Page 1

FOR STRETCH FABRICS

KEITH

R . ICHARDS


•• • ••

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I

Director of Sales and Acquisitions: Dana Meltzer-Berkowitz Executive Ed1tor: Olga T. Kontzias Acquis1t1ons Ed1tor: Joseph Miranda Senior Development Editor: Jennifer Crane Art D1rector: Adam B. Bohannon Production Manager: Ginger Hillman Cover Design: Adam B. Bohannon

Copyright © 2008 Fairchild Books, A Division of Conde Nast Publications. All rights reserved. No part of this book covered by the copyright hereon may be·reproduced or used in any form or by any means-graphic, electronic, or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, taping, or information storage and retrieval systems-without written permission of the publisher.

Library of Congress Catalog Card Number: 2007935039 ISBN: 978-1-56367-479-2 GST R 133004424 Printed in the United States of America

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CONTENTS

lntrodudton

1 >.

1

:"tn·tch 7W‡UPaand .]urgon

2

annd

3

PnnCipl<>s of Pattern-Drafting 53

4

Slopers and Reductions 75

5

Skirts 107

6

Pa nts

7

Tops 201

8

Sleeves 249

9

Sweaters 279

10

Dresses 317

11

Oversized Projects

12

Four-Way-Stretch 371

13

Bodysuits, Leotards, and One- and Two-Piece Swimsuits 395

14

Fitting and Corrections 425

.i\len.,urements 29

175

341

Appendix: Costing Sheets 443


INTRODUCTION

!n the past. the garment industry ,,¡as segmented Into different categories such as daywear, eveningwear. and swimwear. The industry was also divided into houses that manufactu'red knits and those that manufactured wo,¡en fashions. However, in order to remain competitive in the current marketplace. today. all designers and manufacturers must incorporate stretch fabrics in their collections. A large portion of modern collections are created from stretch and knit fabrics. Almost all tops, sweaters, swimsuits, and dresses in a designer collection are created utilizing knit fabrics. The modern designer must understand the use of knit fabrics a nd the specific patternmaking procedures required to ma ke knit garments. Most new stretch designers and patternm akers mistakenly believe that stretch a nd knit garments must be extremely close-fitting a nd tight. While this is often the case, it is not always t rue. Stretch garments can also be loose, draped, shirred, oversized, and fluid . Cowl necks, draped effects, ruffles, a nd flow can easily and very effectively be created th rough the use of knit fabrics. It is the character of the fabric to be fluid and liquid, and it is for this reason that ma ny designers and manufacturer s use stretch fabrics in their collections. Most beginners also assume t hat stretch garments are not "designer." However, Sonia Rykiel, Azzedine Alaia, Missoni, Norma Kamali, and Stephen Burrows, are examples of designer s who have built entire collections and empires based primarily on knit fabrics. Throughout this text, the terms "stretch fabric" and "knit fabric" are used interchangeably. The characteristic that m akes fabric stretch is knitting that is not done like your grandmother while she sat on the porch in her favorite rocking chair, but instead with huge industrial machines that replicate the exact same stitches she used to make that holiday sweater. The new designer can't imagine that your favorite T-shirt, hoodie, ar your comfy fleece track pants were created by bitting with eith er small or large needles.

The Intended Audience This book i::: intended for students of fashion, current designers that need refresher lessons or updated knowledge of designing and patternmaking for stt¡ctch, a nd the experienced home sewer who requ ires pattcrnmak ing knowledge for stretch fabrics. This book assumes that the reader has a basic understa nding of sew ing and will be able to construct these ga rments with industrial equipment. It does not show very many sewing a nd construction techniques. This text is unique in that is develops different slopers for each different stretch r atio, thus allowing the patternmaker to focus on the r ealization of the design a nd not the mathematics necessary to compensate for the stretch factors of knit fabrics. The la rgest ratio is drafted and the other stretch r atios, being smaller, are outlined on the larger sloper. This book is intended as an introduction to the principles a nd practices of stretch patternmaking a nd not every imaginable style is illustrated. To gain a more thorough knowledge of the subject matter it is imper ative that the student practice a nd apply the principles explained in this book. Eventua lly, the patternmaking will become instinctuaL This book a lso cannot foresee the constant and evolving changes inherent in the fashion industry and, consequently, the styles illustrated throughout this text a re not chosen for their fa shion importa nce, but rather as a teaching tool to illustrate the ma ny different patterndrafting techniques the student should understand. The styles created throughout this text are not shown as exa mples of current fashion. Ins tead, they are intended to instruct the patternmaker and designer how to use their own creativity to develop their own unique styles. This textbook is different from other books in that it studies and explains each garment type, rather than garment parts. The student is able to go to the section for T-shirts, and find out how to draft the sloper, create the pattern,


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INiRODUCTION

I

a?QG th use '

tlle re Ievant garment details. . rather . an sifting through chapters trying to find the mformation necessary. Often. this textbook is repetiti,¡e because it has been created so that students may turn to the chapter they are interested in and be able to complete a project without ba,¡ing to flip though many chapters and each eYery page looking for a neckline t hat may only apply to a T-shirts.

How This Book Is Organized Each area of study will begin with the draft of a sloper/block. which is a basic template of t h e garment. and then proceed to illustrate different patterns within the subject area. The final portion of each area of study will focus on a dvanced patternmaking practices of the subject matter. This will be followed by an exercise, garment, to test the designer's knowledge of the

subject matter. and a s hort quiz to delerrnin that you fully under sta_nd . the concepts of project. Each p~oJ ect W ill m corporate two dif. fer en t sea m fimshes, so that by the time th student h as completed the ten projects requir ~ for the course, the student will h ave a thorou:h understanding of stretch fa brics.

About the Diagrams and Illustrations Please note the diagra ms and illustration are not in the correct proportions. The reader cannot measure the illustrations because they are not accurate. All measurements will be indicated a nd should b e followed as taken from the m easurement charts provided. Any of the measurements given may be substituted with per sonal measurements for t h e development of personal slopers and patterns or for custom designs.

Legend The foll owing '"_'ill be used throughout the text and may be used as a gmde to the illustrations.

Fabrics

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Slopers and blocks

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Patterns with seam allowances

Production patterns

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One by one rib

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One by two rib

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Two by two rib

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INTRODUCTION

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Three thread serging

Elastic waist

Elastic waist with stitch through the center

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Elastic waist with two rows of stitching through the center

Coverstitch from the correct side

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Four thread serging

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Topstitching

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Zipper teeth

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Shirring and gathering

Two hole button

Four hole button

Closed buttons showing the button hole

90 degrees. is used to Indicate a right angle.

Is used to Indicate that nn area needs to blended Into a smooth curved line; may or may not Include the word "blend" in the circle.

3/8" binding

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INTRODUCTION

Pattern Labeling All patterns should be created full open. However, for clarity and space the patterns in this text are often created on the fold. All patterns should be labeled with grain lines, style number, and the stretch ratio.

Sewing As mentioned earlier, this book is about making patterns for use with stretch fabrics-not sewing. This text presupposes you have the ab11Ity to put the garment together with the equipment

e a nd is intended for the profes . you. h av with industria l equipment. Alt~lonal deslgnfe rtsh e instructions are intended for though most o. · also b e·IIJ. ewer t he home sewer w11l dustn a 1 s·nformation • · d enefit conta m e . from tl1e I Stretch fabrics may ~eem complicated ·ng in the begmmng, but th ey b '~lid con f u Sl d d . eco"' ·er a nd easier to un erstan With each ·••e eas1 . · corn let ed project . Practice sergmg a few searn · faching elastic, and cover .stitching a few~· at.. before beginning any proJect. Eventually ellla understanding of stretch fabric will beco Your "' . rne tn stinctual and e f 1ect1ve. ·

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ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

The author would like to thank the following for their patience help and understanding during the preparation of this text: colleagues, coworkers, and, especially, the students of the International Academy of Design, whose help and constant questions have been the driving force of this book. In addition, thank you to James Fowler for submitting this series of handouts to Fairchild Books and to Lori Stilwell, my original knitting instructor. To friends, Alan Thomas Smith, Stephen Wong, and Suzanne Boyd, thank you so much for your patience, support, and understanding while I was writing this text. Also, special thanks to the authors of all other fashion and garment textbooks, whose writing and teaching have educated me and inspired me to embark on this journey. And, thank you to Margaret, for a lifetime of love.


••

I I

• ' Designing and Patternmaking for Stretch Fabrics


CHAPTER

I

Stretch Terms and Jargon Objective Because of the former :;egmentation of the garment industry, into e\¡eningwear. knitwear. and swimwear. the stretch industry has its own terminology and jargon. The stretch designer and patternmaker must understand the specific tenns in order to communicate ideas, details. and specifications to manufacturers and contractors. This chapter introduces the reader to the terminology and jargon that is specific to stretch design, patternmaking, and construction. After reading this chapter the reader should be able to identify stretch ratios, the direction of stretch, and understand the stretch patternmaking process. It is important to know these terms before studying any of the other chapters, as this terminology will be used throughout the text.

All Knit Fabrics Are Created on Knitting Machines It doesn't matter whether your fabric is a lightweight , sheer jersey knit such as in many designer T-shirts, or a bulky knitted sweater. Th ey are all knitted on knitting machines. Fine knits forT- shirts are created on knitting machines with very fine needles and yarn, while bulky fabrics are created on thick er-gauged machines with larger needles and bulky yarn . The knit fabric that you purchase is knit. Your favorite T-shirt is knit. Your winter toque is knit. And while there a r e many different sizes of needles and yarn, as well a s combination s of stitches, they a re a ll knit on some variation of the basic knitting machine.

Direction of Stretch The first and most important aspect of understanding knit fabrics is understanding the direction of the stretch, and how the direction should be used when creating garments.

1


~ 1-il\Pl t H 1

STRETCH TERMS AND JARGON

ONE-WAY STRETCH ·, ,,, r.,b1.1·c tJ1 at only st,·etchC's acr·oss 0 ne-way s t re t ch us . the fab. stretches across the fabnc

ric and. the stretch is entirely del'ived from the st.rtches used wh.en crea t.1ng tl1e "~bric ''"' · Garments shou ld be made Wtt.h the stretch going around the body. TWO-WAY STRETCH ·, "abric that .stretches across as well as Two-wm s t rC' t cI1 J:s "· up and ·down: the st retch is denved from the ya rn a nd the stitclws.

FOUR-WAY STRETCH Four-way :s·tretch is fabric that stretches across as well as up

stretches aaoss the fabnc as well as fengthwose and has spandex added

· t]1e "abric an d down " , a nd has supplementary stretch added through spandex/Lycra® being added to the fibers before knitting. . . Most knits stretch more in one d1rectwn than the other, and many knits stretch in only one ?i.rection: cr~ss~ i se. The experienced patternmaker always ubhzes t~e ~mlt-m stretch of knits, with the direction of stretch encu·chng the figure when knits are used for dresses, jacket s, pants, skirts, tops, and sleeves. However, the greatest degree of s tretch should go up and down the torso for bodysuits, catsuits, leotards, or any other garment that passes through the crotch , to allow for maximum mobility. One-way-stretch knits a r e rarely used for these garments because of the discomfort created in the crotch when the customer raises her a rms. Two-way-stretch a nd four-way-stretch pa tterns are identical, meaning, the same patterns may be used interchangeably. However, garments made with two-way stretch will often sag on the body, at the knees, elbows, and crotch, because the fabric does not have any memory, or elasticity, and will not return to its original sh ape after it's worn. Also note that one-way-stretch patterns may be used with four-way-stretch fabrics, as long as the garment does not need lengthwise reductions. For example, a one-way-stretch skirt may be cut using a four-way-stretch fabric because there is nothing holding the skirt down at the botto~ hem (referred to as. ~n a nchor). Thus, the lengthwise direction of stretch is not utlhzed at alL Distinctive and separate four-way-stretch patterns are

o~ly necessary when the stretch of the garment is anchored t rough one p1ecethe· crotch, · · such as with catsuits' bodysuits' leotards, the -crotch.SWimsmts, and other garments that pass through


STRETCH TERMS AND JARGON

Why Knit Fabrics Stretch Knit fa?rics are created by interlooping yarn; each loop is c~ug~t m the row above, and is anchored to the stitches beSide It. As the fabric stretches, the loops expand. Stable-~nit fabrics stretch because the knitted loops will expand ?on~ontally. Because the yarn itself does not stretch, the fabnc wrll not stretch in the lengthwise direction. Two-way-stretch fabrics stretch because the yarn that is ~sed to knit .them is textured and crimped in a spiral formatwn. It uncoils as it stretches, and thus will stretch in both directions-across, and up and down. Four-way-stretch fabrics have a core yarn of spandex, latex, or Lycra® with another yarn wrapped in a spiral around it. The coils loosen as the fabric stretches and because of the elastic core, it will spring back to its origi~al size.

Stretch Factor The str etch factor, or stretch ratio, is the maximum percentage t h at a fabric will stretch. Most knits stretch from 18 to 100 percent. There are five different stretch factors used for designing and drafting stretch patterns.

SPANDEX Spandex is a synthetic fabric, in which the latex yarn u~ed ~or the knitting is wrapped with another yarn. Spandex w1ll g1ve the fabric excellent memory, and the ability to stretch a lot more than yarn without spandex.

LYCRA VS. SPANDEX Lycra® is a trademarked name for spandex. People incorre~tly use the terms spandex and Lycra interchangeably. Lycra 1s a version of spandex, created by DuPont.

LATEX Latex is a natural elastic or rubber core yarn, with other round it It is a natural fiber used to create yarns wrapped a · spandex.

ELASTANE Canadian or other name fior "spandex."

CHAPTER 1

3


o4

C HAPTER 1

, ~ ~

ST RETC H T ERM S AND JAR G ON

Stretch Ratios IS also importan t to under stan

Stable kn1ts

18%-25%

5- stretches to 6 1 / , ·

I

Stable knits have very little stretch, and will need garment ease to al~ movement when worn. Stable knits are often created overs1zed to allow for garment ease. Examples of stable knits are Polarfleece®, sweat fabrics, etc. This type will stretch more than stable kn its. Examples include T-shirt fabric, interlocks, jerseys, etc.

Moderate kmts

26%-50%

5- stretches to 7 11.s-

Stretchy kn1ts

51%-75%

5· stretches Examples of stretch knits include velour, stretch terry, and some T-shirt to 8 31,fabrics, etc.

Super-stretch kn1ts

R1b knits

Sweater kmts

Stretchwovens

76%-100% 5- stretches Excellent stretch and recovery make this fabric suitable for catsuits, to 10· bodysuits, leotards, and swimwear, etc . (for example, fibers blended with spandex or latex). The elastic fibers of this type of knit can stretch many times their original length and width and return to the original measurement. Examples include spandex, nylon spandex, cotto n spandex, jumbo spandex. Up to 5- stretches Known as the traditional "knit one, purl one" wristband stitch. Rib knits depend 100% up to 10· on the knit pattern used (e.g., 1 x 1 ribs will stretc h more than 2 X 2, 3 x 3, etc.). Rib knits are created by alternating stitches between the two needle beds. They appear identical on both sides of the fabric, and don't curl at the edges. Examples include cuff ribbing, waistband ribbing, and crew-neck collars. 18%-50% 5-will Sweater knits are those types of fabrics that one would typically use to create stretch to sweaters and sweater dresses. They are usually made with a thicker yarn. 7 '12Less than 18%

•• •• •• •• I

d t h t di ffer en t knit f abrics a h t" must h ave stretch differ ent amounts, and each stretc r a 10 its own set of slopers.

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5- will Stretch woven fabrics are created by weaving Lycra® w ith in the fabric, and stretch to 6sho uld be treated as a woven fabric. However, the ease should be reduced or removed from the slopers. '

1

2

STRETCHES TO ~

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•• •• • •• • it

••• •• •• •••

•• •

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How to Determine the Stretch Ratio of Your Fabric Take your fabric and fold .t fi . the cut edge. Place one inl a e~ mches below the selvedge and I p a few mches in from from the first pin. p ace another pin at 5" away To get an accurate measure a few inches b ~easurement, always cause the cut ed 0 fi e ow the cut edge, bege ten stretches.

'

!I . Stretch the fabric within the pinned area. If ~t coi?fortably stretches to 6 W, it is a stable kmt, With a stretch ratio of 25 percent, and you should use the stable-knit slopers to draft anY styles with this fabric.


STRETCH TERMS AND JARGON

3

If it comfortably stretches to 71/z'', it is a moderate knit, with a stretch ratio of 50 percent.

5

•• •• c ••• ••

--

STRETCHY KNITS

If it comfortably stretches to 8:Y4', it is a stretchy knit, with a stretch ratio of 75 percent.

STRETCHES TO

6

STRETCHES TO

---

--

RIB KN ITS

SUPER-STRETCH

If it comfortably stretches to 10", it is a superstretch knit, with a stretch ratio of 100 percent.

If it comfortably stretches more than 10", it is a rib knit, with a str etch ratio of over 100 percent .

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STRETCHES TO

MODERATE KNITS

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STRETCHES TO

CHAPTER 1

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STRETCH

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STRETCH WOVEN

And if it stretches to 10" or more in both di. . rections, it is a two-way-stretch knit: If it bounces back, returns to Its ongmal measur e ment when released, it is a four-waystretch knit.

If your fabric doesn't stretch at least 25 percent, to 6 Y4', then it should be treated as a stretch woven.


----------------------~~ C~APTER 1

STRETCH TERMS AND JARGON

•• •• •• •• •

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The Different Stretch Ratios and How to Use Them All of the block drafts in this text will be drafted in the largest stretch ratio, and a ll subsequent ratios will be drawn on those blocks. If your fabric is a moderate stretch ratio, then trace out those lines on the blocks to begin your draft. If your fabric is super-stretch, then trace out those lines to begin your draft. Never cut

•• ••

off the stretch ratios, as you will definitely need them in the future. If you are working with many knit fabrics, then it is a good idea to trace out each individual stretch block on separate oak-tag. If you only use stretch fabrics occasionally, then simply indicate the stretch ratios on the block.

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STRETCH TEAMS AND JARGON

CHAPTER 1

7

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Different Stretch Fits Knit garments can be created with different waist fits. If you require a tight fit, trace out the fitted waist. If you require an unfitted waist, trace out that waist. If you are working with many knit fabrics, then it is a good idea to trace out each indi-

vidual stretch block on separate oak-tag. If you only use stretch fabrics occasionally, then indicate the different waists on the blocks . If you require a fitted top, then trace out the fitted waist. If you require an unfitted waist, trace out that waist.


8

CHAPTER 1

STRETCH TERMS AND JARGON

Stretch Memory . Str·etch memory •·s the a mount that ah knit d F will b . return to •ls . . 1 h a fter· being fully stretc e . a ncs with e orrgtna s ape t th · . . l<cej lent memory will completely return ·rro err ongmal shalle. r brics with poor· memory WI not retu rn to thei~. • h w ereas .a th b '111. tended shape and wi ll eventua 11y sag on e ~dy. With the use of Lycra ®• spandex • latex, and elastane, . knrl fabrics are available with 100 perc~nt mlemtorty, mfteanb•~g they wi]] corn . pletely return to their ongma s a e a er emg stretched.

Garment Ease Garment ease is the amount of extra fabric required to allo for a comfortable fit. Knit garments do not require as lllUc~ garment ease, because the mherent stretch of the fabric usu. ally provides the necessary garment ease.

Negative Ease Negative ease is the amount of extra fabric removed, or re. duced, to allow for an accurate fit. Many knits are lllade smaller than the actual body and use the inherent stretch of knit fabrics to achieve the desired fit.

Design Ease Design ease is the amount of extra fabric required to create' a particular design. The designer may require a fit that is over· sized or much larger than the body by increasing the amoum of design ease. Shirring, gathering, and draped effects are all created with design ease.

Patternmaking Terms SLOPER TOP SLOPER FRONT

MEO

•• ..• •• •

•• •• •• •• • •• •• •

•• •• •

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A sloper, often referred to as a "block" or ~master pattern: is a template of the desired fit, like a croquis: it doesn't h.s~ ~ny seam a llowances or details. It is your basic fit. and from It, many styles can be developed. Experienced patternmaker:l do not start each pattern from scratch. but instead 001 the required sloper and add style lines and details as It would be far too time-consuming, and expensiw, to each pattern from raw measurements.


•• •

••

STRETCH TERMS AND JARGON

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parallel

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GRAIN The direction parallel to the selvage of the fabric is referred to as the grain of the fabric. If a garment is not cut exactly on grain, it will twist on the body and be unwearable-and, ultimately, unsellable.

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9

2

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CHAPTER 1

3

GRAINLINE The grainline is a line on the pattern that indicates in which direction the garment will hang, and is needed to ensure that the garment is cut on grain. The grainline should always be parallel to the selvage when cutting out the garment . Since most knit fabrics h ave a nap, grainlines on stretch patterns should have both arrows pointing in the same direction, one direction only, as illustrated. Blocks and slopers should not have any grainlines, because a fabric has not been assigned to the design yet and you can't know in which direction it should be cut.

4 CF

waist notch

CROSS GRAIN

. . the grain that is perpendicular Cross gram IS fi to the length grain. Two-way-stretch and ourics may be cut on the cross way-st ret ch f:abr · h t d· . . the f:abric also stretches m t a 1gram smce . f: b · f ' Some fabrics such as swimwear a ncs rec wn. t d so they stretch more in the lengthare · d"Jrect"wn, a nd . crea d. et" than the crosswise WISe JTeC JOn should be cut accordingly.

hip notch

NOTCHES

Notches are small clips in the patter~ that indicate where two pieces of a garment hne up.


10

HAPTER1

STRETCHTERMSAN o JARGON

be used to indicate In woqm patternmaking. notches ma~ th·s is not neces. stre t ch fabnc 1"'" Remember the t:eam a llowances. But m 78 · sary. because almost all seam. a llowru.1 ces W'are or you will create to keep all notches in knit fabncs w1thm 8 • holes in your garments.

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•• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• • ~

drill holes for pocl<ets

DRILL HOLES

Drill holes, or drill marks, are used to indicate placements, such as where a pocket should line up on a garment. Do not use a drill on knit fabric-it will cause the fabric to run. Mark the fabric with an awl, or chalk marks. Often, loose chalk is pushed into the drill holes of the pattern, one layer at a time, to transfer markings to the garment.

SHOULDER STAYS

Knit tops require shoulder stays, usually W' twill tape to prevent the shoulders from stretching out of shape. The twill tape may be applied while serging the seams or you may use a metering device to attach the tape to the shoul· ders. Sleeveless garments do not require twill tape, since there is no weight pulling on the • shoulders. Sometimes clear elastic is used to stay the • shoulders; it will not shrink with repeated washings. However, clear elastic has a tendency to grip the presser foot of the serger and should be placed underneath the garment to allow the feed dogs to pull the elastic forward with the garment.

•• •• •• •

••


STRETCH TERMS AND JARGON

CHAPTER 1

11

neckhne and shoulder stay

neckline stay

NECKLINE STAYS Many knit garments require a neckline stay, or tape to prevent the neckline from stretching. The neckline tape is only applied to the back neck. to allow the front to stretch large enough to get the garment on the body. If there is a zipper or other opening in the front of the garment, the tape may completely encircle the neckline. This is especially the case when creating ribbed T-shirts. As the rib collar is attached to the rib gar-

ment, it will often stretch out of shape and needs to be returned to the original size and held in place. Sometimes the neckline stay and shoulder stay are combined into one single tape that extends from the shoulder across the back neck and along the other shoulder. The illustration shows the single stitching line that holds the combined neckline and shoulder tape.

BIAS Bias is any pattern piece cut on an angle, with true bias being the 45-degree angle to the straight grain. In woven fabrics the greatest amount of stretch is on the bias; however, in knit fabrics the greatest amount of stretch is across. Therefore, bias garments are never created with knit fabrics. Knit bias does not have any of the stretch and drape characteristics that woven bias would impart to garments.

DRAFTING Drafting is the process of creating a pattern on paper. The sloper is traced out, the details added, and finally the necessary seam allowances and notches are added. PATTERN A pattern is the finished template used to cut out the g~­ ments. It includes all the details that will eventually be mcorporated into the design. It also includes all the seam allowances and notches necessary for the construction of the final garment. Final patterns should always be made from oak-tag.


C~ "'F'TER

1

STRETCH TERMS AND JARGON

MATCHING SEAMS tt . all sca ms should be matched l Before using any pa lei n~ ~ e length and will sew togeth 0 ensure that they are t 1 e ,a 1 er

perfect)~·. When each

marc h.mg "'·earns · t he pattems s hou ld be on top other.

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SKIRT FRONT

I TRUEING SEAMS

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T·SHIRT FRONT

MED CUT1

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Trueing seams is the process of matching a ll the seams of the pattern. and checking that the lengths of seams match and will sew together perfectly; that they intersect at a desirable angle; and that a ll notches match. To true a seam, line up the pieces as if they had been sewn and pressed open, beside each other. Check to see that all intersecting lines and seams are blended into smooth and continuous lines. When trueing the side seams, make sure that the underarm curve is a smooth and continuous line. Check that the hem is a smooth and continuous line.

.. •.• • •• •• •

••• •• •

.To true the shoulders, line them up beside each other, as if they h ad been sewn and were pressed open. Ensure t?at the neckline is a smooth a nd contmuous line.

Chec~ that the armhole is a smooth and contmuous line.

.• .••


STRETCH TERMS A N D J A R GO N

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C H A P TER 1

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S~E'"- 500,

"""'""''"""

l

_....., c.a:~w -'""' -"

/ /

/ / under layer of paper

MARKER A marker is. a paper tra cing of the complete pattern that IS a pphed to the fabric and held in place with pins, ~veights. staples, or lightweight spray glue. a nd IS cut together with the fabric. All markers should be made on gr a in so that when cut out, a ll the fabric pieces will be on grai n. There should be a layer of paper under the fabric to a id in cutting. There should also be a layer of paper between each new color, to prevent t he color a bove or below from sta ining the fa bric as t he blade of the cutting knife moves up a nd down. MARKER TACKER A marke r tacker is a type of st apler th at doesn't have the bottom attach ment. It is used to staple the m a r ker paper to the fabric lay, t o hold it in place wh ile cut tin g. Never staple in a ny of the ga rment pieces, bu t staple in a reas of the fabric SPEC SHEET A spec sh eet is a sh eet creat ed by the designer, or spec t echnician, containing all the information the patternmaker needs to create the pattern for a particular style. It should include: A sketch, both front view and back view.

MARKER PAPER Ma rker paper or dot paper is specially printed with a grid and numbers for the accurate laying of pattern pieces. The marker ma ker can simply follow the grid to ensure that a ll pattern pieces a re placed perfectly on grain.

that will be discarded, waste fabric. Also, when cutting out, be sure not to cut a staple or you will create sparks, and greatly dull your knife blade.

All required seam allowances. Seam finishes. Hem allowances. Any important construction notes.

Fabric swatch. SIZE SPECS Size specs are the measurements of the manufacturer's target market. Each manufacturer will create garments for a particular customer,

and these measurements will be indicated in the size specs. (See Chapter 2: Sizing and Measurements.)


14

CHAPTER 1

STRETCH TERMS AND JARGON t

~

• • •

PATTERN CARD , The pattern card or "must," is included with all finished · terns. It 1ists a ll ' the p1eces t h a t "rnus t" be cu t t o create Pat th • ~ garment. A ll finished patterns should have a pattern rnust. e '

~ '

,.• ~ '

•• • '

PATTERN PAPER Pattern paper is any lightweight, inexpensive paper that may be used for drafting patterns. Do not draft directly on oak-tag, because it is difficult to fold back pleats, tucks, darts, or seam alJowances for trueing.

OAK-TAG

Oak-tag is a heavier weight of paper than that used for drafting. Because it is thicker and stiffer, it is much easier to trace around when making markers, and/or tracing with wax or chalk. Only final and production patterns should be traced onto oak-t ag, because it is difficult t o fold and crease.

PATTERN HOOKS place punch hole near the center of the hem

0

All patterns should be hung on pattern hooks a nd stored when not in use. When punching holes for patterns, the hem is a more desirable place to make the hole, because if the pattern rips or tears while being stored, it is much easier to replace a portion of the hem than to repair a torn-off neckline or waist. Place the punch hole near the center of the pattern pieces so they hang bala nced and do not swing. COSTING SHEET

Th·1 ·

T-SHIRT FRONT SMALL

CUT1

S IS a sheet created for each style in a collection, which keeps an account of the costs needed to make the garment. Each _style should have its own cost sheet. R emember that the most Important part of a garment is the ''price tag-! PATTERN LABELING

CF

pahtten~s

Atll must be la beled with the style number, the s rete ratw the size · 1· · th d t ' • a gram me, the direction of cutting, e ba 7 completed, the patternmaker's name and pattern

~mm~

·

•• • • · • •

It •

•• •• •• •• •• •

•• •


STRETCH TERMS ANO JARGON

'''"'nwnt manuf:.lctun' r., •'dent1(\ · ..::-tyle::lOt)()

b~

bit> knits

100

blousps/shirts

~00

dre~!::l')$

300

pants

400 ,')00

pckt'li<

5000

!:uper-,:;tretch knits rib knib

6000

four-way-,;tretch knib

l100

\' ('St~

3000 4000

!'(a

15

styll' ntnnlwrs:

mod«:>rate knits stretchy knits

:.woo

CHIII'TI'II 1

00

,;ku·t,;

llw hu~t lwo digilH lsom«:>ti n1C's writl«:>n in •·oman numeralR to avoid confusion) should rep•·e::;enl the various styles within the collection.

Note that there are mu It·1p1e nwt h od;; of crt'att.ng ;;I Ylc num. work fm· w1l1 . mo,:;t · likclv . bers, .and t h e manufact urer t h at ~ou · h ave Its own method

PATTERN NUMBERING All pattern pieces of a particular stvle :;hould be numbered , and should also include the total number of pattern pieces needed for the garment. Use any one of these methods of numbering. . All the examples show the third pattern p1ece for a garment with a total of four pattern pieces needed to complete it. Remember t.hat the marker maker and cutter have not gone to fashion school, and do not understand patterns, so they would noi realize if a pattern piece is missing. Often, a designer will trace a pattern piece from a current style when creating a new style. What would happen if the cutter cut out thousands of garments with a pattern piece missing?

CF

CF

RIGHT SIDE UP R.S.U. stands for "Right Side Up" and should be used for a ny asymmetrical patterns to en sure that you always cut the correct side. The example shows a top with only one shoulder, and to ensure that the back is cut with the matching shoulder, it must also b e labeled "Right Side Up." The reverse side, or the back of the pattern, should be labeled R.S.D. for "Right Side Down." Right side up and right side down patterns should always b e labeled on both sides of the pattern.

ASYMMETRICAL TOP FRONT MED CUT 1 R.S.U.

\ ) · 1 ~fJ>·

ASYMMETRICAL TOP FRONT MED CUT

1 R.S.D.

1


16

l HAI'l l:R 1

STRETCH TERMS AND JARGON

Color Coding Black

Self or main fabric.

Red

Lining fabric.

Blue

-I ld list the type of fusing. Fusing. or interfacing. The pattern maker "'10u

Green

Contrast or any secondary fabric. such as rib.

Purple

Other contrast fabrics, etc.

Pink

Other contrast fabrics, etc.

Brown

Other contrast fabrics. etc.

I //

(

\ \

I I I I

\ \ \

\

I I

I

/

I I

\

\

I

\

V-NECKTOP I LINING I MED I I CUT1

I

Some companies, usually those that only create stretch garments, may use colors to indicate different sizes, because they will rarely use lining or interfacing. But if a company does both woven and stretch garments, the woven format, as above, should always take precedence in order to avoid confusion. For companies that label sizes with colors ~use pattern pieces are indicated with diagonal hnes drawn on the pattern piece.

I I I I I I I I I ~---- - ---

JL

For companies that label sizes with colors, lining is indicated with a large letter "U' on the pattern.

''

' '

t

I

l


STRETCH TERM S AND JARGON

Types of Fit Tht'n.>at¡(' man , d "ffi â&#x20AC;˘ ' } J erent types of fit that may be used to create kmt garments, and each will be illustrated throughout the text. The designer may speci.fY the fit, or the patternmaker must use his o~ her own judgment and e}..'perience to determine the fit. Fashton trends will also determine the fit. Some seasons will require the fit to be very loose around the waist while other seasons will demand that fit be much looser. Both.the designer and the patternmaker must understand current fashion in order to work effectively.

TIGHT FIT Use the block exactly as drafted without increasing a ny of the measurements. Most slopers and blocks in this text will be drafted with the tight fit. While this fit may be too extreme, or too tight for the final garment, it is always easier to create a looser fit from a tight-fitting sloper than the reverse.

SEMI-FIT A semi-fit is halfway between a tight and loose fit, slightly looser around the waist a r ea, and is the most common fit. It appears to have a lot of shaping and will appear like a fitted silhouette, while still a llowing some room around the waist.

LOOSE FIT A loose fit goes straight down from the bust to the hips, and is generally only loose in the waist area.

OVERSIZED Slash a nd spr ead the sloper to create a new oversize~ sloper (illustrated in Chapter 11, Oversized Projects). Hood1es and track suits are good examples of oversized gar_ments. You cannot simply grade the garment into a larger s1~e, ?ecause the neckline, cuffs, and hems would also increase m s1ze.

CHAPTER 1

17


\'HAP tR 1

STRETCH TERMS AND JARGON

,.,.. '

C8

Cutting with Nap and Shine Because of the \\ay knit:> are cJ·eatcd , a!l knits have a nap and many kmt fabrics arc finished and pollsht'd lo create a Shine or texture on the surface. Pattcmmakcrs must take lhis into consider.1tJon and label the patterns acctwdmgly. lt would not be acceptable to cut a g-arment with tlw f,·ont 1n on~ direction and the back in tht' other. \\'hen the cuMo nwr tnes on the garnwnt. 1t ,n1uld look ::~s if the front and back had been cut w1th two diffc1·cnt fabrics. Tlw pattcrnmakcr will crcat.e a gra inline ~~ith arrows pointing in tlw s::~me dircction to md1ca~c nap (as dlustrated). Remcmber thnt becausc of the way kmts a rc made, there is ahn1y 8 a slight nap to the fabric, and it should always be cut accordingly.

"'

1

Kr•t fabnc wt 1()(,1< 1ke th1s •llustrat•on when VIewed 1rorr c.ne d"ect,on.

And It WI/I look like th•s when VIewed from the Other direct 1on.

Grainline with arrows pointing in one direction indicates a .. napped or with shine" layout. Knits a re made by interlocking loops from one row to the next; therefore, all knits have a nap. While som e fabrics show this nap more than others do, it is a good habit to a lways label your grainline with arrows going in one direction. Unless you are absolutely certain that th e fabric has no discernable difference, always use one directional a rrow on your grain lines.

•• •• ~ ~

:Ia

•• •• ••• •

.


STRETCH TERMS AND JARGON

Direction of Knitting Another thing to cons·d . like pantyhose K .t f: 1be~ I S whether or not the fabric will run · · nr a ncs that they were knit h. . us ua 11Y on1Y unravel ·m the direction' Consequently '~~:nrc1liS from the last row knit downward. so that it runs u~wa d f placmg the pattern on th e fabric, place it the neck The d r rom the hem rather than downward from garment ·is beingownward ulled pi acement wr.11 often stretch when the and make it unself bl on, whrch can create a run in the fabric a e.

INCORRECT DIRECTION OF THE GRAINLINE INCORRECT

This i.s the incorrect way of laying the pattern on the fabric. The neckhne rece1ves the most stretch and will a lmost always run.

CORRECT DIRECTION OF THE GRAINLINE CORRECT

This is the correct way of laying the pattern on the fabric. The hem r eceives the least amount of stress and will not run as easily. If the fabric runs, the pattern should be labeled as "with nap," which should be indicated with single-direction arrows on the pattern.

CHAPTER 1

19


0

~'HAf'l ER

1

STRETCH TERMS AND JARGON

•. I

Greatest Degree of Stretch CF

greatest

degree of stretch

CF

greatest

degree of stretch

. _ tr·etch and four-way-stretch garrnents When creatmg tw.o-way. s h slightly more than the other. E ' usually onepatternmakers d1rectron st~etcWI.~stake this into consideration, an)(d. perienced use it to their benefit. t.111 g dresses and tops • the greatest direction of When crea . . d oing around the body. But for catsuits stretchd should be utt~Jze or~any garment that passes d bodysu1ts . . through both' ' ld rs the greatest direction of stretch s, an 1eotar 1 the crotch and the s lou e d' d the body. own . 1 ld b t.lized gomg up an of stretch is crosswJse; sollle s louUsually e uh t J e areat est de<Yree "' . k however, · 1 1 1 . . "' swimsuit fabrics are spec1al Y mt to have the knrt fabncs, sue as ' · ll l t th · of s t retch going lengthwise, para eh o d e selvage· reatest d1·rectron gl · IS · because the gannents pass through Tus . h the h crotc ld an would be uncomfortable when the customer raises er s ou ers. Tops, dresses, pants, skirts, and sweaters should use the greatest degree of stretch going around the bo?Y· Bodysui·ts, catsuits , or any garment that IS anchored by the h . crotch should have the greatest degree of stretc gomg up and down the body.

•• •• •..

••

•• •

I!

•• ••

•• •

Cutting Knits

The cutter should always let the fabric relax for 24 hours before cutting. Often the goods have been stretched when they were I rolled onto a bolt, as in the case when goods are purchased from I jobbers who reroll the goods too tight when they check the quality. Jobbers often stretch the fabric when rerolling it to get a better I yield thereby make more money by shortchanging you! Always double-check the width of goods before purchasing. In the industry, cutters often make up the lay, leave it overnight. and cut the goods the following morning. This ensures that the fabric bas re· laxed back to its original length. Otherwise garments cut with stretched out fabric may be smaller than intended. Many manufacturers slice off the ends of the bolts to create rolls of binding and trim, a nd sell any fabrics left over to jobbers. Never assume that the goods are a standard width. Circular knitted fabr~cs are sometimes cut open, and you cannot assume that the fabnc has been cut on grain. So always check tl1e grain to make sure it is accurate.

Ne~e~

allow the fabric to hang off the table. It will stretch and result Ill maccurate cutting. Knit garments are constructed with very small seam allow-

a~c~s, usually or %",h so it is necessaru to keep all notches to mmimum a d !l.t"·th· 8

yo .ll n WI In t e seam allowance usuallv t ~ Otherwise u WI create holes in the garment. , . , . Wax or clay chalk · b · ·11 steam out f IS est for markmg knit. Wax marks ", Clay marksoe n~:ural fibers, but will leave stains on svntheticS. garment withS:Ipy can be brushed away. It is always ~ to rut a aper marker. J


STRETCH TER M S AND JARGON

C H APTER 1

21

CF CF

T-SHIRT FRONT SMALL CUT 1

Cutting Tubular Goods When using tubular knits, never place any pattern on the fold. It is often dirty or stained. If a knit has a pressed-in fold or crease, it is probably permanent and you will need to refold the fabric to avoid placing a perma nent cr ease in the center front or center back of your garment. To avoid these problems, manufacturers never use the fold of th e fabr ic, but inst ead cut a ll patter ns full a nd open. This, however, forces them to cut an even number of garments only,

For a single item of clothing, r efol.d the tubula r fa bric so the st a in or crease IS m the

which may not be practical for the student or small manufacturer who may only wa nt a single garment, or an odd number. So it is necessary to r efold th e goods when cutting the front and back of a garment. However, you may use the original fold wh en cutting out th e sleeves, because the crease will be discar ded. Manufacturers cut patter ns full open so that a blemish is not used i n a ny part of the garment, but discarded as wast e.

center of the tube a nd will not be used in th e garment.


~'HAI'iER

1

STR ETC H TERM S AND J AR GO N

).

~

,.,. ,.

~

T-SHIRT FRONT SMALL CUT!

T-sHIRT FRONT

MED CUT!

•••

j Garments without Side Seams 0

. ll knit tops are ccasJOna '· oot ~vmde- seam•- This is

manufactured withbl ·f the only ava1·1 .a e 1 tubula~ fabric IS exactly the same Width as .the garment .\1anufacturers rarely create all Sizes of T-shJrt w1thout side seams-usually only MediUm ~;ize because it is the most common. Because the side seams will be hidden under the arm, any permanent creasing will not show as much. If a

'

~

.

tops company Chooses to . ma .nufacture alld of Its .. without side seams, It will have to.or er fabnc m exactly the widths needed for a ll_sizes. . When cutting the Small Size garment, 1t will be necessary to have side seams, or the manufacturer will h ave to order fabric in the exact width.

Pressing Knits Kmt fabncs don't press very effectively and are usually not pressed during constr uction. Most powerful vacuum installed. The vacuum helps pressing is done when the garment is complete, prevent the garment from sliding off the ironto block and shape it and make the hems lie flat, ing board, as well as cools the garment immedias well as to relax the stitching and elastic. ately, which helps set the seams and block the garment. Knits fail to take a sharp crease. The way th~t a knitted fabric presses depends primarily Most knit tops are pressed flat , and it is on Its fiber content and stitch formation. preferable to store them fiat and folded rather Acrylic is extremely sensitive to heat damthan on hangers, which will stretch the shoulage and should never be touched by the iron. Nyders and necklines out of shape. lon and acetate are easily damaged by ironing Elastic should be steamed to help it to relax. fiso be careful _not to leave the iron on the or any duration off AI Often elastic is stretched out of shape during fab . b fi . . lrne. ways test a scrap of the construction process and steaming helps it rKnJc . e ore I~onlllg the actual garment. return to its original size. tl It fabncs are fr vacuum table Th. . eq~en . Y pressed on a Fusible interfacing still requires dry . IS ls an Ironmg board with a pressing.

fabri~

•• .. •• I

1 •

I

1


STRETCH TERMS AND JARGON

Needles and Thread 1\Iost knit fabric~ can b _ . which has a -J·g-htl e "ewn ustng a universal-point needle " 1 b'" rounde d np · that IS · SUitable . knits. It is- usual!v for sewing· . etter to U-"e a ball . t dl a rounded tip that pom nee e. w h"1ch has · Wit · 11out puncturing the fabric yarns. penetrates the f a bnc Knit garments need <::tron d . use good-qualitv polve g an elast1c seams, so alwa~·s · - ster or cotton-wrapped polyester thread. WOOLLY NYLON

Woollybut nvlon a multifil !axed. get::.j,;-thin wh ament thread _that is puffy when retwo loopers ofth en stretched. It ts often used on one or e :>erger to create a soft and elastic seam espec"all [; d.. 1 y or ance and gymnastic garments in which harsh ~earns can create · \\Toolly nylon thread can also be used · ca!Ju,es h · on the \\earer. · m t e botto~1 looper of the cover-stitch machine or col1arette ~achme. This thread is rarely used in the needles because ~f 1ts tendency to bunch up and the difficult it os~s in threadmg the needles. Y p

Interfacing Knit garments don't require as much interfacing as woven garments, because the interfacing will prevent the fabric from stretching. Sometimes a garment may need to be interfaced to prevent certain areas from str etching, such as the seam a llowances for zippers, facings, a nd front plackets for buttonholes. Styles with facings are not meant to stret ch at the facing edge, and need t o be cut larger for the h ead to pass through . Facings and interfacings may only be used on garments that have a la rge enough neckline to fit over the head without stretching or styles that have a zipper or button closing. Tricot interfacing has a crosswise stretch a nd no lengthwise stretch. For best results, use tricot fusing so it stretches as needed. Sometimes the designer will need to control the lengthwise str etch and sometimes the crosswise stretch. Tricot interfacing can also be used to stabilize zipper seam allowances to prevent stretching during application. Tricot fusing is an excellent choice for most knit fabrics, because knit fabrics are not flat compared to woven fabrics, and tricot fusing can stretch into the minute crevices of the fabrics . It therefore gives better adhesion and won't pucker or bubble the way that a Pellon or a woven fusing might.

Block Fusing Loosely knit fabrics are occasionally "block" fused with tricot. Block fusing is when the goods are entirely f~sed before bei~g cut out. They are used to stabilize a loosely kn1t or woven fabnc.

C HAPTER 1

23


24

CHAPTER 1

STRETCH TERMS AND JARGON

Zippers

Knit garments rarely need zippers, because most garlllen • tepped into or pulled over the head. Bow ~ can oft en be S . d . e"er the designer will sometimes ~se zippers as a esi?n detail' sueh as a cente r front . zipper m a hooded .sweatshirt • 0 r e~., posed teeth zippers m track pants, or we1t Zippers for neckline openings or pockets. . . . Always try to eliminate functwnal zippers If ~he fabric has enough stretch and the garment can be stepJ?ed m~o or PUlled over the head. This may not a lways be possible With catsui I 4 and other garments that pass throu~h the crotch., If a zipper 1 is necessary, use invisi~le zippers, smce they don t have any I topstitching on the outs1d~, w~1ch ~akes them easy to sew in I knit fabrics because topsbtchmg will stretch the fabric. The key to invisible zipper applications is to use a zipper that is at I least 1 Y2 inches longer than the zipper opening, or to change t the length of the opening to be 11/2 inches shorter than the zip. per. If you use a zipper that is the same length as the opening, it is not possible to sew the very bottom of the zipper because the slider gets in the way. With a longer zipper you can place the excess length at the bottom of the zipper. Use a 1!2-inch seam a llowa nce for invisible zippers.

Shrinkage Shrinkage refers to the reduction in width and length of the garment, or both, that happens when a fabric is washed or dry-cleaned. There are different methods of compensating for shrinkage, and each depends on the way the fabric was dyed and its ultimate use.

How to Compensate a Pattern for Shrinkage PRESHRINKING The f: b · . a nc can be purchased preshrunk or prewashed to shrmk before cutting out the garment. Also, the manufacturer can send the fabric out to be "sponged'' or preshrunk. COMPACTING The f: b · th ~ .ncs are compressed at the mill the amount equal to e st rkmka~e. The manufacturer can c~t and sew these m ens nowmg th t h •'-"'r intended Slze. . a w en washed they will return to u..-

gtt:

1


STRETCH TERM S AND JARGO N

PATTERN COMPENSATION

The patternmaker s· . washes and dries thtmply cuts out all of the ar nal pattern to measu~';t'hthetht places them ba~k :~e~l~epte~cs, larged t 0 compensate Th'e s nnka ge. The new pattern mtgi· en· aft ts method IS · ':'sed for garmentsts " ' 1II be dyed, or washed that er construction SANFORIZED

.

Sanforized is a trademar ked proce . bearing a ncs this trad .ss of sItrinking the fabric F b percent because they h ebmark will not shrink more than i · shrinkage. ave een sub·e ~ ct ed to a method of compress1ve RESIDUAL SHRINKAGE

Residual that occursshrinkage in the t b indicat · f es the percentage of shrinkage a nc a ter 1ts first washing. PROGRESSIVE SHRINKAGE

Progressive shrinkage is th h . garment upon each subsequeenst was nnhkage mg. that may occur in a

Testing for Shrinkage You sho_uld shrink test every fabric by drawing a 20" X 20" square m the center of the fabric-always in the center bec~use ~here IS u sually some variation towards the edges, especwlly 1fthe goods h ave been split open or treated in some way. ~reate a cardboard t emplate of the square for testing every smgle dye lot. . Do this, a lso, to .check torque on the goods, that annoying thmg that happens 1f you buy a cheap T-shirt and your seams end up twisting a fter washing. Many times goods will be rejected if they have more than 5 percent torque and 5 percent shrinkage. Some fabrics are worse than others for torque, such as jersey knits and a ny variation like eyelets or anything with a drop needle like poor boy ribs. Interlocks are terrible for shrinkage. Even after compacting, interlock fabrics can have 5 to 6 percent shrinkage. After washing and drying the square, measure how much the fabric has shrunk in length and width and make a new pattern based on these percentages. Do this with every lot of fabric. You must make multiple patterns if there is a lot of variation in the dye lots; for example, there may be a pattern for a top with shrinkage of 6 percent length and 2 percent width and another for the same top with shrinkage of 4 percent l~ngth and 1 percent width. Alternatively you can wash a garment that has been made from the that have not been tested initially, then measure the overall garment shrinkage in various areas. For

g~ods

C HAPTER 1

new enlarged pal\orn

25


'HAI'l ER 1

STRETCH TERMS AND JARGON

n ay s hrink more lhan lb · t ]en g tl'l l d · h ~ Je the center f Jon 1 l1as a ll that thrca In t e sea, ex amp · .1 rm ho e y, st c ··•s 1 ]10] ~ because t Je • tr·etchi n g. ou mu ompensat arm ~ . k ' n"ors S '('th e to keep it ft·om shnn. t ~·the final garment .. o t e overall for this in the pattet n fo t the majority of Jt m the area frolll ·- 6 percent. pu -J1 rinkage t::. l to the h e m. "the bottom - o f t 11C a nn 110 e

Shrinkage Template _ d A :W-inch template I.S woe to get the percentages.

,.,.,.

.

because it is easy to multtply by

•• •• ~

5

Dyeing Knits and The metI10d o f dYe1.ng will affect the amount t' of shrinkage d t also t I1e metl10d and amount of compensa 10n use o correct the fit.

•• ••

I I:

••

STOCK DYEING The raw materials, the fibers, are dyed before _being spun into • varn. They will have the most amount of shrmkage but also ~ill produce the most color saturation. Stock dyeing is called "solution" dyeing when synthetic fibers are involved. One advantage of dyeing raw fiber stock is that different colors or shades can later be spun together to create complex yarns . SOLUTION DYEING

Some manmade fibers are dyed by adding colors to the polymer before they are spun. These colors are fast and durable. Solution dyeing is also called dope-dyeing. YARN DYEING

•• •• •• • I

The yarn is dyed before knitting and will have a lot of shrink- 1 a.ge but also great color saturation. Yarn dyeing allows fabnc to be c~eated from yarns of different color, allowing Jacquards, F~Ir Isles, plaids, brocades, and other knit-in designs. I Sp~ce dyemg, a variation of yarn dyeing, is a technique in I whiCh yar~s are dyed at intervals along their length. One problem With yarn dy· · "b , . . f I th . mg Is arre, m which some areas o edyarn might be slightly different shades of the same color I an not obvious wh k · I eas might coincid en u? l1Itted. But when knitted, these ardifferent sha de. ently hne up to create blocks of an obviously 1

a

PIECE DYEING

I

The fabric is dyed after kni . . . age of the complet d ttmg, Which results in less shnnkdyeing includi'ng ue garment. Problems associated with piece t· neven sh · k Ion. Piece dyeing is al rm age and uneven dye saturaso ca11ed vat dyeing.

I I

I


STRETCH TERMS AND JARGON

GARMENT DYEING

Th<' gunnent 1s dyed after cut . turers stock und ~.e d garments tmg call and d sewi . 11 g. •~~ any mnnuf3 cthem as needed according the' , e g~elge goods. and will dv(' manufacturer mu"t compen,ate _ cu:;fitomer tastes or an .s -1 . and w:mt, , ~- TiPc compI.e t e d garment will s h nn · k· ven·' li~ ~ 1 rmka"'e so thnt " · tl1e . ta k e mto con:;1deratJon the f h · tt1e. The de:;ignt'r must 71 must also shrink and d\·e , · a~ltary. tl at threads. trims. nnd - p'>"l'" • ,::,lffil r-"- .. DYE LOTS Every fabric when dved is giv fabric ha,·e the ~am~ dn• lot en ~ dye lot number. If two boll:> of dyed at the same time. in th n~m er, It 1::; because th('y \\l'l'(' both · e ::oamt• dve ;;olufo 1 Th a ric mav have a different d . · • n. e n('xt boll of numbe•· b('c ·t d . f:a b1.flierent· bath. Each d,·e t ~e. 1ot . . · . ause 1 was ycd m 1 0 · 'ane:; shghtlv m col d d · or, an garm('nls cannot be cut from different dv 10 t , ·D.ffi 1 differentlY as well and e · e s. erent dye lots often shrink · · ' very one must be tested for shrinkage.

GREIGE GARMENTS are . tUndyed d fabrics · d called "greige·., Oft en garments are manufacure grelge. an not dyed or colored until after being sewn This way the man~facturer may stock the needed garments a~d not dye them until they are certain that any color is popular. This greatly reduces the production lead-time. The greige garment may be dyed an} color the designer wants.

Ready to Dye Na~ural cotton, after weaving and washing, is an off-white color, a hght shade of ecru or cream. Normally, if the fabric is to be dyed, it goes straight to the dyer at that point. If it is to be sold as bleached fabric or made into "white" clothing, it is first bleached, then washed, then often treated with optic white ners and washed again. Optic whiteners are kind of like a white dye. While technically ther e is no such thing as a white dye, the optic wh iteners occupy, on a molecular level, the same spaces as dyes do. Therefore, unbleached fabrics are said to take dyes better than white or optically whitened fabric.

PREPARED FOR DYEING (PFD) GARMENTS PFD garments h ave h ad no whiteners added and a re actually an off-white in color. They must be sewn with cotton thread (so the stit ching dyes t he same color), and are usually cut oversize based on the understanding that the garment is going to be dyed a nd will shrink. This u sually means: a. There are no starches, sizing, or finishes applied to the fabric that could interfere with the dyeing. b. The garment is sewn with cotton threa~. c. The item is cut oversize to allow for shnnkage.

CHAPTER 1

27


28

CHAPTER 1

STRETCH TERMS AND JARGON

Exercise #1: Study a Knit Garment

....

Each student brings one stretch garment. to. class anct studi . . that garment to determine its charactenst1cs, then PrePares . . a report on this garment covenng: ~ The direction(s) it stretches. Whether it is a one-way, two-way, or four-way-stretch garment. The stretch ratio. Whether or not it has memory. Its design ease, negative ease, garment ease. The estimated amount of garment and design ease in the garment. Whether the fit is tight, semi-fit, unfitted, or oversized. The direction of the knitting stitches. The fabric's nap or shine (or lack thereof). The greatest direction of stretch (for four-way-stretch fabrics). The kind of seam a nd hem finishes, a nd equipment used. How it was dyed.

Test Your Knowledge of the Material in This Chapter 1. What is a one-way-stretch fabric? 2. What is a two-way-stretch fabric? 3. What is a four-way-stretch fabric? 4. Define the term "stretch factor." 5. Define the term "stretch memory." 6. Define the term "direction of stretch." 7. What is a sloper or block? 8. What is a spec sheet? 9. What is a costing sheet? 10. What is a pattern must? 11. What are the three different m ethods to create a sweater? 12. What is a rib knit?

•• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• ••• •• • I I I

•.. •• •• • I


CHAPTER

2

Sizing and Measurements About This Chapter You may have noticed that you do not fit the same size garment from one manufacturer to another or from one country to the next. While this might be confusing at times, some of the reasons for it become obvious when you look at the following chapter. There is no true standard size or industry rule, and each designer must fit a company's size specifications to their target market and company requirements. A designer with a very young market will have tighter-fitting clothing, because younger customers have tighter, slimmer bodies, and generally they like to show them off. Some American manufacturers offer garments with larger and higher busts, because of the proliferation of breast implants, which affects size specifications. The student designer or beginner may have trouble grasping the sizing concepts. The main idea to under~tan_d is that a designer may place any size tag that he/she des1res mto a garment. However, some simple guides do apply; see the charts that follow.

Sizing Categories Clothing sizes depend on both height and figure type. Note that some of the size ranges overlap because most knit manufacturers ' ¡ I n wo create a range of five sizes. ven these sizes will only fit a small ' percentage of the popu1a t"wn, but in knit, the ranges will overlap, because alphabet sizes-E~tra Small (XS), Small (S), Medmm (M), Large (L), and Extr~ Large (XL)-skip every other size.


,lQ

CHAPTER 2

SIZING AND MEASUREMENTS

Pet1te

2P-14P

4 11 " to 54·

Jun1or

5-7-9-11-13-15

52' to 56"

M•sses

6-8-10-12-14-16-18

55 to 5'8'

Even-numbered sizing for the average-proportiOned body t Most des 1gner collections are created 1n th1s SIZe range. YPe.

M1sses Tall

6-8-10-12-14-16-18

5'8" to 6 1"

Even-numbered sizing for taller women of average proportions.

Women's

16W-32W

55" to 59'

Well-proportioned women with a fuller stomach and a lower b line. and extra weight in the upper arms and upper back. A ~1• or 18W has broader fit through the top than a M1sses 16 or 18.

Half S1ze

14 . -30 '

Under 5·5··

Half Sizes were a popular subd1v1si~n of the M1sses category (starting at 14 '12 and go1ng up to 30 12). But th1s SIZe has been replaced by Women and Petite sizing.

Women With a small frame with a slightly smaller bust and hlp than the JUnior s1ze range. Proportioned for women 4'11" to 5'4" tall, with shorter arms I 6 and overall garment length, cut smaller across the back as' Qa,

weu O dd-numbered siz1ng for young wome. n w1th a h1gh bust · srnau· wa 1st, narrow bottom. and a slender f1gure

-.....

16

..•

•• •

Any size with a •;, in the sizing is for older and shorter women with a heavier body type. A Half Size is somewhat shorter than Misses size and a bit fuller and rounder. a Plus S1ze Metnc S.zmg

16-3~

55" to 5'9"

This size range is for larger or full-figured women. Plus Size clothing is fuller through the waist, back, thighs, and arms.

Rougt'ily eqwvalent to the bust measurement, because if the bust fits, most waist, hip, and length alterat1ons are easy to complete.

Size Changes Size labels are often ch anged and may not correspond to these charts. s.ome of the reasons become clear when viewing the next sectwn.

Designer Fitting Often designers will ch . d . ange or customize their slopers to acc?mmo ate the particular fit of their customers If the deSigner has a very yo · h 1· ung customer, h e or she may reduce the P measurement to d tocks and b accommo ate smaller and higher but' reasts · · WI'th eveningwear ·u '· or . designers wh o work pnmanly should then mw~ reqmre a much tighter fit. Each designer target market rae e ~ny changes to size specifications that the qmres.

Vanity Sizing Vanit! sizing is also referr d . . . ers will place a smaller labe I .to as Size shifting. Often desigtl· ~mer, who is much more li~ 10 the garment to flatter the cus· h~t makes her think th ely to buy a garment with a label gamed. at she has lost weight, rather thaD

••


SIZING AND MEASUREMENTS

Eveningwear En't1111I!WC'ar will alwa\" . . fi t tight . . dot h lllf!. and it i..: much. more ex - er than oth·'r . 0f ~ catef!oneor eYemng gown · · penstve to alter a >equmed .

bt?ad~·d

~

Catalogue Catalogue clothes are lab · ' e 1e d ,;rnaller 0 t ·at t h ey will generate ~e,··e or crealL·d \anTL'r ' r return,:; ·Th " · ~. h wtth a garment that\ a little t 00 b. · · e _cu,;tonwr \nll hw garment that i;; too tight. tg. but wtll alwn~·:; n'turn a

French Sizing 1. French wom<·n prefu to wea 10 tl than :\orth American women dro.c ung that " a lot tighter

Italian Sizing Italian women prefer clothing that is very snug at the h 1. d buttocks. P an

German Sizing German women are a Jot taller a nd larger than most women :rom other countries, and the clothing designed in Germa ny ts therefore larger than that of many other countries.

American Sizing America ns t end to be more muscular tha n other countries, with larger back s and smaller waist s; therefore, the clothes must be able to accommodate these bodies. ln addition, more Americans work than their European counterparts, and they need to be able to move in their clothing.

European New Sizing 1-2-3 sizing category that is roughly equivalent to American

8-M-L.

One Size Fits All Th . h thing as "one size fits all" no matter bow erhe IS nod su~ d' Clothing labeled as one size fits all, in roue span ex IS use . fact, doesn't fit anyone properly.

CHAPTER 2

31


SIZE COMPARISON CHART

"'

N

Use this chart to compare sizing of different categories and different countries. M isses Knit size Size

()

Extr a Small

0

Bust Waist Hips Crotch depth

Sma ll

2

30 '12 22 112 33 '12

4

31 1/2 23 1/2 34 1/2 10 %

10 1/2

Medium

6

32'12

8

33 '12 25 112

24 1/2 35 1/2 10%

1

36 /2 10 7/s

34 '12 26 '12 1

37 /2 11

Petite Knit s ize Size

Extra Small Op 2p

Bust

31 '!. 23 '12 34 '12 10 'Is

Waist Hips

Crotch depth

Small

Large

Bust Waist Hips Crotch depth

12

14

16

18

20

22

35 '12

37 29 40 11 •;,

38'12 30 112 41 '12 11 %

40 32 43 11 1/2

41 '12 33 '1. 44 '12 11 %

43'12 35 '12 46 '12 11 '!.

45 '12 37 '12 48 '12 11 7/s

27 '12

38 '/• 11 1/s

M edium

Large

......-

Extra Large

6p

8p

10p

12p

14p

16p

18p

34'12

22p

10 '/ •

10%

35 112 27 '12 38 '1. 10 %

20p

35 '12

3 3 '1• 25'1• 36 112

37 29 40 10 %

38 '12 30 112 41 112 10 7/s

40 32 43 11

41 '12 33 '12 44 112 11 '/a

43 35 46 11 1/ .

45 37 48 11 %

47 39 50 11 112

32 1/ 2 24 '12

1

26 /2 37 1/2 10 1/2

Ex tra Small

33 26 36 10.365

7

Medium

9

34 27 37 10.49

35 28 38 10.6 15

Large

Extra Large

Wllllt

Cralich depth

Extra Small

11

13

15

17

19

21

23

24

36 29 39 10.74

37.5 30.5 40.5 10.865

39 32 42 10.99

40.5 33.5 43.5 11.115

42 35 45 11.24

43.5 36.5 46.5 11.365

45.5 38.5 48.5 11 .49

47.5 40.5 50.5 11 .615

Sma ll

0

2

4

32 1/2 24 1/2 35 1/2 11 1/ ·

3 3'12 2 5 112 3 6 '12

34 1/2 26 112 37 1/2 11 1/2

11 %

Extra Small

M edium

6

8 1

35 12 27'12

38 '12 11 %

10

36 1/2 28 112 39 '12 11 '1.

Sm a ll

38 30 41 11 %

Extra Large

Large

12 39 '12 31 '12 42 '12 12

14 41 33 44 12 1/s

16 42 '12 34 '12 45 112 12'/•

44 36 47 12 3/s

Extra Large

Large

M e dium

18

18w

18w

2 0w

22 w

24 w

26 w

28w

30w

32w

34w

43

45

47

49

51

53

55

57

59

61

35 46

37

39

&0

41 b2

43

48

"'" 'I..

'\3 " 1•

1 b •;..

m

:tJ N (J)

E!z

"z c

3: m )>

(J)

c

:tJ

m 3: m -i

Extra Extra Large

...._ Tal

Knit size

"0 -i

z

Sma ll

5

)>

)>

Extra Extra Large

4p

3

32 25 35 10.24

%

Extra Extra Large

10

Junior Knit size Size

Extra Large

1 1'/..

Extra Extra Large

20 45

22 11 2

37 1 '2

48 '·, 12 ' '

47 39 50 12%

Extra Extra Large

16 w

24

49

51

53

b4

56

47 58

63 55

60

23 ' .

25...

G.J 2 9 .. 4

68

? 1 y,.

62 27"..

66

1 0 '/..

3 1.75

3 3 .75

45

65 57

(J)


(contmued)

-- -

Half Sizes Knit size Size Bust Waist Hips Crotch depth

Extra Small 14 '12 16 112

41 32 112 44 11 1/e

43 34 '12 46 13 1/a

18 112 45 36 '12 48 15 1/a

Small 20 112

47 38 '12 50 17 11e

Medium 22 '12 24 112

49 40 '· 52 19 1/e

-

51 42'·• 54 21 1/a

26 112 53 44 1 56 23 1/o

l arge 28 'h

55 46 1'1 58 25'/o

-~

Extra l arge 30 '12 32 '12

Extra Extra Large 34'12 24

57 48'h 60 27 1/o

61 52.5 64 31.125

-

59 50 •;, 62 29'/e

Plus Sizes Knit size Size

Extra Small 16 18

20

Bust Waist Hips Crotch depth

41 33 44 11 %

45 37 48 15%

43 35 46 13 %

Small 22

47 39 50 17%

24

Medium 26

49 41 52 19 %

28

Large 30

Extra Large 32 34

Extra Extra Large 36 36

51 43 54 21 %

53 45 56 23 %

55 47 58 25 %

57 49 60 27%

59 51 62 29 %

61 53 64 31%

Other Sizing Metric

32

France Italy Germany Vanity sizing European equivalent to S-M-L

0 2 -4 - 6 0

2 0 -2 -4

63 54.5 66 33.125

63 55 66 33%

--

34

36

38

40

42

44

46

46

50

52

4 2 0 -2 1

6 4 2 0

8 6 4 2 2

10 8 6 4

12 0 8 6 3

14 12 10 8

6 14 12 10 4

8 16 14 12

10 18 16 14 5

12 20 18 16

~

~

z

Cl

:t>

z 0

;:: m :t>

(/)

c

ll

m

;::

m

z

-1

(/)

0

:I:

:t>

"0

-1

m ll

"' to) to)


34

CHAf"TER 2

SIZING AND MEASUREMENTS

How to Take Measurements d e in the Misses si ze ran ge The measurem ents include! a~own m easurem ent s with th' 80 pare t 1e11 ose that students ca n com C mpar e your m easurem ents w·th taken fr·om t h e dress-f~r:~m~ne the size of your dress-for1lll the ones provtded to e k . g measurements correctly. ' and to ch eck if yo u ar e ta tn

l

)

~P~

·"'.._, ,.. ..

\

#1 BUST

Measure around the smallest part of the waist. Do not ptll the tape too tight, but keep it comfortably relaxed.

#1 BUST

~ze

Extra Small

S

11

M

Extra Extra Large 43 '·8

45'•

45 45 6 "6

47 47' ,.

6

45

63

·••

61 61

47 65

63 63

ay e changed to suit your particular target customer.

large

29 30 '12 30 '12 31 '12

30 '12 32 32

33

Extra large 32 33 ··~ 33 'h 1

34 /~

Extra Extra LAI9'

33 1 ':1 35 35

35 '.<: 37 36 '.'t

36

37 'h

37. :

39 38 'h 39

-----------~--~~--_::___~~--~~--~~~5~~:2--~4;6~'~h~_;48~'n~_Jso~~:__J52~,~~~~5';[~ 47

~

••• •• • •• •• •• ••

~ -.~~

#2WAIST

Stand on the side of the model with the arms down, and measure all the way around the fullest part of the chest. Then have the model take a deep breath and let it out, while you hold the tape measure. Record the largest measurement.

.,..,.' .,..,.

49

51

53

55

57

47

49

51

53

•• •• • ••• •• •• ••• •

•• ••

__ , __


SIZING AND MEASUREMENTS

35

C HAPTER 2

_ _ J.. \\

\

#3 HIP

#4 CROTCH DEPTH

Measure around the widest part of the hip, slide the tape up and down to make sure that you record the largest measurement.

The crotc h depth measurement may be taken in three ways:

The hip is approximately 7-8" down from the waist.

by 2.

1. When standing, from the front waist to the back waist,

passing through the entire crotch area. Divide that number 2. With the customer seated, take the measurement from the top of the chair seat up to the waist level. 3. Use an " L" square ruler and measure from the crotch up to the waist level.

#3 HIP Size

Extra Small

Misses Petite Junior Misses tall Women's Half size Plus size

33% 34sl16 35 35 '1s 46 44 44

34'1s 35s1,. 36 36 '1s 48 46 46

Medium

Small

35 4ls 36sl,s 37 37 '1s 50 48 48

36 '1s 37 sl16 38 38 41s 52 50 50

#4 CROTCH DEPTH Size Misses Petite Junior Misses tall Women 's Half size PIUS SIZe

Extra Small

9 '1s 10 21••

10'1•• 11 % 11 % 11 •;,. 11 10/ ••

10 10 ' I •s 10 61•• 11 % 13 % 13 2116 13 ' 0/ •o

Small

10 1ls 10 61•• 10 61•• 11 'I• 15% 15 21•• 15 101••

10% 10s1,. 10 101•• 11 % 17 % 17 21•• 17 101••

37 4ls 38sl,. 39 39'1s 54 52 52

38'1s 40 40 sl•• 41 56 54 54

Medium

10% 10 101•• 10 121•• 11 % 19% 19 21•• 19 161••

10 4ls 10 121•• 10 141•• 11 'lo 21% 21 2118 21 ••; ,.

Extra Large

Larg e

40 41 sl16 42 42 '1s 58 56 56

41 'Is 43 43sl,. 44 60 58 58

Large

10% 10 "1•• 11 12 23% 23 21·• 23 ' 01··

43 44 sl,. 45 45 '1s 62 60 60

44 '1s 46 46sl16 47 64 62 62

Extra Large 71 •

10% 10 11 2 .,. 11 11 4 .,. 11 21•• 2 12'1• 12 ·• 27 8 to 25% 25 '1•• 27 't,. 25 10/ 18 27 10/le

Extra Extra Large

46 4/s 48 5

48 48'• s•• 66 64 64

48 ' s 50

so•--· 50 68 66 66

Extra Extra Large

11 2 5 11 1• 11 $ 5 11 ' ' 11 10 .• 6 11 8n 6 11 3••• 4 12''o 12 '8 12 •• 33618 29% 31 "'" 2 1 33' .• 29 '•• 31 .•• 29'o;,. 31 10/•o 33 "' ...

11 11 ' ,.


,~~

l

HAF'TLR 2

SIZING AND MEASUREMENTS

•• •,. ,. •,. •• •• •• •• '

#6 WAIST TO ANKLE

15 WAIST TO KNEE

From the side seam, hold the tape at the waist and measure to the bottom of the ankle bone.

From tt _ ~- ,...a.., hold the tape at the waist and measure to :he 'n<-e level

15 WAIST TO KNEE Extra Small Stze Mt~ses

Pet•te Juntor Mtsses tall Women·s Half stze Plus stze

2 20

21 /a 22 /a 24'/o 24 22 1/a 24

Small

Medium

Large

Extra Large

4

6

8

10

12

14

16

23 21'1: 23 24% 24 . 22' 24 lo

23 'a 21 '/a 23 '• 24 Is 24 7/e 22 '1. 24 %

23 2/e 21 >;. 23% 25 24% 22 a/e 24%

23% 21 7/a 23% 25'/s 24 4/e 22 7/e 24 'le

23'/e 22 23 4/e 25% 24% 23 24 %

23% 22 1/e 23% 25% 24% 23 1/a 24 %

23 % 22'/• 23% 25% 24 7/a 23 % 24 7/e

18 23% 22 % 23 7/a 25 % 25 23 % 25

20 24 22'12 24 25 % 25 1/e 23 4/a 25 1/a

Extra Ext ra Large

22 1

24 /e 22 % 24 1/a 25 7/e 25% 23% 25%

24 24'1a 22 3/• 24% 26 25% 23'/• 25%

#6 WAIST TO ANKLE Extra Small Size Misses Petite Junior Misses tall Women's Half size Pius size

2 38'/s 36% 38 '/s 40 7/e 38 % 37% 39%

4 38'/e 36 7/e 38'/e 41 1/a 38% 37% 39%

Small

6

38% 37 '/a 38% 41 % 38 7/a 37'/e 39 7/a

Mediu m

8 39 37 % 39 41 % 39 37 % 40

L arge

E xtra Large

•• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• •

Extra Ext ra Large

10

12

14

16

18

20

22

24

39 % 37 % 39% 41 7/e 39 1/e 37% 40 1/e

39% 37 7/a 39'/a 42 1/e 39% 37 '!. 40 %

39% 38 1/a 39 % 42% 39 % 38 40 %

40 38 % 40 42 % 39'/a 38 1/a 40 '/a

40% 38 % 40 % 42 7/a 39 % 38% 40 %

40'/a 38 7/a 40 '/a 43 '/a 39% 38% 40%

40 % 39 1/a 40% 43% 39 7/e

41 39% 41 43 511

38'/a

40 38 511

40'1a

41

•• •• •


SIZING AND MEASUREMENTS

CHAPTER 2

37


' It I'

H

,.,. ,..,.

,

SIZING AND MEASUREMENTS

L

.,..,.

-

.,. •• • ~

,

•• ••.

•• •

#10 BACK CROTCH EXTENSION

119 FRONT CROTCH EXTENSION The front ~..rotcr e•te'1SI01'1 IS not a direct body measurement, but IS necessary for drafting pants.

The back crotch extension is not a direct body measurement, but is necessary for drafting pants.

The front crotch measurement IS one-thtrd of the front hip draft measurement

The back crotch measurement is o ne-fourth of the front hip measurement.

I

• I I I

119 FRONT CROTCH EXTENSION Extra Small Size M1sses Pelite Junior M1sses tall Women 's Half size Plus SIZe

2

2' 2 2

2 la

22. 271s 2% 2%

Small

Medium

Large

Extr a Large

4

6

8

10

12

14

16

2 2 '8 2% 2% 3 'Ia 3 3

2% 2% 2% 2% 3% 3% 3%

2% 2% 2% 2% 3% 3% 3%

2% 2% 2% 2'1s 3% 3%

2% 2'1s 2'1s 2% 4 'Is 4 4

2% 2% 2% 2% 4% 4% 4%

2% 2% 2% 2% 4% 4% 4'1e

6

8

10

12

14

3 3 3 'Is 3 11s 4 'Is 4 4

16

18

3 3 '1s 3 '1s 3% 4% 4 'Is 4 'Is

3 'Is 3% 3% 3% 4% 4% 4%

3% 3% 3% 3% 4% 4 41s 4%

3% 3% 3% 3%

3% 3% 3% 3% 5 4% 4%

3% 3% 3% 3% 5'1a 5 5

3 71a

18

2% 2% 2 71s 2 7ls 4 71a 4% 4%

Extra Extra Large

20

22

24

2% 2 7/s 2 71s 3 5 'Is 5 5

2 /s 3 3 3 5% 5% 5%

3 3'/s 3'/s 3'/s 5% 5% 5'/s

7

#10 BACK CROTCH EXTENSION Extra Small Size Misses Petite Junior Misses tall Women's Half size Plus size

2

2% 2 71s 2 71s 3 3 71a

3% 3%

4

2 71s 3 3 3 4 3'1e 7

3 1a

Small

Medi um

Large

4 71a

4% 4%

Extra Large

Extra Extra Large

20

22

3% 3 71s 3 71a 3% 5% 5 1le 5%

7

3 la 4 4 4 5•/e 53.18 53.18

24 4 4 1/a 4 2/a 4 1/8 s ~/1

s •~e

s•~a

.......-


~•

I D

•t

S IZI NG AND MEAS UR E M E NTS

C HAPTE R 2

39

'

1

I

I\

#1 1 CROTCH ANGLE

#12 NAPE TO WAIST

The crotch angle IS not a direct body measurement, but is necessary for drafting pants.

The nape is the point where the neck intersects with the bac k.

The c rotch angle IS one-half of the front c rotch extension.

Measure straight down from the nape to the waist at the center back.

#11 CROTCH ANGLE Size Misses Petite Junior Misses tall Women's Half s ize Plus size

Ext ra Small

1 'I• 1 'Is 1 1ls 1'1s 1% 1

1 'le 1 'Is 1 'I• 1 1ls 1 1ls 1 1ls 1 'Is

Medium

Small

1 'Is 1 'Is 1% 1% 1 4/s 1% 1 4ls

1 'Is 1 'Is 1 'Is 1 'I• 1% 1% 1%

1 'Is 1% 1% 1% 1% 1% 1%

1% 1% 1% 1% 1 7/s 1% 1%

#12 NAPE TO WAIST Size Misses Petite Junior Misses tall Women's Half size Plus size

Extra Small

15 % 14 % 15 % 16 7ls 16 % 15 % 17

15 % 15 15 % 17 'Is 16 7ls 15 % 15 4ls

Small

15 7l s 15 % 15 7ls 17 % 17 '1s 16 15 %

16 1ls 15% 16 '1• 17 % 17 % 16% 16

Medium

16 % 15 % 16% 17 71s 17 % 16 4ls 16%

16% 16 16 % 18 '1s 17 71s 16% 16'1s

Extra Large

Large

1% 1% 1% 1% 2 '/s 2 'Is 2'/s

1% 1% 1% 1% 2 1 7/s 2

1% 1 4/s 1'/s 1'/s 2 '/s 2% 2 4/s

Extra Large

Large

16 'Is 16 % 16 71s 18% 18'1s 17 16%

1% 1% 1% 1% 2% 2% 2%

1

17 /s 16% 17 11s 18% 18% 17 % 17

17% 16% 17 % 18 71s 18% 17'1s 17%

17 % 17 17% 19 '/s 18 7/s 17% 17'1s

Extra Extra Large

1 4ls 1 4/s 1'/s 1'/s 2% 2 '/s 2'1s

1 4/s 1'1s 1'1s 1'1s 2 7/s 2% 2%

Extra Extra Large

17 7/s 17 % 17 '1s 19% 19 11• 18 17 %

18 1/s 17'/s 18 1/s 19% 19% 18% 18


40

CHAPTER

••

2 SIZING AND MEASUREMENTS

•.

.. .

~---~

~

, I

•• •• ••

I '

#14 BACK NECK RISE

#13 BACK NECKLINE

The back neck rise is not a direct body measurement OU\ is calculated as one-eighteenth of the nec kline measure-

The back neckline is not a direct measurement, but is cal· cu lated as one-sixth of the total neckline measurement.

ment.

#13 BACK NECKLINE Size

Extra Small

Misses Petite Junior Misses tall Women's Half size Plus size

2'1a 2% 2% 2'12 3 2% 2%

2% 2% 2% 2 '12

3% 3 3

Small

2% 2% 2% 2 112

2% 2% 2 112 3% 3 112 3 '12

2% 2% 2% 2'12 4 3% 3%

7

7

%

314

1a 'Ia

'I•

7

7

1% 1% 1%

'Is

1a 7 1a

1% 1% 1%

1% 1% 1%

1'h 1% 1%

3'1a

3% 3'1·

Large

Medium

2'1a

Extra Large

2 '12

2 '12

2 '12

2 '12

2% 2% 2 '12 4% 4 4

2%

2 '12

7

2 1a

7

2 la

2%

2% 4%

2 '12 3% 2% 5

4'1a 4'12

4'/.

4 '12 4 '12

4 61a

4lr,

Extra Extra large

2% 2 1 '2

2', 2":

2'•

0

2 .3~

2'~

2 51a 5'8 5 5

2'• 5' e 5 '•

2 ~£

s·.

2' -

s•, 5'\ 5 '~

#14 BACK NECK RISE Size Misses Petite Junior Misses tall Women's Half size Plus size

Extra Small

% %

%

314

'Ia 7 1a

'Is

1 'I•

'Is

314 1% 1% 1%

Small

% 314 7

Medium

1a

la

Large

'Ia

7

31·

31• 1

1a 7 la

1a

7

Extra large 7

ls

T

''s

1

8

' 1$

•a

1f a

1',e

0

1•1a

1'12 1'/e

"

'I• 1 'h

, 'h

, '1:

1'h

1a

7

1 'h 1% 1%

, 1

/s

'

'2

,.

Extra Extra~

.

'!

·n 'I•

,,

"It

1'A 1 1h

\ 1 ! ,

-'t

1' 1\

~


SIZING AND MEASUREMENTS

C HAPTER 2

41

I \

I

I

I\

~5SHOULDERLENGTH

#16 ACROSS BACK

Measure from the point that the neck and shoulders intersect to the point where the shoulder and arms intersect.

Measure between the two bones at the top of the armhole, and since the draft will be completed as one-quarter of the body, you need to divide this measurement in half.

Where exactly are the shoulders? Place your hand on the bone at the top of your shoulder. Pivot the arm. If you have the correct location on the bone, your arm should pivot around this point.

#15 SHOULDER LENGTH Size

Extra Small

Misses Petite Junior Misses tall Women's Half size Plus size

5 4% 4 7/s 4 7/s 5% 5 '12 5%

5 1/s 5 5 5 5% 5% 5%

Medium

Small

5 '/. 5 5 1/s 5 5% 5% 5%

5 112 5 '/s 5 2/s 5 1/s 5 7/s 5 3/4 5%

#16 ACROSS BACK Size Misses Petite Junior Misses tall Women's Half size Plus size

7

6 /s 7 2/s 7 '1s 7 4/s a% a% a%

7 7% 7% 7% a% a 'Is a%

1

7 /s 7% 7% 7% a '/s a% 8%

6 5% 5 4/s 5 2/s 6 5 7/s 5 7/s

Medium

Small

Extra Small

5 3/4 5 '/s 5% 5 1/s 5 7/s 5 3/4 5%

7 2/s 7% 7% 8 9 a% a%

7% 7% 8 8 1/s 9 1/s a '/s 8 7/s

7% 7 7/s 8 1/s 8% 9% 9 9

Extra Large

Large

6 '/4 5% 5% 5% 6 5 7/s 5 7/s

6'12 5 4/s 5% 5 4/s 6 1/s 6 6

Large

7% 8 8% 8 4/s 9% 9 1/s 9 '/s

7% 8 1/s 8 4/s 8% 9 4/s 9 2/s 9%

6 '1. 5% 5 7/s 5% 6 1/s 6 6

Extra Extra Large

7 5% 6 5% 6 '/. 6 1/s 6'/s

Extra Large

7 7/s 8 2/s 8% 8 7/s 9% 9% 9%

8 8% 8 7/s 9 '/s 9% 9'/s 9 4/o

7 1/4 5 7/s 6 '/s 5 7/s 6 '1â&#x20AC;˘ 6 1/s 6 '/s

7 '/s 6 6% 6 6% 6% 6%

Extra Extra Large

8 1/s 8'/s 9 '/s 9% 9% 9% 9%

8% 8% 9% 9 4/s 10 9% 9%


~

l'Ho\PHR 2

.. •

SIZING AND MEASUREMENTS

I

\

\

•• •

\

\

#18 SHOULDER PITCH

#17 SLEEVE LENGTH Measure from the top of the sleeve to the wrist.

Also called shoulder angle.

Measure from the shoulder bone to the elbow and continue down to the wrist.

The shoulder pitch is not a direct body measurement, but is calc ulated as one -eleventh of the nape to waist measurement.

#17 SLEEVE LENGTH Size Misses Petite Junior Misses tall Women's Half size Plus size

Extra Small

22% 21% 23 % 24 % 23 7/s 22 % 32 1/s

22% 21 % 23 '/s 24 4/s 24 22% 32 %

Small 7

22 /s 21 '/s 23 % 24 % 24 1/s 22'/s 32 %

Medium

23 21 % 23 % 24 % 24 % 22 % 32%

23 1/s 21% 23 7/s 24 7/s 24 % 22 % 32%

23 % 21 7/s 24 25 24 % 22 7/s 32%

Large 3

23 /s 22 24 1/s 25'/s 24 % 23 32 7/s

Extra Large 4

23 /s 22'/s 24 % 25 2/s 24% 23 1/s 33

23 % 22 % 24 % 25% 24 7/s 23% 33 1/s

23 % 22 % 24 4/s 25 4/s 25 23% 33%

Misses Petite Junior Misses tall Women's Half size Plus size

Extra Small

1% 1% 1'/s 1'/s 1'/s 1% 1 4/a

1% 1% 1 4/s 1 4/s 1% 1 4/s 1%

Small

1'/s 1% 1% 1% 1% 1% 1%

Medium

1'/s 1% 1% 1% 1 7/s 1% 1 '1e

1 '/s 1% 1% 1% 2 1 7/a 2

1 4/s 1 4/s 1% 1% 2 1/a 2 2 1/a

Large

1 '/s 1% 1% 1% 2% 2 '/a 2%

1% 1 4/s 1% 1% 2% 2% 2%

Extra Large

1% 1% 1% 1% 2 '/a 2% 2%

1% 1% 1% 1% 2% 2% 2 5/e

••• •• -• -- •••

Extra Extra Large

23 7/s 22 4/s 24 % 25% 25 '/s 23'/s 33%

#18 SHOULDER PITCH Size

•• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• •

24 22% 24% 25% 25% 23 % 33'/a

Extra Extra Laf98

1% 1% 1% 1% 2% 2%

28/e

••


SIZING AND MEASUREMENTS

/

1

CHAPTER 2

43

'

t

I \

I

I

#19 BICEP CIRCUMFERENCE

#20 WRIST CIRCUMFERENCE

Wrap tape around the fullest part of the bicep. This measurement is helpful when drafting the sleeve to check that the sleeve will be large enough to accommodate a larger bicep.

Wrap tape around the wrist. Th1s measurement is helpful when draft1ng the sleeve to check that the wrist w '1 be large enough to accommodate the hand.

#19 BICEP CIRCUMFERENCE Size Misses Petite Junior Misses tall Women's Half size Plus size

Extra Small

10 10% 10% 10% 14 % 13% 13 %

10 % 10 % 11 '1• 11 14 7le 14 11e 14 1le

Small

Medium

11 11s 11'1e 11 71e 11 % 15 % 14 7le 14 7le

10 % 11 '1• 11 4le 11 % 15 '/s 14 'Ia 14 'Ia

11 7ls 12 2le 12% 12 4le 16% 15 % 15 %

11 '1• 11 7le 12 2le 12 1le 16 15% 15'/s

Large

12 % 12 % 13 12 71e 16 % 16 16

Extra Large

12 % 13 13% 13% 17 '1• 16% 16%

13 13 31e 13 618 13%

13 3'8 13 % 14 .,. 14

17' '•

17 ~s

16% 16%

17 .• 17 "•

Extra Extra Large

13 6 • 14 . 8 14' 5 14 '·· 1a'.

1..i

c

14 4

!

14-' "'4 E ~

1a'

#20 WRIST CIRCUMFERENCE Size Misses Petite Junior Misses !all Women's Half size Plu s size

Extra Small 1

5 1e 5%

5'1a 5'1• 7'1• 6% 6%

5'1• 6'1• 6 6%

7'1a 7'1• 7 1le

Small

5 7la 6'1• 6'1• 6%

7 '1a 7'1e 7 4/e

6%

6 '1• 6% 7 a%

7 11a 7 '/e

Large

Medium

6% 7% 6% 7% a% 8% 8%

7 7%

6'1• 7%

9 8% 8%

7% a 6% a•;.

7•,. a ·'· 6"-'• a'!

9J,. 9 9

9 •• 9'•

9'•

Extra Large

a'8 a•. 6 -. a·. 10 1 •

9"• 9"•

Extra Extra Large

g:, g

7

a·. 9'• 7'

9'•

9'•

10

10'• 10'.

10'.

a·.

9 '•

-· r

11~

10' 10'/o


...

CHAf'TER 2

SIZING AN D M EASUR EM ENTS

''

1121 NECK CIRCUMFERENCE

#22 BUST SPAN

Wrap measunng tape around base of neck, and measure but do not pull the tape too t1ght.

Measure from apex to apex across the front chest. Drafting tube tops may be useful.

1121 NECK CIRCUMFERENCE E; tr a Small Size MISSes Pet1te Jumor M1sses tall

Women's Half SIZe Plus size

2 14 13 •·s 14 ' 1• 14 5/e 17 21a 16 % 16 %

4 14 '!. 13 /a 14 /a 14% 17 51e 17 1/s 17 '1s

Small

6 14 % 14 15% 14 71s 18 17'1s 17'/s

Medium

8 14 % 14 '1• 15% 15 18 % 17 71s 17 71s

10 14 71s 14 % 15 71s 15 11s 18 % 18 % 18 %

12 15 14 % 16'1s 15% 19 11s 18 % 18 %

Large

Extra Large

Extra Extra Large

14

16

18

20

22

24

15 'Is 14 % 16% 15% 19'1s 19 19

15 % 14% 16% 15 % 19 71s 19% 19%

15% 14 % 17 11s 15 % 20 % 19% 19%

15% 14 71s 17% 15% 20 % 20 1/s 20'1s

15% 15 17% 15 'Ia 21 20 "/e 20'1s

15% 15 1/a 18 16 21 % 20 7/s 20 'la

1122 BUST SPAN Size Extra Small Misses Petite Junior Misses tall

Women's Hatt Size Plus size

6'1o

6% 6% 6% 8 7% 7"1•

6% 6% 6% 6 71a 8'1s 7'1• 7 71a

Small

6% 6'1s 6 '1. 7 8% 8 8

6 /'s 7 7 7 '1a 8% 8 '1s 8'1a

Medium

7 7'1s 7'1a 7% 8% 8% 8%

7'1s 7% 7% 7% 8% 8% 8%

Large

7% 7% 7% 7% 8% 8 '1a 8 "/a

7% 7% 7'1s 7% 8 71a 8% 8%

Extra Large

7% 771s 7% 8

9 8%

a•;,

7 71s 8 7% 8'/a

Extra Extra Large

8 '/s 8% 7 7/a 8%

9%

9%

8%

9 9

8 7111


SIZING AND MEASUREMENTS

I

J

I

CHAPTER 2

45

I

#23 BUST LEVEL

Measure from the shoulder point down to fullest part of bust. This measurement is helpful when determining the bust apex, and will be useful when drafting low-cut tops.

#23 BUST LEVEL S ize

Misses Petite Junior Misses tall Women's Half size Plus size

Extra Small 7

9 /a g% 9 7/a 10% 12% 11 % 11 7/a

10 g 'fa 10 1/a 10% 12% 11 s;. 12 1/a

Small 1

10 /a 9% 10% 11 12% 11 7/a 12%

10% 9% 10% 11 1/a 13 12 1/a 12%

M edium

10% 9% 10% 11 % 13% 12% 12 7/a

10% 10 11 1/a 11 % 13 4/a 12% 13 1/a

Large

10% 10 1/a 11 % 11 4/a 13% 12 7/a 13%

10% 10% 11 % 11 % 14 13 1/a 13%

Extra Large 7

10 /a 10% 11 % 11 % 14% 13% 13 7/a

11 104 /a 12 1/a 11 % 144/a 13% 14 1/a

Extra Extra Large

11 1/a 10% 12% 12 14 "Ia 13 7/s 14%

11 % 10"/a 12'; a 12'/a 15 14 ''• 14'·a


·~

HA.PTER 2

SIZING AND MEASU R E M E NTS

•• •• •• •

•• •

• ••

•24 HIP DEPTH

#25 HIGHEST PART OF CHEST OR BUST

Measure L'le a sta~ce from the wa1st to the fullest part of tl'e h p May be used to check h1p placement and hip ootcl'es

Measure around the highest part of the chest, directly un. der arms. Note: This is above the fullest part of the chest.

N24 HIP DEPTH

S1ze M1sse! Pet1te Jumor MISSeS tall

Women 's Half SIZe Pius SIZe

Extra Sm all ~3

34 35 35'/e 46 44 44 1 /

34 35 1/•• 36 36'1• 48 46 46

Small

35 ;. 36 8h 37 37'·, 50 48 48

36'/a 37 8/16 38 38 '/a 52 50 50

Medium

37 '/a 38 8/ ,s 39 39% 54 52 52

38 % 40 40 8/ ,s 41 56 54 54

Large

40 41 8/,s 42 42 '/a 58 56 56

41 'Is 43 43 8/,s 44 60 58 58

Extra Large

43 44 8/ •s 45 45 % 62 60 60

44 % 46 46 8/ ,s 47 64 62 62

Extra Extra Large

46% 48 48 •;,. 48'/a 66 64 64

#25 HIGHEST PART OF CHEST OR BUST

~e

Misses Petite Junior Misses tall Women's Half size Pius size

Extra Small

32 32 32 33 42 42 43

33 33 33 34 43 43 45

Small

34 34 34 35 44 44 47

35 35 35 36 45 45 49

Medium

36 % 36 1/2 36'12 37'12 46% 46 '12 51

38 38 38 39 48 48 53

Large

39 1/2 39 1/2 39'12 40 '12 49 % 49 1/ 2 55

41 41 41 42 51 51 57

Extra Large

43 42'12 42'12 43 1/2 52'12 52'12 59

45 44 44 45 54 54 61

48'/a 50

•• ••• •• •• •• ••

•• •• •• -• •

so•;,. 50 68 66 66

Extra Extra Large

32 32 32 33 42 42 43

••


~ ~ ~~

SIZING AND MEASUREMENTS

41

CHAPTER'}

#26 ARMHOLE DEPTH The armhole depth os not a direct body domens 1on, but is taken from the sloper draft Measure the distance from the shoulder straight down to the bottom of the armhole.

#26 ARMHOLE DEPTH Small

Extra Small Size Misses Petite Junior Misses tall Women's Half size Plus size

2

6 '/s 6% 6 7/s 7% 7% 6 7/s 7%

4

7 6% 7 7% 7 'Is 6% 6%

Medium

6

7 1/s 6 7/s 7 7 7/s 7% 6% 6%

8

7% 7 7 1/s 8 7% 6% 6%

10

7% 7 1/o 7% 8 1/s 7% 6 7/s 6%

12

7 '/s 7'1s 7% 8% 7 4/s 7 6 71s

Extra Large

Large 14

7% 7% 7 4/s 8% 7% 7 'Is 7

16

7% 7'1s 7% 8 4/s 7% 7% 7 1ls

18 7

7 1s 7 '/s 7 41s 8% 7 7ls 7 21s 7 'Is

Extra Extra Large

20

22

24

8 7% 8 7ls 8% 7 7ls 7% 7'1s

8 11s 7% 8'1s 8% 8 7'1• 7%

8% 7 71s 8'1s 8 7ls 8 '1s 7% 7'1•


'HAI'l ~ R 2

SIZING AND MEASUREMENTS

Cup Sizes Cup size is determined by t he difference between the measurement and the upper bust measurement. This cbust shows different bust measurements, but all upper chest hal'( surements are 36" for illustration purposes only. mea.

#27 CUP SIZE If the upper chest 1s 36' Bust Upper chest Difference Difference Cup size

3611> 36'

37 36'

112

Up to 11> AA

'~h"to

1 1-4

A

38 36" 2 11/> to 2V.. B

39 36" 3 2W' to 3\1.1

c

40

41

36" 4 4\1.1 D

36" 5 5\1.1 DD/E

#28 CUP RADIUS Est1mate the diameter of the breast. Extra Extra Small Stable Moderate Stretchy Super Rib

Extra Small

Small

2V.. 214

2 1 /s 2' 2

2'1•

1 /'o

2

1%

2% 2% 214 2 'I•

1'/•

1 '/•

.• ... •

I

42 36" 6 6V.. DDD/F

•• --------.. •• •• •• ••• •• •• •• •• •

~ 45

36"

7 7'14

G

8 8'14 H

9 9Y. I

Medium

Large

Extra Large

Extra Extra Large

2Y2

2% 2%

2 '% 2'% 2%

2 7/s 2 7/o

2Y2

2% 2%

2¥2 2% 2'14 2

2Y2 2% 2 1/o

2'14

2~


SIZING AND MEASUREMENTS

49

C HAPTER 2

H_ow to Determine Your Own S1ze Range The ·s to fidrst t step. in sta r t"m g your own label or your own company ' . e e rmme .vour s·tze range an d stze . specs. There arc two btastc · r · h ways . · t o get siz·mg tntormattOn. One is to buy it a nd the 0 f er IS to design it yourself, usually by reverse en~ineeri ng o your competitor·s products. · POPULATION MEASUREMENTS May be obtained from the American Bureau of Sta ndards a nd Measurements, which lists measurements based on age groups, and is updated every November.

Purchased measurements

IndiVidual

Populat1on measurements

\

measurements

St atistical analysis

I

t

Standard measurements

http://www.astm.org INDIVIDUAL MEASUREMENTS Individua l measurements of sample customer s or fit models ' a nd dress-forms, should be t aken. STATISTICAL ANALYSIS Ana lyze t he measurements taken, along with those purchased , a nd compa re them to decide on the a ppropriate measureme nts for you target market. Create grade tables based on your ana lysis.

SLOPERS Develop a measurement chart for your company, or use one of the measureme nt charts provided in this text, before creating your company's slopers.

PRODUCTION PATTERNS Production patterns should be drafted to the company size specs. Often, designer samples are created in model's proportions, for showroom sales and fashion shows. These measurements do not fit the average consumer and should be corrected for production patterns. This is the responsibility of the spec technician.

COMPETITORS You can purchase garments from your competitors and take the measurements directly from the garment.

Production Patterns


•• •• • ,

.

l,c;

2 H5

Jilt'

''

"116

•• •• •• •• •• •• •• ••

~/v

:...vJ}

'h·

'!J,

•;_, '11> •;,2 •;32

•;,.

lO!Jl

•;,.

12/32

"13>

'•

'l•s

13 /32 14 /32

'sl32

••

•;,. •;,.

'"132 17 132 18 132

10 /16

20132

n;,s

22132

19132

'•

21 132

23 132

%

12;,.

24132

";,.

25 132 26132

";,.

28132

15/16

30132

•s;,e

32132

27132 7 /e

29132

%

31 132

Test Your Knowledge of the Material in This Chapter 1. Why don't clothes from one manufac-

2. 3. 4. 5.

turer fit the same as from another manufacturer? What are the "true sizings" or industry guidelines for sizing garments? What type of customers are Junior sizes intended for? What type of customers are Plus sizes intended for? What is vanity sizing?

6. What is catalogue sizin~? ween 7. How much is the bust difference bet

~~Wmd~~~~

-

8. How much is the bust difference betw een size 10 and size 8? 9. How much is the bust difference betw Small and Medium? ween 10. How much is the bust difference bet Medium and Large?


SIZIN G AND MEASUREMENTS

51

C HAPT[R 2

Exercise #2 t'rt'Hit' a person a l meas ureme nt ch art w ith th e associated reductions , for fu tu re draft s.

-

Personal M easurement

#

Divide by

Multiply By

1

Bust

2

Wa1st

Stable knits

0% .100

4 4

Moderate kn it s

2% ·.98

SuperSt retchy stret c h knits knits 3.5% 5°/o r--

·.965

--

3

Hip

4

Crotch depth

N/A

No length reduction

5

Waist to knee

N/A

No length reduc tion

6

Waist to ankle

N/A

No length reduction

7

Ankle

8

Knee

9

Front crotch

One quarter of hip measurement

10

Back c rotch

One -third of hip measurement

11

C rotch angle

One half of front crotc h extension

12

Nape to w a1st

13

Bac k nec k

From size c hart closest to your size

N/A

14

Back neck rise

From size chart closest to your size

N/A

15

Shoulder

16

Across back

17

Sleeve length

18

Shoulder pitch

19

Bicep

20

Wrist

21

Neck

22

Bust sp an

23

Bust level

24

Hip depth

25

Upper b ust

4

4 4

N/A

N/A

2 N/A From an appropriate c hart

N/A

No reduction

·.95

10%

Two- & Four-way knits 5% both directions

.90

·.o9

Rib knits


CHAPTER

3

Principles of Pattern-Drafting About This Chapter ~his chapter introduces the reader to the principles and prac~Jces of s~retch patternmaking. While previous patternmak-

mg expenence w1ll help in understanding these concepts, the ?ccaswnal, or new, pattern maker will greatly benefit from seemg how ~tretch patternmaking differs from conventional patternmakmg. In many ways, stretch patternmaking is simpler.

Flat Patternmaking Flat patternmaking is the process of creating templates used to cut out the final garments. Patternmaking is the process of creating a two-dimensional template for a three-dimensional garment, by tracing out the sloper on a blank sheet of paper, then manipulating by slash and spread and adding garment details to create a final pattern.

Sloper A sloper is a template of basic styles, without any seam allowances or style details. Many different patterns can be made from a single sloper. Because a sloper is your master pattern, it should not be changed or altered unless you wish to make those same alterations to all future styles. Slopers should be traced out on lightweight drafting paper, and then changed into the style that you wish to create.

Patterns A pattern is an outline, or a template, of the intended style that is used when cutting out the fabric. All patterns should include seam allowances to allow the pieces to be sewn together; notches to help match seams together; a gr~inline a~d any necessary drill holes; plus all necessary labehng and mstructions. All final patterns should be made of oa.k-tag, ~nd all drafts and working patterns should be made ofhghtwe1ght drafting paper. There are tv.:o methods of creating patterns: flat patternmaking and drapmg.

53


F PATTERN - D RA

FTI N G

PR INC IPLES O

('

How Patterns Are Used t ·'., ,..1 rmEmt.f EvPattern;; are used t 0 cut ou reo-ardless o t1te da pattern. er" .,.3 rment nee ~ ·-"' <Trandmo tl ~~' !' . "' bout ;;omeone "' "' stories you hear a • .. In those cases. ~-ou -e< a · a nd tt n"who ne,·er u~ - pattern. . ·11-fittmg <Tarments are I h can be sure t e"' . deed look it. professional. and must tn CT·

Pattern Development d bY tracing- out the All patt_ern~ are de,·elope I t:n<T thro~gh slash ·I er mampu a I " . appropnate" op · lnn<T . the d~._ ·gn detatls to ~. 1 and ,;pread . an d aPp · "' finallv adding a ll of tht• paper draft. and then . the nece--ary :--eam allo"·ances.

Draping Knits Drapmg- •" a method by which the fabri_c is placed on the fittinll' .Judy and the garment IS cu~ and molded to tht· ~tyle. Draping is difficult? 1_f not impos•ible, wtth !'tretch fabrics, because tt IS extrem!·lv difficult to maintain the same amou nt of stretch wht-n drapmg the separate front a nd back of the· garment. Often the side seams of draped garments will twist around the body, because the seam~ are not identical and were not equaltzed effectively. To get a round this problem, drape the front of the gar ment, a nd use that drape to create the back of the garment by changing the neckline and the armholes of the draft, or the reverse: drape the back of the style and draft the back, from that drape. '

The Differences between Woven and Stretch Patterns Since all woven fabri b . and don't stretch th cs a~e asically the same, slopers. With str~tch ~n_ y need a single set of many different stret~ n cs, _however, there are each stretch fabri d ratios. Consequently c nee s an appropriate sloper:

er

'

h

differ ent scam lnJ H CH anu ij~, Bcstdcs th d d to crea te s t retch Patt '~Ill allowances nee ed 1'frerence between st retcherne, ' · h uge there ts one E ·1"ch s tretch fa bn. c requ·an.>~ atterns. ' k 't {' b . l t n• P wo\'en ... 'f" . 11t s1opct.. Sta ble- n·1 •a ncs, Wh·lch 3 d1 ,er e 2 "' percent., requtre s 1opers crea~ stretch up ~~ic~lar fa bric. While t his seerns Iikd fo r t hat par d hund red s of di fferent slopers e you would nee ly six d 1ffcrent slopcr sets: " n fact there are on .

C

..•

•• •• •• •• •• • •

Sta ble knit

stretches up to 2S'i'o

Modera te-stretch knit

stretches up to 50'ft •

Stretchy knit

s tretches up to 75'?t

Super -stretch knit

stretches up to lOO<:t

Two-way-str etch a nd fou r-way-str etch knit

stretches up to lOO'l in both directions

Rib knit

stretches over 100~ •

This manual t a k es a unique approach to drafting slopers, in that t h e largest-sized sloper is created a n d on each piece t h e other stretch ratios are indicat ed. This m ethod saves a lot of time when dr afting slop ers, a nd u ses far less supplies, which is especially h elpful to the student, or beginnin g pa tternma k er.

How Patternmaking Works

D • • •

D

•• •

In order to create a pattern, you must trace out the appr opriate sloper on a fresh sheet of light· • weight paper; complete any slash and spread. • draw in the details, add the necessary seam a llowa nces, and finally trace the lightweight • pattern onto oak-tag, or hard paper, and label a nd notch the pattern accordingly. Before anY • pattern can be considered complete, you must true and check every seam check every notch- • blend every curve, and the~ label the ~atterJl. • Also remember that fitting and corrections eft part of the pattern making process. n· • When adding seam allowances, create aJI • nal Patterns in oak-tag, or hard pattern papel'· •


PRINCIPLES OF PATTERN-DRAFTING

Principles of Patternmaking Tlwre are six principle" of k . -·11 . ' mt patternmakina t I1at "1 be explamed and 1-11 _ "' U:stratE'd through. h ou t t h IS c aptE'r: 1 Ease 2 Adding a style line 3. Slash ~nd ;:;pread to add fullne::;;:, flare. gathermg. and ease. and pivoting 4. Reductwn;:; for binding. band mg. tnm. and elastic 5. Circle;; for skirt::- and ruffle,; 6. Fitting and corrt>ctions

Seam Allowances :\one of the calculations used to create the slopers or blocks in thi,; manual include seam allowance". nor. for that matter. should any sloper or block. Seam:- should onl.v be added to the final pattern pieces: otherwise vou would soon find your,;elf confused as to ,~·hether they'd been added or not. The amount of seam a llowance you add depend..; on the type of machine you use, which in turn is determined by t h e type of fabric and seam finish. When draftmg patterns for stretch garments, keep in mind that seams a lso affect th e

Knit

Ratio

Serger

25%

4-thread or 5-thread 11 the l abnc IS very thick

Moderate knit

50%

4-thread

100%

4-thread

Super-stretch knit Loosely knitted super-stretch knit

100%

4-thread or 3-thread lor very l ine knits

100%

4-thread

Seam allowance

4-thread or 5-thread if loosely knitted

Sweater knits (cut and sew)

18-SO%

Fully-fashioned sweaters

_ % Single needle, crochet, linking 18 50 Single-stitch seam allowance

Custom garments

55

way the garment stretches. A s1mple RPrgcd scam along t he sidt- of a gn n nent does n't. rt-n lly affect much. but consider. for t•xamplc, uBing n topstitdwd Sl'ntn along t hnt ~ame side sca m. Such :1 seam would lw a nice dccorntiv<' feat.un•. but all that bulk :1cts as an anchor line a nd w ill not a lim\ the fabric to st n•tch as much along ils length as would a simpll' scrgcd scam. So you nc,•d to allow t•xtra lt'ngth. which might in turn afft•ct tlw fit of llw n•sl of lht• garment. A top:<titched S('a m a lso tt•nds to h old in a ~trmght lint'. so be :1\Y:ll'l' that you might n<'ed to allO\\ :1 little extra in gnrm<'nt length or find yourself with a bunch of 45-degTC<' pucke rs down ont' side of the scam . You can usc t his lo you r ad\·antage or you can be constantly ch asing your!.'elf in circles t rying to work out why something doesn't. fit the way you hoped it would. The closer or t ighter the fit a nd t.hc smalle r the garment., t he more you need to build excess into s ma ll a llowances for unforeseen circumsta nces. This usu a lly is n't a problem when working with st a ndard sizes, but wh en ma king cust om garme nts, t hese con siderations might be critical. The seam a llowances a rc det ermined by the type of knits, a nd consequently the ty pe of ser ger. The pa t tern ma k e r mu st know which machine t o use in orde r to apply the correct sea m a llowances.

Stable kn1t

Rib knit

C H APTER 3

When making custom fit garments use '/2" seams to baste the garment tog~ther for the first fitting using a stra1ght-st1tch machine. The excess can be cut away later using a serger.

Hem Allowance

/s" or h''

1" lor straight, 'H' lor curved

%" 3/8'

1" lor straight, 'h" lor curved

1

3

1" lor straight, 'h" lor curved 1

1" lor straight, 'h'' lor curved

or 'h"

1 'H' lor straight, 'h" for curved

/s" or /4'

3

%" 3/s'

'Is"

'12"


56

OF pp.TTERNCHAPTER 3

DRAFTING

PRINCIPLES

Drafting Hems

L hem allowance becau .11 betoo sh ort s~ an J·ncorrec •• fold s up, it WI 4l hc fabnc L when sew.

This is

..

• • •• •• ••

Th . ·san !.DCorrect hem a .llrJwancc. b~;cau-':<: • JS l . fold s. up, ii wJ! l g<.:i largf;r an<! • when the fa bnc stretch out from sewmg. •

•• • Create the correct hem allowance by dra.,.... · a line parallel to the bottom of the Pant. squaring up at the sides. Thi s hem allQ1c. ance is slightly s maller, and wlll not ;,trEtcb out when sewing and actually will help pull th< hem in s lightly.

~~!n

• D

D D D D

D

Understanding the Sewing of Hems 1" HEM stretches when sewing

All straight hems must have at least a 1' be=~ allowance. Cover-stitching causes the seam to "Wl~ out. By using a 1" hem allowance. the fo!OOJ edge will remain intact while the i'titched ed.~ ~tretches out and may be easily pre~t'd b.1<i mto shape.

%"HEM h

A~-(" 2

·

em ~v1ll cause the edge to ~tn'tch out. There IS no choice but to U::<t' '\ • henl .1~owance on_ a curved l'dge, butt~ s;n-tched ~ IS l~ss obvtous on a curvt'd hena and eMt« at

shrmk back. to shan.. "h'l

.

,..... .... • e pressang.

•• •••

••• •• •

••


PRINCIPLES OF PATTERN - DRAFTING

C HAPTER 3

57

Different Ways to Sew a Stretch Hem .... ···.. ··..- ·..

~-

ZIGZAG MACHINE A zigzag machine may be used to hem a stretch garment.

·······

____ folded edge

. · .......

.\

MARCEL STITCH A marcel stitch is a straight stitch in a zigzag pattern. Stretch this seam slightly while sewing.

-~

STRAIGHT-STITCH MACHINE Sew this hem using a large stitch length and stretch the seam as you sew. When the seam has been stretched during sewing, it will have large floats on t he right side of the garment. A stretched seam will not lie flat, but instead will be wavy and stretched. If the seam is not stretched beyond the amount the wearer will stretch it, it will pop when worn.

·.....··

-~ [~~ --- _l HAND HEM A hand hem is used when a blind hemmer is not available or when the designer wants to create a truly invisible hem. The needle travels from right to left, but the sewing is actually going left to right. Keep the stitches smaller than 3/s". Back-tack every third stitch, to reinforce the hem. Hide stitches under the serge when creating delicate garments, such as sweaters.

)

( SERGED-ON BAND A serged-on band is a separate strip offabric that is folded in half and serged to the raw edge of the fabric. Serged-on bands can be done on almost any seam; the band width can vary from 1/.i" to 3" and may also be used on necklines to create crew-neck collars.

folded edge

TUBULAR HEM A tubular hem looks like a sergedon band but is really a folded-up hem, created using the serger. This hem can only be applied to straight

hems.

Since the cover-stitch cannot pivot around a corner, it is necessary to hem the front and back of the skirt before sewing the side seams.


I

IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII...~~::~~~~N-IDRAFTING 58

CHAPTCR 3

PRINCIPLES

OF PATTERN·

.

diffe r ent manufactur~rt member that allowances on the end, flQ -

l~t !~d

""t ,.,m . of tho pattom ••lh lh, II wa"\.,tro a lways (aftertho sewn) e lastic).m"'"""'ont r•.,, .. Ro

"" d•'\:bol

a lso ELASTIC d to fini sh a raw d e Itclose Ela:;;tic may be use outside edge tlgnug on bathwill help keep a;wm leg opemngs s to the body. and dlesuits. a lly 1/16 inch ing suits and bo .Y elastic a re us_u If you have Allowances fodrth of the elastJc. . the elash more t an the w1 f [; bric wrappinu ., ove1 t to a llow a several layers od :) you may wa~layer offabt ·c (not a good ' e '. ch extra pel ' little more, a b0 utd 'l l2 m ric being wrappe ·

fin1she~/" ed e h 'p hugge r s, measureth II " x 25 1'~ = finish.st or d th e

J1

I

For owe red wa1d. wa .iSt and re uce fth at ll1ea.· • t the lowere s u rem e nt o e Pattetn. • Judymen a t- neve r the mea. sure • 1

~

~~ "<rtr

~::

~

lar1~;

. than 1 OR WAIST ELASTIC F . elastic that is sample Whenever usmg 1·emove 1 inch fromott seem like inch, always t That may n t'c is too . t measuremen . b u t if the e 1as ' waJs ·eductwn, te the wearer. ( meenough of a I tight it will -not the Measure the Ju26~'-"· then 26 Y2 -1 n 72 · ist = ' t !so be sew dium SJze of the elastic mus ta the ends (Y2 The en together, so add sean1 a llowances o

aggrav~

over 1" Wide(

- ~:~:~~?:de - - -

pa~~er,~_els'W').

elastic 2" smaller

~:

inch each side).

Elastic Reductions Waist elastic Front neckline Back neckline

.

Less than 1" wide' cut.the elastic f 2 , smaller than the wa1st. More tha n 1" wide ' cut. the elas 1c 1" smaller than the waist. h Cut the elastic 1" smaller than t e front neckline measurement. h Cut the elastic 1" smaller than t e back neckline measurement.

Cutout armholes Regular armholes Front leg opening Back leg opening

Cut the elastic 'h'' smaller than th;, armhole measurement. Cut the elastic the same as the armhole measurement. Cut the elastic 1" smaller ~an"~ front leg opening measur-;;, :re Cut the elastic 1' smaller - "'r:.back leg opening measurew.

Types of Elastic

_owr:""',~·~:~

St,.toh ga<mon'-' ""d olaetio that •t•ekhes with the

~lth

There are various types of elastic, each Its p p ties a nd characteristics designed for specific apphcatwns.

I

INSERT ELASTIC Insert elastic is intended to be covered by the fashion fabric, and can be inserted or stitched into a casing or a channel. Insert elastic can be either knitted or braided. It may be topstitched through the center of a waistband to prevent it from rolling and folding in half, or collapsing.

-----

NON-ROLL ELAsnc el "" Non-mil, or roll-ban, elasu., is inse~. ";.; that is usually braided and...,..;.,. rol folding over when stretched. It doee not be stitched through the center.

'!<t,.

I I I I I I I I I I I I


PRINCIPLES OF PATTERN DRAFTING

SWIMWEAR ELASTIC Swimwear elastic is specially t t d . chlorine and salt water. · rea e to res1st

I

a

DRAWSTRING ELASTIC This elastic has a braided cord knitted into the center of the elastic, which will expand to become a drawstring. Never pull the cord out , as it is impossible to get it back into the elastic.

CHAPTER 3

59

RUBBER SWIMWEAR ELASTIC

Rubber swimwear clastic has a tendency to stick to the pt·esser foot. Always place this elas· tic under the garment, against t he feed dogs, so the teeth can grab the elastic and pull it through the serger.

LINGERIE ELASTIC Basic lingerie elastic comes in a variety of widths and colors and is typically used as an insert elastic.

.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . IPIIo•tt•••

FELT-BACKED ELASTIC This elastic has a soft, plushy backing that is comfortable next to the skin.

i,. ,...,.,.....,.,...,.,. ,. ,. f't"ftiri"t¥ PICOT ELASTIC Picot elastic h as a small lacy finish on one edge, and is used to reduce panty lines. It is used on lingerie and undergarments, because the small picot adds a decorative finish and reduces bulk, thereby reducing panty lines from showing through outerwear. Sew this elastic to the right side of the garment, then flip and cover-stitch.

LACE ELASTIC to give a decorative Lace elastic may be Used finish.


PATTERI'I CHA" ERa

f'RINCI"'LEs oF

ORAFTII'IG

.,

---. ..

nd Gathenng

Elastic Used t o Crea te Shirnng a

.•

GATHERED Sl

DE SEAMS 1

nther or slurr

-.-J l' ae Rf·member to ;;er., p:ut of a the eJn,..t ic '' Jth the can!' .bc-fon: the elastiC _, If '"uwmg tn to a ttach • h trn hi U..aL • ,. ll will be muc nw urn~. " hll• gmt' at tb r

'

gnrm~

t

•• •• •

ASYMMETRI CAL GATHERED SIDE

SEAMS . . . h drawstring or gathering on • Draft a sk~rt WI~thaa straight hem by slashing • Side WI 'd only spreadmg one . t h e p attern on one Sl e. and •

•• ••

tood1 cult d . ,·)n may be ereor "''' ' 1 ".,.~_ -A rt top, p: non both L<>ngthen the atcd v.n1t elastic in the 1ntr)l\" "'in:!l n-.ttan, nn • · ht t 'tch n . CKam aJ!oM ,.... no: an d S<•w '"lth a -.tratg s1 ·

,;atht>nn~

'Ide~. ~tn•tch

••

SKIRT WITH ELAsnc GATHERING DETAIL Gathering details may be added as a detail, using the slash and spread technique. Stretchdetail. and sew clear elastic to create the gathering

VERTICALLY GATHERED SKIRT

;,.

Gathering details may be added to the en!ad length of skirt, using the slash and spr

te~~~

~

Stretch clear elastic to create the gathe detail.


PRINCIPLES OF PATTERN-DRAFTING

CHAPTER 3

61

Binding

Binding may be. u sed to finish nee·kl'1nes arm . of cyclmg ' . · h oles, leg. opemngs, and th e bottom tops b ut l S rarely used on regular h ems of tops and d resses, because it tends to b e a b.1t stiff . and . h eavy for a h. em. It may be sewn manua 11y w1th the cover-stitch machine or auto t. 11 . h b' d' ' rna 1ca y w1t a m m g turner.

COLLARETTE

This attachment for a cover-stitch machine will attach a collar easily. When used for necklines, one shoulder must be left open until after th e collar is attached . Collarette may be sewn automatically with a turner, manually by basting, or serging and then cover-stitching.

F+B x5

6

BINDING REDUCTIONS The binding must be reduced to create a tight finish. Reduce the length of the binding by one· sixth of the original measurement.

Front armh ole + back armhole = ? Then divide by 6 = ? Then multiply by 5 = ? 9" + 9" = 18 I 6 = 5 X 5 = 15" Example: If the original measurement is 6". then the reduced binding should be 5".

If the original measurement is 12". then the reduced binding sh ould be 10". If the original measurement is 1 ".then the r educed binding should be 15". (front + back) divided by G. then multiplied by 5

achine will apply the correct amount Eve n though the m h .· ht tension, it is necessary to 11 of binding, Htre tchcd. at t e g 11 . 11 e etc with the binding ·mho1c nccc 1 , ., la bel the pa ttern , a r ' . 0 how much binding to cui. mNtimrc me ni. This wil l cletcrmrn or ord<'r for production .


w 62

CHAPTER 3

PRINCIPLES OF PATTERN-DRAFTING

BINDING WITH THE COVER-STITCH MANUALLY

.

I the turner that IS Sometimes a sample room may not _ 1 av~ 'ble to crc::1le needed for binding. In such a case 1i IS sld I P055 1 binding manually using the cover-stJtch.

\-------:--~.:,:::::- --- -- -~-- -._' Baste the binding using a large st,itc~, ~n the straight-stitch machme, and don_t ~ any back-tacks. This is temporary bastwg t 1a will be popped after the binding IS complete.

Pf

-~--

-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_--1~--::~·.

.. •. ••

Fold the binding over the raw ed15e, an<J. cover-stitch in place. . Use the cover-stitch to fimsh the raw edg~ on the inside of the garment. When compleu,_ remember to pop and snap all the hasting stitches, or they will pop and s n.ap when th~ customer tries on the garment. She then will think she has torn it and not purchase it.

111111111111111111111111111: 111111111111111 111111111111 PIECING BINDING

Piece plain knits diagonally.

•• •

•• •• •• •• •• •• •• •

Pieced binding will not go through <h • turner easily, so you may need to cut multiple Cl widths of binding, or get the binding cut.

BINDING WITH A TURNER Note that t he pattern should be labeled with the length rf binding, so that the production manager will know how mu2: binding to cut, or or der. Cut the binding 1 1/s" wide for a 3, •" finished binding L~xk for the cu t a nd fin ished measurements e n araved on the turner. The t urner will be engr aved wit h t he cu tting measurement~ well as the finished (after sewn) measu rem;nt. When binding with a t urner. it is not nE:'cessarY to t3lculate the r eductions because the m ach ine will aut~m3tic3l~· s~retch the binding the cor rect a mou nt. Remember th3t the bmder cannot bi 11d · . ·.:! be left 0 . In ~ comp1ete Circle. so one :;:houldt'r u1u:_ . . pen when bmdmg t he neckline until after ;lll till' biOG m g IS complete Wh b'1 d ' -"'·" · · e~ ~ Ing a rmholes. leaw the.> :;:ide :'t'"""" 0 en P until afte r the bmdmg is complete.

• • • • •

a •

I


PRINCIPLES OF PATTERN-DRAFTING

63

CHAPTER 3

BANDING

Hand me' m·w '· al," 0 b e used to pu ll porttons · <'I OS<'t' and tighter to the of th<' garme nt armhole of a tank t 'fb body. Do not ratsc and take in an will tighten the ar~~~le ~ndmg 18 to be applied. The banding hole and stretched t fi ·hecause It ts smaller than the arm· l\f k . 0 t w en sewmg. a e the fimshing b d. b~r reducing the armh an mg smaller than the opening length measurement. o1e measurement by 1/6 th of the total Banding must be c t d it will be applied Th' r~a e smaller than the edge to which the garment edg~ tig~~- 1elps keep the banding flat a nd keep Banding must be r d d the length o th b de uce to cr eate a tight fin ish. Reduce r e an by 116th of the original measurement. Banding Reductions: If the original measurement is 6", th en the reduced band sh ould be 5". If the original measurement is 12", then the reduced ba nd sh ould be 10". I f th e original measurement is 18", then the reduced band should be 15".

f

double the

des~red wtdth

Fold

t

1/6th smaller than the iotal cut edge

Dra ft the ban d double the desired width, because it will fold in h alf.

BANDING WITH A COLLARETTE When banding with a banding attachment, called a collarette t urner, it isn't n ecessar y to cal· culate the reductions because the m achine will automatically stretch the banding the correct amount. Remember that the collarette cannot sew in a complete circle, so one shoulder must be left open until after the entire collar is complete. When banding armholes, leave the side seams open until after the banding is complete.

3

\.,

~

'\


---------------------CHAPTlR 3

PRINCIPLES OF PATTERN-DRAFTING

• •t

Ribbed Finishes · t 0 fa "', uarA ~erged-on cuff mav be used on the wns 1 · d ger to "1e ment to pull the sleeYe tighter an snug bodv. The same principles may be used to create da . . . e~e serged-on rib waist on a sweatshirt, 0 ' a "bb d . t s. Make the n. e1 on waist for pants and sk 1r ' ~,1·ist' not sunp cuff smaller than the customers . dY · 11 mig · ht be overs1ze · smaller than the pattern. wh1c

,§ "E

g 1)'::' c.~

0"' -s -"0>

~ ~

;;;

>.

~

"

c 0

-

1/6thlmllllerth•nwrisl

t

t

In order for the cuff to fit snugly on the wrist, it must be smaller and tighter than the wrist and stretched to fit. The width of the cuff can be whatever the designer desires. but the length must be one-sixth smaller than the wrist. When using an oversized sloper, make the cuff smaller than the customer's wrist. not just smaller than the widened pattern. If the ribbed cuffs will be finished at 2" wide, and folded in half. then draft them 4" wide. To determine the length of the cuffs: Reduce the cuff measurement by one-sixth of the original (regular fit) sleeve. We still want the cuffs to fit tightly on the same customer: her wrist did not get any thicker, just the sleeve.

0 ~ determine the length of the waist: Reduce it by one-sixth of the ongma1 c:egular fit) waist, or hip. .

~:i:~~~~i::~t t~eawaist?and ~o fit tightly on the same customer;

ny thicker, Just the top because she's wearing it

The ribbed waist will be stretch d . to pull it in snugly to the body e to fit the oversized top, in order

t

t I 1

I I I 1 I I I

The :ibbed waist will be finished at 2" wide and folded in half makmg 1t 4" wide. '

her with a looser fit. g

•• '' •• •• ••

over sized raglan

top

Make sure to label the waistband as "rib only."

l

•• ••

I I

• • I

SIS

T

C/8

he waistband should only h

.J.

I CJF

SIS

side%~:c!sthe waistband at~~~n:e~t:~f: at either of the side seams. .

ront, center/back, and the


PRINCIPLES OF PATTER N DRAFTING

C HAPTER 3

66

------CF

STABLE KNIT SKIRT SLOPER FRONT

MED

RIBBED WAISTBAND FOR SKIRTS OR PANTS The same rib reduction principles may be used to create a serged-on rib waist on a sweatshirt or a serged-on waist for pants and skirts. ,

Make the ribbed cuff smaller than the customer's wrist, not simply smaller th a n the block or pattern , which might be oversized .

Ease Ease is the amount that a pattern is larger or in the case of knit fabrics , smaller, than the body. Some ~arments must be made la rger than the body to a llow movement and comfort. Stretch garments are often cut smaller than the body measurements, since comfort and movement are provided through the inher ent stretch of the fabri c. There a re different types of ease used when creating patterns: Negative Ease Negative ease is the amount that the garment is made smaller than the body. Because knit fabrics stretch to accommodate body types, it is desirable to create the garments slightly smaller than the actual body. Negative ease can also refer to the amount of extra fabric removed, or r educed, to allow for an accurate fit. Many knits are made smaller than the actual body and use the inherent stretch to achieve the desired fit . Garment Ease Garment ease is the amount of extra fabric required to allow for a comfortable fit. Knit garments do not require as much garment ease, since the inherent stretch of the fabric usually provides the necessary garment ease. Design Ease Design ease is the amount of extra fabric required to create a particular design; for example, shir~ng, ga~hering, and draped effects. The designer may effect a fit that IS ov~rstzed or much larger than the body by increasing the amount of design ease.


,•ttAPl CH ~

PRINCIPLES OF PATTER

N DRAFTING

I I I

. Ease at the Waist of Sk•rts a nd Pants FITTED WAIST

.

·

. t (only applica ble tf the fabnc will st h. ) . l retth F r a fitted waJs o be uiled on over the tps ' Slmp y use the slo dp dd seam allowances, hems, and other detPet enough tod as drafte , a n a a11 8 required. · .fl ld fth fab · fi To check, place the crossw.tse fo o r eb . nc ad ew inches . below t IJe cu t edo-e "' on the wmst o fyour Ia nc, an t place Pins marking the amount of the waist o you~ s 1oper1pa terns. Bold tight a nd check to see if this amount will stretch to the Width of the hips. If the fabric does not stretch enoug~, use the un. fitted waist; and if that is too large, use the semi-fitted Waist.

I I I

I I II I

1 I

I I I UNFITTED WAIST I Use loosely fitted waist draft when the fabric does not stretch I enough to allow the waist t o be pulled on over the hips, such as with stable and moderate knits. For example, the waist of a stable-knit skirt is only 26 112", while the hip is 36 1h "; the fab. ric will not stretch enough to a llow the skirt to be pulled on over the hips. 26 1/2'' + 25% (6% ") = 33 114", which is not enough to pull on over 36 If2" hips.

I I 1 I I I I I I

SEMI-FITTED WAIST

I

For a semi-fitted waist, find the middle of the fitted waist and I the loose waist .and draw a new hip, using the variform hip I c~rve. Alternatively, increase the waist by any amount that 1111 Will allow the waist to tit over the hips.

I


PRINCIPLES OF PATTERN-DRAFTING

CHAPTER 3

67

Creating Style Lines to Flatter the Wearer

CREATING STYLE LINES Style lines should be used to create specific designs. Style lines may be horizontal, across the garment, vertical, up and down the garment, or on the bias. i.e., diagonally through the garment. Different designs may be created by rearranging the style lines. By using style lines for trumpet skirts, godets and pleats, fullness may be added to the hem.

VERTICAL STYLE LINES Finding the perfect style line takes ti_me, practice, and experience. Diff~rent style lme placement creates different design effects. 1 th By making the seam line paralle_ to e side seam, you can create a sexier design that

Simply slash the draft and trace the two pieces separately. Notch and separate the two pieces, for construction. Add seam allowances, hem, grainlines, and labeling.

makes the wearer look thinner as the eye is forced to travel the length of the seam upward. Also, by dividing the skirt visually into three sections, the eye will assume all three pieces are equal and judge the wearer thinner.


~L'

'""'

<":HA!'TER 3

PRINCIPLES OF PATTERN ·

DRAFTING

Thi" stviE' linE' will makE' the \\!'arer's hips afJ[war n",,'rrllW. but wdl add WE'ight to the thigh.

A contrast detad will draw the eye upwa rd , and create a thmner look.

Placing a darker

':"'ill make them almos~~lor. ~n

the side Panels Illusion of a taller thi mvlBlble and create the • nner person.

This style line will minimize the hips, but add visua l weight to the thigh area.

Tops titching, pin tucks, and diagonal lines will exaggerate this effect, to make the wearer look taller and slimmer.


PRINCIPLES OF PATTERN DRAFTING

CHAPTE.fl :1

69

HORIZONTAL STYLE LINES STYLE •3-002 POINTEO YOKE

.-

Draw tn the yoke style line, illustrated at 2" down at the stde seam. and 4" down the center fold, but tt may be any measurement the destgner requtres.

Honzontal l•nes v.•den the figure , so often the style line IS broken up or angled 1n some manner to help make the customer appear thtnner.

Notch and trace out the separate pieces. Add the necessary seam allowances. Asymmetrical style lines may also be created by drafting the pattern open.

I

1!~:,. u·J~\];)'1.'§\ I

I

I

I l:::::·::::.::.::·:::.-

L. ··--·

......... -· ............ I

L[- - - - - - - - '

Variations of horizontal style lines.

-~.

\ [f------1 .........


70

CHAPTER 3

PRINCIPLES OF PATT

ERN DRAFTING -

Pattern Labeling All final patterns should ~e on folded oak..t butterfly style, and should mclude: \ • All necessary seam allowances. n

u.

ONE-WAY STRETCH STABLE KNIT SKIRT BLOCK BACK MED NAME DATE CREATED

g 0

u.

• All necessary notches.

"'

(.)

..,

,...0 0

ONE-WAY STRETCH STABLE KNIT SKIRT BLOCK BACK MED NAME DATE CREATED

• The grainline, with arrows in one direttiOn only because of the nap of knit fabrics.

••

••

•• •a

• The type of stretch , or the stretch ratio ~ ensure that the patterns are only used for 8 the particular stretch they were intended filr • • A style number if it is a pattern, or labeled as "BLOCK" or "SLOPER." • The name of the particular pattern piece such as "FRONT" or "BACK." ' • The size-Small, Medium, Large, etc. • The date created, to ensure that you are liSing the most current version of the pattern. • The name of the patternmaker.

Grain lines CROSS GRAIN

r

m

z

G)

-i

:r G)

~

z

a

Each pattern should have a grainline indicated. If you notice on each of your pattern pieces, there is a large a.rro;.-. On a stretch pattern, the grain line should be in the middle of the piece, whenever possible. The grainline for stretth patterns should have both arrows pointing the_ same direction, indicating a "with nap" cutting instruction. All fabrics have three grains: lengthwise, cro:;,-.ri.~ and bias. The lengthwise grain runs parallel to the edge; of the fabric, which ar e also called selvedges. It is th~ JD05I stable direction of the fabric and has very little, _if an~ stretch. The crosswise grain runs across the fahnc fro!l! selvedge to selvedge. The fabric store salesperson will lui~ c~t your fabric on the crosswise grain. The crosswise~ tlon ~f knit fabrics has a lot of stretch. The bias WSJ:0 ~ the direction formed if you fold a perfect square of fa~ tn half. It is the diagonal side of the triangle. This di['(!(tldi has very little stretch in knit fabrics. . It is extremely important that the arrow on your ~ nc be placed on the lengthwise grain of the fabric. 11¢ en~ures that your garment will hang straight and 'lrill rJf. tw1st around the body when being worn. When you Jaytillthe pattern pieces, alwa,ys measure ftom the anow to. . selvedge edge of the marker paper at row to be sure that the piece ia • •

both_...,..,

•a •• •

•a •• •• •

• •

a • • •

• • •

a •

• •


PRINCIPLES OF PATTERN-DRAFTIN G

71

CHAPTER 3

MAKING A MARKER FOR CUTTING Once vou have a f1na1 pattern and fabnc ready. 1t 1s t1me to Ia\ out the pattern p1eces. make a marker and cut out vour garment All garments. mcludmg f~rst samples. should be cut out us1ng a marker A marker IS a trac1ng of the pattern on special marking paper that has pnnted hnes and 'or numbers used for hn1ng up the gramhne Prepanng the marker paper

. !

l

1'

·-

1'

112'

112'

Draw a lme Y2' 1n from the Sides of the marker paper Th1s is so that the selvedge will not be 1n the fmal garment.

~

l

~

'<.

Draw a line across the top edge of the marker 1 below the cut edge. Th1s IS 1n case the fabric. which """ be underneath. IS not stra1ght.

~

'<.

-g ~

-g ~ 112'

~

112'

1'

1'

All markers waste 1" of fabnc at each end of the marker. and 1/2" on each S1de

Tracmg the pattern p1eces. Trace all the pattern p1eces (nght s1de up). making sure to include every notch and any drill marks. Measure each piece from the gra1nline to ensure that each pattern p tece is perfectly on grain (parallel to the selvedge). or use the pnnted grid to ensure that every piece is parallel to the selvedge.

1' ··j•••••••••••••S·-·· · · · · · · · · · •••••••

~eas

re

Circle every drill hole so the cutter will know whether it is reall y a drill mark and not JUSt an incidental mark on the paper.

-- --r ----~ =-··t· ---------------------------------------------- ·---- ;:--·;_---- ..

to trace out the pattern pieces. . This is the tncorrect way . and will twist around The garment will end up OFF-grain, the body when worn.

..__________________ .............---·;:---i-- __ ..


l

HAf'HR 3

PRIN CIPLES OF PA

TTERN-DRAFTING

Measure the length and width. of the marker Paper so much fabric you w1ll need and how lon ~o~ know h ow 91or <l'f each p IYof the fabric for each garment.

I

STYLE# 5001 crop lOP fronl MED

STYLE# 5001

I. I

crop lop b&cl< MED cu11 self

I.

{

ctJt 1 setf

I

I

I:

4-

~---------------------~

: I

•• ••• •• It

I

:

••

STYLE# 5001 crop lop back

"?I

cu11 self 1

I

l J

MED

<-...._-_,

\

\1

/I

: STYLE # 5001

I

crop top front MfQ lf 11

I

cu

(e

I I

• • 1-'l-1

f-

fabnc layer

under layer of paper

Place a length of paper underneath the fabric, on the cutting table, and then place the fabric, lining up all selvedges. Place the marker on top of all layers. 1

It is also necessary to place one layer of paper between each color if cutting more than one color, because the

•• •

•• •

1

••• ••• •• •• •

••


PRINCIPLES OF PATTERN - DRAFTING

CHAPTER 3

73

DO NOT place lhe marker will cause lhe garm crookedly on I he fabnc. ThiS body. enl to hang OFF-grain and IWISI on the

_/

\

~

\

)

TYLE It 5001

rop~back

\

STYLE. 5001 crop toP tront

MfJl.

cu\ 1 ...11

cut 1 self

I-----'

\

,_"('

<If ... -\ ' ~"

Pin the layer together and cut all layers including paper together. ' ' Or if the lay is very thick, use weights to hold the marker to the fabnc.

STYLE = 5001

STYLE# 5001 crop top bacor

crop top front

MEll

Or use a stapler in the discarded areas of the marker

.A

/.A

,.""" :ut 1se1f ,..

Or use marker spray glue to hold the marker down. /

t\El2 o...t • self...,..A

.A

marker of top olaf laters

unde r la yer of papef

Keep the layers of paper with the bundles until ready to sew, at the machine, so that if you have forgotten a notch, the operator will be able to check the marker. The marker IS the only way to differentiate between sizes. so the operator will sew the corresponding sizes of pieces together.

STYLE# 5001 crop top bacl.

MEll ..... /

C\Jtlsotf /

S"' ,E • "-XI' ' 'I' ""'!r<W1

.....

..-'\ /

Vt::'

wt • ....r

/..-'\


7-4

CHAPTER 3

PRINCIPLES OF PATTERN-DRAFTING

Test Your Knowledge of the Material in This Chapter 1. \\nat JS a sloper? 2 \\nat is a pattern? 3. ·what are patterns used for? 4. What is the difference between wo\·en patternmakiog and stretch pattern making? 5. Explain the technique of"matching of seams." 6. Explain what is meant b\' the term ·'trueing seams.• 7 How much should binding be r educed? How much should banding be reduced?

9. 10. 11. 12. 13.

What is negative ease? What is garment ease? What is design ease? What are the seam a llowa nces on slo When should you use one-way-stretc~ers? slopers? 14. Why should you exagger ate the siz ga rment? e of a 15. Which direction are measurements duced for one-way-stretch? re-

... •

•• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• •

••


CHAPTER

4

Slopers and Reductions About This Chapter This chapter tllu~trate · h d'ffi ~tretch d . • " t e 1 erent measurements and - d bl rke uctton::; u,:;ed in the den•lopment of stretch slopers an oc s. • To . begin. chooo:e . • the :s'tt·etc h 1.a t'10 t I1at apph.es to your particular . . fabnc · then choose tl1e appropnate m easure ments from th1s chapter. Follow· the direct· · the next chapters using measure· . IOns m ments and reductions from this chapter.

Sloper Reductions This section illustrates the differ ent stretch reductions used in t h e development of str etch slope rs and blocks.

A COMPLETE SET OF PROFESSIONAL SLOPERS INCLUDES:

Reduction for stretch

Stable knit

Moderate knit

Stretchy

Super· stretch

Two- & Four-way stretch

0-25%

25-50%

50-75%

75-100%

100% in both

stretch

stretch

stretch

stretch

directions

0 % smaller

2% smaller

10% smaller both directions

for across measurements

3.5% smaller

5% smaller

for across measurements

for across measurements

for across measurements

·o

'.98

'.96.5

' .95

'.90

Multiply your measurement by Skirt

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Pant

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Top

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Dresses

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Oversized top Catsuits Leotard Bikini

Same as super-stretch Same as super-stretch Same as super-stretch Same as super-stretch Yes Yes Yes Yes

N/A N/A N/A

N/A N/A N/A

N/A N/A N/A

N/A N/A N/A

Rib knit over 100% stretch 10% smaller

for across measurements ·.90 in both directions Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes

N/A N/A N/A

75


CHAF"l ER •

SLOPERS AND REDUCTIONS

I

~

Slopers A ;;Joper· or ma;:ter block is a template of the desir-ed fit 1.1 a croquis: it ne,·er has any seam allowances or details.' ~e experienced patternmaker wr ll never star·t each draft r'l'he 0 scratch but instead will tr·ace the slopcr th~n add details : 1\t seam a llowa nces to create a pattern. By u s rng a s loper Wit lld perfected fit, the pattern maker must on ly make s rnall act· h a ments to the finished pattern rather t h an making exte~U~t­ 81 fitting corr-ections to each patte rn. Ve

MISSES STABLE KNIT REDUCTIONS

1

Bust

2 3

Was! H•p

4

Crotch depth Wa•st to knee 6 Wa•st to ankle 7 Ank•e 8 Knee 9 Front crotch 10 Bac~ crotch 11 Crotch angle 12 Nape to wa•st 13 Back neck 14 Back neck nse 15 Shoulder length 16 Across bac~ 17 Sleeve length 18 Shoulder p1tch 19 Steep 20 Wnst 21 Neck 22 Bust span 23 Bust level 5

-

Multiply your across measurements by

0 for stable kmts 0 for stable kmts 0 for stable kmts No reduction No reduction No reduc t1on 0 for stable knits 0 for stable knits 0 for stable knits 0 for stable knits 0 for stable knits No reductton No reduc tion 0 for stable knits No reductton 0 for stable knits No reductton 0 for stable kntts 0 for stable kntts 0 for stable kntts 0 for stable kntts 0 for stable knits No reduction

Extra Small

Small

Medium

2

6

10

14

35 112 27 '12 38'12 10 112 23'12 39'12 8 '1· 14 % 2% 3'1• 1'1• 16 % 2'12 'Ia 6 7'12 23'1• 1 112 11 71a 7 15 7 10 112

38'12 30'12 41 112 10 % 23% 40 8'12 14 'Ia 2% 3'12 1 '1• 17'1a 2 '12 7 1a 6'12 7% 23'12 1 '12 12 % 7314 15 114 7 112 10 %

31'/z 23'12 34 1/z 10 23 38 112 7 31, 13% 2'1a 2 71a 1 15 % 2%

'!. 5'1a 7 22 31, 1% 10 % 5'12 14 '12 6% 10

1

33 /z 25 '12 36 '12 10 114 23'1• 39 8 13 71a 2'1• 3 1'1a 16 1la 2 '12 'Ia 5 112 7'1• 23 1 '12 11 1la 6'1, 14 31,

6 '1e 10 '1•

~

••• •• •• ---- •

Zero percent smaller 1n crossw•se d~rectron without any reduc tions in lengthwise direction . Use these measurements when draftrng slopers for fabncs that stretch from 0% to 25%.

---

.,

~ ~

Large

Extra Large

18

4.,.-;;;-33'; , 44 ';, 11 24 40 ';, B'J, 15% 23/, 33/. 1 3/e 17 % 2% 7 /a 7 8 23'/. 1% 13% 8'h 15 1h 7 7/a 11

•• •• •

•••


SLOPERS AND REDUCTIONS

CHAPTER 4

Eacl'1 kn·t fabnc 1'1as a d 'fer • the reducloons needed to d:nt s.retch ratoo, a"d each garment must be drafted accordmgl\. The chart below Illustrates aft stooers. ana eventuaO) patterns. tor each fabHc.

Stable kn•ts Moderate kn1ts

5" stretches to 6 ,· 5" stretcl'1es to 7

.

18% to 25% stretch

Reduce b\ 0%

26% to 50% stretch

Reduce by 2%

Stretchy kn•ts

5" stretches to 8

51% to 75% stretch

Reduce by 3%

Super-stretch kn•ts

5" stretches to to•

16% to 100% stretch

Reduce by 5%

R•b kn•ts

5" stretches over 10"

Over 100% stretch

Reduce by 10%

Four-way-stretch kn•ts

5" stretches to 10" •n both d~rect•ons

100% stretch m both d~rect1ons

Reduce by 5% across; Reduce by 10% lengthwise

Use the measurements e'actly as recorded Multiply your ac1oss measurements by 0. 98 Mult•ply your across measurements by 0.97 Multiply your ac•oss measurements by 0.95 Mult1ply your across measurements by 0.90 Multiply your measurements by 0.90 m both d~recti ons

Any fabnc that stretches less than 18% should be treated a; a stretch woven and should have the ease removed.

MISSES MODERATE REDUCTIONS Two percent smaller •n crossw1se d~rectlon w1thout any reductions in lengthwise direction. Use these measurements when drafting slopers for fabncs that stretch from 25% to 50%. Multiply your across measurements by 0.98, 2% smaller, except for the should er measurement, because the final garment will have twill tape to stab1hze the seam and prevent 1t from stretching. Multiply by

1 2

Bust Wa1st 3 H1p 4 Crotch depth 5 Wa1st to knee 6 Wa1st to ankle 7 Ankle 8 Knee 9 Fro nt crotch 10 Back c rotc h 11 Crotch angle 12 Nape to waist 13 Back neck 14 Back neck rise 15 Shoulder length 16 Across back 17 Sleeve length 18 Shoulder pitch 19 Bicep 20 Wrist 21 Neck 22 Bust span 23 Bust level

.98 X .98 X ,g8 No reduct1on No reduction No reduction X .98 / .98 X .98 X .98 ..< .98 No reduction No reduction X .98 No reduction X .98 No reduction X .98 X .98 X .98 X .98 X .98 No reduction X

Extra Large

Extra Small

Small

Medium

Large

2

6

10

14

18

31 7le 24 34'1. 10 11e 23'1• 38 31•

33 31• 26 36'1. 10% 23 % 39'1• 8 13 1le 2'1• 3 1 '1• 16% 2'12

36 '1• 28 3le 39'1• 10 % 23% 39 31•

39'1• 31 'Is

8'1•

8'12 14 'I• 2% 3 112 1% 17 %

42% 34 >;. 45 % 11 '1• 24 'le 40 31· 8 31• 15%

7 '1• 13 'le

2'1• 2'1• 1 15 7lo 2%

>;.

'I•

5'1•

s 'l•

7

22'1• 1% 10 '12 5 31• 14 '1• 6 '12 10

7 '13 23'1• 1 '12 11 11• 6'12 14 112 6 31• 10 '1•

14% 2 112 3'1• 1 '1• 7 16 1•

2'12 1 1a 6 '1• 7% 23 % 1 112 12

7'1• 14 31·

42'1• 10 11•

23 71•

40 '1•

2'1•

'I•

2 11• 3% 1% 17 718 2%

'I•

6 '/.

7 '1•

1

8 23 71e 1% 13 112 8 '/. 15 '1• 8 11

7 1• 23 % 1 112 12 % 8 15

7 '1•

7'12

10%

10%


-liAf'TEA.

SLOPERS ANDRE

••

oUCTIONS

EDUCTIONS . · ron MISSES STRETCHY KNIT R . reductiOns on lengthw•~; ~~r~~~ .

tch from 50~o 0 o. b e th f .,..,,E'e PE>rc<'nt sma •er •n cross'"se d~rec '~pers for fabrics that ~trethe shoulder measurement, ecaus e onal 9arllle Use these measurements when drafM9 S % smaller. exc ept 0 ~ nt 0 97 3 Multopl) your across measurements b)' and. prevent ot from stretchong. d. m Large Extr L Will have~;, oil tape to staboloze the seam Small small Me IU ~rg _ . Extra 14 ,_ ----.._ Multoply by 10 18 1 n wothout any

1

Bust Waost 3 Hop 4 Crotch depth 5 Waost to knee 6 Waost to ankle 7 Ankle 8 Knee 9 Front crotch 10 Back crotch 11 Crotch angle 12 Nape to waost 13 Back neck 14 Back neck rose 15 Shoulder length 16 Across back 17 Sleeve length 18 Shoulder potch 19 Bocep 20 Wrost 21 Neck 22 Bust span 23 Bust level

2

.97 97 '.97 No reductoon No reductoon No reductoon 97 '· 97 '.97 ~

.97

97 No reduct1on No reduct1on .97 No reduction .97 No reduction .97 X .97 X .97 X .97 X .97

No reduction

6

31~ •

33 ''>

~~.;:

;~t:

36%

38 %

39 '1• 7 'Ia 13 %

~~

~~~;: 7

''a 13''•

~~

1

35 '1a ~~

38 %

;~:;.

41 >;,

~g~:

39 %

40 ;·

8 'Ia

14 '1a 2 ''a

2'1a

32 1•

3 'f•

2 'a

1 15'1a 2% >;.

1 1la 16 % 2 112

1 '1• 16 % 2 '12

'Ia

5'1•

5% 7% 23 'Ia 1 '12 11 'Is 6% 14 % 6% 10

'Ia 6 '1•

7 22 'Ia 1% 10% 5 31· 1 14 1a 1 6 12 7

9 1a

7% 23 % 1 '12 11 71a

7'17 14 % 7

10 '1•

~

8 Ia

14 % 2% 3 '12 'I 1 4 17 % 2 '12 'Ia

6% 7% 23 % 1 '12 12 % 7% 14 71s 7% 10 '12

9 ~ ~~ 45 ';,

10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22

23

Bust Wa1st H1p Crotch depth Wa1st to knee Waist to ankle Ankle Knee Front crotch Back c rotch Crotch angle Nape to waist Back neck Back neck rise Shoulder length Across back Sleeve length Shoulder pitc h Bicep Wrist Neck Bust span Bust level

X .95 X .95 X .95 No reduction No reduction No reduction

X .95

1~

17 7; 8 2% 7; 8

8

23 7/o 1% 13% 8'1. 15 10 3/,

.95 .95 X .95 X .95 X X

No reduction No reduction X

.95

No reduction X

.95

No reduction

.95 .95 .95 .95 X .95 X X X X

No reduction

Medium

Large

Extra Large

10

14

18

30 71a 23 %

32% 25'/a 35% 10 % 23%

35'1s 27 112 38 10 % 23 % 39 '/. 8 13% 2%

38 30% 40 71a 10 71s

2 '1a 2 31· 1 7

15 1s 2%

'!. 5'1· 7

22 % 1% 10 '1• 5% 13 71a 6% 9%

7% 13 % 2'1•

3 1 '1a 16% 2'12 'Ia

5% 7% 23 11a 1% 11 6 '1·

14

6% 9 7/a

3'1a

1 '1· 16 71s 2'12 7 la 6'1•

7% 23 % 1 '12 11 % 7

14'1• 6 71e 10

la

41 % 33 3/• 44 1/a 11 '/s 24 '/s 40 3/• 8% 14 7/a 2 3/• 3% 1% 17 '1s 2% 7 /s

6%

7'1•

7 71e 23% 1 112 12% 731· 14'12 7'1• 10 11,

8 23 7'8 1 112 13 8 3!1 14 3/•

23 71a

40 '1•

8 '!. 14 % 2'12 3% 1% 17 % 2'12 7

W • •

• • •

7 7/a

6

39 '1•

7';,

Small

7 '12 13

15 1; 2' '8 3;;.

2

10 '1s 23'1s 38'/.

40 ';, 8';8

Extra Small

33 %

MISSES SUPER-STRETCH KNIT REDUCTIONS

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9

~

~:~

F1ve percent smaller on crossw1se d~rection without any reductions in lengthwise direction. Use these measurements when drafting slopers for fabrics that stretch from 75% to 100%. Multiply your across measurements by 0.95, 5% smaller, except for the s houlder measurement, because the final garment will have tw~e to stabilize the seam and prevent it from stretching. Multiply by

7'.4 10'fi

•• •• •• ••

•• ••

•• •


SLOPERS AND REDUCTIONS

79

CHAPTER 4

MISSES RIB KNIT REDUCTIONS Tel"' perce-nt sma le• •n cross Use these measurements w;~~~~~~t•on \\ •thout any reduct•ons 1n le;othwtse d•rectton Mult•pl\ your across measurem t mg slopers for fabncs that stretch iOO% and over ·

men!"'" have II\ 111 tape to stab~~es•~l 0 90 10% smaller e'cept for the shoulder measurement. because the f1nal gar- ~ e seam and pre\ ent •t from stretchmg Multiply by Extra Large Large M edtum Extra Small Small 2

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8

9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23

Bust Wa•st H1p Crotch depth Wa1st to knee Wa•st to ankle Ankle Knee Front crotch Back crotch Crotch angle Nape to wa•st Back neck Back neck nse Shoulder length Across back Sleeve length Shoulder p•tch B•cep Wnst Neck Bust span Bust level

)( .90 ;., 90 .90 No reduct1on No reduct•on No reduct•on

.90 90 ' 90 X 90 " .90 X

X

No reduct•on No reduct1on

.90 No reduct1on

.90 No reduct1on

v )(

X

.90 .90 .90 .90 .90

No reduct1on

22 32 10'. 23 • 38'. 7 12'. 2 2'• 1 15'/o 2 11o

33 •

31

18

14

10

6

29 1 •

39 11e

36

32 41 ,,

28 31•

23 e

26' 16

33 3

36

38 -\',.

10 !'>18

10

23')18

23'/a

..

10 23 '• 39 .•

39 31•

11

11\

40

7 •

7 11'1

1• 7'Jtl,

12 Jr•

13 1/a 2 114

13'1e 2'1•

2'1•

2-/, 1 16%

11 8

24 •;, 40 31·

1

8

14 2% 3'/.,

3 1/4

1 114

1 1 /o~

2''?

3 1 'Ia 16 7lo 2'12

17 % 2'12

'lo

5'/..

5'1•

'I• 6 '1•

17 7 /o 2% 'I•

6 31•

7

7 22 71s 1 'I• 9%

7% 23 'I• 1% 10 % 6 13% 6 '1• 9%

'I•

5 '1• 13 'I• 6

9'1•

r,

7% 23 % 1 31o 11 6% 13 '12 6 '12 9%

7 11o

1 /•

8

23% 1 3lo 11 31· 7% 13'/.

6'1• 9 '/.

23 '1• 1 '12 12% 8 14 7 •;. 10

MISSES FOUR-WAY-STRETCH KNIT REDUCTIONS Ten percent smaller 1n crossw1se d~rection and 10% smaller in the lengthwise direction. Use these measurements when drafting slopers for fabrics that stretch 100% in both directions. Multiply your measurements by 0.90, 10% smaller, in both directions, except for the shoulder measurement, because the f.nal garment will have twill tape to stabilize the seam and prevent it from stretching. Note that four-way stretch has memory and will return to the ong.nal shape; therefore, twill tape is not necessary to stabilize the shoulders. Extra Large Large Medium Small Extra Small Multiply by

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23

Bust Wa1st Hip Crotch depth Waist to knee Waist to ankle Ankle Knee Front crotch Back crotch Crotch angle Nape to waist Back neck Back neck rise Shoulder length Across back Sleeve length Shoulder pitch Bicep Wrist Neck Bust span Bust level

.90 X .90 J( .90 X .90 X .90 X .90 X .90 X .90 X .90 X .90 x .90 X .90

J(

No reduction No reduction No reduction No reduction No reduction No reduction

X .90 X .90 No reduction

X .90 X .90

2

6

10

14

18

29 '1• 22 32

30 '1•

31 23 '1• 33 31• 9% 22'1•

32 24 314 34 % 9'h 22 % 37'12 7% 13

33'/• 26'1s 36 9% 22'12 37 3/• 7'12 13 '1• 2'1• 3 '13 1 'Is 16 2'12

9 '1• 20 '1• 34 '1• 7 12 '1• 2 3 1 14 'I• 2%

"Is 5 '1• 7 22 '1• 1 '1• 9% 5 '/s 14% 6

9 '1•

23 32 '1•

9 '1• 22 37

37'1•

7 '1• 12 •;, 2 3 1 15 % 2 •;,

'I• 5'12 7 '1s 23 1 '12 10 5% 14 'Is

6 '1• 9'1•

7% 12% 2 'I• 3 '1• 1 15 •;, 2 •;,

'I•

5 31• 7% 23 '1• 1 '12 10% 6 14 71s 6 '1•

9'1•

2'1• 3 '1• 1 15 31· 2'/2

'I• 6

7'1• 23'1• 1 '12 10'1s 6% 15 6% 10

'I•

6 '/• 7% 23 % 1 •;, 11 6% 15 6 'h 10


,.,.

I

~0

\'HAf'HR 4

SLO PERS AN D R

rou c TIONS

- -...______,_

NS JUNIOR SIZE REDUCTIO

thWISe direction. - jan~ reduct1ons 1n ~e~r~m O% to 25%. se dorectlon "l!hOU tabncs that stretc

-t"'"O pe..cen! smalle' .n crosS\'\ I d

ft•na sfopers for

~se ~hese measurements v. h~~ ::recOrded '"'thout any

Use your measurements exac \

-

.

-

Multiply your across

Extra small

measurements by -

1 2 3

Bust Watst Htp Crotch depth 4 5 Watst to knee 6 Watst to anlde 7 Ankle 8 Knee 9 Front crotch 10 Back crotch 11 Crotch angle 12 Naoe to watst 13 Sac• neck Back neck nse ·~ 15 Shoulder iength 16 Across back 17 Sleeve length 18 Snouloer pttch 19 Steep 20 Wnst 21 Neck 22 Bust span 23 Bust level

32 25 35 10 •., 22 1A 38 1 1 7 •• 13 51 8 2''"' 3 1 15% 2%

0 for stable kmts 0 for stable kmts 0 tor stable knitS No reduct ton No reduction No reduct1on 0 tor stable kmts 0 for stable kntts o tor stable kntts o tor stable kntts o tor stable kntts No reduct ton No reductton o for stable kmts No reductton o for stable kn1ts No reductton 0 for stable knits 0 for stable kntts 0 for stable kntts 0 tor stable knits 0 for stable knits No reduction

Small

-2

3;,

4 Ia 7 'I• 23% 1% 10 3/• 5 7/a 14 % 6% 9 7/s

6

34 27 37 10 '? 23 'Ia 38 3/• 8 3 1a 14 1/a 2% 3 1 '/a 15 7/a 2% 7 /a 5 7% 23 % 1 '/a 11 112 6 1/a 15 '/• 6 7/s 10 %

Medium

10 ---36 29 39 10 3/• 23 3/a 39 '/• 8 7/a 14 'Is 2'12 3'/• 1 '/• 16% 2% 1 5% 8 23 7/a 1 112 12 1/4 6% 15 7/a 7 10 7/a

,. ---- •• ••. ~

reduc tions

-

~

Large

14 39 32 42 11 23% 39 3/• 9% 15 1/a 2% 3 112 1% 16 7/a 2 7/a 1 5% 8% 24 '/a 1 112 13 6% 16 112 7% 11 %

Extra Lar

~ 18

----:;---35 45 11 1;, 23 7;, 40 1/, 9 ';, 15'1. 2';, 3';, 1';, 17'1. 3 ';, 1'/, 5';,

8% 24'1. 1% 13 3/. 6 7/a 17 7%

11 7/a

JUNIOR SIZE MODERATE REDUCTIONS Two percent smaller tn crosswtse dtrection without any reductions in lengthwise direction. Use these measurements when drafting slopers tor fabrics that stretch from 25% to 50%. Multtply your across measurements by 0.98, 2% smaller, except for the shoulder measurement, because the final garment w111 have twtll tape to stabilize the seam and prevent it from stretching. Multiply by

1 Bust 2 Wa1st 3 Htp 4 Crotch depth 5 Watst to knee 6 Waist to ankle 7

8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23

Ankle Knee Front crotch Back crotch Crotch angle Nape to waist Back neck Back neck rise Shoulder length Across back Sleeve length Shoulder pitch Bicep Wrist Neck Bust span Bust level

/ .98 /. .98 X .98 No reduction No reduction No reduction J( .98 X .98 X .98 X .98 X .98

No reduction No reduction

X .98 No reduct ion

X .98 No reduction

X .98 X .98 X .98 X .98 X .98 No reduction

Ext ra Small

Small

M e dium

L a rge

2

6

10

14

31 % 24 1/z 34 '/• 10 '/• 22 7/s 38 '/, 7 3/. 13 % 2'/s 2 7/s 1 15% 2%

33 % 26'12 36 '/• 10 1/2 23 1/s 38'1. 8'/• 13 7/s 2'1• 3 1 '/s 15 'Is 2%

35 1/4 28% 38'/ • 10 '1. 23% 39'/• 8 '1. 14 % 2% 3 1/s 1 1/s 16 % 2 '1. 1 5% 8 23 7/s 1 112 12

'!. 4'/s 7'1• 23% 1% 10'12

5 3;, 14 •;, 6 3/7

9%

'Is 5 7% 23 % 1% 11'/• 6 14 7/a

6% 10 1/a

6 '1• 15 '12

7 10%

1 / •

38 31 % 41 1/s 11 23% 39 '1.

9'1•

14 7/s 2% 3% 1 2/ 7 16 7/ s 2 7/s 1 5% 8% 24 1/a

1 '12 12'1.

Extra Large

18 41 '/s 34 '/• 44 1/s 11 '/• 23 7/s 40 '/• 9%

•• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• •

15% 2 3/• 3 5:s

1!iS 17 3rs 3 1/2 1 •,,

5',,

as.• 24 3, , 1'1! 13'/z

16 '/e

6 3/• 16$/•

71fe 11 1/e

1~

6 '12

7$11

•• •• ••

•• •

••


81

SLOPERS AND REDUCTION S C HAPTER 4

JUNIOR SIZE STRETCHY KNIT REDUCTIONS Three percent smaller tn crossw· Us<' these measurements wh n ~e d~rectlon Without any reduct1ons 1n lengthwise d~rect1on. Multiply your across measu e rafttng slopers for fabncs that stretch from 50% to 75%. w1ll have tw111 tape to stab•il~e~ents by 0.97. 3% smaller. except for the shoulder measurement. because the final garment e e seam and prevent 1t from stretchtng. Extra Large Large Medium Small Multiply by Extra Small

1 2 3 4

5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23

Bust Wa1st H1p Crotch depth Wa1st to knee Wa1st to ankle Ankle Knee Front crotch Back crotch Crotch angle Nape to watst Back neck Back neck nse Shoulder length Across back Sleeve length Shoulder pttch B1cep Wnst Neck Bust span Bust level

97 .97 " 97

X

X

No reduct1on No reduct1on No reduct1on

.97 X .97 ' .97 X .97 X

g7 No reduct1on No reduct1on X

.97

X

No reduct1on

.97

X

No reduct1on

.97 .97 .97 .97 .97

X X X X X

No reduction

6

10

31 24 • 34 10 • 22'·•

33 26 • 35 •

35 28'1• 37 7 18

37 !'o't'

10'.1:;-

10 3 /4

38 1 /.a 7 ' II\ 13 '•

23'.'• 3 38 ·• 8 1~ 13 31.

2'/• 2''• 1 15 3 /e 2 3 /e

3 1 'le 15 '1• 2%

23 % 39 11• a% 14 'I• 2 '1• 3 '17 1 'I• 16 31• 2'/• 1 5% 8 23 7/e 1'12 11 7ls 6'1• 15 % 6'1• 10 '12

1

2 1;..

'I•

';.

4 7/e 7'1• 23% 1 113 10% 5 '/• 14 'I• 6% 9%

5 7% 23% 1% 11 'Is 6 14 31· 6% 10

18

14

2

31 40'1• 11 23% 39 31• 9 14% 2'12 3 31• 1 217 16 71• 2 71e 1 5'1e a% 24 'I• 1 '12 12 % 6% 16 7 11

40 31· 34 43 % 11 11• 23 71• 40'1• 9% 15'1• 2'1• 3% 1% 17% 3 '12 1 'I• 5'/• B'l• 24 % 1 '12 13% 6% 16'12 7% 11 '12

JUNIOR SUPER-STRETCH KNIT REDUCTIONS Five percent smaller tn crosswise direction without any reductions in lengthwise direction. Use these measurements when drafttng slopers for fabrics that stretch from 75% to 100%. Multiply your across measurements by 0.95, 5% smaller, except for the shoulder measurement, because the final garment will have twill tape to stabilize the seam and prevent it from stretching. Small Extra Small Multiply by 6 2

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23

Bust Waist Hip Crotch depth Waist to knee Waist to ankle Ankle Knee Front crotch Back crotch Crotch angle Nape to waist Back neck Back neck rise Shoulder length Across back Sleeve length Shoulder pitch Bicep Wrist Neck Bust span Bust level

.95 X .95 X .95 X

No reduction No reduction No reduction

X .95 X .95 X .95 X .95 X .95 No reduction No reduction

X .95 No reduction

X .95 No reduction

X .95 X .95 X .95 X .95 X .95 No reduction

30% 23 31• 33'1• 10 '1• 22'1• 38 '1• 7 '12 13 2 2 31• 1 15% 2%

'I• 4 '/s 7 '1• 23% 1% 10 11• 5% 13'1• 6'1• 9%

32 '1• 25% 35'1• 10 112 23'1• 38 31• 8 13% 2'1• 3 1 15 7ls 2%

'Is 5 7% 23% 1% 11 5'1• 14% 6'h 9 71•

Medium

Large

Extra Large

10

14

18

34 'I• 27 '12 37 10 31· 23% 39'1• 8% 13 '1• 2% 3 1 11s 16% 2 '/. 1 5% 8 23'1s 1% 11 'Is 6 15 6 31• 10%

37 30% 39% 11 23% 39'/. 9 14 % 2'12 3% 1'1• 16'1• 2 71• 1 5% 8% 24 '1• 1 1h 12% 6'1• 15% 7 10 31·

39 71• 33 '1• 42 31· 11 'I• 23 71s 40 '1• 9% 14 'I• 2% 3 '1• 1% 17 % 3'12 1 'Is 5 '/s 8 31• 24% 1 1h 13 6'h 16'1• 7'1• 11'1•


t

H A P T ER

SLOPERS AND REDUCTIONS

-.

----~----------= oo%

JUNIOR RIB KNIT REDUCTIONS

ns ,n lengthwise direction. - ---. h1 and over. · n w1thout any reductiO Tt>n pe,ce.,t smaller tn crosswtse dtrectiO 1 ers for fabncs that stretc h Jder measuremen t. because the final Use these measurements when drafttng sop 9ar. 10 % smaller. except for the_s ou Multtply your ac,oss measurements by 0.90. and prevent It from stretCh ing. - - - -........__ ment "'"have tw•!l tape to stabil1ze the seam Small Medium Large Extra Multiplyby ExtraSmall 10 1~ 2 6 ~

• •

~.

l"" •

3~0~·~~.~--~26 ==========~-:--' -.90; -;:;--------;~;:----: 32~'I•% 2 1 2

3 4 5 6

7 8 9

10 '1

'2 1'3 14

'5 16 17 •8

19 20 21 22 23

Bust Wa•st Htp Crotch depth Wa•st to knee Wa•st to ankle Ankle Knee Front crotch Sac• crotch Crotch angle Nape to wa•st Back neck Back neck nse Shoulder ler1gth Across back Sleeve length Sl'louloer pttch B•cep Wnst Neck Bust span Bust level

, .90 ' 90

No reduction No reduct1on No reduct1on

' .90 ' .90 .90 ' .90

' go

No reduction No reduct1on

28 3,,

24 ';,

2 •;, 31 10 '.. ''•

3 3 'I• 10 'h

~~ ,_': 7 12 ,1, 2 2'1• 1

15 3.~8

2 3/8 "

%

'Is

4 '1•

5 7% 23 % 1 21r 10 % 5'12 13 % 6 11s 9%

90 No reduc t1on

.90 No reduction X .90

.90 X .90

X .90 X .90 No reduction

23 '1•

38 314 7 'h 12 % 2 2 31• 1 15 718 2%

7 'I• 23 % 1 'I• 9%

5'1•

13 11s 6 7

8 la

35 'Is 10 31· 23 % 39 'I• 8 13 'Is 2'1• 3 1 16% 3 2 'j, 1 5% 8 23 71s 1 '13 11 5% 14 '1• 6% 9%

35 'Is 28{• 37 ;, 11 23 % 39 '1• 8 'h 13 % 2% 3 'Ia 1 'Is 162 '1s 1' 1 /8

5% 8 '13 24 'Is 1% 11 "!. 6 14 % 6% 10 '1•

. 3317;;----,,; ,• 40 '; 11 '/ 23';, II

40'~'

S·j: 14 2';, 3';, 1•;, 17'1. 3';, 1'A 571, 831, 24'1. 13;, 12'1. 6'1. 15 3/, 63/c 10 3/ •

----------------------------------------------

JUNIOR FOUR-WAY-STRETCH KNIT REDUCTIONS Ten percent smaller n crossw1se d1rect1on and 10% smaller in the lengthwise direction. Use these measurements when drafting slopers for fabrics that stretch 100% in both directions. Multiply your measurements by 0.90, 10% smaller, in both directions, except for the shoulder measurement, because the fmal \!arment w111 have twill tape to stabilize the seam and prevent it from stretching. Multiply by 1

2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9

10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22

23

Bust Waist H1p Crotch depth Waist to knee Waist to ankle Ankle Knee Front crotch Back crotch Crotch angle Nape to waist Back neck Back neck rise Shoulder length Across back Sleeve length Shoulder pitch Bicep Wrist Neck Bust span Bust level

.90 X .90 X .90 X .90 X .90 X .90 X .90 X .90 X .90 X .90 X .90 X .90 X

No reduction No reduction No reduction No reduction No reduction No reduction

X .90 X .90 No reduction

X .90 X .90

Small

2

6

10

14

18

28"/. 22 '12 31 %

29 % 23 % 32%

30 % 24 '1•

31 '12 25 '1• 34 'I• 10 22 37

32'1s 26 '/s 35 '/s 10'/8 22 '/• 37 '/•

7%

8 13 1/ S

9% 21 % 36% 7 12 '!. 2 3 1 14% 2%

% 4'/s 7 '1· 23 % 1%

9% 5'1• 14 % 6 9%

9 71a 21 71a 36% 7% 12 112 2

3 1 11a 14 71a 2% 7 1a 5

7% 23 112 1%

10 5% 14 71a

6 9%

Medium

33'1• 10 22 36 71a 7'12 12 % 2 3 1 '1a 15 2% 71a 5

7% 23% 1 112

10% 5 '12 15'1• 6 '/a

9%

Large

Extra Large

Extra Small

13 2 1la

3'1a 1 '1• 15 % 2%

% 5'1·

7%

23% 1 1/2

10 31• 5% 15%

6'1. 10

2''•

3 '1•

1'·• 1

15

''

2'1• 1

5 3.'s 8 23'i 1'f. 11 5 3/•

15'.4 •'~' ~

• I I I I

I I I I I

I 1


SLOPERS AND REDUCT IONS

83

C HAPTER 4

Petite Size Reductions PETITE STABLE KNIT REDUCTIONS Zero percent smaller in crosswise d~re . . . . Use these measurements when dr ft Ctlon Without any reductions m lengthwise d~rect1on.

-

-

-

Multiply you r across measurement~ ~ng, slopers for fabrics that stretch from 0% to 25%. Will have tw111 tape to stabilize th Y • 0% smaller, except for the shoulder measurement. because the f1nal garment e seam and prevent 11 from stretchmg. Extra Large Large Medium Multiply by Extra Small Small

1 2

3 4 5 6 7 8

g

10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23

Bust Waist H1p Crotch depth Waist to knee Wa1st to ankle Ankle Knee Front crotch Back crotch Crotch angle Nape to wa1st Back neck Bac k neck rise Shoulder length Across back Sleeve length Shoulder pitch Bicep Wrist Neck Bust span Bust level

X

0

xo

0 No reduction No reduct1on No reduct1on

"-0

xo XG xo

"- 0 No reduction No reduction

xo xo No reduction xo xo xo xo xo No reduction

No reduction

6

33' 25'' 36'·,

s~~a

13

1 '•

2 'Ia 2 Ia 1 14 3/. 2'1•

'I•

4 'I• 7 '1• 21 'I• 1% 10% 5 31· 13 % 6% 9%

10 ''8

21 >ta 37'Je

6 Is 13 '1• 2'1· 3 1 'Ia 15 11• 2%

'I•

5 7 '/o 21 'h 1 31• 11 'I• 6 '12 14 6 7la

9%

18

14 38', 30 1h 41 'h 10 '1• 22 'I• 38''• 7'!. 14 ':, 2'1e 3'h 1% 16 11• 2 3/o

10

2

31 23 1 ·.34' ., 10 ta 21 'r, 36'

35'h 27 •t, 38 •;, 10% 21 7ls 37 % 7 '/• 14 '/• 2% 3 '1• 1 'I• 15 3/• 2%

41

'

44 11:>

11 'I• 22 1/e 38% 7'/o 15 1/.1 2 1 1..

3 311 1'/• 16 3/• 2' ' }

'I•

'~<

%

5% 8 '1• 22'/.1 1 'h 13% 8 31• 14 '/. 7 71• 10%

5% 8 22 1 1h 12% 8 14 'h 7'1• 10 'Is

5'/• 7'/. 21 3/• 1% 11 'I• 7'1• 14 'I• 7 9 '1•

1

33'h

PETITE SIZE MODERATE KNIT REDUCTIONS Two percent smaller in crosswise direction without any reductions in lengthwise direction. Use these measurements when drafting slopers for fabrics that stretch from 25% to 50%. Multiply your across measurements by 0.98, 2% smaller, except for the shoulder measurement, because the final garment wi ll have twill tape to stabilize the seam and prevent it from stretching. Extra Large Large Medium Small Extr a Small Multiply by

2 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23

Bust Waist Hip Crotc h depth Waist to knee Waist to ankle Ankle Knee Front c rotch Back c rotch Crotc h angle Nape to waist Back nec k Back neck rise Shoulder length Ac ross bac k Sleeve length Shoulder pitch Bic ep Wrist Nec k Bust span Bust level

X .98 X .98 X .98 No reduction No reduction No reduc tion

X .98 X .98 X .98 X .98 X .98 No reduction No reduction

X .98 No reduction

X .98 No reduction

X .98 X .98 X .98 X .98 X .98 No reduction

30 '1• 23 33 31• 10'1• 21 % 36 % 6'/2 13 2 '1• 2'1• 1 14 % 2'1• % 4'1• 7 '/• 21 '/• 1% 10 '/• 5% 13 112 6% 9'/•

6 32 '1• 25 35 31• 10% 21 'Is 37 '1• 6 31• 13 % 2'1• 3 1 '1• 15'1• 2% % 5 7 '12 21 112 1% 11 6% 13 3/• 6%

9%

18

14

10 34 31· 27 37 31• 10 % 21 'I• 37 % 7 14 2'1• 3'1• 1 '1• 15 31• 2%

'I• 5 '1• ' 7 ·1· 21 >;. 1% 11 'Is 7 '/• 14

7 9%

3

37 1· 29 '1• 40% 10 71• 22'1• 38 '1• 7'1• 14 % 2 '/2 3% 1 '1• 16 11• 2%

40% 32 71e 43% 11 'I• 22 % 38% 7'12 14 'Ia 2'1< 3% 1% 16"1. 2'12

3j.

'Is

5% 8 22 1 '/2 12% 1 7/o 14 '/•

5%

7'1• 10

8'1• 22 '/ • 1 'h 13 1/o

8% 14 '/2

7%

10 ' 1a


$4

l HAPTEA 4

SLOPERS AND REDUCTIONS

I

PETITE STRETCHY KNIT REDUCTIONS . . direction. -d ctions In lengthWISe o Three percent smaller 1n crosswise direct1on w1thout any re u stretch from 50% to 75 Yo. ecause the fin 1 for the shoulder measurement, b Use these measurements when draft,ng slopers for fabncs that al 9arlllent MuJt,ply your across measurements by 0.97. 3% smaller. ex~~fetchmg. v.ill have tw1ll tape to stabil1ze the seam and prevent 11 from Medium Large E~ s 11 Small ------..::_arg6 Multiply by Extra ma 10 14 18--.o..... 2 1

2

3 4

5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12

13 14 15 16 17

18 19 20 21 22

23

Bust Wa1st H1p Crotch depth Wa1st to knee Wa1st to ankle Ankle Knee Front crotch Back crotch Crotch angle Nape to wa<st Bacl< neck Back neck nse Shoulder length Across bac• Sleeve length Shouloer p<tch Steep Wnst

Nee' Bust span Bust evel

97 97 ' 97 No reduct1on No reduct1on No reduction 97 .97 " .97 X .97 ' 97 No reduct1on No reduction X .97 No reduction X 97 No reduct1on .97 .97 97 X .97 X .97 No reduction X

30 '

~~

33'1• 1 118 0 1 21 ' 1' 36' 18• 6' 12 '" 2 2~

1 14'••

2' '• , 1,

4'18 7'1• 21 '1• 1 '1• 10 5% 13% 6% 9

,.• ••• •• ••.

~~;.;

34 % 26%

10 , 18 21 s;. 37 ,1a

10% 21 'Ia 37 %

13 'I•

13 '/. 2 3/s 3 '1• 1 '1s 15 '/. 2 3la

6

~%

6%

2,/" 3 1 '1a 15 '1• 2'1• '/.

5 7 '1a 21 112 1% 10 31· 6 '1• 13 % 6% 9%

~%

7

'I•

37%~ 29:1·

~~

10 '1• 22 'Ia 38'1a 7 'Ia 14 'I• 2 ,h 3% 1 1 1• 16 '1• 3 2 1s

'!.

7 '/. 21 ';. 1% 11'12 7 13 'Ia

5% 8 22 1% 12'1• 7'/. 14

9%

9 7ls

5 '1•

6~

7~

32';,

~~ 11 ';,

22 3; 8

38';, 7'1. 14 3;, 23;. 3';, 1';, 16 3;, 2 1;, 7/o 5'1. 8'/•

22 '1• 1 'h 13 8 ';, 14 '/•

7'1. 10

PETITE SUPER-STRETCH KNIT REDUCTIONS

1 2

3 4 5 6 7 8 9

10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18

19 20 21 22

23

Bust Wa1st H1p Crotch depth Wa1st to knee Wa1st to ankle Ankle Knee Front crotch Back crotch Crotch angle Nape to waist Back neck Back neck rise Shoulder length Across back Sleeve length Shoulder pitch Bicep Wrist Neck Bust span Bust level

X .95

X .95 X .95 No reduction No reduction No reduction

X .95 X .95 X .95 X .95 X .95 No reduction No reduction

X .95 No reduction

X .95 No reduction

X .95 X .95 X .95 X .95 X .95 No reduction

Extra Small

Small

Medium

2

6

10

14

18

30 22 % 32'1. 10 '1e 21 % 36 % 6'1• 12'12 2 2%

31 71e 24'1• 34 % 10 % 21% 37'1• 6'12 13 2 '1• 2 7la 1

33%

36%

39% 31 7/e

1

14 % 2'1·

% 4 71a 7'1· 21'1•

1 '1• 9 71e 5'12 13 6'1• 9

•• •• •• • •

F1ve percent smaller <n crosswise direct1on w1thout any reductions in lengthwise direction. Use these measurements when draft1ng slopers for fabrics that s tretch from 75% to 100%. Mu1t1ply your across measurements by 0.95, 5% smaller, except for the shoulder measurement, because the final garment Will ha~'" tape to stabilize the seam and prevent it from stretching. Multiply by

•• •• •

15 ~

2%

% 5 7'/, 21'12 1% 10 % 6 '1a 13'1.

6'12 9'1e

Large

26'1•

29

36% 10 % 21 71e 37 % 6%

39 % 10 71e

13 112 2~

3 1 '1e 3 15 1· 2%

'I•

5'1a

7% 21% 1% 11 % 7

6 1a

13'12 6 31. 9%

22'1• 38 '1•

7 14

2'12

Extra Large

42 '1• 11 '/• 22% 38 5/a

7'1• 14 3/7 2 5/e

1 '1• 16 '1•

3'h 1% 16 3/•

2%

2'h

3%

'I•

5%

8 22 1%

'I•

s'ls

8'1• 22'1• 1'/2

13 31.

12 3/• a% 14

7 9%

7'1\ 9'.4

12

7%

• • •

•• ••

•• •• •


SLOPERS AND REDUCTIONS

85

CHAPTER 4

PETITE RIB KNIT REDUCTIONS Ten percent smaller in crosswise d ' . . Use these measurements when d ~~~Ctlon Wi thout any reductions in lengthwise direct1on. Multiply your across measureme ~a ~ng slopers for fabrics that stretch 100% and over. ment will have twill tape to stabili~esthy 0 ·9 0. 10% smaller, except for the shoulder measurement, because the final gare seam and prevent it from stretching. Multiply by Extra Small Small Large Extra Large Medium

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 g 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23

Bust Waist Hip Crotch depth Waist to knee Waist to ankle Ankle Knee Front c rotch Back crotch Crotch angle Nape to waist Back neck Back neck ri se Shoulder length Across bac k Sleeve length Shoulder pitch Bicep Wrist Neck Bust span Bust level

X .90 X .90 X .90 No reduction No reduction No reduction X .90 X .90 X .90 X .90 X .90 No reduction No reduction X .90 No reduction X _go No reduction X .90 X .90 X .90 X .90 X .90 No reduction

2

6

10

14

18

28 % 21 'le 31 10 '1e 21 % 36% 11 71e 2 2% 1 14 31· 2 '1•

30 '1• 23 32 7le 10 31e 21% 37 '1• 6 '1· 12 % 2 2'1. 1 15 'I• 2 3le 5 7 'h 21 •;, 1 'I• 10 5 71e 12 % 6 '1• 8%

34 % 27 •;, 37 % 10 71e 22 '1• 38 'le 6% 13 '1• 2% 3 'le 1 'le 16 '1• 2% 'I• 5% 8 22 1% 11 % 7 '1• 13 6 31· 9 '1e

37 'Ia 30 '1e 40 11 •;. 22 '1• 38 % 6 7lo 13 % 2 •;, 3%

4 71a 7 '1• 21 'I• 1 'I• 9% 5 '1• 12 % 6 8 •;,

32 24 % 34 % 10% 21 7le 37% 6% 12 31• 2 '1• 2 7le 1 15 31• 2% 'I• 5 'le 7'1. 21 % 1 'I• 10'/. 6 112 12 71e 6% 8 7le

6

>;.

>;.

1 1/a

16 31· 2 'h 'Ia 5% 8 '1• 22 '1• 1% 12 7 '1• 13 '1• 7 9%

PETITE FOUR-WAY- STRETCH KN IT REDUCTIONS Ten percent smaller in crosswise direction and 10% smaller in the lengthwise direction. Use these measurements when drafting slopers for fabrics that stretch 100% in both directions. Multiply your across measurements by 0.90, 10% smaller, except for the shoulder measurement, because the final garment will have twill tape to stabilize the seam and prevent it from stretching. Multiply by

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21

22 23

Bust Waist Hip Crotch depth Waist to knee Waist to ankle Ankle Knee Front c rotch Back c rotch Crotch angle Nape to waist Back neck Back nec k rise Shoulder length Across back Sleeve length Shoulder pitc h Bicep Wri st Neck Bust span Bust level

No No No No No No

No

X .90 X .90 X _go X .90 X .90 X .90 X .90 X .90 X .90 X _go X .90 X .90 reduction reduction reduction reduction reduction reduction X .90 X _gO reduction X .90

X .90

Extra Large

Extra Small

Small

Medium

Large

2

6

10

14

18

28 % 21 11a 31 9% 20 '1• 34 % 6 11 7/a 2 2 7/a 1 14 2 '1•

29 '1• 22 32 9 31· 20 % 35 6 12 2 3 1 'Ia 14 '/• 2% 'I• 5 7% 21 % 1%

30 'Ia 23 32 7la 9 7la 20 '12 35 'I• 6'1• 12 % 2 3 1 1/a 14 '1> 2% 'I• 5 7'12 21 112 1'1• 10 5 '1• 14 6 '11

31 23 71a 33 3/ • 10 20 51s 35 112 6 1-'4

32 24 3 ' 34 's 10 20 J· 3 35 •

1 2 11~

9 '/o

9 '14

12 • 2's 3 '. 1'• 15 2'• J' 5'• 7' ' 3 21 " 1% 1Q•,. 6 ':! 14 11• 6 '1•

% 4 'Ia

7 '1• 21 'I• 1% 9% 5 'I• 13 '/. 6 9

9·1· 5 '12 13 '1• 6 9

2 '/a 3 ' ·s 1 1.8

14 3 /, 2 ':• 'I• 5 7.,. 21 5 :a 1 J/8 10%

6 ''•

14 1/a 6 '1•

s ~~ 3

s•.-.


~t\

l'HAt'l tR 4

SLOPERS AND REDUCTIONS

Misses Tall Reductions MISSES TALL STABLE KNIT REDUCTIONS

.

thwise d 1rection.

•• •• •• •• ~ • .• ••

Ml

--.....

h t any reduct1ons m leng 25o/c0 · ment because the final Zero percent smaller 1n crossw1se directiOn Wit ~u r fabrics that stretch from 0% to Use these measurements when draft1ng slopers ~mailer. except for the shoulder measure ' 9arll1ent 5 Multiply your across measurements by 0.9 5· % tit from stretching. Will have tw111 tape to stabiliZe the seam and preven Medium Large Extra La 11 Multiply by Extra Small s:a 10 14 ~ 2

1

2 3 4 5 6

7 8 9 10 11

12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23

Bust Wa1st H1p Crotch depth Wa1st to knee Wa1st to ankle Ankle Knee Front crotch Back crotch Crotch angle Nape to wa1st Back neck Back neck nse Shoulder length Across back Sleeve length Shoulder p1tch B1cep Wnst Neck Bust span Bust level

.95 X .95 .95 X

No reduct1on No reduct1on No reduct1on

95 .95 95 95 ... 95 No reduction No reduct1on

.95 No reduction

95 No reduct1on

.95 .95 )( .95 X .95 X .95 X X

No reduction

~~ > 35 '. 11 r, ~~ 4

~ ;: 13 ''• 2 ''• 3 1 'i• 16 ''• 2 '1s

'I•

4'18 7'12 24% 1'12 10 %

5 118 14 % 6 31· 10 31·

34 ''> 26' '> 37'/2 11 '12 24 ''• 41 % 8 'Is 14 'Is 2% 3 1ls 1 'I• 17 % 2 112 'Is 5 7% 24% 1% 11 % 6% 15 7 11

36'/2 28'/2 39'/2 11 31• 25'1• 41 'Is 8% 14 % 2'12 3 11• 1 'I• 17 7ls 2'12

% 5'1s 8 'Is 24 7ls 1% 12 1ls 7% 15 '1s 7 '1• 11 '1•

39'/2 31 '/2 42'12 12 25% 3/ 42 '" 8% 15 'I• 2% 3'12 1% 18% 2% 'Is 5% 8 '12 25 'Is 1% 12 '1s 8'1s 15 % 7% 11 '12

34 ';, 45 ';, 12'1• 25'1. 42 7; 8 8 7/a 15% 7 2 3/o 3 /, 1 'Ia 7 18 /a 2% 7 /a 5% 7 8 /a 25% 1'I• 13% 8'/a 15% 8 11 '/.

MISSES TALL MODERATE KNIT REDUCTIONS Two percent smaller m crosswise direction without any reductions in lengthwise direction. Use these measurements when drafting slopers for fabrics that s tretc h from 25% to 50%. Mult1ply your across measurements by 0.98, 2% smaller, except for the shou lder measurement, because the final garment Will have tw111 tape to stabi11ze the seam and prevent it from stretching. Multiply by

1 2

3 4

5 6 7 8 9 10 11

12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20

21 22

23

Bust Waist Hip Crotch depth Waist to knee Waist to ankle Ankle Knee Front crotch Back crotch Crotch angle Nape to waist Back neck Back neck rise Shoulder length Across back Sleeve length Shoulder pitch Bicep Wrist Neck Bustspan Bust level

X .98 X .98 X .98 No reduction No reduction No reduction

X .98 X .98 X .98 X .98 X .98 No reduction No reduction

X .98 No reduction

X .98 No reduction

X .98 X .98 X .98

X.98 X.98

No reduction

Extra Small

Small

Medium

Large

Extra Large

2

6

10

14

18

31 7ls 24 34 31· 11 'I• 24 % 40 71s

33 '/. 26 36'/. 11 '12 24 'Is 41%

35 '/. 28 38'/. 11 '/. 25 '1• 41 '1s

38 31· 30 7la 41% 12 25 %

41 s;. 33 '/• 44 % 12 '/• 25% 42 7/e

7'/. 13 % 2'1• 2 71s 1 16 71s 2'12

'I•

4 '1• 7 112

24% 1 '12 10% 5 31.

14%

6'1. 10'1.

8

8'!.

13'1• 2'1·

14%

42 % 8'12 14 7la

2%

3

2%

3'1•

1

1 'Ia

17 % 2'12

'I•

5

7'1. 24% 1'12 11 'Ia 6'12

14% 6 31· 10 31.

1'!. 17 718 2'12

'I•

5'1s 8 '1a 24 71a

1% 11% 7'1• 14 71a

7 11

3 12 1 'I• 18% 2% 7

la 5% 1 8 12

8 3/ • 15 3/e

2 3/• 3'/• 1%

18 7/e

2%

'I•

s%

25'1s

8'.4 25'.4

1% 12%

13 31t

8

15 118 7 318 11

v.

15.4

8 3/• 153.4

1~

,, tA

•• •

•• •• •• •• ••

•• ••

•• •• •• ••

3 4

11 1' 1 1

1

1

1


SLOPERS AND REDUC TI ONS

87

C HAPTER 4

MISSES TALL STRETCHY KN IT REDUCTIONS Three percent smaller in crosswise d' . . Use these measurements when d lrectlon Without any reductions 1n lengthwise direction. raftmg slopers for fabrics that stretch from 50% to 75% Multiply your across meas - h . urements by 0 97 3 o/c · WI11 ave tw111 tape to stabilize th · • o smaller, except for the shoulder measurement, because the final garment e seam and prevent it from stretching. Multiply by Extra Small Small Extra Large Medium Large

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23

Bust Waist Hip Crotch depth Waist to knee Waist to ankle Ankle Knee Front crotch Back crotch Crotch angle Nape to waist Back neck Back neck rise Shoulder length Across back Sleeve length Shoulder pitch Bicep Wrist Neck Bust span Bust level

X X X

.97 .97 .97

No reduction No reduction No reduction X X X X X

.97 .97 .97 .97 .97

No reduction No reduction X

.97

No reduction X

.97

No reduction X X X X X

.97 .97 .97 .97 .97

No reduction

2

6

10

14

18

31 '12 23 '1. 34 % 11 '1· 24% 40 71e 7% 13 '14 2 '1• 2 71e 1 16 71e 2 '12 'I• 4 '1• 7 112 24% 1 '12 10 '/. 5 314 14 114 6 '12 10 %

33 '12 25 31· 36% 11 112 24 71• 41 % 7 71e 13 % 2 114 3 1 '1• 17 % 2 112 'Ia 5 7 314 24% 1 112 11 6% 14 '12 6 314 10 %

35% 27 % 38% 11 '!. 25 '1• 41 'Ia 8 '1• 14 'Ia 2% 3'14 1 '14 17 7le 2 112 'Ia 5 '1• 8'1• 24 71• 1% 11 314 7'1• 14'/. 7 10 71e

38% 30 '12 41'1• 12 25 % 42 % 8% 14 % 2% 3% 1 '14 18 % 2% 'Ia 5% 8'12 25'1• 1% 12'12 7 71• 15 7% 11

41 'I• 33'12 44 '1• 12 '1• 25% 42 718 8% 15 1le 2 314 3% 1% 18 7le 2% 'Ia 5% 8 71• 25 % 1% 13 114 8% 15 '/. 7 314 11 %

MISSES TALL SUPER-STRETCH KNIT REDUCTIONS Five percent smaller in crosswise direction without any reductions in lengthwise direction. Use these measurements when drafting slopers for fabrics that stretch from 75% to 100%. Multi ply you r across measurements by 0.95, 5% smaller, except for the shoulder measurement, because the final garment will have twill tape to stabilize the seam and prevent it from stretching.

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23

Bust Waist Hip Crotch depth Waist to knee Waist to ankl e An kle Knee Front crot ch Back cro tch C rotch angle Nape to waist Back neck Back neck rise Shoulder length Across back Sleeve length Shoulder pitch Bicep Wrist Neck Bust span Bust level

Small

Medium

Large

Extra Large

Multiply by

Extra Small

2

6

10

14

18

X .95 X .95 X .95

30'1• 23'1• 33 31• 11 11• 24 % 40 '1a 7 '12 13 2 '1• 2 31· 1 16 71e 2 '12 'I• 4 71• 7'12 24 % 1 '12 10 5% 14 6% 10 1la

32 31· 25 '1• 35 % 11 112 24 7le 41% 7 314 13 % 2 114 3 1 'I• 17% 2'12 'I• 5 7 314 24% 1 112 10% 6 '1• 14'1• 6% 10%

34 % 27 37 '12 11 31· 25'1• 41 7le 8 13 71e 2% 3'1• 1 'Ia 17 71• 2 '12 'I• 5'1• 8 '1• 24 71• 1 '12 11 'h 7 14 %

37 112 30 40 % 12 25% 42 % 8 '1· 14% 2 '12 3% 1'1• 18 % 2% 'Ia 5% 8 '12 25'1• 1% 12'1• 7 •1· 14% 7 '/a 10 7/a

40 % 32 314 43'1• 12 '1• 25% 42 71• 8% 14 7le 2% 3% 1% 18 7le 2% 'Ia 5% 8 7lo 25% 1% 13 8% 14'/a 7 '1. 11 'Ia

No reduction No reduction No reduction

X X X X X

.95 .95 .95 .95 .95

No reduction No reduction

X .95 No reduction

X .95 No reduction

X .95 X .95 X .95 X ,g5 X ,g5 No reduction

e'la

10 %


ss

CHAPTER 4

,.

,

SLOPERS A ND REDU C TIONS

---

. directiOn . ~ reductions "' lengthwise Ten percent smaller 1n crossw1se direction Wllho~t a~ybncs that stretch 100% and over. m en! because the f 1na1 Qar. Use these measurements when draft1ng slopers or a except for the shoulder m easure ' 11 Multtply your across measurements b\ 0.90. 10% sm~e~~· 11 from stretching. ment wtll have ""II tape to stabtli=e the seam and pre Medium Large Extra l~ Sma 11 ~rge E x t ra small Multiply by o 14 ~

MISSES TALL RIB KNIT REDUCTIONS

-----~===-------------~~--------~ 325% 2~~ 29 ~------;;~------~ •,, ~; •; ' .90 1 Bust 2 3 4 5 6 7

8 9

10

,,

'2 13 '4

'5 '6 17 18

19 20 21 22 23

Watst H1p Crotch oepth Wa1st to ~nee Wa,st to ankle Ankle Knee F'o~t crotch Back crotch C•ot~r angle NaP<" to wa:st Ba:• ~eel< Sac .... neck nse Shoulde' .englh Ac•oss bac~ S e9'~e length

Shoulder p.tcn B1cep Wnst

Ne.:r. Bust span Bust ie,el

' .90 '.90

~~ ;:~~~::~~

No reductton

' 90 ' 90 90 '· 90 .90 No reductton No reduction No

r:d~~tton 90

'· No reductton v .90 X .90 ".90 X .90 X .90 No reduction

8

22 32

33 "I• 11 'h

35 'h 11 3/.1

0 ·a 7 12 ';, 2 2';• 1 16'~ , 2 12

7 'Ia 123'I•4 2 '/a 2 '/s 1 17 3'a " 2 'l2

7 'h 13 1/a 2'/• 3 1 '/a 17 7/a 2 '12

;~ ::: 4

7 Ia

4 'Ia 7 '12 24 3," 8 1% 9% 5'1• 13 '1• 6 9%

18

1

6

2

~~ ~

'Ia

5

7'1. 24% 1 'Ia 10 '1• 6 13 % 6% 9 7/s

~~ ;~:

35'/~ 31 '

- 28 1/o 38 '1.• 12

'Ia 5 'Is 8 '1s 24 7ls 1 '12 11 6% 13 %

6'12 10

~

Jilt II ll 1

11 11

1

1

41

•' •

12 ';,

~~ ~:

~~~:

16

2';,

3'1. 1';. 18 7/ 8

. •

7 'I• 132 % 31

It

8 14

3'/• 1 '/., 18% 2 5Ia 7 /s 5 8 12 25'1a 'I 1 2 11 % 7% 7 13 1a 6% 10 '1•

Y•

• •

2% 'Ia

5% 8 7/o 25% 1'h 12 '/•

8 14 7 '/a 10 '12

MISSES TALL FOUR-WAY-STRETCH KNIT REDUCTIONS Ten percent smaller tn crossw1se dtreclton and 10% smaller in the lengthwise direction. Use these measurements when drafttng slo pers for fabrics that stretch 100% in both directions. Multiply your measurements by 0.90, 10% smaller, in both directions.

1 2 3 4

5 6 7 8 9

10 11

12 13 14 15 16 17 18

19 20 21 22 23

Bust Watst Hip Crotch depth Watst to knee Watst to ankle Ankle Knee Front crotch Back crotch Crotch angle Nape to waist Back neck Back neck rise Shoulder length Across back Sleeve length Shoulder pitch Btcep Wrist Neck Bust span Bust level

Multiply by

Extra Small

2 " .90 X .90 y .90

29 '1•

23 '12

23% 39'1• 7% 12 % 2'1s 3 11s 1 '1a

" .90

X .90 X .90 X

.90

X .90 X .90

X .90

X .90 X .90 No reduction No reduction No reduction No reduction No reduction No reduction

X .90 X

.90

No reduction

X .90 X .90

22 32 10 31· 23 % 38 7/a 7 12'1, 2 3

1 'Ia 16 2'12

'Ia 4%

7'12 24 31e 1'/, 9% 5'1. 14% 6 10'1•

Small

Extra Lar!_

Medium

Large

6

10

14

18

30 '1s 23 32 71a 10 31,

31 23 71s 33 %

32 24 % 34 % 11 23 %

32 7/e 25% 35'12 11 '/& 23 7/a 39'/•

39 7 'I• 12 112

2 3 1 'Ia

16'1 ·

2'12 'Ia 5

7% 24'12 1 '12 10 5% 14 31. 6'1a 10'1•

11

1

16 12 2'12 7 1a 5 731· 24% 1% 10'1· 6

15 6'1• 10%

39'12

7% 13 2 1l s

3 'I• 1 'I• 16 %

2'12 7

1s

5 8 24 31· 1%

10% 6'1• 15 6% 10'..1!

7'/2 13 '/s

22/s 3% 1 '/• 17

2'h

'I•

5'Is 8'/a 24 7/a 16/s 11 6~.. 15\4

e'.4

-~

••• •• •• •• •• •• •

• I I I I I

I I

I


SLOPERS A ND REDUCTIONS

89

CHAPTER 4

Women's Size Reductions WOMEN 'S STABLE KNIT REDUCTIONS Zero percent smaller in crosswi . . . Use these measurements whe s~ d;rectlon W1t11out any reductions 1n 1engthw1se direction. Multiply your across measu n ra hng slopers for fabrics that stretch from 0% to 25%. will have twill tape to stabili;:r;;,ents by 1• 0% smaller, except for the shoulder measurement, because the f1nal garment e seam and prevent 11 from stretching. Multiply by Extra Small Small Medium Large Extra L arge

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23

Bust Waist Hip Crotch depth Waist to knee Waist to ankle Ankle Knee Front crotch Back crotch Crotc h angle Nape to waist Back neck Back neck rise Shoulder length Across back Sleeve length Shoulder pitch Bic ep Wrist Neck Bust span Bust level

xo xo xo No reduction No reduction No reduction

xo xo xo xo xo

No reduction No reduction

xo xo No reduction xo xo xo xo xo

No reduction

No reduction

2

6

10

14

18

43 35 46 11 3/. 24 38% 10 18 1/a 2 7/a 3 7/a 1 1h 16 % 3 1 5% 8% 23 7/a 1 112 14 '12 7 1/e 17 '/• 8 12 1/•

47 39 50 15 3/. 24 1/• 38 7/e 10 1h 18 % 3% 4 1/e 1% 17 1/a 3 '/, 1% 5% 8 7/a 24 '/a 1% 15 1/• 7 7/a 18 8'/• 12 3/•

51 43 54 19% 24 '/, 39 '/e 11 18 % 3 7/e 4'h 1% 17 % 4 1 317 5 7/e 9 24 % 2 16 8% 18% 8 '12 13 '!.

55 47 58 23 >;. 24 3/. 39 '/e 11 'h 18 7/e 4% 4 7/a 2 18 1/a 4 'h 1 1h 6 9% 24 % 2 '1• 16 3/. 9% 19 112 8% 13 '/.

59 51 62 27 "/• 25 39 ''• 12 19 '/e 4 71• 5 1/a 2% 18 % 5 1 ';, 6 '/a 9 ''• 24 7/e 2 '. 17'r, 10 1 1&

20 ' ' 9 1,j' '

WOMEN'S MODERATE KNIT REDUCTIONS Two percent smaller in crosswise direction without any reductions in lengthwise direction. Use these measurement s when drafting slopers for fabrics that stretch from 25% to 50%. Multiply your across measurements by 0.98, 2 % smaller, except for the shoulder measurement, because the final garment will have twill tape to stabilize the seam and prevent it from stretching. Multiply by

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23

Bust Waist Hip Crotch depth Waist to knee Waist to ankle Ankle Knee Front crotch Bac k crotc h Crotch angle Nape to waist Bac k nec k Back neck rise Shoulder length Across back Sleeve length Shoulder pitch Bicep Wrist Nec k Bust span Bust level

--

X .98 X .98 X .98 No reduction No reduction No reduction

X X X X X

.98 .98 .98 .98 .98

No reduc tion No reduc tion

X .98 No reduction

X .98 No reduction

X X X X X

.98 .98 .98 .98 .98

No reduction

Extra Small

Small

Medium

Large

2

6

10

14

18

42 1/a 34 '1• 45 11 3/• 24 38% 9% 17 3/. 2 7/a 3% 1% 16% 3 1 5% 8% 23 7/e 1 1h 14 1/ • 7 16 7/o 7 7/o 12

46 38 '/• 49 15% 24 '/• 38 7/e 10 1/4 18 3 '/, 4 1 '/• 17 1/a 3 1h 1% 5 31· 8 7/a 24 1/a 1 3;, 15 7% 17 % 8 12 %

50 42 1/e 53 19 3/• 24'12 39'/a 10 '/. 18 1/• 3 3/• 4% 1% 17% 4 1% 5 7/e 9 24 % 2 15% 8 11> 18%

53 7/e 46 56' s 23 3/• 3 24 3 •• 39 ·8

57's 50 60 3 ' 3 27 ' 25 39 •• 11 3 • 18 3 ' 4 3· 5 2'' 18 5 s 5 1 ~

8'!. 13

11 '·..

18 1 c 4 ,,,.

.,. J,,.

2 18 •

4',

1' z 6 93 s 24 ' . 2'• 16 3 • 914 19

a•··

13''•

Extra Large

s·.

9'e 24 •• 2' 17'• 10 19 3 .14 8'a 14


!>)

'

WOMEN 'S STRETCHY KN IT REDUCTIONS

-

reductoons on lengthwose dorec~~on. r>< rc : 5·n~loer on cross" ose dorectoon wothout any s that stretch from 50% to 75 o. t because the fonal a U~e these measure.,.,ents "hen draftong slopers for fabnc t tor the shoulder measuremen · 9 rrnent "% smaller excep b M ultopl) vour across measurement s >0 ·9 '·" t t ~m stretchonQ 1 \\Ill have tWill :ape :o staboloze tne seam and prevent r -Mediu m La rge Ext ra Larg ll Small- - ~ Multiply by Extra S ma 14 18 10 6

eo

1 2 3 4

5 6 7 8

9 10 11 12

'3 14 '5 16

•7 '8

t9 20 21 22 23

--------9#

Bust Waost H•p Grote!"> depth Waost to kr>ee Wa•st to ar ·le Anke Knee Front crotch Back crot t> CrotM)ange Nape to wast Back 'leek

Back 'leek nse 5h0u der engtl' Ac OSS baCK Seeve eng:h ShOt. :Jer p •cr B:cep Wrst Neck au:• span Bustleve

-11

)( .97 ..... 97

3-l

No reductoon No reouctoon No reduct•on

97 97 97 97

.97 No reductoon 1\Jo reductoon

.97 No reduction

.97 No reductoon ~ ~

2

X

.91 .97 .97

97 97 No reductoon

-15 '

49 '

41''•

53 rs 45''• 56 •;,

49';, 60 •;,

52 'Ia

15 • 241.

19 '·· 241}

~~:I:

16 %

38 '• 10''• 17 tB 3 ;, 4 1'/ • 17 "• "

39'1• 10 % 18 3'·• 4% 1% 17 %

39% 11 % 18 1/, 4 ';. 5 2';, 18 %

3'A

4

39"·• 11 '/• 18 "4 4'/• 4 ';, 2 18 'Is 1

1 5% 8% 23 'Is 1 '12 14 7 16 % 7% 11 7/a

1% 5% 8 7/s 24 'Is 1% 14 % 7% 17 % 8 12'/•

1% 5 7/s 9 24 % 2 15'12 8% 18 1/a 8 '/• 12 3/ •

1 1/2 6 9% 24% 2'/• 16 '/• 9 18 7/a 8'/2 13 •; ,

1 1/, 6 '/s 9% 24 7/s 2';, 17

24

38 9' • '• 17'• 2' • 3 1 18. 3

4 12

~;'1•

5

9 7/s

19 % 8 3/. 13 %

WOMEN 'S SUPER-STRETCH KNIT REDUCTIONS Fov< P' rosswtse dtrectton without any reductions in lengthw ise direc tion . Usethtlse "leas.;•emer.ts when drafttng slopers for fabrics that stretc h from 75% to 100%. Multoply your across measurements by 0.95, 5% smaller, except to r th e shoulder meas ureme nt, because the final garment "'" ha~e twtll tape to stab~ze the seam and prevent tl from stretc hing. M ult tply by 1

:> 3 4 5 6 7 8 9

10 11 12

13

14 15 16 17 18 19

20 21

22 23

Bust Waost Hop Crotch depth Watst to knee Watst to ankle Ankle Knee Front crotch Back crotch Crotch angle Nape to watst Back neck Back neck nse Shoulder length Across back Sleeve length Shoulder pitch Bocep Wrist Neck Bust span Bust level

95 .95 .95 No reductton No reductton No reductton

/ .95 X .95

X .95 X .95

X .95 No reduction No reduction

X .95 No reduction X .95 No reduction

X .95 X .95 X .95 X .95 X .95 No reduction

------~~-----------------------------

Extra Sm a ll

Sma ll

Medium

2

6

10

14

18

40 7/a 33 '/• 43 3/. 11% 24 38 % 9 '12 17 '/• 2 3/, 3% 1% 16% 3

44 % 37 47 '12 15% 24 '1· 38 7/a 10 17'12 3 '/• 4 1 '!. 17 1/a 3 '12 1% 5% 8 7/a 24 1/a 1% 14'12 7 '12 17 7 7/e 12

48 1/2 40 7/a 51 '/• 19 % 24 '12 39 1/a 10 '12 17 % 3% 4 '1• 1% 17 % 4 1% 5 7/a 9 24 % 2 15'; ,

52 '!. 44 % 55 23 % 24 % 39 % 11 18 4 1/a 4% 1 7/e 18 1/e 4 1/2 1 '12

56 48 '12 58 7/a 27 3/• 25 39% 11 % 18 '/a 4%

1

5% 8% 23'1.

1';, 13 3; .

6 3;. 16% 7% 11 %

a•;,

17 3; ,

8 12'12

Large

6 9% 24 %

2'/e 16

9 18'12 8% 13

.. ••

57;---- ~

~~ 1 •

i~;:

... •• •• • I

HAPTI R 4 SLOPERS AND REDUCTIONS

Extra Large

5 2 '/• 18%

5 1'h 6 1/a 9% 24 7/•

2% 16% 9% 19 1/e

8 '/r 13'/r


SLOPERS AND REDUCTIONS

91

CHAPTER 4

WOMEN 'S RIB KNIT REDUCTIONS Ten percent smaller in crosswise d. . . Use these measurements when d 1 ~Gtlon Without any reductions in lengthwise direction. Multiply your across measureme ~a lng slopers for fabrics that stretch 100% and over. ment will have twill tape to stab/ s ~Y 0.90, 10% smaller, except for the shoulder measurement, because the final gar1 IZe I e seam and prevent it from stretching. Multiply by Extra Small Extra Large Large Medium Small

I I I I I

~ ~

~

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23

Bust Waist Hip Crotch depth Waist to knee Waist to ankle Ankle Knee Front crotch Back crotch Crotch angle Nape to waist Back neck Back neck rise Shoulder length Across back Sleeve length Shoulder pitch Bicep Wrist Neck Bust span Bust level

X .90 X .90 X .90

No reduction No reduction No reduction X X X X X

.90 .90 .90 .90 .90

No reduction No reduction X .90

No reduction X .90

No reduction X X X X X

.90 .90 .90 .90 .90

No reduction

2

6

10

14

18

38% 31 '12 41 % 11 % 24 38% 9 16% 2% 3 '12 1 '/• 16 % 3 1 5% 8% 23 7/a 1% 13 6% 15 112 7'/. 11

42'/• 35'/a 45 15 31· 24 '/• 38'1a 9 '/z 16 '12 3 3% 1 1/a 17 1/a 3'12 1% 5>;, 8 7/a 24 1/a 1% 13% 7 16 1/a 7% 11 %

45 'Ia 38 3/ • 48% 19 3/• 24 112 39'/• 10 16 3/• 3 112 4 1 112 17% 4 1% 5 7/a 9 24 % 1 7/a 14 % 7% 16 7/a 7% 11 7/a

49'12 42 '/• 52'/• 23 3/• 24 3/· 39% 10 % 17 4 4% 1 3/• 18 1/a 4 •;, 1 112 6 9% 24 % 2 15 8 '12 17 112 7 7/a 12 %

53'/a 45 7/a ss >;, 27 3/• 25 39 % 10 3/• 17'/• 4% 4% 2 18% 5 1 112 6'1• 9% 24 7/a 2'/• 15 3/• 9 1/a 18'/a 8 12 3/•

WOMEN'S FOUR-WAY-STRETCH KNIT REDUCTIONS Ten percent smaller in crosswise direction and 10% smaller in the lengthwise direction . Use these measurements when drafting slopers for fabrics that stretch 100% in both directions. Multiply your measurements by 0 .90, 10% smaller, in both directions. Multiply by

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23

Bust Waist Hip Crotch depth Waist to knee Waist to ankle Ankle Knee Front crotch Back crotch Crotch angle Nape to waist Back neck Back neck rise Shoulder length Across back Sleeve length Shoulder pitch Bicep Wrist Neck Bust span Bust level

X X X X X X X X X X X X

.90 .90 .90 .90 .90 .90 .90 .90 .90 .90 .90 .90

No reduction No reduction No reduction No reduction No reduction No reduction

x.90 X .90 No reduction

X .90 X .90

Extra Small

Small

Medium

Large

2

6

10

14

18

38>;, 31 1/2 41 % 11 1/e 22 3/• 36% 9 16% 2% 3 '1a 1 '12 15% 3 1 5% 8% 23 'Ia 1'/z 13 6% 17 '/•

40'12 33'/• 43'1• 13 23 36 7/a 9 '1• 16% 2 7/a 4 1 117 16 3 1/4 1% 5% 8 3/• 24 1% 13%

42 '1• 35'1• 45 15 23 37 9'12 16'12 3 4 1/a 1% 16 '/. 3 1/z 1% 5 >;, 8 7/a 24 1/a 1 13 3/• 7 18 7'/o

44 1/a 36'1a 46 % 16 7/a 23 1/a 37 9% 16 % 3 1/4 4% 1 '/z 16 1/z 3% 1% 5 7/a 9 24 '/• 2 14 7 '/o 18% 7'/a 12t/o

45 7/a 38% 48 % 18 3/4 23'1• 37 1/a 10 16% 3 '12 4 '/z 1% 16 % 4 1% 5 7/a 9 24% 2 14%

7'1• 11%

6 3/• 1

17 /a 7% 11 7/o

'I•

1~

Extra Large

7 '1•

183/• 7'A

12'h


!l~

l'liAI'Tl.R 4

SLOPERS AND REDUCTIONS

~:

Plus Size Reductions

~P~L~U~S~S~T~A~B~L~E~K~N~JT~R~E~D~U~C~T~JO~N~S~t:;~~Ztk·~~-~~e~n~g~th~w~is~e~d~ir~e~ct~io~n~.------------

II II

~U~s~e~th~e~s~e;m~e~a~su~r;em;;en~t~s~w~h~e~n~d~ra~ft~in~g~s~lo~~~e~rs~th~~~u~t~an~y~r~e~d~uc~t=io=n=s~-~========~========~4 ~X~=== x 3X 2

II

~ . · · without any reductions 'n o% to 25%. Zero percent smaller in crossw1se direction f r fabrics that stretch from ~se your measurements exactly as recorde

WI

Multiply by

1 X

20

~ II

24

28

41 52 19 % 24 '12 40 'Is 10 % 5 18 3Is 3 31·

45 56 23 % 24 % 40% 11 '1• 18 7le ' 44 51e 14

1% 16 'I• 3% 1% 5% 8 'I•

23

-=====================~;;======--~~1~6------~~------~;-------~~---~ 49 53 57~

-

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9

10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23

Bust Waist Hip Crotch depth Waist to knee Wa1st to ankle Ankle Knee Front crotch Back crotch Crotch angle Nape to waist Back neck Back neck rise Shoulder length Across back Sleeve length Shoulder p1tch Bicep Wnst Neck Bust span Bust level

X X X

O

0 0

No reduction No reduction No reduct1on

0 x o x 0 X 0 X 0 X

No reduction No reduction x 0 No reduct1on

Nore~~ction ~~ X X

x

0 0 0

No reduction

41 33

~~%

24 39 % 9% 18 '1• 2 31• 3% 1 17 2 '/. 1 5'12 % 8 32'1• 1 '12 13% 6% 16% 7% 11 7le

~i

48 15% 24 'I• 39 'Is 10 " 8 ' 18% 3"• ,. 4

1'1• 15 % 3% 1% 5% 8% 32% 1% 14 '12 7 112 17 112 8 12 %

4 Is

32% 2 15 '/.

8'1• 1

18 14 8 'I• 12 'Is

16 I· 4 'I• 1%

5'1•

9 'Is 3 2 :'• 2 I• 16 9 19 8 '12 13 %

.

49

27 'l 2S '

11

6Q

II

40't, 11 ,1• 19 't, 4'/,

11 .

II

5

2'/, 11';, 4,1, 1';, 6 9';, 33';.

2'h

16';. 93;.

19'/, 3

8 1, 13'1•

PLUS MODERATE KNIT REDUCTIONS

••

• •• •.. • • •• •• •• •

Two percent smaller in crosswise direction without any reductions in lengthwise direction. Use these measurements when drafting slopers for fabrics that stretch from 25% to 50%. Multiply your across measurements by 0.98, 2% smaller, except for the shoulder measurem ent, because the final garmerl • will have twill tape to stabilize the seam and prevent it from stretching. Multiply by 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9

10 11 12

13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22

23

Bust Wa1st Hip Crotch depth Waist to knee Waist to ankle Ankle Knee Front crotch Back crotch Crotch angle Nape to waist Back neck Back neck rise Shoulder length Across back Sleeve length Shoulder pitch Bicep Wrist Neck Bust span Bust level

X .98 X .98 X .98 No reduction No reduction No reduction X .98 X .98

X .98 X .98 X .98 No reduction No reduction

X .98 No reduction

X .98 No reduction

X .98 X .98 X .98 X .98 X .98 No reduction

1X

2X

16

20

40 1le 32% 43 '1e

44 '1s 36'1• 47 15 % 24 114 39 71s 10

11 % 24 39 % 9%

17 % 2% 3% 1 17 2% 1 5'12 8% 32'1s 1 112 13 112 6% 16% 7% 11 %

18 3 11s 4 1 '1. 15%

3 '!. 1% 5% 8%

32% 1 31. 14 115 7% 17 11s 7 11a 12 11s

3X

4X

24

28

48

52

40'1a

44'/e 54 7/s 23% 24 % 40%

51 19 % 24 112 40 11s 10%

18 1/ . 3% 4 '1• 1% 16 '/• 3% 1% 5% 8 7/s 32 % 2 15 8 17 7/a 8 12 %

11 18 1/2

4 1/s 4% 2

16% 4 1/• 1% 5 7/s 9 1/s 32 7/s

2 '/• 15%

8 7/a 18 %

8% 13 1/a

sx 32

55'/• 48

58 3/l 27 % 25 40'/1 11 '/s 183/• 45/s

5

2"•

17'1• 4'/•

1'h 6

g'i•

33'"

2'/1 16'"

g'ft

19'.4

.~

~.,.

~


•• II

II

•~ ~ ~

~ ~

• • ~

SLOPERS AND REDU C TION S

93

CHAPTER~

PLUS STRETCHY KNIT REDUCTIONS '""•ee percent smaller rn crosswr

Use these measurements wh se drrectron wrthout any reductrons in lengthwrse drrectron. Multrply your across meas en draftrng slopers for fabrrcs that stretch from 50% to 75%. '"II have twill tape to stabi~;e~ents by 0.97, 3% smaller, except for the shoulder measurement. because the frnal garment e e seam and prevent rt from stretchrng. _ Multiply by 1X sx 2X 3X 4X

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23

Bust Warst Hip Crotch depth Wars! to knee Wars! to ankle Ankle Knee Front crotch Back c rotch Crotch angle Nape to waist Back neck Back neck rrse Shoulder length Across back Sleeve length Shoulder pitch Bicep Wrrst Neck Bust span Bust level

X X

.97 .97 .97

No reduction No reductron No reductron

.97 .97 ".97 X .97 X .97 X X

No reduction No reduction X

.97

16

20

24

39 32 42 5 • 11 24 ' 39 te 9 to 17 2 5/e 3 'h 1 17

43 '. 35 • 46 '. 15 • 24 .• 39 '• 9 ,. 17 1'• 3 /8

47' z

2 31..

1

No reductron

5 1r2

X .97

8% 32 1/e 1 '/z 13% 6'/, 16 1/• 7'/, 11 1/z

No reduction

X .97 X .97 X .97 X .97 X .97 No reduction

3 'ro 1 'r,.

15 3/• 3'/• 1% 5% 8% 32% 1'/. 14 7'/• 17 7 3/4 12

39 3/.t 50 '1,

19% 24 ,,, 40'/• 10'/• 18 3% 4 '/• 1% 16 '/• 3% 1% 5 3/• 8 7/e 32 % 2 14 3/• 8 17 '/. 8 12 1/z

28 51 3/o 43 % 54 '13 23% 24 3/• 40% 10 3/• 18 1/• 4 •;, 4 •;, 2 16 3/• 4 '/• 1 3/e 5'/• 9'/e 32 7/e 2'/• 15 1/z 8 3/• 18% 8 '/• 13

32 55';• 47 1

'?

58'1• 27% 25 40 % 11 •;, 18 'h 4% 4 7/e 2'/• 17'/• 43/. 1 'h 6 9 3/e 33 1/e 2 1h 16 •;, 9 •;, 19 1/s 8 •;, 13 •;,

PLUS SUPER-STRETCH KNIT REDUCTIONS Five percent smaller in crosswise direction without any reductions in lengthwise direction. Use these measurements when drafting slopers for fabrics that stretch from 75% to 100%. Multiply your across measurements by 0.95, 5% smaller, except for the shoulder measurement, because the final garment will have twill tape to stabilize the seam and prevent it from stretching. Multiply by

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23

Bust Waist Hip Crotch depth Waist to knee Waist to ankle Ankle Knee Front crotch Back crotch Crotch angle Nape to waist Back neck Back neck rise Shoulder length Across back Sleeve length Shoulder pitch Bicep Wrist Neck Bust span Bust level

X .95 X .95 X .95 No reduction No reduction No reduction

X X X X X

.95 .95 .95 .95 .95

No reduction No reduction

X .95 No reduction

X .95 No reduction

X X X X X

.95 .95 .95 .95 .95

No reduction

5X

1X

2X

3X

4X

2

6

10

14

18

39 31% 41 % 11 % 24 39 % 9 1/s 17 1/• 2% 3'/z 1 17 2 3/• 1 5'12 8% 32 1/e 1 '12 13 6% 16 7% 11 1/•

42 % 35 'Ia 45 % 15% 24'/• 39 7/s 9% 17 112 3 3 '/• 1 '/• 15% 3 '/• 1% 5% 8% 32% 1% 13 % 7 1/a 16% 7% 11 3/•

46 112 39 49 % 19 % 24 1/z 40 1/s 10 17 3/. 3% 4 '/• 1 112 16 '/• 3% 1% 5% 8 7/s 32 % 2 14 112 7 7/a 17% 7 7/s 12 1/•

50% 42'1· 53 1/• 23% 24% 40 % 10% 18 4 4% 1 7/s 16 % 4 '/• 1% 5 '1e 9 1/s 32 7/s 2 1/e 15 1/s 8 112 18 8 12 3/.

54 1/s 46 4/s 57 27 % 25 40 % 11 18 1/s 4 1/z 4% 2 1/s 17 '/• 4% 1 '12 6 9% 33 1/s 2% 16 9'/• 18% 8% 13 1/e


~4

'HAPlER 4

SLOPERS AND REDUCTIONS

PLUS RIB KNIT REDUCTIONS

_

-----

---

too;;;in lengthwise direction. tch 1oo% and over. th U5e these meas~rements "hen draft•ng slopers for fabrics tha s ~e the shoulder measurement, because e f•nal 9ar. _ Mult1pl) }Our across measurements by 0.90. 10% smalle~, ~~~~;~~s~~tchlng . X 4X ment Will have tw1!1 tape to stab• ·ze the seam and preven <'" j:~P•c;,n• s"•a'ler ,.., crossw1se d~rect•on without any reduc t t

1X

Multiply by 1 2 3 4

5 6 7

---------~=------::;;;2~ Bust Wa•st H•p Crotch depth Wa1st to knee

Watsttoan~le

A"~ie

8 9 10

Knee

1'

Crotch ailgle Nape to wats! Back neck Sac~ neck •tse Shoude•length Across back Sleeve ength Shedder p:tc~

12 13 14

15 :6 18 19

~~;: ~~~:~~

Lo

Beep W•tst

23

Bust'"'"

" 90

~ .90

r;d~~tion

No No reduct ton Noreductton " 90 ' 90

x.90 X •90

No r~d~~t,on No reduction

36 29 39 11 ' 24 39 , 8 '' 16•.s 2'h 3

17 2 ''•

90 90 90 .90 .90

~; ~~;span

No reduct1on

6 40 ' ' 33 ''• 43'·• 15 'ts 24 ';, 39 7 '• Q'ts 16 ,1, 3

3 ,,a 1 15'1•

~~~

3 'I•

32 'Ia 1% 12 %

1% s% 8% 32 % 1% 13

15 7 10 31•

15 '1• 7 '1• 11 '1a

1, 85 'ta

x .9 0 Noreductlon No r;d~~t,on

,~

2X

6

6 '/.

---sx-

3

10 44 '1• 36 'ta 46'/• 19 % 24 •;, 40 'Is 9% 16 '1• 3% 3 716 1 lj,

14

47 '1• 40 ' ' 50% 23.'/a 24 'I• 40 '!. 10 17 3'1a 4'1• 1 'f.

16 {'/.•

1~~~·

3 •

,,'

1 'Ia 5 '/. 8 '1a 32 % 1 'Ia 13 '/. 7% 16 % 7% 11 %

1 ,a 5 71a 9 '1a 32 'Ia 2 14 'Ia

8

---::--..._

1S

~ 44 'Ia 54 27 ';, 25 40';, 10 ';, 17 ';, 4';, 4 '11 2

17 '{• 4 /,

1 ';, 6

9'/a 33 'Ia 2 '/• 15

B'l•

17 'Ia 7% 12

17'1. 7'/a 12 ';,

PLUS FOUR-WAY-STRETCH KNIT REDUCTIONS Ten P• .e tt smaller tn crosswtse direction and 10% smaller in the le ngthw ise direction. Use these measurements when draft1ng slopers fo r fabrics that stretc h 100% in both direc tions. Multiply yo~r across measurements by 0.90, 10% smaller, in both directions. Multiply by

1

2

3 4

5 6 7 8 9

10 11 12

13 14 15 1 6 17 18

19 20 21 22 23

Bust Waist Htp Crotch depth Wa1st to knee Wa1st to ankle Ankle Knee Front crotch Back crotch Crotch angle Nape to waist Back neck Back neck rise Shoulder length Across back Sleeve length Shoulder pitch Steep Wrist Neck Bust span Bust level

X .90

.90 X .90 X .90 X .90 X .90 X .90 X .90 X .90 X .90 X .90 X .90 X

1X

2X

3X

4X

5X

2

6

10

14

18

36 71a

38'1. 31 112

40 '12 33 'I•

42 'I• 35 1/a 45

44 '/a 36 7!a 46% 18'fs

29 3/4 39% 11

22'1• 37 % 8% 16 % 2 112

3% 1

16 'Ia

No red uction No reduction No reduction No reduction No reduction No reduction

32'1a

X .90 X .90

12%

No reduction

X .90 X .90

2% 1

5 112

8% 1 112 6 16 31, 7

11 '1.

41 % 13 23

37 '1. 8 7la 16 %

2 31· 3 71a 1 'Ia

14 '!.

3

1% 5%

8'12 32'1· 1%

12 % 6% 17 11a 7 11 112

43 '1• 14 'Ia 23 37 71a 9 '1a 16 '12

3 4

1 '!. 15

3'!. 1% 5%

8% 32% 1 a;, 13 s a;, 17 '12 7'1•

11 3;.

16% 23 1/a 38 9 'Ia 16% 3 'Ia 4 'Ia

1 112

23'/• 38 1/s

9% 16 3/ • 3%

4''•

1%

15 '1•

15 111

3 '12 1%

3''• 1 3ts

5%

5'1•

8%

s"1s

32'12

32% 2 13 3 ' 4

2

13% 7 17 7/a 7%

12

7 3~

18'1•

7'/1 12'/o

= •• ••

••. •.

•• •• •

•• •• •• • ••

•• ••

•• •


SLOPERS AND REDUCTIONS

!.J 'J

CllAPHII4

Half Size Stable Knit Reductions ~ALF SIZE STABLE KNIT REDUCTIONS o f:'ercent smaller '" crosswise direc --Use these measurements when draft l•on Without an) "educt•ons n •engthw1se d~rectoon. Use your measurements exactly a '"9 stopers for fabncs that stretch trom 0°o to 25%. s recorded "•thou! any reduct•ons. Multiply by Medium Extra Sm all Small -o?

1 Bust 2 Waost 3 Hop 4 Crotch depth 5 Waist to knee 6 Waost to ankle 7 Ankle 8 Knee 9

10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23

Front crotch Back crotch Crotch angle Nape to waost Back neck Back neck nse Shoulder length Across back Sleeve length Shoulder potch Bocep Wnst Neck Bust span Bust level

----

14 ' '

xo

0 "0 >(

No reductoon No reduction No reduction

><0 ><0

xo xo 0

No reductoon No reductoon

xo No reductoon xo No reductoon xo xo ><0 ·0

xo

No reduction

41 32' 44

11'. 22 • 37'. 9 • 17 • 2 • 3'• 1 '. 15' 2 2Jj, 1 5' 8 22 1t, 1% 13 3/, 6'1. 16 '1. 7 31· 11 %

18

11

:>

45 36 48 15'. 22s 11 37' 10'. 17'12 3 'lc 4

1 •;, 16 3'/• 1 118

5% 8% 22 .,, 1% 14 '12 7'12 17'12 8 11 71s

Large

Ext ra Lar ge

22'1,

26 '1,

30 112

49 40' 2 52 19''• 22·, 37". 10 1 17' ' 3 3 '4

53 44' 56 23 .,, 23 .,, 38

57 48'· 60 27'. 1 23 '• 38''

4J'f'

4%

1 3t5

16 ,,

,, ,,t'

11 " 1~

18' ·•

18

4''

4'• 5 2'1•

2 17

17'12

33/.t

4 •;.

4'1.

1 '/e

1% 5'!. 9'1• 23 2 'Is 16 9 19 8'12 12 71•

1 'h 6 9% 23''•

53 f.&

8 /e 22 31• 2 15 'I• 8 '1• 18 '1• 8 '1• 12 %

2 11s

16''• 9'··· 19'/.. 8 '/o 13%

-----

HALF SIZE MODERATE KNIT REDUCTIONS Two percent smaller tn crosswose direction without any reductions in lengthwise direction. Use these measurements when drafting slopers for fabrics that stretch from 25% to 50% . Multiply your across measurements by 0.98, 2% smaller, except for the shoulder measurement, because the fi nal garment will have twtll tape to stabilize the seam and prevent it from stretching. Extra Large Large Medium Small Extra Small Multiply by

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23

Bust Waist Hip Crotch depth Waist to knee Waist to ankle Ankle Knee Front crotch Back crotch Crotch angle Nape to waist Back neck Back neck rise Shoulder length Across back Sleeve length Shoulder pitch Bicep Wrist Neck Bust span Bust level

X ,98 X ,98 X ,98 No reduction No reduction No reduction

X ,98 X ,98 X .98 X .98 X .98 No reduction No reduction

X .98 No reduction

X .98 No reduction

X ,98 X .98 X .98 X .98 X .98 No reduc tion

14 '12

18 '12

22 112

26 '12

30'12

40 /o 31 71•

44 'I• 35 31• 47 15 'Is 22 % 37 '12 10 17 '/e 3 'I• 4 1 'I• 16

48 39'1. 51 19 1ls 22 7/e 37 31· 10 % 17 % 3%

52 43 % 54 '/• 23 'Ia 23 'Is 38 11 17 % 4 'I• 4% 1 7le 17 4 'I• 1%

55 7/s 47 '12 58%

43'1• 11 /e 22 %

37 '1• 9% 17 2 '/. 3% 1% 15 112 2 '/. 1 5 '1> 8%

22 '1• 1% 13 '12 6% 16% 7% 11 'Is

3 '1· 1% 5% 8% 22 'I> 1% 14 '1• 7% 17'1•

7 118

11 %

4 '1• 1 '12 16 '12 3 '/. 1% 5 '!. 8 '1e 22 '!. 1 71e 15 8 17 7le 8 12'1•

5 1lo 9 '1•

23

2 '1• 15 % 8 71• 18% 8% 12%

27 '1• 23 % 38 '1• 11 % 17 '1• 4% 5 2 'I• 17 '12 4 '!. 1 '12 6 9%

23'1· 2% 16% 9'12 19 % 8% 13 1 1e


HAPTER 4

SLOPERS AND REDUCTIONS

HALF SIZE STRETCHY KNIT REDUCTIONS

.

.

---......._

. d l ions in lengthwise d~rect1on. hree percent smaller in crosswise direction w11hout any re uc h from 50% to 75% 1 shoulder measur~ment, because the final 9arrn Use these measurements when drafting slopers for fabrics that~1ret~ Multiply your across measurements by 0.97, 3% smaller, except or e ent Will have twill tape to stabilize the seam and prevent it from stretchong. . L E~ Small Med1um arg e xtra Lar Multiply by Extra Small ~ 18 '12 22 '12 26 '12 30 ';, 14 '12 T

1 2

3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14

15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22

23

Bust Waist Hip Crotch depth Waist to knee Waist to ankle Ankle Knee Front crotch Back crotch Crotch angle Nape to waist Back neck Back neck rise Shoulder length Across back Sleeve length Shoulder pitch Bicep Wnst Neck Bus I span Bust level

.97 .97 .97 No reduction No reduction No reduction X .97 X .97 X .97 X .97 X .97 No reduction No reduction X .97 No reduction X .97 No reduction X .97 X .97 X .97 X .97 X .97 No red uction X X X

39 31•

31 'I• 42 % 11 'Ia

22 '1s

37 '1• 9 '1s

16 31• 2% 3 '1• 1% 15 '12

2'/. 1

5 '12

43 % 35% 46 '12 15 'Ia 22 % 37 '12 9 71a 17 3 'Ia 3 71a 1 'I•

16 3 '1• 1% 5%

47 '12 39 '1a

50'12

23 '1• 23 '1•

37 31•

38

10 '1•

10 31·

17 '1• 3%

17 '12 4 'Is 4 '12 1 'Is

4 'I• 1 '12

16 '12

3'/. 1%

5'/.

8%

8 '1•

22 '1• 1% 13 % 6 '12 16'1• 7 '12

22 '12

22 % 1 71s

1% 14 7%

17 7% 11 112

51 % 43 'Is 54 %

19 '1• 22 71•

8%

11

.,..,. ••

I

14 % 8 17% 8

17 4 'I•

1% 5 71• 9 '1•

23 2'1a 15 •;,

8% 18 317

8'1• 12 •;,

12

• •

55';, 47 58';,

27 ';, 23 '1.

38 ';, 11 ';, 17 3; ,

4'1. 4';,

2'!• 17 ';,

4'!. 1 ';, 6 9 '1. 23 '/, 2'1.

16'/.

9';, 19 '/a

B'h 13

HALF SIZE SUPER-STRETCH KNIT REDUCTIONS Five percent smaller in crosswise direction without any reductions in lengthwise direction. Use these measurements when drafting slopers for fabrics that stretch from 75% to 100%. Multiply your across measurements by 0.95, 5% smaller, except for the shoulder measurement, because the final garment will have twill tape to stabilize the seam and prevent it from stretching. Multiply by Bust 2 Waist 3 Hip 4 Crotch depth 5 Waist to knee 6 Waist to ankle 7 Ankle 8 Knee 9 Front crotch 10 Back crotch 11 Crotch ang le 12 Nape to waist 13 Back neck 14 Back neck rise 15 Shoulder length 16 Across back 17 Sleeve length 18 Shoulder pitch 19 Bicep 20 Wrist 21 Neck 22 Bust span 23 Bust level 1

.95 X .95 X .95 X

No reduction No reduction No reduction

X .95 X .95 X .95 X .95 X .95 No reduction No reduction

X .95 No reduction

X .95 No reduction

X .95 X .95 X .95 X .95 X

.95

No reduction

Extra Small

Small

Medium

Large

Extra Large

14 'h

18'12

22'h

26'h

30'h

39 30 % 41 % 11 'Ia

42 % 34 %

22 %

37%

9'1a

45 %

15 'I• 22 % 37'/,

9%

16% 2% 3 '/, 1 'I• 15 '1, 2% 1

3% 1 'I• 16

5';, 8%

5% 8%

22'1• 1% 13 6%

16 7% 10 31,

16 %

3

3 'I• 1%

22'h 1% 13 % 7 'Ia 16% 7% 11 'I•

46 ';, 38 112

49 % 19 'Ia 22 %

37% 10 16 71a 3% 4'1a

50 % 42 '1• 53 '/. 23 '1a 23 'Ia 38 10 % 17 4

4%

1 •;, 16 •;,

1 71a 17

3%

4 '/•

1% 5% B71a 22% 1 71a 14 •;, 7 71a

17% 7

7 1a 11 %

1 3/7

5 1ta

9 'ia 23 2 15'/ •

a•;,

18

8 12'/•

1

54 /s 46 57 27 '•• 23% 38'1•

11 17% 4' 2

4'·'

2' 'a 17 '12 4'1• 1''; 6 g 'ts 23'/•

2 11• 16

9'•

18 1/• 8'.4 12'.4

'

•• •. •• •• ••

•• •• •• •• ••

•• •• •

.•

••


SLOPERS AND RED UCTIONS

97

CHAPTER 4

HALF SIZE RIB KNIT REDUCTIONS lt>n percent smaller m cross . . U th Wise d•rect•on w1th . - -.. se. ese measurements when d ft out any reduct•ons m lengthw1se d~rection Multiply your across measureme ~a ~ng slopers for fabncs that stretch 100% and over . 0 ment will have twill tape to stabili~esthy ·90· 10% smaller, except for the shoulder rnea~urement , because the final gare seam and prevent 11 from stretc hing. Multiply by Extra Small Small Extra Lar ge Medium Large

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23

Bust Wa1st Hip Cro tch depth Waist to knee Wa1st to ankle Ankle Knee Front crotch Back crotch Crotch angle Nape to waist Back neck Back neck rise Shoulder length Across back Sleeve length Should er pitch Bicep Wrist Neck Bust sp an Bust level

)( .90 X .90 X .90 No reduction No reduction No reduction

X .90 X .90 X .90 X .90

X .90 No reduction No reduction

X .90 No reduction

X .90 No reduction

X .90 X .90 X .90 X .90 X .90 No reduction

14 '12

18 '12

22 112

26'12

30'12

36 '·· 29 ''• 39 ''• 11 ''• 22 % 37 '/• 8% 15 '12 2 '/, 3 1/4 1 '/• 15 '12 2% 1 5 '12 8 '1s 22'/• 1 '/• 12'/s 6 15 7 10 '/•

40 ' ' 32 '• 43 ' 4 15 1/a 22 % 37 'h 9'1• 15 3/ 4 3 3% 1 117 16 3 '/• 1 '1s 5% 8% 22'12 1 112 13 6% 15% 7 '1• 10%

44 '/s 36 'h 46'1· 19 1/a 22 7/a 37 3/4 9 '/, 16 3 '1s 3 '/• 1'1s 16 '12 3% 1'1s 5 '/• 8 7/a 22 % 1% 13 3/ 4 7 '1s 16'/s 7'1s 11 1/s

47 '1· 40 50% 23 1/s 23'/s 38 10 16 '/• 3 7/s 4 '1• 1 3/ • 17 4 '1• 1'1s 5 7/s 9 1/s 23 2 14'/s 8 17'/• 7% 11 %

51 '/• 43 'Is 54 27 1/s 23 3/a 38 '/• 10 '12 16 % 4 '1• 4'h 2 17'12 4 3/ 4 1 •;, 6 9 '1s 23'/• 2'/• 15 8 3/• 17 3/4 7 7/a 12

HALF SIZE FOUR-WAY-STRETCH KNIT REDUCTIONS Ten percent smaller in crosswise direction and 10% smaller in the lengthwise direction. Use these measurements when drafting slopers for fabrics that stretch 100% in both directions. Multiply your measurements by 0.90, 10% smaller, in both directions. Multiply by

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23

Bust Waist Hip Crotch depth Waist to knee Waist to ankle Ankle Knee Front crotch Bac k crotch Crotch angle Nape to waist Back neck Back neck ri se Shoulder length Across back Sleeve length Shoulder pitch Bicep Wrist Neck Bust span Bust level

X X x X X X X X X X X X

.90 .90 .90 .90 .90 .90 .90 .90 .90 .90 .90 .90

No reduction No reduction No reduction No reduction No reduction No reduction

X .90 X .90 No reduction

X .90 X .90

Extra Small

Small

Medium

Large

Extra Larg e

14 112

18 '12

22 112

26'12

30'12

38% 31 41 'Is 12 '12 21 % 35 '12 8 7/a 15 % 2% 3 7/s 1 15 3 1% 5% 8 'h 22% 1 'h 12 3/• 6% 17 1/a 7 11

40 '12 32 7/s 43 % 14 % 21 '12 35 % 9 1/s 15 3/• 3 4 1 '/• 15 '/• 3 '1• 1% 5% 8% 22 'h 1% 13 6% 17 1h 7'1• 11'/•

42'1• 34 % 45 16 '/• 21 'Ia 35% 9% 15 'Ia 3 '/, 4 1/a 1% 15 '12 3'h 1% 5% 8 '/. 22% 1% 13% 7 17 '1a 7 '13 11 112

44 1/a 36 '12 46 % 18 1/a 21 % 35 7/a 9% 16 3% 4% 1% 15% 3% 1% 5'1• 8 7/s 22 % 2 13 3/• 7% 18 '/• 7% 11 %

7

36 /s, 29 '1• 39 % 10 % 21 1/4 35 % 8% 15 '12 2 112 3% 1% 14 % 2% 1 5 1h 8% 22 '1• 1% 12 % 6 16 3/• 7 10%


~

GH<\PTER 4

SLOPERS AND REDUCTIONS

Men 's Regular Size Reduc t"' 0 " s MEN'S REGULAR STABLE

KNIT REDUCTIONS

. . lengthwise direction. .se d~recllon without any reduclions •n from 0 % t 25% Zero percent smaller 1n crossw1 fabncs that stretch 1 any reductions. Use these measurements when drafting ~o~ersth~ut Use your measurements exactly as recor e WI S Medium Multiply by Extra Small ma 11

°

32

1 Chest 2 Wa1st 3 H1p 4 Crotch depth 5 Wa1st to knee 6 Wa1st to ankle 7 Ankle 8 Knee 9 Front crotch 10 Back crotch 11 Crotch angle 12 Nape to wa1st 13 Back neck 14 Back neck nse 15 Shoulder length 16 Across back 17 Sleeve length 18 Shoulder p1tch 19 B•cep 20 Wnst 21 Neck 22 Chest span 23 Chest level

'0 '0 X 0 No reduction No reduct1on No reduct1on X

0

xO xO X 0 X 0 No reduction No reduction

xo xo No reduction xo xo xo xo xo

No reduct1on

No reduction

32 26 34

g s,a

21 718 39 1/s 8% 14 2 1/s 2 'to 1 19 1/4 2% % 6

8 '1• 24% 1 31· 11 'I•

6 '12 14 5

9 7la

36

36 30 38

9'1• 22 'Is 39 % 14 % 14 11> 2% 3 'Is 1 'I• 19% 2% 31· 6 11• 8% 24 7ls 1% 12 7 11• 14 'I• 6 9'1s

·

Large

~ 48

40

44

40 34 42 10 11s 22%

44 38 46 10% 22% 40 % 15 % 15 112 2 71s 3 71s 1 112 20% 2 112

40 '1• 14 7ls 15 2% 3 '12 1% 20'1• 2% % 6 '12 9 '1• 25 'Is 1 'Is 12 % 8 14 112 6% 9 71s

•• -----..... • -----..... • • ~ • •• •. •

'Is 6% 9 31· 25 % 1 71s 13 112 8% 14 % 7

9 71a

48

42

so

10 5/, 22 7/, 41 1/ 8 15 7/, 16 3 '!, 4 1/a 1'1, 21 1/, 2'/, 7

/a

7 10 1/ , 25'!. 2 14 '/, 9'/, 15 7% 9 7/a

MEN'S REGULAR MODERATE KNIT REDUCTIONS Two percent smaller 1n crosswise direction without any reductions in lengthwise direction. Use these measurements when drafting slopers for fabrics that stretch from 25% to 50%. Mult•ply your across measurements by 0.98, 2% smaller, except for the shoulder measurement, because the final garment will have tw111 tape to stabilize the seam and prevent it from stretching. Multiply by

1 Chest 2 Wa1st 3 Hip 4 Crotch depth 5 Waist to knee 6 Waist to ankle

7

8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23

Ankle Knee Front crotch Back crotch Crotch angle Nape to waist Back neck Back neck rise Shoulder length Across back Sleeve length Shoulder pitch Bicep Wrist Neck Chest span Chest level

;( .98 X .98 X .98 No reduction No reduction No reduction

X .98 X .98 X .98 X .98 X .98 No reduction No reduction

X .98 No reduction

X .98 No reduction

X .98 X .98 X .98 X.98 X .98 No reduction

Extra Small

Small

Medium

32

36

40

44

48

31 % 25 '12 33 % 9% 21 71s 39 '1s

35 '1• 29% 37'1· 9% 22'1s 39 % 14 14 % 2% 3'1s 1 '1s 19 % 2% %

39 '1• 33 % 41'1s 10 '1s 22% 40'1s 14 % 14% 2% 3% 1 114

43 'Is 37'1• 45 10% 22% 40% 15 15 '1• 2 71s 3% 1% 20% 2 112

47 41 '/s 49 10% 22 7/s 41 '/s 15'/2 15% 3 4 1 1h 21 '/• 2'/2

8 '1• 13 % 2 2% 1 19 '1• 2% % 6

8 '1• 24% 1'1. 11 6% 13% 431· 9%

6 '1· 831· 24 71a 1% 11 31· 7 11a 14 5'1• 9%

20 '1· 2% 31· 6 '12 9'1• 25 11a 1% 12% 7 7/a 14'/•

5

3 /•

95/a

Large

7

1a

6 31· 9 31• 25% 1% 13'/•

8%

14 11'!1

6'1·

8'.4

Extra Large

'I•

7

10 '/•

25 5ft 1'/a

1-4

••

•• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• •

• •

~


SLOPERS AND REDUCTIONS

CHAPTER 4

99

MEN 'SREGULARRSS~TRREE~TC~H~Y~~~~---------------------KNIT REDUCTIONS

T'l«'<" percent smaller in cross . . U~e these me WISe direction w'th 1

t - . asurements when draflln sl ou any reductions m lengthwise d~rection. Multiply your across measurement b go opers for fabrics that stretch from 50% to 75%. 97 3 Will have twill tape to stabilize the s!a~ · · % smaller, except for the shoulder measurement. because the final garment and prevent II from stretching. Multiply by 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17

18 19 20

21 22

23

Chest Waist Hip Crotch depth Waist to knee Waist to ankle Ankle Knee Front crotch Back crotch Crotch angle Nape to waist Back neck Back neck rise Shoulder length Across back Sleeve length Shoulder pitch Bicep Wrist Neck Chest span Chest level

.97 X .97 X .97 No reduction No reduction No reduction X .97 X .97 X .97 X .97 X .97 No reduction No reduction X .97 No reduction X .97 No reduct1on X .97 X .97 X .97 X .97 X .97 No reduction )<,

Extra Small

Small

Medium

Large

32

36

40

44

48

35 29 36'1• 9".ts

38 31. 33 40 3 1.. 10 '/a 22 '1e 40 '/e 14 3 1a 14 'h 2 '12

42 % 36 71•

46 11>

3% 1 'I• 20'1• 2%

3 31·

31 25 11.. 33 gs.;8

21 '··

39 ''• 1

8

/a

13 ''•

22 1/a 39% 14 14

2

2 31• 1

19 '1• 2%

'I•

6 8 '1· 24 % 1 '1• 11 6 '1• 13 % 4 31· 9 112

3

1 'le 19 31· 2%

'I•

6 '1• 3

8 1•

24 71• 1 '1•

'/.

6 112 9 '1• 25 118

1'/.

11 % 7

12%

13 71e

14 6 31· 9 '12

5'/. 9 112

7 31·

44 'Ia 10%

22 % 40 % 15 15 2 31·

1% 20 31· 2 112

'I•

6'1. 9 31· 25% 1 '1•

13 8'12 14 'I•

7% 9 112

Extra Large

40 '1. 48 1h 10 % 22 7/o 41 'Ia 15% 15 1h

3 4 1 'h 21 'I• 2 'h

'I•

7 10 '1• 25% 1 'Ia

13 7le 9 '1• 14 'h

8% 9 112

MEN'S REGULAR SUPER-STRETCH KNIT REDUCTIONS Five percent smaller in crosswise direction without any reductions in lengthwise direction. Use these measurements when drafting slopers for fabrics that stretch from 75% to 100%. Multiply your across measurements by 0.95, 5% smaller, except for the shoulder measurement, because the final garment will have twill tape to stabilize the seam and prevent it from stretching. Multiply by

1 2

3 4 5 6 7 8 9

10 11 12 13 14

15 16 17

18 19 20 21 22

23

Chest Waist Hip Crotch depth Waist to knee Waist to ankle Ankle Knee Front crotch Back crotch Crotch angle Nape to waist Back neck Back neck rise Shoulder length Across back Sleeve length Shoulder pitch Bicep Wrist Neck Chest span Chest level

X .95 X .95 X .95 No reduction No reduction No reduction X .95 X .95 X .95 X .95 X .95 No reduction No reduction X .95 No reduction X .95 No reduction X .95 X .95 X .95 X .95 X .95 No reduction

Extra Small

Small

Medium

Large

32

36

40

44

34 'I•

30% 24 '/.

28 112

32'1•

36'1•

3

Extra Large

48

38 32'1• 39 71e 10 '1•

41 1· 36 '1• 43 '/. 10%

45 % 39 7le 47 112 10%

9%

9'1•

21 '1• 39 '1• 8 13 '1•

22'1•

22 %

22 %

22 '1•

39%

40 '1•

13 % 13 31· 2 '1• 3 1 'le

14 'le 14 11•

40 % 14 %

41 'le 15

14 31•

15 '1• 3 4

2 2% 1

19 '1• 2%

19 31• 2%

6

6'1• 8 31• 24 '1• 1% 11 %

'I•

8 '1• 24 %

1% 10%

6 '1• 13 11• 4% 9%

'I•

6'1e 13 112 5% 9 112

2 '12

2'1.

3% 1 '1· 20'1•

3%

1%

1 112

20 31·

2%

2 '12

21'1• 2 112

% 6 '12

6 31·

9 '1•

9'/.

25 'Ia 1 31·

25%

12'1• 7% 13'/. 6 112 9'1•

12 le

'I•

1'/. 7

8% 14

7'12 9'/3

'I•

7 10 '1• 25 % 1 '1e 13 112

9 14'1•

8'12 9'/s


(\) HAP'I"ER 4

SLOPEAS A N D R E DU C TI O N S

----

s,.

MEN'S REGULAR RIB KNIT REDUCTIONS

Ten . eductions 'n lengthwise d~reclion Use. n·, a n crossv.,se o~rect•on '"thou! an\ r that stretch 100%and over. I·• •tlese Measurements \\hen oratt no slopers for fabrrcs t for the shoulder measurement. because the lmal ga ••Uit ply yo -0 90 tO% smaller. excep r me t ur across measurements by . · . nt 11 from stretching. n _w. I have tw1l tape to stab' ,ze the seam and pre•e M L --.. -

Multiply by 1

2 3 4 5

6 7 8 9 10 1' 12 13 14

15 16 17 18

19 20

21 22 23

Chest Wa1st H1p Crater depth Wa1st to Knee Wa1st to ankle Ankle Knee Front crotch Back crater Cro'ch angle "'ape to wa1st BacK neck Back reck r se Shou der ength Across back S eeve length Shou der p1tch 8 cep Wnst Neck Chest span Chest level

K .90

Extra small

Small

32

36

~~ • 30 ' , 9 21 • 39 • 8 7' 12 • 2 2, 1 19 /• 2 /e

90 90 No reduct1on No reductiOn No reduct10n ' 90 90 X 90 ' .90 " .90 No reduction No reduct, on ' .90 No reduct1on )( 90 No reduct1on " .90

8'1• 24% 1%

" .90

10'1a

< <

90 X

90

90 No reduction X

'' 6

5 71a 12%

4% 8 71•

e 0 IUm

arge

40

32 27 34 ' • 9' a

22'1• 39 , 13 13 2'1• 2 ?/e

1 19% 2'1.

36 30 ' 37 .l 10''• 22-'la 40 'Ia 13% 13'· 23;• 3 1 's 1 11e 20'1• 3 2 /e

4~

37';, 45

10';, 22';, 41 'Ia 14 ';, 14% 2'/a 3 1/• 1';, 21 '/, 2 ';,

r,

31• 6'!2

6 31•

9 'I• 25'1a 1% 11 'h 7'1• 13 6 'I• 8 7la

3

1%

10 % 6'h 12 71a 5 'h 8 1la

•• ••.

~

39. 34' ·, 41 ' 10re 22';• 40 'Is 7 13 /e 14 2'1• 3 H? 1 11, 3 20 • 2'1>

6 :,

8% 24 11a

:

Elltra Large

44

Ia

•• ••

'lo 7

9 t• 25% 1% 12 'Ia 7 71a 13 1/.• 7 'Ia 8 '1a

10'/,

25 5! 8 1'/. 12 7/o 8';, 13 1h 8

8'1.

••

MEN'S REGULAR FOUR-WAY-STRETCH KNIT REDUCTIONS

48

I I I I

32 % 27 34'/•

1 /4

34 28% 36

36 30% 37%

I

9%

9 '12

9%

21 37 % 13 13 2 1/s 3 1/e 1 114 18 % 2%

21 1/a 37 7/s

Ten percent sr a ler n rossw1se direction and 10% smaller in the lengthwise direction. Use these measurements when dratt1ng slopers for fabrics that stretch 100% in both d irections . Mult1ply your measurements by 0.90, 10% smaller, in both directions. Multiply by

1

2 3 4

5 6 7

8 9

10 11

12 13 14

15 16 17 18 19

20 21

22 23

Chest Wa1st Hip Crotch depth Wa1 st to knee Waist to ankle Ankle Knee Front crotch Back crotch Crotch angle Nape to waist Back neck Back neck rise Shoulder length Across back Sleeve length Shoulder pitch Bicep Wrist Neck Chest span Chest level

/ .90 I( .90 X .90 X .90 X .90 X .90 X .90 X .90 X .90 X .90 X .90 X .90 No reduction No red uction No reduct ion No reduction No reduction No reduction

X .90 X .90 No reduction

X .90 X .90

Extra Small

Small

Medium

Larg e

32

36

40

44

Extra Large

--------------------------~----------

28 % 23 % 30 % 9 '1a 20 3/4 37 '1•

30 % 25 '1• 32 % 9 '1· 20 7la 37 %

7 1/2

12 3~

12 %

12 71s 2 3 1 1/a 18 1/2 2%

2 2 7/a 1

18 % 2%

% 6 8 1/4

24% 1% 10 11s 5 7/s 14

4% 9%

% 6~ 1

% 6%

8 12

8%

24 %

24 7/e

1% 1 10 12

1% 10% 6~ 14 1/• 5% 9 1/•

6 1%

14 / e 4% 9 1/4

1 3'~

13 1/• 2 1/4 3% 1 1/4 19 2%

21 1/• 38 '/s 13% 13'h

23fe 3'h 11/3 19'/• 2%

3/4

3J,

6%

6 1h

9 25 1% 11 1/s

6% 14% 5%

9 3/a

9''•

25 1 '8 17/s 11 112

71• 14'11 (i1• 1

t A ::...;...,...;


SLOPERS AND REDUCTIONS

CHAPTER 4

101

Men's Short Size Redu t" c Ions MEN'S SHORT STABLE KNIT Zero percent smaller in crosswi . . REDUCTIONS Use these measurement h se direction without an d . . re uct,ons m the lengthwise direction. Use yo ur measurem t s w en drafting slopers fo f en s exactly as recorded 'th r a ncs that stretch Irom 0% to 25%. WI out any reductions. Multiply by Extra Small Small Medium 32S 36 s 40 s 1 Chest xo 32 2 Waist 36 40 x o 26 3 Hip 30 34 xo 32 4 Crotch depth 36 40 No reduction 9 g •;, 5 Waist to knee 9'1• No reduction 3 20 •;, 20 /. 21 6 Waist to ankle No reduction 36 36 '12 7 Ankle 37 xo 8 14 •;, 14 8 Knee x o 13% 14 '1s 14% 9 Front crotch x o 2 2 '1• 2 112 10 Back crotch xo 2% 3 3% 11 Crotch angle x o 1 1 1 1s 1 '1· 12 Nape to waist No reduction 18 11s 18 % 19 1ls 13 Back neck No reduction 2 '1• 2% 2'1• 14 Back neck rise xo '!. 31· 'le 15 Shoulder length No reduction S'ls 6 '1s 6% 16 Across back xo 8 8';, 9 17 Sleeve length No reduction 23 23 11• 23 '12 18 Shoulder pitch xo 1% 1'/. 1'/. 19 Bicep xo 10 112 11 114 12 20 Wrist xo 7 731· 6 '1· 21 Neck xo 13 112 13'/. 14 22 Chest span xo 5 5% 6 23 Chest level No reduction 9 '12 9 '/. 10

6'

Large

Extra Large

44 s

48 s

44 38 44 9% 21 '1• 37 112 15 15 1ls 231· 3% 1% 19% 2%

48 42 48 10 21 '12 38 15 '12 15% 3 4 1 112 20 11• 2%

'Is 6% 9 '12 23 '1. 131· 12 314

a•;,

14 114 6% 10 114

'Is 6'!. 10 24 1 7ls 13 '12 9 '1• 14 •;, 7 10 112

MEN'S SHORT MODERATE KNIT REDUCTIONS Two percent smaller in crosswise direction without any reductions in lengthwise direction. Use these measurements when drafting slopers for fabrics that stretch from 25% to SO%. Multiply your across measurements by 0.98, 2% smaller, except for the shoulder measurement, because the final garment will have twill tape to stabilize the seam and prevent it from stretching. Multiply by

1 2 3 4

5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21

22 23

Chest Waist Hip Crotch depth Waist to knee Waist to ankle Ankle Knee Front crotch Back crotch Crotch angle Nape to waist Back neck Back neck rise Shoulder length Across back Sleeve length Shoulder pitch Bicep Wrist Neck Chest span Chest level

X .98 X .98 X .98 No reduction No reduction No reduction X _g8 X .98 X .98 X .98 X .98 No reduction No reduction X .98 No reduction X .98 No reduction X .98 X .98 X .98 X .98 X .98 No reduction

Extra Small

Small

Medium

Large

32S

36S

40S

44S

48S

31% 25 112 31 % 9 20 112 36 8 13 % 2 2% 1 18 11s 2'14

35 114 29% 35 114 9 '14 20'/. 36 112 13'/. 13 71s 2'14 3 1 11s 18% 2'14

39 114 33 % 39 114 9 '/, 21 37 14'1• 14 % 2 112 3 '14 1 '14 19 11s 2%

43 1ls 37 '1• 43 11s 9'/. 21'1• 37 112 14 % 14 7l s 2 314 3% 1% 19% 2%

47 41 1/s 47 10 21 112 38 15 11· 15 3 /s 3 4

31· S 'l• 8 23 1% 10'1•

6'1• 13'/• 43/•

9'1•

'/.

'/.

'/.

6 11s 8'12 23'1• 1% 11 13 112

6% 9 23'12 1'/. 11 ·1· 7% 133/•

6% 9 '12 23 31• 1'/. 12 112 8% 14

5'1• 9'h

9 3/•

6 71a

s•;,

6'1• 10

Extra Large

1 112

20 1l s 2 31s 3;. 6 "'• 10 24 1 3t. 13 '1• 9 14 'I•

s•;,

10'1•


.,..,. ·,. •• •

, \HAPTER 4

SLOPERS AND REDUCTIONS

MEN'S SHORT STRETCHY K

NIT REDUCTIONS

----.....

. lengthwise direction. ·•thout any reduct•ons 'n oo/c to 75%. . Th ·ee percent smaller on crosswise dorectl~n :rs for fabrics that stretch from 5 r omeasurement. because the f•nal garment Use these measurements when draft.ngos9~p3% smaller. except for the shoulde Mult•pl) vour across measurements by .nd. prevent It from stretching. . Large Extral\\111 have tw•ll tape to stab•hze the seam a Small Medium ~ Multiply by Extra Small 40 S 44 5 48 S

=

38314 42 % =====================;~;--------; 3~2~5~-----335~6~5~-----:~y,-----97 31 33 36 'I• 1

2

3 4

5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23

Chest Wa1st H1p Crotch depth Wa1st to knee Wa•st to ankle Ankle Knee Front crotch Sac~· crotch Crotch angle Nape to wa1st Back neck Back neck nse Shoulder length Across back Slee• e length Shoulder P•tch B•cep Wnst Neck Chest span Chest level

X ·

' .97 ' .97 No reduct1on No reduction No reduct1on x .97 x .97 x .97 97 ' .97 Noreduct1on No reduct1on

Nored~~tion 7

No

red~ction .97 <

:~i

x .97

X .97 No reduction

25 ''a 31 9 20 '·' 36 7 lo 13 ' 1• 2 2 '1• 1 18'/e 2 1/.a 314

29 35 9 'I• 20 3/ '2

5 '1o

6'1• 8 112 23 '14 1% 11

8

23 1% 10 'le

6 13 4 '/. 9 '14

~~~8 3;

13 1' 2 ,;.8 3 1 18 s;. ,; 2 I •4

%

38 314 9 '12 21 37 14 14'1• 2% 3 'I• 1 '1• 19'1• 2%

46 1!, ---------40 3;, 42 '/o 46 1/, 9314 10 21 '14 21 '!, 37 '12 38 14 '12 15 14 % 15 '/a 5 3 2 1e 3 '12 3 7/e 1% 1'/, 1g% 20 '/e 2% 2% 3j.•

s;. 6% g 23 '12 1% 11 % 1

6%

7 12

13% 5 '/. 9 '12

13 % 5% 9%

~~~· 2

2

~ ~·

4

12% 8 '1• 7 13 1e 1 6 14 10

;,

3

1 ~'/e

i ,1

2

4

13

9 14 6 'f. 10 '/a

MEN'S SHORT SUPER-STRETCH KNIT REDUCTIONS Five percent sma 1er 1n crossw1se direction without any reductions in lengthwise direction. Use these measurements when drafting slopers for fabrics that stretch from 75% to 100%. Mult1ply your across measurements by 0.95, 5% smaller, except for the shoulder measurement, because the final garment will have tw111 tape to stabilize the seam and prevent it from stretching. Multiply by

1

2 3 4

5 6

7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21

22 23

Chest Wa1st Hip Crotch depth Waist to knee Waist to ankle Ankle Knee Front crotch Back crotch Crotch angle Nape to waist Back neck Back neck rise Shoulder length Across back Sleeve length Shoulder pitch B1cep Wrist Neck Chest span Chest level

X .95 X .95 X .95 No reduction No reduction No reduction X .95 X .95 X .95 X .95 X .95 No reduction No reduction X .95 No reduction X .95 No reduction X .95 X .95 X .95 X .95 X .95 No reduction

Extra Small

Small

s

32S

36

30 %

34 '/. 28 '12 34 1/4

24 % 30 % 9

9'/.

20 '12

20 %

36 7% 13 1 7/e 2'12 1 18 1/e 2 '1•

36'12 13'1• 13% 2 1/e 2 7/e 1 18 %

% 7

5 1a 8 23

1% 10

6 12 71e

4% 9

2'/•

% 6 '/a 8 '12 23'/•

1% 10 3;, 6% 13 5 '1a 9'1•

Medium 40

s

38 32 '!.

38

9 '12 21 37 13 % 13 71e 2% 3'/e

1 '/, 19 1/e 2%

% 6%

9 23 '12 1% 11 % 7% 13'1• 5%

9'12

Large

Extra Large

44S

485

41 % 36'/e 41 3/4 9% 21 'I•

37'12 14 '/•

14 %

45% 3g 7/e

45% 10

21 '12 38

14 y, 14 7/e

2%

2'/•

3 '12

3 3/,

1 '13 19 % 2%

13/e 20 '1• 2 3/s

3j,

a;,

6%

6 7/e

9 '12

10 24 13;,

23% 1 3/• 12 1/e

8 13'12 6'/e

9%

12 7/s 8 3/4

133/•

6 'A 10

. . •. • I

•• •• •• •• ••

•• •• • •• ••

..•-


SLOPERS AND REDUCTIONS

CHAPTER 4

103

MEN 'S SHORT RIB KNIT REDUCTIONS Ten percent smaller in crosswise direction with . Use these measurements when draft" out any reductoons in lengthwise direction. Multiply your across measurements ~ngo slopers for fabrics that stretch 100% and over. ment will have twill tape to stabilize th~ s~90, 10% smaller, except for the shoulder measurement, because the final garam and prevent it from stretching. Multiply by Extra Small Small Extra Large Large Medium 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23

Chest Waist Hip Crotch depth Waist to knee Waist to ankle Ankle Knee Front crotch Back crotch Crotch angle Nape to waist Back neck Back neck rise Shoulder length Across back Sleeve length Shoulder pitch Bicep Wrist Neck Chest span Chest level

X .90 X .90 X .90 No reduction No reduction No reduction X .90 X .90 X .90 X .90 X .90 No reduction No reduction X .90 No reduction X .90 No reduction X .90 X .90 X .90 X .90 X .90 No reduction

32T

36 T

40T

44 T

26 31.

32% 27 32%

36 30 '1e 36 9 '12 21 37 13 13 '1•

39% 34'1a 39% 9 31• 21 'I• 37 '12 13 '12 13% 2 '12

23 % 28 314 9 20'12 36

7'1· 12 '1· 1% 2%

'lo

9 '1• 20 '1. 36 '12 12% 12'1. 2

2 31•

18 '1o

1 18%

2 '1• >;. 5 71o

2'1• % 6'1•

8 23 1 '12 9'12 5% 12 'I• 4% 8 '12

8 '12 23'1• 1 '12 10'1•

6'1• 12 % 5 8%

2 '1•

3 '1•

3 1 'I• 19 '1• 2%

1 'I• 19% 2%

'I•

'I•

6% 9 23 '12 1% 10% 7 12% 5% 9

6% 9'12 23 31· 1% 11 '12 7% 12 7lo

5 31·

48 T 43 '1•

37 31• 43 '1• 10 21 'h 38 14 14 2% 3% 1%

20 '1• 2%

'I•

6 71• 10 24 1% 12 'lo 8% 13

9 '/.

6 '1• 9 '12

Extra Large

MEN'S SHORT FOUR-WAY-STRETCH KNIT REDUCTIONS Ten percent smaller in crosswise direction and 10% smaller in the lengthwise direction. Use these measurements when draft ing slopers for fabrics that stretch 100% in both directions. Multiply your measurements by 0.90, 10% smaller, in both directions. Mult ip ly by

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23

Chest Waist Hip Crotch depth Waist to knee Waist to ankle Ankle Knee Front crotch Back crotch Crotch angle Nape to waist Back neck Back neck rise Shoulder length Across back Sleeve length Shoulder pitch Bicep Wrist Neck Chest span Chest leve l

No No No No No No

No

X .90 X .90 X .90 X .90 X .90 X .90 X .90 X .90 X .90 X .90 X .90 X .90 reduction reduction reduction reduction reduction reduction X .90 X .90 reduction X .90 X .90

Extra Small

Small

Medium

Large

325

365

405

44S

485

28% 23% 28 31• 8% 19 '12 34 'I•

30 %

32 31a 27 32%

34 '/. 28 % 34 'I• 9 19 71• 35 12 7l o 13

36 30% 36 9 20 35 'Ia 13 13 '1•

7'1• 12 '1• 1% 2% 1 17 '1•

2'1• % 7

5 1• 8 23 1% 9'12 5% 13 112 4% 9

25'1• 30 % 8% 19% 34 '12 12 % 12'12 2

2 11• 1 17 112 2 '/.

'I• 6

8 '1• 23 '1• 1% 9% 6 13% 4% 9'1o

8 31•

19 314 34 % 12 % 12 % 2 3 1 'Is 17 '1.

2 '1• %

6'1• 8% 23 '/. 1% 10'1•

6'!. 13% 5 9'1•

2'1a

2 '1•

3 '1• 1 '1• 18 2%

3% 1 '1• 18 '1• 2%

'I• 6 '1• 8'/. 23% 1 31· 10'12 6% 13 71s 5 11o 9%

'!. 6% 9 23 '12 1 31• 10% 7 14 5%

9 '12


'H <II.~'li.'R o4

1

2 3 4 5 6 7

8 9 10 11

12 13 14

15 16 17

18

19

20 21

22 23

Chest Warst Hrp Crotch depth Warst to knee Wars! to ankle Ankle Knee Front crotch Back crotch Crotch angle Nape to warst Back neck Back neck nse Shoulder length Across back Sleeve length Shoulder prtch Brcep Wnst Neck Chest span Chest level

SLOPERS AND R

c •• •• ••. .

EOUCTIONS

.•

•• • ••

No reduct1on

xo xo xo xo xo

No reduction

MEN'S TALL MODERATE KNIT REDUCTIONS Two percent smaller 1n crossw1se direction without any reductions in lengthwise direction. Use these measurements when drafting slopers for fabrics that stretch from 25% to 50%. Mult1ply your across measurements by 0.98, 2% smaller, except for the shoulder measurement, because the final garment will have twill tape to stabilize the seam and prevent it from stretching. Multiply by 1

2 3 4

5 6 7 8 9 10 11

12 13 14 15 16 17 18

19 20 21

22 23

Chest Waist Hip Crotch depth Waist to knee Waist to ankle Ankle Knee Front crotch Back crotch Crotch angle Nape to waist Back neck Back neck rise Shoulder length Across back Sleeve length Shoulder pitch Bicep Wrist Neck Chest span Chest level

X .98 X .98 X .98

No reduction No reduction No reduction X .98 X .98 X .98 X .98 X .98 No reduc tion No reduction X .98 No reduction X .98 No reduction

X.98 X.98 X .98

X .98 X .98 No reduction

Extra Small

Small

Medium

Large

Extra Large

32T

36T

40T

44T

48T

31 %

35 1/4 30 % 35 '/• 10 1/4 23 % 40'12 13 % 13 7/a 2'1· 3 1 1/a 20 % 2%

26 '12 31 % 10 23 1/a 40 8 13% 2 2% 1 20 1/a

2 '1• %

5'1e 8 26 1 3/. 10 '/• 6 '/a 13'1• 4 3;. 9 112

3;. 1

6 /a 8'12 26'1· 1'/e

11 6 7/e 13 112 5 1/4

ga;.

1

39'1•

43 / a

47 42 '/s

39'1•

38'1• 43 1/a

34 1/4 1

10 12 23% 41 14 '/• 14 %

2 '12 3'!. 1 '!. 21'/a

2% % 6% 9 26 '12

1'1e

1P;, 7% 13 3/4 s a;. 10

10 3/4 23 7/a 41'12 14 3/ . 14 7/a 2% 3% 1% 21 % 2%

% 6% 9 112 26 3/4 2 12 112

8% 14

6'14 10 1/.

47 11 24 '/s 42 15 '/• 15%

3 4

1'/2

22 1/s 2%

% 6% 10

27 2 13'/• 9

1•Y•

ea,.

-~

•• ••• •• •• •• •

-•• •,.•


SLOPERS AND REDUCTIONS

MEN 'STALLSTTRREET~C~H~Y~K~N~~~~-------------------------------

lhrt>e percent smaller inc . IT REDUCTIONS Use these measure rosswlse direct1on w1tho 1 . M 11 ments when draftin 1 u any reduc11ons in lengthwise direction. Y, ~p1Y ~our across measurements bygo ~~P~~s for fabrics that slretch from 50% to 75%. WI

• •• J

J

t J

J

•• ••'

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23

ave Wi ll tape to stabilize the seam ~ d' % smaller, except for lhe shoulder measurement, because the final garment n prevent 11 from strelching. Multiply by Extra Small Small Extra Large Medium Large

Chest Waist Hip Crotch depth Waist to knee Waist to ankle Ankle Knee Front crotch Back crotch Crotch angle Nape to waist Back neck Back neck rise Shoulder length Across back Sleeve length Shoulder pitch Bicep Wrist Neck Chest span Chest level

.97 X .97 X .97 No reduction No reduction No reduction X .97 X .97 X .97 X .97 X .97 No reduction No reduction X .97 No reduction X .97 No reduction X .97 X .97 X .97 X .97 X .97 No reduction X

32T

36T

40T

44T

48T

31 26'1• 31 10 23 1/s

35

38 3/• 34 38% 10'12 23% 41 14 14 '/e 2% 3 1/4 1 '1• 21 1ls 2%

42% 37 7/s 42% 10% 23 7/s 41 112 14 112 14% 2% 3'12 1% 21 'Ia 2%

46 '12 41 % 46 112 11 24 1/e 42 15 15 1/s 3

6% 9 26 112 1 7/e 11 % 7 112 13%

6% 9 112 26% 2 12% 8 '1• 13 7/s 6 '1• 10 '1•

6'1• 10 27

40

7 7/s 13 1/ . 2

2% 1 1

20 /s 2'1•

•;.

5 7/s 8 26 1% 10 '/s 6 13

4•;. 9 112

30

35 10 '/• 23% 40 112 13% 13% 2 1/s 3 1 20% 2

1 /•

a;.

6'/s 8 112 26 1/4

1 7/s 11 6% 13%

5'1•

9•;.

a;.

5•;,

10

•;.

3 '1s 1 '12 22'/e 2%

•;.

2

13 9 14 6 ·1· 10%

I

~

MEN'S TALL SUPER-STRETCH KNIT REDUCTIONS

~

Five percent smaller in crosswise direction without any reductions in lengthwise direction. Use these measurements when drafting slopers for fabrics that stretch from 75% to 100%. Multiply your across measurements by 0.95, 5% smaller, except for the shoulder measurement, because the final garment will have twill tape to stabilize the seam and prevent it from stretching.

I I

Multiply by

Extra Small

Small

Medium

Large

Extra Large

X .95 .95 x .95 No reduction No reduction No reduction 95 X · 95 X · x ·95 x ·95 95

30% 25 'Ia 30 % 10 23 'I• 40 7 s;. 13 1 '1• 2'12 1 20 'Is

34 'I• 29 '12 34 'Is 10 '1• 23 %

6 7 8 9 10 11

Chest Waist Hip Crotch depth Waist to knee · tt kl W a1s o an e Ankle Knee Front crotch Back crotch Crotch angle

38 1 33 1• 38 10 '12 23 'Ia 41 13 % 13 71e 2% 3 116 1 '/• 21 1ls

41 % 37 41 % 3 10 /• 23 'I• 41 '12 14 '1• 14% 2% 3 '12 1 '1• 21 'Is

45 % 40 'I• 45 % 11 24 'I• 42 14•1, 14 71e 2 7le 3% 1% 22 1/s

14 15 16 17 18

Back neck rise Shoulder length Across back Sleeve length Shoulder pitch

5 'Is 8 26 1 31• 10

6'ls

6% 9 26 '12 ,, 1 ,s 11 %

6%

6 71s

26 1• 71 1 1s 12'/s

19 20 21

Bicep Wrist Neck

X · No reduction 95 X · No reduction 95 X · X .9 5 x .95 X . 95 X .95

" 13'1• 5%

13'12 6

22 23

Chest level

1 2 3 4 5

~~ ~=~~~~~aist

x

x ·

~~;:~~~::~~ 95

2;~

6

12 7ls 4%

40'12

13 '1• 13% 2'1• 2 'I• 1 20 %

2;~

8 '12 26 'I• 3 1 'I• 10 %

6 s'

13

's

5'1s

2::: ?• 's

2::: 9'12 3

8

2:::

10 27 2 12 71s

B''

'' 13%

6'12

Chest~~~an~--------~~~~~·~------~9~~~·--------9 --'12_________9_~_._______1_o__________1o~·-~---No reduction


106

CHAPTER 4

SLOPERS AND REDUCTIONS

I

~

MEN'S TALL RIB KNIT REDUCTIONS

• I------ ;. ••I •• •I•

Ten percent smaller in crosswise direction without any reductions in lengthwise direction. Use these measurements when drafting slopers for fabrics that stretch 100% and over. . Multiply your across measurements by 0.90, 10% smaller, except for the shoulder measurement, because the final Qarment will have twill tape to stabilize the seam and prevent it from stretching. Large Medium Ex~ Small Extra Small Multiply by ~ 44 T 40T 36T 481 32T

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23

Chest Waist Hip Crotch depth Waist to knee Waist to ankle Ankle Knee Front crotch Back crotch Crotch angle Nape to waist Back neck Back neck rise Shoulder length Across back Sleeve length Shoulder pitch Bicep Wrist Neck Chest span Chest level

X .90 X .90 X .90 No reduction No reduction No reduction X .90 X .90 X .90 X .90 X .90 No reduction No reduction X .90 No reduction X .90 No reduction X .90 X .90 X .90 X .90 X .90 No reduction

28% 24 114 28 31· 10 23'1• 40

7 '1• 12 11• 1% 2%

'Ia 20 'Ia 2 '1• 'I• 5 71a 8 26 1% 9 '12 5% 12'1a 4% 8%

32 % 28 32 % 10 11• 23 % 40 112 12 % 12 % 2 2% 1 20% 2 '/.

'I• 6 '1• 8 '12 26'1• 1% 10 1la 6 '1• 12 'Ia 4 'Ia 9

36 31 112 36 10 112 23 % 41 13 13 1la

2'1• 3 1 1la 21 '1s 2% 'I• 6% 9 26 '12 1% 10 % 7 12 % 5% 9 '1•

39% 35 11a 39% 10 % 23 7la 41 '12 13'12 13 %

2 '12 3'1· 1 '1• 21 % 2% 'I• 6% 9 '12 26 % 1% 11 '12 7% 12 71a 5% 9'12

I

43 1;, 38 3;, 43 1; , 11 24 ';, 42 14 14 2';, 3% 1'1. 22 '1• 2%

"'

6 71a 10 27 1 31· 12 '1a 8% 13

6'1•

9%

MEN'S TALL FOUR-WAY-STRETCH KNIT REDUCTIONS Ten percent smaller in crosswise direction and 10% smaller in the lengthwise direction. Use these measurements when drafting slopers for fabrics that stretch 100% in both direct ions. Multiply you r measurements by 0.90, 10% smaller, in both directions. Multiply by

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23

Chest Waist Hip Crotch depth Waist to knee Waist to ankle Ankle Knee Front crotch Back crotch Crotch angle Nape to waist Back neck Back neck rise Shoulder length Across back Sleeve length Shoulder pitch Bicep Wrist Neck Chest span Cheat level

X .90 X .90 X .90 X .90 X .90 X .90 X .90 X .90 X .90 X .90 X .90 X .90 No reduction No reduction No reduction No reduction No reduction No reduction

X .90 X .90 No reduction

X .90 X .90

Extra Small

Small

Medium

Large

Extra Large

32T

36T

40T

44 T

48T

28 % 24 'I• 28 % 9'12 22 38 7'/. 12 1/4 1% 2% 1 19 1/a

30 % 26'/a 30 % 9% 22 38 1/4 12 % 12 1/2 2 2 7/a 1 19 % 2 1/4

32% 28 32% 9%

34 '/• 29 3/• 34 1/4 9 7/a 22 '13 38 3/4 12 7/s 13 2 1/a 3 1/a

36 1 31 ' 36 10 1 22 ' 39 13 13 1 s 2' '

%

%

2'1.

% 5 7/a 8 26 1'/a 9 '12 5% 13 112 4% 9'1•

6 8 '/• 26'/a 1 7/a 9% 6 13%

4% 9%

22 '1• 38 112 12 % 12 % 2 3 1 1/a 19 %

2'1•

1''• 19 / a 2%

''•

6 1/a 8'12

6'1• 8 3/4

26'1•

26%

1% 10 1/e

6'1•

13 3/.

4% 9'1t

1 '/a 10 'h

6% 13 7/\

5

9'~

I

3 ~s

1' • 20

2 ~,

s, 6~S

9

26'/l 2 10s/, 7

,..5'.41 t1!,4

•. •• • •• •

•• •

•• •• •

.• ••

-•-• ~

1


CHAPTER

5

Skirts About This Chapter This chapter I · · · h begins · with the development of the sk'1rt soper smce· 1tt IS t t'e eas1est of all styles Draft th k' t b fi . ' · · e s 1r y o11owmg t h.e ms . rue wns, usmg the measuremen t s prov1'ded , or by sub st1tutmg measurements from the charts m · the previous · ch apter. You ~ay create all of the different stretch skirt sloperssta.ble kmt, moderate kmt, stretchy knit, and super-stretch knit-or Simply create the largest ratio stable kit and draw the other ratios in colored markers. ' ' In addition, this chapter demonstrates the drafting process for different patterns, such as A-line skirt, slightly gathered waist, full gathered waist, and dirndl skirt; center back slit, side-seam slit, drawstring side-seam, and gathered side-seams. Although all these patterns are labeled "one-way stretch," they may be used interchangeably with two-waystretch and four-way-stretch fabrics because a skirt does not pass over the shoulders or through the crotch, therefore not utilizing any of the lengthwise stretch. For maximum mobility and a tight fit, one-way-stretch garments should always be cut with the stretch going around the body. There are five principles of knit patternmaking that are explained and illustrated throughout this chapter: 1. Negative ease 2. Adding a style line . 3. Slash and spread to add fullness, flare, gathermg, and

ease 4. Circles for skirts and ruffles . d 1 t' 5. Reductions for binding, bandi~g, ~n:, ~:il~ ~::~a gen6. After studying this chapter, t e s u ~?" era! knowledge of stretch patternma mg.

Skirt Slopers

back that are identical. . . . ly a front and . . 'bl U The skirt sloper IS simP d how this IS possi e. nay won er, h . '11 always stretc to conWoven patternmak ers m 't fabncs WI 1 derstand that stretch-k m f the body. You may a so form to the front a~d b.:c~r~~=~ ~traight. Understand also wonder why the waist I 107


10$

HAPTE:H 5

SKIRTS

th aist will h appen because of Lh(• corn that the curve of . e w · pression of the fatbl1te·tcs.kirt is stretched across, it will shorten in Note that as d b t t h' . and exc . ess that is not shortene · t YTh' s re ·c bmg Will tl1e watst 1s LS ecause compress ' to c1•ea t e an artificial curvedbwms d . the tendency of knits is to mold to the o y.

One-Way-Stretch Skirt Sloper (Stable Knit) The following draft is shown for the skirt sloper an~ is illus. trated in Misses Medium, but the. measurements for Small, Large, and Extra Large are also mcluded for future drafts. Also, note that personal measurements may be substituted in the Standard Measurement column, to create a personal sloper, or you may substitute Misses measurements for other size ranges, such as Petite, Junior, Half Size, Plus Size, etc . The front and back skirt sloper will be drafted on top of each other; then notched, traced, separated, and labeled. Slopers/blocks should always be made of oak-tag, green board, or block plastic. The experienced patternmaker will complete all the sets of skirt slopers for each stretch ratio. Before starting any draft, determin e the stretch ratio of the fabric and select the appropriate sloper. However, for clarity, time, and to save materials, the draft in this chapter is completed in stable knit, and the other stretch ratios are indicated on the slopers in contrasting colored ma rker s. Note that a particular company's size specs may fall between sizes. The dra ft should be drafted accordingly.

MEASUREMENTS NEEDED FOR STABLE KNIT SKIRTS Use the Misses stable-knit measurements forth . . . . . rat1os on the sloper with contrastin e basic Skirt draft, Since 1t IS the largest, then indicate the different stretch 1 g co ored markers. Standard Medium New Divide Extra measure- Reduce measureExtra # by Extra ments Extra by ment Extra Extra panels Small Small 2 Waist Small Medium Large Large Large 27 % 0% 28 '!. 4 3 Hip 22% 23'12 38'12

4 Crotch depth 5

Waist to knee

6 Waist to ankle

0%

10%

No length reduction

39 1/ ,

4

33 1/ 2 10 112

23

No length reduction

22%

38'12

No length reduction

38';.

25'12

27 %

30'12

34 '12

36%

38 1/2

10%

41

1 '2

10 '12

10 %

10 '/s

11 1•s

37 ': 48'': 11 ;.

23

22 7/s

23

23 1/.

23 112

23'•

38 '12

38 1/ ,

38 '12

39

39'12

___.

33 112

44

1

'2

40

= . ~

-.••

•..

.•

•.. ••

••

•• . •


.

SKIRTS

C HAPTER 5

109

Skirt Sloper Draft Since the ft·ont will be d ra f ted on t f 0 sun~ments need to be d ..d d. P o the back the mealVI

#

2 3 4

e Into four.

Extra Extra Small

Extra Small

5% 8% 10 •;,

5 7/a 8% 10% 3 •;,

'I• of waist •;, of hip Crotch depth '/3 of crotch depth

3 ';,

'

Small

Medium

Large

Extra Large

Extra Extra Large

6%

6 7/a 9% 10 % 3 •;,

7% 10 % 10 7/a 3%

8% 11 1/a 11 1/a 3 3/4

9% 12 '/• 11 % 3 3/4

9 '/a 10 4/a 3 •;,

For your sample size and stret h . from t he a ppropriate ch t f c ratws, choose measurements ar rom the p1. · explanation of reductions and evwus c11apter. For an ter 4, Slopers a nd R eductions. measurements used, see Chap-

,-1---~·

-i j_ ____ ______ _

D~

c

J H

A-B = square across the waist measurement (#2 from chart). A-C = crotch depth square down (#4 from chart). C-D = hip measurement squared across (#3 from chart). D-E = squared up to waist level, it's just a temporary guideline and should not meet up with B, but should square up to E. Divide E-F into thirds, as illustrated: E-F =one-third of E-D. F-G = one-third of E-D . G-D = one-third of E-D . At B-G for industry sizes (one-third of E-D), draw a curved hip line using a variform c~rve, . . tely #4 of the ruler (vanform p lacmg approx1ma d. · t 0 th curved ruler) at the waist and bien mg m e side seam to draw the hip curve. d dThe shape of the hips may change epen d t the age group, an ing on the target mark e ' size specs of your customer.

Since there is no such thing as "stretch muslin" to test the fit, you must create a custom style using the actual fabric. This may not be practical for the home sewer, student, or for a custom designer, who may only want to purchase enough fabric for one garment. In order to do this you must exaggerate the fit through the hip area and simply serge off the excess after the fitting. Draw the hip curve to the higher mark and correct the hip shape in fitting. Do not spend a lot of time and effort drawing this hip curve, as it will eventually be serged off. A-H = waist to knee (#4 from chart), or any length required. A-H =waist to ankle (#6 from chart). C-H = square down. D-I = square down. H-1 =square across.


110

CHAF'H' R 5

SKIRTS

1

I( a: w 0

w 0

a.

--' (/)

••.. .

.,"'

u <( m

u..

'

s

~

z a: 0

••

:\2

--'

(/)

1-

'

.,"'E1 .,"'

a:

a.

= ••

7"'1

.•

"0

c

"'

.<: L)

-ro E

}S"

Remove '//' from the back side-seam of the draft.

TRUEING THE SKIRT SLOPER

Add '14' to the front side-seam of the draft.

Place a hip notch at G (two-thirds from waist to crotch).

Trace the hip notch to both pieces.

Trace separately and true the skirt slopers.

This 1s so the back is larger than the front; and, when viewed from the front, you cannot see the side seams, as they will be slightly toward the back.

Place the front and back side-seams on top of each other and ensure that they are exactly the same shape and length, and that all notches match perfectly. A perfect sloper is required for a perfect garment.

3

2

u_ t)

0 -'

_

::

:: ::

:: :: :: ::

:~

For clari~y, time, and to save materials, the student k · designer may create the sloper £or stable mts and trace the other fabrications using the measurements already provided.

Waist Hip

Stable Knit

Moderate Knit

0 0

'Ia -'Ia

Stretchy Knit

v. v.

SuperStretch Knit

Rib Knit

-'I• 'I•

-v. v.

0u_ ONE-WAY STRETCH STABLE KNIT SKIRT BLOCK FRONT MED NAME DATE CREATED

()

OJ

-, 0 r

0

ONE-WAY STRETCH STABLE KNIT SKIRT BLOCK BACK MED NAME DATE CREATED

Label the slopers correctly and include whether they are the front piece or the back piece. Label the slopers with the type of stretch"one-way stretch"-and the degree, or type. of stretch. Label with your name and the date created· No grainline for blocks. It is not necessarY to label the skirt "one-way" stretch as that is implied when labeled "stable-knit." ' _Label the side seams with the other stretcb ratios (see next).

•• •

•• •• •• •• ••

.


SKIRTS

CHAPTER 5

111

'f(

~•

•• I I I I

COMPARE SLOPERS If you have created a complete set of slopers in all stretch rat1os, compare and check the side seams. Line up all four sets of skirt slopers at the side seams and check that the differences between slopers match, and that all curves are exactly the same.

Line up all four sets of skirt slopers at the center front and check that the differences between slopers match. and that all curves are exactly the same. Repeat for the back.

Repeat for the back.

Skirt Equipment The seam allowances needed depend on the type offabric used and equipment used (see Chapter 3, Principles of Pattern-Drafting). Stable Knits

Moderate Knits Stretchy and Super Stretch Knits

Use %" or W' seam allowances for thicker fabrics, or loosely knitted, because if the fabric is very thick, the serge will just pull off if too small Use %" seam allowances Use './.o'' or%" seam allowances

4-thread serger or 5-thread serger 4-thread serger 4-thread serger or 3-thread serger

Seam Allowances For Skirts Side seams Straight hems Curved hems Waist edge (depends on the style of waist finish}

Waistbands Slit

%" 1"

V2" './.o'' None 3Ja" %" %" None . Same width as the elast1c 1., fold back facing/hem

4-thread serger Cover-stitch Cover-stitch For elastic in a casing For elastic serged to waist For separate waistband For underwear finish For ribbed waistband For%" binding Straight stitch


'1'1-

CHAPTER 5

I

SKIRTS

3'8"

~

~ ~

3'8"

r 38

3 18"

::

I':

I ::

:I:~ ~

i

I':

:I ;::~

318

318"

I;:

I':

I::

:I :::~

1• hem allOwance

I ':

M ALLOWANCES TO SKIRTS ADDING SEA m allowances for assembly. All patterns need sea II ce is determined by t of seam a owan The amoun . th revious chart. the seam allowance m tt e p trace out the dra ft To complete the ~a ~r;, add the necessary or sloper. For a Simp ~lis ~:~ted label the patallowances as I u ' . seam d d add the grainhne. tern as illustrate , an b hecking every Always true the pattern y c . . seam allowance before cutting it out mh tabnc.. IJ Check the lengths of every seam t a t WI be sewn together. Check the notch placement, and that all notches match perfectly. . Check that all intersecting and crossmg lines form a smooth and continuous line. Check that all seams a re squared.

I:: I:: I:: '-·~..L_ _ _ __

h propriate sloper front and Trace t ~ apt'o back. The out stretc ra I depends on your fabric choice: • • • • •

Stable knit Moderate knit Stretchy knit Super-stretch knit Rib knit

Decide on the fit of the waist you require, or desire: • Fitted waist • Semi-fitted waist • Unfitted waist

Waist Volume Depending on the season and the silhouette currently in fashion, you may add fullness to the waist of a skirt or pants. Each technique provides slightly different results. This section demonstrates the various techniques used to add fullness at the waist of skirts. The principles may be applied to pants and other garments as well. For instructions on how to draft a separate waistband, see Chapter 6. For waist finishes that are attached to the skirt pattern, such as casings and elastic finishes, see the following: Medium waist == 26 112'' + 25%. Stable-knit s_tretch 1ratio == 331/2", which is not enough to pull over h1ps; 36 12'' unless you use a zipper, or some kind of open1ng at the waist.

th~

•• •

•• •• •• ••

••

••


SKIRTS

CHAPTER 5

113

...

P1nS at the wa 1st

~

stretch to fit the htp

HOW TO TEST IF YOUR SKIRT WILL PULL ON WITHOUT A ZIPPER

Stretch the waist and see if it will reach the draft, at the hip level.

Fold your fabric a few inches down from the cut edge and lay it on top of the skirt draft, at the waist. Place one pin at the side seam and another at the center front.

If it stretches enough, then you may use the fitted waist. If not, then you must check to see if the semi-fitted waist will stretch enough to fit over the hips. If not, then you must use the unfitted waist. If you fuse a waistband or facing, the skirt will still not pull on and a zipper or other opening will be needed.

WAIST FIT There are different waist fits that must be considered when drafting skirts.

FITTED WAIST

For a fitted waist (applicable only if the fabric will stretch enough to be pulled on over the hips), use the sloper as drafted and add seam allowances, hems, and other details required . . f ld of the fabric a few To check place the crossw1se 0 . d â&#x20AC;˘ the waist of your fabnc, an . t f your sloper/ inches below the cut edge on . h ount of the wa1s o place pin s markmg t e am . t will stretch to . ht d see if th1s amoun patterns. Hold t1g an nfitted waist. If that is the width of the hips. If not, use the u too large, use the semi-fitted waist.

a...1 0

u.. u..

u


114

CHAPTER 5

SKIRTS

= ••

rr a.

CF

::J

CF

a.

~

~I

"' ::J

0"

::J

U)

0"

<J)

SEMI-FITTED WAIST

UNFITTED WAIST

Use the loosely fitted waist draft when the fabric does not stretch enough to allow the waist to be pulled on over the hips, such as with stable and moderate knits. For example, the waist of a stable-knit skirt is only 26'12'', while the hip is 36'·"'. The fabric will not stretch enough to allow the skirt to be pulled on over the hips:

For semi-fitted waist, find the middle of the fitted waist and the unfitted waist and draw a new hip, using the vanform hip curve. Alternatively, increase the waist by any amount that will allow the waist to fit over the hips.

increase by 100%

.- - -------- -------- -----------------·-.. ------------------------CF

CF

----------------

Additional Waist Gath

.

Your · enng desi.gn may require additional a t the wa1st. gathering For light g th · . w · . a enng, Increase th aist measurement by 50%, e original

.•. ..

•• •• ••

26 '12" + 25% (6W') ; 33'14', too small for hips of 36'/i'. Increase the waist by extending the side seams straight up, which will resu lt in a larger waist that can be pulled in with gathering or elastic.

increase by 50%

••.. ..

For medium gathermg, · double the original measurement (increase by 100~ ).


SKIRTS

CHAPTER 5

115

CF

¡------------------------==----Very h~a.vy or exaggerated . the ongmal measure g~thermg may triple 300%). ment (mcr ease by up to This may be too much . or regular-weight fabrics. gathermg for heavy

s\a.sn and spread the desired amount

CF

.....

:::::::::::::::::::::::::::

Waist Gathering Without Increasing the Width at the Hem The previous draft increases the hem circumference as well as the waist. Follow these instructions if you wish to increase the waist and not the hem. Slash and spread to create added fullness at the waist.

Increase by 50% of the ori ina! w . up to as much as double the orT i 1 alst, measurement. g na wa1st Remember to blend the hem . t 0 and continuous line. m a smooth


116

CHAPTER 5

SKIRTS

St_y le #5-001 Basic Skirt With Side Shts, Patch Pockets Elastic in a Casing, and Cover-Stitched Hem This basic style teaches about basic skirt patterns, patch pockets, slits, details, elastic in a casing, elastic stretch ratios, and cover-stitched hems. Complete this pattern as illustrated for practice before attempting to draft any other styles, and construct using the sewing instructions in the companion textbook, Stretch Construction. Compare your skirt blocks and sample with the mark sheets in the Appendix before handing them in.

.

D

':: '. '. ' .. r::

•• •• •

I::

I:: I::

'.: : I I:;

I':

I::

I:;

I':

.: i i

_._;_

Trace out the a - - .- - - . . . . J Th ppropnate sloper front and back e stretch ratw depends on your fabric choice:. • Stable knit • Moderate knit • Stretchy knit • Super-stretch knit • Rib knit Decide on the fit of . the waist you require, or desire. • Fitted waist : Semi-fitted waist Unfitted waist

..... •. • •• •• •• •

I::

'

•• •• ••.

PATCH POCKETS

A patch pocket may be placed anywhere on the skirt,

pant, top, sweater, or T-shirt, but will be explained on the back of this skirt, 2'12'' below the waist.

••

•• • •

-


SK IRTS

CHAPTER 5

117

1

2

Draw a. guideline 2'12'' below the nat ura1 wa1st . . It m b lower 1f reqUJred or if used for lowe red wa1sts . ¡ or ay e 1 that the design requires. ' any P ace

Find the center of the guideline, from hip to center back, and measure down the depth of the pocket for 5". If using the semi-fitted or unfitted waist, the guideline will be wider and you should use the center of that new line.

3

4

T l 0~

5'

Make the pocket 5" wide, centered on the vertical guideline, 2'12" on each side of the guideline. Alternatively, use

The pocket may be used straight across the bottom or may be angled. For an angled bottom, measure down an additional 'h'' to create the bottom of the pocket.

any measurement that you require .

5

1/4'

"'"'0'

". d es at the top of the Mark the drill marks 'Iâ&#x20AC;˘ 1n from the e g dges of the "" from the top e pocket, and measure down ,. pocket.

6

0

0

Drill holes are created by actually drilling a small hole in the garment, and must be inside the pocket or your garment will have visible holes. Only the complete skirt should have the drill marks, not the pocket draft.


CHAPTER 5

SKIRTS

Add a 1" hem at the top of the pocket and %" seam allowances on all other sides.

l"hem

- r----------------------·-

r

x·:

:

: '1\~'

Create any design on your pocket.

-

r:.

---------.\.::·-------~ -

The stitching used for designs will prevent the pocket from stretching out of shape. Note that the pocket will need tricot fusing when stitching a design; remember to trim away all excess tricot.

.---.

------~?",:

,__ . '

'

.......:::/:·:·.:::··...... .--------...

·_ _i

·---

,'

/_:'

- ------------.. ----------., -

- -----------------------~ -

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' '''

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'''

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·--...... _

\_\

______

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........

..·

I

!.l ' i

__

J

To prevent the pocket from stretching out of shape when sewing it to the skirt, serge the bottom of the pocket with twill tape, on the inside of the pocket, for one-way stretch. before applying it to the garment. However, if using four-way stretch, serge the twill tape to all three sides. The top will be hemmed with the coverstitch machine.

•••

-•.•. •. •• •• • •• ••

•• •• •• •• •

-•

.. • ~ ~


SKIRTS

CHAPTER 5

119

3"

1 CF

2 CF

SLASH POCKETS WITH 1" ANCHOR Place a mark on the waist 3" in from the side seam.

Create a 6" pocket line going from the 3" mark to wherever 6" of length lands on the side seam. You can create a pocket as small as 5 '12' for very small hands and up to 7" for large hands.

3 ,~

:

/

CF

4 CF

11"

' 1 1" s路

s路

Square in for 1". M easure down 1" for the poc ket anchor.

6

/.. .

5

Draw the pocket bag 11" down and at least 5" wide. Shape as illustrated. The pocket bag can be enlarged, made deeper, but it is not a good idea to make it any shorter, because when the customer sits down the contents will fall out of her pocket.

CF

SKIRT FRONT

blend blend

._/':-:.路

f r easier assembly, so the 0 Blend into a curved pocket bag y around instead . t all the wa operato r c an serge 1n one s ep erging ners when s 路 . . of hav1ng to p1vot at the cor

MED CUT1

Trace and separate the pocket places, and label as Illustrated.


120

CHAPTER 5

SKIRTS

7

"Z:.:

8

~// UPPER BAG

MED CUT 2

The pocket bags are customarily cut from self, but may be cut in lightweight fabric or tricot lining if a pocket facing is created . Draw the facing line onto the under pocket, 2" in from the cut edge, and trace 1t through to the upper poc ket.

Trace out the pattern pieces as illustrated .

3"

2

1 CF

SLASH POCKET WITH FULL ANCHOR Place a mark on the waist 3" in from the side seam.

Create a 6" pocket line going for the 3" mark to wherever it lands on the side seam. You can create a pocket as small as 5 112" for very small hands and up to 7" for large hands.

4

3 CF

11"

s¡

UNDER POCKET CUT2

l SKIRT FRONT MEO CUT1

Draw the pocket bag 11 , d as illustrated. The pocket bown and at least 5" wide. Shape . . ag can be en\ arged, made deeper, but It IS not a good idea t because when the custome 't o make It any shorter fall out of her pocket. r Sl s down the contents win Trace out the pocket bag as illustrated.


SKIRTS

CHAPTER 5

121

7"

1"

Side-Sea m Slits

Skirts may be created wit h a slit on one side or both sides of the side seams. The side-seam slit is created the same as the center back slit; however, it must be added to the front side-seam as well as the back sideseam of the pattern .

//···r·· ··c \ SKIRT FRON i MED _;cUT 1 ON FOL

I

I I I I I I

... ... . . t.. . .. 11 wances to the patAdd the n ecessar y seam. a ? the fold line of ter n a nd a dd a notch to mdlcate th e slit. a llowance to You don't a dd a n extra seam the slit , as it is a lready added.

_ J, ____ _ _ -~ -----

I

CENTER BACK SLIT Slits should be used to allow movement and increase mobility in straight, narrow skirts that extend below the knee. This draft requires a seam line, which is shown in the cen· ter back, but may be any place the des1gn requires. Draft a slit on center back, center front, or side front .


C H 1\l'llR 5

S KIRTS

CB CB

1"1 ~

'-

6"

6"

1"

Trace out the appropnate skirt sloper. Create a center back slit of any length, illustrated here at 6".

1"

May be straight across the top o f the slit, if desired. Create a bias angle at the top o f the slit, 1" above the slit if desired. '

fl (I

il il

CB

ONE-WAY STRETCH SKIRT BACK

MED

..r"" ... , ("'

. ,...

....

I

CUT2

I

I I I I

I I I I

I I I

=1========== Complete the draft as illustrated. It is not necessary to . 1 1nc ude th d -1 end of sewing· you ca . e n I hole to indicate the ' n eas1ly st . parallel to the angle in the slit. op sewing at the level If the slit is not sewn d . own for at I or rema1n closed {S east 1", it will n t 1. · ee construction n t o 1e flat o es.)

SIDE-FRONT SLIT Create a slit on the side f . ront by follow1ng the same instructions. Draft the slit on either side or both sides.

fl

. tl

..•

.. ..,... ,.,.


SKIRTS

123

CHAPTER 5

1"

6"

1"

Trace out the appropriate sloper. Trace out both sides, since the style is asymmetrical. Determine the style line placement.

SKIRT FRONT PANEL

MED

Draft the slit as required.

CUT1 R.S.U.

l

\ CF

CF

-----------ELASTIC IN A CASING

th attach elastic at e There are many different ways to nd simplest for beginwaist. This method is the easiest, a ners to understand.

Draw a guideline up from the waist, an amount equal to the width of the elastic (illustrated at 1" for 1" wide elastic).


~ iAPTI:R 5

1" X 25" fimshed elaStiC

CF

Measure up an add•t•onal amount for the foldback. Th1s IS the area tha' w1l be ms1de wher> the wa•st 1s folded down

Label the wa1st with the fimshed elastic measurement. There are many different ways to sew the elastic, each w1th different seam amounts, so 1t is always preferable to indicate the fin1shed, or after sewn, measurement. If the manufacturer's particular equ1pment requires a larger or smaller seam allowance, inform the sewer what length of elastic you wish after the waist is sewn. Follow the same procedures for unfitted and semi-fitted waists. The elastic measurement remains the same for all three waist styles. The customer did not get any larger; she is simply wearing a skirt wi th more gathering.

1

1"x25" finished elast1c

CF

...............

........................ :::::::::::::;

COVER-STITCHED HEM

Cover-stitched hems are the b choice for the hem. The c est and most professional stretch. over-stitch will allow the hem to

-"'••.-. •• •.. .... -.-. .....

;.

SKIRTS

: 1'"' hem allowance

·-------------------!

Use at least a 1" hem allowance for straight hems. This will g1ve an added . . amount of we1ght to the hem, and hold 1t d . own Without creating a heavy hem. For curved hem

,

s, use a 112 hem allowance.

'tit ;.

i lt

iM.I


SKIRTS 1" X 25" finished elastic

125

CHAPTER 5

y,"

.-----------------------,

0

~ 1"x25" _) finished elastic

0

....: :.,,

\/, . :.J~ \,:

SKIRT BACK MED CUT 1

\( I \\1 CUT1

..

4,

l ___ l_ ______________ _ _________________ j ____ j

Seam Allowances For Style #5-001

WAIST

Illustration shows the final style before any seam allowances have been added. Note that all production patterns should be cut full un' folded, as illustrated.

Add ';." seam allowances to the top edge of the waist, for serging, or turn under.

.------------------------. ~

%"

'' '' ~ '' ''

1"x 25"

,./ 0

0

....:

I \\

) finished elastic

%"

:,

'' '' ' ~' ' :'

. I . : : :

''

SKIRT BACK MEO CUT1

'

v.· :'

l___

\ l _---- --------------------------- J__ - _j

'' ' :'

,}

r

: :

:

: ''

''

~-----------------------------------------1: 1" hem allowance

[ 1

1

_

SIDE SEAMS Add %" seam allowances for 4 -th read serger. 1to the original. Keep the curves exactly para 11e

SLITS

d d· the llowances ad e • The slits do not need any seam a foldback has already been added.

HEM Add 1" hem allowance for a straight hem. The completed pattern should lo<;>k like the illustration. before the necessary labeling.


, 126

HAPTER 5

~

SKIRTS

::---;=;-25--------------:

,,~

finished elast1c

,'/ 0

0

:

i

\\ \

: '' .... '

\\

"~ \

'' ' ''

STYLE# 7001 SKIRT BACK

j

CUT1

~

''

' l '

:

~

STYLE # 7001 SKIRT BACK

: :

Mffi CUT1

:

MED

: :

'

'

l

'

: ,'

:\

...,o~"' 'I<

----------------------------------------------------~---~------ - -------------

1· hem allowance

Each pattern piece should be traced out on oak-tag for PATTERN LABELING

Label the pattern as 1ndicated. Include the drill marks for the pocket placement. the style number, the part of the garment, the s1ze, and how many to be cut. Label the waist w1th the fimshed elastic measurements. Number your pattern p1eces as illustrated to correspond to the pattern card, p1ece number 1 of 2.

production. Many patternmakers like to have as little information as possible on the pattern, and t ake pride in having a clean, neat pattern; however, it is often preferable to indicate as much information on the pattern as possib le, for easier production.

Complete the pattern card as shown in the Appendix, and paste, glue, or staple to oak-tag and hang on the pattern hook, m front of the completed pattern.

l

2"

2"

1

------ --------------------- -------·

STYLE #5-002 SKIRT WITH LOWERED SIDE-FRONT SLITS WAIST AND

This style teaches how to lower a sk·1rt . tic reductions necessary for 10 Waist, and the elas. wered waists • panel seams, shts, and elastic in a casing.

Lower the waist any am at 2" below the nat aunt required, but illustrated here ural waist.

:,. -.•... ••

-..•.. -..

''-


SKIRTS

rr~ -

CHAPTER !>

127

-------------- 11

,r -------------------'----

1

---------- ------

''

'' 1" •

'' '' '

''

• 1"

I I

4"

4"

·---1"

Then square up an additional 1112'' for the part of the casing that folds down.

i

4" I

4"

!

y

y

y

y

'

t'

11

1

'' '

'' '' '

''

i For the casing, use 1'12' elastic, so draw a guideline 11/2 above the newly lowered waist.

'

t' 1"

·---1"

----~

1"

----~

1"

Create panel seams as desired. It is much sexier and flattering to make the seams parallel to the original side seam, rather than having a square, boxy panel.

~~- ~-~~-~-~~-~-~~-~~~-~-~~

1 1/2" X 27" finished elastic

I

·---- ----------

''

... 1'

1"

''

... 1"

'

'' ''

''

I

''

...

''''

4"

'

4"

4"

----~

1"

1"

1"

!

4"

i

y

y

y

''

...

''

! ! y ·---·---'

1"

----~

1'

Label the waist with the finished elastic measurement. ·d of the waist. Square down to create the s1 es

Note that the elastic should be the measurement of the model or the dress form , at the new waist minus 1".


l.'~~

HAPT R 5

SKIRTS

SIDE PANEL MED

ANEL SKIRT FRONT MED CU11 SELF

cur:>

mm

fie <m he Side p:::~e

Draw a g•a

es 10

Notch t'le PI

Separate the p1eces

er co structiof'l

1 •• J( '2T'

•I

f.n shed elasbc

I

I;

I

t i

SIDE

':iit

PAN-L SV.IRT FRONT

MED

CUT I SUF

CliT 2

I

r

.l Add the necessary seam allowances as illustrated. Note that no seam allowance has been added to the slit, since 11 1s already a hem allowance. or facmg.

Also note that the seam allowance has not been added to the waist edge, since the elastic will be serged to the raw edge, folded over, and cover-stitched. The raw edge and the elastic line up perfectly, and no seam allowance in necessary for this application.

STYLE #5-003 SKIRT WITH LOWERED WAIST AND SIDE STRIPES IN CONTRASTING COLOR . Ie Sl.de stripe. or This skirt design shows how to draft a s1ng racing stripe, without a side seam.


SKIRTS

129

CHAPTER 5

CF

t

,•

t

t t

~

1"

Trace out the sloper and draw in the side-seam stripe.

Trace and separate the pieces.

The maximum width without a side seam should not be more than 3" total or 1 112" on each side.

Do not cut two side panels, but instead create a single panel.

t

t

BACK PANEL MED CUT1

I

' •p

I I

!l

~

~

CF

CB

1

CUT

2

1

FRONT PANEL MED CUT1

1

Draft a straight pattern piece that is the same length as . nels that require a side Instead of creating two Side pa seam, combine the t wo panels.

the seams.


130

\It

'w

........ ...... .... ..... .. â&#x20AC;˘. w

CF

w

STY LE #5-004 PEGGED-WAIST SKIRT

Slash and spread to create added fullness at the waist. (Refer to section on gathering ratios.)

A pegged-wa1st skirt may be created by enlarging the original waist, wh1ch can be pulled 1n w1th elastic or gathering.

Increase by 50% of the original waist, up to as much as double the original waist measurement. Blend the hem into a smooth and c ontinuous line.

Ia

... iii

CF

Ill

. ...

"-( To exaggerate the p d circu f egge effect, decrease the hem by 4" m erence, or 1" from each side seam. A slit will be necessary if the skirt . b I IS e ow the knee.

STYLE #5-005 FULL SKIRT To create a full gathered skirt, use a combination of both techniques illustrated above.


SKIRTS

square

CHAPTER 5

131

blend

CF

Find the center of the original b l the hem. ock, and draw a line to blend

Slash and spread the waist and the hem, and enlarge anywhere from 50% to 100% of the original waist measurement. Blend a new waist and hem .

.·:----_-_-_-_-_-_-_-.-.-.-.-.---.--------- 9f________________ ________ _

t~ -~riQi~~j ~~i~i ~~~~~~~~-~~1; :.·:... ... _~ather ·················-····-·-··-·········-·

,.

'

• • •• •• •

; '

extra fullness

/ \ t e gathers

~FT"r;

CF

DIRNDL SKIRT FRONT MED CUT1

-----------.-- --------- ----- --- ----------- ____ _____ _,_-

Add seam allowances and hem allowance to comp lete the pattern. Label the waist w ith the finished , already gathered, measurement. Since all knit fabrics have a nap, the grainline should have arrows pointing in the same direction as the nap.

STYLE #5·006 ALTERNATE METHOD OF DRAFTING THE DIRNDL SKIRT/ FULL SKIRT Straighten out the side seam, and add fullness through the side seam of the block, usually double the measurement of the original waist. This will result tn a large rectangular pattern, which will be gathered at the waist. Alternatwely. use elastic in a casing to pull the watst tnto the original waist measurement.


1~

\'H.&.PTER 5

SKIRTS

CF

1

.. ''

Adding Flare and Volume to the Hem STYLE #5-007 A -LINE SKIRT

Volume at the hem w1 add drama. movement, and fluid1ty to many des1gns

D1fferent A-l.ne sk1rts can be created usmg different methods of draft.ng Each w111 produce sl1ghtly different effects for your des1gn

2

c

Slash

blend

Drafting the A-line skirt with the following technique produces a skirt with the flare primarily at the sides of the skirt. Extend the side seams outward as much as the design requires. Keep the waist measurement the same. Square th e hem at the side seams.

blend

c

~

ana • Preaa to create fu\lnes

Drafting the A-line skirt with the f . duces an A-line skirt with th fl ollowtng technique proe are at the front of the skirt Slash and spread the sk'rt bl . . full as the design requir~s. ock Into an "A"-shaped line as Keep the waist measurement the same. This draft retains the original hip curve.

-.. . fll fll

•• • ••

Keep the side seams the same length.

3

"'•'-... ... •• • ••...

Blend the waist. Blend the hem into a smooth, continuous line.


SKIRTS

~

• ~

133

3 4

I

CHAPTER 5

·;,,~~.;- Slashing the skirt in multiple place that has the fullness spread ev s produces a skirt pattern en 1Y Wlthm the front panels.

By adding a waistband or elastic to the hem, you can create a pout skirt.

.

The more slash es, the more evenly the fl are spread;_ therefore, the more even t he fullness Occaswnally the design may even reqmre . · . more vo1ume m the back than the fron. t IS

blend

5

Controlling Flares The decision of whether or not to blend the waist curve is determined by requirements of the final design. Blending the waist will force the skirt to fall evenly and softly. STYLE #5-008 EXAGGERATED A-LINE Combine both of the above techniques for an exaggerated A-line skirt.

r··'·;(· ..

fl

Clip the waist to force the skirt to fall in distinct folds. The tension is released and forces the skirt to fall into the folds where they are drafted, and where the clips are.


~3~

CHAP1 ER !>

SKIRTS

3"

3"

you want C reat e a temporary guideline indicating, where b t b the godet to be placed. (Illustrated at 3 u may e any place the design requires.)

STYLE #5-009 SKIRT WITH GODETS

A godet skirt is similar to a trumpet skirt, except that the godets do not need a seam and are sewn into a slash m the hem of the skirt.

CF

SKIRT FRONT

MED CUT1

......'"

'

,:: 1 .....

.c

"'

<t_

..

"'

'iii

_,.

Draw the godet as large or as small as desired. Keep the hem of the godet at right angles to the sides by using a compass or a ruler, as illustrated.

&

Trace out the godet pattern piece. Since a seam allowance cannot be added to the slash. you need to add twice the seam allowance amount to the godet in order to maintain the godet size, and balance.


SKIRTS

CHAPTER 5

135

CF

SKIRT FRONT

MEO CUT1

.: '' :'

1"

1"

1"

1"

To exaggerate the appearance of the godet, and make it more VISible: Remove 1" from the slash line at the hem. Add 1" to each side of the godet pattern piece, as indicated. The sewing line decreases to almost nothing at the top of the godet.

STYLE #5-010 SKIRT WITH ASYMMETRICAL HEM

Diagonal hems are created by simply shaping the hem as required. Because the cover-stitch cannot pivot around a corner, it is necessary to hem the front and back of the skirt before sewing the side seams.

GSIDE-SEAM STYLE #5- 011 ORAWSTRIN ¡ng up the be c reated by drawl An asymmetrical hem may string . side seam with a cord , ribbon, or

To create a drawstring at the side of the skirt, simply create a slit extension as high as you wish the drawstring to be.


136

CHAPTER 5

SKIRTS

SKIRT FRONT

MED CUT 1

j Create an equal extension on both the back and the front patterns. The drawstring extension may be applied to either side of the garment, or both sides, depending on the designer's sketch. To construct the skirt, sew down the side seam, press the seams open, and topstitch the seams open. Insert the string, then sew the top of the seam allowance open, catching the string.

STYLE #5-012 TIERED SKIRTS

j

'

r

===:::;!~ !-

:··-:;=··--=-----=--·--=t:i '

I

double

10'

10"

30"

double

13"

'----------------------------------

I I

-- --

I

-- - -~

Lengthen the skirt sloper to 30" by extending the stde seams and center front straight down.

Decide on the placement of the tiers. Tiers may be even am Flare . aunts or graduated amounts, as shown. each sktrt outward 1" at th h e em.


SKIRTS

I I

I I I I I I I

•• •

••

•=

137

Trace out and separate the skirt tiers:

• 1 skirt that is 7" long • 1 skirt that is 17" long • 1

sk~et

that 1s 30" long

All three skirts will attach to the same waistband. For extra volume at the hem, add 1" of flare to each s1de seam. Because of the amount of bulk and the weight of the skirt, this draft is only suitable for lightweight fabrics.

I

• •

CHAPTER 5

SKIRT FRONT LOWER SECTION

MED CUT1

CF

L----------------------------------------------------------------

STYLE #5-013 TIERED SKIRTS


138

CHAPTER 5

SKIRTS

sbtch1ng hne

~-l -----------r;:

FABRIC

LINING stJtching hne

To reduce the we1ght of the skirt and the bulk at the waist , use a lightweight knit lining to support the tiers of the skirts.

Cut the lining as described.

Place the lining seam 2" above the previous tier so it will not show. Add 1" flare to each side seam.

··.: UPPER FRONT MED CUT 1 SELF

MIDDLE MIDDLE FRONT MED CUT 1 SELF

j

LINING FRONT MED

CUT 1 LINING

.J/::::::::::::::::::::::::::::... -........::::::::::::::::::::::: LOWER

LINING

LOWER FRONT

MEO CUT1 SELF Cut the middl t" . . e ler In lining and self as described.

FRONT

MED

CUT 1 LftiiNG


SKIRTS

CHAPTER 5

Cut the lower t 'er on lm,ng and self as descnbed

UI'PE~ORONT CUT 1 SELF

I

I

i

MIDDLE FRONT MEO CUT 1 SELF

LOWER FRONT MEO CUT 1 SELF

LOWER \ LINING FRONT MEO CUT 1 LINING

CF

Decide on the placement of the folds. STYLE #5-014 COWL SKIRT WITH DEEP RADIATING FOLDS Cowl skirt w ith deep radiating folds.

139


140

HAPTER 5

SKIRTS

CF

Spread each sec!Jon twoce the amount of the fold desored. May spread as e1 en amounts or radoatong amounts, as illustrated

For softer, more fluid folds that fall softly, blend the side seam as shown.

CF

CF

•.---- -- -·

For more controlled folds blend • as ondocated. If you wish to tack the fold . folds and retrace th .d s to the sode seams, close the e so e seam.

j

'


SKIRTS

CHAPTER 5

' ' '-,' ~

'

' '

' ' '

STYLE #5-015 DRAPED-EFFECT SKIRT Decide on the placement of the folds. Sarong-effect skirts may also be c reated using the slash and spread technique.

Decide on the size of the folds. Folds may be even amounts or radiating amounts.

Connect all the points. Slash and spread the folds.

. d Slash and spread the tucks, dou ble the amount require .

141


~

HAPTER S

SKIRTS

·····-··:::::::::::::::::: STYLE ltS-016 TWO FRONT TUCKS

·eo

A s 1ngle tuck may b e added 10 tho dosign os o stylo dotnil.

2'

cr

Decide on the ~ of ttte tueQ, llustrated at 3• from the oenuw ltor1l They rnlfi c.~~ the~ oc pattemna!.« clec:ades..

Oeade on the width of the tucks.

Spread the tucks double the amount of the pleat required Ollustrated at 2" for a 1' tuck).


SKIRTS

CHAPTER 5

143

blend

CF

CF SKIRTW TUCKS FRONT

MED CUT 1

blend

Blend a new waist.

Label the pattern as indicated. Notch the pleat placement.

Blend the hem. Note that the technique will increase the entire width of the Skirt. Fo r a r1g hter fit¡ through the hip area , refer to the following draft. Style #5-019 Tucks for a tighter hip and thigh .

3"

3"

Decide on the plac ement of the tucks.

STYLE #5-017 FOUR FRONT TUCKS A skirt with four front tucks may also be created using the slash and spread technique.

This draft will increase the entire width of the skirt, adding slight volume throughout the hip and thigh area. For a tighter fit_ see Style #5-019 Tucks for a tighter hip and th1gh.


144

CHAPTER

5

SKIRTS

:r CF

CF

SKIRT W TUCKS FRONT

MED CUT1

Trace out the pattern and place notches to indicate the tucks.

Decode on the Stze of the tucks. Slash and spread the tucks

2"

3"

STYLE #5-018 TUCKS FOR A TIGHTER HIP AND THIGH This draft differs from the previous technique in that the skirt is only slashed to the hip area and will not increase the entire width of the skirt, just the hip area. However, side seam.the tucks, when sewn, will fall slightly toward the

Slash and spread the desired amount.


SKIRTS

CHAPTER 5

145

CF CF

SKIRTwTUCK FRONT

MED CUT1

SKIRTwTUCK FRONT

MED CUT 1

Fold and true the tucks with a tracing wheel.

Comparing the Two Techniques This diagram shows the difference between the two techniques. Neither is better t h an the other; the choice de pend s on the silhou ette r equired.

CB

STYLE #5-019 ADDING DARTS

CF

Darts are not necessary for knit garments. However, sometimes the designer may require darts for aesthetic reasons. Place the slash line 3" from center front.


14G

"HAf'TER 5

SKIRTS

2

..

~ \

\

'

3"

CF

\I

Slash and spread 2â&#x20AC;¢ for a 1 Wide mouth for the dart.

Find the center of the s1ash opening and draw in the dart. Back dart 5" down from the natural waist. Front d art 3" down from the natural waist.

il CF

.e w S>;IRT w DARTS

BACK MED CUT1

y,

CF

10..

il il iii

SKIRT w DARTS FRONT MED

..

CUT I

iii

Trace out pattern as md1cated. Mark dnll holes 'h" above the apex of the dart. Notch the darts at wa1st and fold to true.

STYLE #5-020 ADDING DARTS WITHOUT INCREASING THE SIZE OF THE SKIRT

..

The challenge with the previous draft is that it increases the Whole skirt including the area below the dart. Use this draft When you do not want to increase the entire Width Of the Skirt. Place a guideline in the center of the waist. Square down to the henn.

,.,.


SKIRTS

CHAPTER 5

2"

CB

2"

CF

Measure 1" on each side of the guideline.

Add the amount of dart to the side seam of the skirt.

Measure down 3 for skirt front.

Try not to shape the side seam any lower than the bottom of dart.

Measure down 5" for Skirt back. Draw 1n the dart.

CB

CF

'

:

·~·

y,·l ' SKIRTwDART BACK

147

,.. ,.

1'"' 1"'

SKIRTwOART FRONT

MED

MED

CUT 1 on fold

CUT 1 on fold

Fold and true the dart. Place a drill mark '12'' above the apex of the dart.

Horizontal Style Lines STYLE #5· 021 POINTED YOKE


148

CHAPTER :;

SKIRTS

CF

Draw In the yoke style line. illustrated at 2" d ow n at the Side seam, and 4" down the center front, or any measurement the design requires.

Notch, trace, and separate the pattern pieces.

YOKE SKIRT FRONT MEO

CUT1 on fold

·-------·------------

----------------- ---------.---------------------------

Notch and trace out the separate pieces. Add the necessary seam allowances.

STYLE #5-022 ROUND YOKE WITH GATHERED SKIRT


SKIRTS

CHAPTER 5

149

CF

---~-----

To draft a skirt with a round yok d low these instructions. e an a gathered skirt, foiTrace and separate the pieces as indicated. Measure down 1 '12' on t he side seam.

On the lower portion, divide the skirt into four sections.

Measure down 3" on the center front. Draw in a curved yoke line. These measurements may change as the d es1gn . requ1 .res.

Redraw the lower portion of the skirt and place notches to Slash the sections and spread each one until the new measurement is double the original measurement.

line up with the yoke.


~50

CHAPTER 5

SKIRTS

Trace out the pattern and label as indicated.

CF

SKIRTwYOKE FRONT

MED CUT1

2" J CF

j

3"

····t·-. ······

ill

• •

iii iii

.. ..• YOKE CUT1

SKIRT w ROUND YOKE

FRONT MED

CUT1 anMt


SKIRTS

CHAPTER 5

151

Gathered Side-Seams Clear el as t IC ' may be used to gather or s hirr a ny part of a ga rm: nt. Remember to serge the seams bcfon? sewing the clastic With. the straight stitch. I f you tr y to attach the elastic wh ile sergmg at the same time, it will be much too difficult. Always u se the clear elastic since the ends will not ravel or fray. . A skirt, top, pant, or d â&#x20AC;˘Âˇess style may be created with gathenng on both sides. . Lengthen the ori g ina l pattern , and simply stretch elastic 111 th e seam s a llowance and sew with a straight stitch . It is much easier to sew the elastic w ith the straight stitch after t he seam has been serged .

I slash and sprea1

CF

D slash and spread\

. in roportion, slash at least In order to keep the hlp notch p b low proportionately, once above the hip notch and once e ' as illustrated.

Slash and spread the section, doubling the length of the original skirt.


i"HAPTI!R 5

I

SKIRTS

r

CF

D

SKIRT WITH ELASTIC GATHERED SIDES

FRONl

MEO CUT 1

--

Btenu a new smoo.,.. • StOe seam as shown.

L bel the s1de seam with Label the pattern as tllusl tradt:dseaam length. th of the ongtna st the Ieng h d stde -seam b Y stretchtng c lear rubber . ms and sew with the Create the gat ere ng the stde sea • . elasttc, after sergt . t stretch the elastic tn the stratght-stttch machtne. Do no hem allowance.

·-------------------------·----·-··--·-

STYLE 115-023 ASYMMETRICAL GATHERED SIDE-SEAM

To draft a skirt with a drawstring or gathering on only one side, and a straight hem, follow these instructions.

Divide the skirt at least once above the hlp ate . notc hand once below the hip notch. The more slashes, t he more accur the draft and the smoother the curve. Measure the original hip length so that you will know hoW long to cut the elastic.


S KIRT S

C HAPTER 5

·------,\, '' \

'' ' a. ''• g

''

'' '' '. >}"--- -- - - - - - - - ; ',

.

~

I

I

..,.. ..

~

.'

:

:T: ' '' '' ' ''

' ''

''

' ''

' ' ' ''

/

......: /

~

Slash and spread the skirt, on one side only, to double the amount of the original side-seam. If the original skirt length is 22", spread the side seam to 44".

'''',, '',, ,, ,,

,,,,

'' •• I'

'•'• '•'• '•

'•,,

SKIRT WITH ELASTIC SHIRRED SIDES FRONT MED CUT 1

,,'•'• ., ., ., ii ,, -& ,':

.,

..

<:

'•

os''

.s 8'/ ,' :j .JP /I

~ Et/

.: §/,'

1.~/,' ct' (/)/'

s /' .!¥ ... ,,'•'•

..

. - ~· .. -~' -J

. Label the side seam with Label the pattern as Illustrated. t create the gathered ergeeasuremen · the original side-seam m bber elastic when s Side-seam by stretching c lear ru h the elastic In the hem. not stretc 1ng the s1de-seams. D0

..''

I

~ : s •

Blend a new side-seam as illustrated.

153


154

CHAPTER 5

SKIRTS

CF

f_

CF

J

j slash and spread

SKIRT WITH GATHER DETAILS FRONT MEO CUT1

STYLE #5-024 SKIRT WITH ELASTIC GATHERING DETAIL Gathering details may be added as a style accent, using the slash and spread technique.

.

Stretch and sew clear elastic to create the gathering detail.

CF

--------·-----···· ·

I

CF

L - - - ---:

STYLE #5-025 VERTICALLY GATHERED SKIRT Gathering details may be added to the entire length of the skirt, using the slash and spread technique. Stretch clear elastic to create the gathering detail, or use an elastic thread In the bobbin of a straight-stitch sewing machine.

I

CF


SKIRT S

155

CHAPTER &

blend

c

..--.. ••• • :• :•• -

Circle Skirts and Circular Ruffles STYLE #5-026 SLASH AND SPREAD CIRCLE SKIRT

blend

Create a circle skirt by slash1ng and spreading the skirt to a 90-degree s1de seam. This draft will retain the hip curve.

ULAR FLOUNCE SKIRT WITH CIRC h of a skirt by following these . a be added to the em A full circle sk~rt m y instructions.

k·rt to fit the hem Draft a circle s '

measurements.


~56

CHAPTER 5

•...'w ... ••

SKIRTS

CF CF

12"

12"

12"

Shorten the skirt by the length of the finished ruffle (i'.'ustrated at 12" but may be any measurement the design requires).

12"

Measure the width of the skirt at the hem, illustrated at 9".

CF

•• • ••

-••• •• • ••

ill ill

slash and spread

Draft a circle skirt using the measurements from the skirt.

For a fu ller flou nce, slash and spread in more places to lengthen the c ircumference of th e hem.

CF

....... ······ ........ --------

STYLE #5-027 FISHTAIL Create an asymmetrical flounce for a dramatic skirt.


SKIRTS

CHAPTER 5

157

1

2 CF CF

a路

a路

a路

I

a路 d1VIde mto three

Determine the placement of the tiers.

STYLE #5-028 LAYERED CIRCLE SKIRTS

Shorten the skirt the amount of the bottom tier.

Create a straight skirt with multiple tiered circular flounces by following this draft.

Divide each section into thirds, or more if greater fullness is desired.

The draft may easily be changed to create many variations of this design. wa1st

c lining

slash and spread

Slash and spread the top layer.

CF length of peplum

WITH A CIASTYLE #5- 029 SKIRT ED CULAR PEPLUM ATTACH . ue It is also Using the same technlq r;ment o f possible to draft an ~s:voerskirts. c1rcular peplums an

slash and spread

Decide on the length of peplum and draw a horizontal line.


'158

CHAPTER 5

SKIRTS

Circle Skirts

t the hem.

Circle skirts are another wa)' of creating fullness a

3

1

cb

0

cf

Half Circle Skirt

cf

Full Circle Skirt

Quarter Circle Skirt

May be four-seamed panels or two-seamed panels, or even oneseamed panel with a seam at the center back only.

4 17" d•rechon of the strength

Full Circle Skirt Example: 261/2" waist. 1

26 /2" divided by 6 = 4 1/2".

•.· 18"

18"

Note that the across measurement has been reduced by 1" to compensate for the fabric stretch in that direction, and may need particular fabricto. be shortened more depending on your length shown at 18" but may be any length the _Skirt requires. destgner


SKIRTS

dJrect1on of the streng th

159

CH APT ER 5

13\1."

17" dJrect•on of the strength

CF CF 18"

18"

18" 18"

STYLE #5-030 HALF CIRCLE SKIRT

Create a half c ircle skirt with two panels. Follow the same draft except use 213 the waist measurement.

STYLE #5-031 QUARTER CIRCLE SKIRT

Create a quarter circle skirt using •;, the waist measurement.

CIRCLE SKIRT GRAINLINES

You may use any one of the grainlines, as long as all pieces are cut with t he same grainline. Cut one for a quarter circle skirt, cut two for a half circle skirt, or cut four for a full circle skirt.

GORED CIRCLE SKIRT

Create a circle skirt with multiple panels by dividing the skirt into multiple gores.

Create a circle skirt w1th multiple panels by dividing the skirt into gores.

Add grainlines as illustrated.

Add grainlines as illustrated.

Simply trace out one panel and label as "cut 12."

Simply trace out one panel and label as "cut 4."


160

CHAPTER 5

SKIRTS

CF

center back opemng

Asymmetrical Circle Skirts An asymmetrical circle skirt may be created by moving the waist circumference to any place within the skirt. Illustrated toward the front, which will shorten the front and lengthen the back.

Asymmetrical Circle Skirt Draft an asymmetrical circle skirt by drafting the waist cut out towards the s ide seam. Very dramatic when added as a flounce at the bottom of a skirt.

4Yz"

17" dtrectJon of the stretch

4Yz"

4Y1"

CF

18"

/ 18"

' â&#x20AC;˘'.......

-- ..

Ha.ndkerchief-Hem Circle Sk1rt Create a circle skirt with a s changing the shape of the hem quare hem by

STYLE #5-032 HANDKERCHIEF-HEM ASYMMETRICAL SKIRT Create an asymmetrical skirt with handkerc hief hem, by comb1mng both techniques .


SK I RTS

E

CHAPTER 5

161

3

waistband

back hem

E

(/)

a: (I)

Slash waist opening

"'

.c

"'iii

:;

"0

(I)

3

front hem STYLE #5-033 SLASH-WAIST SKIRTS

Draft a square with a waist opening in the center.

A· similar technique may be used 1o d raft a sk1 .rt with . s1ngle stra1ght slash as a waist opening. a

For a 26'H' waist, draw the line 13'14' long.

. For this skirt you must draft a sepa ra1e wa1stband.

Also remove the amounts equal to seam allowances from this measurement. The slash will now be 12'/." with four 'I•" seam allowances included.

waistband 3 E --------------------------------------------------back hem

~i

(/)

a: (I) :; (I)

3

\(~;'"'-

~

front hem

STYLE #5-034 ASYMMETRICAL SLASH-WAIST SKIRTS Or create an asymmetrical skirt by changing the placement of the waist slash.

Change the placement of the waist slash by rotating it, or change the shape of the hem.


16~

HAPTER 5

SKIRTS

STYLE #5-035 TIERED SLASH-WAIST SKIRTS

STYLE #5-036 YOKED SLASH-WAIST SKIRTS

Use two layers

Create a yoked version, at the hipline of a skirt.

1n

lightweight fabric with offset slashes to

create a vanat1on of a t1ered skirt.

fl

••

CF

i I i

i i i i i

measure

MULTIPLE CIRCLE RUFFLES A ruffled skirt can also be created using multiple circles at the hem. 3"

.../_.// ''" /

..·

.'

.'

Measure the hem of the skirt and decide how may c ircles wi ll be used. Illustrated at 3"X3" circles for each panel, but may be more or less fullness depending on the design.

•• •• •

••'

'

CF

3"

3"

3 Circles for each Panel 3" f With a ruffle length of 3';. or each circle. 'Ia of 3" = 'h",

'' • ;

Complete the circle pattern as illustrated. Attach all 12 circles together to form a - .-... ..._ ,.._ of ttll hem. , ..

,...,.,..,_v


SKIRTS

Create a circle with graduatmg . flares.

CHAPTER 5

163

Create a ruffle with square points.

CB

CF 11 1/2"

11 1/2"

3"

2Y."

Divided Skirts STYLE #5-037 CULOTTES Draft the culottes with a crotch depth of 10'12'' for a snug crotch, or 11'12'' for a lowered, easy crotch.

Asymmetrical Hems with Ruffles Combine an asymmetrical hem with circular ruffles for a dramatic skirt.

Front crotch extension:

'Iâ&#x20AC;¢ of front hip measurement =

2'/l'

Back crotch extension:

'h of back hip measurement = 3"


164

CHAPTER 5

SKIRTS

CB

......... .........

CF

CF

3"

3"

2Y."

.......

.....

Draw an angled bias line that is half of each crotch

To draw a balanced crotch curve, measure equal amounts up the center front and back.

extension.

CB

CB

CF

C '

3: o. '0 '

~:

,. ct> '

o- :

"'· '-------'---~ ---.

Draw in the crotch curve. CF

--

Square down to the hem.

Button Closing

.... ...... .... ...... ...... ..... ..... ........ .... -

When drafting a button-front closing, the first decision must always be the size of the button because all measurements are taken from that size. The front extension is a lways the amount of the button: e.g., a 112'' button requires a 1/2" extension. Women's and Girls garments but ton right over left, while M~n's button left over r igh t. This applies to tops as well as skuts, pants, jackets, etc. Buttons are measured in units called lines. BUTTON SIZES Li ne 10 12-13 14-1 5-16 18 20 22

Inches

%'1 s/,e" 3; ,, 8 7 11 118

v.·

•;,.·

Line 24-25 27-28 30 32-33 35-36 37-38

Inches

...

•;

''/,&" '14" 1 3/u~"

'Ia" 15/ us"

Line

Inches

40 42-43

1';,,·

1"

45

1 '~·

47-48

13/10


SKIRTS

CHAPTER 5

Button Profiles Buttons FLAT

~

0 0

TWO HOLE

DOME

QUARTER BALL

FOUR HOLE

HALF BALL

0

WIRE SHANK

FULL BALL

0

0

CLOTH SHANK

SELF SHANK

165


~66

C HA PT E R 5

lr )

"'

two button widths

C>

c ·c::;

~ E Ql

.<::

...... --...._

SKIRTS

w

I CF I button I Width I I c 0 I ·u; c I Ql xQl I I I I I I I

....w.... '-

I

~ I I

H I

I

When the but ton is placed on the center fr ont , it should be fra med by a half button width of fabric on each side.

.... .... -.-. ...-. .... ..•.. .... .....

The front exten sion is det ermined by the size of the button; for example, a 1/ 2" button requires a 1/2" extension. Draw in the ext en sion equa l t o the button size. Draw in the under lap double the button size. Dra ft the pattern as illustrat ed.

fill

I

1--1-----J _ I 1/8"1

I

The button should be marked 1 's" la th th b tt · " rger an e u on Slze, to give the button enou h g room to open and close effectively. And the buttonhole should be mark d t " past the center front line, so that th t~ /sd from the shank used fi . . e rea dated and the tt or sewmg, lS accommocenter front. u on appears exactly on the

b

WRAP SKIRT Drafting a double-breasted button-front skirt is very similar to the previous draft, except that the extension measurement and button placement change.


SKIRTS

CHAPTE R 5

167

CF CF

I ~--------------- --- ---faCing

1W

Extend the c enter front 2 '12'' for the extension.

Draft the waist facing 2'12'' below the waist.

Extend an additional 2'12" for the underlay.

The waist may be cut as a separate pattern piece or may be joined to the front so it is a single pattern piece.

CF

blend

Trace out pattern as indicated.

I

WRAP SKIRT FRONT

MED CUT2 FUSE

t

Draft a fusing pattern piece as indicated.

WRAP SKIRT FRONT

MED CUT2 SELF

j


1$8

\~HAF"TER

5 SKIRTS

CF , - notch

r--i 3"

i

r----i 3"

STYLE #5-038 TRUMPET SKIRT Trumpet sk1rts "'e,. 1nther way to add volume and movement to the hem of a sk~rt Trumpets may be added to any style line. shown here on front panel seams and s1de seams.

i

9"

Decide on the placement of the seam line (illustrated at 3" from the side seam, but may be any place the design requires). Decide on the placement of the trumpet (i llustrated at 9").

.... liil

.. ....

Iii

iiill

TRUMPET SKIRT FRONT PANEL MED CUT1

l Draw in the trumpets as illustrated_

Trac e out the front skirt section on the fold, as illustrated.

May be any place the design requires_

Blend the hem. Blend the top of the flare, or clip to release (see section on controlling flares, above). Label the pattern piece Trace out the side panel, as illustrated. Blend the hem into a smooth and continuous line. . Blend the fla cant . res, or chp, as described in section about ro 11tng flares. Label the pattern, as shown.

... .. ,..... Iiiii


CHAPTER 5

SKIRTS

169

CB

2'

2'

2"

6"

Trace out the appropriate skirt block. Draw in the kick pleat as it will appear. Illustrated at 2" wide and 6" high, but may be any size the des1gn requires.

STYLE #5-03g KICK PLEAT

Trace out the underlay as indicated.

c

CB

CB

SKIRT BACK

MED CUT2

2"

2"

2"

2"

----·-----·----·---' '

;

C:B

;

'

'

'

underlayj underlay

------~----'--·--.!.-----'--··.L--------' This illustration shows how the unfolded draft will appear.

The skirt pattern may be drafted as illustrated, but the amount of fabric in the center is wasted. For a more practical pattern, refer to the next.

PLEAT LAY

MED CUT1

Separate the pattern pieces as illustrated for better fabric y1eld. Pattern may even be cut in an alternate fabric or color.

The seam will be hidden inside the pleat.


HO

CHAPTER 5

SKIRTS

Skirt Projects together to see what the fit is like, and to beWhile these skirt styles are very bas ic, they come familiar with knit equipment. As you work will help you understand drafting for stretch your way through this text, you r drafting will fabrics. become instinctive and your sewing skills will Use a stable-knit fabric for the first time and improve. Compare your slopcrs, patterns, and gradually work through the different stretch rasamples with the checklist provided. tios. It is also a good idea to sew the garment

SKIRT PROJECT #1

SKIRT PROJECT #2

The skirt should have a 1" elastic waist in a casing one row of topstitching to prevent the elastic from coll~psing With a patch pocket, slits on the sides and a 1" ' stitched hem. â&#x20AC;˘ cover-

The skirt should have a 1" elastic waist in a casing , one row of topstitc hing to prevent the elastic from collapsing, With a patch pocket, a drawstring on one side, and a 1¡ cover-stitched hem.


SKIRTS

CHAPTER 5

171

SKIRT PROJECT #3

SKIRT PROJECT #4

The skirt should have a 1" elastic waist in a casing, one row of topstitching to prevent the elastic from collapsing, with a patch pocket, and a 1" asymmetrical cover-stitched

The skirt should have a 1" elastic waist in a casing, one row of topstitching to prevent the elastic from collapsing, with a patch pocket on the back, slits on the front panel seams, and a 1" cover-stitched hem.

hem.

Create a costing sheet (see Appendix A) for any skirt style that you create so you become familiar with the process of costing (remember, the most important part of the garment is the price tag!) and can see how the different costs are associated with the final price. Don't be alarmed when your price comes out extremely high; you have purchased your fabric at retail, and your labor costs are h1gh, also. Remember. that in the industry, we cut garments a thousand at a time; consequently, the cutting costs are greatly reduced. (~

/

'

,,

',

I

I I I I

I I I I

I I I I I I I

I I I I I I I

_l

:d::======== I

SKIRT PROJECT #5

. . casing. one " I stic waist In a . t¡1c from collapstng. The skirt should have a 1 e a 1 t~eeu . 1 . row of topstitc h1n9 to preven .t on the s1de pane h back as 1I t with a patc h pocket on e ' seam, and a 1" cover-stitched hem.

Compare your blocks, patterns, and sample with the checklist.


172

CHAPiER !>

SKIRTS

SKIRT SLOPERS CHECKLIST (NOT PATTERNS) . you , ve comp1et ed the assignment correctly. Check your blocks and garments to determine 1f

, ,

Grainlines included on both front skirt and back skirt No arrows on grainlines of slopers Labeling in correct color (black pen or marker)

iJ 0

Size Medium, Med, or M . t kn·t etc along the side seams ·• h r . stable kn1t madera e 1 • Labeled with all the different stretc ra lOS. ' . . block is if it's labeled) Labeled as "BLOCKS" or " SLOPERS" (the only way to tell this IS a

0

iJ 0

Name on blocks

0

Date on blocks Blocks are butterfly-folded Blocks cut out neatly and accurately . Side seams are exactly the same shape when checkmg

0 0 0 0

Hip notches match exactly The front skirt is Vi' larger than the back skirt

0

iJ 0 0

n 0 0

0

o

No seam allowances on blocks No style numbers on blocks No waist on blocks No hem on blocks No slits on blocks Blocks on oak-tag Blocks on pattern hooks No pocket on blocks Costing sheet done correctly

SKIRT SAMPLE CHECKLIST Check your sample to determine if you've completed the assignment correctly. 0

Serged neatly and accurately

0 0 0 0 0

Serged with 4-thread serger or 5-thread serger for very thick fabrics Serged without stretching the seams Perfect tension on the serger All loose threads trimmed Waist stitched evenly

0 0 0 0 0

Elastic tension even all the way around, not pulling sideways Waist stitched in the center of sergeing, on the inside edge 1 row of stitching to prevent elastic from collapsing Hem cover-stitched evenly Hem cover-stitched at 1"

0

Hem cover-stitched before sewing slits, so the little holes are downward

0 0 0 0 0 0

Pocket placed correctly 2 '12" below the waist, where the waist seam should be Top of pocket hemmed at 1" Pocket edges turned under W' Pocket edge-stitched neatly Slit sewn closed for 1" to lie flat Slits sewn in the center of the serge Slits sewn correctly and neatly

0

o

0 0 -

label sewn in the back of the garment Proper hanger Prea~ee~ neatl Y and handed In "store ready"!

...... w

..,. ..... -....... .... .--. ...... ..

-


SKIRTS

CHAPTER 5

SKIRT PATTERN CHECKLIST

0 0

Arrows on grainline of patterns, pointin in . . Labeled in the correct color g one dtrectton only

0

Size Medium

0 0 0 0

Labeled with all the different stretch r Labeled as "BLOCKS" o r "SLOP ~~ tos: stable knit , moderate knit, etc. ERS (the only way to tell this is a block is if it's labeled) Name on patterns Date on patterns

0

Correct style numbers on patterns Patterns are butterfly-folded

0 0

0 0

Patterns cut out neatly and accurately The front skirt is Y2" larger than the back skirt

%" seam allowances on all pattern pieces, or W' if using very thick fabric

0

The waist of the pattern is labeled with the "finished" elastic measurement, the amount after the ring is sewn closed

0

Correct waist allowance on patterns, double the elastic measurement plus W' 1" hem allowance on patterns for straight hems Correct slits included on pattern pieces both front and back, or as required

0 0 0 0 0 0

0 0 0

Hung on pattern hooks Drill marks for pocket placement Pocket pattern included with all required seam and hem allowances Pattern labeled "RIGHT SIDE UP" as required for styles with a single pocket Hip notch Notch for slit fold back Costing sheet done correctly

173


174

CHAPTER 5

SKIRTS

Test Your Knowledge of the Material in This Chapter 1. Why is the front sloper larger than the back sloper? 2. How do you test if a skirt can be pulled on without a zipper? 3. How can you create a fitted waist for a skirt? 4. How can you create an un-fitted waist for a skirt? 5. How can you create a semi-fitted waist for a skirt? 6. How much should you increase the waist for light gathering? 7. How much should you increase the waist for medium gathering? 8. How much should you increase the waist for heavy or exaggerated gathering? 9. How can you increase the volume at the waist of a skirt? 10. How can you prevent a patch pocket from stretching while sewing it to a garment? 11. Why should you blend a pocket bag into a curve, rather than squared? 12. How can you create an A-line skirt with the volume primarily at the sides?

13. How can you create a n A-line skirt with volume at th e front? 14. What happens if you slash a nd spread the skirt multiple times, rather than just a s ingle s lash and spread? 15. What h appens to the skirt's fla res when you blend th e waist after slashing and spr eading? 16. What h appen s if you do not blend t h e skirt after slashing a nd spreading t h e waist? 17. How can you coverstitch the h em of a n asymmetrical h emmed skirt? 18. How can you increase the waist for a slightly gath ered waist skirt? 19. How can you increase the fullness for a gath ered skirt? 20. How can you create a drawstring at the side seam of the skirt? 21. How can you create a skirt with gathers on both sides? 22. How can you create a skirt w ith gathering on only one s ide seam?

...... ... "'...r.-...

.. -...... ..... â&#x20AC;˘â&#x20AC;˘ .....t ill

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iii flil

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c

HAPTER

6

Pants About This Chapter This chapter begins with the development of t h e one-waystretch pant sloper, and will go on to 1·11ust.r a t e some oth er pant sty, les.h Although all these patterns ar·e 1a be1ed "one-way stretch , t ey may be us~d interchangeably with two-wayand four-way-stretch fabncs, because the garment does not pass ove: the shou~d.ers and utilize any lengthwise stretch. For maxrmum mobrhty and a tight fit, one-way-stretch garments should always be cut with the stretch going around the body. Also note that many of the skirt details, such as pockets, waistbands, and hems, may also be applied to pants.

Measurements Needed for Stable Knit Pants Use the measurements for the Women's stable knit draft, since it is the largest, then indicate the other stretch ratios on the sloper, in contrasting color markers. (For a description of the reductions, refer to Chapter 4: Slopers and Reductions.) The measurements given here are for the Misses size range; for other measurements refer to Chapter 4. Also note that some of the measurement; are rounded off for easier drafting.

Standard Medium Reduce by Meas.

# 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Waist Hip Crotch depth Waist to knee Waist to ankle Ankle Knee Front crotch Back crotch Crotch angle

New Meas.

Divide Extra Extra by Panels Small

4 27'12 O% 27'12 4 38 112 O% 38'12 No length reduction 10 '12 'h No length reduction 23 39 'h No length re~uctiOn 8 8'/. O% 8/4 4 ~ 8 14 % O% 14 • One-quarter of hip measurement One-third of hip measurement . One-half of front crotch extension

22 '/2 33 1/2 9 7/a 20 1/a 38 1/4 7% 13 1/a 2 2 3/4 1

Extra Small 1 /2

23 34 '12 10 23 38 112 73/• 13% 2 1/a 2 7/a 1

Small Medium Large

Extra Large

Extra Extra Large

27'12 38'12 10'12 23 112 39 112 8';. 14 % 2% 3'/• 1'/4

33 112 44 '12 11 24 40 112 8 3/4 15% 2% 3% 1%

37 112 48 1/2 11 1/4 24'/ • 41 9 15'1a 3 4 1 '12

25'12 36 1/2 10 1/4 23 1/4 39 8 13 7/a 2 1/4 3 1'/•

30 '12 41'12 10% 23 3/4 40 8 112 14 7/a 2% 3'12 1 '/•

175


176

~~H·\f'HR

6

PANTS

ONE-WAY-STRETCH SLOPER FRONT

TI11s d1aft will use the measurements from the reduction chart in Chapter 2, and the appropriate reductions for each fabric. A-8 = waist measurement {#2 from chart). A-C = crotch depth squared down {#4 from chart). C-D D-E

= hip measurement squared across {#3 from chart). = square a temporary guideline straight up to the waist.

E-D = divide line into thirds.

Since the front will be drafted on top of the back, the measurements need to be divided into four.

#

2 3 4 5 6 7

8 9

10 11

'I• of waist 'I• of hlp Crotch depth Waist to knee Waist to ankle 'I• of ankle 'I• of knee Front crotch Back crotch Crotch angle 'h of crotch depth

Extra Extra Small

Extra Small

Small

Medium

Large

Extra Large

Extra Extra Large

5% 8% 10 'Iz 22 7/s 38 1/4 22 7ls 38 1/4 13 1/s 2 '1a 2% 3 '/z

5 7la 8% 10 % 23 38'1z 23 38 '12 13 % 2 1/a 2 71a 3'/z

6% 9'1a 10 '1s 22 7/s 38'1• 23 1/4 39 13% 2% 3 3 1/ z

6 7la 9% 10 % 23 38 '12 23 1/z 39 11z 14 % 2% 3% 3 1/z

7% 10% 10 71s 23 '/. 39 23% 40 14 7/s 2% 3% 3%

8% 11'1s 11 1/s 23'12 39 112 24 40 112 15 % 2% 3% 3%

9% 12 '1s 11 % 23 3/• 40 24 '1· 41 15 7/a 3 4 3 3.• 4

tJ_ E-G = two-thirds of E-D and d a variform curve, placing #4 of ~~w a curved hip line using the hip curve, blending into the s~ ruler at the waist. Draw curve may change dependi e seam. Note the hlp ng on your target market.

B

'U Note: For cust om garments, draw the hip curve to the hig h er mark toe • nsure that the hip is large enough to fit any customer d • an correct the hip shape in fitting. Do not fuss and any exc~~er ~he hip shape, since it may be correctecl. 8 8 mply 8erged off after fitting the~-


PANTS

CHAPTER 6

177

r-r. ~

s•

C-H = one-quarter of hip measurement C-D {#9 from chart). C-1

1-J-H = draw a smooth blended crotch curve.

= one-quarter of hip measurement (#9 from chart).

At C draw a 45-degree angle and label as J . C-J = one-half of C-H {#11 from chart).

R

G K

half-way w

-' >::

z<(

1

0

"-L---~----- - - 11 ~ALF-WAY GUIDELINE

f-

II

tn

~

I

• • "'• • •

L

Ia

Draw a guideline halfway between K and M. K

= halfway between D and H .

. bel as the grainline. t K = square up to wa1st and Ia . t to ankle measure men M-L = square down from the wals {#6 from chart) .

~

Extra Extra small

if,

.

iJ

Front Crotch extension Crotc h angle D-H Halfway Wa1st to ankle Wa1st to knee

2 1 10'/2

5 '1• 38 '/•

Extra small

2'1• 1 10 7/o 5% 38 1h 13 '/•

--~

The knee line is 1" above the guideline; label as N. (Be care f u,I as there is a tendency to incorrectly . locate haIf-way between the waist and ankle, when 1t should be the crotch to ankle.)

small 2 1/• 1 '/• 11 % 55/7 39 13%

Medium 2% 1'/• 12 6 39'12 13'12

Large 2% 1'/• 13

6 'h 40 13%

Extra Large 23;, 1"1o 14 7

40 '12 13314

Extra Extra Large 3 1 1 /2

15 'to

7'h 41 13 7/e


11$

HArTER 6

PANTS

1i

1/

r

IX. I

p

N

>

0

I

R

L

0

L-Q = one-quarter of the ankle measurement (#7 from

N-0 = one-quarter of the knee measurement (#8 from chart).

chart).

N-P = one-quarter of the knee measurement (#8 from chart).

L-R = one-quarter of the ankle measurement (#7 from chart).

Extra Extra Small

13 1/s 3 2/7

Total Knee Quarter of knee Total Ankle Quarter of ankle

R

Extra Small

13 % 3 1/ 3

7%

7%

2

2

L

Connect H 0 · - In a straight line Connect 0 Q . · - In a straight line Connect Q A.1 · n a straight line Connect 0 P . · Con - In a straight line. nett P-R In a straight II ne.

Small

13 7/s 3 1/2 8 2

M ediu m

L arge

14 % 3% 8'1· 2

14 7/s 3s;, 8 '12 2 '/s

Extra Large

15 % 3%

8% 2 1/s

Extra Ex tra Large

15 7/s 4 9 2''

Q

Blend the hips and kn

. ee Into smooth curves, as illustrated


PANTS

CHAPTER 6

179

PANT SLOPER BACK

r

c-s one-third of hip measurement (# 10 S.nce you've already add e d the f from chart)· amount because you are d f . ront crotch amou 1 . ra ling the front on t n ' only add the additional 0 Connect S-0 1n a straight r P of the back front inseam, and will be lne (note that the back i . · corrected later on) nseam IS longer than the Blend a smooth curve at O.

·

Extra Extra Small Back crotch extension Additional amount

2% 3;,

Extra Small

2 7/o %

Small

Medium

3

'/.

Extra Large

Large

3 '12

3'/• ';.

3% 'lo

'I•

318"1!;·•=::: · ·

E

3/8",1; · • ==::··it314" E B A

B

Extra Extra Large 4

3/4"

A

0

0

Remove '/4'' from the back side seam. You must raise the back of the waist to allow room for sitting and bending. Skirts do not need this because they can easily slide up, whereas pants are anchored at the crotch . Raise the side seams%". Raise the center back

3 /•" .

Do not change the center front height.

Add '/.'' to the front side seam. Re-notch. This way the front is larger than the back so that when you view it straight on. you can't see the side seams because they are slightly toward the back.


180

HAf'T R 6

PANTS

TRUEING THE PANT SLOPERS

Trace out and separate the front and back pant slopers. Place the front sieper on top of the back sieper and match the s1de seams to make sure they are exactly the same.

Place the inseams together the way they w1ll be when they are finally sewn, beside each other. Ensure that the crotch is blended into a smooth and continuous curve; it should need a slight blend, because the back inseam is slightly longer than the front inseam (about 1/s') and must be corrected so the seams match each other perfectly. Check that inseam knee notches match exactly, and that both of the inseams are exactly the same length.

Check notches at h1ps and knees. Make sure that the hem lines up exactly, in a smooth continuous line.

3

4

Label your slopers correctly-indicating whether they are the front piece or the back piece. Also label the slopers with the type of stretch¡ "oneway stretch." ¡ The size must also be labeled. Label with your name and the d t a e created. Never place any arrows on the grainlines.

If you've drafted stable knit slopers, you can save yourself the trouble of drafting the other sloper ratios if you indicate them with lines as illustrated. This saves save oak-tag, and allows you to carry a single sieper rather than multiple sets. The differences between the slopers must be equalized on both sides of the grainline. Also note the illustration is exaggerated for clarity.


PANTS

Stable knit

;:;:::=---___;_..::.::.:.:.~~. ~Moderate Wa~st

Hip Out-seam In-seam

0 O 0 0

Stretchy knit

Super-stretch knit

'Ia -'Ia 'Ia

-

1 116

1a

181

Rib knit

-'Ia

1

116

-

1 /16

1

CHAPTER 6

1

/s

'Ia 'Ia

1

116

. To . 11ne . check and correct the gram of pant f0 1 1n half, then crease your paper all th s, d the calf portion of the leg grain line. e way to the waist. This will be your new

Seam Allowances For Pants The seam allowances needed depend on the type of fabric used and equipment used. For stable knits such as fleece and PolarfleeceÂŽ

Use 1/2'' seam allowances or 3/s"

5-thread serger for very thick fabrics 4-thread serger for normal knit fabrics

If the st able knit fabric is really thick, then use â&#x20AC;˘;," seam allowances, because a smaller serging will not catch enough of the fabric edge to secure the seam. Five-thread serging may be approximated by using a threethread serger and a straight stitch. For stretchy knits For moderate knits, such as T-shirt knits 't ch as spandex For super-stretch km s, su and 4-way stretch

Use 3/s" seam allowances

4-thread serger

Use %" seam allowances

4-thread serger

Use \14" seam allowances

3-thread serger

Use 1/4" seam allowances

3-thread serger

For rib knits d 1/:" for curved hems. 2 Use 1" for straight hems an


18:

CHAPTER 6

PANTS

ADDING SEAM ALLOWANCES TO PANTS Illustrated with %" seam allowances, for stable knits such as fleece for use with a four-thread serger. Always label the waist of the pant with the finished (already sewn) elastic measurement. Square down a hem allowance of 1". STYLE# 1001 SWEAT PANT BACK

STYLE# 1001 SWEAT PANT FRONT

MED

MED

CUT2

CUT2

Extend the waist up 1 'h'' plus and other 1'h", total 3" for the elastic casing. For 'h'' elastic, reduce by 2". For elastic over 1" wide, reduce the measurement by 1". For elastic under 1" wide, reduce the measurement by 2" .

3/8"

Remember to add seam allowances to the ends of the elastic. You don't always know what type of equipment will be used to apply the elastic, especially if the garment will be produced offshore, so you must always label the waist with the finished (already sewn) elastic measurements, including the w idth of the elastic.

ONE-WAY-STRETCH PANT SILHOUETTE VARIATIONS Create a stovepipe leg from the oneway-stretch pant sloper by widening the legs as illustrated. Make the same changes to both sides of the legs. Whatever you do to one leg seam must be duplicated for the other.

Create a bell-bottom from the oneway-stretch pant sloper by widening the legs as illustrated. Make the same changes to both sides of the legs. Whatever you do to one leg seam must be duplicated for the other leg seam.

Create a palazzo from the one-waystretch pant sloper by widening the legs as illustrated. Make the same changes to both sides of the legs. Whatever you do to one leg seam must be duplicated for the other leg seam.

...... ...... ... •

-.. •.. ..-.. -•• --.. ...-. .... ..


PANTS

hot pants

1,.2~ ,

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路-_-_-_-_-_-_路_~-~-~hq~~JamaiCa

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knee

183

1/2.::--._-- ----~~t-~nts

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bermuda _

CHAPTER 6

bermuda _

-~~-C!'.I?~~~-~r:.

-

knee

_

-~3~~-~~~~-E!_rs_

toreador

toreador

capn

capn

ankle

ankle

: /~t'rru~\.,: 路--路

:.:

One-Way-Stretch Pant and Shorts Length Variations Create any style of sh ort from the one-way-stretch pant sloper.

! = -.. --=

Waist Volume Create a fitted, semi-fitted , or unfitted waist finish for any pa nt style. Create unfitted by squa ring a line up to the waist leveL Create semi-fitted by finding the middle of the fitted and unfitted and drawing a new curved hip.

~

Cover-Stitched Waist Elastic To create a cover-stitched wai~~: the height of the Extend the waistband dou e elastic. . Illustrated at 2" for 1" elastic.

At the sides and end of the waist casing, square down from the top line. This waist does not need any seam allowances at the top because the elastic will be serged to the raw edge of the waist.


~ 84

CH APTER 6

E

PANTS

I1

ONE-WAY-STRETCH PANT .. -- ... ·- - ·····---

RIBBED WAISTBAND . . . CUT1

Serged-On Waistband

Ribbed Waistband

This waistband is a separate pattern piece. This waistband will be folded in h alf a nd serged to the pants. Measure twice the width of t he elastic, and the length of the total waist measurement. The waist and waistband will need seam allowances so they can be serged together. This style should also have elastic inserted into the waistband.

The ribbed waistband is a separate pattern piece. The ribbing mu st be reduced in length to pull in t he waist. The waistband should h ave only one seam, placed at one of the sides (u su a lly the left side), center back, or center front , if a drawstring is also inserted . The rib should be one-sixth smaller than the rib waist measurement . This waistba nd will be folded in half and serged to t h e pants. The waist a nd waistba nd will need seam allowances so they can be ser ged together. This style can also h ave elastic inserted into the waistband, or a n a ddit iona l drawstring.

notches

PANTS WITH DRAWSTRING ELASTIC

To create a drawstring waist:

:~~t::~~~:;~e the height of the casing (above the waist) Not h h

e measurement to allow for the foldo

ver.

to P~ ~r~:~~~ front to create an opening for the string


PANTS

CHAPTER 6

185

edgo-stltch

DRAWSTRING WAIST CASING For drawstring elastic, replace the front notc h With . two " notches 112 apart to create an opening fo th d . pass through . r e rawstnng to When sewing ,. s kip over the area between the ooc~~ t h create a hole 1n front for the string to pass through .

WAIST WITH ELASTIC GATHERS

To create a waist with gathered elastiC, extend the wa1st and square down to the side seams. This style will create a small amount of gathering at the waist. (For more on gathering, see further in the chapter.) This waist can have any of the elastic treatments-channel, or serged-on elastic, drawstring, or separate waistband.

2 112"

l

Find the center of the waist on that line and measure out 2112" in each direction, to make a pocket that is 5" wide.

PATCH POCKETS

.

y be placed at

Measure down 2'12' from the waist (but II ma

The pocket needs to be placed at the center of the waistline area, not the center of the hip, or it will appear to be

any level the designer wishes).

falling into the hip.


'1$6

('HAPTER 6

PANTS

1,_ I 5

jl

-s·

'• '--T-----''

I

I

I

Draw the pocket 5" down Mark the drill holes 'r4' down, and · 1n from the pocket edge

is Add seam aII owan C es and label the pattern. . This pattern " labeled L.S.O. for a pocket on the "Left Sode Only.

1" hem allowance 1• ~em al~':"-~~~- _

PATCH POCKET PATCH POCKET

MED

MED

CUT 1

CUT1

I. l Add V< seam allowances to the sides of the pocket and 1" hem to the top of the pocket.

1~

........

'

hem allowance

1

......... ! 1/2"

For an angled pocket, measure down %" at the center of the pocket and redraw.

1" hem allowance

--------------.

I

PATCH POCKET

•:

MED CUT1

1 Add 'I•" seam allowances to the sides of the pocket and 1" hem to the top of the pocket.

' 'I To prevent the pocket from stretching out when sewing across the bottom, serge '/.'' twill tape to the bottom edge.

I

If the fabric stretches in both directions, it may be necessary to serge twill tape to the sides also.

• •

• •

''

'


PANTS

CHAPTER 6

3"

ANGLED WELT ZIPPER POCKETS

Place the pocket wherever the designer wishes.

Or use this guideline.

Make the pocket 6" wide for Medium customers.

Make the pocket 11 " deep from the waist and at least 5" wide.

Blend the pocket bag into a curve for easier construction. You do not have to pivot at the corners and can simply serge all the way around in one easy step.

Draw the welts 1/4" wide by the entire length of the poc ket.

!w elt cut 41

. to the lower welt, and Note that the lower pocket Will sew ell therefore the the upper pocket will sew to the upper w ' ket h the lower poe ¡ upper pocket is 1/2" larger 1 an

Trace and separate all the pocket pattern pieces.


~88

CHAPTER 6

2 112"1

PANTS

-

s· centered

2 1'2"

-~-----t-

1~-

0

ll4. 0

I

\ DOUBLE WELT BACK POCKETS Measure down from the wa1st 2' 1'

Mark the drill ho les W' in from the ends o f the pocket.

Make the pocket 5• Wide. Place II centered tl on the watsl of the pant; do not center it on the hipline.

114" welts

E3

Draw the welts 'f, above and below the drill hole (cutting) line

The lower POcket ba tom of the pocket b g goes from the cutting line to the botag. The upper bag goes from bottom. the top of the Waist to the Or, curve the POcket b ags for easier assembly Th tor does not h ave to p1vot the pock t . · e operaa Pteces.

Draft the p ocket b ag 5" down from the drill hole (cutting) line.

Trace out and separate the pocket bags. Draft the welts 1" wide; they will fold in half and sew with a

'! .'' seam allowance and 6" long.


PANTS

CHAPTER 6

189

STYLE #6-001 WIDE-LEG PANTS 2 1/2"

Wide-leg. pants are very easy to draft, b ecause all you . must do 1s Increase the width of the leg at the ankle.

2 1/2"

2 1/2"

2 112"

To create a wide-leg pant, square up from the hem to the front crotch, approximately 2'12'' to 3". Increase the back leg, ankle width an equal amount to the front, and blend the back inseam at the crotch, as illustrated.

To create a bell-bottom style:

STYLE #6-002 BELL-BOTTOMS Bell-bottom pants are easy to create, and the flare may be placed as high or as low as the designer wishes. The flare can also be as wide as the designer wishes.

Note that the width and placement of the bell-bottom is up to the individual designer. Keep all measurements the same, and square the side seam at the hem. The designer may want the flare to start higher or lower than illustrated, or want the flare to be wider or narrower than illustrated. Any variation may be created as long as all four flare heights and widths are equal to maintain balance and a correct grain.


i~O

~ H I TDl 6

PANTS

STIRRUP PANT FRONT

STIRRUP PANT BACK

MED

MED

CUT2

CUT2

5/8"

5/8"

13/4"lur\J

1314"!ur\J

1"

1"

STYLE #6-003 STIRRUP PANTS

St1rrup pants. once very popular, are easy to create by mak1ng small straps that extend under the foot.

To create a pant with a stirrup: Add seam allowances to the stirrup curved edges depending on the type of finish required. Remember to add seam allowances to the ends (underneath the foot). Elasti c = %"seam allowance. Cover-stitched hem = '12'' seam allowance.

2"1

!~~~~-the waist

2" J 2"

• 1.~:"'-~~!~e -~!'_i~!

·-........

~

STYLE #6-004 HIP HU GGERS

Hip-huggers, or low-rise pants Simply lowering the wa· t • may be created by to ensure that you d IS . Measure the dress-to rm o not make th em too low.

W

j2,

-gw~~ .0

:0

Lower the waist the desired amount. Elastic measurement shoul d be calculated from the Judy. or the customer, at th e new lower waist 1" smaller than the . measurement 0 f where the elastic will lie. The designe tr r may lower the · ont and back are equal watst any amount, as long as the and the elastic reduction of 1" (for elastiC more than 1" Wide) is made at the new lowered waist.


PANTS

CHAPTER 6

191

To create an elastic casing f or a lowered waist· Ra1se the waist double the w·dth · 1 of the elastic d smaII er than the new lowered . an calculate the elastic length as 1" wa1st on the d ress-form (for elastic that is 1" or larger).

LJ LJ STYLE #6-005 PANTS WITH PRINCESS SEAMS

Draw a line dividing the sloper in half, or even toward the sides if required.

Princess or panel seams may be added to pants as a design detail or for color

Notch the sections for easy construction.

blocking.

The pant may be created with separate pieces for the front and back. totalSTYLE #6-006 PANTS WITH SIDESEAM STRIPES ated without Side-seam stripes can be ere . any side seam, but instead the stnpe should be drafted as one piece.

ing four pieces.


192

CHAPTER 6

PANTS

The stnpe will not have a seam through the middle, but instead may be drafted as one single straight piece.

The new draft should look like the illustration and has three pieces rather than four.

The stnpe will be drafted straight instead of curved to save fabnc when cutting the garment out. From the front side seam of the sloper, remove half the amount of the stripe. Repeat for the back. Draft the stnpe separately the length of the new side seams, the w1dth of the total that was removed from the original. Keep the hem stra1ght and measure upwards the length of the seams that will be sewn together.

STYLE #6-008 PEGGED-WAIST PANTS Pegged-waist pant may be drafted wit~¡n:r~':~ with fullness at the waist, ems.

Slash and spread to create pants that are gathered at the top and remain narrow at the bottom.


PANTS ~1ttsh

~d

i :

~

i

193

and spread

slash and

.--. --.. •• !.•. •-,.

CHAPTER 6

Slash the draft down th e center gra· 1· amount desired. In me and spread any

blend

Alsofront. note that you create pants that are only gathered at the Blend a new waist.

Gathenng Increase by

Light 50%

Medium 100%

Heavy 200%

·.'ii'¥.'~-~;,_O}_~!~-~¥~~!;;~~;;r? :.:

PEGGED WAIST

PANTS BACK MED

CUT2

PEGGED WAIST PANTS FRONT MED CUT2

Indicate gathering on the pattern. with dashed lines as indicated. You can also reduce the hem by 1/2'' on each side to make an even narrower hem, but check to make sure that the fabric stretches enough to get a foot through, otherwise you have to insert an invisible zipper.

blond


·~---------------------------------------1~4

HAPT H 6

PANTS

----- ----slash and spread

STYLE #6-009 PALAZZO PANTS

Palazzo or extreme w1de-leg pants can be created by enlarg1ng the hem volume of the pant sloper.

slash and spread

Slash and spread the hem of the pants any amount desired. Fullness Increase by

light 50%

Medium 100%

_ blend

PALAZZO PANT BACK

Sthtralghten out the Side seams by connecting the hem to e crotch w1th a straight line. Connect the hem to the hlp with a straight line.

PALAZZO PANT FRONT

MED

MED

CUT2

CUT2

j

j

Label the pants as indicated.

Heavy 200%


PANTS

HAREM PANTS Harem pants are created exactly like palazzo pants. except that a narrow cuff 1s added to the bottom to pull the pants 1n.

PALAZZO PANT BACK

C HAPTER 6

Harem pants may be created by gathenng the hem and addmg a ribbed cuff to the bottoms.

PALAZZO PANT FRONT

MED

MED

CUT2

CUT2

gather to cuff measurement

CUFF CUT 2.

Draft a cuff the lengt h o

195

f the ongâ&#x20AC;¢nal pant and 4" h1gh to fold into a 2" cuff.


196

CHAPTER 6

PANTS

STYLE #6010 COWL-DRAPED PANTS

Cowl-draped pants are created by slashing and spreading the side seams of the pants.

Pant s may be created with cowls at the side seams by following these instructions.

COWL PANTS BACK

MED CUT2

Slash and spread th . larger spreads for the sbectlons as required, often with e ottom section T then 8" then 10... s. ry spreading 6" Blend a new side seam.

COWL PANTS FRONT

MED CUT 2

Bend the knee, add a grainline, and label your pants pattern. When sewn, these patterns will fall into soft folds.


PANTS

2"1

CHAPTER 6

- J2" 2"1-

197

- J2"

CYCLING SHORTS This draft for cycling shorts also shows how to draft the chamoiS piece-another layer to protect the rider's crotch It can be made of self- or chamois suede, and is top¡ stitched to the inside of the shorts.

Draw a guideline 2" above the knee notch. Draw vertical lines indicated the center of the panel, for panel seams.

db\ Draw the chamois 4" above the crotch seam and 3" below, make sure to square at the center front and back.

\~

Notch and trace out all the pieces for the final pattern. The chamois should be sewn into the inside of the shorts after the crotch seams have been shown.

/

notch for pin tucks ""-.

1

SKI PANT

BACK

MED CUT2

SKI PANTS

SKI PANT FRONT

MED CUT2

te ski pants with a pin tuck down the front, simply straighten out the inTo crea d tseam as straight lines from h1p to ankle and crotch to ankle. seam an ou the waist and hem to Indicate where to sew the pin tuck. Place a noteh at


198

CHAPTER 6

PANTS

1'1

-~----

1-:,,

_. 112"

112'

_1 1'

... = •.

BOOTY SHORTS Short shorts or booty shorts can be created from the basic pant sloper. Draw the hem 1 .. down from the crotch.

j

Shape the hem by raising it '/i' at the front and lowering it 'h" at the back.

... .•

... .... .... .... ,.

ill

1"

WRAP SHORTS

1"

Wrap shorts are created without any S1de seams. They simply wrap back . over the front to give complete coverage.

,. ~

Extend each side seam by 1".

(Ill SHORT SHORT BACKMED CUT2

Blend a new hem and side seam into a curved line.

! Notch the placement of the side seams for construction. The hem and side seam should be bound with the collaretta, and can remain open, or stitched down for modeStY·

,.,. ,.,.,. ~

~


PANTS

C HAPTER 6

199

,..

• ••

-

I I I

KNICKERS WITH RIBBED CUFFS

Knickers with a ribbed cuff should be drafted by tracing the upper part of the sloper in that stretch ratio, and the lower portion should be traced from the rib sloper.

I I I I I

Place the seam 2" below the knee, or any amount the design requires.

, KNICKERS FRONT MEO CUT 2 SELF

I

Blend the curve. Divide the top portion and the lower portion. Slash and spread the upper portion ~ increase the vol ume at the knee leve .

0

Spread as much as the design

u trace the stable knit for the If yo rt"on you must reduce the lower po 1 • ·on 3/4'' as indicated. lower pert 1 t ace the rib ratio for the If you r . . nore. lower port1on, 1g

requires.

---------------------::::.~m~ Gathering Increase by

Light

Medlu

Heavy 200%

5~

Trace and label the pattern as indicated. Label the knee seam with gathering lines, and indicate how much to gather to.


200

CHAPTER 6

PANTS

11 I

• I I

PALLAZZO PANT BACK

PALLAZZO PANT FRONT

MED

MED

CUT2

CUT2

I I I

.... •• •• •• •• •• •• • I

gather

·,·:.

..

......:·.:·:::.:·:. ::::::. : KNICKERS WITH LEG TIES Knickers may be created with ties on the sides by follow ing these instructions.

Cut out the outseam as indicated and b ind with the collarette to create ties.

Test Your Knowledge of the Material in This Chapter 1. How might you draft a one-way-stretch

sloper for a personal sloper? 2. Should you try to draw an exact hip curve for custom pants? 3. What color should you label your Medium slopers? 4. How should you indicate the elastic measurement on the pants pattern?

ln~seam

5. How much smaller should the waist elastic be? 6. When creating a lowered-waist pant, how big should the elastic be? 7. How can you prevent the elastic from collapsing, or folding over, on t he wearer? 8. How much seam a llowance should be used on the waist when creating pants with a serged-on elastic?

Project #1

pockets

Design and create a pair of pants using the patternmaking principles from this chapter. Use any pant silhouette that you wish-wide leg, narrow leg, flared, or bell-bottom. The pants must have an elastic casing waist finish, serged to the ~aw edge and folded over and cover-stitched' or have drawstring elastic. Must have two pockets, which may be the same or different styles. Must have a cover-stitched hem.

..•.

._..-

,.,.,. fill


c

H A p Tr-cE::----;:::R:------=7- - - -

Tops About This Ch apter

.....

-•• ..:

Tops are a huge 0 . outsell bottoms p rtion of the fash· new top for a s~:U~~ts, and ~kirts. ~~~s~~arketpl.ace. They far new pants or a d ay evemng, but m mer Will often buy a This chapterrd~ss as easily. ay not want to purchase 1scusses t on t h e top portion of ops as any garme clarity, later chapt the body, including that are worn and dresses, whichers discuss sweateran top.s, but for noted here rna b are. JUSt longer tops M s, oversized tops, Th. h y e apphed to t hem . any of the details IS c apter begins with . .top sloper s of t he different ow1ng. n o evelop patterns

~ill

~;e~:=~~~{re~ch

tnt~

a~: :~:=l~p~endt

Crew-neck T-shirt V-neck T-sh irt Mock-ne ck T-s hirt Raglan-sleeve d T-shirt Mock-neck top Boatneck top Cowl-neck top Oversized T-shirt

One-Way-Stretch Top Sloper This sloper will be developed on th e fold, with the front on top of the back. The sloper should a lso be cut out full, total, folded, and butterftied on oak-tag to assist in the creation of asymmetrica l designs. Also, this sloper will be developed in size Medium (Misses), for stable knits, and will draw in the different stretch ratios. If you wish to develop a personal sloper, substitute your personal measurements with those listed as "standard size " and make the appropriate reductions. Use the sloper even when using four-way-stretch fabrics. Because there is nothing holding the length stretch down and anchoring it, the fabric will behave like a one-way-

one-way-st~etch

stretch anyway.

201


STABLE-KNIT TOP REDUCTIONS Zero percent smaller in crosswise direction without any reductions in lengthwise direction. Use these measurements w hen drafting slopers for fabrics that stretch from 0% to 25%. # Standard Divide Extra Medium Reduce New by Extra Measurements by Measurement panels Small 1 Bust 35 '12 0% 35'12 4 30 '12 2 Waist 27 '12 0% 27 '12 4 22 '12 3 Hip 35 '12 0% 36'12 4 30 '12 4 Crotch depth 10 '12 No length reduction 9 7/a 12 Nape to waist 16% No length reduction 15% 13 Back neck 2 '12 No length reduction 2% 14 Back neck rise 'l'a No length reduction 3;.1 15 Shoulder 6 No length reduction 5 16 Across back 7 '12 0% 7'12 N/A 6 7/a 18 Shoulder pitch 1 '12 No length reduction 1%

---

/;)

-

0

/.)

- -- Extra Small

31 112

Small

31'12

33'1; 25'12 33'12

10

10'1•

23'12

Extra Large

Extra Extra Large

41 1/o

45 •12

Medium

Large

35'12 27'12 35'12

38 '12 30'12 38 '12

33 '12 41';,

10 12

10 314

48 ';,

11

11 71a

1

16 '1a

16 71a

17 '1a

2'1, 'Ia

17 71a

2 '1,

18 '1a

2 '12 'Ia 6 '12

2 71a 'Ia

2/a

7

5'1. 8% 1'/,

5 1/a

/a

7

5'12 7'1•

7'12

73/,

1%

1'12

8

1 '12

1 '1,

1 71s

6

"

.... 0

2%

7

-i

m

-i

15 7/a 3;.i

%

,> "C

"'

/a

l)llJJJIJ I l l I 1111· ··-··-··-•-•~•:_e~:_•~•.:_•~·- •· •· •· •- •·•-•·•· •-


TOPS

CHAPTER 7

203

----~A

- - -- --io

------ c

_J. ONE-WAY-STRETCH TOP SLOPER

A-D . - 1'12:" shoulder drop (#18 from chart) and square a

. Select the draft with the stret h the size needed, from one f ~h ratio of your fabric, and o e previous charts.

I1ne across.

A-B = nape to waist (#12 from chart). A-C = halfway between A and B. A, B, C = square out lines.

A

A

- - -- -lJ..-=-'E D

---~E:..JD

- - - -- -lc

- - - ---lc

- - - -- - - ' B

B

E-F = back neck ri se (#14 from chart). D-E = back neck (#13 from chart), square up. Since the front w ill be drafted on top of the back, the measurements need to be divided into four.

# 2 3 4

'!. of waist 'I• of hip Crotch depth % of crotch depth 12 Nape to waist 12-b Half-way 13 Bac k neck 14 Nec k rise 18 Shoulder p itch

Ex tra Extra small 5% 8% 10 1/2 3 '12 15%

7 31• 2%

3j, 1%

Extra small

Small

5 71• 8% 10% 3 '/2 15'1• 8 2%

10'1• 3 '12 16 '1• 8 2'/2

31• 1%

~

Medium

Large

6%

6 71•

9'1•

9% 10% 3 112 16 71•

7% 10% 10 71s 3% 17 1/s 8% 2 '12

'I• 1 '/2

8 '12 2 '12

'I•

1 112

'I• 1 '12

Extra l arge

Extra Extra large

8% 11 'Is 11 'Is

9% 12'1• 11 % 3'1. 18 1/s 9 2 71o 'lo 1%

331· 17 71s 9 2 7/o

'I• 1%


HAPTER 7

TOPS

1

2

I

squmo

tor

\

~~\~..

- ----- s

·~·

--···-· :_· · ~-

l

E

A

D

F-G

shou der er>gt

Take your ruler and line it up from pomt F to wherever that measurement of the shoulder length lines up on line D.

#15 from chart

Draw 1n the shoulder line.

- +-..,----,--.,

3

A

4

- ::+----j o

• i.!l il

H

iii

il

II -----~

B

B

....

Draw tn neckline as Illustrated. Square for

iii iii

ti ti ti

C- 1 = bust measurement (#1 from the chart).

at F square to the shoulder ltne.

H- J = '12'' on bias angle of 45 degrees.

Square for '• · at A, square to the center line.

L

Draw the line by hand, since there is no curve that perfectly replicates the curve, and then use you r curves to smooth it out and neaten t! up.

= halfway between K and H.

G = square a line for at least '12'' just a little past the armhole line.

C-H = across back (#16 from chart), square up to shoulder, wherever it lands. Does not necessarily match with point G.

Shoulder length Across back Bust 'I• of bust

Extra Extra Small

Extra Small

5

5 1/e 7 31 '12 7'1•

6'1. 30 '12 7 7/e

(I

.. ..

II

Small

Medium

Large

5 '12 7 '1• 33'12 8%

6 7 112 35 '12 8%

6 '12 7% 38 '12

9%

Extra Large

Extra Extra Large

7 8 41 '12 10%

7'12 8%

45'12 11%

'' '

-'


TOPS

205

C H APTER 7

-4----r"~--, A

---,Oif'----=--'-1

0

M

----1---~e

N; ··--- - ---------

0

G-L-J-1 = draw armhole curve as ous curved line. a smooth and continu-

N

L __

_ _..JO

1-M-N-0-B = connect with a straight line, as an unfitted

line. B-M = bust (#1 from chart). B-0

= draw front neck from center front. Remember to square to the shoulder for 'h" at both F and D to square to the center front a point at D. F- D

= crotch dep th (#4 from c hart).

0 -N = hip (#3 from chart).

K-L = '!<''. G-J-L-1

A

= draw front armhole.

D

Smooth out the front armhole curve. Because the sleeve will be drafted on the fold with no difference between the front and back of the sleeve curves , you must compensate for the difference in the body. The front armhole is '!<'' narrower than the back armhole. This is so you don't have any armhole notches on the sleeve, which will create holes when using such small seam allowances, and is only suitable for knit fabrics because they will stretch to accommodate.

c

B

Note that many T-shirt manufacturers do not bother to take in the front armhole at all, and simply create a wider back armhole for both the front of the T-shirt and the back. Notch waist at side seam.

N

L __ _ _..J

o

Trace and separate front and back. M-N = divide into thirds.

Extra Extra Small Bust Crotch depth Hip '12 of hip

7'/s 9 71• 33 1/ 2

a%

Extra

small

7'/s 10 34'/2

8~ffl·--------~~--------~~-----------------------------------


r

H PTER 7

TOPS

F A

H

A

E

D

D

c

c

s

: ~ Q•J'

B

NLJo

R

N

For the f1tted wa1st: B-S

' - -- - -

0

s-R = draw in the hip curve lining up #4 on the variform curve to point S.

wa 1st measurement 't #2 from chart).

The hip curve may change depending on your target market. Note: This waist may be too tight and too severe for many tops. 1-S-R-N = draw a new curved side seam connecting the point and blending the curves. Blend the waist at the side seam into a curved line.

F

E

A

D

'c

B

R

N.__ _ ___,o

For a semi-fitted wa1st , draw a line hallway between the extremely fitted and the straight, unfitted waists.

Crotch depth '13 Crotch depth Waist '/. of waist

Extra Extra Small

Extra Small

Small

9 7/a 3 '/• 22 '!. 5 7/a

Medium

Large

10 3% 23 '!. 5 7/a

10'/, 3% 25 '12 6%

10 1/2 3'12 27 1/2 6 '1a

10'1. 3 7/a 30'12 7 7/a

Extra Large

11

3 7/a 33'12

8%

Extra Extra Large

11 '/• 33/• 37 '/2 9%

iJ


TOPS

CHAPTER 7

207

1 CF TOP BLOCK BACK

MED

2

TOP BLOCK FRONT

MEO

(date)

(date)

TOP BLOCK FRONT

Trace and separate the front a d n the back top slopers.

MEO (date)

Trueing the one-way-stretch top slopers. Place the shoulder seams together, as if they had been sewn and pressed open.

3

Blend a smooth armhole in a continuous line.

CB

CF

Blend a smooth neck in a continuous line. Check to make sure that the shoulders are exactly the same length. TOP SLOPER

BACK

TOP SLOPER FRONT

MED

MED

(date)

(date)

4 true the hem

Place the side seams together, beside each other, as if they had been sewn.

TOP

SLOPER

Check to ensure that the side seams are exactly the same length and that the waist notches match exactly.

FRONT

MED (date)

Blend the armhole in a s mooth continuous line. Make sure the hem is a straight line. Make sure to correct the armhole, if needed, before drafting the sleeve.

Place the paper draft on folded oak-tag. Glue, tape, or staple into place. Cut out all the layers at the same time. Do not try to cut open and then fold; the edges will never line up.


zos

CHAPTER 7

TOPS

STABLE KNIT TOP BLOCK BACK

MED (date)

Sloper Labeling FITTED WAIST

The shoulder seam isn't reduced because it will have twill tape (shoulder stay) applied and will not stretch.

The fitted waist should be cut out since it is much easier to create the unf1tted and semi-fitted waist from the fitted sloper, but more difficult to do the reverse.

SEMI-FITTED WAIST

Trace out the f1tted waist and indicate the different stretch rat1os.

The semi-fitted waist is halfway between the fitted waist and the unfitted waist, and should be labeled with the different stretch ratios. The shoulder seam isn't reduced because it will have twill tape (shoulder stay) applied and will not stretch.

The shoulder seam isn't reduced because it will have twill tape (shoulder stay) applied and will not stretch.

The best method for tracing the different ratios of the armhole is to create a template of the armhole curve and pivm it from the shoulder point to the different ratios.

Label the side seams of the Sloper with the additional stretch ratios.

Stable knit

0

-

fl

fl

The fitted waist may be too tight or extreme for many tops but may be necessary for dresses, especially strapless and tube dresses.

UNFITTED WAIST

"" "" ''

Moderate knit

Stretchy knit

Super-stretch knit

-'/s

-'/•

_,/8

Rib knit

JEWEL NECKLINE A Jewel neckline is simply a round neckline, and will need a facing in order to f1n1sh the raw edge along the neckline. In order for the neckline to be pulled on over the head it must be enlarged to at least the head size, because once the facing is it will not stretch enough. '

a~tached

• t

i i i

••• •

•• •

•-• -


TOPS 3"

TOP BLOC1< BAC1< MED (date)

·~

..._1

TOP BLOCK FRONT MED

(_ ___

TOP

TOP BLOCK FRONT

BACt\ MED

MED (dale)

~date)

Trace out the unfitted wa1st of the t bl rat1o of you fabric. op ocks, in the stretch In order for the neckline to be pulled over I he head 11 must b.e enlarged . . to at least . 21 unless a zp ' per or other' openIng detail 1s used to mcrease the circumference. In th1s example the measurement of the total neck is 15• and 11 needs to be 21.

200

11f2

112 ~

BLOCK

(datel

CW\PTE'H 7

Measure the neck and subtract t11at amount from 21 (m1n1mum) Neckline

15".

Subtract from 21". Balance

6".

Divide by 4 = 1'h " (two fronts and two backs). Mark the shoulder in 1'12' from the neckline. Reshape the neck. Note: Sometimes the center back will be forced lower 1n order to maintain a smooth and balanced curve.

2 112" CB

'-

I

CF

3112"[

-

JEWEL NECK TOP BACK MED CUT1

JEWEL NECK TOP FRONT MED CUT1

..--2 112"

'

CB

_12 112"

CF

FACING FOR A JEWEL NECKLINE Label the pattern as indicated.

Measure and mark the shoulders in 2'H' from the neck. Measure and mark the front neckline down 2'12". Measure and mark the center back neck down 3'/i'. The center back facing is always lower than the front. It helps to keep the facing inside and c reates a nice frame for the label.


210

CHAPTER 7

TOPS

. ;:r

~

E)

2

~

CF CF

CB

Square guidelines from the shoulder seam and center front/back. Draw in the facing; remember to square for '12' at the shoulders and the necklines.

3

Trace out the facing on a new piece of paper.

4

1/4"

3/8"

3/8"

CF

3/8"

CB

114"

CB

3/8"

CF

JEWEL NECK TOP BACK

MED

3/8"

JEWEL NECK TOP FRONT

MED

CUT1

Remove 'Ia" from the front shoulder line to make the facing slightly smaller so the seams will roll toward the inside of the neck facing.

(on fold)

1/4" CB

3/8"

1/4"

no seam allowance added

Add '12'' seam allowances to the shoulder seams. Add 'Iâ&#x20AC;˘" seam allowance to the neckline edge. No seam allowance needed for the outside edge of the facrng,because it will not be sewn to anything and I hes rnsrde the garment. mere y Label the pattern: Cut 1 self Cut 1 fusing-tricot

1" hem allowance

Add the seam allowances as indicated.

3/8"

BACK FACING CUT 1 SELF CUT 1 FUSE

no seam allowance added

(on fold )

l 1" hem allowance

5

CUT1

The neck has '12'' seam allowances, since it should be sewn with the straight stitch machine. It won't stretch once fusing is applied to the facing , and it doesn't neeo to stretch because the neck opening had been made wider.

" ill

â&#x20AC;˘". .. .. .. ill

.

Iii

..

...


TOPS

CHAPTER 7

211

¡¡---- ----------------------V-NECK WITH FACING The V-neck does not have to be enlarged if the vis low enough that the head can fit through the opening. Remember that the V-neck can be as low as your design requires.

To determine how low the V-neck will be, measure down on the dress-form, from the center front neckline dow nwards, and apply that measurement to the draft.

CB

I

measurement from dress form

TOP

TOP

BLOCK BACK

BLOCK

MED

FRONT MED

(date)

(date)

Measure down on the draft the measurement from the dress-form.

CF

Trace out the semi-fitted waist in the stretch ratio of your fabric. Because there is no sleeve inserted into the armhole, you must raise and take in the underarm '12" to prevent undergarments from showing, and the sides of the breast from falling out, or showing. Other ways to tighten this area-binding that is slightly smaller, elastic, or banding-will be discussed later in this chapter.


1

2

CB

CF

CF V-NECKTOP BACK

ou also must bring rn Because the garment rs sleeveles:~: ends of the shoulder the shoulder a mrmmum of so seam don't hang ott the shoulders.

V-NECKTOP FRONT

MED

MED

CUT1 (on fold)

CUT 1 (on fold)

Label the pattern as indicated.

re drafted for sleeves to Remember that the armholes w~ . any shape you desire. be attached Draw a new armho e rn .. Create a V-neck as low as you wrsh. illustrated here at 3 . To determme the depth of the V-neck, s;m~y~:~~~u;~w down from the neck porn! on the dress- or you wrsh the neck to be.

3

CB 3 112

21/2"

2 112'

...

/

2 112" 2112/,•,

'

ill

'' /

2 112'

4

i!l

' ' ' ' 21/2"

·._f \.

'...: .'

. "-

.../

ill iii

• CF _.· 2112"'.,

•• ..

.. •

Create the facings as separate pieces as shown.

II

The center back facing should be 3'12' low; this gives room for the label and looks more appealing when on the hanger. All other facings should be at least 2'12'' wide. It doesn't look very nice to see the back facing when the garment is on the hanger. In higher-priced garments, create the back facing long enough so the facing edge is 2'12'' lower than the front V-neckline. Shown here with sleeves to indicate the back facing only. If creating sleeVeless garments, combine the armhole and neck facings, as will be illustrated. Your price point and target market will determine this.

•• .. • •'

•• •


TOPS

5

3 1/2"

~ca···· .... j ............. : :

CHAPTER 7

213

:

... .;,

.

.

••• • •• 2 112"• .-''-:·· •• ..). 2112'• , ;/ \ ' ,• •CF' • : •• • 2 112''•• :

Create the facing in one piece 2 ,12.. a f and armholes. ' way rom the neck Curve the lower edge shape so it doesn't show throu h A. stra1ght. line would .show g · . through the g arment as a bold line: but 1f you curve 11 slightly it will not show through as eas1ly when worn, espec1ally after being pressed a few times.

1/6"

6

Remove '/•" from the shoulder seams to make the facing slightly smaller, since it is on the inside of the garment and is therefore slightly smaller. This helps to pull the seam edges slightly inward.

A one-piece facing prevents sewing errors and is easier to cut. It also has a much better hanger appeal.

7

318"

8

' ''

3/8"

3/8"

.•

Add seam allowances to the back facing as indicated.

3/8"

, ..... , .'

318"

.

'

'•

3/8'

for the shoulders and side seams.

W' for the armholes and neck.

The front facing is as illustrated, in one piece. Add seam allowances to the front facing as shown.

The inside edges do not require any seam allowance because they will not be sewn to anything.

9

'

'

The V-point on the facing edge may be curved for easier and faster serging. This enables the operator to serge in one step, all the way around, rather than two steps, once in each direction.


-14

, HAI'lt ll 7

,.

TOr'S

2 l 2' .

l

COLLAR CUT1

4 112"

3"

!

foldline

4 112''

J

... 4"

3"

;:::7 3'

TURTLE NECK TOP BACK MED CUT1 on fold

MOCK NECK A mock neck. or mock turtleneck. T-shirt is a short turtleneck where the collar does not fold back down.

Draft the collar pattern to any height desired, but mock neck collars tend to be 3" and under. If longer, we often refer to them incorrectly as turtlenecks. The length is determined by the total neckline measurement, without any reductions, because the collar should stand up, not lie flat. Note: This draft must be doubled to encircle the entire neckline. You have only measured half the draft. The collar should only have one seam , either at the center back or, preferably, li ned up with the left shoulder seam.

3"

4 1/2"

foldline

4 1/2"

J

8"

3"

114"

TURTLE NECK TOP FRONT

MED CUT1 on fold

TURTLENECK A turtleneck T-shirt has a higher collar than the mock-neck and is intended to fold down over itself. People tend to refer to any type of mock-neck collar that is over 2'/2'-3" as a turtleneck.

•• •..

.... •..

TURTLE NECK TOP FRONT MED CUT 1 on fold

COLLAR CUT1

:

Draft the collar pattern to any height desired, but turtleneck collars are usually over 2". The length is determined by the total neckline measurement, without any reductions, because the collar should stand up, not lie flat. Note: This draft must be doubled to encircle the entire neckline. You have only measured half the draft. The collar should only have one seam, either at the center back or, preferably, lined up with the left shoulder l188lft.

•• •• ••• •


TOPS

CHAPTER 7

215

' 112"

:--

toldhnfl

._,

......

.. •:II

_, CORRECTING THE FIT OF A TURTLENE . CK COLLAR Because the customer's . neck IS wid er at the base tha n at the top,- usmg the exact neckl.me meas urement from th d ra ft WI 1I create a collar th t away from the neck. You c:nglapes at the top, standinge r ht · eave the dr ft · a s 1g correct1on to the fit. a as IS or make To correct this , pinch out th e extra amou t and remove that amount from th n • measure it, e pattern as illustrated .

112' '

1 \l .._ '

112'

Or . colisimply remove approximately ' ,• from each end of the ar pattern. ~:~:lop of the collar is now smaller and will fit snug to the me.

The edge that att aches to the sweater IS also smaller and must be stretched to fit into the neckline.

3/8"

3/8"

3/8"

3/8"

3/8"

3/8"

TURTLE NECK T-SHIRT BACK MEDCUT1

on fold

3/8"

3/8"

3/8"

3/8"

TURTLE NECK T-SHIRT FRONT - MED CUT1

on fold

l 1" hem allowance

Add seam allowances and label the pattern as indicated in the Mock Necks section. The seam of the collar should line up with either the center back or the neckline or, preferably, the left shoulder seam. Always the left, where it is less noticeable.

OTHER TURTLENECK COLLAR CORRECTIONS If your fabric does not stretch enough for the collar to pull on over the head, you have several options to correct the collar. Use whichever method your collar demands. Use a matching rib fabric, which will stretch enough to fit over the head.


·~

2it)

CHAPTER 7

: •• ••

TOPS

COLLAR CUT 1

RIB ONLY

TURTLE NECK TOP BACK

MED

•.... .• .

TURTLE NECK

TOP FRONT

MED

CUT 1

CUT 1

on fold

on fold

Use the same pattern piece. exactly as ·s ' ' but it may not be snug enough. b % for a snug fit. Or reduce the width of the pattern y 10

ther c losure .'" the collar, so the neckInsert a zipper or o to et the garment on and oH the line can be opened up g body.

• I I I

COLLAR CUT 1.

1/8"

:;;

c. c.

·;;:;

b

BACK

MED CUT1

on fold

".... •• •

TURTLE NECK WITH ZIPPER FRONT MED CUT1 on fold

The zipper should be a total of 10", with 4" inserted into the collar and 6" inserted into the front of the top. The next illustration shows how to indicate the zipper opening. When the zipper opening is cut out, the cutter should only cut machine. 3" down so the operator can cut the remaining 3" at the Sometimes zippers may be a single tooth longer or a Single tooth shorter than the actual measurement, Which would leave a hole in the front, so let the sewing machine operator cut the balance of the opening While at the mach1ne.

13" :.:

TURTLE NECK WITH ZIPPER FRONT

MED CUT1 on fold

To indicate a zipper opening on the pattern, remove a slit 'Ia" wide half the length of the zipper. The slit is made 'Ia" wide, like a notch, so the marker maker can trace into the slit area. There is room for the mechamcal pencil. Sometimes zippers may be a single tooth longer or a single tooth shorter than the actual measurement, which would leave a hole in the front, so let the sewing machine operator cut the balance. Label the Pattern with the length of zipper that should be purchased, not the length of the notch/slit, so the produCtion manager and cutter can ensure that they have enough zippers In stock before cutting out of

thoueanda o-n••


TOPS

CHAPTER 7

217

1/8"

TURTLE NECK WITH ZIPPER FRONT

MED CUT1 on fold

Your design may require inserting the zipper on an angle. The operators will not know that you want it cut in this direction, unless you tell them. Indicate the slit in the place that you wish the zipper to be inserted. Alternatively, some patternmakers use drill marks to indicate the bottom of the zipper. Drill marks aren't very dependable on knit fabric, and may create holes or runs in your garments, so they should be avoided if possible. There are times when there is no other way to indicate a detail other than with a drill mark, which should be marked with chalk.

1/2"

This will also depend on your fabric, as some knits, especially shiny ones, will visually exaggerate even the slightest amount of ease.

112"

foldtine

1/T

Enlarge the collar slightly and ease it into the neckline. Use this technique for very small amounts only, otherwise your collar seam will pucker.

l 1/2"

. um of '12'' on each Enlarge the width of the collar, a maxim side, for a total maximum of 1" wider. . . a not ease into the If you make the collar any w1der, 't m Y neckline without showing gathers and puckers.

Enlarge the neckline wider, and the collar accordingly: however, the collar will sit slightly away from the neck.


218

CHAPTER 7

•• •• •• ..

TOPS

.. •.

~

TURTLE NECK TOP FRONT MED CUT 1 on fold

TURTLE NECK TOP BACK MED CUT1 on fold

. .

~

h necessary or as much as you W1den the collar as muc as ' f t least '12'' to h shoulder seam o a off the customer's shoulders.

~~:~~e~t~~:::'fro:: 1~ 1 ng

t the An extremeIY WI'de neckline may be created• to fmake top very easy to get on and off• or as a des1gn ea ure.

neckline, In order to maintain a smO oth curve on the back . .1t may be necessary to lower the back neckline. If so, remember to keep the center back neckline square. Create a new collar to fit the new widened neckline. ,.......::..

: ; - -- - ; - - - , COLLAR CUT 1

J l

I I i I I

__;

fold line ......

create a new collar to fit the neckline

......

•• •• •

.....::

I

'•

TURTLE NECK TOP FRONT

t

MED CUT 1 on fold

Widen the collar as much as necessary, or as much as you desire. However, have a shoulder seam of at least '/,'' to prevent the top from sliding off the customer's shoulders. In order to maintain a smooth curve on the back and front neckline, 1t may be necessary to lower both. If so, remember to keep the center back and center front necklines square.

•t CREW-NECK T-SHIRT To create a crew-neck T-shirt, use rib knit for the collar in order for it to stretch enough to lie flat against the neck. It may be difficult for the student designer to find match1ng jersey and rib, and you may have to use a contrast colored collar.

Create a new collar to fit the new widened neckline. Knitting mills often sell matching ribs, trims, and polo collars that match the fabric. However, the student or new designer may not have access to these supplies and will have to use contrast fabrics. Alternatively, crew-neck T-shirts can be Cf9llted entirely utilizing rtb fabrics: rib body and rib collar.


TOPS 1'

.......

CHAPTER 7

219

1"

1"1. •••• •

t

·- •• 11 "

.-. i: -

TOP BLOCK BACK MED (date)

TOP BLOCK FRONT MED (dale)

/

\

TOP BLOCK SACK MED (date)

Draw the neck seam 1" parallel to the front and lines, below the neckline. back neck-

TOP BLOCK FRONT MED (date)

These sections will be discarded from the final patterns, and should be erased after they are measured.

Remove 1" from the T-shirt draft parallel to d original neckline. an below the

measure for the collar draft

,.1f--------------------------11 2• \

/ measurement from the collar draft

TOP BLOCK BACK MED (dale)

measure for the collar draft

TOP BLOCK FRONT MED (date)

Sew the neckline measurement to draft the rib collar. Note that the rib collar is smaller than the new neckline it will be sewn to and must be slightly stretched in order Measure and record the neck edge of the discarded

to fit.

pieces in order to draft the rib collar.

Also note that some rib fabrics are much more stretchy than others and may need to be reduced further in order

Measure the smaller, inside c urve-the original necklineof the block, so the final collar wil l lie flat.

d

C9.L.~f3..

CREW NECK ----c;u·f'1Rii!oNLY

·•

j2·

to lie flat.

Draft the collar twice as wide as needed, since it will be folded in half and both edges sewn to the neckline. The collar will have only one seam, at the center back, or preferably at the left shoulder.

CREW NECK TOP FRONT MED

CUT1

on fold


220

CHAF'TE.R 7

TOPS

Add " seam allowa four-thread sergers.

318"

3/8"

318'

318" CREW

CREW

as tllustrated, for

NLY"· otherwise the "RIB 0 h never stretch enoug bel the collar as Be sure to Ia t in self and would h enough to sew to collar may be cu d wtll not stretc to Itt over the head, an the neckline.

Add a

318

318"

nces to the pattern

1" hem to the pattern.

NECK

NECK

TOP FRONT

TOP BACK

MED

MED

CUT 1 on fold

CUT1 on fold

318"

.. -~

- · · - ·- ·1- h~,;;;ti~~~~~e

TOP BLOCK BACK

V-NECK T-SHIRT

Determine how low you wtsh the V-neck to be by measurtng on the dress-form from the neck down.

TOP BLOCK FRONT

MED

MED

(date)

(date)

t of the V on the pattern. usIndicate the depth amoun the destgn reqUires. trated here at 3" but may be as low as To determine how low you wish the V-nec k t o be. measure down the neckline of the dress-form.

1"

··.;..

·..;:. 1" TOP BLOCK BACK

TOP '. BLOCK FRONT

MED

MED

(date)

(date)

Draw the collar on the draft 1" parallel to the neckline.

Measure. record , and remove or erase the collar port•on from the draft Measure the inside edge to determine the final length of the collar. In order to lie flat, the collar must be slightly smaller than the neck seam. This is done by recording the smaller collar edge.


TOPS

CHAPTER 7

221

318"

:-- --v.t.iECI•(Cc5L-LAfC--~- -: 3/8-

:____ 9~!1~19~!"!-:! ____ ...

318~

118'

318"

318

318"

318~

.............

3/8

V-NECK

TOP FRONT MED CUT1 on fold

BACK MEO

~~r:1~

~ FRONT \ MEO

: :

I ~nuf:~ I

\'

'' ''

'' ' --------1" hem

I

:

/ i \V-NECtt: TOP!

' V-NECKTO~;

! I

318"

1 hem

Measure the discarded piece in order to determine the length of the collar pattern.

Add seam allowances and label the pattern as Illustrated.

The rib w ill be stretched to fit the neck opening, which will force it to lie flat

Label the collar as "RIB ONLY" to ensure that the collar does not get cut out in self fabric, which would not allow 1t to stretch enough to fit the neckline.

TOP BLOCK

FRONT MEO (date)

V-NECKCREW

Line up the ruler with the center front and the shoulder point of the neckline.

The V-neck crew is a variation of both the c rew and the V-neck.

Extend the line the length of the back nee" measu•errent.


~~'

HAI'TER 7 TOPS

TOP BLOCK FRONT

TOP BLOCK BACK

Make the collar 1" wide and draw the line parallel to the previous line.

MED

MED

(date)

(date)

Trace out the other side of the collar draft. 3/8''

Blend to the curve of the front neckline.

3/8"

3/8"

3/8"

3/8"

3/8"

3/8"

3/8"

TOP BLOCK BACK MED (date)

TOP BLOCK FRONT MED (date)

V-NECK CREW BACK MED CUT1 (on fold ) -

V-NECK CREW FRONT MED CUT1 - (on fold)

". ill

~

i

il

...

1" hem

1" hem

Trace and separate the collar pattern as shown. Add seam allowances and label the pattern as indicated. Label the collar as "RIB ONLY" to ensure that the collar does not get cut out in self fabric, which would not allow it to stretch enough to fit the neckline.

•• •• • I

• '' '

•;


CHAPTER 7

TOPS

TOP BLOCK

2 23

TOP BLOCK

BACK MED

FRONT

(date)

(date)

MED

BOATNECK T-SHIRT

This boatneck is a very simple neckline to dr . often the basis for many cowl necklines. aft, and IS

Square up the center front and back. Square across the center front and back to line up w1th the shoulder point. It appears as if this high boatneck will choke the customer, but the fabric will stretch across to allow room and comfort.

p:37

~

TOP BLOCK BACK MED (date)

TOP BLOCK FRONT MED (date)

Add a 2" hem or fold back facing to the neckline. Fold your paper along the neckline and trace with tracing wheel to true the sides of the hem/ facing so they match the shoulder line.

no seam allowance for the facing/hem

318" COWL NECK TOP BACK MED CUT1-.,

COWL NECK TOP FRONT MED CUT1

318'

''

''

\ 318" !

---1-;.-he,;,·--·

·--1·..-h;rr;·-nd label as indicated.

Add the required seam allowances a

COWL NECK TOP BACK MED CUT 1-

-

COWL NECK TOP FRONT MED CUT1

Trace out the completed pattern as illustrated.


~4

CHAPTER 7

TOPS

2

.!.<' /

TOP BLOCK SACK

MED (date)

WIDE BOATNECK

The ..a,..,• t>oa ~~• Ca"' oe drafted fan her away from the neo· and wtl 'lC: be ash gh as !he pre' 'ous draft, and may be more comf::)"table

,,11

( TOP BLOCK FRONT

MED

..... ..... ...... ...

(date)

Measure .m from t he n eck ' any amount, but at least 'h" away from the arm hole so the armhole seam allowances don't show at the nec kline • and especially if sleeves are to be attached. Illustrated here at 2", but may be any amount the design requires.

~

,___,.

/

\---=i'

\

~

TOP BLOCK BACK

TOP BLOCK FRONT

TOP

BlOCK BACK

MEO

MEO

I date)

(date)

TOP BLOCK FRONT

MED

MED

(date)

(date)

.... .... • •

• •• ••

il II

Square a hne up the center front and back.

The neckline will be as illustrated, and w ill need a hem or facing along the neck edge.

Square a hne across to meet the other ltne. The back neckline may have to be slightly lowered to accommodate the new boatneck.

.

.... ..

(I

~12'

Add a 2" hem or foldback facing to the front as illustrated. True the shoulder by folding your paper and tracing the shoulder with a tractng wheel.

BOAT NECK TOP BACK

MEO CUT1

BOAT NECK TOP FRONT

MED CUT1

With this draft, the facing will extend into the armhole, and when sewn into the sleeve seam, wtll prevent the facing from rolling outward.

II

--

~

;


TOPS

CHAPTER 7

225

u--=> TOP BLOCK BACK

••=

TOP BLOCK FRONT

MEO

MEO

(date)

(date)

COWL NECK

By enlarging the front portion of the boatneck eastly create a cowl neckline. you can

-•

=

Square the back neckline up and 1n as for the boatneck, making sure that both lines intersect at right angles (90 degrees) .

\ \ !.

'\~ _.:........

TOP BLOCK BACK

To determine the length of cowl , hold the tape measure as low as your desire and as far away from the dress-form as you desire, and record that measurement. Divide it in half to use for your draft, since you will be only drafting half of

MEO

MEO

(date)

(date)

Using your " J.:' ruler, match the hem and the shoulder nee point as illustrated. It must remain perfectly square at the front or your fina! neckline will end up having a point at the front.

the garment.

. t d with this style, you will Because of the cowling and extra fabnc crea e . . . d fts in the front, as you W I11 need a larger hem facing than w1th prev1ous ra • easily see inside the cowl. ld r and draw a curved Add 4" hem to the front and 2" hem at the shou e ' line as illustrated.

TOP BLOCK FRONT


.,;:~

CHAPTER 7

TOPS

CF

CB

TOP BLOCK BACK MED

TOP BLOCK FRONT MED

(date)

(date)

COWL NECK TOP BACK MED (date)

The factng can be drafted larger m the center front to prevent the facmg on very flUid fabrics from rolling to the outstde. In some very htgh-end garments. a small wetght ts attached to the center front pomt of the factng to keep it securely tnstde

COWL NECK TOP FRONT MED '

(date)

Illustration shows the completed pattern. Note: The front hem of this draft must be corrected, stratghtened out, and will add length to the front of the garment. While not noticeable in a large cowl, you should use an alternative method (see later in chapter) if your design requires a straight hem or if a skirt is attached.

•: •• •.

•.... •• •

••• •

•• •• •• ••

TUBULAR COWL A cowl may also be created with a tubular collar attached With a separate collar piece that is sewn to the neckline. '

This cowl is a separate collar piece that is folded and attached to the neckline If your tubular collar is very large, it should be sewn with wrong Sides together, so the serging is on the outside and will be hidden by the large collar. If it is sewn with the sherglng on the inside, the seam allowances will show at t e neckline.

•. •.•.

..,... ...

,..


TOPS

CHAPTER 7

227

,.

1

\_ TOP BLOCK BACK MEO

2

TOP BLOCK FRONT MEO

-

(date)

(date)

Measure how far you wish the cowl t0 . Sit from the neck, and mark.

measure ___.

\

TOP BLOCK BACK MEO

TOP BLOCK FRONT MEO

(date)

(date)

"

To draft the collar piece, measure the cowl design line and record the number.

Measure how deep you wish the cowl to be, and mark. Draw in the neckline with curved lines.

4

3

. -~':J~.\-1-~Fl COWL COLLAR

ME-0 CUT-,------ ---

>measure <

TUBULAR COWL TOP BACK MED

TUBULAR COWL TOP FRONT MED

(date)

(date)

TUBULAR COWL TOP BACK MED

TUBULAR COWL TOP FRONT MED

(date)

(date)

The tubul ar cowl can also be created with more volume at the front and less at the back as illustrated. This draft has the seam located at the center back of the top.

Draw the tubular cowl exactly the same length as the neckline measurements. Make the cowl as a single pattern piece, with the seam at the center back or preferably at the left shoulder.

5

TUBULAR COWL COLLAR

--------ME-6 cuE ... -----

. olume in the front and more at the Or the cowl may be created w1th less v back, with the seam at the back neck.

TUBULAR COWL

TOP BACK

MED (dlllll)

TUBULAR COWL TOP FRONT MED (diD)


••, •• I

CHAPTER 7

TOPS

\': ~..~.....

/

COWL NECKLINE ON A FITTED TOP

All of the previous drafts. excluding the tubular cowl, will increase the body of the garment as well as the cowl neck. Use lhe followtng technique if you wish to create a cowl w1th a f1tted body and don't want to 1ncrease any of the body volume. Use this draft for longer top designs, so you don't increase volume of the body of the garment, or if you wish to attach a sktrt.

[F TOP BLOCK BACK

MED (date)

To determine the length of cowl, hold the tape measure as low as your desire, and as far away from the dress-form as you desire, and record that measurement. Divide it in half to use for your draft, since you wi ll be only drafting half of the garment.

'lJ TOP BLOCK FRONT

TOP;

BLGCK ---fRONT

MED

MED

(date)

(date)

Draft the neckline as if for the tight high cowl b . up and 1n, us1ng the "1..:' ruler. • Y squanng

Draw slash lines from th . illustrated. e neckline to the side seam as May be placed higher ing on the a or lower on the side seam, dependmount and placem t f to increase. en o the volume you wish

•• •• •• ••

•• ••

••

•• ••

•• •• •

""_...

"


TOPS spread

229

- ---¡-u

~

Slash and spread as illustrated.

CHAPTER 7

Square a line using the "I.:' square.

To determine how much to spre d surement from the dress-form. a ' use the recorded mea-

FITIED COWL-NECK TOP FRONT

MED

blend":

CUT 1

I Add a 4" hem to the front and a 2" hem to the shoulder area, and draw a curved line.

The completed pattern will add volume only to the upper part of the garment, without increasing any of the body portion. As before, a larger facing/hem may be used if the fabric is very fluid and you wish to ensure that it does not roll outward.


230

CHAPTER 7

TOPS 3/8'

·"··...

•.

WRAP TOP

Wrap tops, betng asymmetncal. must be drafted full by trac1ng one side of the sloper then the other s1de.

'•

Remove ''" ,. at the side seam and at the shoulders, as iilustrated, to puII the top in a little closer to the body, 1f you intend to face the raw edges. This IS not necessary if you finish the raw edge ":'ith bind. or ban d'tn g • as they will be cut smaller and Will pull the 1ng garment in tighter. This is especially important if your diagonal lines are in the bust area.

2 1/2"

2 1/2" fae~ng

notches forties

blend 2112

2 1/2"

Create a facing 2'12" from the front and neckline edges.

=

Notch the center front at the point for the ties to be inserted between the front and the facing when sewing.

WRAP TOP FRONT

MED CUT 2

I The facing needs 'Ia" removed to mak . r than the outer garment. e 11 s lghtly smaller

Trace and sepa t th ra e e Pattern pieces as illustrated.


TOPS

C HAPTER 7

231

As· 51 9nment #7-1: Create AT-Shirt To improve and your understanding and knowledge of tops, draft · garments usmg · the m · struct1ons · · this sew one the foil owmg 111 c11apter. a cost'mg s11eet for your ganncnts so you w .ill bc. Complete t g111 ° underst and tl 1e costs associated with manufacturing a com t P 1e e garment. Please note t hat your garment wi II be very expens1ve · have purchased your fab ric at rct . d • beeausc you wdl aJ1' ouble the cost of wholesale and your Iabo1· will be high . .. garments. However' your sewi. ng . vc.J Y sow 1 r 10r t11ese' Jmtwl tl1e. exerc1se 1s s t'111 ·Important for understanding the relation-' · s1lip between the different costs. Ma ke sure io check your T-shirt agai nst the mark s heets to see how well you und eJstan . . d the patternmakmg . for tops. ' . Cut and sew out this garment so you can see what it fits 1Ike, and how the fit can be improved.

OPTION #1: CREW NECK T-SH IRT IN JERSEY W ITH A RIB COLLAR Draft this basic T-shirt with a rib collar. Note that the student or new designer may not be able to color match the jersey and rib fabrics, and that a contrast colored rib may be used. For sleeve instructions, see Chapter 8, Sleeves.

OPTION #2: CREW-NECK T-SHIRT IN RIB WITH A RIB COLLAR Since the student or new designer may not be able to color match the jersey and rib fabrics, you can also create the top using rib fabric for both the collar and the body of the garment. For sleeve instructions, see Chapter 8, Sleeves.

OPTION #3: V-NECK T-SHIRT IN JERSEY WITH A RIB COLLAR Following the drafting instructions in this ch apter create a V-neck T-shirt. ' For sleeve instructions, see Chapter 8, Sleeves.


,. '

Cti ~ PTER 7 TO PS

OPTION #4: V-NECK CREW T-SHIRT IN JERSEY WITH A RIB COLLAR Following the uraftmi! .nstructwns in th is chapter. create a combi~ation \'-neck and crewneck T-"h1rt For ~let•\·e m-.:truction,-, ,;ee Chapter 8, S lt·e\·b.

OPTION #5 BOATNECK T-SHIRT IN JERSEY Following the draftin g instructions in this chapter, create a boatneck T-shirt. For sleeve instructions, see Chapter 8, Sleeves.

CF

CF

FITIED WAIST

Fitted: Follows waist curve.

SHAPE THE SILHOUETTE AS DESIRED Tank top designs will have finished a h l rather than sleeves. There are diffl rm o es ods used. to fi~ish the raw edges ~;et~t methholes, which Will be illustrated th h e arri_Jchapter. roug out th1s The tank top can be fitted • senu. fi tted 1 fi ared depending on the d . , • oose, or esigner s sketch.

i'A

••

-"--.

Sleeve-Less Garments

••


TOPS

CHAPTER 7

CF CF

SEMi-FITTED WAIST UN-FITTED WAIST

Semi-fitted: Halfway between th e fitted and th

e loose.

Unfitted: Straight down from the underarms to the hips.

CF CF

OV ER-SIZED FIT

FITTED WAIST

Oversized:

Flared:

Use the oversized sloper (see Chapter 11, Oversized Projects).

Extend the hip out as far as desired.

blend

CF

FITTED WAIST

ARMHOLE CORRECTIONS FOR SLEEVELESS

Additional volume: in and spreading your Create additional volume by slash 9 draft to the desired fullness.

GARMENTS

233


HI\PTL:R 7

TOPS 1 the shoulder seam must be shortened When creating sleeveless garmehn s.loper was c reated for a sleeve to be at' } • Remember that t IS s . k' d f . by at least ' · ld hang over the edge, like a In o Wing. !ached and the extra amount wou . and s hou ld not be used to create cap sleeves. This IS not very attractive

CF 112"

UNDERA RM COR RECTIONS FOR SLEEVELESS GARMENTS This sloper was created to have sleeves attached, and the armholes are too

112"

FITTED WAIST

large for a sleeveless garment.

.

· t he arm hole at the side seam 'H' to t1ghten the armhole Raise and take In . and prevent the u ndergarments and sides of the breast from show1ng. or binding You may also tighten the armhole by using elastic, banding, • d f th · methods to reduce the underarm, which will be exp 1a1ne ur er on 1n this text.

1"

112" ___ _":---..1 ..

1"

11/2" .~.

. . .. -- 13"

TOP BLOCK BACK

TOP BLOCK FRONT

MED

MED

(date)

(date)

"..

TANK TOP WITH FACING Th1s bas1c sleeveless garment, with armhole and neckline facings, w1ll.ntroduce the reader to some of the drafting and patternmaking techmques used to create tank tops.

The style lines may be placed anywhere the designer wishes. Note that the shoulder straps can be very close to the neck of the wearer, or away from the neck. Don't make the shoulder straps too close to the armhole; keep them at least '12'' away, so they don't create wings off the edge and will help keep the straps up.

3"1-----:-: v

2 112" 2 112"

••

21/2"

\~

.......

TOP BLOCK BACK MED (dalo)

': '\

2112"

'•(

..'\. :' ' ·.

TOP BLOCK FRONT MEO

,.....,

Remember that this sloper was created to have sleeves attached, and the armholes are too large for a sleeveles garment. s Raise and take in the armhole at the side seam '1:, t tighten the armhole and prevent the undergarme~ts~ and Sides of the breast, from showing.

1 Create a 2 12" facing pattern for this garment by drawing a line parallel to the armholes and neckline.

" ill

ill

II Ill

••• ,.

.... ,, ..

-


TOPS

1/8"

118'

"!-·--''

118"

Blend the curves as illustrated. . Do not make the facing straight across • as the stra1ght edge Will easily show through th e garment wh b · worn . A curved line will be less lik 1 en elng e Y to show through.

1_:~

235

1/8"

118' . (. __ (

1~

CHAPTER 7

Remove 'h'' from the facing to make it smaller since it will be on the inside of the garment.

fi\{G:LF

SE

0

I ANKTO FRONT

CUT1

MED CUT1

I

I

Trace, separate, and label the pattern pieces as illustrated.

V-NECK TANK TOP WITH FACING The V-neck tank top may be created as low as the de· signer wishes. To determine how low you want the V, measure down from the neck on the dress-form.

1" 1"

31/2"

....-:-:-:.

.. ..

1:

. ···\·· ••

''(

.......

... TOP BLOCK BACK

MED (d818)

21/2"

TOP BLOCK FRONT

2 1/2"

:.

'!' .../

..··

2 1a'

......

TOP BI.OCK FRONT aED (cllll)

MED (dale)

• down from the . . t ·11 be create d 6 To Illustrate, thiS garmen WI neck.

Create a 2 1/2" facing pattern for this ganment by drawing a line parallel to the armholes and neckline.


236

CHAPTER 7

TOPS

_J_ blend' •\ _

~

~::\

TOP

TOP

BLOCK BACK MED

BLOCK FRONT MEO

(dale)

(dale)

118"

1/8" (

1/8" \

1/8"

)

·-.1

.

,.._ 1/8"

~

1/8"

--.. . I

~

Remove •;," from th e facing to make it smaller since it will be on the inside of the garment.

Blend the curves as illustrated. Do not make the facing straight across, as the straight edge will easily show through the garment when being worn. A curved line will be less likely to show through.

~: ,,.-······..• /

'"'--- .. ·

.J, i _ _ / ,~

I

V-NECK TANK TOP FRONT

MED CUT 1

j High-end garments are often created with a larger back neck facing so the when on the hanger, the edge of the facing will not show. Only clean, finished self-fabric shows, which is much nicer-looking. Note that the facing edge is curved to keep it away from the bust, thereby preventing the bust from getting heavy and lumpy if the facing moves around.

CUT 1

I

Trace, separate, and label the pattern pieces as indicated.

: •• ••.

•... ••..

•• •• •• •• •• ••

. .•

,.•... ,.••


TOPS

SQUARE- NECKED TANK TOP

CHAPTER 7

237

WITH FACING

Trace out the appropriate sloper. In order to create a flattering square ne ck, the Width of the sh ld must be squared, and kept eve n and parallel ou er straps Take in the armhole at the side · seam '12" t r the undergarments from showing, unless you lghten . bthe armhole • and prevent . . or b1nd1ng methods to reduce th e underarm. WI11 e using elastic. ban d'mg,

°

......2"

2'

2"

n_ _ _ 2"

-~

112·

·._Ttt' TOP BLOCK-· BACK

[J·

TOP BLOCK FRONT

MEO

MED

(dale)

(dale)

Decide how far from the neck you wish the straps to be (illustrated at 2", but may be any measurement the designer desires). Measure down the desired amount at the front and back neckline of the original sloper, and square a line across as illustrated at 3" down the front and 1" down the back, but may be any measurement the designer desires . Remember that if you create a garment with a lowered front and back, the garment wi ll fall off the customer.

Keep the straps even and parallel to the neck, or the straps will appear wavy and uneven. Decide how wide you wish the straps to be (illustrated at 2", but may be any measurement the designer desires). Raise the underarm 'h" and take it in 'lz" to keep the garment tight and close to the body, and prevent the undergarment from showing.

not '., blended enough

TRUEING THE SHOULDER STRAPS Problem-solving the straps. . shoulders are to . ·sh the raw edge. At the point in the neckline where the kedgeto 1tnt match, you need a smooth nee

Blending it does not correct the problem; rather, it creates a slightly rounded point at the neck.


238

CHAPTER 7

TOPS

the armhole gets too large

,···

w1Ufalt off the shoulders

·n the usual manner, If you try to blend the square nee klme 1 it will open up too much and fall off the shoulders. Here the neckline IS no longer squared and has changed shape. the neckline gets too small

You need to square off the ends of t he shou lder straps. If you square across f ro m t he neckline point, the armhole becomes too large.

.... .. .... ....-. filii

find the

-----· center

~

You need to square off the ends of the shoulder straps. If you square across from the armhole po1nt, the neckline becomes too small.

The solution is to split the difference. Find the center of the armhole point and the neckline point and square a straight line across at that point.

,.,_ ~

3 112"

1___ __,__ ','(

2 1/2 \ : : _____ _1_21 /2

_)._ blend

Create a 2'12" facing to clean finish the n k . ec and armholes. Draw the guidelines 2'12" away from a d edges. n parallel to the

Blend the corners into smo oth cun~

••..,s.

,.

..,.,....


TOPS

CHAPTER 7

UARE"

239

N~

FRON1 TANK TOP

MED CUT 1

Remove ' 18 from the facing Since it WI.11 be 1ns1de the garment and needs to be slightly smaller.

1. ">-...1112.

·····

.

Trace and separate the pattern p1eces as illustrated.

111~ ....... , ..

...... 13" •.

TOP BLOCK BACK

TOP BLOCK FRONT

MED

MED

(dale )

(date)

TANK TOP WITH BINDING Binding is great way to finish the raw edges of a garment. It creates a nice, thick seam that defines the edges very well. If you plan to use binding to finish an armhole, it is not necessary to raise and tighten the armhole as in garments with a facing. The binding is cut slightly smaller than the armhole and will pull the garment up and tighter to the body, preventing undergarments from showing.

This tank top will be drafted with straps that are 1 '12'' wide starting 1" away from the neck. The neckline will be lowered 3".


._40

CHA.PTER 7

TOPS

BIN DING REDUCTIONS d ng IS to be ap plied . The bindhole •f b•n ' mailer than the armhole and d ta~e 1n the arm Do not raiS" an hole because '' IS s mg Will tighten the arm . d ng sewmg. stretchoo to f•t un the open1ng by reduc1ng the arm. smaller than Ma~e the finiShing b•nd•ng total length measurement. b · ofthe hole measurement Y ment then divide the sum by 6 to back measure Add front "'"asurement 5 1 and muii Pi> b\ · d e that w ill have binding ap plied. 3111 lliowances to any e g Do not ,1dd s" ' mllole and red uce by approximately measure the ar Alt~•n.lllvt>ly. you may men! by 0 83. 16 5% t>v mull•ply•nq the measure .

FRONT+ BACK

X

6

5

Use ' smaller for nylon spandex. . . . Some fabncs may need add•t•ona 1 r eduction ' whiCh you w ill determ•ne w1th your sample.

If the total arm ho Ie IS 6 .. then the new binding shou ld be 5".

W•1T

If the total arm ho Ie IS 12 .. then the new binding shou ld be 10".

-

If the total armhole IS 18" then the new binding should be 15".

3.'1. • 17

. ._

or 1• smaller for nylon spandex. Some fabrics may need additional reduct1on. Label the pattern with the fin ished (after already sewn, w ith re duc tions) measurement. Label the area that each binding w ill be applied to. Since the manufacturer of your garments m ay be i n ano the r countr y, and to avo•d confusion, binding measurem ents are w ritten on the pattern in the area where they will be applied , along with the fin ishe d m easurement. Most b•ndmg •s applied w ith a cellarette that w ill auto matic ally reduce the b•nd•ng, and stretch it, as 1t IS being sewn. The p roduc tion manager and cutter must know how much to cut or purc hase b efore cutt ing th ousands of garments

-

lft- .a 12'"

......

··············T·J·············· 3"

CURVED HEM OUite often garments are c reated w·th ' a c urved hem . Curved hems are usually inte d and therefore some of th n .ed to be worn tucked into p ants o r skirts, e bulk In the hlp area is reduc ed. Stra•ght hem s are intended to be . 0 worn outs Jde other garments raw a QUideilne approximate! 3" . the des1gner requires. Y above the hem, but it may be as much as


..e ,.

... • •'

I I I t

••

TOPS

3/S"x 12"

CHAPTER 7

241

...J

~

I!?

-"'~ 3/s· x 12" ',)IU

fiOIShed

binding

3/S~x

a~

12·

finished binding

112• hem

allowance

Draw in your new hemline. Remember to keep the curves as shallow a . that you can cover-stitch them easil Ad s posslbl_e so difficult to hem. y. eep curve IS too

Don't add any seam allowances for edges that will have

'Ia' binding applied.

Square the front and back of the curve 0 th . . ' erwlse you w111 get a point in your hem. keep the back neck

•I

as high as poss•ble

I .

:r

I

~

...\\,.,..... TOP BLOCK BACK

MED

(dale) You don't have to raise and take in the armholes of a garment that will be reduced through the use of elastic, binding, or banding.

Keep the back neck very high when drafting T-back tank tops. Sometimes it may even be necessary to raise the back neck. Make sure that the back matches the front at the side seams and the shoulders. Do not add seam allowances to any edge that will have binding applied.


242

CHAPTER 7

TOPS

TANK TOP WITH SIDE CUT-OUTS To create a tank top with cut-outs on the sides, leave one seam of the hole open unt1l after the binding is applied. Check that the side seams match and line up in a smooth continuous curve.

SLIP NECKLINE . neekl'ne may be created with straps that tie to each A slip 1 other or are attached to the back of the top. You don't have to raise and take in the armholes or garments that will be reduced through the use of elastic, binding, or banding.

--

b

bust

span

TOP BLOCK BACK

n

TOP BLOCK FRONT

MED

MED

(date)

(dale)

TOP BLOCK BACK

TOP BLOC K FRONT

MED

MED

(date)

(date)

Measure across the bust span and draw a guideline. Draw a guideline parallel to the center front, squared to the bust span measurement.

Type of Knit

Stable Moderate Stretchy Super-stretch Rib

Extra Extra Small

Extra Small

Small

6 1h

6 7/e 6'h 6 'h 6% 6

6 7/e 6 3/. 6'/. 6 ';, 6 ';,

6% 6% 6 '/, 5 7/e

Medium

Large

Extra Large

7 '/e 7 '/a 7 6 ';, 6';,

7 ';, 7 112 7% 7';, 6 ';,

7 7/a 7 7/a 7 '!. 7 7/e 7 11•

8% 6'1e 8 '/•

-

--------------~~~~--~___i£___~ 77~ '/2

-


TOPS

Extra Extra Small 9· •

Extra Small

~~~;~~------~~~~----~~~----~S~m~a~I~I-----

Bust eve

10

10 •

10

Large

Extra Extra Lorge

10 •

11

11 •

1

.....

rup· •• IU~ '

TOP

TOP BLOCK

FRONT

MEO

ldalle)

Measure down the bust level to f.nd the apex The bust le•ei os the same for all stretch ratoos, sonce the fabroc doesn't stretch on that dorectoon. and when usong a four-way stretch there os nothong holdong down the fabroc to stretch ot tn the lengthwose dorectoons

Type of Knit

Extra Extra Small

Extra Small

Stable Moderate Stretchy Super-stretch Rob

2 ' 2'/• 2 1 7/e 1·/·

2 '• 2'/• 2 /e 2 1'!.

-------

--

TOP

TOP

BLOCk

BLOCk

MEO

FRONT MEO

(date)

(date)

BACK

MED

ldaOO)

~·;

·.

Oust span

BACI<

243

Large

E~tra

Med oum

; BLOCK

C HAPTER 7

Draw the cup. usong one of the radous measurenwnts bo low. usong a compass from the bust apPx

Small

Medium

Large

2% 2% 2'1. 2'/•

2'· 2'h 2% 2'/. 2

2 .• 2 '/• 2'h 2% 2 1/e

1 J/1

Extra Large

Extru Extro Largo

2·'

~··· 2'1• 2'/. 2'/• 2%

4

2J/ A

2'1• 2'h 2'J,


~ 44

CHAPTER 7

TOPS

. . from the bust apex up to the point where the shoulder Draw a gwdeltne meets the neck. This gw d eI.tne follows the direction of the straps, and may be changed accordingly. Measure up 1" on the guideline.

TOP BLOCK BACK MED (dale)

TOP BLOCK FRONT MED (date)

Draw in the neckline, trying not to let your lines go within the bust circle. Otherwise parts of the breast will be exposed.

TOP BLOCK BACK MED (dale)

TOP BLOCK FRONT MED (dale)

Trace and separate the pattern pieces as illustrated.

SUP NECK TOP BLOCK BACK MED CUT1

SUP NECK TOP BLOCK FRONT MED CUT 1

Use binding to finish off the neckline edges and to create straps or ties. Do not add seam allowances to any edge that will have binding applied. Attach the binding to the back and sides before attaching the front section.


TOPS

CHAPTER 7

245

bar-tack

Or attach binding to the front sections befo t . . . . re a tach1 ng the sides. ThiS wil l create a different effect forth t· e 1es1straps.

When using binding to create straps. make the straps longer than necessary. and then correct and complete the measuring during fitting. Make sure to insert twill tape 1n the strap portion of the binding ties to prevent them from stretching. Bar tack the strap to the back binding for reinforcement. Do not add seam allowances to any edge that will have binding applied.

1/2"

1/2"

,.......... , 11· \.......... 1 .. ''

TUBE TOP

Raise the underarm 1" and take in 'h" at the side seams for total bust coverage.

Tube tops are the easiest top to draft and sew.

112" 112"

1" hem

TUBE

TOP BACK

MED CUT1 1" hem

1" hem

TUBE TOP FRONT

MED CUT1 1" hem

f the tube top. Note Add a 1" hem to the top and bottom 0 f the top to · t the top 0 that 1" elastic may be inserted 'n mailer in length keep it secure. The elastic should be 1 s

° "

than the top of the tube top. the top by ere Drawstring may also be added to tonholes for the string to pass through.

ating but-

The tube top may also be created with straight side seams, by making it much tighter. In fact, a tube top can rarely be too tight.


246

CHAPTER 7

TOPS

.: :.

,.

11f2".,

......

_.../(=u TOP BLOCK BACK

TOP BLOCK FRONT

MED

MED

(date)

(date)

SLIT ON A CURVED SEAM

Sometimes a designer wants slits on a curved area of the garment body, such as the side seams at the hips.

Draft the armho Ie an d neckline curves as illustrated or as desired. ForT-backs (swim-backs), tryto ~eep the back neck as high as poss•'ble while still matntatntng a ntce curved ltne. For this style, raise the hem at the side seams 2" and draw a curved hem.

~L

JL

Decide on the length of the slit opening, illustrated here at 6", but may be higher or lower as desired.

~LJL cu~ l

~-·

· ·····-· ·

Notice that a small portion of the sides are cut off, which will expose a small amount of skin.

~LJL

Line up your ruler on the guideline and mark 6" wherever it lines up on the side seam, without going outside the side seam.

~L

JL

~ ~

Notice t~at a 7" slit will cut off the side and expose slightly more sktn. This diagram shows how the sides wiU be cut away and expose some skin on the Side

seams.


= ii = --= ...... ...

TOPS

:::

1

~L

JL

CHAPTER 7

247

2

nn

___/-· ·--~

Draw in the new side seams and hem.

Trace out, separate, and label the new pattern as illustrated

The style needs a 1" fold back facing or hem.

You may place a notch at the hem to indicate where the slit facing should fold back. It is also a good idea to make the top of the facing straight across .

3 318"

4 CF

i

TANK TO FRONT

MED CUT1 '<!>

An angled line is not different enough from the side seam to tell the sewer where to stop sewing down the side seams. But of course, if the design requires an angled line, you should include a drill mark to indicate the end of the seam.

1/2"

1/2"

Trace out the pattern and label as indicated. Note that there is no seam allowance added to the slit, because it is already a hem allowance.

1 118"

2 TOP BLOCK BACK

MEO (date)_

TANK TOP WITH SEPARATING ZIPPER -11 increase the

The width of the exposed zipper teeth WI move · uM~~re SIZe of the front so to compensate yo from the center 'front, '18' from each side.

1;."

TOP BLOCK FRONT

MED _(date)

Measure the width of the zipper teeth, the amount that the zipper would increase the width, and remove half of that amount from each side of the front sloper.


248

CHAPTER 7

TOPS

Test Your Knowledge of the Material in this Chapter 1. What fit should be used for tank tops?

9. How do you create an asymmetrical tank 10.

2. What is semi-fitted?

3. What is un-fitted?

11.

4. How can you make the binding square?

How far from the neck should the straps be? 6. How much should you raise and tighten the armhole of a tank top? 7. Should you always raise and tighten the armhole of a tank top? 8. How much seam allowance should be applied to edges that will have binding applied? 5.

12.

13. 14.

top? How can you hem an asymmetrical hemline? Do the front and back hems have to be the same curves? How much is the hem allowance for curved hems? How much seam allowance is needed for separating zipper? a How much should banding be reduced for tank tops?

Test Your Knowledge By Creating This Tank Top Style # Descnption: Season Fabnc Care

#4004 One-way-stretch square-neck tank top with curved hem and slits Spnng/Summer 04 lnterlock/jersey/T-shirt knit

Date

July 07

Sizes Content

Medium

Sloper to be used Neck Straps Waist Slits Seam allowances Seam fini sh Hem Hem allowance Hem finish Armhole finish Neck finish Binding width Notes:

One-way-stretch top, regular fit , M e d'IUID ,d 4 " own in front , 2" d own 1n . back 2 away from neck , 2" w1'd e Semi-fitted 6 " high with 1" foldback 318"

Four-thread serger Curved 3" h lg · h er on the side seams If:" fl 2 or curved hems Cover-stitch 3~n b'mding /8 311" 8 b'mding 11/8" cut wlll . finish at %"

Cover-stitch h ems befl · . Sew slits l ore sewmg shts. . c osed for 1" · s t ltch machine. Wlth straightLittle darts . s m neck b m ' d'mg to create quare neckl' 1ne. Sew slits right on the serging line.

••

•. ".. 'I

'

tl

'. • II

I i i i i ii j

•• ••..

•• • ';;f

~


!: ....

.-.

CHAPTER

8

Sleeves

=

About This Chapter

This chapter develops different patterns for sleeves. The sleeve measure~ents are determined by the body draft; therefore, all draftmg steps are the same regardless of the fabrication except with different measurements. You can draft a sleev~ for any knit garment using these instructions. This chapter starts with separate sleeves a nd then explains sleeve-body combinations, such as raglan sleeves, dolman sleeves, and saddle sleeves. Each fabrication should have three different sleeves with different cap heights; so, for example with the stable knit front and back, you should have three different cap heights. As with the previous chapters, you should dr~ft the stable knit sloper and indicate the different stretch rat1os for other variations.

STABLE KNIT SLEEVE REDUCTIONS

Sleeve Length Bicep Bicep Wrist Wrist

Extra Extra Small

Extra Small

22 %

22 %

10 5 5 1/s

10% 5 1/ s 5'12 2 3,4

2 4/7

Small

Medium

Large

Extra Large

Extra Large

23 11 '/s 5 4/7 6'/. 3 1/s

23 '/• 11 'Is 6 7 3Y2

23 112 12 % 6 '/3 7% 3 '/•

23 3/ · 13% 6% 8 112 4 Y..

24 14 '/s 7

9 '/• 4%


..":!>0

~

--------

CHAPTER 8 SLEEVES

•• •• •• ••.

CAP HEIGHT REDUCTION h Any cap height may be h leeve SitS into the arm o1e. The sleeve cap determines the angle that t e s used. dependmg on the fit requirements of the design. Shallow Medium Deep

Subtract from the armhole depth measurement

•. •• •

-50%

-33%

-25%

CAP MEASUREMENTS Th 1s chart represents the different reductions based on the measurement of your armhole depth. Armhole Depth

6 6 '/e 6 '14 6% 6 V2 6% 6% 6 7/e 7 7 1/e 7V.

Deep Cap 25% 4V2

4'1e 434 4% 4 'Ia 5 5 5 '/e 5'14 5 '/s 5 '14

Medium Cap - 33%

Shallow Cap -50%

4 4 4 1/s 4'14 4 '14 4% 4 Y, 4 y, 4% 4% 4%

3 3 3 1/s 3 V. 3V. 3 '1s 3 '1s 3'/s 3V, 3% 3%

Armhole Depth

Deep Cap -25%

Medium Cap -33%

Shallow Cap -50%

SV2 5% 5% 5 7/s 6 6 6 6V. 6 V• 6% 6 V2

4 7/s 5 5 5 1/s 5 V• 5 V• 5% 5V. 5 Y, 5% 5%

3% 3% 3 7/o 3 7/o 4 4 4 4 1/o 4 V• 4 V. 4%

7% 7 V• 7% 7% 7 7/s 8 8 1/s 8 V. 8% 8V2 8%

•• •• •

•• •• •

..

_..

DRAFTING THE SLEEVE SLOPER

(!

Around armhole ~

Armhole depth

Often the pattern maker will not draft the sleeve until after the body has been fitted, to save time and effort, in case of fitting changes to the armhole. Choose the sloper that you wish to make a sleeve for, as the measurements for the sleeve are taken from that pattern. Decide on the t ype of sleeve cap that your design requires, by referring to the following diagram. Measure armhole depth of sloper and record. Measure the total armhole circumference, both armholes, and record.

~ ~

,.,. ,. •,,.. ,.,. flit


SlEEVES

be drafted on a folded she« of loghtweoght

The sJeevoe

AB

sleeve length

~ and IS shown 11"1

grit)' 10 you can see and under atand each step, u It applies to the draft

A-C

(armhole Oep1h O'Wl\JS the amount for your particular cap height, from

the chart)

Deep cap

ITl1nUS

Medium cap

25"

rrunus 33"

Shallow cap .. I'TliOUS 50% C-D • bicep hoe - square a hoe out.

Urge

23'/• Sleeve length

CHAPTSR II

23'/r

251


:!5"

CHAPTER 8

~

SLEEVES

D

Place the ruler on point A and wherever it lines up with your armhole measurement, on the bicep line, draw a line. This determines the bicep length.

•• ••. ••.

bicep

.. •

•• •

B-E = wrist Square out 'H ' from A. Square out W' from D.

C-D = half of the total armhole measurement Measure the front and back armhole and then divide this amount in half.

Wrist Half of Wrist

Extra Extra Small

Extra Small

Small

Medium

Large

4%

1

5 /a

7

2Y..

2%

6% 3%

3%

5 /a 3

7%

Extra Large

Extra Extra Large

8 1/a 4 1/a

8-1. 4\1:!

•• •• ••

••

•.

._. ~

,., ~

,. ,.,

(Ill

fA

,

~

~

~


SLEEVES

I

CHAPTER 8

253

z· 0

A-D divide into fourths and lab e1F• G, and H.

F measure down 'h ".

Square a short guideline from each po.1nt.

I measure remains the same.

bicep

C

H measure up '12".

H.

A

A

G F

..

D

"I'

bicep

c

c

B

B

E

Connect point D to C to create the inseam of the sleeve. A

=H =G =

F = D draw the sleeve head connecting all

points in a smooth and continuous line. Remember to square for '12' at the underarm and at the top of the sleeve head for at least W'.


CHAPTER 8

...w ...... ...... ...

SLEEVES

h If-way

I

u

E

To take in the sleeve for fitted sleeve styles:

E

Take in the sleeve 'H' and blend a smooth inseam .

Find the half-way point of the inseam and measure 1" up from that point.

.... .. -•• •• •• •

•• ••

••

1"1 -

-h~li-.;ay

half-way

.... ... .,.. ,.,. ..

IIlii

Cut out the sleeve on the fold and open up and draw in the grainline and a notch at the top of the sleeve, and an elbow notch.

Starting at the underarm, walk the sleeve around the armhole.


SLEEVES

CHAPTER 8

255

( _front

\rmhole

l

back

armhole

When you reac h the shoulder, place a small pencil mark on the sleeve indicating by how much the sleeve is too large.

Then turn the sleeve over and walk around the other side against the back top sloper.

EASE

EASE

1\

1\

. . te the amount of ease You must have two marks that 1ndlca 1n the sleeve. han the recomme If your sleeve is bigger or smaller t t the sleeve. ease of 'h" to %", then you must correc

nded

TRUEING THE SLEEVE . b. ger than %" or smaller than V2", then If your sleeve ts 19 correct the sleeve. you must . t to the seams¡ because the sleeve wtll taddexra You canno st be distributed evenly throughout fit wrong; the ease mu . . the sleeve as shown. . towards the gratnhne. Fold side seams In


-56

CHAPTER 8

SLEEVES

E E ••

spread

...---.

CUTTING LINES

•..

To increase the amount of ease to a minimum of y,• and maximum of %", slash and spread equally to the desired measurement. Draw in the cutting lines.

The sleeve must always be at least Y>'' bigger and at the most %" larger than the armhole. This amount is the sleeve ease, whic h must always be allowed to get a correct fitting sleeve.

split the difference to blend the sleeve cap

Note: Do not change the wrist measurement.

.. •

••

•• •.

•• •

•• ••

overlap

.:1

~ ~ ~ ~

~

Hetrace the sleeve, blending the armhole by splitting the difference between the two sides. Hecheck ease.

To decrease the amount of ease, slash and overlap to the desired measurement. The sleeve must always be at least most, larger than the armhole.

W bigger and. at the

This amount is the sleeve ease, which must 8JwaYS be ,._ lowed to get a correct fitting sleeve. Note: Do not change the wrist measurwnent.

~ ~ ~

,. •


SLEEVES

LINES

Retrace sleeve and blend the armhole by splitting the difference between the two sides. Recheck ease.

slash and spread to increase ease

Blend the new sleeve as illustrated.

257

CUTIING

split the difference to blend the steeve cap

Slash and spread to inc rea se the ease s0 amount falls within the range of 'N' to o/4''.

C HAPTER B

that the total

ALTERNATE METHOD OF CORRECTING SLEEVE EASE

This method of correcting the ease will not change the lower portion of the sleeve, only the sleeve cap.

stash and overlap to decrease ease

Slash and overlap to decrease the ease so that the total amount falls within the range of V2" and 31<". Blend the new sleeve as illustrated.


~!>8

CHAPTER 8

t

SLEEVES

tt.

Sloper Labeling Create all three different slee\'e caps, fo1· future usc, and label as illustrated.

-...•

t

'-

w

w > w ~

(/)

?i:ffi

~::>

g <i. J:

(/)

~ ~

(/)

a.o

<w ::> :::> 0 w ::> <.J;:>

w

> w w

-'

"'o a.w ()::> a. w w 0

••

•• •• (II

~

''fl!

~ ~

'•

Fold the sleeve in half to find the 9ra1n . I'me.


SLEEVES

CHAPTf;A 1\

259

Flared Sleeves Flared or bell sleeves are extremely easy to create. very popu lar a nd

EVENLY FLARED SLEEVES

The previous sleeve has the fullness added towards the inside. To create a sleeve that has the fullness distributed equally around the s leeve, use the following draft.

Simply extend the inseam of the sleeve t he amount t hat you wish the sleeve t o increase. Ma ke sure to square at t he inseam.


~0

C HAPTER 8

,. •,. •,.

SLEEVES

Slash and spread t he sleeve to the d esired fullness. D1v1de the sleeve mto four even sect1ons by fold ing inwards towards the gra.nhne.

FLARED SLEEVE MED

CUT2

•• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• • D

. ~

blend Blend the cap and hem as illustrated.

Labe l the new sleeve as indicated.

•• •• •

••

I!


SLEEVES

CHAPTER 8

261

GATHERED SLEEVES A sleeve with a gathered wrist same technique. may be created with the

Divide the sleeve into four even sections by folding inwards towards the grainline .

••

I I I I

~•

blend Blend the cap and hem as illustrated. Slash and spread the sleeve to the desired fullness.

' I


•'(5.'

, HM'TE:R 8

•• •

SLEEVES

s Indicated.

•,.

b I the new sleeve a d to fit into the c uff. La e . sleeve will be gathere The wnst of the . I measuren,ent . Draft the cu ff to fit the wns

I

•• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• • '

GATHERED SLEEVE ,_.ED CUT 2

'

z-f z-,

CUFF

MEO CW2SELF

Extra Extra Small Wnst HalfofWnst

Extra Small

5

5

2 •

2 34

Small

Medium

Large

Extra Large

Extra Extra Large

6 V. 3 '1•

7 3Y2

7% 3'/s

8 Y2 4 '/4

9 14

· ]:

4%

~k

[L ___________________ _

•• • •• • A

--

~

!II lilt

SHORT SLEEVES

Short sleeves are very easy to create. Measure down the inseam to the length your design requires. This draft will create a little extra volume at the hem when looser styles are required. SLEEVE MEO

CUT2

I

Label the short sleeve as indicated.

,.,.

,.,. ,.,. ,.


SLEEVES

CHAPTER 8

263

~

cIt

It

• •'

FITTED SHORT SLEEVE The previous draft adds extra width at the bottom of the sleeve and may not be suitable for all designs. This draft, however, is snug and fitted at the bottom .

Measure down the length that your design requires and square from the s1de seams. Blend a new hem. Note: This hem is slightly curved.

I

I I

SLEEVE MED CUT2

I

Trace out the sleeve as illustrated.

Add the necessary seam allowances to the sleeve. Make sure to square up the hem.

1•

CAP SLEEVES

. . hter at the underarm. A cap sleeve needs to be pulled tn ttg

lb...................c:J] l

Shorten the sleeve as much as you require.

1


CHAPTER 8

SLEEVES

1/2"

Trace out the new sleeve and then fold the sleeve in half to find the midline.

Slash and overlap the sleeve by 'h" to pull it in tighter to the body.

4"

Trace out the final sleeve as illustrated.

. I.

.I d1 ..

....

. :

:

4"

b .................. ..

FLARED SHORT SLEEVE A short sleeve can have volume added to the hem.

Shorten the sleeve as much as your design requires.

Draw in three slash lines. Slash and spread the sleeve any amount required. To determine the slash line placement, fold the sleeve sides in towards the center grainline.

Spread by an additional

Light

Medium

Heavy

50%

100%

200%


SLEEVES

CHAPTER 8

265

blend

FLARED SLEEVE MED CUT2

I

blend

Blend the cap and the hem of the slee ve as .Illustrated.

Label the final sleeve as illustrated.

FLARED SLEEVE MED CUT2

I maximum 1/2" hem allowance for curved hems The curved hem must have a very small hem allowance, maximum of '/2', in order to be hemmed smoothly.

SHORT PUFFY SLEEVE Volume can also be added to the top of the sleeve to ere¡ ate a puffy sleeve.

..

3"

l\k.... . . . . ..j

...t 3"

Fold t he sleeve in towards the center to locate the slash lines. Slash and spread the sleeve any amount required.

Light hOWn here at 3 ". but Measure down your req uired length. s may be any amount the designer requlfes.

--

Medium

Heavy

Very Heavy

Spread bY an addition::al_ _ _ so_% ___1_o_o_%___2_ oo_% ___3_o_o% __


266

CHAPTER 8

SLEEVES

Heavy and very heavy fullness is only suitable for light and very lightweight fabrics.

Raise the sleeve any amount required - illustrated here at 2", for 1" up, and 1" back down.

SHORT PUFFY SLEEVE MED

CUT2

Note: The sleeve cap draft is raised 2".

Redraw the sleeve, blending the cap and blending the hem.

This translates into 1" above the regular cap, and with an additional1 " for the fabric to come back down 1".

SHORT PUFFY SLEEVE WITH MED HEIGHT SIZEMED

CUT2

-- ... -.--- --. ---------------·-----

....

~-

SHORT PUFFY SLEEVES, MEDIUM HEIGHT By inc reasing the cap height, you can c reate a more dramatic puff sleeve.

Raise the height of the cap by 4".

Label the sleeve as illustrated.

il il


SLEEVES

CHAPTER 8

267

.... ... ~

6" ••••........

SHORT PUFFY SLEEVE, HIGHER HEIGHT Raise the sleeve cap 6".

Extreme variations of this sleeve are created b f . these instructions and need tulle or netti 10 y ollowmg sleeve. ng support the

3"1\6

.................dj!13"

Determine the placement for your horizontal seam, illustrated here at 3" down from the underarm, but it may be any place the designer requests.

LONG SLEEVE WITH SHORT PUFFY CAP

By sewing the cap sleeve to the regular sleeve, you can create a long sleeve w ith a short puffy cap.

. t ds the center to locate the slash lines. Fo ld the sleeve 1n owar ny amount required. Slash and spread the s Ieeve a

Light

~ Spread by

Medium

Heavy

Very Heavy

~ ·% 7·~-------1_oo_o/c_•________2_o_o_%_.________3_o_o_%____

a~


268

CHAPTER B

•.. • '-

SLEEVES

..··················rr·;:············....... ~

(

~

~

Raise the sleeve any amount required. Illustrated here at 2"' for 1.. uP' and 1" back down.

I

LONG PUFFY SLEEVE

MED CUT2

Trace, separate, and label the sleeve as illustrated.

LOWER SLEEVE

MED CUT2

I 3"

l .. . ...........d):1

: 1

3"

LONG SLEEVE WITH PUFFY GATHERED UPPER

This sleeve has gathering at the cap and horizontal seam. Measure down the amount required, illustrated here at 3".

."'. .... -.. ...-. -


SLEEVE S

CHAPTER 8

269

slash and~spread

Fold the sleeve inwards to the slash lines. wards the Qrainline to d eterm ine

slash and spread

Slash and spread the sle . . cap as well eve, mcreasmg the volume at the as at the horizontal seam. blend

I

UPPER SLEEVE MED CUT2

blend ~ ~. ~

.. --- -------

LOWER SLEEVE MED CUT2

I ·------------ ---------· Blend the cap and horizontal seam of the sleeve.

Trace, separate, and label the sleeve as illustrated.


270

CHAPTER 8

SLEEVES

4"

4" LONG SLEEVE WITH FLARED WRIST

Another way to add volume to the wrist of the sleeve is by attaching a separate circular piece to the bottom of II.

. . 11ne w herever you wish the . horizontal seam to Draw a gUide be, illustrated here at 4" above the wnst.

.--.

.•.,..

Trace and separate the pieces, remembering to notch the pieces for easy assembly.

Fold the bottom portion of the sleeve inwards towards the grain line to determine the slash lines.

slash and spread Slash and spread the hem of the sleeve as illustrated.

blend Blend the hem and the top of the piece.

... •• •

.


SLEEVES

CHAPTER 8

271

UPPER SLEEVE

MED CUT2

Label the pattern pieces as indicated. LONG SLEEVE FLARED FROM THE ELBOW DOWN

Another way to add volume to the wrist of the sleeve is by attaching a separate circular piece to the elbow of it.

elbow

. h the horizontal seam to Draw a guideline whereve r you WIS hes of the sleeve. be. It is illustrated here at the elbow no1c

Trace and separate the pieces, remembering to notch the pieces for easy assembly.


272

CHAPTER 8

SLEEV ES

W] '

' '

'

' '

Fold the bottom portion . . of the sleeve inwards towards the grainilne to determine the slash lines.

Slash and spread the hem o f the sleeve as illustrated.

UPPER SLEEVE

MED CUT2

LOWER SLEEVE

MED CUT2 blend

Blend the hem and the top of the piece. The more fullness required, the more you need to spread the sleeve.

Label the pattern pieces as indicated. Notch the sleeve for easier construction.


S LEEV ES

CHAPTER 8

273

TOP BLOCK FRONT

MED

Sleeve-Body Co m b"matlons . DROPPED SHOULDER AN DSLEEVES

Drop shoulder sleeves are c reated b . seam away from the natural armhole: movmg the armhole

(date)

Line up the shoulders as illustrated.

·-.J~~-

TOP BLOCK FRONT

TOP BLOCK FRONT MED (date)

1; 3~"

MED (date)

Square out in each direction an amount equal to the wrist

Extend a line from the shoulders equal to the length of the

measurement.

sleeve.

Extra Extra Small Sleeve length Wrist Half of Wnst

22 %

4% 2'/.1

Extra small

22 3/• 5 1/s 2%

small

23 5% 3

Medium

Large

23 1/•

23 112 7%

6% 3%

3~

Extra Large

Extra Extra Large

23'/. 8 1/e 4'/a

24 8 7/s 4 'h


HAPTER 8

SLEEVES

1"J

Draft the sleeve from the wnst to 1" below the armhole.

DROP SHOULDER BACK

MED CUT1

I Place the new shoulder line and seam wherever you would like it.

DROP SHOULDER FRONT MED

DROP SHOULDER SLEEVE MED CUT2

CUT1

I

Separate and trace the pattern pieces as illustrated.

il i

•• I I I I I

•• •• •• •• ''

tl


S L EEVES

CHAPTER 8

275

TOP BLOCK FRONT

MED (date)

RAGLAN SLEEVES

This draft is for a raglan sleeve for stretch fabrics only. Place the front and back top slopers together at the shoulders. Draw a straight line through the underarm points. Continue the line a few inches past the underarm points.

Place the sleeve sloper on the draft, matching three points: 1. The front underarm point of the sleeve lines up on the guideline. 2. The shoulder notch of the sleeve lines up with the shoulder seam. 3. The back underarm point of the sleeve lines up with the guideline. You will have to move your sleeve around until it lines up perfectly with all three points. Don't worry if your sleeve goes over the armhole of the body, because you will correct this in the next step. Don't worry if your sleeve looks slightly different than this one. the arm of the body, beDon't worry if your sleeve doesn't come as f ar as cause you will correct this in the next step.


276

CHAPTER 8

SLEEVES

add the amount that

the sleeve over1aps

~~•dM••~·

Measure the amount that the sleeve overlaps the armhole seam of the slopers and add this amount to the bottom of the sleeve to compensate for length.

If the sleeve does not reach the armhole seams of the slopers, then the sleeve will get longer and must be shortened by that amount.

the

follow

the ••

body/ sleeve intersectJon•• t

I Draw the raglan seam goin f line to the point where th ~ rom any place on the necke s eeve and bodies intersect.

Continue the raglan style line to the underanm potnt.


SLEEVES

RAGLAN

BACK MED CUT 1

CHAPTER B

277

RAGLAN FRONT

MED CUT1

:...............

;

Note: The sleeve will follow one curve and the bodies will follow the opposite curves.

. position the deThe ragline seams may be placed 1n any sign requires.

Notch the pieces for easy construction and then label, trace, and separate the pieces.


CHAI'l t H tl

SLEEVES

Sleeve Assignments . · from this text and other chapters Using the mfor~at~~:eves. It is a good idea to sew up thes~ dt·aft some pract~c:t the look like. Now that you have a little samples to see w tt. y drafting for knit fabrics, you should more expen ence pa ern . be able to dt·aft. any of the followmg sleeves. COWL SLEEVES

.

.

.

Draft a cowl sleeve, using the informatlOn m Chapter 5, Skirts. SPLIT SLEEVES

~I I.

\__

D ft this sleeve with a slit opening down the center of the sl::ve. Sew the siit closed for 1" at the top, 2" at the bottom, and hem the slit with a 1" hem allowance. Split sleeve

CAR-WASH SLEEVES

Draft a car-wash sleeve by splitting the sleeve into many sections. Double the width of each section so the sleeve can be clean finished by sewing the sections into tubes and turning them inside out.

__)

PETAL SLEEVES

Draft a petal or tulip sleeve that overlaps on the front portion of the sleeve. Draft this asymmetrical style with a short flared sleeve and binding on the other armhole. Practice this asymmetrical st yle with a sh ort capped sleeve and a slip neckline on the other side.

Test Your Knowledge of the Material in This Chapter

Petal sleeve

1. How much should you reduce the armhole depth measurement for a deep cap? 2. How much should you reduce the armhole depth measurement for a medium cap? 3. How much should you reduce the armhole depth measurement for a shallow cap? 4. Why should the patternmaker wait until after the body is fitted and corrected before drafting the sleeves? 5. How should you check the amount of ease in a sleeYe cap? 6. What is the minimum amount of ease? 7. What is the maximum amount of ease? 8. How can you increase the amount of ease? 9. How can you decrease the amount of ease? 10. How can you create a flared sleeve? 1 1. How can you create a short sleeve?

I

''


~-----~C~H~A~P~T~E~R~~9L______ Sweaters About This Chapter Sweaters are not just for fall and winter c0 11 t· t ant part of every season L. echtIOns, · become an 1rnpor . but have · 1 d d · · lg we1g11t sweaters are me u e m many collection s for s pnng · and summer Note that some sweaters are worn directly 0 n the sk 111, . w1t · h. only undergarments, whereas other sweaters a re worn over . . other clothmg. The desig.ner must anticipate and desi 11 the fit of each sweater accordmgly. g This chapter introduces the reader to th e patternmaking techniques for creating sweaters. There are three different methods of constructing sweaters. Each sweater looks similar when viewed from the outside, but differences become apparent when you closely inspect the seam finishes. All sweaters still need hard paper (oak-tag) patterns, and even though fully-fashioned sweat ers will knit to shape, they still need an oak-tag pattern for testing fittings and blocking. Most manufacturers will knit yardage, cut the sweater sample out, and complete the fitting a nd any corrections before adding the expense of programming the computer to knit the pieces to sh ape. There is another difference between sweaters and other knit tops. Next time you notice someone wearing a sweat er, study the armhole seam. You will notice that it ext ends straight up to the shoulder and does not curve outwards at the top, as in T-shirts and other knit tops.

279


..'SO

C'HAPTER 9

SWEATERS

Industrial Knitting Industrial knitting machines are capable of producing sweaters on a very large scale. Extremelv fast. these machines are prog1·ammed. by computer and automaticall} make all the necessary increases and decreases. such as stitch changes and color changes.

SDS-ONE

Software for an industrial knitting machines user station. The technician uses a mouse and/or tablet to create the garment silhouette, stitch formations, increases, and decreases, which are then sent to large industrial machines for knitting.

...

•• •.

.

•• ••

The hand knitting machine is a great tool for creating sweaters on a smaller scale, one or two, and useful for developing stitches. It is also an excellent tool for students to teach them about knit structure, and stitch types. '

I I

The kn it linker is a machine used for joining knit garment pieces together.


SWEATERS

E 2U)

..

RIB

KNIT HEM FINISH

"""

CHAPTER 9

281

.0

â&#x20AC;˘

KNIT HEM FINISH

Armhole Changes For Sweater Knits Slopers for sweaters are slightly different from slopers for other tops; for example, the armhole is knit straight up, rather than curved. Next time you notice someone wearing a sweater, study the armhole seam, you will notice that it extends straight up to the shoulder and does not curve outwards at the top, as in t-shirt and other knit tops. This is done for three reasons: So that the knitter does not h ave to increase stitches and can simply knit straight up the armhole to the shoulder, for easier knitting, especially when knitting Fair Isle, intarsia, and other complex patterns. So that the horizontal stretch of the fabric is reduced, therefore the armhole does not stretch out of shape when attaching the sleeves.

Regular curved armho le.

So that any visible stripes or ribs-remember th~ ~tn{ 00 sweater s are made out of rib and larger yarn _t da ,ts . ht d out and 1t oesn erelike ver~ical lines-are straJg ene lders when the stripes ate a tnangle on the top 0~ the shouk dd and out of place. or ribs meet. This little tnangle loo s 0 . aters or garments with a Note: This is only done ':1th sv:eht .ght jersey fabrics for visible vertical stripe or nb, so h g welt" t-shirts do not require this sloper correc Jon. Sweater with straight armhole.


.'~.'

<' llAt' l E A 9

SWEATERS

Three Ways to Create a Sweater tash1onmp marks I

(1) FULLY FASHIONED

Full fashioning is like hand knitting in that the manufacturer knits the garment parts to shape by casti ng on and casting off stitches. This method of creating sweaters is very expensive because each size and style requires a new schematic, knit plan, or knitting instructions. Fully-fashioned sweaters can be identified by the fashioning marks on the outside and the knit linking together the inside seams.

KNIT HEM FINISH

KNIT HEM FINISH

Note: When creating "fully fashioned" garments, the trims, bands, and collars needed to fin ish the garment must also be fully fashioned. They can be knit as single layers; it is not necessary to fold them over, as the raw edge will already be finished by the knitting machine, by casting on or casting off the stitches.

(2) CUT AND SEW The designer purchases the knitted goods by the yard. This method of creating sweaters is the least expensive because the fabric can be purchased in bulk and used to create a variety of styles and sizes by using different oak-tag patterns. These sweaters can be identified by sewn hems and machine serging on the inside seams.

(3) SWEATER BLANKS

DOES NOT NEED TO BE CAST OFF

KNIT IN STRIPE OR DESIGN

_j

This is the most common method of manufacturing sweaters. The designer can create the t ype of knit, including hem finish, choose the yarn, and have the goods knitted only to the length of the sweater pattern needed. The manufacturer then places the oak-tag patterns on the sweater b lank, lining up the bottom of the patterns w ith the hem of the sweater blank to cut them o ut. The designer can create different sizes easily u sing different graded oak-tag

10-001 MED 1 SELF

I

plaoe on top of sweater blank to cut out

10-001 MED

1 SELF

I

plaoe on top of sweater blank to cut out

patterns. These sweaters can be identified by the knitted hems combined with the serged seams on the inside. Note that the garment m ay have a ribbed, tubular, or finished hem. The manufacturer can easily create horizontal stripes b y changing the color of yarn while knitting the row, or create Fair Isle or any type of knit design that the designer imagines.

KNIT HEM FINISH

Thi s type of sweater manufacturing is especially well suited for complex stitches such as Fair Isle, pointelle, and tuck stitches, because the complexity of the knitting is reduced and the knit technician does not have to detenn're increases and decreases for the anmholes an<l neckline.

•• •• • il

.... .. ....

••

II

..'

''


SWEATERS

283

CHAPTER 9

j SWEATER BLANK SLEEVES

Illustration shows how sleeves are cut from sweater blanks

10-001 MED 1 SELF

The extra rib, or finished hem between the sleeves may be used to cut out the collar. Or the neckline may be re-at tached to the knitting machine and the collar may be knit.

L CASTON EDGE

_) Another variation of cut and sew: The sweater b lank is kn it to the exact width of the sweater panel, reducing the need for side seam fi nishing. The sweater seam s may be linked with a linking machine, or sewn with a straight stitch. Theses side seams require 1/a" seam allowance, while the shoulders and armholes require %" seam allowance, and no hem allowance needs to be added to the pattern .

10-001 MED 1 SELF

I

place on top of sweater blank to rut out

1 KNIT HEM FINISH

Illustration shows the alternative technique for knitting sweater blanks. e pattern and will need to The sleeve is knitted to the widest part of t he s Ieev ' ¡ earn and armhole. be serged to finish the raw edges ofthe 1ns "th increases and decreases along Alternatively, the sleeve may be shaped WI d left raw for cut and sew. the inseam, while the cap may be knit straight up an The sleeve requires %" seam allowance.


$4

CHAPTER 9

SWEATERS

Seam Allowances for Different Methods of Construction Each of the different methods of construction requires dif£ ent seam allowance amounts. Seams that are finishes er. as fully fashioned only need a 1/a", or single stitch sea such lowance, while any garment part that is cut out require: a]. locking with %" seam allowance. over

cast on edge 1/8"

,_

I

Fully fashioned patterns do not need a hem allowance, s1nce the hem is already finished on the kn1tt1ng machine, and should simp! b indicated on the pattern. Y e

- ----------------------- ---' 1/8" 1/8"

1/8" 1/8" ',

: ·--,

·-

1/8" 1/8" /

FULLY FASHIONED SWEATER FRONT MED

1/8"

FULLY FASHIONED

FULLY FASHION COLLAR : 1/8" MED KNIT 1 :

r,

Seam allowances are one stitch wide, ,18,. on all other seams, or seams that will be linked sewn together. · or

1/8"

The trim should also be knit with finished edges . so tnms and collars may be single layer or ' double layer 11 you requ ire thicker trims.

: FULLY FASHIONED : : SLEEVE ' MED KN IT2 •

!

1/8"

Trim measurements should be indicated on the !mal patterns.

1/8"

no hem allowance

You may not need to create patterns for fullyfashioned collars, since the sweater will be hooked up to the knitting machine to knit the collar.


SWEATERS

285

CHAPTER 9

3/8" -----,

3/8"

---~-- -- cu~~~~~Ew-- -----\

3/8"

--- ----- _Mt;P_~-lli_1 ________ ;

CUTANDSEW

3/8"

Cut and sew sweaters need sea tor the over-lack mach in m allowances e, to finish the raw edges.

• --

3/8" 3/8"

3/8"

They also need a hem allowance . must be sewn by hand or m h' • Since the hem ac 1ne. All collars, trims, and bands must b (folded over). e doubled

3/8"

318"

-, CUT AND SEW SWEATER FRONT MED

3/8'

CUT AND SEW SLEEVE MED CUT2

r

3/8"

.--------------'.

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - .J

1 1/2" hem allowance

1 1/2" hem allowance

cast on edge ; 3/8" ;

rULLY FASHION COLLAR MED CUT 1

; ;

,_-- ------------------- --- ---..!

3/8"

3/8"

SWEATER BLANKS

3/8"

Sweaters cut from sweater blanks do not need a hem allowance, because the hem finish is already included on the blank and should simply be indicated on the pattern.

FULLY FASHIONED SWEATER FRONT MED

If the sweater blank is knit larger than the blank, then it should have a %" seam allowance for If the trim is cut from a finished edge, it does not If the trim is cut from the body of the fabric, then

3/8"

3/8"

:

sides.

need to be folded over.

3/8" 3/8"

3/8"

If the blank is knitted the exact width of the sweater, it will need a 'Ia" seam allowance at the

overlocking (serging).

,. .....

3/8"

r

FULLY FASHIONED ! SLEEVE MED CUT 2 3/8"

it must be doubled. no hem allowance

no hem allowance


~86

CHAPTER 9

SWEATERS

318"

H SWEATER BLANKS KN IT-TO-WIDT 't I 0 the exact bo dy Width , 1t1s not necessary to overWhenthe a sweater IS knl lock seams, therefore a 'Ia" seam allowance IS all that IS needed for the . , 'des of the body. Sl armholes, shoulders, and neckline will a% seam allowance, The . the must be over-locked.

requ~re

FULLY FASHIONED SWEATER FRONT MEO CUT 1 1/8"

Since Y . e the hem will already be f1n1shed on the No hem allowance is necessary smc knitting machine.

1/8"

. n is especially useful when creatmg Fa1r Isle and This type of constructlo . . the kn1tter can s¡l mply focus on the pattern1ng techniques patterned des1 gns, without having to worry or fuss WI'th the shaping techniques.

1 match underarm points no hem allowance

MATCHING STRIPES To match the stripes of a knit garment, line up the underarm points.

Sweater Slopers SLOPERS FOR SWEATER KNITS Slopers for sweaters are slightly different from slopers for other tops, for example, the armhole shaping. Use the knit top sloper, with all three of the different sleeves and cap heights. When using a visible stripe or rib, the designer or patternmaker must make corrections to the top slopers before they can be used for sweaters.

You must make the armhole and side seams follow the visible rib or stripe. or else the shoulder seam will look strange. The little triangle w111 stretch out of shape of when attaching the sleeve becauseewthe way that nbs stretch out while s tty. ing and the sleeve will not hang correc


SWEATERS

CHAPTER g

287

remove this sectJon from the armhole

Trace the moderate knit (50 % stretch) top back sloper (most sweater fabrics are moderate knit). Square up the armhole parallel to the center back, from the narrowest part of the armhole straight up to the shoulder, as indicated. Also straighten the side seams to create an unfitted garment. When using a visible stripe or rib, you don't want the rib to stretch out or have unm atc hed c hevrons.

Extra Extra Small

NECK

1st LAYER SWEATER SLOPER BACK

MED

Since the shoulders and armholes are identical, you can create a back sloper and change the neckline to create the front sloper. To create the front sloper, trace out the back sloper and change the neck by lowering it the amount of the shoulder pitch, and drawing in a new front neckline.

Extra Small

Small

Medium

Large

Extra Large

Extra Extra Large

1%

1 V2

1 V2

1 V2

1%

1%

1st LAYER SWEATER SLOPER FRONT

MED

never for rib

ater slopers.

Trace and separate the swe . be worn " ning that they WI 11 Label them as " first layer, mea derneath. rments un . . d With noth1ng but un erga . but it should d . . rsey kmts, You may use the fitted wa1st on Je e it will stretch out an · ts becaus "d earns. not be used for ribbed wals • ·ng the s1 e s . when seWI create huge exaggerated hipS

ers are created as illustrated to take up Otten sweater sIo P Jess materials and oak-tag .


288

CHAPTER 9

SWEATERS

THE SWEATER SLEEVE SLOPER . armhole, and must reflect the The sleeve sloper must be corrected to Ill the new

v

slight changes. dium cap height. . I eve sloper with me Use the moderate kmt s e hole by removing the excess frorn Reduce orenla rge the sleeve to fit the new arm

~

the inseams. . r for the sweater sleeve. Remember that ease is still necessa Y Minimum ease = 112'' total. . ease = 'Y." total. Max1mum ¡ d on the cap of the sleeve ' with half of the ease Mark the amount of ease reqwre . "de of the shoulder notch. on e1ther Sl . s¡ it makes it slightly easier to attach W' ease is better for fully-fashioned s1eeve ' the sleeve with the linker.

reduceslee~

atfle underarm

/

I /

/

I

/

I Measure and mark the ease amount equally on either side of the sleeve notch. Start outside the ease marks, ignoring the ease amount.

I

I

When the sleeve reaches the new underarm side-seam point, mark with a pencil the amount that the sleeve extends past the armhole.

Walk the sleeve around the armhole to the underarm.

-

ease

Remove the excess amount from the sleeve. This amount of the correction is usually so small that it can safely be removed from the underarm of the sleeve. If it is large-more than V2" -it must be corrected by slash and spread (see Chapter 8, Sleeves). Do not change the width at the wrist; rather, taper to nothing as shown. If your sleeve happens to be smaller than the armhole, either change the amount of ease to W' or enlarge the sleeve so that it now fits the armhole (excludiOQ ease).


SWEATER S

1st LAYER SWEATER SLEEVE SLOPER

MED

C H APT E R 9

289

3rd LAYER

SWEATER SLOPER FRONT

2nd LAYER SWEATER SLOPER FRONT MEO

1st LAYER

SWEATER SLOPER FRONT

MED

MEO increase by 2"

Trace and label the sweater sieper.

Increase by 2"

FIRST OR SECOND LAYER SLOPERS FOR SWEATERS

You may leave the faint pencil marks to indicate the ease amount, for future reference.

First layer sweater slopers create garments that have nothing except undergarments worn underneath; for example, summer-weight knits, dresses, and tops that are worn "next to the skin."

u; cj

Second layer slopers or jacket slopers are used

when the designer wants to create styles intended to be worn over other clothing, such as pullovers and cardigans, so the size must inc rease to accommodate the clothing underneath. Third layer slopers create sweaters that are worn over other sweaters; for example, zip-front cardigans, sweater coats, and the like.

All are still size Medium; however, they are size Medium intended to be worn over other garments. The first layer sweater sloper will be increased in width a total of 2", or '12'' per panel, to create a second layer or jacket sloper for sweaters. Repeat or double the measurements for third layer slopers.

increase the total body cira.unference by 2"


,90

CHM'TE:R 9

SWEATERS

1/8 1/8

moddte of the shoulder

1/8

"' 112

1/2

1/8

1/8

1/8

optional length increase

1'a:.._~_::"_:: ' ~""1/8 increase by 1/2"

WIDTH INCREASES

LENGTH INCREASE

Make the increases to the back sloper, and simply change the neckline to create the front sloper.

To apply the length increases:

To apply the width increases: Draw a line parallel to the side seams approximately %" in from the side seam (increase by 'Ia" per panel). Draw a vertical line through the shoulder approximately half-way (increase by '/4' per panel). Draw a vertical line 1" in from the front along the neck edge (increase by 'Ia" per panel).

Draw a line parallel to the shoulder approximately 31<'' in from the shoulder (increase by 'Ia per panel). Draw a horizontal line through the armhole area, approximately half way through the armhole (increase by '12 per panel). For additional length increase, draw a ho rizontal line below the waist notch (increase by 'Ia per panel). Slash and spread accordingly.

Slash and spread accordingly.

'

路---~~-: :',:

! 1/8

1/4

r: __ _ . /; ;

1/8 1/8 1/8

1/4

112 1/2

1/8

!

1/2

1/4

112 1/2

1/2\ 路路--

1~

1/8

1/8

i,:::

114

~:!':

!,

1/8 1/8

1/8

1/8 1/4

1/8 1/8

.

:

il

1/8 118

': i

iL__.....___________..______1~j 118

Both directions of increases should look like the illustration Slash and spread these areas by the amounts illustrated. 路

118 1/4

BLENDING AND TRUEING THE SLOPERS Straighten out the shoulder by drawing a new straight line from neck to armhole and ignore any discrepancies. Blend the armhole, neck, and underarm areas. Label as "jacket slopers" or " second layer slope!' for sweaters."


SWEATERS

CHAPTER 9

291

1/8 118

114

112 1/2

.,

.. !118

SECOND LAYER SLOPER FRONT

'" 'l', 118

1/8

1~

!

118

~~

··----------------------.!

114

SECOND LAYER SWEATER SLEEVE SLOPERS

Draw the front neckline below t he front using the c hart below.

To find the increase areas for the sleeve, line up the sleeve with the body as illustrated, and match the increase areas accordingly. It is possible, and easier, to increase half of the sleeve and copy to the other side, or draft it on the fold of your paper and open it up to trace onto oak-tag.

1/8

118

·. 112

112

112 118

118

·.

:....... .........................' 1/8

118

118

118

Mark the sleeve to correspond to the body, as shown.

Blend the sleeve as illustrated. You can use the original sleeve sloper as a template to blend the curved parts of the new sleeve.

Slash and spread once above the elbow notch. Slash and spread once below t he e lbow notch. ·11 trated to match Slash and spread the s leeve sloper as 1 us ' the body increases.

Extra Extra Small Neckline Drop

1 Y2

Extra small

small

1 Y2

1%

Medium

Large

Extra Large

Extra Extra Large

1%

1%

1%

1'\4


CHAt'TER 9

SWEATERS

·iI

!

2ND lAYER SWEATER SLEEVE MED

I

\ \

L

SLOPER SHIFTING TO CREATE SECOND LAYER

Walk the sleeve around the arm hole to check for accuracy.

SLOPERS

Label as "jacket sloper" or "second layer sloper for sweaters."

It is not always necessary to slash and spread to create second layer slopers. You may simply sh1ft the regular sloper the requi red amount and trace each part as 1t IS enlarged; see the following: Trace out the back neck section for approximately 1".

~

,..

r-'Y .... . T. I

I

'

I

I I

I

1

--r-----r

I.. I I

I

i

.:

J.

I I

1 I

I I

1 I

I

I

I I I I

I I

I

I

I

I

I

I

I I I

I

I

I

---..J-.--

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I

I

I

I

I

I

I

I

I

I

1 I

1 1

I

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Shift the sloper to the left, 1/a", as illustrated, and trace out the next section of the neck.

I

I

I I

I I

I

I

I

I

I I

I I

I

--~----~

I

I

'

y I

I I

I

I I

I

I

1 1

I

I

I

I I

I I

I

:

:

Shift the sloper up 'Ia" and trace out the next section of the neck and the corner intersection. Because the neck will be blended with a ruler in a straight line, it is not necessary to draw the entire shoulder, just the corners.

,---~-----i

I

I

Shift the sloper out '/4' as illustrated and trace the next section ofthe shoutder, the shoulder corner intersection.


SWEATERS

...

·r"' lI

j.

--

. . ·r. . . .

0

--~ ----~ ' '' ''' '' I'

' ''

'' '

'

I

I

!

I I

'' '' ' :----:-----i

'

I

:

' ''

' ''

I

'' :'

I

I

:

I

'I'

' I'

''I

I

1

I

Shift the sloper down 'Ia" and trace the next section of the sloper.

I

,----:-----:.. '

'

'' '

l

i

'' '' '

I

I

-r

~"i \

'' '

I

'

293

'' ''

-··r- - - -

''' '''

I I

CHAPTER 9

'

' '

:

:

-:-

,----:---

: :

I

:

! l

'

Shift the sloper down another 'h'' and trace out the next sections.

l

Shift the sloper out 'Ia" and trace the remainder of the underarm and the corner intersection. Indicate the waist notch.

t

--

,(' '

I

, ......:•' ' I I

I

I

t-J--~----t '

'

'' '' '' '' ' ''0

'' '' ''' '

I I

: I

I :

''

'''

~

1

I I

:---:-----i ''

''

o

I

'

Shift the sloper down 'Ia" and trace to the hem and the hem corner intersection.

I I I

--~----~

'' '' ''' '' '

I

' ''

,1~

/

' '''I ___ JI

' ----1,'

:'

'' ''

I

I

:'

L I.....,.. \18

I

I I I I

'

Shift the sloper back Yo'' and trace that portion of the hem.

(

,"' I

I

\ l

:

:

1

;;; --:-----r I;

1:I!

I

'

'

,

'' '''

' '' ''

i,

i,

: ! ! ! ! :---:-----i

ij--

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1

114

Shift the sloper back '/4' and trace that section of the hem.


~

CHAPTER 9

SWEATERS

i'J

~

..., +'"

I I!

it

l¡ l l

Shift the sloper back up ''â&#x20AC;˘" and trace that port1on of the center back.

~-

Shift the sloper up '/4' and trace the last portion of the center back. The sloper should have traveled a full circle and be back at the same point that it originated.

Sh1ft the sloper over e and trace the rema1n1ng section of the hem. and the corner

To blend:

To create the front sloper:

Connect the shoulders, s1de seams, and hems with a straight line.

Trace out the back sloper and make changes to the neck as illustrated.

Blend the neck and underarm, using the original sloper as a curve template, so that the new sloper retains the original curves.

Lower the neck 1'/e" and bend a new neck.

Note that it may look as if the neck has increased by a total of '14', but after blending it should have only increased by %" due to the nature of the curves.

Or use the original neckline as a template. To indicate the fitted waist, trace the side seam from the original sloper.

Repeat for the front sloper.

Extra Extra Small Neckline Drop

Extra Small

Small

Medium

Large

Extra Large

Extra Extra Large_

1V.

1%

1%

1%

H4

1~


SWEATER S

C HAPTER 9

295

-----~

'

I

I

I

2nd LAYER SWEATER SLOPERS

I

I

I

~-------41 I I I I

MEO I

I

I I I

'I

II

I

I I I

I

'' I

..1

-----T1 I I

I

I

I

I

I

Alternate method of cutting out sweater slopers: To save space and oak-tag, place front and back together as illustrated. Fold on the fold line of center/front and center/back. In order to use these slopers, you must trace the back twice and the front twice, using the center as the fold line.

I

I

I

'I

II

I

I

SLOPER SHIFTING TO CREATE SECOND LAYER SLEEVE SLOPER$

The sleeve sloper may be increased on the fold on light paper, as half, then opened and traced onto oak-tag. Trace the first section of the sleeve as indicated.

1/8

.....

/:

I

I I I

-----1-1

-----1-1I

I

I I

I

I I \o--------11 I I I I

I

I I

I I

I I

I I

I

I I I I

I I

~-------+'I

II

I

I

I I I I

I I I I I I I

I

I I I

I

,_____,II

I

I

I

1 I I I

I I I I

I I I I I

\-----.,-

I

I

I

I

I

I

I

I

Shift the sloper out 1/a" and trace the next section.

I I I I I

I I I

I I I

Shift the sloper down "" '' and trace next section.

Shift the sloper out 'Ia" and trace as indicated.


,'HAf'T[R !l

SWEATERS

~,

1

.â&#x20AC;˘.

Shift the sloper down '18.

Shift the sloper back up '18 and trace as 1nd1cated.

Shift the sloper back in and trace.

Shift the sieper up 'Is".

Shift the sloper in 'Is".

Shift the sieper up '14" as indicated and you should have gone a full circle and be exactly where you started. Cut out the paper sieper on the fold, and open it up and trace again onto oak-tag. Always cut the sleeve full/ open, and do not put a crease in your sleeve sieper, as it will wear out along that edge too fast.


SWEATER S

MATCHING STRIPES Match the stripes of any design at the underarm , as illustrated. Note: You cannot match from the bottom because the sleeve will often be much longer than the body.

CHAPTER 9

297

To match the stripes of the body to the stripes of the sleeves, lay the front pattern on the striped fabric and draw faint lines to indicate the stripe placements. Walk the sleeve pattern around the body pattern and match the sleeve stripe at the underarms as illustrated.

Seam Allowances for Sweaters This manual illustrates all sweater drafts with a hem allowance, even though fully fashioned sweaters or those cut from sweater blanks do not need the hem a llowance added. This manual also illustrates all completed patterns on the fold, which is not acceptable for production patterns. Sweater Blanks

Fully Fashioned

Side seam

%" four-thread serger

%- four-thread serger

Armhole and sleeves

'Ia" four-thread serger

%- four-thread serger

Shoulders

'Ia" four-thread serger

'Ia" tour-thread serger With twill tape, or clear elastic to prevent them from stretching, for styles w ith sleeves.

Neckline and collars

With twill tape, or c lear elastic to prevent the shou lders from stretching, for styles with sleeves only. four thread serger %" four-thread serger

One stitch seam allowance 'Ia" One stitch seam allowance 'Ia" One stitch seam allowance >,â&#x20AC;˘

Cut and Sew

Hem

1 W' for hand hem or blind hem

'Ia" four-thread serger No hem allowance needed for sweater blanks, since the hem is already knit in.

One stitch seam allowance ' â&#x20AC;˘ No hem allowance for fully fashioned since the hem is already knit.


.'~~

\ HAf'l ER 9

SWEATERS

I' I·

:I :I

1:

•I

I · I ', I .

:I

•I

: I

I:

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I .

·. I '. I

1 .'

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._1

STYLE II 10-001 TURTLENECK SWEATER

A turt n patt~rns

~- .,.,.._.Jtl. to araft

•"• "'

th~

s•mptest of at sweater

The collar IS s1mply a long rectangle that IS folded over and attached to the neck

Decide whether you want a f1tted. semi-fitted, or unfitted wa1st for your design. You'll probably desire the unfitted wa1st for a pullover, so 1t's easier for the customer to put on and off.

Turtlenecks can be createa for <,rst, second, or th.rd layer slopers

nedd :1e measurement

total neckline measuremmt

~

4

..

:c:

g>

.c: 0 Cl>

"' (.)

"

£

.S1 .Q

.g"

~ ~

4:

.S1

:;;

1:

Ill :!2

fold line

,g

"

:;;

1l

.. ..

..

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c:

~

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0

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a .c:s" .S! "'.S1" ,

~

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ii

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foldline

.0

.g

-

..

Draft the collar double the height of the required collar stnce it will be folded over and both raw edges will be sewn to the neckline of the sweater. Draft the collar pattern any height desired, but remember that any collar higher than 4" will be pushed down by the jaw.

Trace out the appropriate sloper. Measure the front and back neckline of th e soper. 1

The collar should have only one seam, either at the center ~ack, or preferably lined up with the left shoulder seams. herefore, the neckline measurement must be doubled, because you've only measured half of the neckline.

-... ~

.. .. .

..

•• ,•

•.


SWEATERS

C HAPT ER 9

299

#10-001 COLLAR ~

_,. .,.

~

..,., .,. .,. .,. .,. ...-

--... ......,. ...... .......... .... Cliilfi8

.-.a ~

~

............. ... ~

~

\ Since the neck .is wider at the b ase than at th t the exact neckline measurement from t e op, using a collar that gapes at the top. he draft woll create

MED

CUT1 SELF

-..-"""~-

Or simply remove approximately 'h " from each end of the collar pattern .

To correct this, pinch out the extra amo and remove that amount from the unt, measure it, pattern as illustrated.

The top of the collar is now smaller and will fit snug to the neckline.

The collar should be left with this extra fabric w . a zopper, since the z1pper will scratch th ~en Inserting e wearers neck.

The edge that attaches to the sweater is also smaller and must be stretched to fit into the neckline of the sweater.

:------------------------, I

I

#1 0-001 COLLAR I

I

OJT~~ELF

-4 I

~~~;::---- --------------- 1 (........... I

..

,:n I

I

I

: I I

' ......

' I I I

:!r ,a. I

.,. ............ \

I

/ I I I

I I I I

/ #10.001

FRONT MED CUT1 SELF

u' l I I

I I I I

I

_J-lI I I '---------- -' I

;.I_ _ _ _

I I I

I

L. L - - - - -

~-- ----- - ---:

Add seam allow ances and label the pattern. Note that fully fashioned or sweaters cut from sweater blanks should not have hem allowance added. Fully-fashioned sweaters should only have a " one-stitch " seam allowance, o r 'Is".

COLLAR CORRECTIONS

If your fabric does not stretch enough for the collar to pull on over the head, then you have several adj ustment options. Insert a zipper or other closure in the collar.


300

CHAPl Lt1 9

SWEATERS

Enlarge the neckline and the colla r accordingly; however, the collar will sit away from the neck.

Use a contrast fabric, o ne that stretches more, for the collar.

Enlarge the collar and ease it into the neckline, for very small amounts only, to avoid puckering of the collar seam.

u:

0

STYLE # 10-002 SWEATER WITH OVER-SIZED TURTLENECK OR TUBULAR COLLAR

A tubular cowl neck sweater may be created by widening the neck opening and drafting a larger collar.

Decide how w ide you wish the nec kline to be and mark accordingly. Stay at least '12'' in from the armhole so the sleeve seam allowance doesn 't show.

u:

rj

:1 :( \

Draw in the new neckline, staying as high or close to the original neckline as possible, and square for %" at the shoulders, to blend.


SWEATERS

CHAPTER 9

301

#10-001 COLLAR ( loldllne J

Draw the collar accord ing to the new me necessary. asurements; no reductions are In addition, when constructing this garment towances are toward the outside of the ar~serge.the collar so the seam atthe collar and would otherwise she g .ent, Since they will be hidden b w on the InSide. Y

MED

CUT 1 SELF

("

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j

0

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#10-002

BACK

r~"'

#10-002

FRONT ~

CUT1 SELF

0

"'

STYLE # 10 -003 OFF-THE-SHOULDER SWEATER This is an off-the-shoulder sweater.

Walk the sleeve around the armhole to the shoulder seam.

Draw in the neckline as required. Line the sleeve up with t he body.

ve since that portion Ignore any ease at the top of the slee . â&#x20AC;˘ of the sleeve is not included in t he destgn.

Don't draw it too low in the back; otherwise it wtll droop, and sag in the back.


30~

CHAPTER 9

SWEATERS

1161h smaller for rib A

I fQIIJl

10-003 OFF-SHOULDER S\\'EATER SLEEVE "-ED CUT 1 SELF

..

.. n

l

OULDER SWEATER

10S~~:::e~F;;:D CUT 1 RIB ONLY

..

1(}{)03

OFF-SHOU.DER

OFF-SHOU..DER

sv.<OATER

SWEATER

SLEEVE

10-003 OFF-SHOU.DER

MEO

BAO<

MEO

ClJT1

ClJT1

SWEATER

FRONT

MEO

ClJT 1

I~

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()

1(}{)03

"' 10-003 OFF-SHOULDER SWEATER BACK MED CUT1

ir

10-003 OFF-S HOULDER SWEATER SLEEVE MED CUT1

I

10-003 'oFF-SHOULDER SWEATER FRONT MED CUT 1

I

Trace and separate the p1eces. Draft the collar usmg the neckline measurements.

J

If you wish the collar to fit snugly against the arms, then reduce the collar pattern by one-sixth of the total measurement.

For fully-fashioned sweaters, mark the ribbing on the pattern pieces.

/

STYLE# 10-004 TUBULAR COLLAR IN ASYMMETRICAL NECKLINE

A one-shoulder sweater may be created by following these instructions.

10-004 MED CUT 1 --

J

/

,

()

., ()

10-004 ASYMMETRICAL NECK SWEATER

FRONT M CUT1

Draft any asymmetrical st 1 • Draw the asymmetrical y ek With the sloper unfolded. nee line as re · . pie bust coverage by k . qwred; g1ve amunderarm. eepmg the neckline high at the

I

The collar may be knit in matching rib (one-sixth smaller), or sewn with elastic inserted into the collar to keep it snug agai nst the body.

Draft the collar us· th mg e new neckline measurements.

••


SWEATERS

10-004

C HAPTER 9

303

10-004

ASYMMETRICAL NECK SWEATER FRONT M CUT1

ASYMMETRICAL NECK FULLY FASHIONED SWEATER FRONT M CUT 1

If you wish the collar to fit snug against the arms, then reduce the collar pattern by one-sixth of the total measurement. The collar may be knit in matching rib, or sewn on with elastic inserted into the collar.

For fully-fashioned machine knit sweaters, draft the patterns with the rib finish drawn onto the pattern, as illustrated. The rib is drawn onto the pattern and any half-scale patterns since the sweater will be knit using the knit radar, and is easier to follow in this manner.

neckline measurement

1/8"

u:

u

STYLE #10-005 TURTLENECK SWEATER WITH CENTER FRONT ZIPPER Zip-front turtleneck sweaters are drafted similarly to the other turtleneck sweater. Trace out the second layer sweater sloper, since the cardigan will most likely be worn over other clothing.

Because the width of the zipper teeth ill add an extra '/4'' to the center front w ('Ia" to each side of the card'1gan)• You must move the center front notch In by

Ya", from the center front. Later you will add 'Ia" seam allowan~e. f ont but sew the front w1th V2 to each r · the wance thereby us1ng up seam allo ' extra Y•"·

Draft the collar pattern to the heighV width desired. The length is determined by the total neckline measurement. Do not reduce the collar like the turtleneck draft, since there is a zipper in the front that would be uncomfortable if the collar was snug.


04

C HA PTER 9

SWEATERS

~., 'l '

\

bien~ 1

'' u. t)

L Measure 1n and mark the shoulder 2'12'' from the neck. along the shoulder, and square down for a few 1nches. Measure 2''2" in from the center front, along the hem, and square up to meet the other line.

Blend a smooth curve along the facing Trace out the facing on a separate piece of paper.

blend \

2 ~-

Remove

'Ia" from the shoulder of the

facing as indicated .

line.

This will make the inside facing slightly smaller than the outside, to accommodate the thickness of the fabric.

1

ii

I

2.__

II II II

3 !!,"

()

a>

Create a back facing for this style by ~e~suring in 2'12'' at the shoulder, and 3 Yz at the center back. The back of the facing is lower to prevent it from rolling up and com1ng . out when worn. It also provides extra room for placing the label.

Blend the back neck facing into a smooth curve as illustrated.

Remove '12'' from the shoulder of the facing as illustrated.

•• ••

••

---

~


SWEATERS

CHAPTER 9

305

#10-Q01 COLLAR

MED

PATTERN O PTION # 1

CUT 1 SELF

This pattern option may be used when the designer does

,____.............

~ #10-001 BACK

not want a facing.

(

MED

BACK NECK FACING MED 1 SELF 1 FUSE

This option will show the exposed zipper tape when viewed from the inside.

#10-001 FRONT

MED

CUT 1 SELF

L_______________ _J

u:

u

Cut the fusing 3/o" wide and as long as the front. This piece will prevent the front from stretching while the zipper is bemg attached.

CUmELF

t_________ _ PATTERN OPTION # 2

r··-----------~::~~~:~~~=~-----------1

the zipper tape is not visible.

MED CUT 1 SELF

L_------------------------------------- J

uJ

"'"-::> N

.... ::>

()

0

#10-001

#10-001 BACK

FRONT MED CUTiSELF

MED CUT 1 SELF

uJ

::;; t!>

z

iii

::>

~II

FRONT FACING MED 2 SELF 2 FUSE

"-

tr

w

ll. ll.

N

....z 0

tr "1------___j~ ~'------~

''

----------

This option shows the pattern for the same sweater but w ith an inside facing that clean-finishes the inside front so

w


306

CHAPTER 9

SWEATERS

#10-001 COLLAR

MEO

PATTERN OPTION# 3

This option shows the pattern with a front facing and no back facing. The back neckline seam is finished with neckline tape.

CUT 1 SELF

/·,(.

,..

Note the tape measurement written along the back neck of the sweater.

u. (.)

·~· I

CUT 1 SELF

UJ

II)

::> u.

"'...::>

(.)

0

UJ

#10-001 FRONT

Mf.Q CUT 1 SELF

::;

~ u;

FRONT FACING

MED

::>

2SELF

0::

2 FUSE

u.

UJ

0.. 0..

;;;

...z 0

0::

u. !------~

' ' ·--------------------

:------·

,__________ ___ __ .,!

#1 0-001 COLLAR MED CUT 1 SELF

PATTERN OPTION # 4 Use this option for sweaters cut from sweater blanks. Do not add any hem allowance, since the hem will be knit into the fabric.

•' '

The collar may be cut single layer because the top edge is finished by the knitting machine. There is no front facing . Instead, 1" wide knit stalling is used, and will be sewn to the inside of the zipper. Stelling should be knit double jersey to prevent it from rolling. Draw the ribbed hem onto the fully-fashioned pattern for easier knitting. Since most knitting starts from the hem upwards, it is easy to see the hem amount in the knitting machine, using the radar.

\.

~.-"'

', #10-001

BACK

--·\

(r. . ~ oo.

FRONT

MEO

CUT 1 SELF

CUT 1 SELF

UJ

II)

::> u.

..."'::> u

~I

(!)

z

u;

:::>

u. 0::

w

0.. 0..

;;;

...z 0

0:: u.

"'0UJ

::;

(!)

z

...~ z

"0:: 0

<5 z ::;

...0

(/)

...... ...

.......

...... ...... ...

,, ,, ,

~ ~


SWEATERS

C HAPT ER 9

307

PATTERN OPTION # 5 ()

'"

u. u

Use this option f

f or uffy-fashioned sweaters. This sweater r ing bee equ~res a smgle-st1tch seam allowance ('/8') for hnk1ng or sewause there are no raw edges. The rib or hem fi · h up. lniS IS drawn onto the pattern, since 1t does not need to fold Staffing may b k should b . e nit to match the sweater. so a facing is not needed. Staffing e kmt double jersey to prevent it from rolling .

C.F.

I I I

I

Cf

: : I

I

••

....

: button size extension

• • r· '

button size : underlap :

STYLE # 10-006 CARDIGAN SWEATER The following illustrates the draft for a cardigan sweater, w ith a 112" button, thus a W' overlap.

The center should always be extended the width of the button to make a "frame" equal to a half button w idth all the way around the button.


308

CHAPTER 9

••

SWEATERS

•• •w •..

' •u.

:u '

-

'

2 Y,"

Extend the center front an amount equal to the width of the button you plan on using.

Create a facing as in Style #10-002. 2 '12'' in from the center front; consequently, 3 '12" from the edge because of the extension. 2'12' along the shoulder. 3'12'' down the center back.

.... ... •• •• •• •

blend

\ : y_

blend

\

:

_){_

1

/'~ ()

!» 0'

c:

blend

•U:

:u

'1

'

/''

blend ()

:u.;

0'

o(.)

c:

-

Blend the facing line into a smooth curve. Place the front on the folded ed ge of a piece of paper, as illustrated, and trace the entire front. Also trace the front facing lines.


SWEATERS

C HAPTER 9

309

Open up the paper as illustrated. Remove Ve" from the shoulder edges of the facing. to account for the fact that the facing is on the inside and needs to be slightly smaller than the outside.

, #10-003

#10-003

MED CUT 1 SELF

#10-003

MED

MED

CUT2 SELF

CUT2 FUSE

I Add seam and hem allowances.

'------------ -¡ Create the back pattern pieces as illustrated. If the pattern is cut and sewn, add a hem allowance as

Label as indicated.

indicated.

Create a new pattern piece for the fusing as indicated.

STYLE # 10-009 V-NECK CARDIGAN WITH BAND FINISHING A similar cardigan may be drafted with a band to finish the front edges. The band may be knit in rib, as a single layer or a double layer, or it may be cut and sewn as a double-layer.


, 10

~'H 'lf'llR 9

SWEATERS

3"

1/2" __.

__. 112"

Draw 1n a V-neck. The illustration shows the V extending 3" below the original neckline, but the depth may be any measurement the des1gner wants. To determ1ne how low you wish to create the V-neck, measure down from the center front of the fitting Judy.

Extend the center front past the original center front by the amount equal to the width of your button. The illustration shows '12'' tor a 'N' button, but the button may be any size the designer requires, as long as the center front is extended an equal amount.

measure back neck

\

/discard these sections\

C:2

-,.

Draw in the collar with the neck band parallel to the new neckline. Make the band double the width of the buttons (illustrated at 1" for a \12" button).

Remove and discard the band sections from the draft. The band will be drafted as a new straight piece from the neckline measurements and will be folded in half when sewn. To make the back neck lie flat at the back collar, and not stand up in the air, make it smaller than the back neckline and stretch it slightly to fit the neck edge. Reduce the back neck portion of the collar by one-third of the neckline measurement. Or simply measure the smaller, upper portion of the back neck curve and use that measurement.

...... ........

....... ......... ,... ..,. iiA


SWEATERS

318

318"

~s·

3/8"

c. .·\.,

-·······:

311

CHAPTER 9

318"

: 3/8"

~2

H

\

·,

.:ocl1ii

~~!i ~ ~

H ---------------·

E~

Ii

8i~ ~ ~a ~~

318"

316"

31e·

5g

:______________ ! 318"

Draft the neckband pattern from the length of the total neckline, the neck edge of the discarded pieces. Place a notch to correspond with the shoulder seam, so you will know when to start stretching the collar band.

318"

Because knit fabrics are looser than woven fabrics and easily fray and unravel, use %" seam allowances and a four-thread serger for construction. Do not cover-stitch a sweater knit hem-it will stretch out of shape and not lie flat. Use a blind hemmer or hand sew the hem. Use a 1 '12' hem allowance for hand hems. Note that the band does not extend beyond the bottom of the garment, and is only as long as the outside portion of the front. II will not be folded up with the hem.

I

d :\ ·. \

_\

y," seam allowance. For fully fashioned sweaters, add 8 "bb d trim and link it onto It is possi ble to knit the band as n e the front. Do not add hem allowance to fully-las indicate the hem amount with a line.

. h·oned sweaters; JUS! 1

STYLE# 10-010 BOAT NECK SWEATER

A boat neck is one of the simplest necklines to draft and sew.


~1.'

,'HAP1 f:R P

SWEATERS

2"

r h

I II II II

r

:--...

;r

l f~ II

JI

II II

I u I

Find a placement for the ends of the boatneck and mark The 1llustrat1on shows 2" from the neck. but 1! may be any from the armmeasurement the des1gner wants. up to hole, so the seam allowances w1ll be h1dden.

Square a line from the center front to meet the marks on the shoulder. Note: The center front must be extended in order to draw the line, and w1ll consequently ra1se the new boatneck above the neck seam. Don't worry about th1s choking the customer. as the fabric will stretch to allow for comfort.

fok:S OY"er to create facmg fold over facmg

fold over

-

3/8"

3/8"

:l 1" hem

Fold the paper along the new neckline and trace the shoulder and armholes. Unfold the paper and create a 2" facing/hem as illustrated.

facmg

3/8'

3/8"

3/8"

3/8"

3/8''

3/8"

1" hem

Because knit fabrics are looser than woven fabrics and easily fray and unravel, use %" seam allowances and a four-thread serger for construction. Always use at least a 1" hem allowance for all straight hems and Y2" for curved hems. Do not cover-stitch a sweater knit-it will stretch. Use a blind hemmer or hand sew the hem. Use a 1W' hem allowance for hand hems.

...... ... â&#x20AC;˘... ...... ...... ...

... ,. --


SWEATERS

CHAPTER 9

313

STYLE# 10-011 COWL-NECK SWEATER Cowl necklines are created like boatne k . center front IS extended to c reat th c s, however, the e e drape effect. A cowl may be created on the front th anywhere else the designer might . ' e back, the sleeve or 1magme.

Place a mark on the shoulder of the draft.

fold over to create a facing

········... !!square ·····...

.-····

... square

y :

y

~

/

"'.,c-·

iJ' . ~', IC~J. . . . . . . .

·.

r··

.. j

Using the L-square ruler, draw in the new neckline at the length desired. The neckline must always be squared to the new center front.

Fold the paper along the new neckline and trace the shoulder and armholes. Unfold the paper and create a facing/hem that is 2" on the back and shoulders but with a slightly curved line, to become 4" on the front. This compensates for the fact that you can see inside this neckline.


3 14

C HAPTER 9

SWEATERS

'w

•'•• •• ••. ••

faong

..

318~

318'

318'

3/8'

1 1/2' hem

1 1f'L hem

Because knit fabncs are looser than woven fabncs and easily fray and unravel. use 3/8 seam allowances and a four-thread serger tor construction.

STYLE #10·012 CREW- NECK SWEATER

Rib knit must be used for the collar of this sweater.

Always use at least a 1" hem allowance for all straight hems and Yz" tor curved hems.

1"

. ·· ~.1"

\

new neckline

··..

To create a crew-neck sweater with a 1" collar, remove 1" from the sweater draft parallel to and below the original neckline.

Since the collar will be drafted as a straight piece, to fold in half, remove these sections and draft the collar separately. In order for the collar to remain flat, it must be drafted one- sixth smaller than the new neck opening.

.•. •.

lD

•• • ""

-•...


SWEATERS

~ "6~

"

E

ti

.lll

a

E

ti

.lll ~

i,.,

~

"c:

0

315

~E ~

~ .:.

t::

CHAPTER 9

_'f

-a

~,.,

~

0

In order to lie flat, crew-neck collars can on I be m from rib fabrics. Y ade

a

3/8" i

3/8"

"fi

~,.,

i 0

t::

~

a

~,., 318" i

3/8"

I 0

The width of the collar is 2". 1'" hem allowance

The length of the collar pattern is determined b th 1 . . . Y e ength of the outstde edge of the ongtnal neckline (the discarded pieces), which is one-sixth smaller than the new neck opening. Alternately, draft the collar one-sixth smaller than the cut edge of the neck opening (see section on binding and banding).

Assignment #1

Because sweater knits fabrics are knitted a little looser than other knits, a larger seam allowance is needed so that they don't unravel, fray, or run. Use a four-thread serger with a %" seam allowance. For straight hems, use a minimum of 1" hem allowance. For curved hems, use a '/,'' hem allowance.

Assignment #2

Create a zip front cardigan sweater wi~h hood, and a front facing and back neck tw1ll tape.

Create a crew neck sweater with a 6" zipper in the center front.

Use a 24" separating zipper.

Add a 11/z" hem allowance and hand hem, or blind hem the sweater.

Add a 1112'' hem allowance and hand hem or blind hem the sweater. · a purchased Cut a nd sew this garment usmg sweater knit.

Cut and sew this garment using a purchased sweater knit.


316

CHAPTCR 9

SWEATERS

Test Your Knowledge of the Material in This Chapter 1. What are the three methods to create a

sweater? 2. What corrections should be made to the one-way-stretch top sloper to create a sweater sloper? 3. How much ease should the sleeve of a sweater have? 4. What is a "second layer" sweater sloper? 5. How much should you enlarge the sweater sloper for second layer? 6. Can you cover-stitch the hem of a sweater knit? 7. How are the cowl necklines drafted? 8. How do you draft a turtleneck? 9. How many seams should the turtleneck collar have?

10. Will a turtleneck collar drafted with the exact neckline m easurements fit snugly against the neck? 11. How much hem a llowance should be added to patterns for a fully-fashioned sweater or a sweater using sweater blocks? 12. How much seam allowance is necessary on the center front for a style with separating zippers? 13. Can a fitted sloper be used to create sweaters out of ribbed fabric? 14. How can you reduce the collar pattern for a turtleneck so that it fits snugly against the neck? 15. What are "fashioning marks"?

• ~

1)1

•• •• •• ••• •• ••• •• I

•• •• .Ill•.

'


c HA

p T E R

0

Dresses

.

'

,j,,,,,,,,J,

About This Chapter This chapter introduces the reader to the patternmaking techmques needed to draft stretch dresses. Because most neckline and sleeve variations are illustrated in the chapter on tops and sweaters, this chapter is brief.

317


CHAPTER 10

318

•..

DRESSES

One-Way-Stretch Dress Sloper \.,u

tdll

,,tl,u·h tho

top"'"""'' tu en·''t

kut lopiLr to l\hl<l I 1 ,) II

S

till' sln tch rUt Ills n IJI,llll tho

to

tn~lo

lllrl•

Extra Extra Smnll

Son.oll

38 •

:>3 38

11 t st to kneo w~,st

OJl(l r

e..ua

[>friO

Lo:ge

..

-

••tGnd ltMt longtf'l Of IJ\t lOP sJoo.lf ID cnate • drna ~

Stretch Ratio s for Dres ses lru ll'ftch r tho for llrl'cil! ~lop r r lht hi for thr l 'I' lopt r

11

.... .... ....-. ..-... -

Dress Waist

rh, cln 1o1 .- 1 fl.'lthrn an htlt<tl, "' Hnhtt<'d, d 1 nd111s: on the For lit l<!tl , u

th droft

Fur unhtt~_'{), qu. Till

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llttoo , d d " '"

In


DRESSES

CREATING A DRESS SLOPER FROM A CATSUIT SLOPER

Because we raised the waist when creating the catsuit draft, we must lower it 1'12' for aT-shirt or a short dress.

CHAPTER 10

319

Slash and spread the waist 3" to return it to the natural waist.

If creating a very long dress, leave the waist shortened, because the weight of the fabric will pull the waist down. Because you shortened the waist when drafting the catsuit sloper, you will have to increase the length if you plan to use the catsuit sloper for a dress style.

mm blend

blend

. t hen creating the T shirt or Because we raised the wals w catsuit draft, we must lower it 1W' for a short dress. ave the waist shortIf creating a very long dress, le f b ¡c will pull the ened, because the weight of the a n waist down.

lower may have to For a medium-length dress, you . usly shortmount previO the waist by half of the a testing. ened. This process may take some Bend new side seams.

Extend the center front to the length of dress required, and square a new hem.

Trace out a new dress sloper.


320

CHAPTER 10

DRESSES

1/2"

1/2"

? """"""fl 1_\······~ u : 1/2" 112 : j \_ DRESS BLOCK BACK

MED

STYLE #10-001 TUBE DRESS

A tube dress is one of the easiest styles to draft.

TUBE DRESS

DRESS BLOCK FRONT

BLOCK BACK

MED

Raise the underarm by '12'. Take in the underarm by W' to make the garment tighter in this area, as the original sloper was created to have sleeves. This is not necessary, however, if you use binding, elastic, or some other reducing trim.

MED

TUBE DRESS BLOCK FRONT

MEO

Add a 1" hem to both top and bottom of the dress, and label as illustrated.

o=··· DRESS BLOCK BACK

MED

···c::u

DRESS BLOCK FRONT

MED

STYLE #10- 002 BOATNECK DRESS

The boatneck dress is the basis for many cowl-styled dresses but can also be a style on its own.

2"J[F:::7

DRESS BLOCK BACK

MED

Square a line across the front w here you want the neckline to be. Repeat for the back.

··::.:::'l)l'"

DRESS BLOCK FRONT

MEO

Add a 2" facing or hem to the top edge of the dress.

Add seam allowances as illustrated. However, you do not have to add seam allowances to the top, because the h8n'l allowance Is already added.


DRESSES

CHAPTER 10

321

STYLE #10-003 COWL-NECK DRESS

There are different techniques used to create cowl-neck dresses. The method shown here will increase the overall width of the dress and may not be suitable for all styles.

Measure on. the c us1omer or the dress-form how low you wish the cowl to b e, measunng from one Sl'd e of the neck down the length of the cowl and b ack up to the other Sl'd e of the neck. Then divide this measurement in half ecause you will be working on one-half of the pattern. '

\!.~::~··:····-

.....:

·---~--- .....:j•.

hemtfacing

COWL NECK DRESS FRONT MED - CUT 1 (on fold)

DRESS BLOCK FRONT MED

Using your measurement and an "I:' square, draft the cowl to the hem of the dress, as illustrated.

DRESS BLOCK FRONT MED

........Jl Because it will be possible to see inside the cowl, you must create a larger hem/faci ng for the front portion of the cowl, or 4", and curve it to the shoulder seam, 2".

The hem of the dress must be corrected.


3.:!2

CHAPTER 10

DRESSES

E #10-004 ALTERNATE COWL

NECK DRESS

f drafting the cowl will increase volume The previous method o lting in a looser waist. throughout the entire garment, resu h STYL

.

To create a dress that is fitted except for the cowl, use t e followmg Instructions.

DRESS BLOCK FRONT MED

Slash through the shoulder area to any area between the underarm and waist. This area Will get larger, so 1f you want it t1ght, keep the slash h1gh on the side seam.

... • ~

DRESS BLOCK FRONT MED

Slash and spread the section.

DRESS BLOCK FRONT MED

Measure from the center front to determine how large you want the cowl.

~ ~

• •• • ~

I I

I

318"

DRESS BLOCK FRONT MED

Extend the center front and s uare across. q Make sure the new center front is perfectly square at the neck; otherWise, you will get a point at the front because 1t 1s on the fold.

318"

DRESS BLOCK FRONT MEO

3/8"

DRESS BLOCK FRONT

MEO

,...., Create a facing 4" at the front and 2" at the shoulder. Because you will be able to see inside the front, a deeper hem/facing is needed.

Add seam allowances to the completed pattern.

•• • I

•• ••

'


DRESSES

323

CHAPTER 10

STYLE #10-005 WRAP DRESS

This wrap dress ma . Y be drafted With a self-tie that inserts into the f . acmg edge.

2 112" /'

....... """""'"' DRESS BLOCK FRONT

MED

j To draft a wrap dress, trace out the full sloper, both sides.

Add a 2 112" facing to the front edge.

1¡

I

1/8"

1/8"

Trace and separate the pattern pieces. Remember to reduce the facing as in previous facing drafts, by Vo".

Draw in the wrap front with the Vneckline as low or as high as you wish.

DRESS BLOCK FRONT

MED

STYLE #10-006 WRAP DRESS WITH BINDING The same dress can be created w ith binding for ties. The edges that will be bound do not need any seam allowances added.

Trace both sides of the sloper for asymmetrical styles. Place the style line where you wish to 2" to 2'12" past the

create the overlap , center front.

Create a hem along the front edge. The neck edge should be finished with binding.


-4

CHAPTER 10

DRESSES

\

\\ DRESS

l

BLOCK FRONT

MED

.Ji STYLE #10-007 WRAP DRESS WITH FLARED CAP SLEEVES Create a flared-sleeve wrap dress.

Trace both sides of the sloper for asymmetrical styles. Place the style line where you wish to create the overlap, 2" to 2'12'' past the center front.

I

notches for \.

openong

ill

....

... iii

Create a 2V2 hem for the center fronts.

Blend the shoulder sleeve intersection.

,, ,

Place notches on the side seam where the tie will come out.

.1'

DRESS BLOCK FRONT MED STYLE #10-008 ASYMMETRICAL-STYLED DRESS Create an asymmetrical dress with flared cap sleeves on one side and a slip neckline on the other.

...:

-

Create the sleeve as Illustrated, remembering to keep the end squared ; otherw1se, you will get a peak at the tip of the sleeve.

Trace both sides of the sloper for asymmetrical styles. Place the style line where you wish to create the overiiPo all the way to the side seam.

,_"'""

,_,_"""' ,_


DRESSES

CHAPTER 1 0

325

) DRESS

BLOCK FRONT MED

Draw in the slip neckline on the alternate side, remembering to mamtarn complete bust coverage. Place a notch where the t wo pieces will attach to each other.

Trace and separate the piece, remembering to include the notches as necessary for matching up the pieces.

Extend the shoulder into a sleeve as illustrated.

,.

318'

Add seam allowances to the pieces as illustrated.

STYLE #10-009 SLIP NECKLINE DRESS

There should not be any seam allowances on the neckline, because it will be finished with a 3/s" wide binding.

This dress has a neckline that is straight across the front.

While constructing this garment, serge the front seam towards the outside so that you can bind that edge.

You don't have to raise or take in the side seams if you will be using reduced ¡ h d tighter because rt rs . . brndrng. The binding will pull the underarms hrg er an slightly smaller.

DRESS

BLOCK BACK MED

DRESS

BLOCK FRONT MED


326

CHAPTER 10

DRESSES

STYLE #10-010 TOP AND SKIRT COMBINATIONS

You can easily combine skirt and top patterns to create dress styles.

DU

Line the slopers up as illustrated, and you will see how easy it is to match the pieces.

DU -eii"largeWa!St

•..

Or you can separate a dress style into separate pieces for drafting dresses with a waist seam.

Enlarge the waist of the top to create the extra fullness required for the gathered top.

.•. •. . •..

.•.

,, ,

,.


CHAPTER 10

DRESSES

327

ljUst span

STYLE #10-011 EMPIRE-WAIST DRESS

Create an Empire-waist dress with gathered skirt. In order to draft this skirt, which has a horizontal seam below the bust, you must first determine where the bust is on the sloper.

Extra Extra Small

Stable Moderate Stretchy Super-stretch Rib

1 /2

6 6% 6% 7

5 /a

Draw a guideline parallel to the center that is half the bust span away from the center front.

Extra Small

Small

6%

6 71a

6 '1, 6'12

6% 6% 6%

7 6'1a

6'1•

6'1•

6% 6

6'1•

The first step is to find the apex of the bust.

Medium

? 'Ia ? 'Ia

Large

7'12 7 '1, ?'Ia ?'Ia 6 71a

Extra Large

Extra Extra Large

7 71a 7 11a 7 11a

8 31a 6'1a

7% 7 '1•

B'la 7 11a 7'12

.S!

-t

N

b

.o bust

span

p n

Draw a guideline p arallel to the center front but away from the front by half the bust span amount.

Extra Extra Small

WBust level

Extra small

10

Measure the bust level to wherever it lands on the guideline. This is your apex.

Medium

Large

Extra Large

Extra Extra Large

11

11'1•

sma~l~~------~1~0~~~'-------1~0~~~·-----------------------10'1•


.~8

~·ti<\PTLR 10

·r.

DRESSES

~

...

From the apex. draw a guideline that extends from the center front to the s1de seam. Th1s IS the line that you w11/ slash and spread to add extra length for the bust.

- - --Stable Moderate Stretchy Super-stretch R1b

Extra Extra Small

Extra Small

2 2 11s 2 1 '/a 1 :t,

2 4 2 '/, 2 '/a 2 1 'Ia

Small

2 3 ta 2%

2'1• 2'/a 1'/a

Cut and separate the up . slightly below the bust. per portion from the lower portion,

To determine the bust radius, use the c hart below. From the original bust ap ex, draw in the bust radius using a compass.

Medium

Large

Extra Large

Extra Extra Large

2 112 2 112 2% 2 1/4 2

2% 2% 2 112 2% 2 1/a

2% 2% 2% 2 112 21/4

2 7/a 2 7/a 2% 2% 2%

Separate the sections.


DRESSES

-·--.

11/2"

1 "

El,i~flE

; I

3"

.

:-------,

DRESS UPPER CUT 1

(

double 1\e wrdlh

329

CHAPTER 10

r.-.~.. Qilfhf:tr tO-W~ISt

l

MPIRE DRESS OWER PORTION FRONT MEDIUM

t

CUT 1 on fold

Enlarge the skirt to create the extra fullness required for the gathenng. . Add 50% for light gathering. . Add 100% for medium gath enng.

Draw in the neck a nd armhole style line (refer to s/ eeveless garments).

Label the pattern as illustrated.

Make sure to n t h for easy o c the pattern pieces assembly.

Add 200% for heavy gathering ( 1 for very light fabrics). on Y

STYLE #10-012 DOLMAN-SLEEVE DRESS It is easy to create a do/man-sleeve dress, one without any armhole seams. The pattern is simply a front piece and a back piece. Note that these st yles consume a Jot of fabric, and a lot of fabric is wasted, because of the large pieces.

Extra Extra Small Wrist Half of wrist

4% 2 '/•

Extra small

small

5 '/s

5 71•

2 '/•

3

Line up the shoulders as illustrated, and extend the shoulder line an amount equal to the length of the sleeve.

Medium

Large

Extra Large

Extra Extra Large

6%

7% 3%

8 '/s 4 '/•

8 7/s 4 •;,

3%


330

CHAPTER 10

DRESSES

At the wrist, square a line in each direction equal to the wrist measurement.

Blend a smooth curve at the underarm.

Measure and mark down from the underarm point on the side seam (illustrated at 1", but may be any measurement that the designer requires). If you make the armhole too low, it will be difficult to wear this garment under many jackets and coats.

Draw in the neckline, as required by your design.

Trace and separate the pattern pieces as illustrated, remembering to notch for easy assembly. You should probably place the notches at the original shoulder point for future styling, so you will always be able to determine where the exact shoulder point is on this pattern.


DRESSES

STYLE #10-013 LOWERED ARMHO SLEEVE LE WITH DOLMAN

CHAPTER 10

331

Line up the shoulders as illustrated and extend the shoulder line an amount equal to the length of the sleeve.

• This dolman dress has a lowered armh 0 1e, a Wider wrist measurement, and an armhole seam.

At the end of the sleeve, square a line in each direction as wide as you want the sleeve to be.

Measure and mark down from the underarm point on the side seam (illustrated at 1", but may be any measurement that the designer requires). If you make the armhole too low, it will be difficult to wear this garment under many jackets and coats.

Extra Extra Small Sleeve length Wrist Half of wrist

22%

4% 2'1•

Extra Small

22 '1• 5'1• 2%

Small 1

23 1• 5% 3

Medium

23% 6% 3%

Large

Extra Large

23'1s 7% 3"A

22 '1s 8'1• 4'1•

Extra Extra Large

22 71• 8 71• 4'h


332

CHAPTEA10

•• •• ••.

DRESSES

.. . w

\

I

. I to the lowered underarm Point with a Connect the wns straight line.

Trace and separate the pa11e rn pieces as illustrated.

the front for a V-neck as illustrated. Lower b any style Draw 1.n an armhole seam as illustrated; it may e you wish.

CB

Trace and separate the pattern pieces as illustrated.

STYLE #10-014 V-NECK T-SHIRT DRESS

Same as for V-neck T-shirt, except that the dress sloper is used Instead of the T-shirt sloper.

STYLE 10-015 TANK DRESS

Follow the instructions for tank tops, substituting the~ block for the top block.

w

--.-... ....-......


DRESSES

C HAPTER 10

333

,.

,

.'',

/

'

''

STYLE #10-016 SLIP NECKLINE A slip neckline may be created with straps that tie to each other or are attached to the back of the top. You don't have to raise and take in the armholes of a garment that will be reduced through the use of elastic, binding, or banding.

Draw in the nec kline, trying not to Iet Your lines .go within the bust circle; otherwise, parts o f the breast will be exposed.

Draw a guideline from the bust apex up to the point where the shoulder meets the neck. This guideline follows the direction of the straps, and may be changed accordingly. Measure up 1" on the guideline.

Trace and separate the pattern pieces as illustrated.


CHAPTER10 DRESSES

Use binding to finish off the neckline edges and to create straps or ties.

Or you may attach binding to the front sections before attaching the s ides. This will create a different effect for the ties/straps.

Do not add seam allowances to any edge that will have binding applied. Attach the binding to the back and sides before attaching the front section.

bar.tack

When using binding to create straps, make the straps longer than necessary, then correct and complete the measuring during fitting. Insert twill tape in the strap portion of the binding ties to prevent them from stretching. Bar tack the strap to the back binding for reinforcement. Do not add seam allowances to any edge that will have binding applied.

To create an asymmetrical neckline, you must trace out the sloper full, both sides open, before drafting the neckline.

You don't have to raise and take in the armholes of a garment that will be reduced through the use of elastic, binding, or banding. Do not add seam allowances to any edge that will have binding applied.


DRESSES

STYLE #10-017 COWL-NECK DRESS Use this draft for longer top designs to avoid increasing the volume of the body of the garment, or if you wish to attach a skirt to the bottom of the top.

Draft the neckline as in the tight high c owl, squaring up and in using the ''!..:' ruler.

CHAPTER 10

335

To determine the length of the cowl, hold the tape measure as low and as far away from the dress-form as your desired distance, and record that measurement. Divide that measurement in half to use for your draft, because you will only be drafting half of the garment.

Draw slash lines from the neckline to the side seam as illustrated. These may be placed higher or lower on the side seam, depending on the amount and placement of the volume

spread

-----....

Slash and spread as illustrated.

d d mead use the recor e To determine how much to sprea ' surement from the dress-form .

you wish to increase.

····· ··u

Square a line using the "t:' square.


336

CHAPTER 10

DRESSES

-....

blend

Add a 4" hem to the front and a 2" hem to the shoulder area, and then draw a curved line as illustrated .

The completed pattern will add volume only to the upper part of the garment, without increasing any of the body portions. As before, a larger hem/facing may be used if the fabric is very fluid and you wish to ensure that it does not roll outwards.

STYLE #10-018 SLIP NECKLINE WITH COWL

You may also create a slip neckline with a cowl in the front.

Draw a guideline from the bust apex up to the point where the shoulder meets the neck. This guideline follows the direction of the straps, and may be changed accordingly. Measure up 1" on the guideline.

TOP BLOCK

BACK

TOP BLOCK FRONT

MED (date)

MED (date)

Draw in the neckline, trying not to let your lines go within the bust circle; otherwise, parts of the breast will be exposed.

Trace and separate the pattern pieces as IHustrated.


DRE SSES

CHAPTER 10

337

cowl

mqasuromont

- lj -~

1

~ÂŁ.

Draw in the slash lines for the cowl. Slash and spread the sections an amount equal to the amount of cowl required. Make sure that the center front remains squared.

Because you can see inside of the cowl, you will require a deeper hem/ facing in the front

Trace the pattern as illustrated.

Add a 4" hem to the center front and a 2" hem at the shoulders, and then blend with a smooth curved line.

_)

STYLE #10-019 HALTER DRESS You can easily create a halter dress. It _ 11 may be a halter in the back as well, or can easily be created as a backless style.

TOP BLOCK BACK

TOP BLOCK FRONT

MED (date)

MED (date)

Draw in the style lines as you wish them to appear, remembenng to shape them for complete bust coverage.

The back of this dress may also be lowered if you desire.


338

CHAPTER 10

•..

DRESSES

STYLE #10- 020 OFF-THE-SHOULDER DRESS WITH BAND FINISH

Line up the front and back dress slopers as illustrated and place the sleeve along the shoulder.

The off-the-shoulder styled dress requires sleeve and body draftmg.

Draw m the lowered neckline as illustrated.

1--

Measure the neckline in order to draft the ribbed band for the neckline.

COLLAR MED CUT 1 . RIB ONL'f . -

-----1

10% smaller

BACK MED CUT1 on fold

I SLEEVE MED CUT2

FRONT MED CUT 1 on fold

I Make the rib pattern one-tenth smaller than the neckline.

.. .. ..

.... .•• -•-.. ....• ..._,. ,.-a

"'

II'

fiJit


DRESSES

C HAPTER 10

339

Jumpsuits ABOUT THIS SECTION This section w ill explore som . fi · . e patternma k · d s1gns or JUmpsm ts. These gar m g etails a nd de · d b ments a re t . stnts a n may e u sed with oneno as t1ght as cat The jumps uit sloper combine:~h-stretch fabrics. sloper to create a one-piece slop . N e top sloper a nd the pa nt a much lower crotch than the ecx. t ote tbhat the jumpsuit has a smt ecau ·t · from one-way-stretch fabric and n d se I I S created ee s some comfort a nd ext ra fa bric in t he crotch a rea.

JUMPSUIT SLOPERS

Simply attach the top sieper to the pant sieper.

Trace out a new sieper and label as a jumpsuit.

This draft is for a jumpsuit, which is different from the catsuit in that it may be used for one-way-stretch fabrics. However, please note that the crotch will be much lower and looser than the catsuit because the fabric does not stretch in the lengthwise direction.

Simply square down from the JUMPSUIT WITH WIDE LEGS Create a jumpsuit with wide legs.

crotch.

Or create a bell bottom jumpsuit.


,l4tl

CHAPTER 10

DR[~SES

Test Your Knowledge of the Material in this Chapter I I low do you draft a drP~~ from a top ,-Jop<>r·> What change, mu,t 1·ou makl' to tht• cabuit >'Ioper if you wnnt to u..;t· 1t to crc•;t., a dro>~" ,Jopt.•r'' .I can you t-rt•att• a dn·~s with nn unfittt'd "ai~t'? .J fi rm can vou crt•;Ht• n dn·...;..; with a fittt•d w:n,t '' fi 1/ow C.tll ~·ou cn•atr· a cfrp,s "ith n "'ffil · tittt'cl \\ntst? G. \\'hich ,J,;pt·r .should bP uspd to t·n•o\lp ,1 cln•" fnm1 n fo11r·wuy ,;ln·tch fillnic"' 2

I''"'


c Oversized Projects About this Chapter Occasionally a designer may require garments to be oversized, or much la rger than normal garments. This chapter will introduce the reader to the concepts and patternmaking techniques used to create oversized garments, and will begin by drafting of a set of oversized top slopers. Understand that your garments may be created as large as you wish, but the size label does not change, because the customer is simply wearing them larger, looser, and baggier. To create an oversized jacket, use the jacket sloper and enlarge as much as your design requires. Once you have created the oversized slopers, you may use any of the other details in this text on oversized styles.

OVERSIZED TOP SLOPERS

The following examples will be illustrated with and total body increase of 6", but the designer may want a smaller increase, or a larger mcrease.

ai

u

u:

u

increase the total body cirrumference by s¡¡

341


CHAPTER 11

O VERSIZED PROJECTS

The oversized sloper is used when the designer wants to c reate styles that mfddle of the shoulder : underarm area

. ··-···-+ ... r armhole

I

I

area

are loosely fitted or baggy. This is still a size Medium, because the neckline has not been changed, ana should be labeled "Medium Oversized." To create a style that is 6" larger around the c irc umference, extend each quarter of the pattern by 1W', half of that through the shoulder and the other half through the underarm. Draw a vertical line through the shoulder area to the hem and then through the underarm area to the hem. Then draw a line horizontally through the armhole the same amount that th shoulder has increased , because you don't want an oversized p roject withe tight armholes. Use the straight waist, as it doesn't make sense to make an oversized fitted wa1st.

INCREASE CHART

1" 2" 3" 4" 5" 6" 7" 8" g"

DD

10" 11" 12" 13" 14"

Underarm Increase

Quarter Body Increase

Shoulder Increase

'I•

'I• '12

'Is

% 'h %

%

31· 'I•

'!.

'h % 1 1 'I• 1 '12 1% 2

'h

'h

s;.

1 1 'Is 1 'I• 1% 1 112 1% 1%

2'1• 2'12 2% 3

3'1· 3'12

'I• 1

I 5

g>

~

I

. ta

• ira

il m

1% 1 '12 1%

1'!.

I

I blend

To b lend: Straighten out the shoulder b . from the neck to armhole i Y drawtng a new straight line Blend th ' gnonng any discrepancies. e armhole and the underarm areas.

fll

1'1•

width increase of 1 1/2'

Only the widths of th b the neckline or the e. ody and sleeve have ch • wnst . anged, not

..

il il

Sfra·

=

'-

1 'Is

~!"

Slash and spread the bod . 6" d. 'd y to Increase the fit lVI e by 4 1 'Y:2" for each p . anel of the body 1Y2" d' ·d 1VIedby 2 = 3 '" f · " or each ar t Slash and spread the ea hat will be enlarged. se two areas by 3," illustrated· " nch.a

~

fg

Use this cart to determine the amount for each increase. Total Body Increase

.-. ..•. ..-.. •

e


OVERSIZED PROJECTS

CHAPTER 11

B

VERSIZED TOP SLOPER BACK MED

--

VERSIZED TOP SLOPER FRONT MED

343

c

\

XX / ',

~

Label as "oversized slopers." It is still Medium size, but intended to be worn looser.

It does not make any sense to create a fitted oversized top sloper, since it is already so oversized, and the sides extend well past the waist of the customer.

C'\ 3/4"

OVERSIZED SLEEVE

The sleeve must increase equally in order to fit into the body.

By looking at the illustration, it is easy to understand the placement and amounts of the increases necessary. Make the changes necessary to ensure that the sleeve fits into the new body.

Figuring out the sleeve is simple, whatever changes have been made to the armh ole must be re-created so the sleeve will fit into it. Slash and spread the sleeve to correspond to the body, as illustrated.


344

CHAPTER 11

OVER-SIZED SLEEVE BLOCK

T Blend the new sleeve and wa lk around to check for accuracy.

.. .... -.-.... ..-.. -â&#x20AC;¢

~

O VERSIZED PROJECTS

Label the sleeve as Me dium Oversized Sleeve Sloper.

Remember to allow for sleeve ease. Check the ease. Max1mum "

~

Somet1mes the wnst area of the sleeve is only enlarged half as much as the balance of the sleeve.

OVERSIZED CREW NECK T-SHIRT The oversized crew neck T-shirt is created the same way as the fitted crew neck, except that the oversized slopers will be used.

Sometimes the w rist is not enlarged at all. You must determine by you r design which method to use.

OVERSIZED V-NECK T-SHIRT The oversized V-neck T-shirt is created the same way as the regular V-neck T-shirt, except that the oversized stoper is used instead of the regular sloper.

See Chapter 9, Tops See Chapter 9, Tops


OVERSIZED PROJECTS

CHAPTER 11

345

CF

OVERSIZED TOP SLOPER FRONT MED

OVERSIZED HOODIE

THE KANGAROO POCKET

Hoodies are a great example of oversized garments.

The kangaroo pocket can be applied to many different garments, such as pants, skirts, T-shirts, and can be any size or dimension you wish.

This draft will demonstrate an oversized hoodie.

Measure up lhe center front 6". Measure across the hem 4" in each direction. Measure across the top of the pocket 3" on each side.

CF

...

1/4"

,..-,:0

1/4~

seam allowance

,·------ ----------------,

OVERSIZED TOP SLOPER FRONT MED

u' o'

' ~· o' ';6:

o:

, ...

!!

0~~ 1 "'"

Add hem allowance and seam allowances to the pocket as Mark the drill marks '14' in and 1/4" down from the line, since you don't want the marks, sometimes drilled, to show once the pocket is applied.

illustrated. The sides of the pocket will be hemmed with the cover stitch. The top of the pocket will be edge-stitched in place. The bottom of the pocket will be caught in the rib waistband.

. f" ·sh the sides of AI ternately, you can use a folded nb to '"' the pocket.


346

OVERSIZED PROJECTS

CHAPTER 11

·"'

d

To curve the sides of the pocket, you must add a facing. If you want to shape the sides of the pocket, you must use

CF

OVERSIZED TOP SLOPER FRONT MED

...,.,., .. _.._ 0

Label the front of the top as illustrated with drill marks and notches to indicate the pocket placement.

OVERSIZED TOP SLOPER FRONT MED

ZIPPER WITH COVERED TEETH

To c reate a top with a zipper opening, whereby you don't want to see the teeth , you can c reate welts to cover the teeth . Measure down any length for the zipper.

OVERSIZED TOP SLOPER FRONT MED

't

I I

a facing to fmish the edges.

0

'' '

OVERSIZED TOP SLOPER FRONT

MED

Draw parallel lines '/." w·d t 1 ' e 0 draft the welts. Trace and separate the pieces as illustrated.


OVERSIZED PROJECTS

CHAPTER 11

347

,.

---+ The welts drawn on the pattern can be tr as illustrated, and seam allowan aced on the fold ces added. The long side of the welts should have 'N ances, and the ends should have '1:.. seam allowz seam allowances.

I

..

When folded, the welts look like the illustration.

CF CF

OVERSIZED HOOD IE FRONT MED

RIB WAISTBAND

Label the pattern pieces as indicated. The welts must be fused with tricot to prevent them from stretching when sewing and wearing.

The rib waistband needs to be slightly smaller than the waist. Even when creating the waistband for an oversized top, the waist is still drafted using the regular sized sloper. It needs to be snug on the customer's waist.

CF

The width to the waistband can be any size you wish, and will be folded over and sewn to the hem. Use the rib sloper with bui lt in reductions to determine the length of the waistband. . . . aistband to fit around the Th1s waist must be multiplied by four to create a w entire hem.

RIB SLOPER


CHAPTER 11

OVERSIZED PROJECTS

~.

..

ALTERNATE METHOD OF DETERMINING RIB LENGTH

fl the model at the area of the body Measure the dress-form or ' where the rib will sit.

1o% smaller than h1p measurement

'IIi

... =

Make the rib length 10% smaller.

.

Ill

CF

II fl

REGULAR SLEEVE BLOCK

, .. / RIB

OVERSIZED HOOD IE FRONT MED

~ SLEEVE ~ BLOCK

i t i

•t

"' '" f·--..........-......,' ..... "'t~61EiJt"r9........................."";................."']

~

Label the pattern as illustrated.

RIB CUFFS

Notch the front, back, and sideseams of the waistband for easy assembly and to ensure that you stretch the waistband to fit the top evenly.

When drafting a ribbed cut, use the regular rib sloper, so that it is snug on the c ustomer's wrist.

REGULAR SLEEVE BLOCK

Make the length to fit the regular rib sloper as wide as you wish illustrated at 4" which is folded in half. '

:·./RIB \ SLEEVE

; BLOCK

:

.

.

·IEJ::


; ..,.,~

~

OVER S I Z ED PROJ E CTS

ALTERNATE METHO

M

I

D OF DETERMINING CUFF RIB LENGTH

easure the dress-form ' or fit model at lhe area of the body where lhe rib will sit.

I

I

I

10% smaller than wrist measurement

\

~•

••• •

349

C H APTER 11

Make the rib length 10% smaller.

CB

c

neckline

I

drop

OVER-SIZED SLEEVE

OVERSIZED TOP SLOPER FRONT MED

I

HOODS Label the pattern as illustrated.

Hoods may be created for any neckline or for regular fit, T-shirts, sweaters, tank tops, and catsuits. Place the front sieper on top of the back sloper, matching the shoulders. Measure the difference between the necklines; this is the amount of the neckline drop.

measure back neckline CB

OVERSIZED TOP SLOPER BACK MED

OVERSIZED TO SLOPER FRONT MED

\ Measure from the pit of the neck, all the way around the head to the pit of the neck on the other side. Measure around the head from eyebrow to eyebrow.

b ck neckline. Measure the front neckline and t h e a


350

CHAPTER 11

~

OVERSIZED PROJECTS

half of the ear to ear measurement

.. .. ..-. .-. ~

neckhne drop

--------~

1measurement

Mark a guideline above by the amount of the neckline drop.

Draw intersecting lines. From the lower point mark, measure up 15" or desired amount. Square a line 12" across, or the desired amount.

r neckline drop -----~.,._-"':-::: "

112

measurement

Using the measurement of the front neckline, hold the ruler on the lower line and place it wherever your front neckline lines up on the upper line.

back neck - - - -- - --

""---'

1neckline drop

measurement

Apply the back neckline measurement along the upper line.

Make sure to square the line for '12''.

At approximately half-way along the center back sh the hood to resemble the back of your head mak'. ape • 1ng sure th t th r · a e lne IS squared straight up for the first 1".

blend

Blend the neckline into a smooth c urve for easier sewing.

•• •• • ~


OVERSIZED PROJECTS

CHAPTER 11

351

,.,. HOOD MED CUT2

HOOD MED CUT2

Trace and label the hood as .1 ' 1ustrated.

1

HOOD OPTIONS

To a curve d hood, measure 2W' from the points andcreate d raw the curve. '

HOOD MED

HOOD MED CUT2

CUT2

Measure in 2 '12''.

Cut out the section so that it forms a dart at the top of th back of the hood. e

Measure down 2 '12''.

HOOD WITH PANEL SEAMS AND CENTER BACK SEAM Square a line across and down from the 2'12" marks.

Separate the pattern pieces.


CHAPTER 11

O VERSIZED PROJECTS

Swing the center back panels to line up with each other as illustrated and make into one s1ngle piece.

Blend the corners into a smooth curve, and you will have to reduce the length of the center back, from the top edge of the panel, so that it fits to the new curved line.

1112"

HOOD

MED CUT2

HOOD WITH RIBBING A hood pattern can be drafted without a center back seam, by reversing the center back panel and c utting it on the fold. It will need a length correction, from the top edge, so that it fits perfectly to the curved lines.

The hood may also be drafted with ribbing to finish the edge of the hood. Measure an amount for the rib, illustrated at 1112'', but may be larger or smaller, as the designer wishes.

Separate the pieces.

Reduce the length of the ribbing pattern piece by 10%, remove it from the top, then straight edge.


,

,,"' •..

-•..

• •

OVERSIZED PROJECTS

HOOD MED CUT2

If

RIB TRIM

CHAPTER 11

353

HOOD MED

MED

CUT2

CUT2-

I

I I I

••

HOOD ON FOLD 1 ustrated. Fold and trace the pattern pieces as .11

The hood may be drafted with a fold at the top.

This hood has a seam in the ribbing at th e top of the h d but may also be cut in a single piece. ea •

I

"Ill

HOOD MED

HOOD MED CUT2

CUT 2

HOOD ON CENTER BACK FOLD The hood may be drafted without a seam in the back and just a large dart. This is very useful when using striped fabrics since both sides will match at the back.

Alternatively, the dart intake amounts may be transferred to the shoulder notch, the excess, normally taken in at the center back, must be taken in as a dart at the shoulder notch.


354

CHAPTER 11

OVERSIZED PROJECTS

HOOD MED

;,CUT2

OVERSIZED HOODED RAGLAN SWEATSHIRT

Raglan sleeves are often used when creating oversized garments.

Reduce the length of the dart to 3'12'.

Since there is no armhole seam, it is not as obvious that the garment is cut bigger, and will fit a larger segment of the population. In this section, we will create the pattern for a raglansleeved top with a hood, ribbed cuffs, and waistband.

......

..,

... â&#x20AC;¢...

IIIII

IIIIi

OVERSIZED TOP SLOPER FRONT

MED

Place the front and back slopers together alon the shoulders. g Draw a line connecting the underarm points. Extend the line beyond the underarms.

Draw a guideline from each underarm point and extend the line past the underarm point by approximately 3".

....

.... ,.

,-

,-


OVERSIZED PROJECTS

355

CHAPTER 11

c

\

OVERSIZED TOP SLOPER FRONT MED

add the amount of the overtap to the hem

Place the sleeve on the underarm line as illustrated. Match Point 1 to the shoulder notch on the shoulder line. Match Point 2 to the back underarm point on the line.

Remember to add to the length of the sleeve, the amount that the sleeve overlaps the shoulders, and to keep the length consistent, otherwise the sleeve will be too short.

Match Point 3 to the front underarm point on the line. Note: The sleeve will overlap at the shoulder and go past the underarm points. We will correct thi s in the next step.

c

OVERSIZED TOP SLOPER FRONT MED

I

romo;t,;;;,o0~;oun to tho hom

-----

d on top then this If there is a gap when the s leeve Is place ' e so It 1 amount must be removed from t he hem of the s eev doesn't get any longer.

\ Mark the neckline 1" from the shoulder line 1n both dtrections. or use any measurement the designer desires.


356

CHAPTER 11

•~

OVERSIZED PROJECTS

Draw a stra 1ght hne from the neck point to the underarm mtersecllons as shown. Extend th1s line past 11'i' the underarm point. Draw the raglan style line from the marks on the neck to the sleeve armhole Intersection and continue through the center of the underarm point. When draft1ng the f1tted raglan T -shirt in Chapter 7, you followed the Opposing curves to remove the excess fabric from the underarm. However with the oversized top, you don 't want a tight armhole, so draw a line ' straight through the new armhole to the underarm intersection. You've gone to a lot of trouble to make this sloper oversized, and should use the extra fabric for a comfortable easy fit.

OVERSIZED

TOP SLOPER FRONT MED

....

.. .-.. ..... -.-. -.. -...... -..... ---""

• •

i ll

c

)

,.//

{.OVERSIZED

....

11n-

Notch the front and back raglan sea

OVERSIZED TOP SLOPER FRONT MED

TOP

SLOPER FRONT MED

Measure down 1'12'' at the underarms and square a lin across to the body and the sleeve. e

. ms 1or construction.

~

j

Blend a new curved underarm.

~

"'


OVERS IZED PROJECTS

CHAPTER 11

357

CF

OVERSIZED

TOP SLOPER FRONT MED

RAGLAN FRONT

Trace out the sleeve in a contrast colored pencil or pen, so that you can see the piece clearly.

CB

Trace out the front and back bodies in a contrast colored pencil, or pen, so that you can see the pieces clearly.

RAGLAN CF

BACK

RAGLAN RAGLAN

SLEEVE MED

BACK MED

RAGLAN FRONT MED

RAGLAN FRONT

Notch, separate. and label the pattern pieces.

Raglan Style Options The ragl an sea m may be shaped as desired.


358

CHAPTER 11

OVERSIZED PROJECTS

RAGLAN BACK

RAGLAN BACK

~'

\

'

~

.r..\J'..

~

,. ••• ·/

:.·~

CF

c

./J!. RAGLAN FRONT

RAGLAN FRONT

The raglan seam may be shaped as desired; it may even extend into the center front if you desire.

The basic raglan draft may also be used to create dolman or batw1ng sleeves. Shape the underarm as desired and place a long seam down the shoulder of the garment.

...

... •. .• .. ... .

ill

) RAGLAN

,....

...

BACK

.,

OVERSIZED POLO SHIRT CF

The polo shirt may be created with a kmtted polo collar or a self collar. Knit collars are purchased in different lengths:

RAGLAN FRONT

Fo~ a more comfortable fit, and to keep the sleeves from falling backwards on the customer, move the shoulder seam towards the front or the arm by 'N'.

Nevertheless, many manufacturers simply kn1t one SIZe and either stretch it to fit the neckline, or ease it 11110 a smaller neckline.

xs

13

M L XL

14" 15• 15• 17"

s

-


OVERS IZED PROJECTS

,~

CHAPTER 11

....' ,.

3 59

.,'

-¡-

'- - - - - ' - - - - -'

Draft the placket on top of the top draft, so you can see and understand how it all fits together.

Trace out the placket as illustrated and add seam allowances.

Draft the slit as deep as you w ish, illustrated here at 6". Then draft the placket to finish at 1" wi de. The placket is 1" w ide a nd will fit into an opening of 1" wide. The two plackets w ill overlap for buttons and buttonholes.

Fold each placket towards the inside. Indicate with a slit or a notch the center front placement of the placket on the front of the top.

To sew: Fuse the placket pieces to re-enforce ons and buttonholes. them f or butt F ld both plackets in half. . o both plackets, folded , With raw une up es touching. ed g . V: " before the sew at W' stopping â&#x20AC;˘ lackets. ends of the P til 1' before Clip the slit all the way un the end. . . Clip a Y in the sht.

Sew across the bottom, catching the little triangle.


360

CHAf'TCR 11

OVERSIZED PROJECTS

/ 2%"

back neck facing cut 1 sell cut 1 fuse

3X"

= ••. .•. ..

-•. -•• -.-3

POLO COLLAR FACINGS

You may also create a facing for a style with a placket.

Make the back facing longer than the front, since it will be viewed when on the hanger. Make the back placket 3'12'' down at the center back.

OVERSIZED SHORT SLEEVE WITH RIBBED CUFF A rib cuff still needs to fit snugly on the arm even though the garment is oversized. It must be made 10% smaller than the original sloper, before enlarging.


OVERSIZED PROJECTS

CHAPTER 11

361

Assignment #1· H . Kangaroo Pocket ood•e with

AssJg~ment . #2: Create an

Create an oversized hood·Ie Wit .hS t · an exposed teeth zipper, n .b cuf fse -m · a dsleeves . ' band with a kangaroo pocket. ' n waist-

Create an rati . overs·_Ized ragI an hoodie with a scpang Zipper, nb cuffs, and waistband.

Assignment #3: Create an Oversized Polo Top Create an oversized raglan-sleeved polo top using a purchased collar with a center front but-

0 vers1zed Hoodie

Assignment #4: Create an Oversized Turtleneck Create an oversized turtleneck top with a separating zipper, ribbed collar, cuffs, a nd waistband.

ton placket.

. C t an oversized Assignment #5: rea e Dolman Sleeved ToP top with rib cuffs d . d d 0 lrnan s1eeve Create a cropped oversize and waistband.


362

CHAPTER 11

OVERSIZED PROJECTS

u.

u

COAT SLOPER FRONT MED

JACKET SLOPER FRONT MED

TOP SLOPER FRONT MED Increase by 2"

II!CI'V8 58

by2"

inCTease the total body Orrurnference by 2'"

Jacket Slopers This section will introduce the patternmaking principles used to create knit jackets and coats. The principles are similar to those already studied· however the blocks used are slightly differ~nt. Jack~ts must be created slightly larger than the clothes worn underneath. The slopers must be enlarged enough to accommodate the clothes worn underneath, and knit coats must be larger than the jackets worn underneath. Regular slopers are used to create a garment that has nothing except undergarments wor n underneath. For example, summer weight knits, dresses, a nd tops that are worn "next to the skin." Jacket slopers are used when the designer wants to create styles intended to be worn over other clothing, such as pullovers a nd cardigans. Therefore, the size must increase to accommodate the clothing underneath . Coat slopers are used t o creat e garments that are worn over other sweater s or jackets. They are still all size Medium, however, they are intended to be worn over other garments.

The regular top sloper will be increased in width a total of 2" or '/,'' per panel to create a jacket sloper. Repeat or double th e measurements for coat slopers.

approx half·way

---l 1/4 ----

•...... ~

below the waist notch

-----l1/8 ---- -

VERTICAL INCREASES Make the increases to the back sloper and simply change the neckline to create the front sieper. To apply the vertical increases: Draw a line parallel to the side seams approximately 31/ in from the side seam (increase by Ys" per panel). Draw a vertical line through the shoulder approximately half-way (increase by y,• per panel). Draw a vertical line 1" in from the front along the neck per panel). edge (increase by

v.·

.•. .. ... .. ,•

--


OVERSIZED PROJECTS

CHAPTER 11

363

118 :

118 : 118

1f".

1/2

1/2

114

118

HORIZONTAL INCREASE

112

~ 1'8

To apply the horizontal increases:

118

· Draw a line parallel to the shoulder ap from the shoulder (increase b 101 proximately '/4' in Draw a horizontal line th roug h the Y armhol • per panel). proximately half-way thro h e area, apby V2 per panel). ug the armhole (increase

118

! 1/8 114

; 118 118

Slash 'II and spread these areas by the amounts I ustrated.

Draw a horizontal line below th . e w aist notch (increase by '/• per panel). When both directions of increases are indica! should look like the illustration. ed, they

,w"6_,. •Stra·9ht 1

.

1112"\

?/'~e ' ''' '' '

:

'

l' ' ''' ''' ''

: '' '

!

--''

'' '' : g:

•"' \~-:

''' '' '' :' '' '

i

!,__ --------- -----'!

BLENDING AND TRUEING THE SLOPERS Straighten out the shoulder by drawing a new straight line from the neck to armhole, ignoring any discrepancies.

SECOND LAYER SLOPER FRONT To create the second layer front sweater sloper, simply trace out the back sloper, when completed, and lower the front neck 1'12" and draw in a new neckline as illustrated. Or use your front sloper and trace out the neckline.

Blend the armhole, neck, and the underarm areas. Label as "jacket slope rs" or " second layer sloper'' for sweaters.


364

CHAPTER 11

OVERSIZED PROJECTS

1/8

1/8

- j :;~---~~: - -f

1/4

:

: 1/4

\below the elbow notch!

:.·1/8!-;----; -1-,5t -/-

\

1/8

·~

~

1/8

~ ' 1/8 ....... ...,... 118

SECOND LAYER SWEATER SLEEVE SLOPERS

To find the increase areas for the sleeve, line up the sleeve with the body as illustrated and match the increase areas accordingly.

Mark the sleeve to correspond to the body, as illustrated. Slash and spread once above the elbow notch.

It is possible, and easier, to increase one-half of the sleeve and copy to the other side, or draft it on the fold of your paper and then open it up to trace onto oak-tag.

r___ :

/~~~~~.

I,. ,:;~/ I 112

1/2

112\._

.

·-,

: 1/8

::

I ,. ,: :/ i1/8

1/8

1/8

1~

i 1/8

1/4

L.

------------!

Slash and spread the sle . the body increases. eve sloper as illustrated to match

'

I.. ------------.!'

Blend the sleeve as illustrated. You can use the 0 · · 1 blend th nglna sleeve sloper as a template to e curved parts of the new sleeve.


OVERSIZED PROJECTS

CHAPTER 11

365

I

2ND lAYER SWEATER SLEEVE

MED

Walk the sleeve around the a rm hole to check for Label as "jacket sieper" or "s accuracy. sweaters." econd layer Sloper for

SLOPER SHIFTING TO CREATE SECOND LAYER SLOPERS

It is not always necessary to slash and spread to create I second ayer slopers. You can s1mply shift the regular Sloper the required amount, and trace each part as it is enlarged. See the following: Trace out the back neck section for approximately 1".

1/8

/~r" ' ' --~----L ' ' :' :' '''

'' '

:

:

i i

f

l

I

'' I

''

'' '' '

' ''' '

'' '' '

:

,----:-----:-

Shift the sieper to the left, 'Ia", as illustrated, and trace out the next section of the neck.

Shift the sieper up 'Ia" and trace out the next section of the neck and the corner intersection. Because the neck will be blended with a ruler in a straight line, it is not necessary to draw the entire shoulder, just the corners.

Shift the sloper out '14' as illustrated and trace the next section of the shoulder, then the shoulder corner intersection.


366

CHAPTER 11

OVERSIZED PROJECTS

( =- ~ -~

~

~·r !

1/4

r· l

•,J

-~

Shift the sloper down 1/a" and trace the next sect1on of the sloper.

Shift the sloper down another '14' and trace out the next sections.

Shift the sloper out '/a" and trace the remainder of the underarm and the corner intersection. Indicate the waist notch .

........

/: ''

''

!

1

''

' ''' '''

''

t : _.,. ; Shift the sloper down 1/a" and trace to the hem and the hem corner intersection.

J

'

:

:

'

'

''' ''' '' '

'

l'

' ''

-+----~

' '''

''' '' ''' ' ' --i-----~

''

'

1

-~·---t

I I

'' '' '' '''

~

\ :

\---r---r I

1

Shift the sloper back 1/e" in the reverse

Shift the sloper back /4' and trace that

direction and trace that portion of the

section of the hem.

hem.


OVERSIZED PROJECTS

r

CHAPTER 11

367

~-r I

--r----t o

--f

!' !' [

1

I

I

:

'' ''

'' '

'' -r''

I

:---~-· __ _t

I

' I

Shift the sloper over 'Is" and trace the rema1n1ng sect1on of the hem and the

t118

Shift the sloper back ' " that portion of th up Is and trace e center back.

corner.

Shift the sloper up W' and trace the last portion of the center back. The sieper should have traveled a full Circle and be back at the same point that 1t originated.

To create the front sloper: To blend:

Trace out the back sieper and make changes to the neck as illustrated. Lower the neck 1'Is" and bend a new neck. Or use the original neckline as a template. To indicate the fitted waist, trace the side seam from the

Connect the shoulders, side seams, and hems with a straight line. Blend the neck and underarm, using the original sloper as a curve template, so that the new sloper retains

original sieper.

the original curves. Note: It may look as if the neck has increased by a total of '14', but after blending, it should have only increased by %" due to the nature of the curves. Repeat for the front sloper.

Extra small Neck drop

1

1••

7

small

Medium

Large 9

1 /os

Extra Large


368

CHAPTER 11

OVERSIZED PROJECTS

r

I

n~E~ BL~~~L

2

MED

MED

-~

. __J

1

---Alternate method of cutting out sweater slopers: To save space and oak-tag. place front and back together as illustrated. Then fold on the fold line of center/front and center/back. In order to use these slopers, you must trace the back twice and the front twice, using the center as the fold line.

SLOPER SHIFTING TO CREATE SECOND LAYER SLEEVE SLOPERS

The sleeve sloper may be increased on the light paper fold, as half, then opened and traced onto oak-tag. Trace the first section of the sleeve, as indicated.

"••

• ti

• I

I

Shift the sloper out 'Is" and trace the next section.

Shift the sloper down ';.'' and trace the next section.

Shift t he sloper out 'Is" and trace, as indicated.

/1 . 1/8;

. . '

~-------! ' ' ''

'

II

:

' ____ j '' '' '' ''

.. '

''' ''

Shift the sloper down 'Is".

Shift the sloper back in and trace.

Shift the sloper in 'Ia".


OV ERSIZED PROJECTS

CHAPTER 11

··-

I

~

\ .. \

\

--~

369

.. 114

..

-·--·· · ~ ',

Shift the sloper back up as indicated.

'Is" and trace

Shift the sloper up 'Ia".

Shift the sloper up 1/." as indicated. You should have gone full circle and be exactly where you started. Cut out the paper sloper on the fold, open it up, and trace again onto the oak-tag. Always cut the sleeve full/open, and do not put a crease in your sleeve sloper, as it will wear out along that edge too fast.

Assignment #6 Create your own version of Style # 10-002, zip front oversized turtleneck with a front facing a nd back neck twill tape. Create a 3" high, finished collar. Use a 24" sepa rating zipper. Add a 11/z" hem allowance and hand hem, or blind h em the sweater . Cut and sew this garment using a purchased sweater knit.

Test Your Knowledge of the

Material in this Chapter 1. How much la r ger sh ould th e over sized slop er b e? 2. What size is t h e oversized sloper? ? sized sloper · 3 · When should you use a n over

4. How can you figure out how much larger to make the sleeve? 5. How can we ensure that the ribbed cu ffs fit snugly?


_ _ _ _C~H A

T E R

2

Four-Way-Stretch About This Chapter This chapterc introduces the PI .mclp - . 1es of t b way-s t ret ch 1a rics. The patterns ar . ~o-way- and fourof stretch; the difference become e Identical for both types wears the garment, and areas 0 ; ~~p:~nt when the customer Ie c do not return to their original shape, causing baggy forth. ees, crotches, waists, and so

k:

.......hfii-1~1~

stretches across the fabric as well as tengthw1se

stretches across the fabric

Stretches only across the fabric, and the stretch is entirely derived from the stitches used when creating the fabric. Garments should be made with the stretch going around the body.

Stretches across as well as up and down the fabric. The additional stretch is derived from the texturing and c rimping of the yarn used to knit the

s.lfelchet 1etOU lhe labnC aswe"aslef\{lthwlte andh&s&P~~ndexadded

Stretches across as well as up and down the fabric. Supplementary stretch is added to the yarn before knitting by using spandex/Lycra~.

fabric.

Most knits stretch more in one direction than in the other. · h w·se direction. When . kmts only stretch 111 t e cross l any M using knits for dresses, jackets, pants,r skirts, ?ps atnhde ut1.1t1zes alwaysand k ·. sleeves ' the experienced patternmad.1e t.10n of stretch encnrec built-in stretch of knits so that the of st 1.et ch should t t degree cles the figure. However, the grea es . catsuits, leotards, or go up a nd down the torso for bodysUl~sthe crotch, to allow for any other garment that passes througk 1.t are rarely used for maximum mobility; one-way-stretch ~ s er raised her arms garments, because when the om . tt would be uncomfortable 1n the cro tt · ·ns are created identlTwo-way- and four-way-stretch pa bet sed interchangeably. cally, mca ning thesamcPatterns maY e u

~hese

ct~~

371


C HAPTER 12

FOUR - WAY- STRETC H

that garments made with two-way Please! notlel. f~owes:egr, on the body at the knees, elbows, and stretc 1 W I o .en fabric doesn't h ave a ny memo1.y or e1ast 1.ch becauS e tile crotc . . d ' II t eturn to its origmal s h ape wh enbworn. 1ty an w1 no r Also note that one-way-stretch patterns may e used with r t 1.e tcl1 fabrt¡cs as long as the garment does not need ,our-way-s lengthwise reductions. For example, a one-way-stretch skirt may be cu t us1¡ng a fiour-way-stretch fabnc because there is nothing holding the skirt down at t~e bo~tom hem (referred to as a n anchor), so the lengthwise dtrectwn of stretch I S not utilized a t all. Distinct and separ ate four-way-stret ch pa.tterns are only necessary when the stretch of th~ garment I S anchored through the crotch, such as with catsUits, bodysUits, leotards, and one-piece swimsuits.

Four-Way-Stretch Slopers Rule of thumb: 5" will stretch to 10" or more m both directions. Four-way-stretch garments ar e not just for swimsuits and activewear. The increased use of spandex in more a nd more knits results in mor e r esilient fabrics that don't bag or sag when wor n. When you u se super-four -way-st retch fabrics, the patt ern can and should be simpler becau se of the fabric's innate ability t o mold around the body. Many four-way-str et ch fabrics don't n ecessarily look like activewear fabrics, so the garments creat ed with them don't have to be activewear. Because knitted fabrics with spandex have excellent stretch and excellent memory, they allow us to create form-fitting garments that hold their sh ape without the need for tailoring or for zipper s and other fast ener s. For maximum mobility a nd tight fit, four-way-stretch garments must h ave negative ease, meaning that they must be smaller tha n th e actua l body. When dra fting for super stretch, the designer must reduce the body measurements to compensate for the str etch. While each combination of knit stitches a nd fiber content r equires a n individua l solution, an average 10 percent r eduction applied to vertical and horizontal measurements will result in a basic fit. Because it is much easier to take in an oversized garment th a n to let out a too-tight garment, note tha t a ll measurements should be exaggerated until a fter the fitting.

Four-Way-Stretch Reductions Rule of thumb: 10 percent smaller in crosswise direction without any reductions in lengthwise direction; 10 percent smaller in the lengthwise direction. Use these measurements when drafting slopers for fabrics that stretch 100 percent in both directions.


FOUR-WAY- STRETCH

373

CHAPTER 12

Only four-way-stretch sl 1 h opers are h pass t roug 1 t e cr otch and sh ld _used for garment h lengthwise str etch . ou ets, m order to U tT s t t hat d · I IZe e These re uct10ns may a! so b e u sed for two-way-stretch fabrics.

MEASUREMENT CHART The following draft will use the "Misses Medi .. ments in the standard column 0 r use the s1ze . um range measurements· that you wish.however, for a personal sieper. substitute the measure-

... :: ...............,. ... $

ff/JWIIJ

#

Measurement

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24

Bust Waist Hip Crotch depth Waist to knee Waist to ankle Ankle Knee Front crotch Back crotch Crotch angle Nape to waist Back neck Back neck rise Shoulder length Across back Sleeve length Shoulder pitch Bicep Wrist Neck Bust span Bust level Upper chest

Standard

34 112 26'12 37 '12 10% 23 % 39 '1• B'l• 14 '1• 2% 3% 1 '1a 16% 2 112

'Ia 5 '/• 7% 23 1/a 1 112 11'12 6% 14 7/a 7 10'1a 32

Reduce by5% X .90-10% X .90 X .90 X .90 X .90 X .90 X .90 X .90 X .90 X .90 X .90 X .90 X .90

no reduction no reduction no reduction no reduction no reduction no reduction X .90 X .90 no reduction X .90 X .90

Extra Extra Small

28% 21 '1• 31 9 20 % 34% 7 12 2 2 71• 1 14 1la 2% % 5 11a 7 22 % 1% 9% 5 14'12 5 7/a 9

Small Medium Large 33 '1• 32 31 29 '1· 30'1• 26'1• 24 31• 22 23 23'1• 36 34% 32 33 31· 32'1• 9% 9 112 9% 9'1a 9'1• 22'12 22% 22 1/e 22'1• 20'1a 37 31· 37'12 37 '1• 34'!. 37 7 112 7 % 7% 7 '1· 7'1• 3 1 1 13'1• 13 12 1· 12 12 12 1· 2'1• 2'1• 2 '1• 2 2 3% 3'1• 3'1• 3 3 1 1 '1a 1 1e 1 1 1 3 1 16 15 1• 15 12 15% 14 '1• 2'12 2'12 2 112 2'12 2% 'Ia 'I• 'Ia 'Ia % 6'1• 6 5 31• 5 112 5'1• 7'1a 7 112 7% 7 '1• 7 11a 23 3la 23'1• 23 '1a 23 22 71a 1 112 1 '12 1 '12 1 112 1'12 11 10 31• 10% 10 9% 6'1a 6 '/• 6 5% 5 '/• 7 15'/a 3 15 /a 14 14 /• 14% 6 '12 6% 6 1/• 6 1/a 6 7 10 1/a 3 10 9 /a 9 /• 9'/e

:::

Four-Way-Stretch Sloper Draft

~

A-B

,.,.

..,. .,. :: f/iliiJIA

~

~

Extra Large

Extra Small

nape to waist Extra Extra Small

Nape to Waist Half-way

14 1/a 7

Extra small

small 3

14 •;..

7'1•

15 /a 7 7/a

Medium

15 112 73/.1

Large

15% 7 7/a

Extra Large

16 8

Extra Extra Large

34% 27 112 37% 9 '1a 22'1s 38 7 '1s 13% 2% 3'12 1 1le 16 '1• 2 112 'I• 6'12 7 31• 23'12 1 '12 11 % 7 15'/• 6 3/• 10 1/•

Extra Extra Large

16'/• 8 1/a


374

CHAPTER 12

FOUR-WAY- STRETCH

=t

~

A-C

=

A-D = back neck

half of A-8

A-E = Back neck rise

Square a guideline at A-8-C.

A-F = shoulder pitch

E

.-r1

A

G

I.

E-G = shoulder length (goes from point F to wherever that measurement lines up on line F, the shoulder pitch line).

Square a line from the shoulder at point E past line F, the shoulder pitch line.

Since the front will be drafted on top of the back, the measurements need to be divided into four.

'I• of waist 'I• of hip Crotch depth '13 of crotch depth

Extra Extra Small

Extra Small

5'1e

5'1• B'le

8% 10'12 3 112

10% 3 112

Small

Medium

Large

Extra Large

Extra Extra Large

6% 9'1• 10'1• 3'12

671• 9% 10% 3112

7% 10% 107la 35!1

8% 11 11e 11'1e 3'1•

9% 12'1e 11% 3'1•


FOUR -WAY-STRETCH

CHAPTER 12

375

BACK NECK

oraw a curved line as illustrated. Remembe '/2" from E and W' from A. Draw free h r to square for line with your curved ruler. and and clean up the

FRONT NECK

Draw . ,~ .. f a curved rme as Illustrated. Remember to square for r 2 rom E and W' for F. Draw free hand and clean up the tne wtth your curved ruler.

4 F

c

H

.

C-H = across back measurement, square up to shoulder, and label the point where it intersects the shoulder line

H-K = 'h " on a bias angle.

point J (it does not meet up with point G). C-1 = bust measurement. K =half of H-J .

Extra Extra Small Across back Bust

7 7'/â&#x20AC;˘

Extra Small 1 /â&#x20AC;˘

7 7 '1e

Small

Medium

Large

7'/4 7'12

7'1e

7'h

?'A

8

Extra Large

7% 8'1e

Extra Extra Large

7% 8%


CHAPT[R 12

FOUR WAY-STRETCH

G

G bad. armholo

\

lronl ": <lr mholo 1.'4

' K

I

.:'f

H

H

Because the sleeve woll be drafted on the fold without any dofference between the front and back. and consequently no armhole notches. you must compensate for the necessary dofference on the body at the armhole. The back armhole os '·<" larger than the front armhole.

Draw the armhole b; connect,ng paonts J·K·I Draw free hand. then clean up the lone wl!h vour curved ruler

Draw a guodelone of 'li', tn towards the body. r

Draw front armhole, G-K- 1.

1

Blend and smooth front armhole curve .

J

.......

..

....

-......

IIIII

C-1 = bust 8-L = crotch depth L-M = hip Connect all points with straight lines, 8-L-N-M-1. M-N = divide into thirds.

Extra Extra Small Hip Crotch depth Thirds Waist

31 9 3 21 1/ s

8-Q = waist measurement.

Extra Small

Small 7

32

32 /s

9'1• 3 22

9'1• 3'/• 23

Medium

Large

33% 9% 3'/• 23 7/s

34% 9 112 3 1/s 24%

Extra Large

36

9% 3 '/• 26 1/s

Extra Extra Large

37% 9% 3'/• 27 '12

.... ... ..

.... •


FOUR-WAY-STRETCH

'

CHAPTER 12

377

J H

r :{ P'R r>

"

0

o~./ -~~

Q-P = draw a curved line If you place #4 of the variform curve at the waist point Q, then pivot the curve until it reaches point P, you can achieve a nice hip curve. Alternatively, you can exaggerate the hip and correct it in first fitting.

T-S-R ~ To draw a balanced crotch, place a mark up the curve an amount equal to the crotch extension, and draw the curve through all three points, T-S-R. Draw the curve by hand and clean it up using the French curves.

L-R = front crotch extension L-S = crotch angle, on the bias

Front crotch Crotch ang le Grain Waist to ankle Waist to knee

Extra Extra Sma ll

Extra Small

2

2 1 5 34 7/a 20'1s

4 7/a 34% 20%

Small

2 1 5 1/a 37 22 1/a

M edium

2 '/• 1

5'1• 37'/• 22 1/•

Large

Extra Large

2'/• 1 1/a 5% 37 '12 22 %

2'/• 1'/• 5% 37'/. 22 112

Extra Extra Large

2% 1 '/• 4 7/a 38 22 %


CHAPTER 12

FOUR - WAY- STRETCH

v

_1_: "

'

M M

o-,.:

l

w

v

p.;

_&

P-i

0

o-/.

0

... v

NL

R

= half way between point N and point R

Square a line up from W all the way to the waist and label pointV.

To locate the knee, find the halfway mark between point U . and point w, then measure an additional1 " up. Note that th1s is between the crotch and the ankle, not the waist and ankle. X-Y = knee measurement

At V, square down to ankle and label (waist to ankle).

X-Z = knee measurement

V-W = waist to ankle

W-AA = ankle measurement W-BB

M

0

/ v

0- :'

~

:\

l

:x

y:

:

knee

I.,.halfwa)'

N-X-Z-AA-Y-R = connect with straight lines

Extra Extra Small Knee Ankle Back crotch Front crotch Additional

= ankle measurement

Blend the hip (point N) and knee curves (points X andY).

Extra Small

Small

Medium

Large

3

3 1/a

1%

3 '/a

1%

1 3/.

2 '/a 2 7/a

3 2

3 2

3 1/4 1 7/a

1

3 1/a 1'/ a 3 1/a 2 1/a

1

1

3 '/• 2 1/a 1

Extra Large

Extra Extra Large

3 '/• 1 7/a 3% 2 1/ • 1 1/a

3% 1 7/a 3 112 2% 1'/a


FOUR -WAY-STRETCH

CHAPTER 12

379

'\_A

M

0 ~1

B

_Q

v

additional

ry s /,amount

pi

N\

,l RBB

u

~

J

Z

AA

--+ _ " - blend

R-BB

= additional amount

Because this draft is on top of the front dart, and you've already added the front crotch amount, it is only necessary to add the additional amount to equal the back crotch total. BB-Y

Illustration shows how the front and back are interrelated and which lines are required.

= connect with a straight line

At Y, blend a smooth curve. Place notches at waist, hip, and knees.

I

CATSUfT

-

FRONT MEO

,....,

te the front from the back. . lines. because it may ith two (2) gratn Label the siopers w

Trace and separa

be cut either way. hi s waist. and legs. fit throughout the P ; and test the fit on a To correct the sample garmen must make up a you dress-form. model or


380

CHAPTER 12

FOUR-WAY-STRETCH

S UIT SLOPERS

checking that all seams match . and true them, . t h Trace out separate pattern h p•eces /ders armholes, un derarms ' Inseam, cro c ' outand are accurate at the s ou ' TRUEING THE CAT

seam, and neckline. . b ith the type of stretch. . re membenng to Ia e 1 w k Label the pattern pieces, Notch at the waist, hips, knees, and center back nee . . I all ieces with black for Med•um. Also remember to /abe P . d 'th the corrections indicated on the This s/oper must be cut, sewn, and f•tte WI block.the back and front inseams together the way that they will be when sewn. Place Match from the knee notch upwards.

.

Check to see that the crotch is bien d ed .In a smooth' continuously curved hne. Ensure that from the knee notch down matches perfectly.

.

1 the difference between the two po1nts. Howl't Normally when we blend, we sp t h . correct and the back crotch must be ever, in this instance, the front cro c IS . lowered by a very small amount to match •t. Note that some des•gners pre fer to leave the excess in the pattern as ease in the · back thigh area.

""""-~ FRONT

MED

4-way

Place the shoulder seams together as they will be when sewn.

Place the side seams together as they will be when sewn.

Blend a smooth armhole in a continuous line.

Match from the waist notch upwards.

Blend a smooth neck.

Check to ensure that the side seams are exactly the same length and that the notches match.

Check to ensure that the shoulders are exactly the same length. If there is any discrepancy, split the difference between the two, taking some away from the larger side and adding to the smaller side. Blend as necessary.

Blend the armhole in a smooth, continuously curved line.


FOUR-WAY-STRETCH

Checking the Side Seams Place the front and back catsuit slopers on t f h o eac other' . seams are exact!op th check to see t h at t h e s1de Y e same and that every noteh mateh es exactly.

Four-Way-Stretch Seam Allowances Four-way-stretch fabrics should be serged with a three-thread serger, as the fabric needs to stretch a lot more than other fabrics. If a three-thread serger is not available, a four-thread will work. Shoulder Twill tape is not necessary in the shoulders if the fabric has memory (meaning that it will return to its original measurement after being stretched). Side seams

1

Armholes

Y4" or %"

Neckline

Y4" or %"

Hem

1" for straight hems

Zipper

W' seams for invisible zipper application

.14" or %"

Y2" for curved hems

C HAPTER 12

381


,' $.'

l'liAI'H. H 12

FOUR·WAY·STRETCH

Greatest Degree of Stretch

CB

i-

-< greatest degree of stretct)..

I CATSUIT

'"""' ,..., M£0

........

-

~

.l{

!

When creating two-way· a nd four-way-stret ch garments, usuallv one direction stretches slight ly more t h a n the other. Experienced patternmakers conside r this a nd use it to t heir benefit. \Vhen creating dresses a nd tops, the great est direction of stretch should be utilized going a round t he body. However, for catsuits. leotards, and bodysuits, or a ny garment tha t passes through the crotch and t he shoulders, t he g r eat est direction of stretch should be uti lized going up and down the body. Usually the gr eatest degree of stretch is crosswise; however, some knit fabrics, s uch as swimsuit fabrics, ar e s pecially knit to have the greatest direction of stretch going len gthwise parallel to the selvage. T his is because th ese garments pas~ through the crotch and would be u ncomfort a ble when the customer raises her shoulder s. Tops, dresses, pants, skirts, a nd sweater s should use the greatest degree of stretch going arou nd th e body.

CATSUIT

....,

SAC' MEO

!.~

.i'

~ fl~

.,

Catsuits, bodysuits, leotar ds or a ny other

~arment that is a nchored by the' crotch s hould

a~ed the g r eatest degree of str etch going up an. ohw n the body, s o t h at when t h e cu stom er raises er arms ' t h ere I·S no discomfor . t in the cro t ch ar ea.

CATSUIT WITH M OCK NECK AND INVISIBLE ZIPPER

This basic catsuit should be drafted, sewn, and fitted to complete the sloper draft. It will have a simple mock neck with an invisible zipper in the center back.


FOUR- WAY- STRETCH

::· ~-~--)>

,E_i""''"~l·

I

CATSUIT

BACK

~

,,-

:a

FRONT MED

4-way

4-way

Slr~l_ch_

"'"'"'

16

383

~

;-':l I

CATSUIT

MED

C HAPTER 12

I

CATSUIT

CATSUI'T

BACK

FRONT

~:1

.·-.MED

M ED

4-..y

;

atrell:h

\~

Double the height, because the collar will be folded in half

This pattern requires a zipper to get the garment on. Use a 'h" seam allowance the length of the zipper, excluding the distance that the zipper will go up into the collar.

and all three layers sewn together.

The zipper extension is W' by 16" for an 18" zipper with a 2"

Illustrated at 4" for a 2" finished collar.

collar.

To create the mock neck collar:

To determine the length, measure the front and back necklines and double that measurement, as you've only measured half of the total neckline.

,rrq ·- - -~~rt~~~-- _-·p,n· 114" •••

1/-4'

:114"

[,. I " · .! tff\i ~~T \

1: :Zi

\i

MED

~

4-way

$tr8~

: ~~t.:·; . FRONT

·--..... MED

114' / ··-~

Add '/.'' seam allowances for the three-thread serge or W' seam allowances for the four-thread serge. 111"

The three-thread serge is much stretchier. Square up a 1" hem allowance.

:,w

114"

G

1"hem

Extra Extra small Neck

14 1/2

Extra small

small

Medium

14 7/•

w

114" :

1" hem

Large

Extra Large

Extra Extra Large

15

15'/•

15'/•


384

CH A PTE R 12

FO UR-WAY-S TR ET C H

I

CATSVIT

FRONT

··-....., MED

l ....

FLARED-LEG CATSUIT

. f erence of the hem as much as required. Widen the c1rcum

Create a flared or bell-bottom leg on the catsuit.

You can st art the flare at any point on the leg that you wish. Remem ber th at Whatever amount you add to one side of the leg must be equal on the other side of the leg.

CATLIT FRONT

LIT

CAT BACK

CATL IT FRONT

MEO

MEO

MED

4-way

4-w ay

4-way

LIT

CAT BACK MEO

4-way stretCh

WIDE-LEG CATSUIT

.....J

........ j &q"l;a1 amou--nt$

You can easily create a wide-leg catsuit.

Decide on the width you require at the hem of the pants and square a line up to the hip. Make sure that whatever amount you add to one side of the leg is the same on the other side of the leg, as well as the front and back. Blend the back inseam if required .

For a wider leg, you must increase the length of the crotch seam and blend into the waist.


FOUR-WAY-STRETCH

CATSUIT BACK MED

CHAPTER 12

385

CATSUIT FRONT MED

4-way

4-way

stretch

stratch

HALTER This type of halter catsuit is often used in active sportswear, as it allows complete freedom of movement of the

Draft the collar to fit the sieper neckline.

arms.

~.-

¡.

Add the necessary seam allowances as illustrated. Draw in the halter style lines anywhere you wish.

The halter style lines do not have any seam allowances, as they will be finished with W' binding; for other finishes, you

Remember to cover the bust area completely.

may have to include seam allowances.

This draft will have a 1" shoulder seam.


86

CHAPTER 12

FOUR-WAY-STRETCH

(

.....,......_....... ,. .....

~

,/ ·

..}··

BACKLESS HALTER

Th1s halter style is backless with a collar.

Draw in the style lines as you wish , remembering to cover the bust area completely. The back may be lower or higher, as you require.

Add the necessary seam allowances as illustrated. Draft the collar to fit the original cat-

I

suit sloper.

• I

rr· ~

1112"_.,.1•

7\

match and ;

\

~~i 9

Is·

TANK NECKLINE CATSUIT

Catsuits with tank necklines are often used in active sportswear.

Draw any style of tank top on the slopers. Raise the underarm 112" and take in 112", unless some binding, banding, or elastic will eventually raise and tighten the underarm.

• '•


FOUR-WAY-STRETCH

CHAPTER 12

387

CATSUIT WITHOUT SIDE SEAMS

A catsuit may be developed without any side seam, which makes it very easy to draft color blocked designs.

Place the front and back slopers beside each other. Remove the extra volume from the center front and center back areas. Try to keep the volume exactly the same and balanced.

ld pear once the Illustration shows how the draft shou ap h front . volume has been moved f rom the sides t o t e waist and back.

. . f the waist to the ankle of the draft. Draw a gUideline rom


388

CHAPTER 12

FOUR-WAY-STRETCH

Remove the extra volume gained from the inseams. Remember to keep the new leg balanced and even.

The illust rat ion shows the final sloper, without any side seams.

I:

CJSUIT

CATSUtT;

BACK

FRONT !

MED 4-way stretch

MED

4-way

:

l

stretch!

CATSUIT WITHOUT CENTER FRONT SEAM The catsuit may also be developed without a center front seam.

Extend th e center front all the w ay down to the hem.


FOU R -WAY-STRETCH

CHAPTER 12

I """" .....,

CATSUIT MED

-"' \:

\.

Take the amount of volume that will be lost at the front and move it to the back using tracing paper.

CATSUIT WITHOUT SIDE SEAM OR CENTER FRONT SEAM

CAJSUIT BACK MED ~. 4-way

•.

I

I

CATSUIT

CATLIT

BACK

FRONT MED 4-way

MEO

CATSUIT FRONT MED

I

I

CATSUIT

BACK

FRONT

CATSUIT

......, MED

h

......, MED

stt1tch

:·~\"'""' \

CB

CB

1

CATSUIT RONTIBACK MED CUT 1

. .>:

.... ·· .t:-; \'·

i !;

·t without side t a catsUI . ou can crea e eked styles, By combining the prev1ous drafts, Y . ful tor color-blo This IS use seams-or a center front seam. . tersecting. earns 1n Whereby yoy wouldn't want t he s

389


390

CHAPTER 12

FOUR - WAY-STRETCH

HALTER WITHOUT SIDE SEAMS

CB

OR CENTER FRONT SEAMS

CB

, .. -' ,., ~elF CA,:~ FRONT/BACK MEO

CUT I 1/4"

COLOR BLOCKED CATSUIT

SOME PRACTICE STYLES

MOCK NECK

T-BACK

RAGLAN

WITHOUT A HOOD

SLEEVELESS

COLQR-BL()Ct<S>


FOUR-WAY-STRETCH

CHAPTER 12

391

TiGHTS WITH SIDE SEAMS In thiS section, we develop tights slopers with Side . seams and without.

In order to prevent the tights from riding down at the waist tomer bends over, we must ra1se the back waist Th. . when the cuswhen the crotch of the pant is really high and tig.ht ~~~sdonly ~ecessary fabric to allow for bending over. oesn t have extra

I

I ....,

CATSUrT

CATSUIT

BACK

FRONT

r.t£0

MED

........

..-

""'"'

I

.....

31... --- ·····318"

318"·---- ...•

TIGHTS

BACK

._, .... "' MEO

i

Raise center back waist 3//'.

I

........,""

TlG><TS FRONT MED

-{

Create an elastic casing the same as for one-way-stretc h pants.

Add nothing at the center front.

Side-seam %".

TIGHTS WITHOUT SIDE SEAMS

Place front and back slopers on paper. Match at the hip and the ankle. Trace around the slopers to about 3" above the waist. Remove slopers. Measure the amount of the gap between the front and back outseams. Take in each of the inseams an amount equal to half of the gap. Fo llow the shape of the gap exactly. Remove exactly the same shape from each leg. Keep the widths identical.


392

CHAPTER 12

FOUR-WAY-STRETCH

Tum excess mlo a dan

DART INTAKE

Add seam allowances and turn the

waist excess into a dart. This is sometimes the option a designer wants.

I

Option #3

Option #2

Option #1

Remove half of the excess from center front and center back

Tum excess Into an ease

Change the entire waist excess into ease by drawing a straight line across the waist and ignoring the dart. This will create a lot of gathers when elastic is inserted, and may not be the desired look.

No ease. Remove half of the excess from the center front and half from the center back, the same way as with the legs. In this case, the waist will be smaller than the elastic, causing it to look odd on the hanger. However, if this is for dancers or gymnasts, it will be suitable, as they would prefer a smooth flat waist and don't require the garment to look attractive in the store.

!

\

DRAWSTRING WAIST TIGHTS

I

{

For drawstring elastic, replace the front notch with two notc hes '12'' apart to create an opening for the drawstring to pass through. I

I

,.

Knee

,.

- - - . ;. , - - - - i- - - - - - -:- - - - .... - - -

2"1

nr~1 r '-; . I.. .

EIGHT-PANEL BICYCLE SHORTS BICYCLE SHORT SHAMMY To create eight-panel bicycle shorts: Trace out the tights to 1" above the knee level. Create a princess seam. Notch and separate the pattern pieces.

Create the shamm . leather to soft Y as Illustrated and cut out in a light en the crotch araa for riding.

â&#x20AC;˘.. â&#x20AC;˘


FOUR-WAY-STRETCH

rest You~ Kno_wledge of the Material m Th1s Chapter What is a one-way stretch?

1· What is a two-way stretch?

;· What is a four-way stretch? : When should you use a fo~r-way stretch sloper? 4_ Must four-way stretch fabncs only be used for active wear? 5 What is the d1fference between the front armhole and 6 · the back armhole? Which serger should be used for four-way stretch fabrics? 7 : What it "the greatest degree of stretch"? 8 . When creating tops, dresses, pants, skirts, and sweaters, 9 which direction should use the "greatest degree of stretch''? . When creating catsuits, bodysuits, leotards or any gar10 ment that is anchored by the crotch, which direction should use the "greatest degree of stretch"?

CHAPTER 12

393


=--====:r=c=EH=EA=~pn_-=r[}ECER==J::1::__:3~===== Bodysuits, Leotards, and One- and Two-Piece Swimsuits About this Chapter This chapter covers development of patterns for bodysuits, leotards, and one-piece and two-piece swimsuits. The slopers may be created from scratch or developed from the catsuit sloper. The leotard sloper may be used to create leotards, bodysuits, or any top with panty attached, as well as one-piece swimsuits. Panties and swimsuit bottoms are also covered in this chapter, but will need a separate sloper. Since there is nothing anchoring the top of the swimsuit, it ~eh aves like .a one-way stretch. Note that the catsuit sleeve w11l also fit th1s sloper, or you can follow the sleeve instructions in Chapter 8.

Four-Way-Stretch Reductions Rule of thumb: 10% smaller in crosswise direction without any reductions in lengthwise direction; 10% smaller w the lengthwise direction. d ff slopers for fabrics Use these measurements whe~ ra. mg that stretch 100 percent in both dJr~ctwn~ for garments that Four-way-stretch slopers are on Y u~e der to utilize the t h d shoulders m or pass through t h e cro c an t ' tch They may also be 1 lengthwise as well as the hori~on~ut t~:re ~ill be no memory d tretch out of shape used for two-way-stretch fabncs, in the garment, so it will tend to sag an s on the body after wearing.

395


ND TWO - PIECE SWIM SUITS

396

BODYSUITS, LEOTARDS . AND ONE - A

CHAPTER 13

----

FOUR-WAY-STRETCH REDUCTIONS E xtra Extra

1 2 3 4

5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23

Bust Wa1st H1p Crotch depth Wa1st to knee Wa1st to ankle Ankle Knee Front crotch Back crotch Crotch angle Nape to wa1st Back neck Back neck nse Shoulder length Across back Sleeve length Shoulder p1tch B1cep Wnst Neck Bust span Bust level

Small

Extra Small

Multiply by

0

0.90 '0.90 '0.90 '090 "0.90 '0.90 '090 . 0.90 X 0.90 X 0.90 '0.90 0.90

28 ·• 21'' 31 9

3

20'"

34'• 7 12 2 2 •

Medium

18

6

14

20

2

10

29 • 22 32 9 '' 20'·• 34 •

30 1 8

31 23 518 33 31•

32 24 31.. 34 %

33'1• 26'1• 36 9% 22'h 37'1. 7'h 13 '1• 2'1• 3 '1e 1 'Ia 16 2'h

34% 27';, 37'1. 9'1• 22% 38 7% 13% 2 31o 3'12 1 'le 16 •;. 2 '12

no reduct1on no reduction no reduct1on

no reduct1on

0.90 '0.90

14

0.90 0.90

12 1

"

2 3 1 15 1 fe

1

2 318

'·· 5 s

''• 5'1•

7 22 31• 1%

7'1• 22 71• 1 •;, 9% 5'1• 14% 6 9 '/o

11

5 14 '12 5 7/o 9

23 32 • 9 ,'" 22'' 37 7''..

..

2 3 1

g J/8

no reduct1on

1 /A

12 1

t

no reduct1on no reduct1on

Large

Extra Extra Large

Small

]

14 'I• 2'.

Extra Large

2 1/1

''•

5'h 7 '1• 23 1 '12 10 5% 14'1• 6 '/e 9 '/•

g •;,

gJ/&

22 1

4

37 1·1

7% 12 3/4

2'1• 3 116

1 15 '12 2 •;,

'I•

5 31• 7'1• 23'1• 1 •;, 10% 6 14 '1• 6 '1• 9 '/•

22'1• 37'h 7"1• 13 2'1• 3'1• 1 'Ia 15 11• 2'h

'I•

'I• 6'1• 7% 23'1e 1 •;, 11 6% 15 '1• 6 '12 10 '/s

6 7'h 23'1• 1 •;, 10'/. 6 '1• 15 6% 10

'I• 6'12 7 '!. 23 '12 1 '12 11 % 7 15'1• 6'!. 10 '/.

-----A

_ ____ c

-----8

LEOTARD SLOPER The leotard sloper may be used to create leotards,

A-8 = nape to waist

bodysuits. or any top with panty attached, as well as onepiece swimsuits.

A-C = half of A-B A, B , C = square out lines

Nape to waist Half-way

Extra Extra Small

Extra Small

Small

Medium

Large

14 % 7

14 '1• 7 1/e

15'1. 7%

15 '12

15'1.

7'1.

7 7lo

Extra Large

Extra Extra Large

16 8

16'/• 8 '/a

.... .. •

•••


RODYSUITS, LEOTARDS. A NO ONE- AND TWO-PIECE SWIMSUITS JLE -

_________o~--·--

A • F

CHAPTER 13

397

·~~

A

DitCh G

c c

--B

A-D

back neck measurement

D-E

back neck nse

E-F

shoulder pitCh

E-G shoulder length measurement goes from pomt E to wherever that measurement lines up on the shoulder pitCh line. line F

Extra Extra Small Shoulder pitCh Back neck Back neck nse Shoulder

B

Extra Small

2% >;,

Small

Medium

Large

Extra Large

Extra Extra Largo

1 '12 2'12

1 '12 2'/,

1 112 2'12

1 '· 2'/:;.

,,,

2''·

6'/.

6'h

'lo

5 112

5'/e

'I•

5 31•

'lo

6

1' ,

'I•

E

G'~A E

c

/~·-

.....

G

-

~

B

Draw a curved front neckline as illustrated. AI E, square a line towards line F.

Remember to square for 'h" at E and '12" at F.

A

F


""" ~,.,._,

'HAPl ER 13

BODYSUITS. LEOTARDS , AND ONE- AND TW O - PIECE SWIMSUITS

-r~; H

E

b

c

across back

~A

G -~:J, F

B

Draw a curved back neckline as illustrated.

C-H - across back: square up to the shoulder line and Iabeii, note that it may not line up with point G.

Remember to square for ·2 atE and 1t2 at A.

E

·Z?\:

L:

Gj

H

J

• •

E

A

c

J

• • I

H

I

B

B

C-J = bust measurement H-K = '12'' on bias angle.

Across back Bust •;, of bust

Extra Extra Small

Extra Small

7 28 3/a 7 1/a

7 1/a 29 1/c 7 3/a

Small 1

7 /c 30 1/a 7 '12

Medium

Large

Extra Large

Extra Extra Large

7% 31 7 3/,

7 1/ 2 32 8

7% 33'/• 8%

34 % 8%

7'!.

••• ••• .•. ••

.,.•

--

, "'


CHAPTER 13

BODYSUITS, LEOTA RDS , AND ONE- AND TWO - PIECE SWIMSUITS

E

r:

399

A

back armhole

K:

c

H

B

B

AI K, square a guideline in both directions.

Draw the back armhole from point G-K-1. Square the line for 'h'' at G and at I.

E

E

A

A

G back

114"

armhole

back armhole

front armhole

front armhole

K"

c

H

c

H

B

B

Extend the center front the amount of the crotch depth.

Draw a guideline 'h'' in from the back armhole. Because the sleeve will be drafted on the fold, with no difference between the front and the back, you must include that difference in the body portion of the garment. Draw the front armhole from point G-K-1, at the inside guideline. Square the line for 'h'' at G and at 1. Note that because the sleeve is drafted on the fold, with no difference between the front and back curves, you must exaggerate the difference in the body of the garment; this Way, you can eliminate any notches on the sleeve and armhole' red ucmg · the chances of gettmg . holes ·1n t h e garment . Extra Extra Small

Extra Sma ll

9

Small

Medium

Large

Extra Large

Extra Extra Large

~~d-ep_t_h----~~~~~~----~~~~.~----~9~~~.~------~9;~~.------~g~V,~----~9~5~~~--~~~9;~:.~~--

9


P I ECE SWIMSUITS

400

CHAPTER 13

BODYSUITS, LEOTARDS , AND

ONE- AND TWO E

back armhole

front armhole

K'

R

p

B

waist

If

c

H

c

0

A

F

A

I

-1%"

Or-

M

N

. v1de . • D1 the 11ne, waist to crotch ' into three equal sections.

Draw a guideline equal to the hip measurement.

E

E

A

A

F back armhole

back armhole

front armhole

K' H

front armhole

K'

c

:

c

H

ill

0

B

N ' - - - - - ---'M

On B-0, measure and mark the waist measurement.

Hip Crotc h depth Thirds Waist

To draw the hip curve, line up #4 of the variform curve with the waist and blend as well as possible into point Q .

Extra Extra Small

Extra Small

Small

Medium

Large

7 3/4

8'1•

3

8 9 1/a 3

9 1/4 3 1/a

5'1•

5'1.

5'/.

8 '/, 9% 3 1/a 6

8% 9 112 3'/a 6 1/ .

9

Extra Large

Extra Extra Large

9 9%

9% 9%

3'1•

3'1•

6 112

6%

•• ., ••

•• •• •• •.

..


BODYSUITS, LEOTARDS, AND ONE- AND TWO-PIECE SWIMSUITS

CHAPTER 13

401

E A

E

F

back armhole

c

A

front armhole

K.

c

H

0

R

B

waist p Q

N

Divide line P into four sections.

c __ _ _ __,

M

Draw a guideline 1'/,'' in from the center front. This will be the width of the crotch.

E

E

A

A

F back annhole

front annhole

K.

R waist

B

front armhole

K

c

H

0

back armhole

c

H

0 P

R

If

B waist

Ptdiv:de Q

N '------~M

At the intersection of the upper hip, the new front guideline, and the bias angle, draw a 1%" line.

01-

~ip i~to 4

N '------~ M

At the mark closest to the side seam, raise '12".


~'HAI"TER 13

BODYSUITS, LEOTARDS. AND ONE- A

NO TWO - PIECE SWIMSUITS

A

F

:'J: - ,\;. : ·-I bad

armhole

~

J

c

c

H

B

fj.," N

--

'

M

~

' >

Draw rn the front leg openrng by connecting the points from 1 to 5.

'' '

Blend into the center front.

Make a smooth, continuously curved lrne that blends into the front crotch lrne. Draw freehand , then clean up the lines w1th the curved ruler.

l

E

f~:

baCk a'Ttlhc:Me

front armhole

back

front

armhole

armhole

K

.j:

H

K

-

C

c

.V H

0

R (

p1

·r

N

Find the center of that line and mark out %" + '/,'' + W'.

B

warst

..

Q '-

For the back, connect a straight line from point P to the front crotch line.

A F

G

2

3

.G-...-;, I

y·¥. '< 5 M

Redraw with curved lines. These lines are for the different sizes of bottoms. Some medium customers have larger or smaller bottoms, and it will depend on your target market which curved line you incorporate.


I I

BODYSUITS, LEOTARDS

'AND ONE- AN

D TWO-PIECE SWIMSUITS

CHAPTER 13

403

CF

LEOTARD SLOPER FRONT MED (date)

LEOTARD SLOPER BACK MED (date)

TRUEING THE LEOTARD SLOPERS

Trace and separate the leotard sloper as illustrated.

To true the neckline and armholes. line up the slopers as illustrated, as if they had been sewn and pressed open. Make sure that the curves blend in a smooth and continuous manner and that there are NO points in the blend.

!

t

CB

CF

~

D

I

CB

blend

~

..

••

•• ••

-

•• .-

-

hole curves into Match the underarms and blend the arm smooth and continuously curved lines.

ening at the side seam by matching the Blend the Ieg o P . . t hes and walking the stde seams. watst no c ening into a smooth and continuously Blend the leg op curved line .


CHAPTER 13

BODYSUITS, LEOTARDS, AND ONE- AND T

WO PIECE SWIMSU IT S -

blend )

I CB

Blend the crotch into a smooth and continuously curved line.

l

You will have to add an additional 1/4" to the crotch seams in order to make the curve smooth enough to attach elastic.

1

CATSUIT BACK

MED

MED

4-way

4-way stretch

stretch

1- r -

0

"i!' ";;

C)

.,

..

$"'

I!!

I!! C)

C)

Label the slopers as indicated.

"

.!:

c:

"

'0

$

-r-

·e

I!!

C)

'0

1

CATSUIT FRONT

C>

..

CREATING A LEOTARD SLOPER FROM A CATSUIT

Trace the upper part of the catsuit to just below the crotch. Draw a guideline at the waist. Extend the center front to below the crotch. Square a line in at the crotch.


OODYSUITS. LEOTARDS AND ON ' E- AND TWO - PIECE SWIMSUITS

CHAPTER 13

405

,

1112"

Divide the waist to crotch into three

Divide the top line into four parts.

equal parts.

At the intersection, find the bias and draw a guideline. Mark 1%" on the guideline. At the mark closest to the side seam, measure up 'h".

Draw a guideline parallel to the side seams from the first mark. Follow the exact hip curve. Mark the line 'h"

+ W' + W'.

Use these marks when drafting highercut, sexier swimsuits and leotards.

Draw a guideline 1'12'' away from the center front crotch line. Note this line may not line up with points on upper hip line.

Draw a curved line from the side seam to the 'N' mark to the bias line, and blend into the crotch. Create one smooth and continuously curved line.


406

CHAPTER 13

BODYSUITS, LEOTARDS, AND ON E -

AND TWO-

PIECE SWIMSUITS

LEOTARD SLOPER BACK

Trace the upper part of the catsuit sloper to just below the crotch .

Connect the points with a straight line. Find the middle of the line.

Draw a guideline at the waist. Extend the center front to below the crotch. Square a line from the center back at crotch level. Place the front leotard draft onto the back draft and trace the upper hip guideline and crotch guidelines.

~

~12"+112"

At the middle, measure out:

'12'' for small; 1" for medium; 1 '12'' for large buttocks. Note: the customer may still be Small or Medium, but with large buttocks.

Draw the back leg opening from the crotch to the hip, with a continuously smooth line.


BODYSUITS, LEOTARDS, AND ONE- AND TWO - PIECE SWIMSUITS

CHAPTER 13

407

Elastic Reductions Elastic. is of crucial importance when designing and creat ~~g swu~1suits. Elastic will help keep the garment snug in e crucial areas of the leg openings, the armholes, a nd even n eckhnes. The reductions for elastic depend on two variables. The first variable depends on where the elastic is placed on th e body. Some areas demand t ight ness, a nd other areas require the elastic to be slightly looser. The other variable is the width of the elastic, si nce wider elastic is much stronger th an t hin elastic. In the past, we would reduce 1" from the front-leg-opening elastic measurement, with no reduction for the back opening, but now most of the industry uses an elastic metering device to attach the elastic, which str etches the elastic evenly a ll the way around. Since the device cannot tell wh ether you a re sewing the front or t he back, the industry h as changed practices to r edu ce the elastic to an even 2" all the way around the leg opening. The seam a llowances for elastic are usually 1/ 1s" more than the width of the elastic. If you have sever al layer s of fa bric wrapping over the elastic (not a very good idea), you may want to allow a little more, about Y32" extra, per layer of fabric being wrapped with the elastic.

11/2" 11/2/ f> .

~

smaller

\ <>o-.,~~··.

(

.

e~_r.;,.

'"6 .

~..... \ "~;, . f{jF\ ~ no reduction °1~1 ~ for armhole elastic

reduce elastic / by 2" total'-

FRONT LEG OPENING

Cut the elastic 1" smaller than the front leg opening measurement. BACK LEG OPENING

Cut the elastic 1" smaller than the back leg opening measurement.

ARMHOLE, NECKLINE, AND LEG OPENING OPTIONS

To create cover-stitched legs, arms, and neckline: While it is possible to simply coverstitch hem the arm, neck, and leg . if you do ' they will noth be ·11 opentngs, very snug or tight to the body; t ey WI gape and sit away from the body.

You must raise and take in the underarm for a cover-stitched armhole and neckline. However, if you intend to use elastic, binding, or some type of reducing trim, this is not necessary.


408

CHAPTER 13

BODYSUITS, LEOTARDS, AND ONE -

AND TWO - P

IECE SWIMSUITS

"7

1/2" seam allowance for covershched edges

112" seam allowance ( for coverstiched

:L

112" seam allowance \ for coverstiched edges

;~ 3/8"

t:z.

seam allowance

L Jfor coverstiched edges 318"

ASYMMETRICAL BODYSUIT WITH ELASTIC LEGS, ARMS, AND NECKLINE

To draft the asymmetrical bodysuit, the pattern must be traced open, full, not on th e fold.

that will Add seam aII owan ces as illustrated, %" for seams . be sewn to oth er Seams • and '12' for cover-stitched hems.

318" 1/4" seam allowance

for elastic edges

1/4" seam allowance

for elastic edges

elastic by 2" total

.

i ll

reduce neckine 318"

... •. •

ill

318"

' 1/4" seam allowance

1/4" seam allowance for elastic edges

for elastic edges 318"

Cut the elastic to the exact measurement of the armhole, without any reductions. Reduce the neckline elastic by 2" total all the way around, 1" smaller than the front and 1" smaller than the back. Reduce the leg opening elastic by 2" total all the way around, 1" smaller than the front leg and 1" smaller than the back leg. Add '/.'' seam allowance for elastic. Serge the elastic to the "wrong" side of the opening, flip once, and then cover-set.

.... •. •

•..

....

:


BODYSUITS, LEOTARDS AND ON '

E- AND TWO-PIECE SWIMSUITS

CHAPTER 13

409

3/8"

1/4" seam allowance for elastiC edges

114" seam allowance for elastic edges

no reductton reduce neck1n~ for armhole elashc by 318 ..

elastic

2" total

3/8"

reduce elasllc by 2" total

for elast1c leg opening /

'

3/8"

1/4" seam allowance for elastic edges

ASYMMETRICAL BODYSUIT WITH PICOT ELASTIC ARMHOLE

Picot elastic is the same as regular elastic except that it has a fine lacy edge on one side that helps red uce panty lines. Serge the elastic to the outside of the leg openings, flip once, and then cover-stitch to expose the lace.

Cut the elastic to the exact measurement of the armhole, without any reductions. Reduce the neckline elastic by 2" total all the way around, 1" smaller than the front and 1" smaller than the back. Reduce the leg opening elastic by 2" total all the way around, 1" smaller than the front leg and 1" smaller than the back leg. Add 1/4' seam allowance for elastic.

318" no seam allowance for binding edges

3/8"

ASYMMETRICAL BODYSUIT WITH BINDING

Cut the binding one-sixth smaller t h an the armhole. Don't add any seam allowance to the arm hole or neckline When applying binding.

nstruction seam allowances to the Do add the normaI co . areas that will have bmd,ng.


..10

~ HAPTER 13

BODYSUITS, LEOTARDS, AND ONE - AND TWO-PIECE SWIMSUITS

l

i

1/6thsmnllcr

1/6th smnUer

318" 318"

318"

v,

318"

1/6th

smallo~_ _ ]

318"

ASYMMETRICAL BODYSUIT WITH BANDING

Banding is another method of finishing the armhole and neck edges.

Cut the banding one-sixth smaller than the armhole. Add seam allowances to the armhole and neckline when banding will be attached, as determined by the type of fabric and serger used .

ASYMMETRICAL BODYSUIT WITH SHAPED BANDING

The banding may be shaped for any design.

Shape the banding as required.

.... ......... ...... ....... ..--..


BODYSUITS, LEOTARDS 'AND ONe. AND TW O-PIECE SWIMSUITS

CHAPTER 13

411

Lining CROTCH LINING

Cut this lining in self.

Measure up 6".

Serge the top edge unless you're working in nylon spandex or a fabric that will not fray or unravel, in which case the edge should be left raw to reduce read-through.

Square in from the leg opening. Make the top edge of the lining curved so that it is less likely to show a ridge on the right side of the garment.

Leave the top of the lining loose, attaching the lining only at the sides and crotch.

Bikini Tops ADDING A BUST DART TO THE TOP SLOPER

Use the one-way-stretch top sieper to create the bikini top sieper. Because there is nothing stretching the bikini top, it wi ll act almost like a woven fabric; in fact, these slopers may be used with some woven fabrics. You must create a dart in the bikini sieper because when knit fabrics stretch, they tend to do so evenly, with even tension; this means they will tend to flatten the bust shape. The dart can be disguised or hidden later, but must be included in the sieper. The basic top slopers do not have any bust darts built in, so you will need to modify them to create a bust dart in FULL LINING

Cut a full lining in nude tricot lining.

order to draft the bikini top.


CUP DIFFERENCE CHART

.... l>l

.(.

You must first determine the cup size by selecting the measurements from this chart. BUST

--

u

p p E

R

c H E

s T

inches 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 112 38 39 '1> 41 43

30 '12 'I> -'1> - 1 '12 -2 '12 - 3 '1• - 4 '1• - 36 '12 - 37 112 - 40 - 42 112 -45 '1>

31 112 1 112 '12 -'12 - 1 112 - 2 112 - 3 '12 - 36'12 - 36'12 - 39 -41 112 - 44 '1>

-

3 2 112 2 112 1 112 '12 -'12 - 1 '12 - 2 11> 36 '1> 35 '12 38 40 112 43 '1>

33'12 3'1> 2 112 1 112

'I• - '12 - 1 '1> - 36 112 - 34 112 -37 - 39 '12 - 42'12

()

34 112 4 '12 3 112 2 112 1 112 '12 - '12 - 3 6 '12 - 33'12 - 36 - 38'12 - 41 '12

35 '12 5 '12 4 '12 3 112 2'12 1 112

'I• -36 '12 -32 112 - 35 -37 112 -40 112

37 7 6 5 4 3 2 -36'1> - 31 - 33 '12 - 36 - 39

38'12 8 '12 7 '1> 6 112 5'12 4'1> 3'12 -36 112 -29 112 - 32 -34 '1> - 37 112

40 10 9 8 7 6 5 -36'12 -28 - 30 112 - 33 - 36

41 '12 11 '12 10 112 9'12 8'12 7'12 6 '12 - 36'12 - 26 112 - 29 - 31 112 -34'12

43 112 13 '1> 12 '12 11'12 10 '12 9'12 8'12 - 36'12 -24'12 - 27 - 29'12 - 32'12

J:

45 '12 15 112 14 '12 13 112 12 '12 11 112 10 112 - 36'12 - 22'12 - 25 - 27'12 - 30'12

l>

"1l -i

m

-"' :0

OJ

0

c

-<

(/)

c =i Cfl

....

m

0

i!:0 c

(/)

CUP SIZES

l>

z c

Cup size is determined by the difference between the bust measurement and the upper bust measurement. This chart is demonstrated with different bust measurements. Difference

Up to 1/ 2" AA

Cup size

'12'' to 1 '1• A

1 112 to 2 114 B

2 '12 to 3 114

3 '12 to 4 114 D

c

4 '12 to 5 114

5'12 to 6 114

DD/ E

DDD/ F

6 '12 to 7'!. G

7'12 to 8 114 H

8 '12 to 9 114 I

.....

:E

:E

Cup Size

8

10

12

14

16

Small

Medium

Large

B

'/.

%

1 1% 1% 2 '1•

%

7

% 1 1%

% % 1 314

'I•

D

% % 1 1le 1%

DOle

z

c

(/)

This chart shows the amount needed to increase at the side seam by slashing and spreading.

G H I

l>

0 ' "1l m () m

CUP AMOUNTS

c

0 z m

1 1% 1%

2

314 1 '1e 1 112

1 1% 1%

.....

~.

1e 1 '14 1 7/e 2 1/e

i:(/)

c =i (/)


BODYSUITS, LEOTARD

S , AND ONE

-AND TWo

- PIECE SW IM SUITS

CHAPTER 13

413

I I=

~ span

TOP BLOCK

TOP BLOCK FRONT

FRONT MED (date)

MED (date)

First, find the apex of the bust. Draw a guideline parallel to the center that is half the bust span away from the center front.

Draw a guideline the front half f t,hpara11 el to the center front but away from , o e bust span amount.

~

.9!

j

r,

guideline

bust

span

TOP BLOCK

TOP BLOCK

FRONT

FRONT

MED

MED

(date)

(date)

Measure the bust level to wherever it lands on the guideline; this is your apex.

Stable Moderate Stretchy Super-stretch Rib Bust level

Extra Extra Small

Extra Small

Small

6'12 6% 6% 6'1• 5 7/s

6% 6'/2 6 1/2 6% 6 10

6 7/s 6 3/• 6 3/ • 6% 6'1• 10 '/•

9'1s

From the apex, draw a guideline that extends from the center front to the side seam. This is the line that you will slash and spread to add extra length for the bust.

Medium

7 '1• 7'1• 7

6'1• 6'/2 10 '/2

Extra Large

Extra Extra Large

7 112 7 '12 7%

7 7/s 7 7/s

8% 6%

7'1• 67/s 103/ •

7'1s

Large

771• 7'1• 11

6'1• 7 7/a 7 112

11 '/•


414

NO TWO-PIECE SWIMSUITS CHAPTER 13

BODYSUITS, LEOTARDS, AND ONE- A

CUP CORRECTIONS It seems as 1f you could just draw 1n the bust dart as IS, but there IS a slight problem that must be corrected.

Note how the fabric in the illustration creates ripples pulling from the armhole. This happens with any large bust, whether a dart is added or not, and must be corrected. Place another small dart, this one in the armhole. Note: This dart will be pivoted into the bust dart and will not show.

ARMHOLE DART Remove th1s amount as an armhole dart to correct the fit noted prev1ously Cup Size

B

c

D DD DDD/F G H I

2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

4

0 0 0

'12 'I> 'h

'I> '12

6

0

Iâ&#x20AC;˘ 'I> 1 1 1 1 1

8

10

12

14

16

18

20

0

0

'12 1 1'1> 1 112 1 '12 1'12 1 '12

1 '12 2 2 2 2 2

0 1 2

0 1 '1â&#x20AC;˘

0 1 112 3 3'12 3'12

0 1% 3'12 4 4 4 4 4

0 2 4 4 112 4'12 4'12 4 112 4 112

>;.

Once you have determined the amount of the armhole dart, square a guideline from the armhole to the apex.

2'12 2'12 2'12 2'12 2'12

2'12 3 3 3 3 3

3'12 3 112 3'12

Slash and overla th8 the bust dart P . armhole dart as illustrated; note hoW gets slightly larger, also.


BODYSUITS, LEOTARDS AND , ONE- AND TWO - PIECE SWIMSUITS

Draw in the bust dart as illustrated.

The bust dart cannot be used as is and must be shortened; otherwise it w ill go right to the apex. Shorten the dart by 1" up to 1'12"; when pivoting the dart to another position to bring the apex back to the original point, remember to shorten the dart again.

Stable Moderate Stretchy Super Rib

CHAPTER 13

415

To determine the bust radius, use the chart below. From the original bust apex, draw in the bust radius, using a compass.

Extra Extra Small

Extra Small

Small

Medium

Large

Extra Large

Extra Extra Large

2 1/s 2 '/s 2 1 7/s 1 '/•

2 '/• 2'/• 2 1/s 2 1 7/s

2'1s 2'1s 2'/• 2 1/s 1 7/s

2 '/, 2 112 2 '1s 2'/• 2

2% 2% 2 112 2 3/s 2 1/s

2'/• 2'!. 2% 2'12 2'/•

2 7/s 2 7/s 2'!. 2% 2%

Slash and spread to move the dart to the hem area.

. m the bust apex to the shoulder/neck interDraw a I1ne 1ro section as illustrated. Measure up the line 1".


416

CHAPTER 13

BODYSUITS, LEOTARDS AND ONE- AND TWO-PIECE SWIMSUITS

Lone your ruler up woth the 1" pomt and swong ot unto! ot touches. tangent to the curve of the bust radous.

Repeat for the other side.

lJ

/

Usong an L-square ruler, draw a lone that IS square to the other guodeline and touches the curve of the bust radous

Trace out the cup, and separate.

In order to use the cup with the dart, you must shorten the dart lengths; otherwise, the cup becomes too pointy.

Repeat for the other side.

BIKINI WITH DART AND BINDING This bikini top is finished with self-binding, using the cellarette machine.

In order to use the cup with the dart, you m ust shOrten the dart lengths; otherwise, the cup becomes too pointy.


ElODYSUITS , LEOTARDS AND ' ONE- AND T WO-PIECE SWIMSUITS

CHAPTER 13

417

0

no seam allowances for binding 1/2"

No seam allowances are required for this style; %" finished binding doesn 't need any.

~he gap between the cups should be a minimu~ of 'li' for reasts that are very close together, and a maximum of 1" for breasts that are far apart.

BIKINI WITH EASE AND BINDING This bikini converts the dart into ease under the bust.

BIKINI WITH A CHANNEL FOR A DRAWSTRING This b'k' 1 ¡ 1n1

top is lined with a spaghetti

~t~ap inserted between the self and the 1010

g to create the tie at the top.

:~~bottom of the bikini has a casing 1 a string inserted inside.

Mark a notch 1" away from the dart legs, one on each side.

Remove the dart and blend a curve. Label the pattern to indicate that you must gather between the two notches to a final measurement of 2".

Fill in the dart by drawing a smoothcurved line along the bottom of the

Add '/.'' seam allowances to the sides to sew to the lining and a '12" seam allowance to the lower edge

draft.

for a casing.


418

CHAPTER 13

BODYSUITS, LEOTARDS, AND ONE- AND

TWO-PIECE SWIMSUITS

BIKINI BOTTOMS AND PANTIES

You may expect that you can just cut off the leotard to create a panty bottom, but remember, the length measurements were reduced to accommodate the lengthwise stretch of the fabric. Once the leotard IS cut, It Will spring back and be lower down on the body. You must create a separate panty sloper that does not have as much lengthWISe reduct1on.

~~

FOUR-WAY-STRETCH REDUCTIONS Note that the crotch depth is multiplied x o.g5, a reduction of 5%, because the four-way-stretch reduction of 10% is too much, and a 0% reduction, as in one-way-stretch, is too little and will cause the crotch to sag.

Multiply by 2 3 4

Waist Hip Crotch depth

X 0.90 X 0.90 X 0.95

...-.... ....... .-., -;

This draft IS for the bikini panty bottom, and should be used with four-waystretch fabrics.

Extra Extra Small

Extra Small

Small

Medium

0

2

6

10

21 1/o 31 9

22 32 9 1/s

23 32 7/s 9 1/4

23 7/o 33 3/. 9%

Large

Extra Large

Extra Extra Large

14

18

20

24% 34 % g 1/2

26 1/s 36 9%

27 1/2 37% 9%

I iiii

Iiiii


BODYSUITS, LEOTARDS, AND ONE- AND TWO-PIECE SWIMSUITS

419

CHAPTER 13

1

waist

I

--

~

5

~

~

!

...... ........ .......

....

Draw intersecting lines, and measure the waist amount and the crotch depth amount.

Square a line at the crotch depth, mark wit h the hip measurement, and square a guideline up to the waist.

Extra Extra Small

Extra Small

21 1/a

22 5'12 9 1/a 32 8 9 1/a 3

Waist Quarter of waist Crotch depth Hip Quarter of hip Crotch depth Thirds

5 '1• 9 31 7% 9 3

Small

Medium

23 5%

23 7/a 6 9% 33% 8'12 9% 3 '/a

9'1• 32 7/a

8'1• 9'1• 3 1/a

-r-

Divide the guideline into thirds.

Large

24 3/4

6'1• 9'12 34% 8% 9 '12 3 '/a

Extra Large

Extra Extra Large

26 1/a 6'12 9% 36 9 9% 3'/•

27'12 6 7/a 9% 37% 9% 9% 3'/•

iliiriil

liiilili

li;;itl i;;ll

1

I

........ ~

I

-~

~ ~

,,

_l

waist

waist

I

fj;;ill

1111111

1

waist

-

I

I

I

I I

I

-

I

divide hip into 4

the variform c urve at the waist , b le ndng as Well as possible to the lower rnark on the outseam.

1

Div ide t he upper hip line into four eq ua l sect ions .

I I

_l _l

I

I!+""

'

11/2"

-

-

Draw in the hip c urve by p laci ng #4 of

I

,' '

+-

Mark a guideline 1'12'' from the center front.


420

CHAPTER 13

BODYSUITS, LEOTARDS , AND ONE- AND

I

W31SI

1 318'

parallel

- , '

TWO-PIECE SWIMSUITS

waist

:'1,

â&#x20AC;˘-+

'

-/

-

Find the bias in the intersection and measure down 1%".

Draw guideline parallel to the side seam that lines up with the mark on the horizontal guideline.

Measure up the guideline 'h" + 'h" + W.

-. THE BIKINI BACK Draw in the front leg, using connection points 1-2-3-4-5, with a smooth and continuous line.

waist

Find the midd le of the line and mea-

sure out 1/2" + Y2"

1 + 12".

For higher, sexier front legs, use the higher points. Students and new designers often mistakenly raise the side seam s to create a higher leg opening. This will cause the back of the swimsuit to collapse into the buttocks.

waist

Draw a smooth curve for each of the marks, as illustrated.

Trace out the front draft and connect the crotc h poi nt to the hip point with a straight line.

waist

Label the lines as Small, Medium, and Large.


BODYSUITS, LEOTARDS , AND ONE- AND TW

2â&#x20AC;¢ 0-PIECE SWIMSUITS

CHAPTER 13

4

blend) ,

...

1/4" bik.nl

bottom sloper M

.,.

..........-.... ....-.. .........

...... ........... ....... ........... ....... ... ~ ~

BLENDING AND TRUEING

Line up the crotch seams across from each other and blend the curve. You will have to increase the size of the crotch by '!<'' to make the c urve smooth enough for elastic.

Place the front and back beside each other and walk the side seams down from the waist.

Label the slopers as illustrated.

Blend a smooth and continuous sexy line .

1 112"

j_ _________

1112"

cut elastic 2" smaller

11/2"

_.l.__ _________ j.

1/4"

1/4" ,--------

D~ ,.,

..-- ~ "'

114.

.

..

.

'.

4'"

:

' '-

3/8"

3/8"

BIKINI WITH LOWERED WAIST

This draft illustrates a lowered waist bikini bottom .

Lower the waist by as much as your design requires, illustrated here at

1'12''.

Add the necessary seam allowances .

t


422

CHAPTER 13

BODYSUITS, LEOTARDS, AND ONE- AND T

WO-PIECE SWIMSUITS

· ------~ s·

Create a bikini bottom that ties on the side by following these drafting instructions:

D'

Lower the waist, and extend the side seams 5" on all sides to create the tie extension.

-

3/4"

3/4"

You can leave the ends squared or you can blend them into curves.

1 1/2"

BRAZILIAN HIGH-CUT SWIMSUIT

This swimsuit has a very high leg, with a very low front and back.

Square a line from the new side seam, the 1'12'' mark . Do not concern yourself with the length yet; just make it long enough to reach the front that you will draw in next. Measure down the front 3". Measure down the back 4".

Measure in at the waist 3/4''.

Take your ruler, line it up at the waist, and mark wherever 1'12'' lands on the side seam.

Blend a smooth-curved waist. Connect the front to the curved portion of the front leg opening. Connect the back with a straight line.

Find the center of the back line and measure '12" + '12".


BODYSUITS, LEOTARDS, AND ONE- AND

j....

TWO-PIECE SWIMSUITS

423

CHA PTER 13

.,.,

--....-... .........-.. ...... .......... .......... ............. ......... PT ...... ..., .... ., .... ..,.

Draw a curved back leg.

Trace the new bikini bottom .

STRING BIKINI

A bikini that ties at the side is easy to draft.

Create the Brazilian high-cut swimsuit bottom draft as shown previously. Simply cut the pattern lower and finish the waist edges with binding ties.

11/2"

-,,._ '----- ---- --~,---~- '- ,.

THONG, G-STRING, AND T-BACKS

For the thong, T-back , or G-string, lower the waist 1 '12''.

Draw a line parallel to the new waist, 1" lower.

1/4"

lllilllif.

:~::-,

....

' shape

1/4"

~-~e ends of the sides, using the smallest wa1st. .

The thong has a Center strap that measures y,• . total, . each s1de, and uses 2 x y,· elastic on each Side Shape the center back as required .

y,• for


CHAPTER 13

BODYSUITS, LEOTARDS, AND ONE- AND TWO-PIECE SWIMSUITS

Test ~ou~ Knowledge of t he Matenal m This Chapter 1. When should you use the leotard/bodysuit

sloper? 2. How should you true the sleeve to ensure that it fits the armhole? 3. Should the sleeve fit exactly into the armhole? 4. What is the difference between the front and back of the sleeve? 5. How long should you cut the elastic for a leg opening on a bodysuit?

6. How much smaller than the leg opening should the binding be? 7. How much smaller than the leg opening should the banding be? s. How much should you take in the bodysuit at the side seam when creating a sleeveless style? 9. How should you create a style with shirring on one side seam?

._ .-

----....... .-.--.. -....... ....... ~


~--cc~HPA0PTC~~----PTER 14

Fitting and Corrections About This Chapter This chapter teaches how to improve the fit a nd style of simto turn an ordinary garment ¡ t ple garments, and how 'tt' . m oa "designer" garment. F 1 mg IS part of the patternmaking process, and a pat~ern cannot be completed until after the fitting and all correctiOns have been done to the final patterns.

Fitting and Corrections When doing the fitting on a customer, put the garment on right side out. When doing the fitting on a dress-form, you may put the garment on inside out, which makes it a little easier to pin the seam allowances. However, a customer might think you don't know what you're doing if you make them put on garments inside out. When the fitting is complete, remove the pinned garment from the dress form, or model, and trace all of the corrections to the sloper if it is a sloper fitting, or onto the pattern if it is a pattern fitting. Knit garments must always be removed from the dress-form in order to trace out the corrections, since the fabric is stretched out when on the body and needs to relax for you to get an accurate correction. Label the corrections in a contrast marker and note the fabrication. Many companies require all first corrections to ~e done in red marker with second correction in blue, etc. This way everybody in the company can tell where each garment is m the fitting and patternmaking process, and whether a pattern is ready for production.

425


426

CHAPTER 14

FITTING AND CORRECTIONS

Re-Shaping the Waist bust

wa1st

The waist is the most common correction made to garments. Everybody wants a smaller waist, and demand garments that fit correctly in this area. However, do not make the garment too tight in this area or it becomes uncomfortable, and the customer will begin to think she has gained weight. Too tight garments wear out a lot faster than loosely fit garments. Pin out the excess fabric at the hip and reshape the pattern accordingly. Do not make the hips too tight or the fabric will strain and wear out prematurely.

Hip Fittings and Corrections The hip of pants and skirts often needs to be fitted and corrected. You must pin out the excess fabric and reshape the hip. Don't make the pants too tight, because even though the fabric_ will stretch ~o accommodate a larger body, th1s causes stram on the fabric and causes it to wear out quickly.

-.. f ill

iilll

iiilll

.... •

•• ••


FITl'ING AND CORRECTIONS

Re¡Shaping The Legs Ptn out equal amount on both sides of th 1 nd correct the pattern as indicated. e egs 11 Make sure to focus on the areas aro und the knee. to ensure that they fit accurately.

Shoulder is Too Big The shoulder seam should line up exactly with the shoulder. If the shoulder is too big, remove the excess from the shoulder of the pattern. If the shoulder is too small, add extra to the shoulder of the pattern.

CHAPTER 14

427


4:.'~

'HAPTER 14

FITTING AND CORRECTIONS

1_L (--;.,.

wa1st

Shoulder is Too Small If the shoulder is too tight. you will get horizontal lines pulling across the upper chest area. To correct shoulders that are too narrow, extend the shoulder and armhole outwards increasing the size.

t ) I

~bd-

Crotch is Too High If the model h as a longer waist, it may be necessary to lower the crotch. Lower the crotch as indicated and make corrections to the blocks.

.

Iii

ii Iii

..

II

•• knee

• • I

I

ankle

I

I I

• • I


FITTING

AND COR RECTIONS

CHAPTER 14

crotch is Too Shallow ·lt·tpe the crotch as indicated. ..

He~

bust

Crotch is Too Low If the model has a short waist, it may be necessary to raise the crotch. Reshape as necessary.

ankle

429


'HAf'lER 14

FITTING AND CORRECTIONS

Thigh is Too Wide Pin out excess fabr ic nnd r e move from patte rn accordi n gly. Keep both s ides even a nd equa l.

Reshaping the Sleeve Since most dress-forms don't have any arms, the sleeves must be fit on a live model. Pin out the excess fabric and correct the pattern a nd blocks as illustrat ed.

.

Iii Iii Iii

•• •• •• I I I I

••


FITTING AND CORRECTIONS

correcting the Ease of a Sleeve The_.

sleeve ease should be minimum â&#x20AC;¢/," and Jii11 ,/;". Slash and spread to correct.

Jlla-"JU

Reshaping the Neckline Reshape the neckline to ensure that it follows the neck accurately.

ankle

CHAPTER 14

431


CHAPTER 14

FITTING AND CORRECTIONS

Collar is Too Big The colla r s hould fit s nugly around the neck. If t he colla r is too big, pin out the excess a mount a nd correctRemove the pattern ha lf.the a mount of the excess from each end of the colla r patLern at the center back. . . The neck edge will stretch to fit the ~ecklme, wh1le the folded edge of the colla r wi ll fit snugly against the neck. Because the neck of the customer I S w1der at t he base than at the top, using the exact neckline measure me nt from the draft will create a colla r that gapes at the top, and sta nds away from the neck. You can leave the draft as is, or make a slight correction to t he fit. To correct this pinch out the extra a mount, measure it and remove that a~1ount from the pattern as illustrated. ' Or simply remove approximately '/." from each end of the

318"

318

COLLAR CUT 1

colla r pattern . The top of the collar is now sma ller and w ill fit snug to the

l

foldhne

3/8"

3/8" 3/8"

3/8"

318"

3/8"

3/8" 3/8"

TURTLE NECK T-5HIRT

BACK MEO

TURTlE NECK

3/8"

FRONT

MEO

on fold

on told

l

T.SHIRT

-CUT1

CUT I -

3/8"

1¡ hem allowance

1

neckline. The edge that attach es to the sweat er is also smaller and must be stretched to fit into the neckline of the sweater. Add seam allowances and label the pa ttern as in Chapter 9. The seam of the collar should line up with either the center back or the neckline, or preferably the l eft shoulder seam (always the left), where it is less noticeable.


FITTI NG AN

0 CORRECTIONS

CHAPTER 14

433

TUR11.E NECK TOP FRONT MED

CUT 1 on fold

Other Collar Options If your fabric does not stretch enough for the collar to pull on over the head, then you h ave several options to correct the collar. Use whichever method your collar demands. Use a matching rib fabric, so that the rib fabric will stretch enough to fit over the head.

Use the same pattern piece, exactly as is, but it may not be snug enough. Or reduce the width of the pallern by 10 percent for a snug fit.

COLLAR CUT1

TURTLE NECK

WITH ZIPPER

BACK MED CIJT1

an fold

Insert a zipper or other closure in the collar at the neckline can be open ed to take fue gar rnent on and off the body.

~ fu

TURTLE NECK

WITH ZIPPER

FRONT MED

CUT1

an fold

ld be a total of 10" with 4" The zipper sho~l and 6" inserted into the inserted into the co ar, front of the top.


~4

l'HAI'T(R 14

FITTING AND CORRECTI ONS

TURTLE NECK TOP BACK

Enlarge the collar and ease it into the neckline for very small a mounts only to avoid causing the collar seam to pucker. This will also depend on your fabric, as some knits, especially shiny ones, will visually exaggerate even the slightest amount of ease.

TURTLE NECK TOP FRONT

MED

MED

CUT 1 on fold

CUT1 on fold

Enlarge the width of the collar, a maximum of '/i' on each side, for a maximum of 1" wider. If you make the collar a ny wider, it may not ease into the neckline without showing gathers and puckers.

create a new collar to fit the neckline

TURTLE NECK TOP FRONT MED CUT1 on fold

En~arge the neckline wider and the collar accordmgly; however the collar will sit slightl away from the neck. Y

Widen the collar as much as necessary however, having a shoulder seam of at least 1/2:, to prevent the top from sliding off the shoulders of the customer is recommended. Note that in order to maintain a smooth ~urve on the back neckline, it may be necessary o lower the back neckline, but remember to keep the center back neckline square. Create a new collar to fit the new widened neckline.

-.-. -•.. •. •

•• •• •

••• •• •


FiTTiNG AND CORRECTiONS CHA PTER 14

An extremely wide neckline can be created to make the top very easy to get on a nd off, or as a design feature.

435

Widen the collar as much as necessa ry, however, having a shoulder sea m of at lC'asl 1 ; • to prevent the top from sliding off the shouldC'rs of the customer is recommended. Note that, in order to maintain a smooth curve on the back a nd the front nccklinC', it may be necessary to lower the necklines, but remember to keep the center back a nd CC'nter front necklines square. Create a new collar to fit the new widened neckline.

Slightly Enlarging the Bust ·' bust is too la rge for the garment, Sometimes the customer s ft tt ut the bust. Therefore, It and stretch fabrics t~nd to a h::~ount of fabric in the bust be necessar y to w crease t may A" area. front of the garment up to I • . Increase the bus~ a rea of the be necessary to add a dart to For large bust srzes, rt may the sloper.

ankle


FITTING AND CORRECTION S

st Dart to the Top Adding a Bu Sloper

.

11 they try to do so e venly, w1th

E ven though knit fa brics strethc ' will try to flatten the bust · 11 mean s t ey d even out t h e tens10n, · even tension, wI11c use shape. To build in a bust sh apde a nt h ave any bust darts built · leper s o no bust da rts. The basics d ·r them for larger bust s izes . in so you will need to mo J y

Darts . . . . based on a 36" chest. This chart shows the difference m cup s1zes d calculate the differences. You will n eed to measure your model's bust and upper c1lest an E t L Medium Large x ra arge Extra Small Small Bra Upper chest Difference

2

4

6

8

10

12

14

16

18

20

36 1/z 36 Y2

37 36

38 36 2

39 36 3

40

41

42

43

36

36

36

36

44 36

45 36

4

5

6

7

8

9

1

Bust Dart Amount This ch a r t illust rates how large your bust dart should be at the side seams. Cup Size

8

10

12

14

16

8

3116 •;16

% 1 3/16 1 3/ 16 1 9/16

•;16 1 1% 1%

13/16 1 3/16 1 3/4 1 15/16

1 1% 1% 2 3/16

c

D DO

1 1%

~ span

TOP BLOCK FRONT

MED (date)

Stable Moderate Stretchy Super-stretch Rib

b n

-=

The first step is to find the apex of the bust. Draw a guideline parallel to the center that is half the bust span away from the center front.

TOP BLOCK FRONT

MED (date)

Extra Extra Small

Extra Small

6% 6% 6% 6\4

6% 6Y2 6Y2 6% 6

5 1/a

Small

Medium

Large

6% 6% 6% 6% 6Y.,

7 1/a 7 1/a 7 6 1/a 6Y2

7 Y2 7% 7% 7% 6 1/a

-.. .--.... ..------

Extra Large

Extra Extra Large

7 1/a

8% 6% 8 1/s 7% 71h

7% 7 1/a

7% 7'A


FITTING AN 0 CORRECTIONS

Extra ExtraSmall

Extra Small

CHAPTER 14

437

Small

~=====~9~~~路======~1~0====~~~====M ~i~u~m~___:L10% a~r~g~e----~E~xt~r;a __~~E~xt~r;a~~ avsii~------------------------~10 ~路~n~____~21ed~o路~n~====~~====~L~a~ tr~11a~L~a~ rg=e=== 11rg=e===E=x= % :..----

il"'f

::an

TOP BLOCK FRONT

MED (date)

Measure the bust level to wherever it land on the guideline. This is your apex. s

At first 路t the bust d 1 seems as if you could just draw in Problem thart. . another s llght, . t However, there 1s a must also be corrected.

TOP BLOCK FRONT

MEO (date)

From the apex draw "d . tends from th ' a gm ehne that exTh. . e center front to the side seam I S I S the line that you will slash ~nd spread to add extra length for the bus. t

Note how the fabric in the illustration ereales ripples pulling from the armhole. This happens with any large bust, whether a dart is added or not, so you must place a small dart in t,he armhole also. This dart will be pivoted into t,he busL dart and will not show.


438

CHAPTER 14

FITTING AND CORRECTIONS

Armhole Dart C up Size

B

c

D DD

8

0

0

0

0

0

3 /16

s;,&

>;,

%

9 /16

13/16

9 /16

13/16

Once you have determined the amount of the armhole dart, square a guideline from the armhole to the apex.

16

14

12

10

9/ 16

'h

1 3/ 16

1 1>;,.

1%

Slash and overlap the armhole dart as illustrated. Note how the bust dart gets slightly larger also.

Draw in the bust dart as illustrated.

..

• ••

..

'ii

Iii I Ci I I

,-''radiu~~ ..

c

• The bust dart cannot be used as is; it must be shortened, other wise it will go right to the apex. Shorten the dart by 1", up to 1'/2'. When pivoting the da rt to another position, bring the apex back t o the original point and then shorten the dart again.

Stable Moderate Stretchy Super Rib

Extra Extra Small

Extra Small

2 1/s 2 1/s 2

2'/.o 2'/.o 2 1/s 2

1'1s 1%

1'1s

To illust rate the bust radius, use the following ch art.

Small

Medium

large

2% 2% 2V.. 2'/a F/a

2Y2 2Y2 2% 2 '/.o 2

2% 2% 2% 2% 2 1/a

Extra large

Extra Extra Large

2~

2 7/a 2 7/a

2~

2% 21h 2'A

2~

2% 2 '/t

'

'


F I TTING AN

D CORRECTIONS

ott1er Tricks and Corrections to Make a Better Fitting Garment most studentsf think of knit garments , they 1.n1 · store, but thisag1ne 1e1P,_ $10 garments rom h a department · · • . lsn t n ys the case. Althoug kmt garments are 1·n sJ"'a .11 expens1ve a d ·Jy available, you can sti create a versatile a d _n d1 rea ·gner · t h e fit, changing thn attractJVe garmen t bY re fi nmg . deSJ choosmg . qua J"t c b · e amount of 1 y 1a ncs, a 1termg the neck!" . ease, ., fi t 1ne, s11ap1ng gure ypes, and adding custom deta1ls . 1.t to Jlatter d1f1erent . ·s section w1l1 s11ow you some subtle pattern-mak· . · 11 . . mg tncks Tl a more. fiattenng designer-pnced . . and techmques to . create . ~'ent The pnnc1p1e examp1e m th1s section c gar•" · . an be used for anY stretch proJect. \VheJl

special Fabrics For Knit Garments Search for fine quality fabrics with unusual or special £ _ tures. It's also possible ~o use knit fabrics not always thou;~t of as knit garment fabncs, such as stretch velour, panne velvet, wool jersey, cashmere, and fleece. For fall garments use slightly heavier knits, like wool jersey, velour, sweater knits, or thermal cottons. It's not a lways necessa ry to find matching or coordinated rib knits-quality garments can be made using self-fabrics: • Bound necklines • Mock necks • Turtlenecks

• Bound V-necks • Self-facing • Hoods

Fit Corrections If possible, measure a favorite garment, noting the width, amount of ease, length, and any other key measurements. By comparing this garment with your slopers, it's easy to judge and correct any changes. Creating the perfect garment takes a little time and patience, but is well worth the extra effort.

Ease In order to make the new garment fit like the original, you must calculate and allow for the same amount of ease. Calculate the ease intended for the garment style by measuring the pattern from side seam to side seam across the front a nd back at. the bust and hip and then compare the total measurem~~t Withyour persona l' measurements. For examp1e, 1'f the ongl· na! ga rment measures 34" around, an d 1'f your bust measurement i 3 , h ·g·nal gannent s 2 , then you can conclude that t e on 1 . d has 2" of ease. So, if your sloper measures 33 , , you w1!1hnee tou · · 1 T en yo add 1" 0 f ease to create the same fit as the ongma · ld must decide if that a mount of ease should be in the shou er

CHAPTER 14

439


440

CHAPTER 14

FITTING AND CORRECTIONS

re the s houlder s of the r ea M eas U h · to th e sloper. If the s oulder a rea or the undera rm a · orig ina l garme nt, an d compa re th en a ll of th e eas e must b e 1n measu1·ements a re the sa me_. . w ill div ide the a m ount of des1g ne1 the unde•·m·m . Often a h lde r a nd the u nde r ar m , but ocease equa lly bet ween the sd ou t o only t h e sh oulde r a r ea, or casiona lly may n eed to ad ease only to t he unde rarm a re a.

CB

Body Ease

CF

CB

CF

Shoulder Ease

Slash and spread at the underarm to add more ease around the body. Remember to correct your sleeve so that it also fits into the new armhole. Since the ease is placed at the sides of the body, it will not change the fit of the shoulder area or the neck area.

Slash and spread at the underarm to add more ease at the shoulder. Since the ease is placed at the shoulder area, it will not cha nge the silhouette of the garment.

114" 114"

............ CB

CF CF

......._. 1/4"

Back Shoulder Ease Determine your best shoulder width by measuring f: . garments and adjusting the pattern. avorIte For older or larger and stoop-shouldered bodies 'II get a better fit across the shoulders if the back-sh ~~ seam is. '/<" longer than the front. The extra '1." of th~ ba~~ seam Will be eased onto the front seam when sergin t th front shoulder, and will be held in place with twill t g 0 e Slash and spread to create '1." ease in the back sh~~~der.

Or: .

Slash and spread to create t>ase

~n the hack shoulder seam without

me · b reasmg the overall size of the ody.


FITTING A

NO CORRECTION S

441

CHAPTER 14

blend

CB

gather to front

CF

Shoulder ~ ~~~

measurement

CB CF

Draw a straight line, from neck point to armhole point, to correct the new shoulder.

cateLgaabtehl the shoulder with dash lines to indienng.

Shoulder Placement Balance the front a nd back armhole depths. Then check your slopers. If the front and back armhole depths are exactly the same, you may want to rebalance the armhole by adding extra to the back, and trimming from the front a nd moving the shoulder seam line forward as illustrated. This correction will prevent garments with lots of ease from falling backward off of the shoulders. Remove '//' to 1", or even as much as 2", from the front shoulder. Add that amount to the back shoulder.

CB

CF

Correcting the Neckline It may be a good idea to raise the back neck, especially for stoop-shouldered and older customers. Raise the back by as much as '/z'' and lower the front by the same amount, so t~e neck circumference or neck measurement, doesn't change-It is just redistributed. Raise the back neck for a more flattering fit, and for stooped shoulders. the front neck as illustrated, so the overall ne~kbrmeLower . . l redistn. . measurement does not change but IS s1mp Y uted. Work in small increments to find the most flattenng neck width for your face and body.

'-¡¡: \114" CB

CF


4~

CHAPTER 14

FITTING AND CORRECTIONS

Define a Flattering Neckline . . a If -vour customer's There are many optwns for neck- "'-h apm.,. t f a Y-neck. o face is verv round . you may prefer the contras k · ht be a good · vou have - an angu 1ar "tace. a round nee mJg or 1f h the dress . k k the dept on t to a v as chmce. If vou want a \'-nee · mar d form as )o,~- vou wish the neckline to be. an conYer shown in th~ next illustration.

.. j 2' CB

CB CF

.... j

3'

CF

CB

'~\ -~

6'

CF

This is a !'lightly lowered v-neck.

This is a more lowered v-neck.

Shape a v-neck to soften the straight line by sh aping the line in by '!.''.

• •• .. (ill

iii tl

Test Your Knowledge of the M aterial in This Chapter 1. Should you place the garment on inside out

when doing a fitting? 2. Can you measure the corrections while on the model to transfer the corrections to t he patterns? 3. What happens if you make a garment too tight? 4. How can you fit the sleeves of a garment? 5. What should you do if the collar is too big?

• •Ill

II

6. What can you do if th e fabric does not stretch enough for t h e collar to pull on over the head? 7. How can you slightly increase t h e bust a rea? 8. How can you correct the pattern for older or larger a nd stoop shoulder ed bodies?

II

•II

••

IIi till

.

Ill


Appendix: Costing Sh

eets

About This Appendix This appendix will introduce the reader to th . . osting and how to fill out and complete a coste pnlnclples of c b h h . mg s 1eet for a er t at t e most Important pa t 0 f garment. Remem · t "th · a gar t h e pnce ag; WI out 1t, the garment 1·sr thl Jll ent is t. wor ess . . t . There JS no pom.lllnl cr ea In!~ a garment if it is not for sale. This appendix WI a so exp am pattern cards • u1e1·ruses and· how to fill them out correctly. •

....... ....... ............... ....... ................. ...... ....... ~

~

~

~ ~

.... ~

Total Cost and Key Factor Pricing Total cost pricing works well if the customer would pay whatever you charge for the garment; while this is ideal, it is not very often the case. Competition and the marketplace demand that you sell your garment for a lower price than is calculated by total cost pricing. In this case, use the key factor pricingsubtract the cost of goods from the actual selling price and divide by labor hours. This will result in a "Key" number. Understand that it may appear better to sell the garment at the highest possible price, but in fact, it is not. For example, you might sell one skirt for $10.00, or you can sell 10 skirts for $7.00. If it costs you $5.00 to make the skirts, then you will have made $5.00 profit on the single skirt and $20.00 profit on the 10 skirts. Key factor pricing helps you determine whether a style is worth including in your line or if it is profitable .

Costing Sheets The following explains how to fill out a costing sheet. Note that the costing sheet may differ for the company you eventuf ally work for. . to ob tam · the "Cost o Complete the following informatwn Goods." Name: Include the name of the person who filled out the cost sheet. Style #: Every style should have a number 1"dent"1f Ying it from other garments in the collection.

443


·H-1

.\I'I'I!NOIX:

COSTI NG SHEETS

" ld l"st the sizes thai the garment wil l Size Range: .ou s11ou 1 eventually be graded to. Description: Wt·ite a short descripti?n of ~he garment; for example, a flee ce skirt with elastlc casmg~ a smglc back patch pocket, a nd side seam slits. Tlus JS tmportant m case someone outside the company uses any of your patterns and won't undet·stand your numbering system.

Fabric: List the name of the fabric that will be used to create this garment. For example, fleece, 12 oz interlock, etc. Supplier: List where you purchased the fabric used to sa~ple the garment. Later, if you find a cheaper or better verswn of the sa me fabric for production, then you can update the pattern card. Content: List the fiber content, including the blends of fabric used for the ga rment. Remember that by law you must include this information on the label of every garment. Care: List any laundry or dry cleaning instruction required for this garment. New designers often believe that they can simply label the garments "Dry Clean Only"; however, there are many stores that refuse to buy "Dry Clean Only" garments, because many customers r efuse to buy those garments. Self: List the total yardage needed to make a single garment . Next, list the price and multiply to find the total cost of self. Contrast: Contrast is any secondary color or fabric required to make the garment. Lining: List any linings needed. Fusing: List any fusing needed. Zipper: Lis~ the length of the zipper, the size of the teeth , and whether 1t 1s separating or closed. Sh/pads: List any shoulder pads required.

Ot~er: L!st any other notions needed to creat e the garment mclu_dmg elastic,_ buttons, and buttonholes if sent out.

D;

~ot 1lst th~e_a~, sm ce t~at will be accounted for in the overt~a cdo~ts, lt l S nearly Impossible to calculate how much rea l S used for each garment.

Total: Add · together to get the "Cost of . all, of the m at enals M a t ena1s. Cutting· List the c t f . try ~any garm~st o cuttmg; remember that, in the indusof~ single garme:ts;~l~ ~ut hund~eds at a time, so the cost who is cutting h d d e a lot higher than for someone un re s at a time. If you are working for a

--.... ... -: ~

:•

= •..


.

APPEND I X:

r)!<' nanufacturer, s1mply taketh .1• ·:td "rret1 a fcosttt'estimate. Oftentimese garment to the cutt , contract · . er 1 the cost o cu mg m t11e estimate ors Include . , so 1.t may not I d th be necessary t o recor 1s cost. It is alwa a ways to ]lave a thorough record of the lab ys a good idea d 't 'll or costs wh h ' a contractor an 1 w1 also help you man en 1ring making duplicate samples. age time when .

sewing: List the time it takes to sew a co 1 Remember that you 'd will sew a lot slow:Pthete ~arment. r an m m t factories, so as a gm e, charge the garment $l O/h1.os estimate. for an Finishing: List an~ screen printing, embellishment tion, .button sewmg, or other finishes that tl'le garment ' decorareqmres. pressing: List the time c it takes to . give the garment a fi nal · so it press. Some manutacturers w1ll send out the pressmg is important to k now t h e costs. Total: Add all of the construction costs together to get the "Total Cost of Labor." Subtotal: Add the "Total Cost of Material" and the "Total Cost of Labor" together for the subtotal. Overhead: Overhead is any other cost s required to create the garment: thread, twill t ape, electricity, rent, etc. To find an accurate "Overhead Bu rden ," you need to add up all of the expenses your company will incur over the next year, and divide th em by th e total labor hours the operators have available. You will end up charging an amount to each garment based on the time it takes to construct . So if the overhead burden is $1/hr and the garment takes two hours, you will add $2/garment. Faulting: Faulting is u sed to account and allow for any damaged goods and processes. For example, if your fabric arrives with a large hole in the center, or a cone of~hread arrives tan gled up, then it should be accounted for m the cost of the garment. The industry standard may be anywhere from 2%-3% of the subtotal. Total Cost : To find the total costs, add the cost of materials, cost of labor overhead and faulting.

lt'1 l the total cost , ' . Y 2'/2 Th'l S 1·s To find the wholesale pnce, mu . 1 . lP by Wholesale: times 2. Some manufa cturer s m ay mu tip Y · the price at which you will sell the garment to stores. Ret · · 1 th total cost times ml: To find the r et ail price, n:ultip Y 1 e This is the price two. Some r et ailer s m ay multiply 2 Vz.customers. . ld by t 0 the at wh1ch the garment will be so

COSTING SHEETs

445


446

Af'PEN OIX;

COS TIN G SHEETS

TOTAL"C~O~sllT~PRR~IC~I~N~G'==================is~ty~te~#==~------------------------------Name

s,ze

~

Fabnc

Content

@

Yards Yards Yards Yards Inches Pair

Self Contrast

un.ng Fusmg Zipper

Sh/pads

0 0

Cuttrng

Hours Hours Hours Hours

Pressmg

Cost of labor Subtotal

$

@ @ @ @

~d~~'cost of Materrals Sewmg FtniShing

Descnptoon Supplier Care $ $ $

$

$ $ @10.00/hr @10.00/hr @10.00/hr @10.00/hr

Total labor+ total materials . Overhead burden per construction hour ($1.00 per hour of labor) 3% ol subtotal

Overhead

Fault1ng Total cost Wholesale Retail

Subtotal + overhead + faulting

$

$ $ $

2 x total cost 2

$

x wholesale

$

KEY FACTOR PRICING Name Size Fabric Content

Self Contrast Ltnmg

Fusrng Zopper Sh/pads Other Total

Yards

@

Yards

$ Yards Yards Inches Pair

Cost of Materrals

@

St yle # Description Supplier Care

$

$ @

$

$

@ @ @ @

$ $ $ $

$ $ $

$

$

Cutt~ng

Sewtng F•n•shmg Pressrng Total Market Prrce Profit Key Factor

$

Cost of Labor

Hours Hours H ours Hours

@10.00/ hr @10.00/ hr @10.00/ hr @10.00/ hr

Los t the pnce that garment m ust stay at to remain competitive. Subtract the cost of labor lrom the market price. Divide the profit by the total labor hours.

$ $ $ $ $


APPENDIX:

COSTIN

pattern Card

G SHEETS

447

card'' or "pattern must" 1· ·\ ..,,.,ttcrn ,... . ll<' cut Jn order to make a gar ment aIsts . d a ll the Pieces tl r,·erV n should be Includ . 1at must · pattern. It helps the cutter, who [!!nguage as you,. understand wh·Ich p· may not s Peak tl ed with sists the manag·er bY ensur· Ieces to cut out It 1e1 same . productiOn k supphes to ma e up the garments. I mag· m g that the re ·are a so as· 100 garment sand there were n ot enoughm e· If your rtactory enough pJete them-aII the operators w ld . Zippers in t cut out to do till the zippers arrived. sit around to a style that you already have a ll the supphes t tt b.e better for? to fi rstnothmg cut out

w~:ld~'ust

~~t~ c~m­

PATTERN CARD Date

Style# oescnption Season Fabnc care FRONT VIEW Piece# 1

Sizes Content

Garment p1ece

BACK VIEW Self

Contrast

Trim/elastic

Fuse

2 3 4

5

6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 Spec Sheet Name Style# Description Season Fabric Care

Irate the

Date Sizes Content

measure~

a different stretch ratio and each garment must be drafted by ut11izmg the stretch ratiO accord•ngly. The charts below ollus· Use the measurements exactly as recorded 5 inches stretches to 6 114" 18% to 25% stretch Reduce by O% Multiply your across Reduce by 2% measurements by .98 26% to 50% stretch Multiply your across 1 5 inches stretches to 7 12'' measurements by .97 Reduce by3% 51% to 75% stretch Multiply your across 5 inches stretches to a%" measurements by .95 Reduce bY 5% Multiply your across 76% to 1OO% stretch measurements by .90 Reduce by tO% 5 inches stretches to 10" Multiply your Over 1OO% stretch measurements by .90 Reduce bY 5% 5 inches stretches over 10" In both doractlons across tOO% stretch Reduce bY tO% In both directions 5 Inches stretches to tO" lengthwise in both directions

ents needed to draft slopers and eventually patterns for each fabnc. Stable knits Moderate knits Stretchy knits Super stretch R1b four-way·stretch

--

Med

f\ny fatmc th at stretches less than 18% should be treated as woven stretch.


448

APPEND I X:

COSTING SH EETS

MISSES STABLE KNIT REDUCTIONS

any

Zero percent smaller in crossw1se d~rect•on w1 thout reductjons m le~gth~•~e t':~~on. · Use these measurements when draftmg slopers for fabncs that s tretch rom 0 N ote: All fracllons are rounded off to the nearest 'lath for ease o f draft1ng.

Extra Multiply Your Across Measurements By

1 Bust 2 Wa1st 3 Hip 4 Crotch depth 5 Wa•st to knee 6 Waist to ankle 7 Ankle 8 Knee 9 Front crotch 10 Back crotch 11 Crotch angle 12 Nape to waist 13 Back neck 14 Back neck rise 15 Shoulder length 16 Across back 17 Sleeve length 18 Shoulder p1tch 19 Bicep 20 Wnst 21 Neck 22 Bust span 23 Bust level

Extra Small

30 11.! 22 112 33 11.! g 7;a 20 11s 38 1/4

1 for stable knits 1 for stable kn1ts 1 for stable knits No reduction No reduction No reduction 1 for stable knits 1 for stable kn1ts 1 for stable knits 1 for stable knits 1 for stable kmts No reduction No reduction 1 for stable knits No reductron 1 for stable knits No reduction 1 for stable knit s 1 for stable knits 1 for stable knits 1 for stable knits 1 for stable knits No reduction

Extra Small

Small

31 'n

33 112

25 11.!

1

23 12 1 34 12

1

36 12

10 1/4 23 1/4

10 23 38 112

39 8 13 718

7 3/4

7 5/a 13 1/s

13% 1

2

2 /a 7 2 /a

2 3/4

1 15 % 2 318 314 5

1 15 % 2 318 314 1 5 /a 7 22'1. 1 318 10 318 5 112

6 718

22% 1% 10 5 11s 14 318 6 112

14 112

6% 10

7

9 1•

Medium

L a rg e

35 112

38 112

27 112 1 38 12 1 10 12 1

23 12 39 112

a31/4

1 /4

14 /8 2 3/8

1 1/a

1 1/4

2

3

16 118 1 2 12

'Is

5 112 7 1/4

23 1 112 11 'Is 6 1/4 14'1. 7

6 1•

10 114

41 12

44 /2

10'1. 23 314 40

11 24 40 112 8 3/4 15% 2 314 3 3/4 1% 17% 2%

8 112

14 71s

2 5/8

3 112

16% 2 112

17 118 2 112

'Is

1 1/4

'Is

23 14

6 112 73/4 23 112

11 718 7 15 7 10 112

12% 7 314 15 114 7 112 10 314

1

7 12 1

1 112

41 1/7

33 112

3 1/4

6

Extra

Large

30 112 1

1

1 12

Extra

Extra Large

1

'Is

45 112

37 112

48 112 11 1; ..

2 4 1/4

41 9

15 7/e 3 4 1

1 12

18 118 2'1.

'Is

7 8 23 314 1% 13 31e 8 11.! 15 112

7 112 8 31s 24 1% 14 11e

11

11 1/4

7 71•

g';..

15 314 8 318

MISSES MODERATE REDUCTIONS Two percent smaller in c rosswise direction wi thout any reductions in lengthwise direction. Use these measurements when drafting slopers for fabrics that stretch from 25% to 50%.

Mulliply your across measurements by .98, 2% smaller, except for the shoulder measurement, since the final garment will have twill tape to stab1lize the seam and prevent 1t from stretching.

Multiply Your Across Measurements By

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23

Bust Wa1st

Hip Crotch deplh Waist to knee

Wa1st lo ankle Ankle Knee

Front crotch Back crotch Crotch angle Nape to waist

Back neck Back neck rise

Shoulder length Across back Sleeve length Shoulder pilch Bicep Wrist

Neck Bust span Bust level

X .98 X .98 X .98 No reduction No reduction No reduction

X .98 X .98 X .98 X .98 X .98 No reduction No reduction

X .98 No reduction

X .98 No reduction

X .98 X .98 X .98 X .98 X .98 Noreduclion

Extra Extra Small

Extra Small

0

2

7

30 1• 23 33 314 10 23 38 112 7% 13 118 2 118 7

2 1• 1 15 % 2% 314 5 118 7 22 314 1% 10 11s 5% 14 118 6%

9%

31 718 24 34 314 10 118 23 118 38 %

7"1. 13% 2 118 7

2 1• 1 15 718 2% 314 5 114 7 22 71s 1% 10 112 5 314 14 114 1 6 12 10

Small

Medium

6 33 314

10

26 36 314 10 318 23 31s 39 114 8 13 718 2 114 3 1 11s 16 31s 2 112

·'Ia 5% 7 113 23 11s 1 1 12 11 114 6 112 14 112

6'1.

10 11s

36 114 28% 39 114 10% 23% 39 314 8 114 14 31s 2 112 3 114 1 114 16 718 2 112

'Ia

6 114 7% 23% 1 112 12 7 114 14 314 7 11s 10%

Large

Extra L arge

Extra Extra L arge

14

18

22

39 114 31% 42 118

42 % 34 314 45 % 11 11s 24 118 40 314

44 5/s 36 31• 47 1h 11 11• 24 11• 41 8 718 15 4te 3 4 1 'h 18 1/s 2%

10 11o 23 718

40 114 8 112 14 71o 2% 3 112 1% 17 % 2'1s

'Is 6 314

7 11a 23% 1'h 12 31• 8 15

7'n

10%

a%

15 31s 2 7/s 3% 1% 17 7/s 2%

'Is

'>a

7 11• 8

a%

13 1.-'.1

24 1 51! 7 13 ·•

23 118 1 5;a 8 3 /4 15 1/c 8 11

7 112

9

153/a

a' ..

11

.....


450

Af'f"ENDIX:

COSTING SHEETS

MISSES RIB REDUCTIONS

lengthw se d"ect1on 1

1

d!fectro~ Wltho~~ra;:b~~c~u~a~:~r~tch 100% and over

Ten percent smaller'" crosswise Use these measurements when draftmg sop~~

aller except for the shoulder measure

Mulllply your across measurements by 90, 1 sm stabiliZe the seam and prevent It from stretchmg

~=:~:

Multiply Your Across Measurements By

1

2 4

H1p Crotch depth

5 6

Wa1st to knee Waist to ankle

3

7

Ankle

8

Knee Front crotch Back crotch

9

10 11

12 13 14

15 16 17 18

19 20 21 22 23

Bust Wa1st

Crotch angle Nape to wa1st Back neck

Back neck nse Shoulder length Across back Sleeve length Shoulder p1tch

X X X

Neck Bust span Bust level

.90 .90 .90

.90 X .90 X .90 X .90 X .90

0

2

28 31s 21 11s 31 10 23 38 112

29 1/4

2%

No reduction X .90

.90

7

7

22 71a

9318 5 13 6 9

9% 1

1 1/4

X .90 .90 .90

X X X X

1

15 718 2 318 314 5 11•

22 31•

No reduct1on

.90

.90 No reduction

33 1• 10 31a 23 318 39 1/4 7 31s 12 314 2 11s 2 718

2%

1

15% 2% 31• 5 11s

No reduct1on

23'1a 3

7

2

1 1 /4

5 14 13 11a 6 9 'Is

Medium

6 31

12 11• 2

12

No reduct1on

Sma ll

22 32 10 'Ia 23 11s 38 31•

7

X

Brcep Wnst

Ex tra Small

Small

No reduction No reduction No reductron

X

ment Since the final garment Will have twill tape to ,

'

1

16 318 1 2 12

'Is 5'1. 7 31s 23 118 1 318 3 10 1s 6 13 31a 1

6 1• 9 31a

Extra

Extra Extra

L arge 14

Large 18

Large 20

36 28%

39 'Ia 32 41 7/a 1 11 1a 24 'Ia 40 31• 8 14 2%

41

10 33 11• 26 'Is 36 10% 23% 39'1. 7 112 13 'Ia 2'1• 3 1 1/a 16 71• 1 2 12 7 /a 1 6 /4 7% 23 3/a 1% 11

38 3/4

10 7/s 7

23 1a

40 1/4 7 3/4

13 %

2% 3 ';, 1

1 /•

17% 1 2 12

'Is

6%

6 3/4 7 7/a 23% 1% 11'1. 7%

9%

6 7/a 9 3/4

13 112 6 112

13 3/4

3 112 1

1 /•

17 7/a 2% 7 /a 7 1/• 8 23 7/a 1 112 12% 8 14 1 7 1• 10

33 31• 43% 11 11• 24 11• 41

8

'I•

14 2'1.

3% 1% 18 11a 2% 7 /a 7 112

8 31a 24 1 11z 12 3/4 3

8 1a

14 11a

7 112 10 11a

Ten percent smaller in crosswise direction and 10% smaller in the lengthwise direction. Use these measurements when drafting slopers for fabrics that stretch 100% in both directions. Multiply your measurements by .90, 10% smaller, in both directions except for the shoulder measurement, since the final garment will have twill tape to stabilize the seam and prevent it from stretching. Note that lour-way-stretch has memory, and will return to the original shape and twill tape is not necessary to stabilize the shoulders.

1

2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

12 13 14

15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23

Bust Waist Hip Crotch depth Waist to knee Waist to ankle Ankle Knee Front crotch Back crotch Crotch angle Nape to waist Back neck Back neck rise Shoulder length Across back Sleeve length Shoulder pitch Bicep Wnst Neck Bust span Bust level

X .90 .90 .90 X .90 X .90 X .90 X .90 X .90 X .90 X .90 X .90 X .90 X X

No reduction No reduction No reduction No reduction No reduction No reduction X .90

X .90 No reduction X .90

X .90

Extra Extra Small

Extra Small

Small

Medium

0

2

6

10

28 3/e 21 1/a 31

9 20 3/ , 34% 7 12

2

7

2 /a 1 14 2 3/e

3;, 1

5 /e 7

22 3/4 3 1 /a

93/a 5 1

14 /z

6 9

~

~

MISSES FOUR-WAY-STRETCH REDUCTIONS

Multiply Your Across Measurements By

..•.

29 1/4 22 32 1 9 1a 20 7/e 34 7/e

7 12 1/4 2 3 1 14 1/4 2 3/e

3;,

s';, 7 7 22 /a 1 1/z

9% s%

14%

6 1 9 /a

30 1/a

23 32 7/e 9';, 22 37

1

7 14 12 112

2 3 1

15 3/e 2 112 'Ia 5 112

72;.

23 1 1 12 10

s% 3

14 ;. 1

6 /a 93/4

31

23 7/a 33 3/4 93/a 22 1/4 37 1/ 4

7%

12'1. 2 1/a 3 1/a 1 15 1/z

2 112 7

/a 5 3;,

7% 1

23 /a 1 1 12 10 3/a 6

14 7/a 6 1/c

9'/a

Large

Extra La rge

E xtra Extra L arg e

14

18

20

32 24 3/4 34 %

33 /• 1 26 /a

1

34 51a

9 112

22 3/e

37 112

7%

13 2 1/ a

3 1/ 4

1

15'1. 2 112 1

/a

6 7 4 ia

23'/• 1

1 7 10 3/c 6 ';•

15 63/e 10

36

9%

27 112 37 318 95/8

22 112 37'/. 7 112

22 5Je 38

13 /a

13 3 /a

1

2

1 /4

3 \·~

1''a 16 1 2 12 'Ia

6 11-4

7'te

7 518

23 a 3 17

1' '8 16 1 • 2 17

'·'a

6'.-2 7 31.

23 318

23 112

11 6•~e

1.'8 11 3/a 7 15 2/a

1 17

15 6 112 10

631• 10 1/c

.• iii

•• •• •• ••


APPENDIX : COSTiNG SHEETS

JUNI -f('O

t smaller 1n c rossw1se d•rection wi thout any reductions ·

1 percen eosurements when draft1ng s lopers for fabncs that stre't" he~gthw1se d•rection.

Use tnese nl

..... -.... ..= = = ~ t

2

3 4

5 6 7

B

9 tO tt t2 t3 t4 t5 t6 t7

tB t9 20 2t 22 23

451

OR SIZ~STABLE KNIT REDUCTIONS

Bust warst HiP crotch depth Waist to knee wa1st to ankle Ankle Knee

Front crotch

Back crotch Crotch angle Nape to wa•st Back neck sack neck nse Shoulder length Across back Sleeve length Shoulder pitch Bicep Wnst Neck Bust span Bust level

rom 0% to 25% and ex acuy as recorded Without an

c

Multiply Your Across

E xtr a Extra

Extr a

Measurements By

Small

Small

Y reductions.

Small

X1 X1 X1 No reduc tion No reduction No reduction

X1 X1 X1 X1 X1 No reduction No reduction X1 No reduction X1 No reduction X1 X1 X1 X1 X1 No red~ction

Medium

l arge

0

2

6

32 25 35 10 114

32 25 35 10 114

10

34 27 37 10 112 23 11a 3a 31• a%

14

36 29 39 t0 314 23 3/a 39 114

2 3/a 3 1 1 /e 15 7/a 2%

t4% 2 112

39 32 42 11 23% 39 314 9 3/e 15 11e 2%

7

22 1a

38 11•

22 71a

7 71a

3a 'l•

13%

13 % 2 '1• 3 1 15 3/a 2% 3;,

2 1/4

3 1 15 31a 2 3/a 314

4 71a

7 1/4 23 31a 1 3/a 10 3/4 5 7/a 14 % 6% 9 7/a

7 71a

4 71a

7 ';, 23 3/a 1 3/a 10 3/ 4 5 7/a 14 % 6% 9 7/a

14 1/e

7

/a

5 7% 23%

! 'Ia 1

11 12 6 1/a 15 1/4 6 7/a 10 31a

7

a 1a 3 114

1 114 16% 2 '1. 1 5 3/a 8 23 7/a 1 ';, 12 114 6 3/a 15 7/a 7 10 7/a

3 112 1 3/e

16 7/a 7

2 /e

1

Extra Large

18 42 35 45 ,, 1/4

23 7/a 40 1/ot 9 7/e 15';, 2 7/e 3 3/4

1 3/e

t7 '1a 3 112 1

5'1a a% 24 1/a 1 ';, 13 6 '1a 16 112 7 3/a 11 3/a

Extra Extra Large

1 /8 5 7/8

a% 24 3/a 1 5/a 13 3/4 6 7/a t7

?'Ia 7

11 /a

20 43 1; , 36 112 46 112

=

11 3/e

24 40 112 to ';, 15 7/e

2 7/e

3 7/e 4 1 /e 17 s/e

0 0 6

a';,

24 1h t 'la 14 1/8

7

17'1. 3 7

/4

12 1/a

JUNIOR SIZE MODERATE REDUCTIONS

Two percent smaller in crosswise direction without any reductions in lengthwise direction. Use these measurements when drafting slopers for fabrics that stretch from 25% to 50% . Multiply your across measurements by .98, 2% smaller, except for the shoulder measurement, since the final garment will have twill tape to stabihze the seam and prevent it from stretching.

Multiply Your Across Measurements By

4 5 6 7 8 9 10 t1 12 t3 14 ts 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23

Bust Waist Hip Crotch depth Waist to knee Waist to ankle Ankle Knee Front crotch Back crotch Crotch angle Nape to waist Back neck Back neck rise Shoulder length Across back Sleeve length Shoulder pitch B1cep Wrist Neck Bust span Bust level

X .98 X .98 X .98 No reduction No reduction No reduction X .98 X .98 X .98 X .98 X .98 No reduction No reduction X .98 No reduction X .98 No reduction X .98 X .98 X .98 X .98 X .98 No reduction

Extra Extra Large

Extra Extra Small

Extra Small

Small

Medium

0

2

6

10

14

18

20

31 'Ia 23 112 34 11• 10 22 31a 1 37 12 7% 13 31a 2 11a

32 3/s

33% 25 112 36 11• 10 1/ 4 22% 38

34 1/• 1

35 1/• 27 '19 38 1/ 4 10 112 22 7/a

36 3/• 283/a 39 3/•

38 219 29 7/a 41 1/a to 'Ia 23 1/a 39 9 1/• 14 7/a 2'1s 3 '1. t 21a 16 112 2 31•

2 71a 1 11a 15 11a 2%

3;.

4% 7 1/s

22 71a 1% 10 1/2 5 314 1 14 1• 6 3/a 9%

24 112 35 1/4 10 1/ a 22 112 37% 8 13% 2 114 3 1 1la 15% 1 2 12 7

1a 4 7/a 7 1/4 23

t 'ls 7

10 /a

5 71•

14% 6 112 9 71a

a';, 7

13 /a 1 2 1• 3 1 1/a 15 112 2 51a 7

1a

5 7'1s 23 1/a 1 31• 11 1/• 6 14 718 6% 1 10 1a

26 12 37 1/ 4 10 3/a 3 22 /• 38 1/4 8 112 14 1/a 2 3/a 3 11a 1 1/a 15 31• 2'1s

Large

3a'la 8 3/• 14 % 2 3/a 3 1/a 1 1/• 16 2 51a

7

7

5 1/a

5 /• 7% 23 % 1 '1'2 12 1 6 1• 15 418 7 6 19 10'19

1a

?'Ia 23 '14 1 3/a 11 'Ia 1 6 /a 15 114 6 31• 10%

/a

1

Extra Large

10%

23 38 31• 9 14 '1s 1 2 12 3 1/• 1 1/• 16 1/ • 2 3/4 7 /a 5 '1s 8 23'/s 1 1h 12 3/s 6% 15 31• 7 10 718

'Ia 5'1'2

a'l• 23'1s 1'1'2 3 12 1• 6 1h 16 118 7 119 1 11 19


'4-5-

Af''f'ENOIX.

COSTING SHEETS

JUNIOR SIZE STRETCHY KNIT REDUCTIONS

d~rectoon

n reductions in lengthwise direction. Tluee pe.-cent smaller on crosswose wothout ab Y that stretch from 50% to 75%. h fnal garment will have twoll tape to stab!Use these measurements when drafting slopers for fa ncs t to the shoulder measurement. Since t e ' Multiply your across measurements by .97, 3% smaller, excep r l•ze the seam and prevent 11 from stretch•ng.

Multiply Your Across Measurements By

Extra Extra Small

Extra Small

0 1 2 3 4

5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23

Bust

<

Wa•st

X

Hop Crotch depth

X

Warst to knee Wa1st to ankle

No reduction No reduct1on No reduction

Ankle Knee Front crotch Back crotch Crotch angle Nape to wa•st

Back neck Back neck nse Shoulder length Across back Sleeve length Shoulder potch 81cep Wnst Neck Bust span Bust level

.97 .97 .97

X 97 X 97 ~ .97 < .97 < .97 No reduct1on No reduCtion

' .97 No reduct•on X

.97

No reduct1on

X 97 .97 .97 ' 97 ~ .97 )(

X

No reductiOn

35 10 22 1/4

37

37 114

1 18

13 1/4

2'A! 2 3 '4 1 15 2 1/4 ";, 4 3/4 7 22%

, ,/4

10% 5 3/4 14 1/s 6 318 gO;.

6

2

31 23 114 34 10 22 114 7'

Small

33 26 1/4 35 7/o 10 112 23 1/s 38'1. 8 11s 13 314 2 1/ 4 3 1 1/s 15 7/s 2% 'Is 5 7% 23% 1% 11 1/s 6 14 3/4 6% 10

32

24 1 4

7 'Is 1 13 1'2 1 2 1• 3 1 15 1/s 2 112 7 1s 4 3/4 1 7 18 22 314 1 318 10 3/4 7 5 1• 14% 1 6 12 9 7/s

M edium

10 35 28 11• 7 37 1• 10'1. 23% 39 114 a% 14 118 2 318 3 1/s 1 1/4 16% 2 3/4 1 s% 8 23 716 1 112 11 7/s 1 6 18 15% 6 7/s 10 112

L arge

E x tra Large

14

18

7

40 31• 34 43 5;. 11 114 23 716 40 1/4 9% 15 118 2 314 3% 1% 17 3/s 3 112 1 118 5 71s 8 3/4 24 318 1 112 13 31s 6% 16 112 7 318 11 112

37 1• 31 40 314 11 23% 39% 9 14% 1 2 12 3% 1'/4 16 718 2 7/s 1 s% 8% 24 1/s 1 112 12% 6 3/s 16 7 11

F1ve percent smaller •n crossw1se d1rect1on without any reductions in lengthwise direction. Use these measurements when draftong slopers for fabncs that stretch from 75% to 100%. Multoply your across measurements by .95, 5% smaller, except for the shoulder measurement, since the final garment will have twill tape to stabi~am and prevent 11 from stretch1ng.

1 2 3 4 5 6

7 8 9 10

11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23

Bust Waost Hop Crotch depth Waost to knee Waost to ankle Ankle Knee Front crotch Back crotch Crotch angle Nape to waist Back neck Back neck rose Shoulder length Across back Sleeve length Shoulder pitch Bocep Wrist Neck Bust span Bust level

X X X

.95 .95 .95

No reduct1on No reduction No reduction X X X X X

.95 .95 .95 .95 .95

No reduction No reduction X

.95

No reduction X

.95

No reduction X X X X X

.95 .95 .95 .95 .95

No reduction

Ex tra Extra Small

0 30 31a 22 314 33 1/4 g3;, 21 3/4 36 3/s 7 112 13 1 2 /s 2'1. 1 14 % 2 1/4

3;.

4 5;. 6 7/s 22 1/4 1 31s 10 114 s% 13 7/s 6 '1• 9 316

'•

• ~

I

i

• ~

JUNIOR SIZE SUPER- STRETCH REDUCTIONS

Multiply Your Across Measurements By

'

Extra Small

2 31 31s 23 3/4 34 % 9 7/s 21 7/s 36% 7 3/4 13 1/s 1 2 /s 7 2 /s 1 1 /s 14 7/s 2% 7 /s 4% 7 22 3/ s 1% 105;. 53;. 14 1/s 6 3/s 9%

Small

M e dium

large

Extra large

6

10

14

18

32 1/4 25% 35 1/s 10 112 23 1/s 38 3/4 8 13 3/s 2 1/4 3 1 15 7/s 2% 'Is 5 7% 23 % 1 3/s 11 5 7/s 14 3/s 6 112 9 7/a

34 1/4 27 1/2 37 10 3; . 23% 39 '!. 8 3/s 13 7/s 2 3/s 3 1 1/s 16% 23;, 1 5 3/a 8 23 7/a 1% 11 % 6 15 6 3;. 10%

37 30% 39 7/a 11 23% 39 3/4 9 14% 1 2 /2 3% 1'/4 16'1a 2 7/s 1 5% 8% 24 1/a 1 '1'2 12% 6 1/4 15 5/a 7 1o•;,

39 7/s 33 1/4 42 3/4 11 1/• 23 7/s 40 1/4 9% 14 7/s 2% 3% 1 3/s 17 % 3'1'2 1 1/a 5 7/a 8 3/• 24% 1 11'2 13

6 '1'2 16 1/ • 7'1e 11 tl•

Ei t I I

I

•••

.

II

•..•


~

§

--

APPENDIX: COSTING S HEETS

JUNI

453

OR SIZE RIB REDUCTIONS

-mailer 1n crosswJse d~rectton without any reductions In 1 . Ttfl pt'rc;en~:asurements when drafting slopers fo r fabncs that stretc~"~ci~~lse directton. 0 use these across measurements by .90. 10% smaller. except forth h and over. 5 ~tulttPIY )'our eam and prevent it from stretching. e oulder measurement . 5 stJbthZB the s . ~nee the f•nal garment Will have tw II t

--

I 2 3 4 5 6 7 6 9 tO 11 12 13 14 t5 16 17 16 t9 20 21 22 23

Bust Wa1st Hip crotch depth wa 1st to knee wa1st to ankle Ankle Knee Front crotch Back crotch crotch angle Nape to waist Back neck Back neck rise Shoulder length Across back Sleeve length Shoulder pitch Bicep WriSt Neck Bust span Bust level

Multiply Your Across M easurements By

X .90 X .90 X .90 No reduction No reduction No reduction X .90 X .90 X .90 X .90 X .90 No reduction No reduction X .90 No reduction X .90 No reduction X .90 X .90 X .90 X .90 X .90 No reduction

Ex tra Extra Small 0 28 314 21 112 31 112 9 114 1 20 12 1 34 12 7 1 12 14 2 3 2 14 1 13 314 1 2 14 314 4 114 1 6 12 21 1 114 9314 1 5 14 13 6 9

1

Extra Sma ll

2 29 314 22 112 1 32 12

9'14

20 314 34 314 1

7 /4

12 112 2

2'1.

1 14 2 114 314 4 '12 6'1. 21 114 1 114 10 5'12 13 112 6 9

Small 6 30 5;, 24 114 33 114 10 112 23 11a 38 314 1

7 12

12 314 2 2314 1 15 718 2%

'Ia 5 7% 23% 1 2h 3 10 18 5'12 13% 1 6 1a 9 31a

Medium 10 32 31a 26 118 35 11a 10 3/4 233;. 39 114 8 13 11a 2 1/4 3 1 16 318 2 314 1 5'1. 8 23 718 1 113 11 5314 14 1/4

6 318 9314

l arge

ape to

Extra

l arge

14

18

35 1/a 28 3/4 37 314 It 23% 39 314

37 3; ..

a';,

13 518 2 31a 3 1/a 1

1 /e

16 718 2 7/a 1 5'1a 8 113 24 118 1'1. 11 314 6 14 314 6% 10 114

31 112 40 112 11

1 /4

23 718

40 1/4 7 8 18 14 2 112 3 318 1 /4

1

17% 3 112 1

1 /6

s'l• 3 8

/4

24 318 13h 12 318 6 218 15'18 6314 10314

JUNIOR SIZE FOUR-WAY-STRETCH REDUCTIONS Ten percent smaller in crossw1se direction and 10% smaller in the lengthwise direction. Use these measurements when drafting slopers for fabrics that stretch 100% in both directions. . . . Multiply your measurements by .90, 10% smaller, in both directions except for the shoulder measurement, s1nce the !mal garment w111 have twill tape to stabilize the seam and prevent it from stretching.

Multiply Your Across Mea s urements By

1

2 3

4

5 6

7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16

17 18 19 20 21 22 23

Bust Waist Hip Crotch depth Waist to knee Waist to ankle Ankle Knee Front crotch Back c rotch Crotch angle Nape to waist Back neck Back neck rise Shoulder length Across back Sleeve length Shoulder pitch B1cep Wrist Neck Bust span Bust level

X .90 X .90 X.90 X .90 X .90 X .90 X .90 X .90 X .90 X .90 X .90 X .90 No reduction No reduction No reduc tion No reduction No reduc tio n No red uction X .90 X .90 No reduction X .90 X .90

Extra Extra Small

Extra Small

Small

0

2

6

10

3 28 14 1 21 12 1 31 12 9 114 20 112 1 34 12 7 1 12 1• 2 3 2 1• 1 3 13 14 2 114 3/4 4 1/4 6 112 21 1 1 14 9 3/4 5 1/4 13 6 9

29 314 1 22 12 32 112 9 1/4

3 29 1• 23 318

30% 1 24 14 33 114 10 22 7 36 18 7 112 12 314 2 3 1 118 15 2%

20'1.

3 34 1• 1 7 /4 1 12 12 2 2 31• 1 14 1 2 /4

a;, 1

4 12 6 '1. 1 21 /4 1 1 /4 10

s'l2 1

13 12 6 9

32 % 7 9 /8 7 21 1• 36% 7% 1 12 12 2 3 1 1 1e 7 14 18 2% 1

1a

5 7 318 1 23 h 1% 10

s% 7

14 /a 6 9%

Medium

1

1a

5 7% 23% 1 1 12 10 %

s'n 1

15 /4 6'/a

g';.

large

Extra l arge

14

18

1 31 12 25 114 1 34 14 10 22 37 7 314 13 2 118 1 3 18 1 114 3 15 18 2 314

32'18 1 26 18 1 35 18 10 '/a 22 1/4 37 114 8 13 'Ia 2 114 1 3 1•

'Ia

5 114 7 314 3 23 1• 1 1h 3 10 14 5'/a 1 15 h 6 1/4 10

1 1/c 1

15 h 2 314 1 5 3/a 8 7 23 18 1 1h 11 531• 7 15 /a 6%

10%


454

APPENDIX :

COSTING SHEETS

PETITE SIZE STABLE KNITS REDUCTIONS

.

.

.

. . . . ut an reductions in lengthwise direction. . . . Zero percent smaller in crossw,se d~rect,on With~ f ~rics that stretch from O% to 25%. . e the final garment Will have t will tape to stabiUse these measurements when draftmg slopers ~~ ra except for the shoulder measurement, SlnC Multiply your across measurements by 1_. 0% sma e , E lize the seam and prevent it from stretchmg. xtra Multiply Your Ac r oss M easurem ents By

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23

Bust Waist Hip Crotch depth Waist to knee Waist to ankle Ankle Knee Front crotch Back crotch Crotch angle Nape to waist Back neck Back neck rise Shoulder length Across back Sleeve length Shoulder pitch Bicep Wrist Neck Bust span Bust level

X X X

1 1 1

No reduction No reduction No reduction X X X X X

1 1 1 1 1

No reduction No reduction X

1

No reduction X

1

No reduction X X X X X

1 1 1 1 1

No reduction

E xtra Sma ll

sma ll

M e dium

2

6

10

31 112 23 112 34 112 10 1/e 21 % 36 % 6% 13 1/ 4 1 2 /e 2 7/e 1 14 3/4 2 1/4 3/4

4 7/e 7 1/ 4 21 1/4 1 3; . 3 10 /s 5 3/4 13'1. 6% 9 3/e

1

1

33 12 1 25 12 36 112 10% 21 % 37 1/ e 6 7/e 13 3/4 2 1/ 4 3 1 1/e 15 1/ 4 2%

35 12 1 27 12 1 38 12 10% 7 21 /e 37% 7 1/s 14 1/ 4 2% 3 1/ 4 1 1/ 4 15 3/4 2%

3;.

•;.

5 7% 21 112 1% 11 1/ e 6 112 14 6 7/ e 9%

5 /s 7 3/4 21% 1% 7 11 /e 1 7 /4 14 1/4 7 7 9 /e

1

L arge

Large

14

18

1

38 12 30 112 41 112 10 7/e 22 1/e 38 1/e 7% 14 3/ 4 2% 3 112 1% 16 1/4 2% 3/4 3

5 /e

8 22 1'12 12% 8 14 112 7% 10 1/e

1

41 /z 1 33 12 1 44 /z 1 11 / e 22 % 38 % 7% 15 1/4 2 3/4

3 3/ 4

1% 16 3/ 4 2 112 7/8 5%

8 1/ 4 1 22 / • 1 112 13 3/e 8 3/ 4 14 3/ 4 7 7/e 10 3/e

PETITE SIZE MODERATE REDUCTIONS Two percent smaller in crosswise direction without any reductions in lengthwise direction. Use these measurements when drafting slopers for fabrics that stretch from 25% to 50%. Multiply your across measurements by .98, 2% smaller, except for the shoulder measurement, since t he final garment will have twill tape to stabilize the seam and prevent it from stretching. Multiply Your Ac ross M easure m ents By

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23

Bust Waist Hip Crotch depth Waist to knee Waist to ankle Ankle Knee Front crotch Back crotch Crotch angle Nape to waist Back neck Back neck rise Shoulder length Across back Sleeve length Shoulder pitch Bicep Wrist Neck Bust span Bust level

X X X

.98 .98 .98

No reduction No reduction No reduction X

.98

X .98 X X X

.98 .98 .98

No reduction No reduction X

.98

No reduction X

.98

No reduction X X X X X

.98 .98 .98 .98 .98

No reduc tion

Ex tra Small

Small

Medium

Large

Extra Large

2

6

10

14

18

7

32 7/e 25 35 3/4 10% 21% 37 1/e 6 3/4 13% 2 1/4 3 1 1/e 1 15 /4 2%

34% 27 37% 10% 21 7/e 37% 7 14 2 1/4 3 1/e 1 1/e 15 3/ 4 2%

37 % 7 29 /e 40% 7 10 /e 22 1/e 38 'Is 7% 14 3/a 2 112 3% 1 1/4 1 16 /• 23/a 3;. 5% 8 22 1 12 3/a 7 '1a 14 114 1 7 1• 10

40% 7 32 11! 43% 1 11 /1! 22% 38% 7 112 14 711! 23/• 3% 1311! 16 3/• 2 112 711! s% 1 8 1• 1 22 /• 1 'h 13 'Ia 5 & /a 14 111 7 5"

30 /e 23 33 3/4 10 'Is 21 % 36% 6 112 13 2 1/e 7 2 /e 1 14 3/4

2'1.

3/4

4 7/e 7 1/4 21 ';. 1% 10 'Is 5% 13 '12 a%

9

1 /•

3/4

3;.

5 7 112 21 112 1% 11 e% 13 31• a%

5'1e 7% 21 3/• 1% 11 % 7'/a 14 7 9 5/a

9 3111

'n

10~


.. .. ~

APPENDIX:

ETITE SIZE STRETCHY REDUCTIONS p ercent smaller .1n crossw1.se d'~rect 10n ' without any reductions in Three

use ~h

1

COSTING SHEETS

455

~se measurements when draftmg slopers for fabrics that stretch ~rngthw1~e direction.

our across measurements by .97, 3% smaller, except forth om 50 Vo to 75%. Muii1P1YYam and prevent it from stretching. e shoulder measureme 1 . hze these n , Since the final garment . Multiply Your Across Extra Will have twill tape to stabi-

= -------~------------------~~~--------~~~------~~~======~~~==~~~======~~=

================M~e~a~s~u~r;e~m~e~n~t~s~B~y======~S=m~a=l=========~==------~~~~----~~~~~~~~~

--1

2

3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23

Bust Waist Hip crotch depth Waist to knee Waist to ankle Ankle Knee Front crotch Back crotch Crotch angle Nape to waist Back neck Back neck rise Shoulder length Across back Sleeve length Shoulder pitch Bicep Wrist Neck Bust span Bust level

Small

M edium 10

34% 26% 37 3/a 10% 21 7/a 37 % 7 13 3/4 2 3/a 3 118 1 15 31.

'I•

2'1.

'I•

5 1/a

7 31•

21 314 1% 11 112 7 13 718 7

Large

Extra Large

14

18

37 3/a 29 % 40 1/4 10 7/a 22 1/a 38 1/a 7 1/a

40 1/4

14 1/c

2 112 3 3/a 1 1/4 1

16 /4

2'1.

32 112 43 1/8 11%

22 3/a 38 5/a 7 3/a 14 3/ ..

2 3/c

3'1. 1'1. 16 3/4 2 112

'I•

s'le 8 22 1'1. 12 11•

7 31.

14

6 1•

7 1/4

9%

9 '1•

'Ia

s'ta 1 8

/4

14

1 /•

22 1/• 1 112 13 8 112

7'1.

10

PETITE SIZE SUPER-STRETCH REDUCTIONS Five percent smaller in crosswise direction without any reductions in lengthwise direction. Use these measurements when drafting slopers for fabrics that stretch from 75% to 100%. . . . Multiply your across measurements by .95, 5% smaller, except for the shoulder measurement since the final garment Will have twill tape 10 stabl· llze the seam and prevent it from stretching. Extra Extra Multiply Your Across Large Large Medium Small Small Measurements By 18 14 10 6 2 39 318 3 36'1. 7 33 1• 31 1• 31 718 Bust 1 30 29 X .95 1 26 18 42 1/ • 24 1• Waist 22% 39'1e X .95 36 % 7 3 34% Hip 10 /8 32 /• X .95 tO 'Ia 22318 tO% 4 7 22 118 10 'Ia Crotch depth No reduction 21 1• 1 38'18 21 'Ia 5 Waist to knee 38 18 21% 37'1e No reduction 7 1/ 4 37 118 6 Waist to ankle 7 36% 6 31• No reduction 14 3/7 1 6 112 7 Ankle 1 14 6 /4 13 12 2'18 X .95 1 13 2 112 8 1 Knee 12 12 2 11• 3 12 X .95 2 1/s 3 '1s 9 2 Front crotch 3 1 3/8 7 X .95 ,,/4 2 1• 1 10 3 2"1. ls 1 Back crotch 16 1• X .95 16 11• 1 11 2 112 1 15'1< Crotch angle 1 X .95 2'18 15 1• 314 12 'Is 14 2'1s Nape to waist ';. No reduction 2'1s 13 s'IB 2 1/4 Back neck s',~e 314 No reduction 1 14 a';. 31• 5 /8 Back neck rise 1 8 X .95 5 15 22 1• 7 31• 4 711• Shoulder length 22 No reduction 7 112 16 1 112 21 3/• 7 14 1 Across back 3 1'"' X .95 21 12 12 1• 17 1% 21 11• Sleeve length 12 No reduction 1'1s 8 °/8 18 11 2/8 1 11• Shoulder pitch 7'"' X .95 10'1s 14 19 7 5 Bleep 9 /s t 3 1• 1 X .95 6'"' 7'"' 20 1 13 /!! 1 Wrist 7 5 12 13 1• X .95 21 6 31• Neck 13 6'1!! 22 X .95 6 11• Bust span g',le 23 X .95 9 Bust level No reduction

, ,,.

'I•

6'"'

g'"'

g•"'

g'"'


-4-St'

l\l'l't:NDIX

COSTING SHEETS

---

PETITE SIZE RIB REDUCTIONS

crosshw~~~~aftlng slopers for fabncs that stretch 100% and over

rrechon Without any reductions '" lengthwise direction

'en pe.-c<>nl smaller In

Use these measurements w e Multtply your across measurements by .90. 1O% smaller· except for the shoulder measurem

ent smce the fmal garment will have twill tape to •

stab,hze the seam and prevent II from stretchmg. Multiply Your Across Measurements By

Extra Extra Small

Small

Medium

l a r ge

large

6

10

14

18

30 118 23 32 'ia 10 3 /s 21% 37 1/a 6 1/4 12 318 2 2 3 14 1 15 114 2 31a 314 5 7 112 21 112 1 114 10 5 71a 12% 6 1/a a%

32 3 24 '• 34 5/a 10% 21 71a 37 5/a 6 3/a 12 % 2 11a

27 112 37 31a 10 71a 22 11a 38 1/a 6% 13 114 2% 3 11a 1 116 16 114 2% 314 5%

30 1/a 40 11 11a 22 3/a 38 51a 7 6 1a 13% 2 112 3 31a 1 114 t6 314 2 112 7 1a 5% 1 8 14 22 114 3 1 1a 12 7 71a 13 114 7 9 31a

2

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23

Bust

' 90 X 90 X 90

Wa1st

H1p Crotch depth Wa1st to knee Watst to ankle

Ankle Knee Front crotch

Back crotch Crotch angle Nape to warst

Back neck

No reduct10n No reduct1on No reductron X 90 x .90 ' .90 X 90 .90 No reduction

"

No reduct1on

Back neck nse

Shoulder leng!h Across back Sleeve length Shoulder p1tch B1cep

X ~

.90

No reduct1on X 90

' 90 •. 90 > 90 X 90

Wnst

Neck Bust span Bust level

90

No reduction

No reduct1on

28 21' El 31 10 1/a 21 3-11 36.11 6 11 ~18 2 2% 1 14 3/4 2 114 3;4 4 7 1a 1 7 /4 21 114 1 114 9% 5 1/a 12 31a 6 1 8 12

2 7/a

1 15 314 2% 314 5 11a 73;, 21 314 1 114 10 314 6 112 12 71a 6 31a 7 8 1a

8 22

1 31a 11 %

?';, 13 631, 1 9 1a

PETITE SIZE FOUR-WAY-STRETCH REDUCTIONS Ten percent smaller 1n crossw1se dtrecllon and 10% smaller in the lengthwise direction. Use these measurements when draftmg slopers for fabncs that stretch 100% in both directions. Multiply your across measurements by .90. 1% smaller, except for the shoulder measurement, since the final garment will have twi ll tape to stabillze the seam and prevent 11 from stretch1ng M ultiply Your A c r oss Measurements By

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23

Ex tra Small

2 Bust Wa1st H1p Crotch depth Wa1st to knee Waist to ankle Ankle Knee Front crotch Back crotch Crotch angle Nape to wa1st Back neck Back neck rise Shoulder length Across back Sleeve length Shoulder pitch Bicep Wrist Neck Bust span Bust level

.90 .90 .90 .90 X .90 X .90 X .90 X .90 X .90 X .90 X .90 X .90 No reduction No reduct1on No reducllon No reduction No reduction No reduct ion X .90 X .90 No reduc tion X .90 X .90 X X X X

28 31a 21 11a 31 9% 20'1, 34 314 6 11 71a 2 2 71a 1 14 2'1, 314 4 71a 1 7 14 21 114 1 31a 9 31a 5 11a 13 314 6 9

Small

6 29 114 22 32 9314 20 31a 35 6 12 2 3 1 11a 14 114 2 31a 314 5 7% 21 % 1% 9% 1 5 12 13 71a 6 9

Medium

10 30 11a 23 32 71a 9 71a 20 112 35 114 6 114 12% 2 3 1 11a 14 112 2%

3;.

5 7 112 21 112 1% 10 5 71a 14 6 11a 9'11!

L arge

14 31 7 23 1a 33 314 10 20% 1 3 5 12 6 114 12 112 2 11a 3 11a 1 11a 14 3;. 2% 314 5 7% 21 % 1% 10% 1 6 1• 14 11a 1 6 1• 1 9 1•

Extra L a rge

18 32 24 314 34 % 10 20 314 35 314 6% 12 314 2 11a 3 114 1 2/8 15 2%

3;.

5 11a 7 314 2 1 31• 1% 10 611! 6 112 14 11• 6 311! 9 311!


APPENDIX:

--

MISSES TAL~ STABLE KNIT REDUCTIONS

COSTIN G S H EETS

457

nt smaller 1n crossw1se d•rect•on w•thout any reduct 1ons 10 len thw, percemeasurements when drafttng slopers for fabncs that stretch fr~m ~e d•rectton. 5 use th~ ~ur across measurements by 1. 0% smaller, except for the shoulder meto 25%. ~~LIIfrP"') and prevent It from stretchrng. asurement, s•nce the fi ·e the seam •na1garment will have tw• ll t

0

:ero

---~

1

2

3 4 5 6

7 8

9

........

..... .............

10 11 12 13 14 15 16

'7 18 19

20 21

22 23

.............

.. ~

.....,._

..... ~

B•cep Wnst Neck Bust span Bust level

ape to stab•·

Small 2 1 X 1 X 1 X

No reduction No reduction No reduction

1 1 X 1 X 1 X 1 X X

Knee Front crotch Back crotch Crotch angle Nape to wa1st Back neck Back neck nse Shoulder length Across back Sleeve length Shoulder p1tch

Extra Small

No reduction No reduction X

1

No reduct1on

1 No reduction X 1 X 1 X 1 X 1 X 1 No reduction X

1

32 12

24 112 35 112 11 1/4 24% 7

40 1a 7 71a 13%

2 1/4

3 1 1 1a 16'1a 2% 7

1a 4 71a

7 112 24% 1 1 12 10 % 7 5 1a 14 % 3 6 14 10 314

6 34 112 26 112 37 112 11 112 24 71a 41 'Ia 8 1/e 1 14 /e 2'1a 1 3 /a

, ,/e

17%

2 112 7 1a

5 7 3/4 24 % 1% 11 31a 6% 15

7 11

Medium

10 36 112 28 112 39 112 11 3/4

25 11a 41 7/e

8'1a 14 '1a 1

2 12 3 1/4

, ,/4 7

17 /a

2 112

'Is

5 1/a 1 8 /a 24 7/e 5 1 /a 12 11a 7% 15 1/e 7 1/4 11 1/4

Large 14 39 1h 31 1h 42 112 12 25 3/e 42 3/e 8 '1e 15 1/e 2'1e 3 112 3 1 /a 18 3/e 2'1e 7

1o

5% 8 112 25 1/e 1'1e 12 7/e 8 1/e 15 3/e

7%

11 1h

Extra Large

18 42 1h

34 \7 45 112 12 1/.t 25';, 7 42 /e

8 7/e 15 % 2'1e 3 3/4 1% 18 7/e 2'1e

';,

5'1e 8 7/e 25 3/e 13/.t

t3'1e 8 7/e 15 5/a 8 11 3/4

MISSES TALL MODERATE REDUCTIONS Two percent smaller in crosswise direction without any reductions in lengthwise direction. Use these measurements when drafting slopers for fabrics that stretch from 25% to 50%. Multtply your across measurements by .98, 2% smaller, except for the shoulder measurement, since the final garment will have twill tape to stabillze the seam and prevent 1t from stretching. Multiply Your Across Measurements By

~

~

eust warst HIP Crotch depth Waist to knee wa 1st to ankle Ankle

Multiply Your Across Measurements By

4 5 6 7 8

9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23

Bust Wa1st Htp Crotch depth Watst to knee Watst to an kle Ankle Knee Front crotch Back crotch Crotch angle Nape to waist Back neck Back neck rise Shoulder length Across back Sleeve length Shoulder pitch Bicep Wrist Neck Bust span Bust lever

X .98

.98 .98 No reduction No reduction No reduction X .98 X .98 X .98 X .98 X .98 X

X

No reduction No reduction

.98 No reduction X .98 No reduction X .98 X .98 X .98 X .98 X .98 No reduction X

Extra

Extra Small

Small

Medium

2

6

10

14

18

7

3 33 1• 26 36 314 11 112 24 71a 41 'Ia 8 13 71a 2 114 3 1 11a

35 '1< 28 3 38 1•

38 31• 7 30 /e 41 'Is 12 25% 42% 1 8 12 14 7/a 2 '1s 1 3h

41 '1s 33 3/4

31 1a 24 34 314 11 114 24 % 40 71a 7 314 13 318 1 2 1a 2 71a 1 16 71a 2'12 7

1a 4 1a 7

7 112 24 31a 1 112 10 % 5 314 14 31a 6 112 10 112

17'1a 1

2 12 7

1a

5 7 314 24'1s 1 112 1 11 1a 1 6 12 14 '1s 6 3/4 10314

11 3/4 1

25 1a 41 71a

a't• 14% 2 '1s

3 1/ 4 1

1 /4

17 71a 1

2 12

Large

,,;..

18'1s 2'1s 7

1a

7

1a

5 11a 8 11a 24 71a 1% 11 'A> 7'/4 7 14 1a 7 11

Large

44 518 1 12 /4

25'1s 42 7/e 8 3/4

153/e 23/• 3 3/4 1'1s 18 7/a 2'1s

'Ia

5% 8'12 25 1/a 1'1s 12% 8 15 1/a

5 '1s 8 7/a 25% 1'1s 13 3/o 8 3/• 15 3/o

7'1a

1t 1h

11

1 /•

73/•


M'l'liNOI

COSTING SHEETS

MISSES TALL STRETCHY REDUCTIONS

dtrect 1on.

reductions '" lengthwise %. . ent will have twill tape to stabiT ''t't' Pl"'rcent smaller'" crossw•se direction without a;y that stretch from so% to 75 nt since the final garm u~e these measurements when draft•ng slopers for fa ncs t for the shoulder measureme , M~lhply your across measurements by .97, 3% smaller, excep Extra h:e the seam and prevent 1t from stretchmg. Large Large

Multiply Your Across Measurements By

Extra Small

2 1

2 3 4

5 6 7 8 9 10 11

12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23

Bust Warst

H1p Cro1ch depth Warst to knee Warst to ankle

.97 ' .97 X .97 X

No reductron No reductron No reductron

Ankle Knee

X

Front crotch

X

Back crotch Crotch angle

' X

Nape to wa1st

Back neck Back neck rrse Shoulder length Across back Sleeve length Shoulder p1tch B1cep Wnst Neck Bust span Bust level

X

97 97 97 97 97

No reductron No reductron X .97

No reductron X

.97

No reductron X

.97

X 97

".97 )( .97 X .97 No reduction

31 23 ·,. 3 34 1 • 11

/4

24% 7

40 18

7'.rs 13 1/4 2 1/o 2 '18 1 16 7/8 2 112 7/8 4 7/e 1

7 12

24 318 1 112 10 1/4 5 3/4 14 1/4 6 112 10 3/8

small

6 33 1/z 25 314 36'1e 11 , 2 24 116 41 J/8 7 118 13 3/4

2 1/4 3 t 1/8 17 3/8 2 1/2 7/8

5 7 3/4 24% 1 1/2 11 6% 14 112 6 3/4 10%

Medium 10 27% 38% 11 3/4 1 25 /e 41 7/8 8 118 14 1/e 2 3/8 3 1/4 1 1/4 17 7/s 2 1/2

7/s 5 1/e

a

1 /8

24 7/s

1s/8 t1 3/4 7 1/8 14 3/4

7

7

10 /s

14

18

30 112 41 1/4 12 25% 42 %

41 1/• 33 112 44 1/e 12 1/4 25% 42 7/8

a%

14 % 2% 3% 1 1/4 18% 2% 7/8

5% a'/2 25 1/s t% t2 112 7% 15 7% 1t

a%

15 1/8

2 3/4

3% t% 1a 7/8 2% 7/8

5% 8 7/s 25 % t% t3 1/4

a% 1

15

/4

7 3/4

t1 3/8

MISSES TALL SUPER-STRETCH REDUCTIONS Five percent smaller'" crossw1se d~rect1on w1thout any reductions in lengthwise direction. Use these measurements when draft10g slopers for fabncs that stretch from 75% to 100%. Multiply your across measurements by 95, 5% smaller, except for the shoulder measurement, since the final garment will have twill tape to stabihze the seam and prevent 1t from stretch1ng. Multiply Your Across Measurements By

1 2 3 4 5

6 7

a 9 tO tt t2 t3 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23

Bust Wa1st H1p Crotch depth Wa1st to knee Wa1st to ankle Ankle Knee Front crotch Back crotch Crotch angle Nape to waist Back neck Back neck nse Shoulder length Across back Sleeve length Shoulder pitch Bicep Wrist Neck Bust span Bust level

X .95 X .95 ".95 No reduction No reduction No reduction X .95 X .95 X .95 X .95 X .95 No reduction No reduction X .95 No reduction X .95 No reduction X .95 X .95 X .95 X .95 X .95 No reduction

Extra Small

Extra Small

2

6

30 7/e 23 1/4 33 3/4

32 3/4 25 1/e 35 % 1 t1 h 7 24 /e 4t % 3 7 /4 t3 % 2 1/4 3 1 1/8 t7 % 1 2 12

1t 1/4 24 5/ e 40 7/e 7 112 t3 2 1/8 2 3/4 1 16 7/e 1 2 12 7 18

4 7;. 7 112 24 % 1 112 10 5% 14 6% t0 1/8

7 18

5 73;, 24% t 112 103;.

s';,

t4 1/8 6% 10%

Medium

Large

Large

10

14

18

34 % 27 37 112 tt % 1 25 /e 4t 7/ e 8 t3 7/8 2% 3 1/8 t 1/ 8 17 7/8 1 2 12

37 12 30 40 % t2 25% 42% 8 1/ 4 14% 1 2 12 3% 1 '1. 183/8 2%

1

40% 32 % 1 43 /4 12 1/ 4 25% 7 42 / 8 8% 7 14 /8 2 3/4

7/a

5 '1e 8 1/8 24 7/8 1 1 12 1 11 12 7 14% 7 6 /e 10 %

3% 1% 7 18 /8 2%

7/8

7/8

s% 8 'h 1 25 /e 1% 12 1/4 7 3;. 14 % 7,/s 7 10 /s

5% 7 8 /8 25% 1% 13 8 3/i 147/i 1 7 12 1 11 /i

•• •• •• • I


APPENDIX:

COSTING S H EETS

459

TALLRIBREDU~C~T~IO~N~S~========---------------------------------MISSE5

r 1n crossw1se

d~rect1on without any reductions in lengthw ise directio

. •t"t'··ct'nt :;nutl~:ments wt1en draftmg slopers for fabncs that stretch 100% and over. n. t f*Se m~su measurements by .90, 10% smaller, except for the shoulder me l

.:~ tpl\ rour across d prevent It from stretching.

---~•'-''t'

5ts~'hz•

;

3 4

~

7 8 9 0

~1

12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23

Bust waist HiP crotch depth Waist to knee Waist to ankle Ankle Knee Front crotch Back crotch Crotch angle Nape to wa1st Back neck . Back neck nse Shoulder length Across back Sleeve length Shoulder p1tch Bicep Wrist Neck Bust span Bust level

Multiply Your Across Measurements By

en

E xtr a Small

2 X .90 X .90 X .90 No reduct1on No reduction No reduction X .90 X .90 X .90 X .90 X .90 No reduction No reduction X .90 No reduction X.90 No reduction X .90 X .90 X .90 X .90 X .90 N o reduction

f~nal garm t .

asurement, s•nce the

me seam an

29 114 22 32 1 11 14 24%

40 11a

7 12 114 2 2% 1 7 16 1a 1 2 12 7 1a 7

4 1a 1 7 12 24 % 3 1 1a

9'1. 5'1• 1

13 14 6 9%

Small 6

Medium 10

31 23 7/a 33 3/4 1 11 12 7 24 /a 41 % 7 3;. 12 314 1 2 1a 7 2 1a 1 17% 1 2 12 7

1a

5 3 7 14 24 'Ia 3 1 1a 10 ';. 6 13% 1 6 14

9 71a

Will

have twill tape to

Extra Large

Large 14

32 11a 25% 1 35 12 11 314 25 1/a 41 7/a 7'12 1 13 /a 2 1/ 4 3 1 1/a 7 17 /a 1 2 12 7 /a

5'1• 1

8 /a 7 24 /a 1 1 12 11 6% 5 13 1a 1 6 12 10

18

35 1;, 28 113 38 114 12 25 31a 42 3/a 7 314 13% 2 3/a 3 1/4 1 1 /4 18 3/a 2%

'Ia

38 114 3t 41 12 114 25 5/a

42 11a 8 14 1 2 12 3 3/a 1 1/4

18 7/a 2% 1

5% 1 8 12 25 1/a 1 1 12 11% 3 7 /a 7 13 1a 6 314 10 114

1a

5%

a';•

25 31a 1 112 1 12 /4 8 14

?'Ia 1

10 12

MISSES TALL FOUR-WAY REDUCTIONS Ten percent smaller in crosswise direction and 10% smaller in the lengthwise direction. Use these measurements when drafting slopers for fabrics that stretch 100% in both directions. Mulliply your measurements by .90, 10% smaller, in both directions. Multiply Your Across Measurements By

4

5 6

7 8 9 to 11 12 13 14 15 16

17 18 19 20 21

22

23

Bust Waist Hip Crotch depth Waist to knee Waist to ankle Ankle Knee Front crotch Back crotch Crotch angle Nape to waist Back neck Back neck rise Shoulder length Across back Sleeve length Shoulder pitch Bicep Wrist Neck Bust span

~

No No No No No No

No

X .90 X .90 X .90 X .90 X .90 X .90 X .90 X .90 X .90 X .90 X .90 X .90 reduction reduction reduction reduction reduc tion reduction X .90 X .90 re duction X .90 X .90

Extra Large

Extra Small

Small

2

6

10

14

18

1

1

31 23 'Is 3 33 14 11 23% 1 39 1• 7% 3 12 /4 1 2 1e 1 3 18 1 1 1a 1 16 12 1 2 12

32 3 24 14 34 'Ia 11 23% 1 39 12 7% 13 1 2 18 1 3 14 1 1 14 3 16 14 2 112

32 /s 25% 1 35 12 1 11 la

29 14 22 32 3 10 /4 23 % 7 38 1e 7 1 12 14 2 3 1 1 1a 16 1 2 12 7

1a

7

4 1a 1 7 12 24 % 1 1 12 9% s';. 14 % 6 1 10 1a

30 18 23 7 32 1• 10"1. 1 23 12 39 1

7 1• 1

12 12 2 3 1 1 1• 1 16 /4 1 2 12

Medium

5 7% 1 24 12 1 1 12 10 s% 14 3/4 1 6 /a 1 10 /4

'Is

7

1s

7

1a

Large

5 3 7 14 24% 1% 10

'I•

6 15 1 6 /4 10%

5

8

7

23' "• 39 14 3

7 112 1 13 /8

2'1s

3 218 1 1 1• 17 2'.12 11a

5'/B

s'~s

3

24 /4 1518

10% 1 6

/•

15 6 3/a

1

10 12

24 7,~ 1% 11 6% 1

15 /B 1 6 12 10%


460

APPENDIX

COSTING SHEETS

WOMEN'S SIZE STABLE KNITS REDUCTIONS s m lengthwtse direct•on. . Zero percent smaller'" crosswose d~rectJon Without any ;educt•o~retch from 0% to 25%. nee the final garment woll have twill tape to stabiUse these measurements when drafting slopers for fabncs that 5 h lder measurement, 51 Mull1ply your across measurements by 1. 0% smaller. except for the 5 ou

Extra

lize the seam and prevent 1t from stretch•ng.

Multiply Your Across Measurements By

Extra Small

2 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23

Bust Waist

H1p Crotch depth Wa1st to knee Wa1st to ankle Ankle Knee Front crotch Back crotch Crotch angle Nape to wa1st Back neck Back neck nse Shoulder length Across back Sleeve length Shoulder p1tch Bicep Wrist Neck Bust span Bust level

X X X

1 1 1

No reduction No reduction

No reduction " 1 X 1 X 1 X 1 X 1 No reduct1on No reduction X 1 No reduction X 1 No reduction X 1 X 1 X 1 X 1 X 1 No reduction

43 35 46 11 314 24 38% 10 18 11a 7 2 16 3 716 1 112 16% 3 1 s% a% 7 23 16 1 112 14 112 7 116 17 114 8 12 114

small

6 47 39 50 15 314 24 114

38 716

10 112 18% 3% 4 11s 1% 17 11s 3 112 1%

s% a'Is 1

Medium

L a rge

10

14

18

51 43 54 3 19 1• 24 112 39 116 11 18% 3 716 1 4 12 1 516 17% 4 1 3/7

55 47 58 23 314 24 314 3g 31s 11 112 18 71a 4 31s 4'ls 2 1 18 16 4 112 1 1 12 6 9% 24 % 1 2 14 16 314 9% 19 112 8 314 13%

59 51 62 27 314 25 39% 12 1 19 1s

5 71a

24 16 1 314 15 114 7 71a 18

9 24% 2 16 a% 18 314

12 314

13 14

a'l•

Large

a'h 1

4 716 1

5 1s 2 31s 18% 5 1 112 1 6 16 9% 7 24 1a 1 2 12 1 17 12 1 10 1s 20 114 9 14 114

WOMEN'S SIZE MODERATE REDUCTIONS Two percent smaller 1n crosswise direction without any reductions in lengthwise direction. Use these measurements when draft1ng slopers for fabrics that stretch from 25% to 50%. Multiply your across measurements by .98, 2% smaller, except for the shoulder measurement, since the final garment will have twill tape to stabolize the seam and prevent it from stretchmg.

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23

Bust Waist Hip Crotch depth Waist to knee Waist to ankle Ankle Knee Front crotch Back crotch Crotch angle Nape to waist Back neck Back neck rise Shoulder length Across back Sleeve length Shoulder pitch Bicep Wrist Neck Bust span Bust level

Multiply Your Across Measurements By

Extra Small 2

X .98 X .98 X .98 No reduction No reduction No reduction X .98 X .98 X .98 X .98 X .98 No reduction No reduction X .98 No reduction X .98 No reduction X .98 X .98 X .98 X .98 X .98 No reduction

42 116 34 114 45 11 314 24 38% 9 314 17 314

2 716

3 314 1% 16 5;. 3 1 5% a% 23 716 1 112 14 114 7 7 16 1s

7 71a

12

Small

Extra L arge

M edium

Large

6

10

14

18

46 38 114 49 15 314 24 114 38 71s 10 114 18 1 3 14 4 1 '14 17 116 3 112 1 31s 53;.

50 42 116 53 19'1. 24 112 1 39 1s 10% 1 18 14 3% 4% 1% 17% 4 1 31e 7 5 18 9 24% 2 15%

7

57-'s 50 60 3 • 3 27 '• 25

8 71a

24 11e 1 314 15 73;. 17% 8 12%

a'n 3

18 /e 8 3/e 13

53 18 46 56 718 23% 24% 39 % 1 11 1• 18 112 4 43... 2 18 118 4 112 1 112 6 9 318 24% 1 2 1• 16 3/e

'I•

9'1• 19 8 5/e 13 3/e

39 5 ~

,,s. .

3 18 •• 4 3'• 5 2'.•

18 5 ~ 5 ,·~ 6 118 95/o 24 7/o

2'1.1 1

17 /e 10 19 3.4

,,,.

14


-APPENDIX:

woMEN ~IZE STRETCHY REDUCTIONS cant smaller in crosswtse d~rectton wtthout any reductions in len

.

use these ur across measurements by .97, 3% smaller, except for the shout SO Yo to 75%. der measurement sin Mult iply Your Acr oss M easure m ents By

,

.

ce the fmal garment will

Extr a Small

have twill tape to stabi-

______------------------------~~~~----~~~------~S~m~a~~~~------~~~ Medium 2

6 10 _____-------------------~X~.9~7~--------~~~------~~-----===~==41 %

Bust Waist Hip crotch depth Waist to knee 5 Waist to ankle 6 Ankle 7 Knee 8 Front crotch 9 Back crotch 10 crotch angle 11 Nape to waist 12 Back neck 13 14 Back neck rise 15 Shoulder length 16 Across back 17 Sleeve length 18 Shoulder pitch 19 Bicep 20 Wrist Neck 21 22 Bust span Bust level 23 1 2 3 4

x ·97

X .97 No reduction No reduction No reduction x .97 x .97 X .97 X .97 x .97 No reduction No reduction x .97 No reduction x .97 No reduction X .97 X .97 x .97 X .97 x .97 No reduction

34 44% 11 % 24 38% 9'1• 17 % 2 3/4 3 3/ . 1 3/e 16% 3 1 5% 8% 23 7/ e 1 112 14 7 16% 7 3/ 4 11 7/e

461

~----

Th~ per measurements when drafttng slopers for fabrics that stretch fro~1hwt~e direction. MultiplY yo and prevent 11 from stretchmg. liZB the seam

COSTING SHEETS

45 % 37 7/e 48 112 153;. 24 1/4 38 7/ e 10 1/e 17 7/e 3 1/4 4 1 1/4 17 1/e 3 112 1% 5'1• 8 7/e 24 1/e 1'1• 14 3;. 7% 17 3/e 8 1 12 /•

49 112 41 314

52% 19 3/4 24 112 39 1/e 10% 18 3 3/4 4 3/a 1% 17% 4 1% 5 7/a 9 24% 2 15 112 8 3/a 18 1/a 1 8 /• 12 3/4

Large

14

Extra Large

18

------::=-:;-------------2~3 53 /e 45 % 56 1/4

23 3;, 24 3;, 39 3/e 11 1/e 18 1/4 1

4 /4 4 3/4

2 18 1/a 4 112 1';, 6 9 3/a 24'1e 2 114 16 1/4 9 18 7/a 8 112 13 1/•

57 1/•

49 1/2 60 1/e 27 3/. 25 39 % 11 % 18 112

4 3/4

5 2 1/4 18% 5 1 112 6 1/e 9'1e 24 7/e 2 112 17 9 7/e 19% 8 3/ 4 13 3/•

WOMEN'S SIZE SUPER-STRETCH REDUCTIONS Five percent smaller in crosswise direction without any reductions in lengthwise direction. Use these measurements when drafting slopers for fabrics t hat stretch from 75% to 100%. Multiply your across measurements by .95, 5% smaller, except for the shoulder measurement, since the final garment will have twill tape to stabihze the seam and prevent it from stretching. Extra Extra Multiply Your Across Large Large Medium Small Small Measurements By 18 14 10 6 2 1 56 1 52 /• 48 12 1 Bust 44% 48 1h 40 7/s X .95 44 '1e 40 7/e 2 Waist 37 58 7/e 33 1/4 1/4 X .95 55 1 51 3 Hip 47 12 27 3/• 43 3/4 X .95 23 3/• 19'1< 4 Crotch depth 15'1. 25 11 3/4 1 24% No reduction 24 /2 5 Waist to knee 39% 24 1/4 39 3/a 24 No reduction 7 39 1/a 11 % 6 Waist to ankle 38 /a 1h 11 38% No reduction 10 18 1/e 7 Ankle 10 3 18 9 112 X .95 1 17 / • 4% 8 Knee 17 12 4 '/e 17 1/4 X .95 3% 5 9 3 3 1/4 4% 1 Front crotch 2 /• / 4 4 X .95 2 1/4 10 Back crotch 4 17/e 3% 1% X .95 1/4 1 18% 11 1 18 /e Crotch angle 1% 1 17% 5 X .95 12 4 1h 17 /a Nape to waist 16% 11h 4 No reduction 13 1 1h 3 112 Back neck 6'/e 3 1'1s No reduction 14 6 1'1s g'/e Back neck rise 1 5 7/e 3 X .95 15 9% 5 /• 24 7/e 5% 9 7 No reduction 16 Shoulder length 24% 8 /e 2'1e Across back s% 24% 1 17 X .95 2'/a 7 24 /a 16 51e Steeve length 2 23 /s 3 ta No reduction 16 1 1 1 /• g'le Shoulder pitch 15 /4 1 12 1 t9 9 X .95 1 14 h 19 11e B1cep 1 8 /• 13 3/4 1 18 1l 20 Wrist X .95 7 1h 8 12 173/• 6"1• 21 X .95 17 13 1h Neck 8 16% 13 22 X .95 1 7 7/a 12 1l 7% 23 Bust span X .95 12 Bust level 11 % No reduction

e•te


46~

·\l'f'LNOI'\

COSTING SHEETS

WOMEN 'S SIZE RIB REDUCTIONS h ut an reductions in lengthwise dtrec tJon.

len percent smaller 'n cross;IS~ d•~~~~~o~o";,'!r~ for flbncs that stretch 100% and over. t since the final garment will have twill tape to O% ller except for the shoulder measuremen ' Multiply your across measurements by .90. 1 sma · stabilize the seam and prevent Jt from stretChing. Extra Use these measurements w en ra

Multiply Your Across Measurements By

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23

Bust Wa1st H1p Crotch depth Wa1st to knee Wa1st to ankle Ankle Knee Front crotch Back crotch Crotch angle Nape to wa1st Back neck Back neck nse Shoulder length Across back Sleeve length Shoulder p1tch B1cep Wrist Neck Bust span Bust level

.90 ' .90 X .90 X

No reductiOn No reduct1on No reductiOn

.90 .90 X .90 > .90 )( .90 X

X

No reduct1on No reduct1on

)( .90 No reduction X

.90

No reduction X X X X X

.90 .90 .90 .90 .90

No reduction

Extr a Small

2 38 314 31 112 41 % 11 314 24 38% 9 16 % 2% 3 1/2 1 1 1• 16% 3 1 5% a%

23%

1% 13 s% 15 112 7 114 11

Small

6 42 11• 1

35 1s 45 15 314 24 11• 38 71s 9 112 16 112 3 3 3/4 1 1/s 17 'Ia 3 112 1% 5'1. a 71s 24 11s 1% 13 3/4 7 16 11s

?'Is

11 %

Medium

L a rge

10

14

18

49 112 42 11• 52 1/4 23 31• 24 ';. 39% 10% 17 4 4% 1 3/4 1a 1/s 4 112 1 112 6 9 31s 24% 2 15

53 1/s 45 7/s 55 3/4 27 3/4 25 39% 10 3/4 17 1/4 4 3/s 4 5/s 2 1a% 5 1 112 6 1/s 9% 24 7/s 2 114 15% 9 1/s 1a 1/8 8 12 314

7

45 1s 38% 48% 19 314 24 112 39 11s 10 16 314 3 112 4 1 112 17% 4 1 31s 5 7/s 9 24% 1% 14 31s 7314 16 718 7% 11 %

a'l2

17 112

?'Is

12%

large

WOMEN 'S SIZE FOUR-WAY REDUCTIONS Ten percent smaller in crossw1se direction and 10% smaller in the lengthwise direction. Use these measurements when draftmg slopers for fabrics that stretch 100% in both directions. Multiply your measurements by .90, 10% smaller, 1n both directions. Multiply Your Ac ross Measure ments By

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 a 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23

Bust Waist Hip Crotch depth Waist to knee Waist to ankle Ankle Knee Front crotch Back crotch Crotch angle Nape to waist Back neck Back neck rise Shoulder length Across back Sleeve length Shoulder pitch Bicep Wrist Neck Bust span Bust level

X .90 X .90 X .90 X .90 X .90 X .90 X .90 X .90 X .90 X .90 X .90 X .90 No reduction No reduction No reduction No reduction No reduction No reduction

X .90 X .90 No reduction

X .90 X .90

E xtra Small

Sma ll

M ed ium

L a r ge

Extra La rge

2

6

10

14

18

3a% 31 1/2 41% 11 'Ia 22% 36 314 9 16 318 2% 3 7/ s 1 112 15% 3 1 5% a% 23 7/8 1 112 13 6% 17 114 7 1/4 11 %

40 112 33 114 43 1/4 13 23 36 718 9 11• 16% 2 7/8 4 1 1h 16 3'1. 1% 5% a% 24 1% 13% 6% 17% 7 318 11 7/8

42 114 35 1/8 45 15 23 37 9 112 16 112 3 4 1/8 1% 16 1/4 3 112 1% 5% 8 7/8 24 'Ia 1 3/4 13% 7 18 7% 12

44 118 36 718 46 3/4 16 7/8 23 'Ia 37 9% 16% 3'1. 4 3/8 1 112 16 112 3 3/4 1% 5 7/s 9 24 1/4 2 14 7% 18% 7'1l! 12 2!\

45 7/8 3a% 4a % 18 3/4 23 1/ 4 37 'Ia 10 16% 3 112 4 112 1% 16% 4 1'1s

s'ls

9 24% 2 14 3!\ 7 3/• 18 3/• 7 5,.\ 12 1h


APPEND I X : COSTING SHEETS

463

S SIZES STABLE KNITS REDUCTIONS

pt.lJ

ent smaller 1n crossw1se d1r~ct1on without any reductions m len zerO perc measurements when draft1ng slopers for fabncs that stretch frgthw1se direction. v e these asurements exactly as recorded w1thout any reductions om 0% to 25%.

~~5

------1

2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

11

..... = = ............ ....... ............... ..... .............. ~

~ ~

12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23

sus! WaiSt HiP crotch depth Waist to knee wa1st to ankle p.nkle Knee Front crotch sack crotch crotch angle Nape to waist Back neck sack neck nse Shoulder length Across back Sleeve length Shoulder p1tch B1cep Wnst Neck Bust span Bust level

Multiply Your Across

Measurements By

X 1 X 1 X 1

No reduc tion No reduction No reduction X 1 X 1 X 1 X 1 X 1 No reduction No reduction X 1 No reduction X 1 No reduction X 1 X 1 X 1 X 1 X 1 No reduction

. 1X

2X

16

20

41 33 44 11 'Ia 24 39 % 9% 18 11a 2 31• 3% 1 17 2 314 1 5 112 3 8 1a 1 32 1a 1 112 3 13 /4

6 '1• 16'1. 7 314 11 7/a

3X

4X

24

45 37 48 15% 24 'I• 39 71a 10 'Ia 18 31a

49 41 52 195;. 24 ';, 40 1/a 10%

3 3/4 4'1a

4 1 'I• 3 15 1• 1 3 1• 1 31a

11~/e

19 1/e

4 3/4

4'18 2 16314

1

16 1•

3 3/4

5

2 1/4

n't•

1

4 /4

1 31a

s'l• 7

8% 32 31a 3 1 1• 14 112 7 'lz 17 112 8 3 12 1a

57 49 60 27'1• 25 40%

4 1/4

t 'la

s'le

32

53 45 56 23 518 24 314 40'1. 1 11 /e 18 718

t8sl,

3 1/4

sx

28

8 1a

32 % 2 15 114

8'1• 1

18 1• 1 8 1• 7 12 1a

43/.1

131a 571a 1 9 18 32 718

1112 6 9318 33 118 2 112 1631• 9 3/4 19 3/4 83/ 4 13 718

2 1/4

16 9 19 1 8 12 13'1s

PLUS SIZES MODERATE REDUCTIONS Two percent smaller in c rosswise d irection without any reductions in lengthwise direction. Use these measurements w hen d rafting slopers for fabrics that stretc h from 25% to 50%. Multiply your across measurements by .98, 2% smaller, exc ept for the shoulder measurement, since the final garment will have twill tape to stabilize the seam and prevent it from stretching. M u ltip ly Your A c r oss M e a surem e nts By

Bust Waist Hip 4 Crotch depth 5 Waist to knee 6 Waist to ankle 7 Ankle 8 Knee 9 Front crotch 10 Back crotch 11 Crotch angle 12 Nape to waist 13 Back neck 14 Back neck rise 15 Shoulder length 16 Across back 17 Sleeve length 18 Shoulder pitch 19 Bicep 20 Wrist 21 Neck 22 Bust span 23 Bust level

X .98 X .98

X .98 No reduction No reduction No reduction X .98 X .98 X .98 X .98 x .98 No reduction No reduction X .98 No reduction X .98 No reduction X .98 X .96 X .98 X .98 X .98 No reduction

sx

2X

3X

4X

1X

20

24

28

16 40 'Ia 32 '1s 1 43 /a 11 % 24 39% 9 '1s 3 17 1• 3 2 1• 3% 1 17 2 3/ 4 1 1 5 12 8 '1s 1 32 1a 1 'h 1 13 12 s% 3 16 / a 7 '1s 11 'Ia

44 'Ia 1 36 1• 47 15% 24 7 39 1a 10 18 1 3 1a 4 1 3 15 1• 3 'I• 1 31a 5%

'I•

'I•

6 51a 3

32 1a 3 1 /• 14 'Is 3 7 1a 17 'Ia 7 7/a 1 12 /a

48 1 40 1a 51 19% 1 24 /2 40 'Ia tO% 1 18 1• 3% 1 4 1• t 'le 1 16 1• 3 31• 3 1 1•

s'l• 7

6 1a

32 % 2 15 8 17'/a 8 5 12 /a

32 7

52 44 'Ia 7 54 1e 23're 24 31• 3 40 1• 11 1 t8 12 4 'Ia 4're 2 3 16 1• 4 t 31a

'I•

5711•

9 1• 7 32 18 1 2 1• tS're 8'/a t8 '18 8' /a 1 13 /a

55 1• 48 58 31• 27're 25 40're 11 31• t 8 31• 4'18

5 2 'I• 1 17 1• 431• t 112 6 9'18 33 '18 1 2 12 16318 9'1> t9'rs 8'.18 5 13 /a


464

APPENDIX:

COSTING SHEETS

PLUS SIZES STRETCHY REDUCTIONS any reductions in lengthwise direc~ ion .

sm~~ents when drafting slopers for fabncs that stretch from 50% to 75l-6,;,ent, since the final garment will have twill tape to stabir '" crosswise direction without

ij'reehpercent

se t ese measur Multiply your across measurements by .97 . . 3% smaller· except for the shoulde r m easure hze the seam and prevent it from stretching.

Multiply Your Across Measurement s By

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 a 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 1a 19 20 21 22 23

Bust Waist

Hip Crotch depth Waist to knee

Waist to ankle Ankle Knee

Front crotch Back crotch Crotch angle Nape to waist Back neck Back neck nse Shoulder length Across back Sleeve length Shoulder p1tch Bicep Wrist Neck Bust span Bust level

X .97 X .97 X .97 No reduction No reduction No reduction X .97 X .97 X .97 X .97 X .97

No reduction No reduction X

.97

No reduction X

.97

No reduction X X X X X

.97 .97 .97 .97 .97

No reduction

1X 16 39 3/4 32 42% 11 % 24 39% 93/a 17% 2% 3 112 1 17 2 3/4 1 5 112 a% 32 1/a 1 112 13 3/a 6 112 16 1/4 1 7 /2 11 112

sx

2X

3X

4X

20

24

28

32

51 % 43 % 54 113 23 % 24 % 40 % 10 3/4 1a 1/4 4 1/a 4 112 2 16 3/4

ss '; , 47 112 sa•;, 27 % 25 40 % 11 1/4 1a 112 4% 4 7/a 2 1/4 17 1/4 4 3/ 4 1 1 12 6 9% 33 1/a 2 112 16 1/ 4 9 112 19 1/a a 'l2 13 112

43 % 35 7/a 46 112 15 % 24 1/4 7 39 /a 9 7/a 17 7/a 3 1/a 7 3 /a 1 '/• 15 % 3 1/4 1 3/a s% a% 32 3/a 1% 14 1 7 /4 17 7 3/4 12

47 112 39 3/4 50 112 19% 24 112 40 1/a 10 1/4 1a 3% 4 1/ 4 1% 16 1/4 3 3/4 1 3/a s 3;, a7!a 32 % 2 14 3/4 a 17 3/4 a 12 112

4 1/4 1 3/a 7 5 /8 9 1/a 32 7/8 2 1/ 4 15 112 a 3/4 1a% a•;, 13

PLUS SIZES SUPER-STRETCH REDUCTIONS Five percent smaller in crosswise direction without any reductions in lengthwise direction. Use these measurements when drafting slopers for fabrics that stretch from 75% to 100%. Multiply your and across measurements by .95, 5% smaller, except for the shoulder measurement, since the final garment will have twill tape to stabilize the seam prevent it from stretching. Multiply Your Across Measurements By 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 a 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 1a 19 20 21 22 23

Bust Waist Hip Crotch depth Waist to knee Waist to ankle Ankle Knee Front crotch Back crotch Crotch angle Nape to waist Back neck Back neck rise Shoulder length Across back Sleeve length Shoulder pitch Bicep Wrist Neck Bust span Bust level

.95 .95 .95 No reduction No reduction No reduction X .95 X .95 X .95 X .95 X .95 No reduction No reduction X .95 No reduction X .95 No reduction X .95 X .95 X .95 X .95 X .95 No reduction X X X

1X

2X

3X

4X

2

6

10

14

18

so% 42 % 1 53 / 4 23% 24 3/4 40 % 10 % 18 4 4% 1 7.Je 16 3/4

54'-s 4 46 ·11 57 5 27 18 25 40 5·8 11 18 118 4 '.~ 4 3; .

39 31% 41 3/4 11% 24 39 % 9 1/a 17 1/4 2% 3 112 1 17 2% 1 5 112 8 3/a 32 1/a 1 112 13 6 3/a 16 7 3/a 11 ';.

42 3/4 35 1/a 45% 15% 24 1/4 39 7/a 9% 17 112 3 3 3/4 1 1/4 15 3/4

3 1/4 1% s% a% 32% 1 3;, 13 3; , 1 7 /e 16% 7% 3 11 /•

1

46 12 39 49 % 19% 24 112 40 1/a 10 17 3/4 3% 4 1/a 1 112 16 1/4 3 3/4 1% s3;. 8 7/8 32 % 2 14 112 7''8 17 '/8 7 718 12 ';.

4'.-. 1% 7 5 -8 9',a 32 7'8 2 1,11 15',~ 8 '1!! 18 8 12 31•

sx

2''" 17'. 4 3,. 1' ~

6 93>& 33 '~ 23/8

16

9 11•

18 3/• 8 '-'

13 1, .

. ........ ...

... • till


APPENDIX: COSTING SHEETS

pLUS

465

SIZES RIB REDUCTIONS -

Uer 10 crossw1se direction w 1thout any reduct 1ons In len th

,.f', percent sm:Urements when draft1ng slopers for fabncs that stretch ~OO~se direction. list these m,e;cross measurements by .90. 10% smaller, except for the shouldand over. ~·~.~lt•P'~ )'OU am and prevent 11 from stretch1ng. er measurement. since th tabth:e these

5

Multiply Your Across Measurements By

-=== '

5 6 7

8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 !6 17 18 19 20 21 22 23

sus! Warst H1p Crotch depth wa 1st to knee wa1st to ankle p.nkte Knee Front crotch sack crotch Crotch angle

Nape to wa•st Back neck

Back neck rrse Shoulder length Across back Sleeve length Shoulder p1tch B1cep Wnst Neck Bust span Bust jevel

1X

2X

2

6

".90 " .90 X .90 No reduct1on

36'/s 29 3;, 39 5/s

40 1'2

No reduction No reduction

24 39% 8 5/s 16 3/s 2 112

X 90 X .90 X .90 X 90 X .90

No reduct1on No reduction X .90

No reduct•on X .90

No reduct1on X .90 X .90 X .90 X .90 X .90 No reduct1on

11 51s

3 114 1

/a

17 2'1. 1 1 5 /2

a'Is

32 1/s 1 3/s 12% 6 15 7

10 3/4

1 1. 43 1/ ..

33

15 511! 24 1/ • 39 7/s 1 9 /s 16 1h 3 3% 1 t;. 15 3/4 3 1/• 1% 5% s% 32 % 1% 13 6 3/4 15 3/4 1 7 /• 11 1/s

e final garment w 11 ' have twttl tape to

3X 10 44 1le

36 711!

463;. 19 5/s 24 1h 40 1/a 9% 16 3;, 3'1'8 3 '1'8 1 'h 16 1/4 3 3/4 13/e 5';, 8 7/s 32% 1 7/s 13 3/4

7'1'8

16 3/s 7% 11 %

4X 14 47 3,,.

40 11:! 50 3/s 23'1. 24 3tt 3

40 -'8 10 17 7 3 1o 4';. 1 3/~

163;,

4'; . . 1'1e

5 7/e

1 9 /e 32 7/e 2 14% 8 17'1'8 7% 12

sx 18 51 1.'4 44 1 ~&

54 27 5/a 25 40\'8 10 \"1

17 ''• 1 4

.'. t

4 1h 2 17 1l• 43;.

1'7 6 9 3/a 33 1111

2'/.t 15

8 3/4

17 3/4 7 1/e 12 11:!

PLUS SIZES FOUR-WAY REDUCTIONS Ten percent smaller 1n crossw1se direction and 10% smaller in the lengthwise direction. Use these measurements when draftlng slopers lor labrics thai stretch 100% in b oth directions. Mutt1pty your across measurements by .90, 10% smaller, in both direclions.

..,. ---

...........

..... ............. ....

............ ... ~

-~

Multiply Your Across Measurements By

1 2

3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16

17 18 19 20 21 22 23

Bust Waist Hip Crotch dep1h Wa1s1 to knee wa,st to ankle Ankle Knee Front crotch Back crotch Crotch angle Nape to waist Back neck Back neck rise Shoulder length Across back Sleeve length Shoulder pitch Bicep Wrist Neck Bust span Bust level

X .90 X .90 X .90 X .90 X.90 X .90 X.90 X.90 X .90 X .90 X .90 X .90 No reduc tion No reduc tion No redu c tion No reduction No reduction No reduction X .90 X .90 No re d uction X .90 X .90

5X

2X

3X

4X

2

6

10

14

18

7 36 /s 29'1. 39% 11 22 3/4 37% s% 3 16 /s 1 2 /2 3% 1 1 16 /o 3 2 /• 1 1 5 12

3 38 /•

1 40 12 33 1/4 43 1/4 14 7/e 23 7 37 /e 9'1'8 1 16 h 3 4 1 1/• 15 1 3 /• 1'!'8

1 42 /• 35 1/s 45 16 3/4 1 23 /8 38 9'1:> 16'1s 3 1/s 4 1/s 1 112 1 15 /• 1 3 12 1'1s

44 1111

1X

a'Is 1

32 / 8 1 112 12 '1s 6 16'1< 7 11 1/4

1 31 12 41 'Is 13 23 3 37 /•

a'l•

16'1s 2 3/ 4 3 '1• 1 1/s 14 3/• 3 1%

s'ls 1

8 12 1 32 /• 1'1s 3 12 /• 6% 1 17 /8 7 1 11 12

s'ls a% 32 '1'8 3 1 /• 13

s'1l•

17 12 1 7 /• 11 3/4

s'l•

8 3/• 1 32 12 2 13'1'8 7

17 118

7'1'8 12

1

36 1• 46% 18'18 1 23 /• 38 1/a 9'18 t6 3/• 3'111 4'1a 1'111 1 15 h 3 3/• 1'1s

s'l• 1

8 /a 32 '111 2 13 3/4 7'111 t8 1/• 7 3/1 1 12 /4


466

APPENDIX:

COSTING SHEETS

Half Sizes HALF SIZES STABLE KNITS REDUCTIONS . reductions in lengthwise d~rection. Ten percent smaller In crosswise direction w•tho~t a;ybrics that stretch from 0% to 25% . Use these measurements when drafting slopers or a Use your measurements as recorded without any reducuons.

Multiply Your Across Measurements By

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23

Bust Waist

Htp Crotch depth Waist to knee Wa1st to ankle

X X X

No reduc tion No reduc tion No red uction

Ankle

X

Knee Front crotch Back crotch

X

Crotch angle Nape to waist

Back neck Back neck rise

Shoulder length Across back Sleeve length Shoulder pttch Bicep Wrist Neck Bust span Bust level

1 1 1

X

X X

1 1 1 1 1

No reduction No reduction X

1

No reduction X

1

No reduction X 1 X1 X1 X1 X1 No reduction

Ex tra

Medium

Large

Extra Large

Small

Small

14 112

18 112

22 1/2

26 112

30 112

45 36 112 48 15 1/a 22% 37 112 10 1/a 17 112 3 1/4 4 1 1/4 16 3 1/4 1 3/a 5% 8% 22 112 1% 14 112 7 112 1 17 12 8 7 11 /a

49 40 112 52 19 1/a 22 7/a 37 3/4 10% 17 3/• 3 '1. 4 'ts 1% 16 112 3 3/4 1 'ts 5 3/ • 8 7/a 22 3/ 4 2 15 1/ 4 8 1/ • 18 1/ 4 1 8 1• 12 'ts

53 44 112 56 23 1/a 23 1/a 38 11 1/a 18 4 1/ 4 4% 2 17 4 1/4 1 3/a 5 7/a 9 1/a 23 2 1/a 16 9 19 8 1/2 7 12 /s

57 48 112 60 27 1/a 23 3/a 38 1/ • 11 'Ia 18 1/• 4 3/ • 5 2 1/ 4 17 112 4'1. 1 112 6 9 'te 23 '(. 2 '1s 16 3/ • 9 3/ • 19 3/ • 3 8 /• 13 3/s

41 32 112 44 1 11 /a 22'1s 37 1/4 9% 17 1/4

2 3/4 3% 1'ts 15 112

2'1<

1 5 112 8 'ts 22 '/. 1'ts 13'1.

s't.

16 3/ 4 7 3/ 4 11 'Ia

HALF SIZES MODERATE REDUCTIONS Two percent smaller in crosswise direction without any reductions in lengthwise direction. Use these measurements when drafting slopers for fabrics that stretch from 25% to 50%. Multiply your across measurements by .98 , 2% smaller, except for the shoulder measurement, since the final garment will have twill tape to stabilize the seam and prevent it from stretching. Multiply Your Across Measurements By

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21

22 ?3

Bust Waist Hip Crotch depth Waist to knee Waist to ankle Ankle Knee Front crotch Back crotch Crotch angle Nape to waist Back neck Back neck rise Shoulder length Across back Sleeve length Shoulder pitch Bleep Wrist Neck Bust span Busllevel

X .98 X .98 X .98 No reduction No reduction No reduction X .98 X .98 X .98 X .98 X .98 No reduction No reduction X .98 No reduction X .98 No reduction X .98 X .98 X .98 X .98 X .98 No reduction

Extra Small

Small

14 112

18 12

1

1

40 /s 31 7/a 43 1/s 11 1/a 22% 37 1/ 4 9 3/a 17 2 3/4 3% 3 1 /s 15 112 2 3/4 1 1 5 12 8% 22 1/4 1% 1 13 12 6% 16 3/s 7% 1 11 /a

1

44 /a 35 3/4 47 15 1/s 22 % 37 112 10 17 1/s 3 1/s 4 1 1/4 16 3 1/4 1% s% a% 22 112 1% 1 14 / • 73/s 1 17 /s 7 7/ s 11 5ta

Medium

Large

Extra Large

22 112

26 112

30 1h

48 39 % 51 19 'Is

52 43% 54 7/s 23 1/s 1 23 /s 38 11

22%

37 3/4 10% 17% 3% 4 1/4 1 1 h 16 112 3 3/ 4 1% s% 8 7/s 22% 1 7/s 15 8 17 718 8 1 12 18

17% 4 '!s 4% 17a 17 4 1/4 1 s,.a 7 5 s 9''8 23 2'/s 15 518 7 8 18 18 5/s 8 318 12 51a

55 7 s 47 11'2 583 • 27 11\l 23 318 1 38 • 113,. 17 7'8 4 5•a 5 2 1 /4 17 1/2 4 3• 1'1:1 6 93-'8 23 1/ • 23.'11

16 3.'11 9 '-'2 19 3-11 8 5)& 13 11a


---

APPENDIX ·

~ zeS STRETCHY~RR"EED~U~C;T:;;IO~N~S------­ HALf :s t .,..,aile' n croSS"- tSe d1rect1on w•thout any reduct 0 .

1

~ ·~:·:;...~urenleots when draft.ng slopers for fabncs that ~t~=t~nhl~r:Qlhw<se d"ecloon t ..,. tht"- ~across measurements by 97 3% smaller. except forth h m SO% to 75%

~·M"' '~

fi.""# :~ ~

Multiply Your Across

E xtra

Measurements By

Small

---------------:~----~~--~~~~~=.97 .97 .97 No reduct1on No reduct1on No reduction X 97 X 97 X .97 X .97 X .97 No reduct1on No reduct1on ' .97 No reduct1on X .97 No reduct1on x.97 97 97 .97 X .97 No reduct1on X

2

3 4

65

7 8 9

10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23

wa1st H•P

crotch depth Waost to knee wa,st to ankle Ankle Knee Front crotch sack crotch crotch angle Nape to waost sack neck sack neck rose ShOulder length A<; ross back Sleeve length Shoulder p1tch B•cep Wnst Neck Bust span Bust level

X X

1

39 ' 31 "1 42 % 11 118 22 318 37

-

- -

1

sust

467

mf!t"lt '-"1\l hs"e t¥r!ll

Medium ----------------=============-~~----~~~----~S~m ~a~l~~----~~~r 14 12 18

t

ETS

--

e s Oulder measurement, S•nce the ~nal gar

nd prevent ot from stretchong

;:-----

COST IN G SHE

'2

22 1'2

43 ~ 35 • 46 1 ., 15 I 8 22'1• 37' 9'11 17 1 3 's 3 ''e

1 /4

9';. 16 3/4 2%

3'~ 1 3/e

47

~6'.

27 1 .. 23'• 38 1 4

11' ~ l7J.

n' ,

3'to 4'' 1'1> 16 11>

4 ...

•';, 4 .....

4 .,.,

,.,.. 17 ,...

33/• 1 3/8

2'.

17'

4 114

4'.

1'

s'-.

53/•

8 7/8

6 g' ..

9'•

22 3;, 1 1/s

1

23 2'"' 1

14 3/4

8

4)

"

lQl,4

17'. 4

1 /4

30 1 ~

55 •

54., 23 1 8 23 1 .. 38

37 3/4 10 1/4

17 7 31• 11 112

2

51 ... 43

22 is

22 112 1 5 /s 14

'2.6' 1

1

8~18

7

19 1 "8

16 3';.. 1'/s 5 ';•

Ex.tro Large

-

1

39'"' 50 1 7

,,,...

15 112 2 31• 1 5'·'2 8% 22 1/4 1 31s 13 3/s 1 6 12 1 16 1• 1 7 12 11

tape to Mal>!

Large

23 4

15 }> 8 314 18 1h

3

17 /4

s''•

8 12

12 112

2 111

16 1 4

9'}> 19 111 a' ~ 13

HALF SIZES SUPER-STRETCH REDUCTIONS FIVe percent smaller 1n crossw1se d~rectlon w1thout any reductions'" lengthwise direction. Use these measurements when drafting slopers for fabncs that stretch from 75% to 100%. Multiply your across measurements by .95, 5% smaller, except for the shoulder measurement. since the final garment w•ll have twill tape to stabl hze the seam and prevent 11 from stretching. Multiply Your Across Measurements By

Extra Small

Small

14 112

1B 12

1

2

3 4 5 6 7 8

9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23

Bust Wa1st H1p Crotch depth Watst to knee Wa1st to ankle Ankle Knee Front crotch Back crotch Crotch angle Nape to waist Back neck Back neck rise Shoulder length Across back Sleeve length Shoulder pitch Btcep Wnst Neck Bust span Bust level

X .95 X .95 X .95 No reduction No reduct1on No reduction X .95 X .95 X .95 X .95 X .95 No reduction No reduction X .95 No reduction X .95 No reduction X .95 X .95 X .95 X .95 X .95 No reduction

39 7 30 1s 3 41 1• 11 11s 22% 1 37 1• 1 9 1s 16%

2% 1

3 12 1 1 1• 1 15 12

2 31•

1 1 5 12 8 '1s 1 22 1• 1 '1s 13

s'ls 16 7'1s 10 31•

Large

22 112

26 112

1

3

I

Medium

42 1• 34 51s 45 51s 15 'Is

22 511•

37 12 9% 16% 3 3 3 1• 1 1 1• 16 1 3 /• 1 '1s s% 8 51s 1

22 12 1 '1s 3 13 /• 1 7 1• 5 16 1• 7 5/s 1

11 1•

46 12 1 38 12 49 3/a 1 19 ls

22 718 3 37 1• 10 16 71s 3% 4 11s 1 1/2 16 112 3 3/• 1'1s s 31•

6 731•

22 1• 1 7/s 14 '12

7 11s

17 318 7 7/s 3 11 1•

1

50 /a 42 11• 1 53 1• 23 118 1 23 /a 38 5 10 /8 17 4 4 31s 171s 17 1 4 1• 1 3h 5 7/s 9 '/a 23 2 1 15 1• 8 1h 18 8 1 12 1•

Extra Large

30 112 54 1/J 46 57 27 1/a 23 1/a 38 1/• 11 17 31• 4 1h 43/• 21 17 h 41/• 1'12 6 9 3/a 23 2 11• 16 9'1• 183/• 8 3/a 12 3/•

'I•

'I•


Jll' f'f.: N OIX

---------

COS T ING S HEETS

HAI\~L~F~S~I~Z~E~S~R~IB~R~E~D~U~C~T~IO~N~S~:;;;;-;;;~;;;;int.~E·~df.r~e~ct,on.

reduct•ons m lengthwise ' over. . the final garment will have twill tape to 1en oerc~nt smaJ•er '" crossw•se dtrect•on w•thout any that stretch 10 0% and asurement. s1nce Use these measurements when draftmg slopers for fabncs ept for the shoulder me M ua,p4y your across measurements by .90. 10% smaller. exc Extra sta b•ltze the seam and prevent •t from stretch•ng Medium Large l arge

Mult ip ly Your Across

1

2 3 4

5 6

Wa1st to ankle

Watst to knee

7

An~le

8 9

Knee

10 11

12 13 14 15

16 17 18

19

Front crotch Back crotch

Crotch angle Nape to wa1st Back neck

Back neck nse Shoulder length Across back Sleeve length Shoulder p1tCI' B1cep

20

Wnst

21 22 23

Neck Bust span Bust level

sma

11

26'12

30 'f

1 40 ·'> 32 7/s

' .90 )( 90 X 90

Bust Watst

H1p Crotch depth

Extra Small

4 3 11• 15 1/s

No reduct•on No reduct•on No reduct1on

22518

37 1/ 2

9 1/a

15 3 14

' 90 "' 90 "' 90 ".90 x.90

3 3 5/a 1 '/7

16

No reduct•on No reduCtiOn X .90

3 1/ •

1% 5% 8% 22 112 1 112 13

No reduct1on

" .90 No reduct1on X .90 ".90 < .90 ' .90 " 90

6 3/4

15 3/4 7 1/4

10 3/4

No reduct1on

HALF SIZES FOUR-WAY REDUCTI ONS Ten percent smaller 1n crossw1se d~rec110n and 10% smaller in the lengthwise direction. Use these measurements when draftmg slopers tor fabncs that stretch 100% in both directions. Multiply your measurements by 90. 10% smaller, m both d~rect1ons. Multiply Your Across Measurements By

Extra Small

90 X 90 X .90 X .90 X .90 X 90 X .90 X .90 X .90 X .90 X .90 X .90

36 7/s 29 1/4 39 % 10% 21 1/ 4 35% 8% 15 112 2 112 3% 1% 14 3/4 23/• 1 5 112 8 3/s 22 1/ 4 1% 12% 6 16 3/4 7 10 3/•

14 1/2 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23

Bust Wa1st H1p Crotch depth Wa1st to knee Waist to ankle Ankle Knee Front crotch Back crotch Crotch angle Nape to waist Back neck Back neck rise Shoulder length Across back Sleeve length Shoulder pitch Bicep Wrist Neck Busl span Bust level

X

No reduction No reduction No reduction No reduction No reduction No reduction X X

.90 .90

No reduction X .90 X

.90

Extra Large

Small

Medium

Large

18 112 38 3/ 4 31 41 % 12 112 21 % 35 112 8 '1s 15% 2 3/4 3 7/a 1 15 3 1% 5%

22 112

26 112

30'h

40 112

42 1/ 4 34% 45 16 1/4 21% 35 3/4 9 3/a 15 7/a 3 1/7 4 1/s 1% 15 112 3 112 1% 5% 8 3/4 22% 1% 13% 7 17 7/a 7'1.1

44 1/s 36 112 46 3/ 4 18 1/a 21 3/4 35 7/s 9% 16 3% 4% 1% 15% 3% 1% 5 3/• 7 8 18 22 3/•

B'h

22 3/a 1 112 12 3/4 6% 17 '1s 7 11

32 7/ a 43 % 14% 21 112 35% 9 1/s 15% 3 4 1 1/4 15 1/4 3'1. 1 3/a 5% 8% 22 112 1% 13 6 3/4 17 112

7 1/4

11 1/•

11 112

2

13 3/•

7%

18 11•

7'1e 11 3/•


APPENDIX :

COSTING SHEETS

469

·s REGULAR SIZE STABLE KNITS REDUCTIONS ~EN

lrE""r '" crossw•se d•rect•on w1thout any reduct1ons 1n lengthw1se d •rect•on ~ _ rP"l"f'"'l 5.,.,a rnents \\hen draft•ng slopers for fabncs that stretch from 0% to 25% · " .t,tt~::# ~svft" ts exactly as recorded. w•thout any reduct•ons

Multiply Your Across Extra ~~ ~~su~men~~~~~~~~~~~~----~~~------~~~----------------------------------

~

Large Extra ~----~~!_----~~~ --=====~M~ea~s~u=r=e=m=e=n=t=s=B=y~====~S~m~a~I~I======~S~m~a~I~I------~M~e~d~i~u~ 40

:_________~~-----===~========~La~r~g~e ---------------~:-----------~~3~2~------~~3f6 ~ : ~ ~~ ~~ 40 4:4 48 ----;

wa•st

3 ' 5 6

CHr,potch dePth Wa,s110 knee Wa•s110ankle

7

8

1

fi.N'e

=crotch

~~ eac•~r~~~e

" 12 '3

t•

15 16 :7 18 19

~

2 2 23

No reductiOn No reduction No reduct1on X 1 > 1 > 1

:~

32

36

209, '> 36 8 13'Aa

9, • 203,, 36'

2

f'• 1

Grote Nape to wa,st Sac" necre Bae" neck nse Snoulde' ength

Noreduct1on No reduction x 1 N d 0 re, ~CtiOn

18 /a 21

~cei

No reduct1on x 1 X1 1 X1 x 1 No reductton

23 1 sla 10 112 6 'I• 1 13 12 51 9 12

,Across baC~h Stee>e 'eng h Sh<JOide'P'tC

N:k Chest span Chesllevel

~.

1•

4~, '>

2';,

21 37 14 'h 14 5/e 2'h

18 518 2

t9 'la 2 318

/2

14

14 11e

~'Ia 'I•

3,4

5 7/e 8

34

3/4

:

,

·~

23 'I• 131• 11 114 7 3 13 14 3 5 31a 9 14

~~~!

7l...

1':1

6318 2; 'l2 131• 12 731• 14 6 10

38

48

:~

44 9'·• 1 21 , 37'h 15 t 5"a

;~;

13 ·"' 19510 2Jte

";~

s''• 9

'h

2331•

~~~:

10 21' "> 38 1 15 7 15''•

~

t '? 20' e 23-e

s'~ "

tO 24

t 'l•

8 'h 14

13 '»

s'la

7 10 1,.,

'I•

10 'I•

~~ :~

MEN'S REGULAR SIZE MODERATE REDUCTIONS Two percent sma ler •n crosswtse d~rectton wtthout any reductions in lengthwise direction. Use these measurements when draft.ng slopers for fabrics that stretch from 25% to 50%. Mult•ply your across measurements by .98, 2% smaller, except for the shoulder measurement, since the final garment will have twill tape to stabiliZe the seam and preven11t from stretchtng . Extra Extra Multiply Your Across Large Large Medium Small Sma ll Measurements By 48 32 36 40 44 47 Chest x .98 39 43 'Ia 35 'I• 41 11a 31 3;a 3 , Watst x . 33 1a 37 ~I• 29 3;a 47 25 12 98 43 1 Htp x .98 31 % 35 1• 39 10 9 4 Crotch depth 9 '12 21112 No reductton 9 9 21 /' 3 5 1 1 38 to knee No reduction 20 12 20 14 2 37 / ' 1 7 6 15 1• atst 10 ankle No reduction 36 36 '12 3 /' 7 t 5'1s 8 X .98 13 8 3 13 13 318 9 Front crotch X .98 " '; 2314 4 1 10 Back crotch X .98 2 2 '1: 3% I /2 11 20 11a Crotch angle x .98 2% 31 ''e 1 1% 12 Nape to waist 2% x .98 11 " 19 'Ia 19% 31• 13 Backneck Noreduction 18 1e 18~1e 2% 3 2% 1 14 B k No reduction 2 1• 2 3I• 3 /4 s'l• ac neck rise 3 14 I• s% IS 10 Shoulder length X .98 6'11'e 6% 9' " 1I• 16 Across back 24 9 No reduction 5 1a '" 13/• 17 Sleeve length X .98 8 23 '12 1 18 13 1• 12 pitch No 1 'l2 9 19 1 8 14 1• 20 Wrtst x .98 10 11• 11 % 7 s/8 631• 21 Neck X 98 6 'Is 6 111a 133'• 14 1 . 1 13 12 6'1• 10 /• 3I ' 22 Chest span x .98 13 I• 5 /• 10 23 3

'I•

~atst

~~~~

~~~~der

Chest level

'I•

j•

1;;

~:~:

~:~;~

'I•

;

'I•

r:d~~tion

2~%

2~ :js;.:

'I•

1 ~ ~;

2~~:

------------~~x~-~9~8~~--------j4~ ~·~----_:~---------No reduction 9 ~!·~--------J5~'f.~• /4 9 '12________je~3~ 1


i4T0

Al'f'ENDIX:

COSTING SHEETS

MEN'S REGULAR SIZE STRETCHY REDUCTIONS t an

reduct•ons '" lengthwise d•recuon.

.

.

Three percent smaller'" crossw•se dtrection w•thou f b~cs that stretch from 50% to 75%. . ce the final garment wtll have twill tape to stabiUse these measurements when draft•ng s/oper~~~l/:r. except for the shoulder measurement, Sin Mulf•P'>' your across measurements by _97. 3% l•ze the seam and prevent 11 from stretchmg. E xtra

1

2 3

32

36

X .97 X .97 X .97

31 25 2/ o 31 9 1 20 36

35 29 35 9 1/ 4 20 3 / 4 36 112 13 %

Watst

Hrp Crotch depth

5 6

Warst to knee Wa1st to ankle

Ankle

8 9 10

Knee Front crotch Back crotch

11

Crotch angle

12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23

Extra Small

Chest

4

7

Multiply Your Across Measurements By

Nape to wa1st

Back neck Back neck nse

Shoulder length Across back Sleeve length Shoulder prtch Brcep Wrrst Neck Chest span Chest level

No reduct1on No reductron No reduct1on

' .97 .97 X .97 X 97 )( .97 X

7 ~Js 13 114

2 1/a 3

1

1

.97 .97 .97 X 97 X .97 No reduction

9 1•

X

.97

No reductiOn X

97

No reduct1on X

X

13 3/4

2 2 51s 18 1/e 2 1/4 J;, 5 71s 8 23 1% 10 11e 6 13 4%

No reductton No reduction

Small

1

Medium 40 38 3 /4 33 38 314 9 1/z 21 37 14 14 11e 2% 1

3 1• 1

18% 2 114 314 1 6 18 8 112 1 23 1• 1% 11 6 314 13% 1

5 1•

9 112

1

1•

1

19 1s 2 31s 314 6% 9 1 23 12 1% 11 % 7 112 13% 5 31• 9%

Large 44 36 71s 42% 9314 21 'I• 37 112 14 112 14% 2% 1 3 12 1 31s 19 % 2 31s

>;.

6% 1 9 12 3 23 1• 1 314 12 31s

8 11•

13 71s 1

6 1• 10

Large 48 46 112 40 31• 46 112 10 21 112 38 15 15 11s 3 3 71s 1 112 20 11s 2% 314 6 71s 10 24 1 314 13 9 14 631• 10 11s

MEN'S REGULAR SIZE SUPER-STRETCH REDUCTIONS Five percent smaller 1n crossw1se d1rect1on without any reductions in lengthwise direction.

Use these measurements when draft•ng slopers for fabrrcs that stretch lrom 75% to 100%. Multiply your across measurements by .95, 5% smaller, except for the shoulder measurement, since the final garment will have twill tape to stabilrze the seam and prevent rt from stretchrng. Multiply Your Across Measurements By

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23

Chest Wa1st Hip Crotch depth Warst to knee Waist to ankle Ankle Knee Front crotch Back crotch Crotch angle Nape to waist Back neck Back neck rise Shoulder length Across back Sleeve length Shoulder pitch Bicep Wrist Neck Chest span Chest level

X .95 X .95 X .95 No reduct1on No reduction No reduction X .95 X .95 X .95 X .95 X .95 No reduction No reduction X .95 No reduction X .95 No reduction X .95 X .95 X .95 X .95 X .95 No reduction

Extra Small

Small

Medium

32

36

40

44

30 31s 24 314 30% 9 20 112 36 7% 13 1 71s 1 2 12 1 1 18 1a 1 2 1• 314

34 1• 1 28 12 34 9 114 20 314 36 112 13 114 13 % 1 2 1a 2 71a 1 18 % 2 tl4 3;,

38 32 114 38 9 112 21 37 13 3/4 13 71s 2 3/a 3'1a 1 '1. 19 'Ia 2%

41 314 1 36 1s 41 >;. 9% 21 ';. 37 112 14 tl4 14 >;. 2% 1 3 12 1 1 13 19% 2 31a 314 6% 9 tl2 23 3/4 1% 12 1/a 8 13 tl2 s'AI gJ;.

5 71a 8 23 1% 10

6

12 7/a 4% 9

1

'I•

6tla 8tl2 23tl4 1% 10 314 s% 13 5 1/a gt;4

%

s% 9 23'12 1% 11% 7% 13 t/4 s% 1 9 12

Large

Extra Large 48 45% 39 7;. 45 % 10 21 112 38 14 314 14% 2 71a 3 3 14 1% 20 'Ia 2%

>;.

s% 10 24 1 3/4 12 7111

8 3/4

3 13 /• 1 6 h

10

.

"" i i ii

i ii

I

t

•• •• I I


APPENDIX :

~EN

COSTIN G SHEETs

------

·s REGULAR SIZE RIB REDUCTIONS -

471

crossw•se d~rectton wtthout any reducttons •n lengthwtse dtrection

-ce·,l smaller'" 1 when drafttng slopers for fabncs that stretch 100% and over 10% smaller, except for the shoulder measure me l ~ t 1\ ,'()Lir across ~prevent rt from stretchmg. nt. smce the fmal garment w II h ,u?fl('l. the seam an • ave twtll tape to

~-~., ~t"se mE'asureme~:surements by .90.

--5tabrr ..e

Multiply Your Across

Extra

------=====M=e=a=s=u=r=e=m=e=n=t=s=B~y=======S=m~a=II========~S~m~~a~II ~M~e~d~iu~m~----~~~-------1~~ Large 44 ~-------------:~------~-----~;-------;~---~~==~~ 1

2

3

Large

______

48

c~est

39'1. 34';• 39 5/s 9'1• 21 1t. 37 112 13 11> 13';, 1 2 12

wa,st

~;~tch depth

WaJst to knee waist to ankle

8 9 10 •1 12

!3 14

15 16 17 18 19

20 21 22 23

Extra

Ankle Knee Front crotch sack crotch Crotch angle Nape to wa1st sack neck sack neck nse ShOulder length Across back Slee'e ,ength Shoulder p•tch 81cep Wnst Neck Chest span Chest level

3 1/4

43 1; . 37 3;. 43 1!. 10 21 11> 38 14 14 2 3!.. 3!)/8

1 1/4 19'ta 2'1a

13/a 20 1/e 2'1a

6'1a 1 9 12 23 3/• 1% 11 112

6 7/e 10 24 1'/a t2 11a 8 3/a 13

'I•

7'1a 7

12 1a 5'1• 1 9 1•

'I•

6 1/4

9 112

MEN'S REGULAR SIZE FOUR-WAY REDUCTIONS

......... ........... ..... tiil!ll

tliiiJ'

~

..... .....

.......-.....~

~ ~

.....

Ten percent smaller 1n crossw1se d~reclion and 10% smaller in the lengthwise direc tion. Use these measurements when draftmg slopers for fabrics that stretch 100% in both directions. Mutt1pty your measurements by .90, 10% smaller, 1n both d~rect1ons. Multiply Your Across Measurements By

1 2 3 4

5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23

Ches1 Wa1st H1p Crotch depth Wa1st to knee Wa1st to ankle Ankle Knee Fronl crotch Back crotch Crotch angle Nape to waist Back neck Back neck rise Shoulder length Across back Sleeve length Shoulder pitch B1cep Wnst Neck Chest span Chest level

X .90 X .90 X .90 X.90 X .90 X .90 X .90 X .90 X .90 X .90 X .90 X .90 No reduction No reduction No reduction No reduction No reduction No reduction X .90 X .90 No reduction X .90 X .90

Extra Large

E xtra S m a ll

Sma ll

M e dium

Large

32

36

40

44

48

34 114 28% 1 34 1• 9 7 19 1• 35 7 12 1a 13 1 2 1a 3 11a 1 1 1• 18 2'!1

36 30% 36 9 20 35 1/a 13 1 13 1• 1 2 1• 3% 1 1 /• 1 18 1• 2%

28 3/4 23% 3 28 1• 1 8 12 1 19 12 1 34 /4 1 7 1• 12 ';. 1% 2% 1 1 17 1• 1 2 1•

30% 1 25 /4 30 5/a 8% 19% 1 34 12 12% 1 12 12 2 7

2 1• 1 1 17 12 1 2 /•

'I•

3;.

5 71a 8 23 1% 1 9 12 s% 1 13 12 4% 9

6 1 8 1• 23 'Ia 1% 3 9 1•

6 13% 3 4 /• 1 9 /a

32% 27 32% 3 8 1• 3 19 1• 34% 12% 3 12 1• 2 3 1 11a 3 17 /• 1 2 1•

'I• 1

6 /a 1 8 /2 1 23 1• 3 1 1•

10 1/8 6'1< 3

13 1•

5 9'1•

'I•1

6 1• 8 31• 23% 3 1 1• 1 10 12 6'1s 7 13 /• 1 5 18

9'/8

'I• 3

6 1• 9 1 23 12 1'14 3 10 1• 7

14

5 3/a 1 9 12


47~

t't't Nnl

COSTI NG SHEETS

MEN 'S SHORT SIZE STABLE KNITS REDUCTIONS -f'"-' ~,-cent smaller m crossw1se d~rect10n w1thout any reductions'" lengthwise dJ';~~on. Use tl1ese measurements when draft1ng slopers for fabncs that stretch from 0% to UsE' your measurements exactly as recorded w1thout any reductions

Multiply Your Across Measurements By

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23

"' 1 1 • 1

Chest

X

Wa1st

Hrp Crotch depth

No reduct1on

Wa1st to knee Wa1st to ankle

No reduct10n No reduct•on

>< )( )( )( "

Ankle Knee Front crotch

Back crotch Crotch angle Nape to warst Back neck Back neck rise

Shoulder length Across back Sleeve length Shoulder prtch Brcep Wrrst Neck Chest span Chest level

1 1 1 1 1

No reduction

No reduct1on X 1 No reductton X

1

No reduction

1 1 1 1 1 No reductron X

X X X X

·

Extra Small

Small

32 s

36S

40S

44

36 30 38 9 7/a 22 1 /a 39 '/a 14 3;a 14 .,., 2 3/e 3 ';•

40 34 42 10 1/a 22 3/a 40 1/a 14 'Ia 15 2% 3 112 1% 20 1/ 4 2%

44 3a 46 10% 22% 40% 15 3/a 15 1/2 2 7/ a 3 7/a 1 112 3 20 /• 2 112 7 /s 6 3/• 3 9 /4 25% 1 7/s 13 112

32 26 34 9 '1'1 7 21 11! 39 1/a

s 'l'l

14 2 '1'1 2 'Ill 1 19 1/4 2 3/s

'I•

6 8 1/• 24 5/ s 1 314 11 1/ 4 6 112 14 5 9 7/8

1

1 /4

19 3/ 4 2 3/ s 3;,

6

1 /•

s 37/ •

24 / s 1 3/ 4 12 7 14 1/ • 6 9 7/s

'I•

Medium

'I• 1

6 12 9 1/4 25 1/s 1 7/s 12 3/4 8 1 14 / 2 6% 9 7/s

Large

s

Extra Large 4a s

a'!.

14 3/4 7 9 7/a

48 42 50 10% 22 7/a 41 1/e 15 7/e 16 3 ';• 4 1/e 1% 21 ';, 2 112 1 /a 7

to ';,

25% 2 14 1/ 4 9 112 15 7% 9 7/e

MEN'S SHORT SIZE MODERATE REDUCTIONS Two percent smaller m crosswtse d~rect1on Without any reductions in lengthwise direction. Use these measurements when drattrng slopers tor fabrics that stretch from 25% to 50%. Multrply your across measurements by .9a, 2% smaller, except for the shoulder measurement, since the final garment will have twill tape to stabilize the seam and prevent rt from stretchrng.

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 a 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 1a 19 20 21 22 23

Chest Warst Hrp Crotch depth Warst to knee Warst to ankle Ankle Knee Front crotch Back crotch Crotch angle Nape to warst Back neck Back neck rise Shoulder length Across back Sleeve length Shoulder pitch Bicep Wrist Neck Chest span Chest level

Multiply Your Across Measurements By

Extr a Sma ll 32S

36

s

40 S

44S

.9a X .98 X .98 No reductron No reduction No reduction X .9a X .9a X .9a X .9a X .98 No reductron No reductron X .9a No reductron X .9a No reduction X .9a X .98 X .98 X .98 X .9a No reduct ion

31 3/a 25 112 33 % 9% 21 7/a 39 1/a a';, 13'1. 2 2 3/4 1 1 19 /• 2%

35 1/4 29 3/a 37 1/ 4 7 9 /a 1 22 /a 39% 14 14 2;e 2 3/a 3 1/a 1 1/a 19 3/• 2'1e

39 /• 33% 41 1/a 10 1/a 22% 40 1/a 14% 14 3/4 2% 3% 1 '!. 20 ';. 2 '1e

1

43 /a 1 37 /4 45 10% 22% 40 % 15 15 1/< 2 7/a 3 3/4 1% 20 % 1 2 12

6 a';, 24% 1% 11 6 3/a 13'1. 4 3/4 9%

6 1/4 a% 24% 1% 11 % 7 1/a 14 1 5 /• 9%

X

'I•

Sma ll

3;.

M edium

3;. 1

6 12 9 1/4 1 25 /a

t'!. 1

12 12

7 1/a

14 1/ 4 s% 9%

Large

1

1;e

6% 9 '1. 25 % 1% 1 13 / • a% 14 1/2 6 1/ 4 9%

Extra Large 48S 47 41 1/a 49 10% 7 22 /a 41 1/a 1 15 12 15% 3 4 1 112 1 21 /• 2 112 7 /a 7 1 10 /• 25 % 7 1 /s 14 1 9 /• 14 3/• 6 '/4

g'fe


APPENDIX :

COSiiN G S HEEis

473

·s sHORT SIZE STRETCHY REDUCTIONS

MEN

d~rection without any reduct•ons 1n length

"'"'lflPf) )'our d prevent It from stretchmg the seam an ,:e Multiply Your Across Measurements By

surement, smce the final garment Will h

E x tra Small

avetw•lltoPe to stab,. Small

32S 1

2 3 4

5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23

... = ...-....

..

ller 1n crossw•se

pereent ~~:ements when draf11ng slopers for fabncs that stretch from ~~ 1direction. 7 1_,~trwse use me:cross measurements by 97, 3% smaller, except for the shoulder me~ 5%

cnest wa•sl

~~tch

depth wa 1stlo knee Wa•stto ankle Ankle Knee Front crotch Back crotch crotch angle Nape to wa1st Back neck Back neck nse Shoulder length Across back Sleeve length Shoulder p1tch B1cep Wnst Neck Chest span Chest level

X .97 X .97 X .97 No reduction No reduction No reduction X .97 X .97 X .97 X .97 X .97 No reduction No reduction X .97 No reduction X.97 No reduction X .97 X .97 X .97 X .97 X .97 No reduction

31 25 1/4 33 9% 21 7/a 39 1/a 1 8 /a 13 5/a 2 2 3/4 1 1 19 /4 2% 3/4 6 a';, 24% 1 3/4 11 6 ';, 13% 4 3/4 1 9 12

36S 35 29 7 36 /a 7 9 /a 22 1/a 39% 14 14 1 2 /4 3 1 1 /a 19 3;, 2% 3;, 1 6 /4 a3;, 7 24 /a 1 3/4 11% 7 7 13 /a 3 5 14 1 9 12

Medium

s

40 38 3;, 33 40 3;, 1 10 /a 22% 40 1/a 14 3/a 14 112 2 112 3 3/a 1 ';, 20 1/4 2 3/a 3;, 6 112 9 ';, 1 25 /a

t%

12 3/a

7'1. 14 6 3/4 1 9 12

Extra Large

Large 44

s

42 518 36 7;, 44'18 10';. 22'1. 40';, 15 t5 23; , 33;,

t%

203;, 1 2 12 7 /a 63;, 9'1• 25'1. 7 1 /a 13 8 112 1 14 /•

?'Ia 1 9 12

48S 46'n

40 3/ ..

4B 1n 10'18 22 718 41 118 15 318 15 1;, 3 4

,.,.,

211/4 1 2h '18 7 10 1/• 25'18 1718 13 718

g';.

14 112 8'1a 1 9 12

MEN'S SHORT SIZE SUPER-STRETCH REDUCTIONS

Five percent smaller 1n crosswise direction without any reductions in lengthwise direc tion. Use these measurements when drafting slopers for fabrics that stretch from 75% to 100% . Mullip/y your across measurements by .95, 5% smaller, except for t he shoulder measurement, since the final garment will have twill tape to stabl· lize the seam and prevent 1t from stretching. Extra Multiply Your Across Extra Large Large Medium Small Small Measurements By 48S 44 40S 36S 32S 3 45% 41 /• 1 1 Chest 7 3 38 34 1• 1 39 18 30 1a X .95 1 36 1a 1 1 2 Waist 32 1• 28 12 31• 47 12 X .95 24% 1 43 1 3 39 1a 1 Hip to% 36 1a X.95 32 1• 1 tO 'Is 4 10 1a Crotch depth 22 7/e 9 71a 9% No reduction 22 % 1 1 5 Waist to knee 22% 41 /a 22 1a 21 'Ia 1 40% No reduction 6 40 1a 15 Waist to ankle 39 % 1 14% 39 'Ia 1 No reduction 7 Ankle 14 1a 15 /• 3 13'1s 1 14 1• 8 X .95 8 Knee 14 1• 3 1 13'1< 1 2'1< 13 1• X .95 9 4 1 2 12 Front crotch 2 1• 1 3% 2 X .95 10 1 12 3% Back crotch 1 1'1s 3 1 2% 11 X .95 21 1• 1 1 1• 3 Crotch angle 1 1a 20 1• 1 2 112 1 12 X .95 20 1• 3 Nape to waist 1 2'/2 19 1• 'le 19 14 13 No reduction 7 2 '1s Back neck 1a 3 2% 7 14 2 1a 31• No reduction 1 631• 31• Back neck rise tO 1• 15 31• X .95 6 1/2 1 931• Shoulder length 6 1• 25% ts 6 9'/4 No reduction 25% Across back 831• 1'/e 1 1 17 8 1• 25 1a 1 X .95 131• Sleeve length 13 12 24 'Ia 18 7 t31• 24% No reduction 3 t2 /8 9 Shoulder pitch 1 1 1• 19 1 1a 12 1'1s X .95 s% B•cep 14 1• 11 % 20 7 '18 10% 7 t4 X .95 Wrist s'l2 3 6 1a 1 21 13 1• 6 1a 1'12 1 g'/8 X .95 Neck 1 1 t3 12 22 6 12 g'ls 13 1• X .95 Chest span 23 5'1s g'l• 4% 1 X .95 Chest level 9 12 9% No reduction

s


474

APPENDIX.

COSTI NG SHEETS

MEN 'S SHOAT SIZE RIB REDUCTIONS

.

I ngthwise dtrectton. Ten percent smaller m crossw•se direct1on wtthout any reducttons in ~ 100 % and over. ·nee the fin al garment Wtll have twill tape to Use these measurements when drafting slopers for fabncs that stretc houlder measurement . 51 Multtply your across measurements by .90, 10% smaller, except for the 5 stabthze the seam and prevent it from stretchtng. Extra

Multiply Your Across Measurements By

Extra small 3

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23

Chest Waist

H1p Crotch depth Watst to knee Watst to ankle

Ankle Knee Front crotch

Back crotch Crotch angle Nape to watst

Back neck Back neck nse Shoulder length Across back Sleeve length Shoulder p1tch Bicep Wnst Neck Chest span Chest level

X X X

90 90 .90

No reduction No reductton No reductton X .90 " .90 ~ .90 ' .90 X 90

No reductton No reductton

>< .90 No reduction X .90 No reduction >< .90 X .90 X .90 X .90 X .90 No reduction

28 1• 23 3/ B 30 5/a g5;a 21 7/s 39 118 7 112 12 5/a 2 2 112 1 19 114 2% 314 6 8 11• 24% 1% 10 118

5 71•

12% 4% 7 8 1s 28 314

small 32 3/B 27 1 34 1• 9 7/a 22 'Ia 39% 13 13 2 'Ia 1

2 1• 1 19 31• 2% 314 1 6 1• 8 314 7 24 1a 1% 10% 6 112 12 718 5 112 8 '1s 32%

Medium

Large

36

39 51a

30 518 37 3/4 10 11a 22% 40 11• 13% 13 112 3 2 1• 3 'Ia 1 'Ia 1 20 1• 2 31s 314 6 112 1 9 1• 25 11a 1 51a 11 112 1 7 1• 13 1 6 1• 8 31• 36

1

34 1• 41 3/a 10 318

22%

40 5/s 13 718 14 2 51a 3 112 1 1 1• 20 314 2 112

'Is

6 314 9 314 25 318 1 314 12 11s 7 71a 13 ';. 7 11a

8 71a

39 %

Large 43';.

-

37 3;. 45 lOS;. 22 7/s 41 1/s 14 1/4 14 3/s

2 11a

33;. 1 31s 21 'I• 1 2 12 7

1a

7 10'1• 25% 3 1 1· 7 12 1s 8 112 13 112 8 1 8 1s 43 114

MEN'S SHORT SIZE FOUR-WAY REDUCTIONS Ten percent smaller 1n crossw1se d~recllon and 10% smaller in the lengthwise direction. Use these measurements when drafhng slopers for fabrics that stretch 100% in both direct ions. Multiply your measurements by .90. 10% smaller, in both directions.

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23

Chest Waist Hip Crotch depth Waist to knee Waist to ankle Ankle Knee Front crotch Back crotch Crotch angle Nape to waist Back neck Back neck rise Shoulder length Across back Sleeve length Shoulder pitch Bicep Wrist Neck Chest span Chest level

Multiply Your Across Measurements By

Extra Small

Small

32 s

36S

40$

44S

48S

X .90 X .90 X .90 X .90 X .90 X .90 X .90 X .90 X .90 X .90 X .90 X .90 No reduction No reduction No reduction No reduction No reduction No reduction X .90 X .90 No reduction X .90 X .90

28 314 23 % 30% 9 11s 20 314 37 11a 1 7 12 12% 2

30 % 25 114 32 % 1 9 1•

32% 27 34 114 9% 21 37% 13 13 2'1a 3 11a 1'1. 18% 3 2 1a 314 6 114

34 ';. 28% 36 1 9 12 21 'Ia

36 30 % 37 % 9% 1 21 1• 1 38 /s 3 13 1• 1 13 1.! 2 3/a 3'1.! 1 1 /J 1 19 1• 2%

2 71a

1 18 114 3 2 18 314 6

8'1• 24% 3 1 14 10 11s 5'1• 14 4% 9%

20 71•

37% 12 314 12 71a 2 3 1 11a 18 112 2%

3;.

6 11a 1 8 12 24'1. 1% 10 112

6'1•

14 'Ia 431• 9'1•

Medium

a%

24 71a 1 314 10314 1 6 12 14'1• 5'1• 1 9 1•

Large

37 71a

13 'Ia 1 13 14 2 114 3 3 /a 1 1 /• 19 2 31a

3;.

6 31a 9 25 1 7/a

Extra Large

'I•

s'n 1

1

9 1• 1 25 /s 1'/s 1 11 1.!

ss;,

14 1.! 1 6 1•

11 /a 6 7/a 14%

93/e

7 11• 1

-

9 1/•


A PPENDI X :

p.4E"'••'5 T.AL

L

COST I NG S HEETS

475

siZE STABLE KNITS REDUCTIONS

rossw1se drrechon w•thout any reductrons tn lengthwtse dtrect•on pf'"('ef''t smaller 1M ~s when draftrng slopers for fabncs that stretch from 0% to 25%

:~r0 ~se measurernen .,..,..actly as recorded without any reductions.

... .....---=:

't!

=:;

5

M~e~d~i;u~m~----~~~------lE~x~ tr~a~ 32 TII======~S~m~a; 36 TII------~ Large Large -------~M~ea~s~u~r~e~m=e=n=t~s==B~y=======S~m~a~

-----

4~T~======~!=~ ______~ 40~T--------~4~ -------------~~----------~~~------~~:_ ~ ; : 32 36 40 44 48 T

wa~st 2 ~;~tch

3 '

5 6

7 8 9 tO 11 12 13

depth Wa•sttoknee

warst to ankle Ankle Knee Front crotch sack crotch Crotch angle Napetowarst Back neck

Xl

~~ ;:~~~::~~

Noreduct1on x l ~: x 1 x1 No reduc!IOn

Noreduct1on

x 1

Back neck nse

:~ !:'~~~~~th,h

No reduct1on

SteeVe leng

No reduct1on

17 18 19 20 21 22

ShoUlder P•tch S'cep Wnst Neck Chest span Chest level

x 1 X 1 x 1 X 1 x 1 No reductiOn

14

23

X,

;~

;~ '• 40 1 2~•/a 2 '1• 1 20 11e 2 1/• 3/• 5 7/ e 286

~~

;~~:

40'u.~ :: ,1, 2 'I• 3 1 '!e 20% 2' '•

3'

~

~g23 h

39

41

~~ h

~~31,

1

48 11

7

5;,

23 /e

14 h 14 'to 2 '12 313;, 21 'I• 118

~~',~

24 18

,

1

15 'le 231• 313 'to 1• 21518

15'/e 3 4 1 1 1:1 22 ;a 23/a

23/e 314

23;8

286:~.

2~6~~

26 '/•

27

t '!a

2 12 731• 14 6 10

2 1231• B'h 14

2 13'7 g' ,, 14 'n 7 103 4

6 '~: ,,

7

1 le 10 '12 6 '1• 13 '12 53 9 1•

3 5

11

'I•

7 1331• 3 5 1• 10

t L

'I•

31 "'

r3.~

'I•

6% 1

10

;,

31 •

1f "

MEN'S TALL SIZE MODERATE REDUCTIONS Two percent smaller 1n crossw1se d 1rect 1on without any reductions in lengthwise direction. Use these measurements when draftmg slopers for fabrics lhat stretch from 25% to 50% , Mulllply your across measurements by ,98, 2% smaller, except for !he shoulder measurement, since the final garment will have twill tape to s1ablhzelhe seam and prevent 1t from stretc hing.

~

§

·

~~~t"" measurem~e~n~ts~~~~~~~~~~~~~~--~~~~------~-------------------------------------US' Multiply Your Across Extra

4

5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 t6 17 18 19 20 21 22

23

Chest WaiSt Hlp Crotch depth Wa1st to knee

~na~~~ to ankle Knee Front crotch

Back crotch Crotch angle Nape waist 10 Back neck B k ac neck rise Shoulder length Across back Sleeve length Shoulder Pilch B•cep Wrist Neck Chest span Chest

Mult iply Your A c ross Measurements By

E xtra Sma ll 32 T

36 T

40 T

x ,98

31 'Ia 26 '12 31 'Ia 10 23 11e 40 8 1331a

35 11• 30% 35 11• 1 10 1• 3 23 1/ e 40 12 1331• t3 '1e 1

39 1• 34 'I• 1 39 1• 10 '12 23''• " 41 14 '1• 14 31e 2 '12 3

2% 1 1 20 1a 2 3

'I•

3 1 'Ia 20% 2 2;e

1I•

6''a

8 26 131• 10 11• 6 'Ia 13'1•

8h 26 1'1e 11 7 6 /a 13 '12 1

X

,98

x ,96 No reduction No reduction No reduction x ,98 x ,98 X 98 , X ,98 x ,98 No reduction No reduct ion X ,98 No reduction x ,98 No reduction x ,98 X ,98 x ,98 X ,98

2

5 1a

'!ev~e~'------------~~x~,~ 9~8~~--------J4~3~~·-No reduction g '12 _

Small

2 1•

31,

('

'I•

Medium

1

'I• 1 2 ~ ~~:

Large 44 T 43 '/e 38 'I• 43 'Ia 1031 7' 23 /e

i!!;! 1

14'1• 23'• { 3 /e 1>;. 21 'Ia 2 >;,

2%

'le o

631e 9

6 1/a 9 3h 26 /•

'le

2

~ I;! t

113/• 7 o;, 13 31, 531• 10

Extra Large 48 T 47 , 42 le 47 11 4 2 2

'I•

is•;. 15% 3 4

1' ~

('

22 Ia 2% 7 'le

a'fa

6 1e 10 27 2 13 9 14'1•

14 6 11/4

lO 'h

2

12 'h

'I•

6•1,

j5~~1·~------_2~--------__.:1~0~1~•-------------

______ 9 31•


4;"6

'\PPlNDIX:

COSTING SHEETS

MEN'S TALL SIZE STRETCHY REDUCTIONS ll'u·~ rcent smaller rn crosswrse drrectron wrthout any reducttons '" lengthwtse d~rec~on. u ..e th:e measurements when draft•ng slopers for fabncs that stretch

fro~dSO~~~:;ement· srnce the final garment w•ll have twtll tape to stabt_

M.ulttply your across measurements by .97. 3% smaller. except for the shou er l•ze the seam and prevent 11 from stretchtng

Multiply Your Across Measurements By

1 2

Chest Warst

H1p Crotch depth

3 4 5 6 7

Ankle

8

Knee

Warst to knee Warst to ankle

9 Front crotch 10 Back crotch lt Crotch angle 12 Nape to W81St 13 Bat.:k neck 14 Back neck nse 15 Shoulder length 16 Across back t7 Slaeve length 18 Shoulder p1tch t9 B•cep 20 Wnst 21 Neck 22 Chest span 23 Chest level

.97

)i

' .97 .97

X

No reductron No reductron No reductron

)( .97 97 X 97 )( .97 )( .97 '>(

No reductron No reductron

)( .97 No reductron

97

X

No reductron X .97 X .97 X X

X

.97 .97 .97

No reductron

Extra Small

Extra

Small

Medium

Large

Large

32 T

36T

40T

44T

48T

31

35 30 35 10'/•

38 314

42~/e 7 37 to

46 1h

42% 10 3t. 23 718 41 1h 14 112 14'18 2'18 3 112 1 3to 21 5to

46 1h

26' ·.. 31 10 23 1-11 40 7

7 '8 1 13 / 4

23 3to

40 1h 13 5/ e 13 314 2118

2

2 1/ •

3 1 20% 2 1/.s

5 7/ s

6 1/s

2'111 1 1 20 18 3;,

3t•

8 112

8

26 13/• 10 1/s 6 13

4 31• 1

9 12

1

26 14 1 718 11

6 31•

13% 1 5 1•

931•

34 38 3 /.a 10 1h 23 5 te 41 14 14 1to 2 3/e

3 1/4 1 /4

1

21 'to

2 3to 3t• 6 3to

9

26 1h 1 7to 11%

7 112

13% 5 314 10

2 3to 3t• 6 5/s

9 1h

3 26 t• 2 12% 1

6 1•

13 7to 1

6 1•

10 118

41 "to 11 24 118 42 15 15 1/e 3 3

7

to

1

1h 22 1111

2 3to 3t• 7 6 111

10 27 2 13 9 14

3 6 1•

10 3to

MEN 'S TALL SIZE SUPER-STRETCH REDUCTIONS Five percent smaller 1n crosswrse drrect1on wrthout any reductions in lengthwise direction.

Use these measurements when draft1ng slopers for fabrics that stretch from 75% to 100%. Multiply your across measurements by .95, 5% smaller, except for the shoulder measurement, since the final garment will have twill tape to stabi-

llze the seam and prevent 1t from stretching.

Multiply Your Across Measurements By t Chest 2 Wars t 3 H1p 4 Crotch depth 5 Warst to knee 6 Waist to ankle 7 Ankle 8 Knee 9 Front crotch 10 Back crotch t1 Crotch angle t2 Nape to waist 13 Back neck t4 Back neck nse t5 Shoulder length t6 Across back 17 Sleeve length 18 Shoulder pitch 19 Bicep 20 Wrist 21 Neck 22 Chest span 23 Chest level

X.95 X .95 X .95 No reductron No reduction No reductron X .95 X .95

X .95 X .95

X .95 No reduction No reduction

X .95 No reduction

X .95 No reduction X .95 X .95 X .95 X .95 X .95 No reduction

Extra Small

Small

32T

36T

30% 25% 30 31e tO 1 23 to 40 7% 13 7 1 1a

34 1•

2 112

1 1 20 18 1 2 1• 3;, 5 '1• 8 26 1 314 tO 6 7 12 /a 4% 9';,

1

29 1h 34 11s 1 10 1• 23 318 1

40 12 1 13 14 13 31a 1 2 1a

2 71a

1 20% 1

2 1• 3;,

1

6 /a 1 8 12 26 1/4 1'1. 10'1. 6% 13

5 1/a 1 9 h

Medium

Large

40T

44 T

38 1 33 14 38 1 10 12 23% 41 13 314 7 13 1a

41 314 37 41 314 10 314 7 23 18 41 112 1 14 1• 14 31o 2% 1 3 12 1 21%

2 31a 1

3 16 1 1 14 21 11a 3 2 /a

31• 6% 9

26 112 7 1 /a 11% 3 7 /o 13 1/4 s% 9 3;.

'I•

2 31a

>;.

6% 1 9 12 26 3/4 1 7/a

12 'Ia 8 13 1h 6 10

Extra La rge 48 T 45% 7 40 18 45% 11 1 24 1• 42 3 14 1• 7 14 1a 7 2 1a 3% 1% 1 22 1o 2% 3;, 7 6 /o 10 27 2 12 7/s

8 3/4

3 13 1•

6 1h

10

1 /•

....... ..... ...... .-,-

ill


APPENDIX:

COSTING S H EETS

477

~RIB REDUCTIONS MEN'S fA direction withou t any reductions 1n lengthwise dlrect1on 1

nt 51113uer in cro~,:~~rafting slopers for fabn cs that stretch 100% and over easurements nts by 90. 10% smaller, except for the s houlder measurement, since the fl

ren perce

1 use rnesyoe';across measure~~ from stretching na garment Will have tWill tape to MLIIIipiY seam aarn:c;d~p~re::v:o:e~n~~~:;;;~~~~;;;,;---;;;~;----------------------=:.:::__

stab•l•ze the

:_

Multiply Your Across Measurem e nts By

Extra Small 32 T

Small 36 T

M edium 40 T

32 11e 10 /• 23 31e

36 10 '12 23%

Extra Large

Large

------------------------:~--------~~~------~v,-------~~------~ 44~T~----~4~8~T~ ~ ~ ~g ~~~:: ~f31' ;~,12 39'1• 43 '1• 3 3 waist 1-liP crotch depth

x .90 No reduction No reduction

28 1• 10 23 'Is

Waist to knee

No reduction

40

40 112

t3 t4 t5 t6 t7 t8 t9

WaiSt to ankle Ankle Knee Front crotch Back crotch Crotch angle Nape to wa,st sack neck . Back neck nse Shoulder length Across back Sleeve length Shoulder pitch Bicep

x .90 x .90 x .90 X .90 X .90 No reduction No reduction x .90 No reduction X. 90 No reduction X .90

12% 12 31, 2 231• 1 20% 2 'I• 314 6 11a 8'' '2 26 11• 1 31• 1 10 /'

20 2t 22 23

Wrist Neck span Chest Chest level

2

3 4

i 7

98 tO tt 12

7 'I• 1 12 1• 3 1 1• 2'1s

'Is

x .90

20 'Is 2 'I• 314 5 71a 8 26 1 'Ia , 9,(2

x .90

12 11s

No reduction

3 8 I•

X .90

x .90

5 /8

4 'Is

6 14

12% 4 71a 9

;~%'8

38 1;, 43 /• 11

10{• 23

41

13 13 ';, 2 'I• 3 1'1s 21 'le 2% ,1, 6% 9 26 112 131• 3 10 I• 7

12% 5% 9 'I•

/

1

8

41 (> 13 2 13 / /' 2 (> 31 /' /' 2

~~: >;. s'le

9 112 26 >;. 13'• ,. 11 '12 7'fe 12 71s 5 3,.'• 9 '12

24 /s

42 14 14 23/• 3'1• 3 1 /B

2 ~~:

,,,

1;,

6"

10 27 13,, , 12 'le

8 3~8

13

s ''• ,. 9 ';.

MEN'S TALL SIZE FOUR-WAY REDUCTIONS Ten percent smaller in crosswise direction and 10% smaller in the lenglhwise direction. Use these measurements when drafting slopers for fabrics I hat stretch 100% in both directions. Mulllplyyourmeasurements by .90,10% smaller, in both directions.

t 2 3 4 5 6

Chest Waist Hip Crotch depth Waist to knee Waist to ankle

9

nee Front crotch Back crotch

~ ~nkle ~~ 123 t t4

~~

t tS7 19 20 2t 22 23

~~~-

Napetowaist Back neck Back neck rise Shoulder length Across back Sleeve length Shoulder pitch Bleep Wrisl N 9Ck Chestspan

~

Extra large

Multiply Your Across Measurements By

Extra Small 32 T

36 T

40 T

44 T

48 T

x .90 x .90 X .90 x .90 x .90 x .90 x .90 x .90 X . 90 X . 90

28 % 24 'I• 28 314 9 112 22 38

36 31'12 36 10 , ~

1g1, 's {' 2 I•

19\ 's {' 2 I•

1•

1•

32% 28 32 31s 9314 22'1• 3 8 '12 12'1s 12 31• 2 3 1'1s 19% ,, 2 1, 34

34 11• 29 31• 1 34 1•

12 '1. 1 ';. 2 'Is

30% 26 'Is 30'1s 9 s;. 22 38 'I• 12% 12 '12 2 2 'Ia

~

·.9900

7'1•

No reduction No reduction No reduction No reduction No reduction No reduction X .90 X .90 Noreduc tlon

5 1a 8 26 1 71s g 112 5% 13tl2

X.go

4%

3

7

Small

3

6 8 'I• 1 26 1s 1 71s

9 31,

6 13% 4%

Medium

6 ,,~._

8 ,',: 26 ~ 1 10 'Is 6 •; 4

1!~ 1

Large

9 71a

22 1f.l 38 31• 12 '/8 13 1 2 /8 31a

1~

19'/8 2 3.s

s.,

6 '· , 8 ,1, 26 s.'e 1 'Ia 10 ' '2 5

6 18

13 1'8 5 g 5/e

22

'

39

~; ... ,, 2 3~ 8 1 4 20 3 2 \!

s,,

53 ~ 9 26' '2 2 10 3 •

7 14 3 5 11 9 314

------------~x~.9~0~----------~g~t;.~4 _________!93~/s~------~9~12~------~~-------------


Richardson, keith designing and patternmaking for stretch fabrics  
Richardson, keith designing and patternmaking for stretch fabrics  
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