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COMMUNITY COLUMNISTS INSIDE!

WEDNESDAY

THE

Lighting the way for Alexander City & Lake Martin since 1892 SPORTS BRHS take area volleyball October 19, 2016 Vol. 124, No. 210 www.alexcityoutlook.com crown, Page B1.

4% FUNDS CITY SERVICES

Two area stores hit by ‘smash and grab’ burglars By MITCH SNEED Editor

Mitch Sneed / The Outlook

Alexander City Police Department investigators were on the scene at Five Points Annex on Jefferson Street Tuesday morning after a smash and grab burglary was reported at the business.

Alexander City Police Department investigators are looking for answers in two more smash and grab burglaries at area businesses early Tuesday morning. Alex City In and Out on

Dadeville Road and Five Point Annex on Jefferson Street were both hit by burglars some time after they closed for business Monday evening. Police were called to the convenience store shortly after midnight Tuesday morning. “At that location entry was

CAMP HILL

made by removing an air conditioning unit,” said Det. Sabrina Osborne. “They attempted to gain entry to the store’s cash drawer, but when they were unsuccessful, they took undisclosed items from the store and left the scene.” See BURGLARY • Page 2

Local high school grad rates show improvement

Police chief recovering after being hit by vehicle By CLIFF WILLIAMS Staff Writer

By MITCH SNEED Editor

Camp Hill Police Chief Johnny Potts is in good spirits despite being injured after being struck by a vehicle during a traffic stop Sunday. Potts was on patrol Sunday when he pulled over someone on Martin Luther King Drive. “I was out on routine patrol,” Potts said. “I stopped a vehicle that was parked on the wrong side of the road.” Potts said the driver of the car he stopped is a Camp Hill resident known to him. The name was not released due to the case still being under active investigation. “I issued the young man a ticket,” Potts said. “After he signed it, I started to walk back to my car. I walked a little bit and then he accelerated and hit me.” Potts was able to call

Graduation rates at schools in Alexander City and Tallapoosa County remained steady in the 2014-15 school year according to recently released statistics by the U.S. Department of Education. Benjamin Russell had a grad rate of 86 percent for the most recent posted school year, just a percentage point lower than the 87 percent recorded in 2013-14. Horseshoe Bend led all county schools with a 92 percent grad in 2014-15. Reeltown had a rate of 86 percent compared to the 79 percent it recorded the previous year. Dadeville’s 2014-15 graduation rate rose to 89 percent, up from 84 percent in 2013-14. Alexander City Schools Director of Secondary Education Dr. Beverly Price said the steady numbers are encouraging, especially in a

See CAMP HILL • Page 7

Kenneth Boone / The Outlook

The Horseshoe Bend Generals are led onto the field by the school’s newly created tank through a cloud of smoke after the blast of a cannon. The new pre-grame features are part of what school leaders hope will become new traditions for the school.

GAMEDAY TRADITIONS

Tank, smoke, cannon fire welcomes the Generals By MITCH SNEED Editor

If you haven’t been to a football game at Horseshoe Bend this season you are missing an explosive pre-game performance that officials hope will become new traditions as the Generals take to the gridiron. Horseshoe Bend has added a team entrance where fans form a spirit line alley across the field, then a smoke machine starts forming a cloud behind the run-through held by the cheerleaders.

But before the players break through, a massive tan tank rolls into place. With smoke rising, a stadium-shaking explosion of a cannon rings out and the band begins to play the fight song. With that, the tank leads the charge of the Generals onto the field. Horseshoe Bend Principal James Aulner said the new entrance is something that was added this year in hopes of creating a more festive atmosphere and increasing interest among students See GENERALS • Page 6

Weather

87 55 Low

Lake Martin

Lake Levels Reported on 10/18/16 @ 8 p.m.

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2014-15 2013-14 2012-13 2011-12 Benjamin Russell Dadeville High Horseshoe Bend Reeltown High State averages

86 89 92 86 89.3

87 84 92 79 86

81 72 93 89 80

78 78 87 93 75

By CLIFF WILLIAMS Staff Writer

485.08 laceyshowell@gmail.com

LOCAL GRADUATION RATES

County schools go back to drawing board on capital projects

Today’s

High

See GRAD • Page 6

Cliff Williams / The Outlook

Family Engagement Night at Alex City Middle Alexander City Middle School teacher Denise Shivers, right, helps Latonya Whetstone log into a system the school uses that will allow Whetstone to monitor her son Debrenski’s grades and attendance at Tuesday’s First Annual Family Engagement Night.

With the help of the new 1-cent sales tax, the Tallapoosa County Board of Education is quickly reaching the required one-month’s reserve of operating, an amount totaling about $1.8 million and are beginning to plan what to do with the additional revenue once the goal is met. “We should reach our one month’s reserve with either the December or January tax payment,” Superintendent Joe Windle told the board Monday night. “At that point we will begin the projects that are on Phase I of the capital improvement plan and See EDUCATION • Page 7

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Woman wants photographer boyfriend to focus on her

Thursday

85 56 Low

High

Mostly sunny, 20 percent chance of showers

Friday

69 46 Low

High

Mostly sunny, 20 percent chance of showers

Staff

Directory Telephone: (256) 234-4281 Fax: (256) 234-6550 Website: www.alexcityoutlook.com Management Steve Baker Publisher, Ext. 218 steve.baker@alexcityoutlook.com Mitch Sneed Editor, Ext. 213 mitch.sneed@alexcityoutlook.com David Kendrick Circulation Manager, Ext. 204 david.kendrick@alexcityoutlook.com Lee Champion Production Manager, Ext. 220 lee.champion@alexcityoutlook.com Accounting Angela Mullins Bookkeeping, Ext. 202 angela.mullins@alexcityoutlook.com Mary Lyman Boone Bookkeeping marylyman.boone@alexcityoutlook.com Newsroom Betsy Iler Magazine Managing Editor, Ext. 221 betsy.iler@alexcityoutlook.com Lonna Upton Assistant Magazine Editor, Ext. 227 lonna.upton@alexcityoutlook.com Cathy Higgins Sports Editor, Ext. 228 cathy.higgins@alexcityoutlook.com Cliff Williams Staff Writer, Ext. 212 cliff.williams@alexcityoutlook.com

David Granger Staff Writer, Ext. 210 david.granger@alexcityoutlook.com Advertising Sales Tippy Hunter Advertising Director, Ext. 206 marketing@alexcityoutlook.com Doug Patterson Newspaper Advertising, Ext. 205 doug.patterson@alexcityoutlook.com Emily Gregg Advertising Sales, Ext. 225 emily.gregg@alexcityoutlook.com Donna Jones Advertising Sales, Ext. 217 donna.jones@alexcityoutlook.com Jaylan Reynolds Advertising Sales, Ext. 232 jaylan.reynolds@alexcityoutlook.com Scott Hardy Advertising Sales, Ext. 208 scott.hardy@alexcityoutlook.com Composing Audra Spears Composing Department, Ext. 219 audra.spears@alexcityoutlook.com Darlene Johnson Composing Department, Ext. 203 darlene.johnson@alexcityoutlook.com Hallie Holloway Composing Department, Ext. 203 hallie.holloway@alexcityoutlook.com Alethia Russell Graphic Artist, Ext. 231 alethia.russell@alexcityoutlook.com Circulation Linda Ewing Asst. Circulation Manager, Ext. 201 linda.ewing@alexcityoutlook.com

Tallapoosa Publishers, Inc. manages The Alexander City Outlook, The Dadeville Record, Lake magazine, Lake Martin Living, (USPS: 013-080, ISSN: 0738-5110) Kenneth Boone The Outlook is published five times Photography and a week, Tuesday through Saturday a commercial web mornings, by Tallapoosa Publishers, printing press. Inc., 548 Cherokee Road, P.O. Box 999, Alexander City, AL, 35011.

Postal

Information

POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Post Office Box 999, Alexander City, AL 35011.

How to Submit Obituaries

Wednesday, October 19, 2016

The Outlook

© 2011 Tallapoosa Publishers, Inc. Reproduction of any part of any issue requires written publisher permission.

Obituaries can be submitted to The Outlook from funeral homes by e-mail at obits@alexcityoutlook.com or by fax at (256) 234-6550.

DEAR ABBY: My boyfriend and I are mature adults who enjoy photography. He brings his camera when we go to the beach or sporting events -- even to the store. He’s learning all the time about how to use light correctly and his zoom lens. When we get back and I download the pics from his camera, the majority of shots are of women’s chests, behinds and pretty faces. He has snapped many of them while they were standing right next to me. (There are very few shots of me -- ever.) When I ask if he wants me to delete the photos, he says no. I don’t understand why he would keep pictures of strangers. He says he’s like any photographer -- he likes to review his photos. I tell him it hurts my feelings to think he enjoys looking at other women more than at me. It would be different if they were beautiful portraits, but they’re not. It is painful that

Burglary

etc. But he doesn’t have a high libido, which I am concerned about because he’s only 26. He has confessed to me he’s had relations with men in the past, and I’m thinking he may DEAR ABBY be bisexual. While that does not Advice concern me whatsoever (after all, it’s one thing to be attracted to someone and another thing I’m not included. Am I wrong to entirely to cheat), I worry that feel unimportant and ignored? he thinks he couldn’t share this -- OUT OF THE PICTURE DEAR OUT: You are entitled with me, and that it may lead to lies. I am also worried that to your feelings, and they may if I confront him with this, he be justified. Because you identify this man as your boyfriend, I may be offended or think I think less of him. What should I do? assume you have an exclusive -- LOVING RELATIONSHIP IN relationship. There will always MICHIGAN be women around who are DEAR LOVING: You and younger and prettier. That’s life. your fiance are overdue for a Because you can’t control his taste in subjects, my advice is to frank talk. He has told you that quit downloading his pictures for he has had more than one him if they make you uncomfort- same-sex relationship, so it’s fair to consider him to be bisexual. able. That he didn’t use that word DEAR ABBY: My fiance and I doesn’t mean he was dishonhave a loving relationship. He is est. We communicate with our actions as well as verbally. affectionate -- hugging, kissing,

continued from page 1

Det. George Long is the lead investigator on the Alex City In and Out burglary. The store is equipped with security cameras and they are looking to see if an image of the suspect can be extracted to help identify a suspect in the case. Osborne said the call reporting the incident at Five Points Annex at 226 Jefferson Street came in at about 7:30 a.m. “They broke out the glass in the front door and went right for the cash drawer,” Osborne said. “They grabbed what they could and it appears that they were in and out pretty quickly.” By the end of the day, the glass had been replaced and the store was back open for business. There was no sign of what was used to break the glass. At similar burglaries in the area recently, a large brick was found at the scene. She described that break-in as a classic “smash and grab.” Osborne said there was no surveillance footage from the pawn shop and asked for the public’s help. “If anyone was in that area and saw anything unusual, we welcome any information,” Osborne said. “At Five Points and at the In and Out, the roads are pretty well traveled. We ask that anyone with information to call us at 256-234-3421.” These incidents were the latest in several similar burglaries. This year alone nine smash and grab burglaries have been reported in Alexander City. “They are one of the most common burglaries that we see,” Osborne said. “Normally it is someone who knows the area and the store. Typically they know what they are after and get in and out in a matter of minutes.” Osborne said it was unclear if the two Tuesday burglaries were related. She said that investigators were exploring all options and had not ruled anything out.

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That you have continued your relationship after learning about his sexual history should indicate to him that you don’t think less of him. As to the strength of his libido, no two individuals are alike. If he is able to provide you with what you need, I don’t think you need to be concerned. If not -- as I said before, you have to talk with him about it. DEAR ABBY: How do you get a man to help you financially? -- ANONY-MISS IN BEVERLY HILLS DEAR ANONY-MISS: Tell him you need his help and hope he’s the type who likes rescuing women. Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Contact Dear Abby at www.DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069.

Tallapoosa County under drought advisory STAFF REPORT TPI Staff

Tallapoosa County was among 28 Alabama counties that were placed under a drought emergency in the latest Alabama Drought Declaration Tuesday. The Alabama Department of Economic and Community Affairs’ Office of Water Resources updated the declaration in accordance with the Alabama Drought Planning and Response Act of 2014. The declaration is based on a review of current and anticipated conditions and reported impacts, including rainfall, streamflow, reservoir and groundwater levels. The counties now under the emergency status, the most severe in the drought declaration, are: Region 1: Colbert, DeKalb, Franklin, Jackson, Lauderdale, Lawrence, Limestone, Madison, Marshall and Morgan Region 3: Blount, Cherokee, Cullman, Etowah, Jefferson, Shelby, St. Clair, Walker and Winston Region 4: Calhoun, Chambers, Chilton, Clay, Cleburne, Coosa, Randolph, Talladega and Tallapoosa “Very little rainfall, above normal temperatures, and falling reservoir and groundwater levels have indicated drought conditions have become more severe in many areas, particularly in north, east and central

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Alabama,” said Tom Littlepage, manager of OWR’s Water Management Unit. “As water levels drop, we strongly urge public water systems and other users of large amounts of water to continue to carefully monitor conditions and implement their drought conservation plans, as needed.” ADECA’s OWR serves as the state’s lead office for drought planning, monitoring and response activities. During dry periods, the office works with local water systems, farmers, reservoir operators and industries to encourage water conservation to mitigate negative impacts associated with declining water levels. “Drought is a slow, silent disaster that can cause water shortages and negatively affect hay, livestock and other industries,” ADECA Director Jim Byard said. “With careful monitoring, we can help to mitigate some of the negative impacts. Our Office of Water Resources will continue to work with the Monitoring and Impact Group and our partners to carefully monitor data, stay in contact with local water systems and issue updated drought declarations as conditions warrant.” As part of that effort, the drought advisories and a list of drought impacts and water restrictions throughout the state are available and updated constantly on ADECA’s website at www. adeca.alabama.gov/water.

Obituaries Mrs. Elizabeth J. Laney Mrs. Elizabeth J. Laney of Alexander City, Alabama died October 18,2016 and arrangements will be announced later by Wright’s Funeral Home.

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Wednesday, October 19, 2016

Page A3

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The Outlook

Recollections of Bill Baxley and the Cuban Missile Crisis O

le Bill Baxley has been in the news a lot this year. He was the lead defense counsel for former Speaker Mike Hubbard’s ethics conviction trial over in Opelika. Baxley practices law in Birmingham and is one of the state’s premier and most expensive criminal defense lawyers. Like a good many of the top defense attorneys, Baxley was first a prosecutor and a doggone good one. Baxley was born and raised in Dothan, the heart of the Wiregrass. His family was one of the original settling families in Houston County. His daddy Keener Baxley was the Circuit Judge in Houston and Henry counties. Mr. Keener had been the District Attorney prior to going on the bench. Bill grew up in his daddy’s courtroom. There was no doubt in his mind that he would be a lawyer. Baxley was a child protégé. He also had a meteoric rise in Alabama politics. He finished Dothan High School at 16, the University of Alabama at 20 and Law School at 22. He became the District Attorney in Houston and Henry

STEVE FLOWERS Columnist

Counties at the age of 24. He was elected Attorney General of Alabama at the ripe old age of 28 and served eight years as the state’s top prosecutor. Unlike many of the recent attorney generals, who actually know nothing about criminal prosecution, Baxley though young was well qualified and an effective prosecutor. Baxley was elected lieutenant governor in 1982 and ran second for governor twice, once in 1978 and again in 1986. Bill Baxley like most politicians had his favorite stories and jokes. His best that he told repeatedly throughout the years took place in October over 50 years ago. It was during the Cuban Missile Crisis. Most of us thought our world was coming to an end. The story was about an ole guy named Squatlow. I am not sure whether this story is true or not but it could very well be true. Squatlow got his

nickname because he would squat down low to the ground whenever he talked with folks. Ole Squatlow would hunker down with a chew of tobacco in his mouth and gossip and swap stories all day. Baxley was a young district attorney for Houston and Henry Counties. Dothan and Houston County has about 90 percent of the people in the Circuit with Henry County being the home to about 10 percent. Baxley was a youthful 25-year-old district attorney and would travel to Court on occasion in Henry County to prosecute the few criminals they had in Henry County. Baxley like most politicians would stop at a country store and drink a coke with the rural folks in the area. Henry County is a very sparsely populated rural county in the Wiregrass with two small towns, Abbeville and Headland. Abbeville happens to be the county seat. Squatlow had a mechanic shop/gas station/grocery store in the obscure community of Tumbleton in Henry County. His whole

world was no bigger than that county. The biggest places he had ever been were Abbeville and Headland with a population of about 1,000 people each. Well, they may have been back in the woods, but they knew about the Cuban Missile Crisis and the standoff between the United States and Russia. It was a scary situation. I think most people were afraid that a nuclear war was imminent. The whole world was on edge. During the week of this crisis, Baxley while traveling to court in Henry County, stopped by Squatlow’s store in Tumbleton. Squatlow and all the folks in the little community were scared. This was obviously the topic of conversation that day. Ole Squatlow sauntered down in his lowest squatting position and just shook his head. “You know, I’ve been thinking about it all night, and I just know those damn Russians are going to bomb Abbeville. Yeah, they gonna drop one of them atom bombs right on Abbeville,” said old Squatlow. Baxley looked at

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Squatlow and said, “Squatlow, why in the world would the Russians drop a bomb on Abbeville, Alabama?” Squatlow looked at Baxley like he was the most stupid person he had ever seen. He shook his head at how ignorant this young, 25-year-old lawyer was. He looked at Baxley and said, “Boy, don’t you know nothing? Don’t you know that +

Steve Flowers is Alabama’s leading political columnist. His weekly column appears in over 60 Alabama newspapers. He served 16 years in the state legislature. Steve may be reached at www. steveflowers.us.

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Today is

October 19, 2016 Today’s Event

911 BOARD: The Tallapoosa County 911 Board will meet Oct. 19 instead of

Wednesday, October 19, 2016

The Outlook

the normal second Wednesday at 5:30 p.m. in the 911 Administrative office at 240 West Columbus Street, Dadeville. Call 825-8490 for more information.

Today’s Anniversary

Reggie and Alicia Clifton are celebrating their anniversary today.

Submit calendar items: Participate in your Outlook by calling 256-234-4281, faxing them to 256-234-6550, sending your event to calendar@alexcityoutlook.com or logging on to http://www.alexcityoutlook.com/.

Today’s Birthdays

Gracie Lee Young, Crystal Pemberton, Jeanine Keel, Sybil Humber, Teresa Kelly, Dwayne Thomas, Sonny Stewart, Miranda Marshall, Rev. Walter Coleman and Rebecca Holley are celebrating birthdays today.

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CHARISH: Chairish pieces will be on display at the United Way Building in Downtown Alexander City and on the MainStreet Facebook page.

October 20

RALLY IN THE ALLEY: Raffle tickets for Chairish pieces will be sold at Rally in the Alley from 5 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. DYSLEXIA INVENTORS: The Adelia M. Russell Library will be hosting Great Inventors with Dyslexia Oct. 20 from 3:45 p.m. 5 p.m.

October 20-23

WOMEN’S CONFERENCE: New Covenant Ministries of the World is hosting a Women’s Conference Oct. 20-23 at the Liberty Life Christian Center at 243 S Street in Alexander City. Thursday and Friday there will be 9 a.m. Supplication, 11:30 a.m. Women in Training and 7 p.m. Profound Women of Evangelism. Saturday, Oct. 22 from 10 a.m. to noon is the Young Adult Women Seminar, Seminar Part I from noon to 2 p.m. and Seminar Part II from 2:30 p.m. to 4 p.m. Speakers include Evangelist Emma Parmer, Evangelist Andora Dothard, and Lady Wendy M. Jones. Sunday, Oct. 23 is Climax Day with Evangelist Lashunda Brown speaking. Chief Apostle W.T. Traylor is founder and chief administrator.

October 21

OPEN HOUSE: Alabama Power Shoreline Management is hosting a public education open house Oct. 21 from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the Creekside Lodge Event Center.

October 22

CHRISTMAS CARD WORKSHOP: The Artist Association of Central Alabama is hosting a Christmas Card Workshop October 22 from 9:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. at Wine Emporium. The cost is $40 for members and $50 for nonmembers. The class is limited to 12 prepaid students. CHAIRISH: Chairish pieces will be displayed along Main Street during the MainStreet Farmers Market and Fall Festival. Raffle tickets will be sold and drawing held for the winners. The MainStreet Fall Festival and annual pumpkin roll and pumpkin bowling will be in Strand Park. FAMILY GAME NIGHT: The Bibb Graves School Association is hosting family game night with bingo Oct. 22 from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. CANCER WALK: The first annual Pink Out Cancer Walk will be Oct. 22 from 10 a.m. to 11 a.m. at the Courthouse in Dadeville. 48 year breast cancer survivor Jan Pearson is coordinating this walk in observance of Breast Cancer Awareness Month. HAUNTED HAYRIDE: The Fields of Fear Haunted Hayride will be Oct. 15, 22 and 29 from 7 p.m. to 11 p.m. at 503 Freeman Road, Dadeville. Cost is $15. FARM DAY: The Weogufka Center is hosting a farm day Oct. 22. See the Museum of Old Farm Equipment, the train man Robert Pearson will set up in the school and Ms. Kay Chesire will be in the history room. Call Jerry Reeves to show your antique cars and trucks at 256-223-1303. Vendors booths are available by calling Melvin Palmer at 256-249-8885. Breakfast starts at 6:30 a.m. FALL FESTIVAL: The Horseshoe Bend School will be hosting its fall festival Oct. 22 from 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. at the school. FISHFORACURE: Coosa County Sheriff’s Office is hosting the annual

COACH “Fish for a Cure” fishing tournament this Saturday, Oct. 22 at Wind Creek Marina. Guaranteed payout totals $4K (up to 12th Place) and door prizes. Blast Off is Safe Daylight. Entry fee is $100 and optional big fish pot $10. To pre-register call Coosa County Sheriff’s Office at 256-3771803. Registration begins at 4:30 on Oct. 22, 2016.

October 23

FOUNDER’S DAY: The GAP Fellowship Church will celebrate its 17th Annual Founder’s Day and the dedication of the church building at the new location of 721 Robinson Court, Oct. 23 at 2:30 p.m. Guest speakers will be Rev. Jason Whetstone of Christian Faith Fellowship of Dadeville at 11 a.m. and Rev. Bruce Williams of Enon United Methodist Church of Birmingham at 2:30 p.m. The past of GAP Fellowship Church is Lewis and marilyn Benson. FALL SERVICE: Darien Church is hosting a fall service Oct. 23 at 10:30 a.m. The church is located on Highway 22 five miles west of Wadley at Cotney’s old store. The service will be followed by a covered dish lunch. AUDITIONS: Alexander City Theatre II will hold auditions for “The Vision,” an uplifting, non-denominational Christmas play by William Grandgeorge, from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. at the Old Bama Theatre, 264 Tallapoosa St., Alexander City. Visit the Facebook Page for details. CHURCH HOMECOMING: Bradford United Methodist Church invites everyone to their annual homecoming celebration Sunday, Oct. 23 at 10:30 a.m. followed by a fellowship meal. Guest speaker will be Rev. Bill Gandy and special music will be provided by Harlan Burton.

October 24

AUDITIONS: Alexander City Theatre II will hold auditions for “The Vision,” an uplifting, non-denominational Christmas play by William Grandgeorge, from 5:30 p.m. to 7 p.m. at the Old Bama Theatre, 264 Tallapoosa St., Alexander City. Visit the Facebook Page for details. MINISTERIAL ASSOCIATION: The next meeting of the Alexander City Area Ministerial Association will be Monday, Oct. 24 at 6:30 p.m. at River of Life Worship Center. The guest speaker will be Teri Trammell, executive director of The Lighthouse in Alexander City. She will talk about the services offered by this institution. There will also be time for sharing information, mutual support, planning, and intercessory prayer. All Christian ministers are invited. For more information contact Bill Middlebrooks, secretary at 256-234-3371.

October 25

DYSLEXIA QUOTES: The Adelia M. Russell Library will be hosting Dyslexia Quotes and Books Oct. 25 from 4:45 p.m. 6 p.m. AUDITIONS: Alexander City Theatre II will hold auditions for “The Vision,” an uplifting, non-denominational Christmas play by William Grandgeorge, from 5:30 p.m. to 7 p.m. at the Old Bama Theatre, 264 Tallapoosa St., Alexander City. Visit the Facebook Page for details. AUTHOR VISIT: Author Fred Norrell will visit the Dadeville Public Library at 2 p.m. to talk about his recently published book, A Boy’s Adventures on Lake Martin. It is a memoir of his boyhood on the lake beginning at age 6 and the summers he spent with his father fishing, camping, building a raft and doing all the fun things to be treasured as a child. He will have books available for sale. This event

is sponsored by the Friends of the Library. Call 256 825-7820 for more information. DRUG PLAN ENROLLMENT ASSISTANCE: Tallapoosa County and The East Alabama Regional Planning and Development Commission’s Area Agency on Aging will host a Medicare Prescription Drug Plan enrollment assistance event on Tuesday, Oct. 18, Oct. 25, Nov. 1, Nov. 8, Nov. 15, Nov. 29 and Dec. 6 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the Sportplex Cabin. To help develop a plan comparison, Medicare recipients will need to bring their Medicare card,along with a complete list of medications they are taking and the dosages. Volunteers will guide them through the selection process and help them get information on the cost of each plan. People interested in getting a plan comparison will be assisted on a first come, first served basis. Each counseling sessions will last about 40 minutes. There may be a wait time. Contact East Alabama Regional Planning and Development Commission at (800) 243-5463 ext. 150 with questions.

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October 28

DOWNTOWN SHOWDOWN: Lake Martin Area United WAY is hosting its Downtown Showdown Fashion Show Oct. 28 from 6 to 9 p.m. The fashion show featuring local designers will start at 7 p.m. FALL HARVEST: The Bill Nichols State Veterans Home is hosting a Fall Harvest Oct. 28 from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. It is free to the public. There will be a bake sale, yard sale, country store and grilled hotdogs. FALL CELEBRATION: The Family Worship Center Fall Celebration will be Friday, Oct. 28 from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. with hotdogs, games, trunk a treat, hayride and cake walk. The pastor is Tony Harris. FASHION SHOW: The Downtown Showdown Fashion Show for the United Way will be Oct. 28 from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. in the United Way back parking lot. The fashion show starts at 7 p.m. Tickets are $30 and VIP tables are available by calling 256-329-3600. The event will have hous d’oeuvres and feature local designers.

October 29

FALL FESTIVAL: Mt. Zion Baptist Church on Highway 63 South is hosting a fall festival and trunk or treat with popcorn, shaved ice, cake walk, hayride, fishing booth, corn hole, karaoke and lots of games and food for all ages. FALL BOOK SALE: The Friends of the Dadeville Public Library will have its Fall book sale from 8 until 1 p.m. Saturday in the library basement at 205 North West St. We have lots of new donations, including fiction, non-fiction, biographies, history and politics, children’s books, sports, cookbooks, religious and inspirational books, travel, hobbies and crafts, decorating and how-to books, etc. Fill up one of our plastic bags for $5, or 3 bags for $10. Baked items will also be available for purchase. This is a big fundraiser to benefit the library. Call 256 825-7820 for details. TRICK OR TREAT: The Brothas Keeper Motorcycle Club, The Alexander City Police Department, The Alexander City CARE Unit, The Alexander City Fire and EMS Department and the Tallapoosa County Sheriff’s Office are hosting a Spooktacular Halloween Trick or Treat Safe Zone Oct. 29 from 4 p.m. to 8 p.m. at Strand Park in Alexander City. There will be candy for kids of all ages, games and bouncy houses.

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The Outlook

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Welcome to Equality Reverend Milton Smith

W

hen you read this I will already be in England. At the time of this writing my Mum is still at the “Centre of Heart Excellence” in London. I won’t be able to concentrate for columns while away for about two weeks, but I will take notes for next month. Please keep my Mum, Phyllis Barker in your prayers. Happy Anniversary to Andy and Casey Burns of Kellyton, celebrating eight years October 20th; then remembering my wonderful brother Maurice, born Oct. 21, the same date as Louis Buzbee, his wife Mary Oct. 24, and my estranged son Jamie, the 23rd, Happy Birthday to all. The 26th is my sweet Ron’s Birthday (sorry to be away); and Sandra Thompson of Hillabee Park. Then on Oct. 26 Roger Pasley and Janice Cason Nov. 5. The new Pastor at Equality’ United Methodist Church is Rev. Milton Smith, whom I met at the Equality Reunion recently. Rev. Smith was easy for conversation, and my first impression was

ROSIE MORGAN Nixburg/ Equality

a very good one. Besides that, he is a snazzy dresser which says a lot. Rev. Rev. Smith Smith took over pastoral duties at Equality’s United Methodist Church July 1, and has been in the Ministry 44 years, most recently served two Methodist Churches in Sylacauga and started a not-for-profit organization. Such an educated person in his field, Smith obtained his Doctorate (Baptist and Methodist) at Gardner Webb University in North Carolina; his Master’s degree at Southwestern Baptist Theological and post doctorate at Seattle School of Theology and psychology, majoring in Emotional trauma and abuse. No wonder he was so easy to talk to. Rev. Smith has been

a hospice chaplain and a missionary, has served in Spain twice, Japan, Eastern Europe and Peru, working extensively on trying to help those taken or involved in Human trafficking which is a seriously sad problem around the world. Rev. Milton Smith says his main goal while serving in Equality is that he would “like to see the Church become a conduit with the community and God. I am sure Rev. Smith will achieve his goal. He is really good with people and emotional understanding – at least that is my opinion. We need pastors just like him to save the Churches and prayer from all the legal groups that are always trying to remove it from public availability. When I was in high school, we had “assembly” twice a week, in the auditorium (which was huge), it was led by the Headmaster Mr. Worrell. The headmaster gave the school news with upcoming events, led the hymns that we all sang; then led us in “The Lord’s Prayer”

and every child was proud they could join in, knowing all the words. It is sad for me that our country seems so fractured by politics that gets to such a low level, and divided into groups. I have seen changes over the years. I began connected to the military, getting a strong sense of pride living in the South. Many things have also changed in England, right now, the Brits’ newspapers are laughing at us here, after so much “corruption learned from wiki-leaks with e-mails about the Clinton leadership.” Big government and same laws for all didn’t work for the Brits, that is why they got out of the EU. Most Brits are thrilled to govern themselves again, as it has been through history. Until next month, enjoy the seasons, and keep smiling. Rosie Rosie Morgan writes on the events and happenings in Equality and Nixburg in each Wednesday’s Outlook.

Senior Sweet Shop a success at Oktoberfest

T

he Alexander City Parks & Recreation 50+ expresses many a thanks to those who helped contribute in any way this year’s towards the Senior Sweet Shop and the 5K at Oktoberfest. You could see the ACPR 50+ Fundraiser group hard at work in their blue shirts with the American Flag on the back. If we named all that; volunteered working time, gave baked goodies, gave donations or stopped by to buy, we are afraid we would miss somebody. The group appreciated all contributions. In this week’s article, we’re going to go back and highlight a specific Mini Van day trip with Lillian Howard. Writer for this piece was Lillian Howard herself and she did a great job articulating their experience. “The van trip with Lillian on Sept. 2, 2016 was an adventure indeed. We started out about 8 o’clock that morning heading east and stopped for a “Hot” Krispy Kreme donut and coffee. We continued on to Valley, AL with a scavenger hunt at Timeless

CORLEY HOLT Senior Moments

Antiques. The staff at Timeless had made a list of 19 things that could be found within the store. I started looking for things, but quickly got side tracked to what I do best “Shopping!” The prize for finding the most treasures was awarded to Renee Wall. She received a $25 gift certificate! Boy, I sure could have used that myself. After having such a fun time at the antique store, we went to Sonny’s Buffet and enjoyed lots of choices to eat. When our tummies were full, we talked and laughed all the way home. Passenger’s for the trip were Ruby Gaston, Brenda Fricks, Mary Robertson, Renee Wall and of course me, Lillian.” –Lillian Howard

coming Saturday for their group trip. Don’t forget on Monday, Oct 17 we will have Pancakes & Trivia starting at 8:30. October Luncheon is on Wednesday, October 19th at Noon. For the luncheon this month, we’re going Salad style. All you will need to bring is yourself and $4. Volunteer choppers and servers will get a discount rate $2, call office for details. Guest speaker will be the Pastor of Flint Hill Methodist Church at 12:30.

Notes to Know:

Tuscumbia travelers meet at the Activity Center by 7:15 this coming Thursday for their group trip. Jasmine Hill travelers meet at the Activity Center by 8:15 this

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The ACPR 50+ send out get well wishes to Emma Wilson and Joe Campbell. Until next time, keep a smile on your face and love in your heart. Holt writes about the Alexander City Parks and Recreation Department’s 50+ club.

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Generals and fans for the Horseshoe Bend football team. “Our football team has struggled in the past and we wanted to start some new traditions to build some excitement at the games and in the process transfer that excitement over to the players,” said Aulner. “The tank was the idea of one of our teacher’s David Crouch. As you know he had an accident where he lost some of his fingers and this is what he was working on when he had the accident. “When that happened, we didn’t know what to do. But the teachers and students felt as a tribute to him, they wanted to get it done and put it on the field. So our Jessica Hodnett who teacher Agri-Science and the FFA all pitched in to finish the project. It has really been a lot of fun and added something special to the start of the games.” The tank was built from wood and mounted on an older model John Deere Gator all-terrain vehicle. The structure was painted with the same desert tan that is used on today’s military tanks and the words GENERALS STRONG emblazoned on the front. Hodnett said it has been fun to see how the students and fans have responded. “This was Mr. Crouch’s idea and it was really a great one,” Hodnett said. “He had pretty much made all the parts and the frame and all that was left was for us to put it together and put some finishing touches. “Originally we thought about having students in Generals uniforms, but we will add that next year. Right now it’s two students wearing jerseys

The Horseshoe Bend Generals are led onto the field by the school’s newly created tank through a cloud of smoke after the blast of a cannon. The new pre-grame features are part of what school leaders hope will become new traditions for the school.

Wednesday, October 19, 2016

The Outlook

continued from page 1

and I’m driving it just for safety reasons. So we start across the field we use a fire extinguisher to blow smoke out of the tube that serves as the tank’s gun. It’s really quite a show.” The cannon that is hot off in the entrance and after touchdowns will scare an unsuspecting fan or opponent half to death. Generals coach Jason Franklin said that the cannon was an idea that they started considering in the summer. After several internet searches, they found a former coach in Utah that made them as a hobby and they pulled the trigger so to speak and purchased one. “We got to looking around and found these that he makes and with a few modifications it is really added something to the whole atmosphere,” Franklin said. “Not only at the entrance, it makes the kids what to score a bunch of points to hear that cannon fire. We even do it when we get back from a road win too. We all gather up and fire it off. “We’ve never really had the mascot and the General, the tank the cannon, they all create that identity of who we are. They all play into getting the kids pumped up and it’s paying off.” The football team is doing their part to add to the excitement as well. They are now 5-3 on the season and a win this weekend at Woodland will solidify the Generals playoff berth. Not bad for a team that was 0-10 a season ago. “We are all really proud of the way they have worked and battle this year,” Aulner said. “If the entrance helps bring some excitement and get them pumped up, that even better.”

Grad

continued from page 1

diverse school system. “There are often times when you see a year where numbers drop or rise, but to see those steady numbers show we are on the right track,” Price said. “It hasn’t been long since we were seeing rates in the 70s, so to see the rise into the high 80s is on the way where we want to be. “We started last year with a plan to work vertically from Pre-K on up through high school with curriculum that is constantly building. I think in time that will produce great results. Plus Dr. Wilkinson at the high school is doing some incredible things in working with students to identify a career path early on and put students in areas of study that match those interests. When a student is excited about what they are studying and seeing a reward at the end – they are much more likely to graduate.” Tallapoosa County Schools Superintendent Dr. Joe Windle said the system’s steady improvement is encouraging. The most recent numbers show the system with an 89 percent graduation rate overall, meaning it has reached the state average, which was at an all-time high of 89.3 percent. “Our system graduation rate has increased every year for the last four years from 77 percent in 2011 to 89 percent with the 2015 data,” Windle said. “We hope to see the 2016 data continue to climb as we add students who may have graduated over the summer or transferred to another school

district and were listed as dropouts. We have until December to clean up these different situations.” Windle cited four main factors in the improvements in the system’s grad rates. “We are beginning to see the effects our Career Technical Center is having on keeping a certain segment of our student population in school, that’s one big reason,” Windle said. “Also, our Credit Recovery Program has been a factor. It gives kids the opportunity to dig out of an adverse academic situation without losing hope of getting back with their peers. “Also we are working hard to identify strugglers as early as possible and providing them the support to address their needs. And the fourth part of that is the availability of blended learning opportunities that combine online courses with the regular curriculum to meet the diverse needs of today’s student.” The local numbers come a day after the state of Alabama got some great news on grad rates. Alabama graduated students at a rate of 89.3 percent in the 201415 academic year, according to numbers released Monday by the U.S. Department of Education. That rate is more than 6 percent higher than the national average of 83.2 percent and 3 percent higher than the 86.3 percent grad rate that Alabama posted in 2013-14. That 89.3 ranking gives Alabama the nation’s second highest rate, second only to Iowa’s 90.8 percent, stats show.

Kenneth Boone / The Outlook

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Wednesday, October 19, 2016

Camp Hill

continued from page 1

for help and was transported to the Lake Martin Community Hospital and is seeing orthopedic specialist to determine the recovery process for injures to his leg and broken bones in his left foot. “I was discharged from the hospital today (Tuesday),” Potts said. “I am scheduled to see the orthopedic doctor tomorrow (Wednesday).” The State Bureau of Investigation is the lead on this investigation. SBI is being assisted by the

Tallapoosa County Sheriff’s Department. The SBI’s findings will be turned over to the district attorney. Potts thinks the incident highlights the dangers that law enforcement faces everyday. “We have to be cautious and careful,” Potts said. “You can never tell when these things when will happen and always be cautious.”

Education pay cash for them.” At Monday’s meeting, the board tabled approval of the capital plan that included three phases due to concerns over how the distribution of the projects and communication of those projects from the central office to the board. Monday night, Windle presented the board the three phases. The proposed capital plan depends on several assumptions according to information in the board packet from Monday night. • One month’s operating reserve will be maintained at all times. • There will be sufficient capital on-hand to complete Phase 1 projects. • Phase I projects will be cash projects. • Phase I projects not begin until one month’s reserve is met. • Phase I projects will begin in 2017 and end in 2018. • Tallapoosa County Board of Education gets approval for $8 million bond to complete Phase II. • 1-cent sales tax or ad valorem equivalent will remain in effect for at least 10 years with a pledge from the Tallapoosa County Commission. Windle explained that the Phase I projects would begin in 2017 and end in 2018. • Technology infrastructure will be paid from e-rate grant and WIRED dollars. The Phase I projects and some of the Phase II projects were brought up as Windle promoted the 1-cent sales tax proposal last summer. At the same time, Windle mentioned using the tax money to help with technology infrastructure after the reserve requirement was met. Windle explained at Monday’s board meeting that many of those improvements have been made thanks to the work of technology director Joel Padgett who was able to acquire e-rate grant money for those upgrades. Board member Randy Anderson, who represents the Horseshoe Bend School district, raised the

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concerns over the plan “It is very problematic to me, the recommendations are,” Anderson said. “First of all, there are too many assumptions. We cannot even begin to obligate this board for $10 million with these many assumptions on the table. Second this board has not been properly informed of your (Windle) recommendations prior to tonight.” Anderson also had concerns over how much of the monies were being spent in Reeltown and Dadeville. At a work session in September with Ken Funderburk of Stifel Mechant Capital discussing the refunding of bonds the board currently owes, the idea of using the revenue from either the sales tax or an ad valorem tax was presented to float a bond. The hypothetical amount mentioned was $8 million which is close to the total of cost of Phase II at $8,235,948. At that September meeting, the $8 million bond was the suggested amount that could be financed based on projections of revenues of the new sales tax. Anderson was concerned that the auditorium project at Horseshoe Bend was in Phase III after the bond money would have run out.

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Windle stated at Monday’s meeting that the capital plan was a management tool and that each project would still have to be approved by the board. “This is a management tool so that the legislature can approve capital outlay funds,” Windle said. “Before each project can be let for bid, the board would have to approve it.” Tuesday Windle said the central office will continue to work on the capital plan. “We will go back to the drawing board and tweak the lists and work from there,” Windle said. “We will iron it out at the next work session.” Phase 1 Projects • Dadeville High School football stadium visitors bleachers $120,000 • Horseshoe Bend High School kitchen HVAC $60,000 • Reeltown High School football field lights $175,000 • Horseshoe Bend School metal roofing for band room, concession stand and pavilion $103,650 • Horseshoe Bend High School metal fascia at eaves $7,920 • Reeltown High School concession stand and bathrooms at softball field $225,000

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• Architect fees at 7.8 percent $46,142 Total $737,712 Phase 2 Projects • Horeshoe Bend Elementary Gym upgrades $140,000 • Reeltown High School gym and band room $3,500,000 • Dadeville High School gym updates (no weight room) $2,123,744 • Dadeville Elementary School roof (includes 9 percent fees) $540,204 • Reeltown Concession Stand and bathrooms at the football field $265,000 • Dadeville High School Field House $867,000 • Prior bond to complete roof and kitchen at Reeltown $800,000 Total $8,235,948 Phase III Projects for consideration • Elementary building upgrades at Reeltown • Land purchase at New Site and Reeltown • Upgrade classrooms and bathrooms at Dadeville Elementary School • Auditorium at Horseshoe Bend • Safety considerations – camera systems, safe rooms, upgrade doors, etc. • Additional classrooms at Reeltown

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Wednesday, October 19, 2016

The Outlook

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CATHY HIGGINS SPORTS EDITOR (256) 234-4281 X228

sports@alexcityoutlook.com

Wednesday, October 19, 2016

ANDY GRAHAM Columnist

Midterm grades are in for the SEC

T

hinking back to my school days, I feel like it’s only appropriate to give out some midterm grades to the SEC. Obviously, these marks won’t necessarily reflect the final grade, but they are based on the body of work to date and give an accurate reflection of each team at the moment. Top of the class… Alabama (7-0; 4-0) A+ The Crimson Tide is the best team in the country and it’s not even close. You can’t win with a true freshman QB. Really? The defense and special teams have scored as many touchdowns as the defense has given up so far this year for crying out loud. Texas A&M (6-0; 4-0) A+ Trevor Knight has been a difference maker and the defense is better than a year ago (although not a lot better). We’ll find out who the real top dog in the SEC is on Saturday when A&M travels to Tuscaloosa. Honor roll… Florida (5-1; 3-1) B The Gators fell in Knoxville with a backup QB, but have been otherwise unfazed behind a strong defense. Florida finds itself in control of its own destiny once again, but a late season make up in Baton Rouge could be problematic. Auburn (4-2; 2-1) B- After a shaky start, Auburn has actually taken some significant strides in the last three weeks. The next two games against Arkansas and Ole Miss will speak volumes about the rest of the season. I would have given AU a solid B, but the minus is for the game plan against Clemson, which still irks me. Arkansas (5-2; 1-2) B- The Hogs two losses are courtesy of the top two teams in the SEC. QB Austin Allen has been terrific, but the defense needs some work. LSU (4-2; 2-1) B- It’s definitely rare for a team to receive a grade this high after firing its coach before midseason. The Tiger offense looks completely different all of a sudden and Leonard Fournette hasn’t even been playing. Giving it the old college try… Tennessee (5-2; 2-2) C The Vols were picked to win the East, but have struggled all year. Injuries and losses are mounting, but the schedule is about to lighten up. Ole Miss (3-3; 1-2) C A brutal schedule has doomed the Rebels. Chad Kelly is still the best passer in the league, but an SEC crown is merely a pipe dream at this point. Kentucky (3-3; 2-2) C- The Wildcats defense is horrid, but UK still has a chance to go bowling if they can find two wins among Miss State, at Missouri and Georgia. Vanderbilt (3-4; 1-3) D+ Vandy has been predictably Vandy up to this point with some close losses and some ugly wins. However, they beat Georgia on homecoming. Remedial classes needed… Georgia (4-3; 2-3) D It’s safe to say the honeymoon is over for Kirby Smart. Growing pains are always expected, but losing to Vandy wasn’t part of the process. Mississippi State (2-4; 1-2) D- Want to know how good Dak Prescott was? Watch the Cowboys on Sunday. Dan Mullen is rebuilding and it may take a while. South Carolina (2-4; 1-4) DThe Gamecocks boast the worst offense in the SEC. Of course, they supplement that with the worst run defense in the SEC as well. Missouri (2-4; 0-3) F QB Drew Lock has thrown for a ton of yards against bad teams, but the Tigers have struggled against real competition. Zero SEC wins = F. Andy Graham writes a regular sports column for Tallapoosa Publishers.

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SUPER REGION BOUND

Lady Wildcats, Generals, Cougars head to Montgomery By CATHY HIGGINS Sports Editor

Three area teams are gearing up for the Super Regional Volleyball Tournament at the Multiplex at Crampton Bowl in Montgomery this week. Following stellar seasons, Benjamin Russell (Class 6A), Horseshoe Bend (Class 2A) and Central Coosa (Class 3A) are all in contention for the state championship. The Lady Wildcats heads into Round 1 Friday after coming out on top in Tuesday’s Class 6A, Area 6 playoffs, which the No. 1 seeded Benjamin Russell hosted. Benjamin Russell locked in a place at Super Regional with a season of 29-11 overall and 4-0 in the region, which jumped to 30-11, 4-0 Tuesday. “It’s been a good season,” Lady Wildcats head coach Pam Robinson said. Tuesday’s playoffs determined their position in the next round in Montgomery. That was decided when the Lady Wildcats emerged Class 6A Area 6 champions by defeating runner up Wetumpka (9-9, 3-3) 3-0 with scores of 25-21, 25-20 and 25-19. The playoffs began with Opelika (9-14, 0-5) facing off against Wetumpka) and the winner then playing Benjamin Russell. The Lady Indians won 3-1 and Opelika’s loss ended their season. Standout Lady Wildcats included juniors Tayla Stowes, JaTori Leonard amd A’niah Ford, all of whom were named Area 6 All-Area team members, and BRHS most valuable player junior Abby Martin. Both Benjamin Russell and Wetumpka play Round 1 of the tournament at 12:45 p.m. Friday, although their opponents have not been announced at press time.

Horseshoe Bend

The Horseshoe Bend varsity volleyball team is also headed to Montgomery to play in the Super Regional Volleyball Tournament. The Lady Generals play

Cliff Williams / The Outlook

Above, Benjamin Russell sophomore Asia McWaters, left, and junior JaTori Leonard jump for the ball during Tuesday’s, Area 6 playoffs against Wetumpka. Below, Horseshoe Bend Lady Generals pose with their trophy after winning the Area 8 volleyball playoffs Monday afternoon.

Samson at 9 a.m. Friday in Round 1, Game 4 of the tournament. The winner will continue to the quarterfinal round. “We are excited about the opportunity to play at this venue,” said Horseshoe Bend head coach Allison Franklin. After finishing the regular season 11-5 overall and 2-0 in the Class 2A, Area 8 region, No. 1 seeded Horseshoe Bend hosted the 2A Area 8 Volleyball playoffs Monday against Lanett and LaFayette. “We were very excited to host the 2A Area 8 Volleyball Tournament,” Franklin said. Lanett defeated LaFayette, which ended the Lady Bulldogs’ season. Lanett then faced the Lady Generals. “We played Lanett in the second match and won 25-5, 25-9, 25-11,” Franklin said. Seniors Taylor Walton, Alexus

Submitted / The Outlook

Hardnett, Heather Clanton, and Brooke Robinson combined for a total of 12 aces and 7 kills. Sophomore Maggie Wood added another 5 aces and 8 kills.” With that victory, Horseshoe Bend continues striving for the state championship. “Our next step is the Super Regional,” Franklin said.

Central Coosa

Following a season of 15-9 overall and 7-1 in the region, Central Coosa defeated Beulah in Monday’s Class 3A, Area 6 playoffs 3-1. With that the Lady Cougars head to Super Regional Round 1 where they take on Flomaton at 11:30 a.m. Thursday for the chance to move on to semifinals.

ASWA WEEK 9 FOOTBALL POLL Class 7A

1. McGill-Toolen (29) (8-0) 348 2. Hoover (7-1) 251 3. Hewitt-Trussville (9-0) 240 4. Central-Phenix City (7-1) 203 5. Davidson (7-1) 169 6. James Clemens (6-2) 140 7. Enterprise (8-1) 118 8. Spain Park (6-2) 83 9. Mountain Brook (6-2) 52 10. Lee-Montgomery (6-2) 33 Others receiving votes: Bob Jones (6-3) 10, Auburn (5-3) 5, Gadsden City (4-5) 1.

Class 6A

1. Hillcrest-Tuscaloosa (26) (8-0) 338 2. Oxford (9-0) 244 3. Minor (2) (8-0) 216 4. Opelika (8-1) 215 5. Blount (1) (7-2) 164 6. Spanish Fort (6-2) 143 7. Park Crossing (8-1) 123 9. Ramsay (7-1) 78 8. Daphne (6-2) 53 10. Decatur (7-1) 29 Others receiving votes: Wetumpka (7-2) 16, Austin (6-2) 15, ClayChalkville (6-3) 13, Gardendale (6-3) 4, Hartselle (7-2) 2.

Class 5A

1. Scottsboro (22) (8-0) 324 2. Etowah (1) (8-1) 236 3. Carroll (1) (8-0) 215 4. Vigor (3) (7-2) 194 5. St. Paul’s (1) (6-2) 176 6. Central-Clay Co. (1) (7-1)171 7. Beauregard (6-1) 123 8. Mortimer Jordan (6-2) 63 9. Briarwood Chr. (7-1) 48 10. Jackson (5-3) 34

Others receiving votes: Demopolis (6-2) 33, Brooks (6-2) 10, Russellville (6-2) 9, Eufaula (6-2) 7, Hayden (7-1) 5, Sylacauga (6-2) 5.

Class 4A

1. Andalusia (26) (8-1) 337 2. Haleyville (1) (7-1) 250 3. Rogers (1) (8-0) 226 4. UMS-Wright (1) (6-2) 177 5. Jacksonville (8-0) 174 6. Madison Acad. (6-2) 144 7. Handley (6-2) 77 8. Thomasville (5-2) 70 9. Cordova (7-2) 68 10. West Limestone (7-1) 33 Others receiving votes: Leeds (6-3) 30, St. James (8-1) 19, Madison Co. (5-3) 11, Munford (6-2) 11, Cherokee Co. (7-2) 10, North Jackson (5-3) 9, Dadeville (5-4) 4, Hamilton (4-4) 1, Tallassee (6-3) 1, Wilson (7-1) 1.

Class 3A

1. Piedmont (27) (9-0) 342 2. Gordo (2) (8-0) 267 3. Mobile Chr. (7-1) 222 4. Opp (7-1) 197 5. Colbert Co. (7-1) 170 6. Montevallo (7-1) 119 7. T.R. Miller (6-2) 116 8. Daleville (7-1) 98 9. Ohatchee (7-1) 74 10. Pike Co. (7-1) 28 Others receiving votes: Fultondale (7-1) 7, Lexington (6-2) 6, Oakman (5-3) 3, Bayside (5-3) 2, Randolph Co. (6-2) 2.

Class 2A

1. Fyffe (24) (8-0) 333 2. G.W. Long (2) (7-0) 254 3. Elba (3) (7-1) 237

4. LaFayette (8-0) 211 5. Lanett (8-1) 165 6. Tanner (5-3) 150 7. Aliceville (7-1) 120 8. Southern Choctaw (6-1) 50 9. New Brockton (5-3) 35 10. Lamar Co. (6-2) 32 Others receiving votes: Sheffield (7-2) 20, Washington Co. (6-2) 19, Sand Rock (6-2) 12, Goshen (6-2) 8, Red Bay (6-2) 5, Cleveland (5-3) 2.

Class 1A

1. Maplesville (24) (7-0) 333 2. Linden (5) (8-0) 275 3. Spring Garden (8-0) 223 4. Addison (9-0) 202 5. Georgiana (9-0) 170 6. Wadley (7-0) 143 7. Cedar Bluff (6-2) 96 8. Sweet Water (5-2) 80 9. Decatur Heritage (6-2) 52 10. Pickens Co. (6-2) 50 Others receiving votes: Hubbertville (6-1) 18, Isabella (7-1) 4, McKenzie (7-2) 4, Brantley (5-3) 2, Berry (5-3) 1.

AISA

1. Autauga Acad. (29) (8-0) 348 2. Bessemer Acad. (8-1) 255 3. Monroe Acad. (8-1) 232 4. Marengo Acad. (7-1) 195 5. Chambers Acad. (8-0) 179 6. Escambia Acad. (6-2) 146 7. S. Choctaw Acad. (7-1) 115 8. Abbeville Chr. (6-3) 65 9. Fort Dale Acad. (6-2) 43 10. Cornerstone Chr. (6-2) 33 Others receiving votes: Glenwood (5-3) 18, Lowndes Acad. (5-2) 13, Pike Liberal (5-3) 6, Lee-Scott (4-4) 4, Northside Methodist (5-4) 1.


ClassiÄeds

Lake & River Phone (256) 277-4219 Fax (205) 669-4217 The Alexander City Outlook

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Wednesday, October 19, 2016

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The Outlook

Page B7

High School Football Flashback

Dadeville’s Margarius Buchanan, above right, runs against Handley. Buchanan’s status for Thursday’s game with Childersburg is unknown due to a pulled hamstring. The BRHS band, above left, performs at halftime at the Sportplex Friday night. Left, Horseshoe Bend’s Braxton Walls tries to hall in a pass against Fayetteville. Bottom, BRHS Nelcolby Maxwell runs against Helena.

Photos by Kenneth Boone and Cliff Williams

Halloween P arty

e! r a d u o y if Join us

st 1 3 r Monday, Octoberking lot

TLOOK pa Come to THE OUr scariest, cutest or dressed in you from 4 p.m. - 6 p.m. silliest costume own Alexander City

ad, Downt tlook 548 Cherokee Roos will be taken inside The Ou ot ph , in In case of ra

e published k b l il w s h p ra g Photo he Outloo T in th 8 r e b m Tuesday, Nove

al An annuadition. n tr downtow This is the perfect opportunity to get a professional portrait of your son, daughter or pet in costume!

Kenneth Boone Photography 2016 Halloween Photo Packages These images will be full length to show off costumes and we will have an extensive backdrop featuring hay bales and pumpkins. Payment by check or cash required at the time the photo is made. Photo packages will be available for pick-up at The Alexander City Outlook beginning on Monday, November 14th. You do not have to purchase a photo package to be in The Outlook. For more information please contact The Outlook at 256-234-4281.

Package A - $25 1 - 8x10 photo 1 - 5x7 photo 4 - Wallets Package B - $40 2 - 8x10 photos 2 - 5x7 photos 8 - Wallets

Individual Images 1 - 5x7.............$10 1 - 8x10...........$15 8 - wallets.......$15 1 - button........$15 Larger sizes are available upon request and may be ordered separately.


Page B8

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The Outlook

Wednesday, October 19, 2016

Oct 19, 2016 Alex City Outlook  
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