florida

44.5%

Charlotte

65.6%

Atlanta

75.3%

San Antonio

44.2%

Nashville

65.6%

73.5%

Jacksonville

44.1%

Jacksonville

63.9%

South Florida  Tampa Tampa Bay Bay

73.3%

Orlando

44.0%

United States States United

63.8%

Raleigh-Durham

72.6%

Charlotte

44.0%

Raleigh-Durham

63.8%

Nashville

72.1%

Nashville

42.9%

Denver

63.6%

United United States States

71.8%

Austin

42.6%

Atlanta

63.1%

Houston

71.7%

Houston

42.3%

San Antonio

62.7%

Jacksonville

71.5%

Phoenix

62.4%

San Antonio

71.0%

United States United  Tampa Tampa Bay Bay

40.8%

Portland

61.9%

Orlando

70.3%

St. Louis

40.2%

Orlando

60.5%

Phoenix

70.1%

Denver

38.1%

Houston

60.4%

Denver

69.8%

Dallas-Ft. Worth

37.4%

Seattle

60.0%

Dallas-Ft. Worth

Dallas-Ft. Worth

59.6%

Portland

South Florida

59.4%

Seattle

65.3%

Seattle

31.7%

Austin

58.1%

Austin

64.6%

San Diego

30.2%

Mpls-St. Paul

25.2%

San Diego

53.1%

Asian Orlando

69.4% 65.8%

San Diego

60.9%

70.8%

San Antonio

58.7%

41.8%

Phoenix

33.2%

Portland

31.9%

Hispanic, All Races

Other San Antonio

58.8%

Houston

68.4%

Houston

52.8%

Houston

53.1%

Jacksonville

68.3%

Dallas-Ft. Worth

52.0%

South Florida

52.0%

South Florida  Tampa Tampa Bay Bay

68.0%

St. Louis

52.0%

66.6%

South Florida

51.6%

Dallas-Ft. Worth  Tampa Tampa Bay Bay

51.7%

Atlanta

66.2%

Tampa Bay Bay  Tampa

51.0%

St. Louis

51.7%

Baltimore

64.9%

Phoenix

49.3%

Baltimore

Portland

64.3%

Baltimore

49.0%

Jacksonville

52.0%

51.6% 49.2%

Raleigh-Durham

62.3%

Austin

47.9%

Atlanta

48.5%

Phoenix

62.0%

Denver

47.3%

Phoenix

48.2%

Dallas-Ft. Worth

61.2%

Austin

48.1%

60.6%

Orlando United United States

46.9%

Seattle

46.7%

Denver

47.8%

Charlotte

60.3%

Jacksonville

46.4%

Orlando

47.7%

Denver United United States States

60.0%

Atlanta

46.4%

United States States United

47.7%

59.0%

Charlotte

45.0%

Charlotte

46.3%

Mpls-St. Paul

58.5%

Raleigh-Durham

44.2%

Raleigh-Durham

45.9%

San Diego

57.6%

Mpls-St. Paul

42.3%

Mpls-St. Paul

43.8%

41.5%

Nashville

Nashville

57.5%

Nashville

St. Louis

57.0%

San Diego

Austin

55.6%

Portland

39.0%

Seattle

40.3%

San Antonio

53.4%

Seattle

37.9%

San Diego

39.7%

39.1%

Source: US Census Bureau, 2018 American Community Survey 5-year estimates, S2502.

64

Black

2020 REGIONAL EQUITY REPORT

Portland

43.8% 41.2%


CIVIC QUALITY

REGIONAL HOME OWNERSHIP BY RACE/ETHNICITY SHARE OF HOUSING UNITS THAT ARE OWNER-OCCUPIED Tampa Bay Region White, Non-Hispanic

73.3%

All

66.9%

Asian

66.6%

Two or More Races

52.9%

Some Other Race

51.6%

Hispanic, All Races

51.0%

Black

40.8%

All

White, Non-Hispanic

Citrus

81.4%

Hernando

77.8%

Black

Citrus

82.2%

Citrus

Hernando

80.4%

Hernando

65.4% 55.9%

Sarasota

73.8%

Manatee

77.4%

Pasco

Pasco

72.0%

Sarasota

76.2%

Polk

48.6%

Manatee

71.6%

Polk

75.0%

Sarasota

47.5%

Pasco

74.6%

Manatee

Polk

68.5%

Pinellas

65.7%

Hillsborough

Pinellas Hillsborough

58.1%

Asian 84.3%

Citrus

Pasco

82.8%

Hernando

Sarasota

77.2%

Pasco

Polk

75.8%

Polk

Hernando

75.6%

Sarasota

Pinellas Hillsborough

68.3%

69.8% 64.5% 59.9%

74.8% 66.4% 59.7% 56.3% 50.9%

40.6%

Pinellas

37.5%

Hillsborough

36.6%

Hispanic, All Races

Citrus

Manatee

70.5%

51.6%

Other Citrus

75.0%

Hernando Pasco Polk Sarasota

67.5% 60.6% 56.5% 52.4%

Manatee

47.8%

Manatee

48.4%

Hillsborough

47.7%

Pinellas

48.4%

Pinellas

47.3%

Hillsborough

48.3%

Source: US Census Bureau, 2018 American Community Survey 5-year estimates, S2502.

www.stateoftheregion.com

65


CIVIC QUALITY

HEALTH INSURANCE COVERAGE WHAT

The percent of the population that is covered by health insurance—either through private health insurance or public medical assistance programs.

WHY

Individuals with health insurance have better and more affordable access to health care than those who are uninsured. As such, they are more likely to seek preventative care and necessary medical treatment, which leads to better health outcomes.

In Tampa Bay, the disparity between the highest and lowest rates of coverage is nearly 15 percentage points.

OF NOTE

– In Tampa Bay, the share of insured Blacks is almost 5 percentage points lower than the share for White, Non-Hispanics, which ranks Tampa Bay 9th out of 20. – In comparison to its peers, Tampa Bay has a low health insurance coverage rate. When broken down by race, Tampa Bay’s coverage rate places it in the fourth or fifth quintile in each category. – Hispanics and individuals classified as “Some Other Race” have the lowest rates of health insurance coverage in the region and White, Non-Hispanics and Asians have the highest. Source: US Census Bureau, 2018 American Community Survey 5-year estimates, C27001.

66

2020 REGIONAL EQUITY REPORT


CIVIC QUALITY

BLACK-WHITE GAP: HEALTH INSURANCE COVERAGE SHARE OF THE POPULATION WITH HEALTH INSURANCE Disparity Measure Region

Tampa Bay in Context

White

Black

Jacksonville

86.0%

83.6%

-2.4%

San Diego

93.1%

90.3%

-2.9%

Portland

93.1%

90.1%

-3.0%

Phoenix

91.2%

88.1%

-3.1%

Baltimore

95.5%

91.6%

-3.8%

Nashville

89.9%

85.9%

-4.0%

Denver

93.6%

89.6%

-4.0%

Austin

90.0%

85.8%

Difference

-4.3%

Tampa Bay

84.7%

80.0%

-4.6%

San Antonio

87.5%

82.5%

-5.0%

Seattle

94.2%

89.1%

-5.1%

Charlotte

89.7%

84.0%

-5.8%

United States

91.0%

84.7%

-6.3%

Orlando

86.5%

79.9%

-6.6%

Mpls-St. Paul

96.2%

89.6%

-6.6%

Atlanta

88.2%

81.4%

-6.8%

Raleigh-Durham

92.3%

84.4%

-7.8%

Dallas-Ft. Worth

87.7%

80.0%

-7.8%

Houston

88.8%

79.7%

-9.0%

St. Louis

92.6%

82.6%

-10.0%

South Florida

86.1%

74.1%

-12.0%

Jacksonville

-2.4%

San Diego

-2.9%

Portland

-3.0%

Phoenix

-3.1%

Baltimore

-3.8%

Nashville

-4.0%

Denver

-4.0%

Austin

-4.3%

Tampa Bay Bay ï‚„ Tampa

-4.6%

San Antonio

-5.0%

Seattle

-5.1%

Charlotte

-5.8%

United United States

-6.3%

Orlando

-6.6%

Mpls-St. Paul

-6.6%

Atlanta

-6.8%

Raleigh-Durham

-7.8%

Dallas-Ft. Worth

-7.8%

Houston St. Louis South Florida

-9.0% -10.0% -12.0%

Source: US Census Bureau, 2018 American Community Survey 5-year estimates, C27001.

www.stateoftheregion.com

67


CIVIC QUALITY

COMPARATIVE HEALTH INSURANCE COVERAGE BY RACE/ETHNICITY SHARE OF THE POPULATION WITH HEALTH INSURANCE All

White, Non-Hispanic

Mpls-St. Paul

94.1%

Mpls-St. Paul

96.2%

Baltimore

91.6%

Baltimore

92.8%

Baltimore

95.5%

San Diego

90.3%

Seattle

91.7%

Seattle

94.2%

Portland

90.1%

Portland

90.8%

Denver

93.6%

Mpls-St. Paul

89.6%

St. Louis

90.1%

San Diego

93.1%

Denver

89.6%

Denver

89.2%

Portland

93.1%

Seattle

89.1%

San Diego

88.1%

St. Louis

92.6%

Phoenix

88.1%

United United States

86.8%

Raleigh-Durham

92.3%

Nashville

85.9%

Nashville

86.5%

Phoenix

91.2%

Austin

85.8%

Raleigh-Durham

86.5%

United States United

91.0%

United United States States

84.7%

Phoenix

85.4%

Austin

90.0%

Raleigh-Durham

84.4%

Charlotte

84.9%

Nashville

89.9%

Charlotte

84.0%

Jacksonville

84.6%

Charlotte

89.7%

Jacksonville

83.6%

Austin

83.6%

Houston

88.8%

St. Louis

82.6%

Atlanta

82.1%

Atlanta

88.2%

San Antonio

82.5%

Orlando  Tampa Tampa Bay Bay

81.6%

Dallas-Ft. Worth

87.7%

81.4%

81.4%

San Antonio

87.5%

Atlanta  Tampa Tampa Bay

80.0%

San Antonio

79.6%

Orlando

86.5%

Dallas-Ft. Worth

80.0%

Dallas-Ft. Worth

78.3%

South Florida

86.1%

Orlando

79.9%

South Florida

77.4%

86.0%

Houston

79.7%

Houston

76.1%

Jacksonville  Tampa Tampa Bay Bay

84.7%

South Florida

Asian Mpls-St. Paul

Hispanic, All Races 94.1%

San Diego

78.8%

74.1%

Other San Diego

79.9%

Seattle

93.7%

Jacksonville

75.1%

Seattle

79.7%

Raleigh-Durham

93.0%

Denver

74.8%

Portland

78.6%

Baltimore

93.0%

Orlando

74.7%

St. Louis

77.7%

Portland

92.9%

Portland

74.3%

Jacksonville

77.7%

San Diego

92.1%

Phoenix

73.9%

Mpls-St. Paul

77.4%

Phoenix

92.0%

San Antonio

73.8%

Baltimore

76.9%

Denver United United States States

91.3%

St. Louis

73.1%

Denver

76.5%

90.7%

Seattle

73.1%

Orlando

74.9%

Austin

90.0%

73.0%

Phoenix

74.5%

St. Louis

89.9%

South Florida United United States

72.9%

United States States United

74.3%

Charlotte

87.4%

Mpls-St. Paul

71.4%

San Antonio

74.2%

San Antonio

86.6%

Baltimore

70.5%

South Florida

73.2%

Dallas-Ft. Worth

86.3%

70.3%

85.6%

Austin  Tampa Tampa Bay Bay

71.4%

Atlanta

Austin  Tampa Tampa Bay Bay

70.3%

71.1%

Nashville

85.4%

Houston

58.8%

Dallas-Ft. Worth

59.9%

Jacksonville

85.4%

Dallas-Ft. Worth

58.4%

Houston

59.7%

Houston

85.4%

Charlotte

54.2%

Charlotte

59.2%

South Florida  Tampa Tampa Bay Bay

84.7%

Atlanta

51.7%

Nashville

58.6%

84.4%

Nashville

51.2%

Raleigh-Durham

57.0%

Orlando

83.6%

Raleigh-Durham

50.2%

Atlanta

56.4%

Source: US Census Bureau, 2018 American Community Survey 5-year estimates, C27001.

68

Black

2020 REGIONAL EQUITY REPORT


SHARE OF THE POPULATION WITH HEALTH INSURANCE Tampa Bay Region White, Non-Hispanic

84.7%

Asian

84.4%

All

81.4%

Two or More Races

81.0%

Black

80.0%

Hispanic, All Races

70.3%

Some Other Race

69.9%

All

White, Non-Hispanic

Black

Pinellas

82.8%

Hillsborough

Hillsborough

81.8%

Manatee

84.8%

Pasco

83.0%

Pasco

81.5%

Pinellas

84.8%

Hillsborough

81.6%

Citrus

80.8%

Polk

84.6%

Pinellas

81.3%

Sarasota

80.3%

Sarasota

83.3%

Citrus

80.1%

Polk

80.2%

Pasco

82.7%

Polk

Manatee

79.6%

Citrus

80.9%

Manatee

Hernando

79.5%

Hernando

79.0%

Sarasota

Asian

87.7%

Hernando

Hispanic, All Races

Citrus

95.7%

Hernando

80.5%

89.0%

77.2% 74.4% 68.7%

Other Hernando

79.6%

Hillsborough

87.5%

Citrus

76.1%

Citrus

77.1%

Manatee

86.0%

Pasco

74.9%

Pasco

75.5%

Polk

86.0%

Pinellas

71.5%

Pinellas

72.9%

Pasco

84.7%

Hillsborough

70.4%

Hillsborough

71.1%

Polk

69.7%

Polk

70.8%

Pinellas Sarasota Hernando

CIVIC QUALITY

REGIONAL HEALTH INSURANCE COVERAGE BY RACE/ETHNICITY

80.2% 75.6% 70.1%

Sarasota Manatee

65.2% 61.0%

Sarasota Manatee

66.3% 62.2%

Source: US Census Bureau, 2018 American Community Survey 5-year estimates, C27001.

www.stateoftheregion.com

69


OUTCOMES

WORKING POOR WHAT

The share of workers who have worked full time in the last 12 months and have household incomes below the poverty line. This includes all individuals ages 25 to 64 who worked at all during the last 12 months. The poverty line refers to the federal poverty level and varies by household size and composition. Full-time work is defined as working at least 35 hours per week for at least 50 weeks in the year prior to the survey.

WHY

Having a full-time job does not always provide families with a pathway out of poverty. The rise of low-wage service sector jobs has led to an increase in the number of workers who work full time and still cannot make ends meet. The variations by race and ethnicity in the share of fulltime workers who earn below the poverty line reveal the demographic groups who are most burdened by the failure of full-time work to pay family-supporting wages.

Black workers in Tampa Bay are two times as likely to be part of the working poor as White workers. And Hispanic workers are almost four times as likely.

OF NOTE

– Across the region and in the peer communities, workers of color are much more likely to be working full-time and still below the poverty line. Among the peer metros, the average share of working poor for White workers is less than 1 percent while the average share for Black workers is almost 3 percent and for Hispanic workers it is more than 4 percent. – In the eight-county region, the highest share of working poor is among Asian workers in Sarasota County and the lowest is among Asian workers in Pasco County. Source: 2018 5-year American Community Survey microdata file from IPUMS USA.

70

2020 REGIONAL EQUITY REPORT


SHARE OF WORKERS WORKING FULL-TIME IN LAST 12 MOS. WITH FAMILY INCOME BELOW THE POVERTY LINE Disparity Measure Region

Tampa Bay in Context

White

Black

Difference

Baltimore

0.5%

1.4%

+1.0%

Charlotte

1.1%

2.1%

+1.0%

Portland

0.9%

2.0%

+1.0%

San Diego

0.8%

2.0%

+1.3%

Austin

0.9%

2.3%

+1.3%

Atlanta

0.9%

2.4%

+1.5%

San Antonio

1.0%

2.6%

+1.5%

Seattle

0.6%

2.2%

+1.6%

Houston

0.8%

2.5%

+1.6%

Orlando

1.2%

3.0%

+1.8%

Tampa Bay

1.2%

3.0%

+1.8%

Raleigh-Durham

0.7%

2.5%

+1.8%

Dallas-Ft. Worth

0.8%

2.7%

+1.9%

South Florida

1.0%

3.0%

+2.0%

St. Louis

0.9%

3.0%

+2.2%

Phoenix

1.0%

3.3%

+2.3%

Denver

0.7%

3.0%

+2.3%

Nashville

1.2%

3.5%

+2.3%

Jacksonville

1.3%

3.7%

Mpls-St. Paul

0.5%

4.4%

Baltimore

+1.0%

Charlotte

+1.0%

Portland

+1.0%

San Diego Austin

+1.3% +1.3%

Atlanta

+1.5%

San Antonio

+1.5%

Seattle

+1.6%

Houston

+1.6%

Orlando

+1.8%

Tampa Bay Bay ï‚„ Tampa

+1.8%

Raleigh-Durham

+1.8%

Dallas-Ft. Worth

+1.9%

South Florida

+2.0%

St. Louis

OUTCOMES

BLACK-WHITE GAP: WORKING POOR

+2.2%

Phoenix

+2.3%

Denver

+2.3%

Nashville

+2.3%

+2.4%

Jacksonville

+2.4%

+3.9%

Mpls-St. Paul

+3.9%

Source: 2018 5-year American Community Survey microdata file from IPUMS USA. Notes: Universe includes the civilian population ages 25 through 64 not living in group quarters who worked at all during the year prior to the survey. The poverty line refers to the federal poverty level and varies by household size and composition. Full-time work is defined as usually working at least 35 hours per week for at least 50 weeks during the year prior to the survey. www.stateoftheregion.com

71


OUTCOMES

COMPARATIVE WORKING POOR BY RACE/ETHNICITY SHARE OF WORKERS WORKING FULL-TIME IN LAST 12 MOS. WITH FAMILY INCOME BELOW THE POVERTY LINE All

White, Non-Hispanic

Black

Seattle

0.9%

Baltimore

0.5%

Baltimore

0.9%

Mpls-St. Paul

0.5%

Baltimore Portland 2.0%

Mpls-St. Paul

1.0%

1.4%

Seattle

0.6%

San Diego 2.0%

1.3%

Raleigh-Durham

0.7%

Charlotte 2.1%

Denver

1.4%

Denver

0.7%

St. Louis

1.4%

Portland

Seattle

2.2%

San Diego

0.8%

Austin

2.3%

San Diego

1.6%

Dallas-Ft. Worth

0.8%

Atlanta

2.4%

Raleigh-Durham

1.7%

Houston

0.8%

Houston

2.5%

1.8%

St. Louis

0.9%

Raleigh-Durham

2.5%

Nashville 2.0%

Atlanta

0.9%

San Antonio

2.6%

 Tampa Tampa Bay Bay 2.0%

Portland

0.9%

Dallas-Ft. Worth

2.7%

Jacksonville 2.0%

Austin

0.9%

Orlando

3.0%

Atlanta 2.0%

Phoenix

1.0%

Tampa Bay Bay  Tampa

3.0%

Charlotte

San Antonio

1.0%

Denver

3.0%

Orlando

2.2%

South Florida

1.0%

South Florida

3.0%

San Antonio

Austin 2.1% 2.4%

Charlotte

1.1%

St. Louis

3.0%

Dallas-Ft. Worth

2.4%

Nashville

1.2%

Phoenix

3.3%

Phoenix

2.5%

Orlando

1.2%

Nashville

3.5%

South Florida

2.6%

Tampa Bay Bay  Tampa

1.2%

Jacksonville

3.7%

Houston

2.8%

Jacksonville

1.3%

Mpls-St. Paul

Asian

Hispanic, All Races

Seattle

0.9%

San Diego

Baltimore

2.2% 2.3%

1.1%

Seattle

Baltimore

1.2%

Jacksonville

St. Louis

1.2%

Denver

4.4%

Other Seattle

1.9%

Baltimore 2.0%

3.0%

Jacksonville

2.6%

3.2%

Mpls-St. Paul

2.7%

Austin

1.3%

Mpls-St. Paul

3.2%

Denver

3.0%

Portland

1.4%

San Diego

3.2%

San Diego

3.0%

Atlanta

1.4%

San Antonio

3.3%

Portland

3.3%

Houston

1.4%

Orlando

3.4%

San Antonio

3.3%

Phoenix

1.5%

South Florida

3.5%

St. Louis

3.3%

 Tampa Tampa Bay Bay

Orlando

3.4% 3.4%

1.6%

Portland

Denver

1.7%

St. Louis

4.1%

South Florida

Mpls-St. Paul

1.7%

Austin

4.3%

 Tampa Tampa Bay Bay

4.1%

Dallas-Ft. Worth

1.8%

 Tampa Tampa Bay Bay

4.4%

Austin

4.2%

South Florida

1.9%

Dallas-Ft. Worth

5.3%

Dallas-Ft. Worth

Houston

5.5%

Houston

5.3%

Raleigh-Durham 2.0% Orlando 2.0%

Phoenix

San Antonio

2.1%

Charlotte

Nashville

2.2%

Raleigh-Durham

Charlotte

2.6%

Atlanta

Jacksonville

2.6%

Nashville

3.8%

5.7% 6.0% 6.4% 6.6% 7.6%

5.1%

Phoenix

5.4%

Charlotte

5.4%

Raleigh-Durham

5.7%

Atlanta Nashville

6.0% 6.6%

Source: 2018 5-year American Community Survey microdata file from IPUMS USA. Notes: Universe includes the civilian population ages 25 through 64 not living in group quarters who worked at all during the year prior to the survey. The poverty line refers to the federal poverty level and varies by household size and composition. Full-time work is defined as usually working at least 35 hours per week for at least 50 weeks during the year prior to the survey.

72

2020 REGIONAL EQUITY REPORT


SHARE OF WORKERS WORKING FULL-TIME IN LAST 12 MOS. WITH FAMILY INCOME BELOW THE POVERTY LINE Tampa Bay Region White, Non-Hispanic

1.2%

Asian

1.6%

Two or More Races

1.9%

All

2.0%

Black

3.0%

Hispanic, All Races

4.4%

Some Other Race

5.1%

All

White, Non-Hispanic

Black

Hernando

1.5%

Hillsborough

1.0%

Pasco

Sarasota

1.5%

Manatee

1.0%

Manatee

1.8%

Pinellas

1.5%

Sarasota

1.1%

Hernando

1.9%

Citrus

1.7%

Pinellas

1.2%

Pinellas

Pasco

1.8%

Pasco

1.3%

Sarasota

2.9%

Polk

1.4%

Polk

3.0%

Manatee 1.9% Hillsborough

2.3%

Hernando

1.5%

Hillsborough

Polk

2.4%

Citrus

1.5%

Citrus

Asian Pasco Hillsborough

Hernando Sarasota

0.8%

Pinellas

1.3%

Pinellas Manatee

Hispanic, All Races

0.5%

Polk

3.6% 4.1%

Hillsborough

2.8% 8.5%

4.4%

Polk

Citrus

n/d

Manatee

Hernando

n/d

Citrus

Sarasota

3.0%

5.3% 5.7% n/d

1.5%

2.4%

3.6% n/d

Other Hernando

1.1%

Pasco

1.8%

Sarasota

OUTCOMES

REGIONAL WORKING POOR BY RACE/ETHNICITY

0.5% 2.5%

Pinellas

3.2%

Citrus

3.2%

Pasco Hillsborough Polk Manatee

3.9% 4.3% 5.0% 5.4%

Source: 2018 5-year American Community Survey microdata file from IPUMS USA. Notes: Universe includes the civilian population ages 25 through 64 not living in group quarters who worked at all during the year prior to the survey. The poverty line refers to the federal poverty level and varies by household size and composition. Full-time work is defined as usually working at least 35 hours per week for at least 50 weeks during the year prior to the survey. The label “n/d” indicates “non-disclosed” and that the sample size was not big enough to make the calculation. www.stateoftheregion.com

73


OUTCOMES

POVERTY WHAT

The percentage of the population that is living below the federal poverty line. The poverty line refers to the federal poverty level and varies by household size and composition.

WHY

The poverty rate shows the percentage of the population impacted by financial insecurity and reflects a lack of access to family-sustaining economic opportunity. People who live in poverty struggle to secure basic human needs, and they can require higher levels of social support. Increasing levels of poverty may translate into greater community needs regarding homelessness, crime, illiteracy, and health.

The poverty rate in Tampa Bay is highest for Black residents (24.3%) and lowest for Non-Hispanic, White residents (10.6%).

OF NOTE

– Overall, about one in seven residents in Tampa Bay live in poverty. – Tampa Bay’s disparity in poverty rates between Black and White residents is slightly better than the disparity for the United States as a whole, yet Tampa Bay ranks 16th out of its 20 peers. – Asian residents also experience a lower-than-average poverty rate, while residents of other minority groups or mixed races experience a higher-than-average poverty rate. – The rates vary widely across the eight-county region. Residents of Sarasota County (9.7%) are the least likely to live in poverty, while residents of Citrus County (16.7%) are the most likely to live in poverty. Source: US Census Bureau, 2018 American Community Survey 5-year estimates, B17020. Notes: Population for whom poverty status is determined.

74

2020 REGIONAL EQUITY REPORT


OUTCOMES

BLACK-WHITE GAP: POVERTY SHARE OF POPULATION WITH INCOME BELOW THE POVERTY LEVEL IN THE LAST 12 MONTHS Disparity Measure Region

Tampa Bay in Context

White

Black

Difference

San Antonio

8.6%

17.8%

+9.2%

Raleigh-Durham

7.3%

17.5%

+10.3%

Atlanta

7.7%

18.1%

+10.4%

Charlotte

8.5%

19.0%

+10.5%

San Diego

8.9%

19.5%

+10.7%

Austin

7.4%

18.2%

+10.8%

Orlando

9.7%

20.6%

+11.0%

Phoenix

9.3%

21.0%

San Antonio

+9.2%

Raleigh-Durham

+10.3%

Atlanta

+10.4%

Charlotte

+10.5%

San Diego

+10.7%

Austin

+10.8%

Orlando

+11.0%

Phoenix

+11.7%

Houston

+11.7%

Baltimore

+11.9%

Dallas-Ft. Worth

+11.9%

+11.7%

Houston

6.8%

18.5%

+11.7%

Baltimore

6.2%

18.1%

+11.9%

Dallas-Ft. Worth

6.9%

18.8%

+11.9%

Denver

6.1%

18.5%

+12.4%

South Florida

8.9%

22.3%

+13.3%

Nashville

9.0%

22.4%

+13.3%

Jacksonville

9.9%

23.3%

+13.4%

Tampa Bay

10.6%

24.3%

+13.7%

United States

10.0%

24.2%

+14.2%

Seattle

7.2%

21.5%

+14.3%

Portland

9.1%

26.8%

+17.7%

St. Louis

7.9%

26.4%

+18.5%

Mpls-St. Paul

5.5%

28.3%

+22.8%

Denver

+12.4%

South Florida

+13.3%

Nashville

+13.3%

Jacksonville

+13.4%

Tampa Bay Bay ï‚„ Tampa

+13.7%

United United States

+14.2%

Seattle

+14.3%

Portland St. Louis Mpls-St. Paul

+17.7% +18.5% +22.8%

Source: US Census Bureau, 2018 American Community Survey 5-year estimates, B17020. Notes: Population for whom poverty status is determined. www.stateoftheregion.com

75


OUTCOMES

COMPARATIVE POVERTY BY RACE/ETHNICITY SHARE OF POPULATION WITH INCOME BELOW THE POVERTY LEVEL IN THE LAST 12 MONTHS All Mpls-St. Paul

9.0%

Mpls-St. Paul

5.5%

Denver

9.4%

Denver

6.1%

Seattle

9.6%

Baltimore

6.2%

Baltimore

10.4%

Houston

6.8%

Portland

11.4%

Austin

11.6%

Dallas-Ft. Worth 6.9% Seattle 7.2%

Raleigh-Durham

11.8%

St. Louis

11.9%

Nashville

12.4%

Raleigh-Durham 7.3% Austin 7.4% Atlanta 7.7%

San Diego

12.5%

St. Louis

7.9%

Dallas-Ft. Worth

12.6%

Charlotte

8.5%

Charlotte

12.7%

San Antonio

8.6%

Atlanta

13.1%

San Diego

8.9%

Jacksonville

13.3%

South Florida

8.9%

United United States  Tampa Bay

14.1%

Nashville

9.0%

14.1%

Portland

9.1%

Houston

14.2%

Phoenix

9.3%

Phoenix

14.7%

Orlando

9.7%

Orlando

14.7%

Jacksonville

9.9%

San Antonio

14.9%

10.0%

South Florida

15.4%

United States States Bay  Tampa Bay

Asian Baltimore

7.9%

Houston

9.3%

Dallas-Ft. Worth

9.6%

Seattle

9.7%

St. Louis Jacksonville Atlanta

Raleigh-Durham

17.5%

San Antonio

17.8%

Atlanta

18.1%

Baltimore

18.1%

Austin

18.2%

Denver

18.5%

Houston

18.5%

Dallas-Ft. Worth

18.8%

Charlotte

19.0%

San Diego

19.5%

Orlando

20.6%

Phoenix

21.0%

Seattle

21.5%

South Florida

22.3%

Nashville

22.4%

Jacksonville United United States States  Tampa Tampa Bay Bay

23.3% 24.2% 24.3%

St. Louis

26.4%

Portland

26.8%

Mpls-St. Paul

10.6%

Hispanic, All Races

28.3%

Other

15.2%

Baltimore

14.1%

Seattle

16.0%

Seattle

14.8%

Denver

16.1%

Jacksonville

15.3%

Jacksonville

15.5%

9.7%

16.5%

Denver

South Florida

16.9%

South Florida

16.7%

9.9%

Austin

17.3%

San Diego

16.8%

9.9%

Baltimore

San Diego

17.4%

Austin

16.8%

Mpls-St. Paul

18.2%

Mpls-St. Paul

17.4%

10.5%

San Antonio

18.7%

San Antonio

18.4%

10.7%

Dallas-Ft. Worth

19.4%

Dallas-Ft. Worth

18.8%

10.8%

Orlando

19.9%

Portland

18.9%

11.0%

St. Louis

20.2%

St. Louis

19.2%

11.0%

Houston

20.7%

Orlando

20.8%

11.8%

Portland United United States

Tampa Bay Bay  Tampa

19.6%

11.5%

Tampa Bay Bay  Tampa Orlando

Tampa Bay Bay  Tampa

21.0%

11.9%

21.0%

Houston United United States

12.0%

Atlanta

22.5%

Atlanta

Portland

12.4%

Phoenix

23.1%

Phoenix

South Florida

22.8%

12.7%

Charlotte

24.0%

Charlotte

San Antonio

22.8%

13.4%

Nashville

25.6%

Nashville

Mpls-St. Paul

23.1%

14.0%

Raleigh-Durham

25.9%

Raleigh-Durham

23.2%

San Diego

10.2%

Nashville Raleigh-Durham Charlotte Austin Denver United United States States

Phoenix

Source: US Census Bureau, 2018 American Community Survey 5-year estimates, B17020. Notes: Population for whom poverty status is determined.

76

Black

White, Non-Hispanic

2020 REGIONAL EQUITY REPORT

20.2% 20.3% 20.6% 21.4%


OUTCOMES

REGIONAL POVERTY BY RACE/ETHNICITY SHARE OF POPULATION WITH INCOME BELOW THE POVERTY LEVEL IN THE LAST 12 MONTHS Tampa Bay Region White, Non-Hispanic

10.6%

Asian

11.9%

All

14.1%

Two or More Races

17.3%

Some Other Race

20.7%

Hispanic, All Races

21.0%

Black

24.3%

All Sarasota

White, Non-Hispanic

9.7%

Sarasota

7.6%

Citrus

8.2%

Pasco

Manatee

12.5%

Manatee

Pinellas

13.0%

Hillsborough

Pasco

13.5%

Pinellas

Hernando Hillsborough

14.3% 15.3%

9.7%

Hernando

22.8%

10.6%

Manatee

23.5% 24.2%

Hillsborough

Pasco

12.4%

Polk

25.8%

12.9%

Sarasota

26.0%

Pinellas

26.4%

Hernando

Citrus

16.7%

Citrus

16.4%

Hispanic, All Races

8.8%

15.1%

12.1%

16.6%

Pasco

10.6%

Polk

Polk

Asian

Black

Other

Pinellas

17.4%

Sarasota

16.9% 17.0%

Polk

10.2%

Sarasota

17.8%

Pinellas

Citrus

10.2%

Hernando

18.3%

Pasco

18.3%

Hillsborough

10.6%

Pasco

18.8%

Hernando

18.7%

Pinellas Hernando Manatee Sarasota

Hillsborough

12.6%

Citrus

14.2% 17.2% 22.6%

Polk Manatee

21.3% 22.2% 23.3% 24.7%

Hillsborough Polk

20.3% 22.8%

Manatee

23.7%

Citrus

24.2%

Source: US Census Bureau, 2018 American Community Survey 5-year estimates, B17020. Notes: Population for whom poverty status is determined. www.stateoftheregion.com

77


OUTCOMES

CHILD POVERTY WHAT

The percentage of the population under the age of 18 that is living below the federal poverty line. The poverty line refers to the federal poverty level and varies by household size and composition.

WHY

As previously mentioned, the poverty rate shows the percentage of the population impacted by financial insecurity, which can affect family stability. Children who live in poverty often have less access to quality education, healthcare, and community environments—elements that are crucial to their healthy development.

In Tampa Bay, Black children are almost three times as likely to live in poverty as White, Non-Hispanic children.

OF NOTE

– Overall, 1 in 5 children in Tampa Bay live in poverty. – In comparison to its peers, Tampa Bay has a high child poverty rate for every demographic category and ranks in the 4th or 5th quintile in each category. Notably, Tampa Bay ranks 20th for child poverty among White, Non-Hispanic children and 19th for child poverty among Black children. – Across the peer metros and in Tampa Bay, children of color are significantly more likely to live in poverty. – The county where child poverty is highest is Pinellas County, where more than 40 percent of Black children live in poverty. In Citrus County, where the child poverty rate is the highest in the region for White, Non-Hispanic children and children in the “Other” category, it is lowest for Black and Hispanic children. Source: US Census Bureau, 2018 American Community Survey 5-year estimates, B17020. Note: Population for whom the poverty status is known.

78

2020 REGIONAL EQUITY REPORT


SHARE OF CHILDREN <18 LIVING IN HOUSEHOLDS BELOW THE POVERTY LEVEL IN THE LAST 12 MONTHS Disparity Measure Region

Tampa Bay in Context

White

Black

Difference

9.5%

24.4%

+14.9%

Phoenix

10.2%

27.9%

+17.7%

Charlotte

9.6%

27.4%

+17.8%

Orlando

11.2%

29.3%

+18.1%

Atlanta

8.1%

26.5%

+18.4%

Raleigh-Durham

6.7%

25.1%

+18.4%

Dallas-Ft. Worth

7.5%

26.1%

+18.6%

San Antonio

San Diego

8.4%

27.2%

San Antonio

OUTCOMES

BLACK-WHITE GAP: CHILD POVERTY

+14.9%

Phoenix

+17.7%

Charlotte

+17.8%

Orlando

+18.1%

Atlanta

+18.4%

Raleigh-Durham

+18.4%

Dallas-Ft. Worth

+18.6%

San Diego

+18.7%

Houston

+18.8%

+18.7%

Houston

7.4%

26.2%

+18.8%

Baltimore

5.9%

25.6%

+19.7%

Austin

5.0%

25.4%

+20.4%

Denver

5.3%

25.8%

+20.5%

South Florida

9.9%

32.2%

+22.4%

Tampa Bay

13.2%

35.7%

+22.4%

United States

11.7%

34.8%

+23.1%

Jacksonville

11.8%

35.2%

+23.4%

Portland

9.4%

33.1%

+23.7%

Nashville

10.4%

34.6%

+24.3%

Seattle

6.6%

33.2%

+26.5%

St. Louis

9.4%

38.8%

+29.4%

Mpls-St. Paul

4.5%

35.2%

+30.6%

Baltimore

+19.7%

Austin

+20.4%

Denver

+20.5%

South Florida

+22.4%

Tampa Bay Bay ï&#x201A;&#x201E; Tampa

+22.4%

United United States

+23.1%

Jacksonville

+23.4%

Portland

+23.7%

Nashville

+24.3%

Seattle St. Louis Mpls-St. Paul

+26.5% +29.4% +30.6%

Source: US Census Bureau, 2018 American Community Survey 5-year estimates, B17020. Note: Population for whom the poverty status is known. www.stateoftheregion.com

79


OUTCOMES

COMPARATIVE CHILD POVERTY BY RACE/ETHNICITY SHARE OF CHILDREN <18 LIVING IN HOUSEHOLDS BELOW THE POVERTY LEVEL IN THE LAST 12 MONTHS All

White, Non-Hispanic

Mpls-St. Paul

11.7%

Mpls-St. Paul

4.5%

San Antonio

24.4%

Seattle

11.8%

Austin

5.0%

Raleigh-Durham

25.1%

Denver 12.4%

Denver

5.3%

Austin

25.4%

Baltimore

5.9%

Baltimore

25.6%

14.2%

Seattle

6.6%

Denver

25.8%

14.5%

Raleigh-Durham

6.7%

Dallas-Ft. Worth

26.1%

Raleigh-Durham

16.1%

Houston

7.4%

Houston

26.2%

San Diego

16.1%

Dallas-Ft. Worth

7.5%

Atlanta

26.5%

St. Louis

17.0%

Atlanta

8.1%

San Diego

27.2%

Baltimore

13.6%

Portland Austin

Nashville

17.5%

San Diego

8.4%

Charlotte

27.4%

Charlotte

18.1%

Portland

9.4%

Phoenix

27.9%

Dallas-Ft. Worth

18.2%

St. Louis

9.4%

Orlando

Atlanta

18.8%

San Antonio

9.5%

South Florida

32.2%

Jacksonville

19.2%

Charlotte

9.6%

Portland

33.1%

United States United

19.5%

South Florida

9.9%

Seattle

33.2%

Tampa Bay Bay  Tampa

20.7%

Phoenix

10.2%

Houston

20.7%

Nashville

Orlando

21.0%

Phoenix

21.0%

San Antonio

21.1%

South Florida

21.3%

Asian St. Louis

5.4%

29.3%

34.6%

10.4%

Nashville United United States States

Orlando United United States States

11.2%

Mpls-St. Paul

35.2%

11.7%

Jacksonville

35.2%

Jacksonville Tampa Bay Bay  Tampa

11.8%

Tampa Bay Bay  Tampa St. Louis

35.7%

13.2%

Hispanic, All Races Baltimore

17.5%

34.8%

38.8%

Other Baltimore

14.1%

Austin

6.8%

Seattle

20.5%

Seattle

14.8%

Baltimore

7.5%

Denver

21.4%

Jacksonville

15.3%

Raleigh-Durham

8.1%

South Florida

21.7%

Denver

15.5%

Phoenix

8.7%

Jacksonville

22.6%

South Florida

16.7%

San Diego

8.8%

San Diego

22.8%

San Diego

16.8%

Dallas-Ft. Worth

8.9%

Mpls-St. Paul

23.0%

Austin

16.8%

Seattle

9.1%

Austin

23.2%

Mpls-St. Paul

17.4%

Houston

9.3%

San Antonio

26.1%

San Antonio

18.4%

Atlanta

10.1%

St. Louis

26.8%

Dallas-Ft. Worth

18.8%

Jacksonville

11.1%

Dallas-Ft. Worth

27.0%

Portland

18.9%

United United States

11.3%

Portland

27.5%

St. Louis

19.2%

Nashville

11.8%

Orlando United United States Tampa Bay Bay  Tampa

27.9%

Orlando

19.6%

Houston

28.9%

Orlando 12.2% Tampa Bay Bay 12.2%  Tampa Denver 12.3% South Florida

12.7%

Charlotte Portland San Antonio Mpls-St. Paul

28.4%

Tampa Bay Bay  Tampa

28.4%

Houston United United States

20.3%

Atlanta

21.4%

20.2% 20.6%

Phoenix

31.0%

12.8%

Atlanta

31.6%

Phoenix

22.8%

13.0%

Charlotte

32.7%

Charlotte

22.8%

14.8%

Nashville

33.8%

Nashville

23.1%

18.7%

Raleigh-Durham

35.4%

Source: US Census Bureau, 2018 American Community Survey 5-year estimates, B17020. Note: Population for whom the poverty status is known.

80

Black

2020 REGIONAL EQUITY REPORT

Raleigh-Durham

29.9%


SHARE OF CHILDREN <18 LIVING IN HOUSEHOLDS BELOW THE POVERTY LEVEL IN THE LAST 12 MONTHS Tampa Bay Region Asian

12.2%

White, Non-Hispanic

13.2%

Two or More Races

19.8%

All

20.7%

Some Other Race

28.0%

Hispanic, All Races

28.4%

Black

35.7%

All Sarasota

White, Non-Hispanic

15.1%

Black

Sarasota

9.2%

Citrus

4.0% 19.3%

Pasco

18.1%

Manatee

9.7%

Pasco

Pinellas

18.8%

Hillsborough

9.9%

Hillsborough

34.0%

Hernando

19.2%

Pinellas

Manatee

35.2%

11.6%

Manatee

20.6%

Pasco

16.2%

Sarasota

36.9%

Hillsborough

20.7%

Hernando

16.5%

Hernando

37.0%

Polk

17.4%

Polk

Polk

26.0%

Citrus

29.0%

Asian

Citrus

30.8%

38.8%

Pinellas

Hispanic, All Races

42.1%

Other

Pasco

5.3%

Pinellas

22.4%

Sarasota

16.9%

Citrus

5.9%

Citrus

23.2%

Pinellas

17.0%

Hillsborough

6.9%

Hernando

23.6%

Pasco

18.3%

Hernando

18.7%

Polk Pinellas

19.5% 24.6%

Sarasota Hernando

Pasco

16.0%

Manatee

27.9% n/d

OUTCOMES

REGIONAL CHILD POVERTY BY RACE/ETHNICITY

26.0%

Sarasota

27.4%

Hillsborough

Hillsborough

28.4%

Polk

22.8%

Manatee

23.7%

Citrus

24.2%

Polk Manatee

31.5% 33.1%

20.3%

Source: US Census Bureau, 2018 American Community Survey 5-year estimates, B17020. Note: Population for whom the poverty status is known. www.stateoftheregion.com

81


OUTCOMES

UNEMPLOYMENT WHAT

The percentage of the labor force who is not working but is actively looking for work.

WHY

The unemployment rate, when viewed by race and ethnicity, provides a measure of these demographic groups’ success in finding work and, conversely, their barriers to employment. The differences reflect education and experience as well as barriers such as criminal background, transportation access, immigration status, and others.

In Tampa Bay, Black workers are almost two times as likely as White workers to be unemployed.

OF NOTE

– The unemployment rate for Black workers was 4.4 percentage points higher than the rate for White workers, which ranks it 9th of 20 metros. – The unemployment rate for workers of color was generally higher than the rate for White workers in Tampa Bay and in the peer metros. – Among the eight counties in the region, there was a great deal of variation in unemployment rates, from a low of 1 percent for Asian workers in Citrus County to a high of 15 percent for Asian workers in Hernando County. – The COVID-19 pandemic and resulting economic crisis have led to a dramatic spike in unemployment, which has hit communities of color particularly hard. As the regional economy begins to improve, many of the disparities highlighted in this report are likely to lead to an uneven recovery. Source: US Census Bureau, 2018 American Community Survey 5-year estimates, S2301.

82

2020 REGIONAL EQUITY REPORT


OUTCOMES

BLACK-WHITE GAP: UNEMPLOYMENT SHARE OF THE LABOR FORCE THAT IS UNEMPLOYED Disparity Measure Region

Tampa Bay in Context

White

Black

Difference

San Antonio

4.6%

7.1%

+2.5%

Austin

3.7%

6.8%

+3.1%

Denver

3.5%

7.0%

+3.5%

Dallas-Ft. Worth

4.0%

7.6%

+3.6%

Nashville

3.7%

7.6%

+3.9%

Seattle

4.3%

8.4%

+4.1%

Orlando

4.7%

9.0%

+4.3%

Raleigh-Durham

3.7%

8.0%

+4.4%

Tampa Bay

5.4%

9.8%

+4.4%

Phoenix

4.9%

9.4%

+4.5%

Houston

4.6%

9.3%

+4.7%

Atlanta

4.2%

9.0%

+4.8%

Baltimore

4.0%

9.2%

+5.2%

Charlotte

4.6%

9.8%

+5.2%

Jacksonville

5.1%

10.6%

+5.5%

Portland

4.9%

10.5%

+5.6%

South Florida

5.0%

10.7%

+5.7%

United States

4.7%

10.6%

+5.9%

Mpls-St. Paul

3.1%

9.2%

+6.1%

San Diego

5.2%

12.4%

+7.2%

St. Louis

4.1%

11.9%

+7.8%

San Antonio Austin

+2.5% +3.1%

Denver

+3.5%

Dallas-Ft. Worth

+3.6%

Nashville Seattle

+3.9% +4.1%

Orlando

+4.3%

Raleigh-Durham

+4.4%

ï&#x201A;&#x201E; Tampa Tampa Bay Bay

+4.4%

Phoenix

+4.5%

Houston

+4.7%

Atlanta

+4.8%

Baltimore

+5.2%

Charlotte

+5.2%

Jacksonville

+5.5%

Portland

+5.6%

South Florida

+5.7%

United States States United Mpls-St. Paul San Diego St. Louis

+5.9% +6.1% +7.2% +7.8%

Source: US Census Bureau, 2018 American Community Survey 5-year estimates, S2301.

www.stateoftheregion.com

83


OUTCOMES

COMPARATIVE UNEMPLOYMENT BY RACE/ETHNICITY SHARE OF THE LABOR FORCE THAT IS UNEMPLOYED All Mpls-St. Paul 3.9% Denver 3.9% Austin

4.4%

Nashville

4.5%

Raleigh-Durham

4.7%

Seattle

4.8%

White, Non-Hispanic Mpls-St. Paul 3.1% Denver 3.5%

Austin

6.8%

Denver

7.0%

Raleigh-Durham 3.7% Austin 3.7%

San Antonio

7.1%

Dallas-Ft. Worth

7.6%

Nashville

7.6%

Raleigh-Durham

8.0%

Seattle

8.4%

Dallas-Ft. Worth

4.8%

Nashville 3.7% Dallas-Ft. Worth 4.0% Baltimore 4.0%

Portland

5.3%

St. Louis

4.1%

Atlanta

9.0%

Baltimore

5.6%

Atlanta

4.2%

Orlando

9.0%

San Antonio

5.6%

Seattle

4.3%

Baltimore

9.2%

St. Louis

5.6%

Charlotte

4.6%

Mpls-St. Paul

9.2%

Phoenix

5.6%

Houston

4.6%

Houston

9.3%

Houston

5.8%

San Antonio

4.6%

9.4%

United United States

5.8%

4.7%

Atlanta

5.9%

Orlando United United States

Phoenix Tampa Bay  Tampa Bay

4.7%

Charlotte

9.8%

Orlando

6.0%

Phoenix

4.9%

Portland

10.5%

Charlotte  Tampa Tampa Bay Bay

6.0%

Portland

4.9%

10.6%

6.1%

South Florida

5.0%

Jacksonville United United States

Jacksonville

6.3%

Jacksonville

5.1%

South Florida

10.7%

San Diego

6.4%

5.2%

St. Louis

South Florida

6.4%

San Diego Tampa Bay Bay  Tampa

5.4%

San Diego

Asian

Hispanic, All Races

9.8%

10.6% 11.9% 12.4%

Other

Denver 3.3% St. Louis 3.3%

Raleigh-Durham

4.2%

Raleigh-Durham

4.4%

Denver

4.5%

Denver

4.6%

Austin 3.6% Baltimore 3.6%

Nashville

4.5%

Dallas-Ft. Worth

4.9%

Atlanta

4.7%

Austin

5.1%

Raleigh-Durham 3.7% Atlanta 3.7%

Dallas-Ft. Worth

4.8%

Atlanta

5.1%

Austin

4.9%

South Florida

5.5%

Jacksonville

3.9%

St. Louis

5.2%

Houston

5.7%

Nashville

4.2%

Baltimore

5.4%

Seattle

5.9%

Seattle

4.2%

South Florida

5.5%

Nashville

6.0%

Dallas-Ft. Worth

4.3%

Seattle

5.5%

San Antonio

6.1%

Phoenix

4.3%

Houston

5.6%

Baltimore

6.2%

Portland

4.3%

Portland

5.9%

Phoenix

6.5%

San Antonio

4.3%

San Antonio

6.0%

Jacksonville

6.5%

South Florida

4.5%

Jacksonville

6.1%

Portland

6.5%

Houston

4.6%

Phoenix

6.2%

Orlando

6.6%

Mpls-St. Paul

6.2%

Charlotte

6.7%

6.5%

6.7% 6.9%

Mpls-St. Paul

4.6%

United United States

4.6%

Charlotte

5.0%

Orlando

6.6%

Mpls-St. Paul Tampa Bay Bay  Tampa

Orlando

5.1%

Charlotte

6.7%

United United States States

5.1%

United States United San Diego

6.8%

San Diego

San Diego

 Tampa Tampa Bay Bay

5.3%

Tampa Bay  Tampa

7.6%

Source: US Census Bureau, 2018 American Community Survey 5-year estimates, S2301.

84

Black

2020 REGIONAL EQUITY REPORT

St. Louis

6.7% 7.6% 8.1%


OUTCOMES

REGIONAL UNEMPLOYMENT BY RACE/ETHNICITY SHARE OF THE LABOR FORCE THAT IS UNEMPLOYED Tampa Bay Region Asian

5.3%

White, Non-Hispanic

5.4%

All

6.1%

Some Other Race

6.4%

Hispanic, All Races

6.5%

Two or More Races

8.8%

Black

9.8%

All Sarasota

White, Non-Hispanic

4.7%

Black

Sarasota

4.5%

Pasco

6.7%

Pinellas

5.7%

Hillsborough

4.7%

Citrus

8.4%

Manatee

5.9%

Manatee

5.0%

Sarasota

8.7%

Hillsborough

6.1%

Pinellas

5.0%

Hernando

8.9%

Pasco

6.5%

Polk

6.2%

Pinellas

9.1%

Polk

6.9%

Pasco

6.3%

Hillsborough

Hernando

Hernando

7.3%

Citrus

Citrus

8.6%

Asian Citrus Sarasota

8.5%

Polk

Sarasota

1.8% 3.8%

12.6%

Other Sarasota

4.5%

10.6%

Manatee

Hispanic, All Races

1.0%

Polk

7.3%

9.9%

4.8%

Manatee

5.7%

Hernando

6.2%

Hernando

6.1%

Manatee

6.2%

Hillsborough

5.1%

Polk

6.3%

Polk

6.6%

Pasco

5.1%

Pinellas

6.6%

Hillsborough

6.6%

6.7%

Pinellas

7.0%

Pinellas

6.3%

Hillsborough

Manatee

6.5%

Pasco

Hernando

15.1%

Citrus

7.3% 10.3%

Pasco Citrus

7.6% 11.6%

Source: US Census Bureau, 2018 American Community Survey 5-year estimates, S2301.

www.stateoftheregion.com

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ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

The 2020 REGIONAL EQUITY REPORT is produced by the Tampa Bay Partnership Foundation, in collaboration with the Community Foundation of Tampa Bay and United Way Suncoast and is affiliated with the State of the Region initiative. This report expands and advances previous benchmarking efforts, drawing primarily from the work that our organizations have done together in producing the annual Regional Competitiveness Report. Very sincerely, we thank and acknowledge the work of hundreds of volunteer leaders and stakeholders for building the foundation for this research. We would also like to recognize the executive leadership of our collaborating partners: from the Community Foundation of Tampa Bay, Marlene Spalten; and from United Way Suncoast, Jessica Muroff. Thank you and your staff for your significant contributions of time, talent, and financial resources. The Tampa Bay Partnership, with the support of all listed above, led the development of this report through its research and education foundation. Rick Homans, President and CEO, provided leadership and strategic vision. Dave Sobush, Director of Policy and Research, served as project manager for this initiative. Additional support was provided by Jennifer Mikosky, Vice President of Communications, and Courtney McDonnell, Program Director. This research was performed by Alexander Research & Consulting.

ABOUT OUR PARTNERS The Tampa Bay Partnership is a coalition of regional business leaders, joined by a shared commitment to improving the personal and economic well-being of Tampa Bay residents. Through its foundation, the Partnership conducts objective, datadriven research to identify the regionâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s greatest challenges and measure our progress toward shared community goals. The Community Foundation of Tampa Bay is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit that connects people and resources to inspire charitable giving and create a meaningful, lasting impact on our region. Serving Hillsborough, Pinellas, Pasco, Hernando, and Citrus counties, the Community Foundation of Tampa Bay works to build a better community through creative philanthropy, vision, and leadership. United Way Suncoast staff, volunteers, and trusted community partners fight for the education and financial stability of every person in the communities we serve. Across DeSoto, Hillsborough, Manatee, Pinellas, and Sarasota counties, United Way Suncoast develops, enhances, and implements services and initiatives to help create a stronger, more vibrant community.

Profile for Tampa Bay Partnership

2020 Regional Equity Report  

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