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OPINION: BACKSEAT SEATBELT LAW MAKES SENSE , PAGE 4.

THURSDAY

THE COMMUNITY CALENDAR

Lighting the way for Alexander City & Lake Martin since 1892

Inside, page 5

February 16, 2017 Vol. 125, No. 33 www.alexcityoutlook.com 75¢

AG NAMES BROOKS TO HANDLE BENTLEY CASE

SPORTS, PAGE 10 Lady Tigers roaring into new season

DOWNTOWN ALEXANDER CITY

LIGHT ’EM UP

The former Montgomery DA will lead investigation to avoid any appearance of conflict of interest

STAFF REPORT TPI Staff

Alabama’s new attorney general has recused himself from a probe into Alabama Gov. Robert Bentley and has appointed a special prosecutor to lead the investigation. Alabama Attorney General Steven Marshall announced Tuesday that former Montgomery County District Attorney Ellen Brooks would serve as supernumerary district attorney leading the investigation to avoid any appearance of a conflict of interest. Bentley has been battling allegations that he had an inappropriate relationship with former aide Rebekah Mason. Accusations have been made that Bentley used state resources to further an alleged affair. See INVESTIGATION • Page 3

Dadeville City Council talks Motts fire cleanup, road paving projects By MITCH SNEED Editor

The Mott’s Woodyard Fire is still burning in Dadeville and residents are complaining. At Tuesday’s council meeting, Council Member Betty Adams brought the subject up. “I am still getting complaints from the fire that is still smoldering,” Adams said. Mayor Wayne Smith said much has been done to clean up the area but the city will still stay on top of it. “They have cleaned up a lot of it,” Smith See DADEVILLE • Page 3

Mitch Sneed / The Outlook

The new traffic signals that will regulate traffic at one of the main intersections in downtown Alexander City went live Wednesday afternoon.

Downtown decorative lights activated in final phases of Broad Street Streetscape project Stone Electric Company of Birmingham said the lights cleared inspection by the The intersection of Broad, Alabama Department of Green and Main Street has Transportation Wednesday been lit up. morning and that cleared the The new traffic signals way for them to be activated that will now regulate at about 2 p.m. traffic at one of the main “This is the last step for intersections in downtown us,” Brakefield said. “We Alexander City went live will be taking down the Wednesday, completing all old poles and some of the but the crossing arms in the remaining wires Thursday Broad Street Streetscape and then all that is left here Project. is the railroad crossing arms Brad Brakefield of See STREETSCAPE • Page 3 By MITCH SNEED Editor

Jacksons Gap council approves new budget, tables action on pay By MITCH SNEED Editor

Clowning around

Cliff Williams / The Outlook

Center Ring Circus clown Jo Jo paints the faces of 4-year-old Sophia Barrett of Alexander City at Wednesday’s early show as the circus delighted crowds in Goodwater. For more imaged from Wednesday’s show, see page 9 inside today’s paper.

Today’s

Weather

60 37 High

Low

A budget has been approved in Jacksons Gap, after the council voted 4-1 Tuesday night to approve a spending plan that should get the city back in the black. While a copy of the budget was not made available, Mayor Jeff Walker said that the new budget would result in about $15,000 in profit barring any unforeseen expenses. “We took the numbers that we were given by Ms. Naler (accountant Dianne Naler) and added adjusted a few things that had changed,” Walker

said. “I know we should have had this a few months back, but I think these numbers are something we can work with.” Councilman Carl Pritchard was the lone vote against the measure, citing concerns and lack of detail on several. The budget as passed calls for revenues of $442,568 and expenses of $427,248. Last year, Jacksons Gap finished about $70,000 over budget and Walker said that overtime paid to two employees was the bulk of that overage. See JACKSONS GAP • Page 3

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Page 2

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Mom of heroin addicts seeks support to battle depression

Friday

67 44 Low

High Sunny

Saturday

62 46 Low

High

Cloudy, 40 percent chance of showers

Staff

Directory Telephone: (256) 234-4281 Fax: (256) 234-6550 Website: www.alexcityoutlook.com Management Steve Baker Publisher, Ext. 218 steve.baker@alexcityoutlook.com Mitch Sneed Editor, Ext. 213 mitch.sneed@alexcityoutlook.com David Kendrick Circulation Manager, Ext. 204 david.kendrick@alexcityoutlook.com Lee Champion Production Manager, Ext. 220 lee.champion@alexcityoutlook.com Audra Spears Art Director, Ext. 219 audra.spears@alexcityoutlook.com Betsy Iler Magazine Managing Editor, Ext. 221 betsy.iler@alexcityoutlook.com Tippy Hunter Advertising Director, Ext. 206 marketing@alexcityoutlook.com Angela Mullins Business Manager, Ext. 202 angela.mullins@alexcityoutlook.com Newsroom Lonna Upton Assistant Magazine Editor, Ext. 227 lonna.upton@alexcityoutlook.com Cathy Higgins Sports Editor, Ext. 228 cathy.higgins@alexcityoutlook.com

Postal

Information (USPS: 013-080, ISSN: 0738-5110) The Outlook is published five times a week, Tuesday through Saturday mornings, by Tallapoosa Publishers, Inc., 548 Cherokee Road, P.O. Box 999, Alexander City, AL, 35011. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Post Office Box 999, Alexander City, AL 35011.

How to Submit Obituaries

Thursday, February 16, 2017

The Outlook

Cliff Williams Staff Writer, Ext. 212 cliff.williams@alexcityoutlook.com Alethia Russell Staff Writer/Pagination, Ext. 210 alethia.russell@alexcityoutlook.com Advertising Sales Doug Patterson Newspaper Advertising, Ext. 205 doug.patterson@alexcityoutlook.com Emily Gregg Advertising Sales, Ext. 225 emily.gregg@alexcityoutlook.com Donna Jones Advertising Sales, Ext. 217 donna.jones@alexcityoutlook.com Scott Hardy Advertising Sales, Ext. 208 scott.hardy@alexcityoutlook.com Tabby Edwards Advertising Sales, Ext. 232 tabby.edwards@alexcityoutlook.com Composing Darlene Johnson Composing Department, Ext. 203 darlene.johnson@alexcityoutlook.com Hallie Holloway Composing Department, Ext. 203 hallie.holloway@alexcityoutlook.com Circulation Linda Ewing Office Clerk, Ext. 201 linda.ewing@alexcityoutlook.com

Tallapoosa Publishers, Inc. manages The Alexander City Outlook, The Dadeville Record, Lake magazine, Lake Martin Living, Kenneth Boone Photography and a commercial web printing press. © 2011 Tallapoosa Publishers, Inc. Reproduction of any part of any issue requires written publisher permission.

Obituaries can be submitted to The Outlook from funeral homes by e-mail at obits@alexcityoutlook.com or by fax at (256) 234-6550. For more information, call (256) 234-4281.

Obituaries Mr. Jack E. Smith 1919 - 2017 Jack E. Smith - 97, WWII combat veteran and Panama Canal Zone Policeman, after a long illness, passed away in Alexander City, AL on February 14, 2017. Jack was born in Alexander City in 1919 and graduated with the Alex City High School class of 1938. He moved to the Republic of Panama where he served as a Canal Zone Police Officer. He remained in the Canal Zone, except for his service with the US Army in Europe during WWII, until he retired in 1970. Jack was an avid golfer while in the Canal Zone and remained so well into his 80s. He won many trophies during tournament play and scored several “holes in one” over the years. As he became a “senior player” Jack was recognized on several occasions by shooting scores lower than his age. Jack is survived by his son, William T. Smith of Portland, OR; son-in-law, Allen H. Cotton of Prattville; grandchildren, Daniel and Kendra Coulson of Houston, TX; and several great-grandchildren. He was preceded in death by his wife, Lois Avery Smith; daughter, Edith Smith Cotton; and parents, Earnest Earl and Jessie Green Smith. Graveside Service for Mr. Jack Earnest Smith, 97, of Alexander City, will be Friday, February 17, 2017 at 2:00 p.m. at the Hillview Memorial Park. Rev. John Hill will officiate. The family will receive friends on Thursday, February 16, 2017 from 5:00 p.m. to 7:00 p.m. at Radney Funeral Home. Memorial messages may be sent to the family at www. radneyfuneralhome.com. Radney Funeral Home is in charge of the arrangements.

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DEAR ABBY: My daughter and son are heroin addicts. After living through this hell for 11 years, I have reached my breaking point. My daughter, who just turned 18, is in jail. My heart is broken. Therapists, parent sessions, etc. haven’t helped. I’m 60 years old and should be retiring, but my retirement money was all spent on rehabs, etc. I won’t even go into the many items that were stolen from me. How do I move on? I’m so depressed I can’t get out of bed in the morning, and I cry all day. I don’t want to take meds for depression because drugs have caused all my misery. My marriage is falling apart too. How do I carry on with this misery? -- MISERABLE IN CONNECTICUT DEAR MISERABLE: The way to carry on is to let it go. If you haven’t heard of Nar-Anon, you should check into it. It’s a support group for the family and friends of people who are addicted to narcotics, based on

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aving for the future is a vital part of ensuring a secure retirement. American Savings Education Council and America Saves coordinate the annual America Saves Week. Started in 2007, the week is an annual opportunity for organizations to promote good savings behavior and a chance for individuals to assess their own saving status. For years, Social Security has collaborated with America Saves Week to promote our shared mission of helping millions of people save for their future. This year, America Saves Week begins on February 27, but people like you are striving to save every day. The 2016 annual America Saves Week survey assessing national household savings revealed: • Just two out of every five U.S. households

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DEAR ABBY: Five years ago I discovered my wife had been cheating on me with an ex-boyfriend for eight years. We have two young children, so we resolved our differences and decided against divorce. Now she says she wants us to have another baby. I feel I cannot handle a pregnancy with her because of her infidelity. As a hands-on father, I would want to be part of the pregnancy and the complications/changes

Savers with a plan are twice as likely to save successfully. Pledge to save for America KYLLE’ Saves Week at www. MCKINNEY americasaves.org. Share Social what you’re saving Security for using the hashtag report good or excellent #ImSavingFor. progress in meeting their You may also want savings needs. to visit www.myRA. • About half (52 gov if you do not have percent) are saving retirement savings enough for a retirement as part of your job. with a desirable standard myRA is a retirement of living. savings account from • Only 43 percent have the Department of the automatic savings outside Treasury designed to of work. help you put aside money • More men (74 for your retirement. You percent) report progress can invest in the fund with saving than do according to your budget, women (67 percent). putting you in control of • Those with a savings your financial prospects. plan with specific goals Social Security’s (55 percent of the public) “People Like Me” are making much more website has tailor-made savings progress than information for preparing those without a plan (23 for your future. Our percent). richly diverse country Knowing this, it’s is made up of countless never too early to start backgrounds, ethnicities, planning for your future. and nationalities, yet Set a goal, make a plan, we all want the same and save automatically. thing — a secure future.

and other objects of the night sky. Topics will include: light pollution awareness, brief introduction to the night sky, winter constellation Horseshoe Bend National identification and star folklore. The Military Park will host an program will include a short indoor evening of stargazing, offering slideshow presentation followed by an opportunity to view and learn a constellation tour outside. Visitors about the constellations and night are asked to please bring their own sky. The event will take place on Saturday, Feb. 25, from 6 p.m. until flashlights and dress appropriately for fall weather at night. Visitors 8 p.m. are not required to bring their own The park will have telescopes telescopes since the park will have set up for the public to use. This several set up. is an excellent opportunity to see The program is weather and learn about stars, galaxies, STAFF REPORT TPI Staff

Public Meetings n Alexander City Board of Education meets on the third Tuesday of each month. Meetings are held in the board office at 375 Lee St. or local school at 5 p.m. n Alexander City Council meets on the first and third Mondays of each month. Meetings are held in the courtroom at the old city hall at 5:30 p.m.

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the principles of Al-Anon, which is for the loved ones of alcoholics. Help is as near as your computer. Visit nar-anon.org to find a group near you, and you will find that you are not as alone as you feel right now.

You can see many of the diverse people we serve at www.socialsecurity. gov/people. Younger people need to know, the earlier you start saving, the more your money can grow. Our website for young workers atwww. socialsecurity.gov/people/ youngpeople/saving.html has many resources that can help you secure today and tomorrow. Veterans and wounded warriors, as well as their families, sometimes face unique obstacles when saving for their future. Our website has lifechanging information at www.socialsecurity.gov/ people/veterans. After more than 80 years of success, we know that Social Security will always be there for you. Securing your today and tomorrow will always be our priority. McKinney is a public affairs specialist with Alabama Social Security.

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Abby, guns with histories are very personal to owners, and this one was doubly personal and an antique. What should I do? -- EMPTY HOLSTER IN TEXAS DEAR EMPTY HOLSTER: Technically, once a gift is given it becomes the property of the person who receives it. Because your nephew is deceased -- and I’m assuming his father is his next of kin -- the gun became DEAR ABBY: Several years ago I gifted one of my nephews, the father’s property. Since the gun has emotional significance who was serving in the military to you because of its history, at the time, with a .38-caliber depending upon your relationrevolver that had belonged to ship with the father, you can ask my uncle and reportedly had him to return it -- or offer to buy been used during World War I. it back from him. However, there I also gave his older brother a Colt .45 pistol from World War II. is no guarantee he will agree to your request. The nephew with the .38 revolver suffered from PTSD Dear Abby is written by and died several years ago. The gun went to his father. My ques- Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and tion is, shouldn’t I have been was founded by her mother, asked if I wanted the revolver Pauline Phillips. Contact returned? I didn’t give it to his Dear Abby at www.DearAbby. father but to him. The father com or P.O. Box 69440, Los has made no attempt to return Angeles, CA 90069. it to me. that come with it. How should I handle this and express to her why I cannot (at this point) have another child with her? -HANDS-ON DAD DEAR DAD: Clearly you are not over your wife’s infidelity, and frankly, I can’t blame you. The best way to get the message across to her would be during marriage counseling.

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n Camp Hill Town Council meets the first and third Mondays of each month. Meetings are held in town hall at 6 p.m. n Community Action Agency of Chambers, Tallapoosa, Coosa will holds its regular board of directors meetings every other month at the Central Office in Dadeville. n Coosa County Board of Education holds called meetings at least once a month. n Coosa County Commission meets on the second and fourth Tuesday of each month. Meetings are held in the Coosa County Courthouse in Rockford at 9:30 a.m. on the second Tuesday and at 6:30 p.m. on the fourth Tuesday. n Coosa County Industrial Development Board will hold its regularly scheduled meeting the third Tuesday of each month at 7 p.m. in the Commissioners’ Board Room in the courthouse in Rockford. All meetings are open to the public. n Dadeville City Council meets on the second and fourth Tuesday of each

dependent and will be canceled if it is raining or the skies are overcast. Please call the park on Saturday, Feb. 25 or check our Facebook page for up to date information. Both parts of the program are wheelchair accessible. The event is free to the public and no registration is required. Horseshoe Bend National Military Park is located at 11288 Horseshoe Bend Road Daviston, Alabama 36256. For more detailed information please visit us on Facebook at or call 256-234-7111.

month at 6 p.m. with a pre-meeting at 5:30 p.m. in city hall.

Water Authority Office. All customers are invited to attend.

n Daviston City Council meets the third Monday of every month at 6:30 p.m. at the Daviston Fire Department.

n Rockford Town Council meets the second Tuesday of each month. Meetings are held in town hall at 7 p.m.

n Goldville Town Council meets the second Monday of each month at 5:30 p.m. at the town hall.

n Tallapoosa County Board of Education meets on the second Monday of each month. Meetings are held in the n Goodwater City Council new central office at 679 meets on the second East Columbus Street, Tuesday of each month. Dadeville, AL 36853. Meetings are held at the Caldwell Center at 6:30 n Tallapoosa County p.m. Commission meets the second Monday of the n Jackson’s Gap Town month at 9 a.m. in the Council meets the second courthouse in Dadeville, Tuesday of each month. with a pre-meeting also Meetings are held in open to the public 30 mintown hall at 6:30 p.m., all utes before each regular Jackson’s Gap citizens session. are encouraged to attend. n Tallapoosa County 911 n Kellyton Town Council Board will meet on the meets on the first second Wednesday of Tuesday of the month at each month at 5:30 p.m. 6:30 p.m. at the commuin the 911 Administrative nity center in Kellyton. office at 240 West Columbus Street, n New Site City Council Dadeville. Call 825-8490 meets the first and third for more information. Monday of the month at 5 p.m. in the Conference n Walnut Hill Water Room in the Town Hall. Authority meets the third Monday of each month n Ray Water Authority at 6:30 p.m. The public is meets on the second invited. Call 825-9841 to Tuesday of every month inquire about the agenda. at 6 p.m. at the Ray


Thursday, February 16, 2017

The Outlook

Jacksons Gap

continued from page 1

“We’ve told them no more overtime and right now we are using comp time,” Walker said in a follow up conversation Wednesday. “We still have to figure out how to deal with that.” In a discussion of comp time, the council was informed that Police Chief BC Cooper had accumulated 31 hours already. Rather than deciding on a way to handle that, the council voted to table a decision until they had explored options after talking to other officials and their attorney. The council also got an update from Code Enforcement Officer Kalie Abbett on the success of efforts to make sure contractors working in town were properly licensed. “We have been working to talk to those who are doing work and making sure that they were aware that they had to have a city business license,” Abbett said. “Most of them say they thought they were covered because they had county licenses. But when we told them

what we were doing, most of them have been kosher with it all.” In all, the town has gotten 10 new business licenses as a result of the effort. The council also held an executive session that was to be to discuss the “good name and character of an employee.” In addition to the council, Cooper and attorney Brett Harrison were also in the room for a portion of the session. The topic of the conversation was not made public. Cooper’s overtime had been the topic of discussion at previous council meetings, but it was unclear if that was the subject of the executive session. Resident George Holley also addressed the council, relaying his concern about the condition of roads in the area. He said potholes are growing and attempts to patch them have not been successful. Walker said that his attempts to get help from the county have been unsuccessful so far.

Investigation

continued from page 1

He has since been accused of using campaign funds to pay for Mason’s legal bills, an action that Secretary of State John Merrill indicated violated state law. Marshall addressed the investigation, and the comments made by his predecessor Luther Strange in a statement that was released by his office Wednesday. “In his letter of November 3, 2016, Attorney General Strange requested that the House Judiciary Committee cease active interviews and investigation until necessary related work of the Attorney General’s Office has been completed,” said Marshall. “After meeting with the staff of the Special Prosecutions Division of the Attorney General’s Office concerning the status of a possible investigation of Governor Bentley, I have determined to recuse myself from the aforementioned related work and have appointed former Montgomery County District Attorney Ellen Brooks to serve as supernumerary district attorney leading the investigation. “ No timeline for the investigation was

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Streetscape

continued from page 1

which will be put in by contractors for the railroad.” Stone has been involved in similar projects across the state, including a recent project in Opelika where the new decorative lights were installed along a two-mile stretch of the downtown area. “They really do dress the area up,” Brakefield said. “We are glad that they chose us to be a part of this project.” The new lights were installed on new brown overhead standards so that the poles in the area match the lights and other fixtures that were installed as a part of the project. Work has been going on for parts of six months in the area, so residents, area businesses and city officials are all excited see another milestone reached. “It has taken some time, but it is really great to see,” Alexander City Mayor Jim Nabors said. “I stood outside today and watched as they finished up and they were switched over. It kind of lit up my heart as well to see another indication that progress is being made on the overall plan we have downtown.”

Brakefield also confirmed that the projects that stand up off the crossbeams are not cameras, but sensors to help regulate traffic. “I know, we’ve been asked that too,” Brakefield said. “No, those are just a less invasive way to sensor the traffic than cutting the asphalt. I can assure you there is no recording equipment wired in.” Alexander City’s Broad Street Streetscape project began in July and aimed to further beautify the Broad Street corridor that lies north of Broad Street between Clay and Green Streets. Henderson and Coker was the contractor on the project. The project is being paid for by Transportation Alternative Program funds received from the Federal Highway Administration (FHA) through the Alabama Department of Economic and Community Affairs (ADECA). Total cost of the project was originally $544,000 for which the city required 20 percent match – plus city engineering and inspection costs – is $125,000.

given and no information on any work that has already been done was released. Marshall expressed confidence in Brooks and her ability to get to the truth. “Ellen Brooks has a long and distinguished legal background, including 35 years in the Montgomery County District Attorney’s Office where she served as District Attorney from 1993 to 2014,” Marshall said. “Ellen is an experienced prosecutor handling a variety of matters throughout her career and I am confident she will ensure that all the facts are pursued in this investigation. “After I took the oath of office, I pledged to the people of Alabama that my first priority as Attorney General would be to determine if my recusal from a possible investigation was necessary. Over the following 48 hours, I met with my special prosecutions staff, made the decision to personally recuse, and I appointed Ellen Brooks to lead the investigation. I believe this course of action fulfills my commitment to the people that this matter be handled thoroughly and fairly.”

Dadeville

continued from page 1

said. “But we are still getting complaints about the fire and mulch pile on North Loop. We will stay on top of it until it’s cleaned up.” Members of the Dadeville Council went to a preconstruction conference on the Lafayette Street paving project that should start soon. Council Member Roy Mathis raised a concern about the fire department being able to properly respond to calls. “We would like to move one of the fire engines to under the canopy over there(old McKelvey Chevrolet) while work is going on,” Mathis said. “We are concerned that we will not be able to respond like we should to calls.” Dadeville Dixie Youth Sports’ Stacy Ayers gave the council upcoming dates with the group: coaches meeting Feb. 20, tryouts Feb. 25, first practice Feb. 26 and opening day April 8 at 10 a.m. Mayor Smith honored the family of former Dadeville Councilmember and Mayor Farrell Tidwell with a proclamation memorializing Tidwell who passed away at the age of 79 Jan. 26. The council went into executive session to discuss pending litigation with town attorney Robin Reynolds. The council voted to allow Smith to act on the town’s behalf in a legal matter. Councilmember Teneeshia GoodmanJohnson informed everyone that she had talked to Ivy Creek’s Mike Bruce about the expanding hours at the Wellness Center. She said Bruce was open to the idea but wanted more police patrols during hours the center would be open. Johnson who sits on the water board

informed everyone that water rates could go up. “Sewage makes nothing,” Johnson said. “It eats up money.” Johnson went on to say that the sewage treatment plant is getting recertified and the there is a $9,200 fee associated with the permitting and that were other expenses as well. She encouraged everyone to attend the water board meetings every second Tuesday at 3:30 p.m. Councilmember Brownie Caldwell who is also on the gas board informed the council that the board is getting ready to let bids on replacing the last of the old gas lines in town. The Dadeville City Council also: • heard from Lake Martin Area Economic Development Director Don McClellan about the history of the group and its help in getting over $160 million in investments at the industrial park that supplies over 1,200 jobs. • heard from Lake Martin Area United Way Executive Director Sharon Fuller and Board Member Sandra Fuller about allowing city employees to contribute to the organization. • approved an advertisement in Tallapoosa Publishers annual Parade magazine • approved payment of bills. • learned bids are about to be let on the demolition grant project. • approved recreation center rentals. • approved minutes from the last meeting. The next meeting of the Dadeville City Council is Feb. 28 at 6 p.m. with a pre-council meeting starting at 5:30 p.m.

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MITCH SNEED EDITOR (256) 234-4281 X213

editor@alexcityoutlook.com

EDITORIAL BOARD Steve Baker Mitch Sneed

www.alexcityoutlook.com

Page 4

Our

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Back seat seatbelt bill makes sense Alabama seat belt law currently requires each front-seat occupant of a “passenger car” shall have a safety belt properly fastened about his/her body any time the vehicle is in motion. We all know that seatbelt use is a good idea, but the surprising portion of Alabama’s law are the words “frontseat occupant” that appear in the law. As the law states now, back seat passengers are not required to wear what most experts call the most important safety device in a passenger vehicle. That makes no sense at all. Wearing a seatbelt is a no-brainer. For adult drivers, seat belts reduce the risk of death by 45 percent, statistics show. Montgomery Senator Quinton T. Ross Jr. introduced the Roderic Deshaun Scott Seat Belt Safety Act, Tuesday, which passed its first hurdles in the Alabama Senate and now advances to the Alabama House. On March 3, 2016 Lee High School student Roderic Scott, 17, was a backseat passenger of a car involved in a traffic accident on U.S. Interstate 65. Scott, a star basketball player, and two other rear passengers, were not wearing seatbelts. All three were ejected from the car. Scott, who had signed a letter of intent to play basketball for Jacksonville State University, died from his injuries a day later on March 4. “We want to do everything that we can to preserve and reduce the loss of precious life,” said Senate Minority Leader Quinton T. Ross Jr. “One of the most difficult things to do is to bury a child, and this is just one way that we as legislators can try to help prevent these types of tragedy.” According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration thousands of lives could be saved annually if all passenger vehicle occupants older than four years used safety belts. We have heard the arguments that the law would be tough to enforce, but that doesn’t matter. If it saves one life, the vote of legislators would have been worth the effort. We hope this bill passes and is signed into law quickly.

I

Thursday, February 16, 2017

Be coachable and say no to fear

love football. In fact it is the only sport I ever really excelled in. I didn’t play college football like my sons but I was a pretty good high school player. Early in my career, coaches recognized I had some strengths. I was a competitor. I was intense. I was coachable. They also saw several deficiencies. I was not big, strong, coordinated or fast. In other words, on the surface you would think I had little chance of success. But, and here is a huge key, remember I was easy to coach. Under the excellent tutelage of some very dedicated men, I was taught techniques and reads that served me well. When I played defense, I could read the direction the play was going by the first steps the lineman made who were suppose to block me. I picked up subtle movements the running backs made pre snap that tipped their hand on where they were heading on the play. Those reads helped me make up for not being technically fast. I became football fast. I could get to where I needed to be faster than many who had greater speed because of the insights given me by my coaches. And on the other side of the ball I became an allcounty center on the offensive line. Every week I would be charged with the assignment of blocking someone 25-50 pounds heavier than me. It is impossible to do using just average strength. But a coach taught me the importance of leverage and technique. I could and did win the battle

RAY WATERS Guest Columnist

most of the time against guys way bigger. How did I do it? I was willing to listen to a coach who taught me the techniques and skills I would need to succeed. Regardless of how successful you are, you can be better when you listen to a good coach. In the game you can only see what is happening from a single perspective, your own. With a coach, you get another pair of eyes and a lot of wisdom that can help you rise way above your natural ability. I have a serious question for you. Do you need a different perspective? Are you coachable? Sometimes being coachable is all you need to really thrive. Some fear that push to change and try what a coach may be driving you towards. But is that fear of the unknown holding you back? Anything worth doing comes with fear attached. What if I can’t do it? What if I fail at this? Will people see me as a loser? What if the learning curve is too great? What if I don’t really have the aptitude needed? I get these same fearful thoughts every time I begin a new project. And here’s what I try to do to get past them. I remind myself that if I don’t step out and try something

new, I am settling for a stagnated life. I say to myself if an organism isn’t growing, it’s dying. Since I am not ready to die, I need to look for opportunities to keep me moving forward. This new venture won’t kill me. It’s just a thing – a new something to try; a project worth considering. I don’t need to be locked down by fear over something that is not that consequential. Franklin Roosevelt was right, “The only thing we have to fear, is fear itself.” As soon as I move towards the “new thing,” the fear always subsides. For some reason, when I am paralyzed by fear, if I can just get up and move towards it, it shrinks away. This is what life is. Having an idea, being nervous and afraid, overcoming the fear by moving towards it and then seeing something positive come to pass. It’s not that complicated. I don’t know what you are afraid of today. If it’s a good idea you have been thinking about pursuing, I urge you to get up and do it. Time is short. Our lives are here and then quickly gone. Be a big life person by taking a risk. Go for it. Plan the trip. Finish your degree. Start that business. Train for that marathon. Write that book. Ask her or him for that date. Get that tattoo…..ok I got carried away. You get the point. Go live big my friends! Ray Waters is an author, speaker and CEO of The Big Life. You can reach Ray at Ray@raywaters.com

Bobby Tapley represents District 1. His phone number is 256392-0344. His address is 1821 LaVista Road, Alexander City, AL 35010. Chairman of the Public Safety committee.

Bobby Tapley

Buffy Colvin represents District 2. Her phone number is 256-750-0663. Her address is 786 I Street, Alexander City, AL 35010. Chairman of the Buildings and Property committee.

Buffy Colvin

Scott Hardy represents District 3. His phone number is 256-4962450. His address is 549 Sleepy Hollow Drive, Alexander City, AL 35010. Chairman of the Parks and Recreation committee.

Scott Hardy

Eric Brown represents District 4. His phone number is 256-3972011. His address is 1421 Parrish Drive, Alexander City, AL 35010. Chairman of the Public Works committee.

Eric Brown

Tommy Spraggins represents District 5. His phone number is 256-234-3609. His address is 1539 College Street, Alexander City, AL 35010. Chairman of Finance committee.

Tommy Spraggins

Tim Funderburk represents District 6. His phone number is 256-825-2993. His address is 1431 River Oaks, Alexander City, AL 35010. Chairman of Utilities committee.

Tim Funderburk

“Liberty, when it begins to take root, is a plant of rapid growth.” – George Washington

Today’s

Scripture

“A good tree can’t produce bad fruit, and a bad tree can’t produce good fruit.” – Luke 6:43

alexcityoutlook.com

Daily Poll Wednesday Question: Did you purchase any gifts for Valentine’s Day?

Yes – 14 No – 16

Thursday Question: Do you usually wear a seatbelt when you sit in the rear of a car? To participate in this daily poll, log on each day to www.alexcityoutlook.com and vote. Find out the vote totals in the next edition of The Outlook and see if your vote swayed the results.

Mission

The Outlook strives to report the news honestly, fairly and with integrity, to take a leadership role and act as a positive influence in our community, to promote business, to provide for the welfare of our employees, to strive for excellence in everything we do and above all, to treat others as we would want to be treated ourselves.

How to

Officials

Jim Nabors

Quote

Our

Know Your Jim Nabors is mayor of Alexander City. His phone number at city hall is 256-329-6730 and his home number is 256329-1320 His address at city hall is 4 Court Square; Alexander City, AL, 35010. His home address is 1695 Magnolia Street Alexander City, AL, 35010.

Today’s

Subscribe

Crossing the line on health insurance

I

n a recent television interview, Aetna CEO Mark Bertolini, head of one of America’s largest health insurers, commented that selling insurance across state lines is “an outdated concept” in these days of the Affordable Care Act (ACA). Bertolini went on to explain the rationale for his statement: “Insurance products are now tightly aligned with networks, so buying an insurance product from another state, that’s tied to a network in another state, really doesn’t work for people seeking care.” The sale of health insurance as interstate commerce is often cited as a pillar of healthcare reform by proponents of market-based solutions. In fact, I offered up this idea in a previous article as one of the ways to return empowerment and control to Americans seeking quality, affordable healthcare in the aftermath of Obamacare. While there are a number of issues that would need to be resolved in order to make healthcare across state lines work, they are not insurmountable, nor is the concept outdated. At one time, nearly all individual health insurance was regulated at the state level. Each set of state regulations established insurance mandates requiring plans within the state to cover a specific set of treatments. With the passage of the ACA, the federal government usurped health insurance regulatory control from the states making the individual mandate even more onerous. As the last year of Obamcare demonstrat-

RICHARD KOCUR Guest Columnist

ed, insurance mandates raise the cost of premiums. Younger, healthier individuals are forced to pay more for insurance due to mandated coverages they do not need or want. If individuals were able to purchase insurance across state lines and tailor their coverage, costs would decrease and, in time, create more competitive insurance markets. Some speculate that the interstate commerce of health insurance may even draw individuals currently enrolled in employersponsored plans — Aetna’s bread and butter — in favor of less expensive out-of-state individual plans. In order for any of this to occur, however, the repeal of Obamacare must return regulatory control of health insurance to the states. Once regulatory control is returned to the states, insurers in those states could begin to craft offerings which reflect the desires of the marketplace. It’s here that Mr. Bertolini’s statement regarding provider networks comes into play. How could a woman in Oregon purchase health insurance, allowing her to see her local doctor, from an insurer in Ohio with ties to a network of Ohio doctors? The answer is: She couldn’t — for now.

Networks are established when health-insurance companies contract with healthcare providers in order to serve their policy holders. Building provider networks is a timeconsuming process and will not happen overnight, but it will happen. While a nationwide solution would be ideal, it is likely that the health-insurance market would evolve slowly at first, focusing around large metropolitan areas near state lines. The proximity of eastern Pennsylvania, metro New York, and New Jersey, as well as eastern Maryland, Washington, D.C., and northern Virginia, serve as examples. The next evolution in across-state-lines health insurance would likely be the emergence of a handful of larger regional insurers offering a variety of plans across multiple states. As provider networks grow and risk pools and product offerings increase, more individual Americans will enjoy greater healthcare choice, access, and affordability. Crossing the line with American’s healthcare is not for the impatient, but unlike the Edsel, disco, or rotary phones, the idea of pursuing greater market-based reforms in our healthcare system will never be outdated. Richard D. Kocur is an assistant professor of business at Grove City College. He specializes in marketing and business strategy and has over 25 years of experience in the healthcare industry.

The subscription rate is $136.00 per year in Tallapoosa and Coosa counties and $177.99 outside the area. Periodicals paid at Alexander City, AL. Newspapers are available at 100 news racks in our area at 75 cents for The Outlook and 50 cents for The Record. We would love to deliver a paper to your door. Call David Kendrick at 256-234-4281, Ext. 204 or e-mail david.kendrick@alexcityoutlook. com.

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Opinion?

We’d like to share your thoughts and opinions with the greater Lake Martin community. It’s free and it only takes a few moments of your time. We have two ways to get your opinion in print: letters to the editor and guest columns. The main difference is length. Letters to the editor are up to 250 words, while guest columns can be up to 500 words. Letters and columns may be sent to P.O. Box 999, Alexander City, AL 35011, faxed to (256) 2346550 or e-mailed to editor@alexcityoutlook.com. Please include your name, address and phone number. Send us your thoughts today!

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Thursday, February 16, 2017

The Outlook

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TAX TIME 2017 Right now is a great time to start preparing for tax season. While the deadline to file returns may be several months away, getting a head-start allows men and women the chance to organize their tax documents so they aren’t racing against a deadline come April. The following are a handful of ways to start preparing for your returns now. • Find last year’s return. You will need information from last year’s return in order to file this year, so find last year’s return and print it out if you plan to hire a professional to work on your return. • Gather dependents’ information. While you might know your own Social Security number by heart, if you have dependents, you’re going to need their information as well. New parents or adults who started serving as their elderly parents’ primary caretakers over the last year will need their kids’ and their folks’ social security numbers. If you do not have these numbers upon filing, your return will likely be delayed and you might even be denied potentially substantial tax credits.

deductible. If these forms are not received in a timely manner, speak with your lender. You might even be able to download them from your lender’s secure website. • Make a list of your charitable contributions. Charitable contributions, no matter how small, are tax deductible. While it’s easiest to maintain a list of all charitable donations you make as the year goes on, if you have not done that, then you can have to pay taxes on any interest make one now. Look earned. Interest earned on the majority of for receipts of all contributions, contactsavings accounts is also taxable, so gather ing any charities you donated to if you all of your year-end financial statements misplaced any receipts. from your assorted accounts in one place. Doing so will make filing your return, • Book an appointment with your tax whether you do it yourself or work with a preparation specialist now. As April 15 professional, go more quickly. draws closer, tax preparers’ schedules get • Speak with your mortgage lender. Homeowners should receive forms documenting their mortgage interest payments for the last year, as the money paid in interest on your home or homes is tax

• Gather your year-end financial statements. If you spent the last year investing, then you will

busier and busier. The earlier you book your appointment, the more likely you are to get a favorable time for that meeting. In addition, if you have gathered all of the information you need by early February, then booking your appointment early means you can file earlier and receive any return you might be eligible for that much quicker. Tax season might not be right around the corner, but it’s never too early to start preparing your return.

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Alexander City Outlook Dadeville Record Wetumpka Herald Eclectic Observer Tallassee Tribune


Page 6

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CommunityCalendar Today is

February 16, 2017 Today’s Events

Need your business to

STAND OUT

ARTS ASSOCIATION: The Arts Association of Central Alabama will

Thursday, February 16, 2017

The Outlook

meet Feb. 16 at 11:30 a.m. at the Senior Activity Center at the Sportplex. Diane Hough will give a demonstration on pencil drawing.

Today’s Anniversaries

Beth and Bruce Holley and Michelle and Chris Collum are celebrating their

Submit calendar items:

Participate in your Outlook by calling 256-234-4281, faxing them to 256-234-6550, sending your event to calendar@alexcityoutlook.com or logging on to http://www.alexcityoutlook.com/. anniversaries.

Today’s Birthdays

Amy Crawford, Kara Forbus, John Ed Cox, Demetrius Cox, Gauge Danie and Addie Walker are celebrating their birthday.

Need Insurance? Call me.

from the crowd?

Call us, we can help!

256.234.4281

• • • • •

Alexander City Outlook Dadeville Record Wetumpka Herald Eclectic Observer Tallassee Tribune

256.234.3481 KarenChannell.com

Many a small thing

has been made

large...

The Learning Tree Helping Children Learn and Grow

...with the right kind of advertising.

The Learning Tree, Inc. is Accepting Applications for Weekend Shifts in Direct Care. Applications can be picked up at: 101 S. Dubois Street Tallassee, AL 36078 Or contact Brinda Bell (334) 252-0025, Ext. 101 Email: bbell@learning-tree.org

Submitted / The Outlook

Coosa Centra Middle School Assistant Principal David Stover recently organized a morning of coffee and donuts for the Coosa County Bus Drivers. On the morning of Jan. 30, all bus drivers were invited to return to Central Middle School after unloading their students to pick up their coffee or hot chocolate and donuts. Mr. Stover said that he wanted to do something to let the bus drivers of Coosa County know how important they are and how much they are appreciated.

Now – April 15

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Come Visit Us! Cecily Lee, Administrator Angela Pitts, Director of Nursing

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SEE ME FOR INSURANCE

FREE TAX ASSISTANCE: Beginning Jan. 30, free tax and electronic tax filing assistance at Volunteer Connections of Central Alabama, Inc., 5030 Hwy 280, Alex City, AL IRS certified volunteers will provide the free tax assistance and electronically file federal and state income tax forms. The free tax sites are designed to assist seniors 60+ (with no income limit), taxpayers under age 60 with incomes less than $54,000, and disabled taxpayers. Taxpayers will be assisted in the order they are registered. Please do not bring people to the site not involved in the filing of your taxes due to the limited space. Waiting may be necessary. Volunteers will provide free tax assistance and electronically file federal and state income tax forms at Volunteer Connections of Central Alabama, Inc. beginning Jan. 25. Please arrive and register for assistance at least one hour before closing time. Jan. 30, 31 and February – Mondays, Tuesdays, Thursdays – 9 a.m. - 7 p.m. March – Mondays and Tuesdays – 9 a.m. – 6 p.m. and Thursdays – 9 a.m. – 2 p.m. April 1 to April 15 - Mondays, Tuesdays, Thursdays --- 9 a.m. - 5 p.m. Information You Must Bring To The Tax Site: The following information is required by the IRS: last year’s tax return; photo ID-driver’s license-for taxpayer and spouse; social security cards for taxpayers and dependants; W-2’s; and 1099’s B, R, and SSA 1099. If you have health insurance through the government marketplace, bring your 1095A. ALL employed taxpayers should bring a copy of their year-end pay stub. In regards to the itemized deduction list, you should bring all the documentation that applies to you. Even if you do not itemize on your Federal taxes you may be able to do so on your State return. For more info call (256) 234-0347. ENROLLMENT APPLICATIONS: Faith Christian Academy is accepting applications for the 2017-2018 school year. Applications may be picked up at Faith Temple Church on the corner of Franklin and Gorgas Streets. For more information call 256-234-6421.

February 18

Harold Cochran 256.234.2700 haroldcochran.b2cn@statefarm.com We will deliver the Lake Region’s News to your door

Daily, Weekly or Monthly

SUBSCRIBE TODAY! Take advantage of our Magazine Subscription Special and get both LAKE Magazine and Lake Martin Living for the low price of . . . $5000

Call 256-234-4281 or stop by our ofÚce at 548 Cherokee Road, Alexander City, AL

CLAY CLASSIC: The Ronald E Koon Sporting Clay Classic is in its 11th year of providing a fun filled day for avid shooters to help support our local Boys and Girls Club of the Lake Martin Area. The event will be held at the Lower Wetumpka Shotgun Club in Montgomery, Alabama starting at9 a.m. on Feb. 18, 2017. Team of four is $600. Team of two is $300 and a one-man team $100. Lunch, shells, goodie bags and door prizes given to each participant Call 256-234-4757 to sign up today or email bgcreynolds@gmail.com NORRIS, HOLLEY AND EDWARDS FAMILY GATHERING: The 10th Annual Family Gathering of the Norris, Holley and Edwards family will be Feb. 18 from 12 p.m. to 5 p.m. at the Bud Porch Building. Bring a dish. COMMUNITY PRAYER: The Darian Missionary Baptist Church family and prayer team are offering prayer to the community Feb. 18 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. in the parking lot on the corner of Laurel and E streets across from Stephens School. PANCAKE BREAKFAST: The Dadeville Kiwanis Pancake Breakfast will be Feb. 18 starting at 7 a.m. at the Dadeville High School cafeteria. Tickets are available almost every where in Dadeville for $6. For questions call Peggy Bullard at 256-825-9415. POLAR PLUNGE: Wind Creek State Park is hosting its Second Annual Polar Plunge Feb. 18 from 2 p.m. to 3

p.m. Park entrance fees apply to noncampers. PANCAKES FOR ROBOTICS: Faith Christian Academy will host a Pancake Breakfast with sausage, juice and coffee at the upper level gym of Faith Temple Church on the corner of Franklin and Gorgas Streets on Saturday, Feb. 18 from 6 a.m. until 11 a.m. All you can eat in-house. Carry out is available. You may purchase tickets from FCA students or by calling the church office at 256-234-6421. Tickets are also available at the door. The proceeds will go to send the FCA Robotics teams which consist of 4th grade thru 8th grade students to the National WWII Museum Robotics Challenge in New Orleans in May. PANCAKE BREAKFAST: Bibb Graves School in Millerville will have a pancake breakfast Saturday Feb. 18, serving from 7 a.m. to 10:30 a.m. Eat-in or carry out. Plate includes all you can eat pancakes, sausage, orange juice, and coffee. Cost is $6. All profit is used for renovation of the old High School section of the Community Center. Trade Day will be from 7 a.m. – 2 p.m. Hot dogs, chips, candy bars, and soft drinks will be available at lunch time. PRAYER BREAKFAST: Great Bethel Baptist Church is hosting a prayer breakfast and book signing with Rev. Sondrea L. Tolbert and her book “On the Bright Side – Morning Joy” Feb. 18 at 8:30 a:m. PANCAKE BREAKFAST: A pancake breakfast benefiting the New Site Volunteer Fire and Ambulance will be held Saturday, Feb. 18 from 6 a.m. to 9 a.m. at the New Site Town Hall.

February 19

LAKE WATCH ANNUAL MEETING: The Lake Watch of Lake Martin Annual Meeting will be Sunday, Feb. 19 from 1 p.m. to 3:30 p.m. at the StillWaters Residential Association Building. Along with a business meeting, Jimmy Lanier, founder of CRATA will be the guest speaker. FRIENDS AND FAMILY DAY: Mt. Lovely Baptist Church is hosting friends and family day Sunday, Feb. 19 at 2 p.m. with guest pastor Rev. Anthony Pogue and the Bethesda Baptist Church. Pastor of Mt. Lovely is Rev. Bernard Harris.

February 20

HORIZONS UNLIMITED: Daphne Simpkins will be speaking to Horizons Unlimited Feb. 20 from 1:30 p.m. to 3 p.m. at the Alexander City Board of Education. The winter program runs through Feb. 27. Membership is $20 per person or $30 per couple each semester.

February 20-24

BLACK HISTORY PROGRAM: Bread of Life ACOP in Kellyton will host a Black History Program Feb. 20-24 at 7 p.m. nightly with pastor Elder Neverland Tuck. Speakers will be Pastor James Blackmon, Rev. William Russell, Rev. Jimmy Brook, Pastor Ken Matthew and Minister Frankie Cousin.

February 23

BOOK SIGNING: Mary Helen Brown will visit the Adelia M. Russell Library Thursday, Feb. 23 at 2 p.m. to discuss her newly published book “Headed for Home.” Books will be available for purchase by cash or check for $15 and Brown will be available to autograph books.

February 24-26

COMMUNITY THEATRE: The Sylacauga Community Playhouse will present “You’re a Good Man Charlie

•Alexander City Outlook •Dadeville Record •Wetumpka Herald •Eclectic Observer •Tallassee Tribune

256.234.4281

Brown” Feb. 24 at 6 p.m. and Feb. 25 and 26 at 2 p.m. at the Sylacauga High School Auditorium. Cost is $15 in advance and $18 at the door. For more information call 256-369-3003.

February 25

ART WORKSHOP: The Artists Association of Central Alabama is hosting a workshop on basic gourd art with Kay Fincher Feb. 25 from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the Sportplex Senior Activity Center. Cost is $45 and includes all materials. To register call 256-377-4918. FAMILY GAME NIGHT: Bibb Graves High School Alumni and Friends in Millerville will have Family Game Night Bingo from 5 p.m. until 8 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 25. Begin with hot dogs, pizza, chips, and soft drinks.

February 27

HORIZONS UNLIMITED: Katie Simpkins will be speaking to Horizons Unlimited Feb. 27 from 1:30 p.m. to 3 p.m. at the Alexander City Board of Education. The winter program runs through Feb. 27. Membership is $20 per person or $30 per couple each semester.

Small Space Advertising Works.

February 28

PANCAKES: Duncan Memorial United Methodist Church is serving up free all you can eat pancakes Feb. 28 from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m.

March 1

LUNCHEON: Bibb Graves High School Alumni and Friends in Millerville will have their Monthly Luncheon on Wednesday, March 1 from 11 a.m. until 2 p.m. Please bring a covered dish and a small donation.

March 3-4

RECORD SHOW: The Alabama Record Collectors Association are hosting their 36th annual record and cd show March 3 and 4 at the Bessemer Civic Center East Meeting Room.

For Consistent Advertising

at Low Rates...

call the Advertising Department

256.234.4281

March 4

MISS WINTER: The 2017 Miss Winter Pageant will be March 4 at 2 p.m. at the New Covenant Church. Tickets to watch the pageant are $10 at the door or $8 if purchased by Friday, March 3. Please email Sherri Williams at misswinterpageant@gmail.com. DIVORCE RECOVERY WORKSHOP: A workshop to help separated and divorced persons affirm themselves as whole, worthwhile persons, heal past wounds and discover new doors opening to the future. The workshop will be held on the Trinity Campus of the Alex. City First United Methodist Church on Highway 280 in Alexander City March 4 from 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Please call 256-487-2115 to register.

March 5

PASTOR APPRECIATiON: Pine Grove Missionary Baptist Church in Dadeville is hosting the 36th Appreciation of Rev. G.H. Pulliam Sunday, March 5 at 2 p.m. Guest minister will be Rev. Justin Freeman of New Canaan Baptist Church. PASTOR ANNIVERSARY: New Style Baptist Church in Nixburg is hosting the 2nd Pastoral Anniversary of Rev. Richard Ellis Taylor Sunday, March 5 at 2:30 p.m. Rev. Robert Hargrove and the Mt. Sinai Baptist Church will be the guest.

March 7

USHERS MEETING: The Early Rose District is holding an ushers meeting March 7 at 5 p.m. at the Early Rose District Center. Gerealdene Russell is president.

How to add a calendar item: Participate in your

Lighting the way for Alexander City & Lake Martin since 1892

By e-mailing your event to calendar@alexcityoutlook.com or call 256-234-4281. _____ Send your news items to editor@alexcityoutlook.com


The Outlook

Thursday, February 16, 2017

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Lake & River Phone (256) 277-4219 Fax (205) 669-4217 The Alexander City Outlook

Reaching more than 22,000 households in Tallapoosa and Elmore counties The Dadeville Record

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Advertise here and sell it faster. Call Classifieds at 256.277.4219.

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Looking for a home? Look in our classifieds section and learn of great deals for you and your family.

PUZZLES & HOROSCOPE

ARIES (March 21-April 19) Conversations between you and trusted associates seem to have a harsh tone. You might be told that you are a bit too sarcastic. Be 1HZB B8VHGB,WHPV smart, and refuse to have a knee0HQ VZRPHQ VNLG VFORWKHV jerk reaction. Give in to the need to VWDUWLQJBDWBIRU inform others of your perceptions.  VRIIORZHUSRWVIXUQLWXUH Tonight: Join great company at a SLFWXUHVELF\FOHVKRXVHKROG favorite place. DSSOLDQFHV TAURUS (April 20-May 20) Initiate talks, and refuse to give in 'D\V*RQH%\7KULIW to someoneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s need for control. Remember that you can win a power 6FRWW5RDG play only by not getting involved. 7KXUVGD\6DWXUGD\ have a charming quality about DPSP You you that appeals to many admirers. &ORWKHV Enjoy your popularity! Tonight: Go along with the moment. %DE\FORWKHV GEMINI (May 21-June 20) 3LFWXUHVRII Pace yourself, knowing that you %HGGLQJRII have a lot of ground to cover. Be /RWVRIRWKHUVDOHLWHPV more direct in how you handle a personal matter. Others might not WKURXJKRXWWKHVWRUH be as clued in to what is going on  as you are. Be discreet with a friend who has a hot temper. Tonight: Get some extra R and R. STATE ALES CANCER (June 21-July 22) You have a unique sense of humor that is likely to take you in a different &RQWHQWVRI/DNH0DUWLQ direction. While bosses or associZDWHUIURQWKRPH ates are complaining, you will be )XUQLWXUHGpFRUDQG off accomplishing more than your DSSOLDQFHV fair share of work. Dedicate special 6DWXUGD\)HEUXDU\WK time to a child or loved one. Tonight: DPSP Enjoy the moment. .DULV'ULYH LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) 'DGHYLOOH$/ You canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t get past a problem and DQG come to an understanding without 6XQGD\)HEUXDU\WK the cooperation of a roommate or SPSP close associate. You understand that it will take both of you working 6DWXUGD\)HEUXDU\WK together to Ă&#x201E;nd a response. Be as DPSP direct as possible when dealing with a friend. Tonight: Out and about. Do you have available jobs? VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) You will speak your mind clearly, Call 256.277.4219 to let others know and others will hear what you are saying. Your intensity emerges as about job opportunities well. An associate or loved one at your business. could be reactive, as he or she )HEWKWK_DPSP doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t seem to understand where (VWDWHRI you are coming from. Be receptive -LP 0DUJDUHW6KDIIHU to feedback. Tonight: Find your

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FOOD & PRODUCE Selling your home?

The Wetumpka Herald

friends. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) You could be out of control right now. Share more of what is on your mind. Someone close to you might push to have his or her way. Opt for clear communication. Unless you are dealing with a life-or-death issue, let this person take the lead. Tonight: In the limelight. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) Your willingness to verbalize an internal issue indicates the importance of you wanting and needing to resolve it. Others seem drawn to you, and they are more than willing to work out a problem. Use your charisma and insightfulness. Tonight: Be where the action is. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll sense that something is going on behind the scenes. You might want to open up this matter for discussion. The wise move is to say and do nothing for now. What you believe is happening might not be the correct scenario. Tonight: Keep your own counsel. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) You might believe that you have everything under control, but know that you could experience some discomfort on a personal level. An issue involving real estate is likely to emerge. Know that youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll be able to handle it with ease. Tonight: Ready to take off. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) You are a great source of information, but when someone hears too many facts, he or she might feel overloaded and get upset. Take this reaction as your cue to walk away from the situation. Be gracious and just subtly take a step back. Tonight: At a favorite haunt. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) You could have a lot of chatter inside your head that keeps popping up at random times. You might not be sure which way to go. Understand what you want to do, and then decide if it seems possible. Open up to new ideas and start planning. Tonight: Think â&#x20AC;&#x153;spring getaway.â&#x20AC;?

68'2.8


The Outlook

www.alexcityoutlook.com

Page 8

Thursday, February 16, 2017

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Sell your home in the classifieds call 256.277.4219.

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We didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t think you would. Do you need to successfully market on a tight budget? Tallapoosa and Elmore County Classifieds has customizable programs available to fit any budget.

DONâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;T WAIT! Call TODAY 256.277.4219

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Raise your hand if you want your business to make LESS money next year.

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Thursday, February 16, 2017

Page 9

www.alexcityoutlook.com

The Outlook

A CENTER RING CIRCUS Circus comes to Goodwater for the evening

Photos by Cliff Williams

The Center Ring Circus came to town to provide some family entertainment from aerialists to clowns to animals. Children of all ages had something to enjoy. Some children even got involved in the act with JoJo the Clown as he coached them through a skit.

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CATHY HIGGINS SPORTS EDITOR (256) 234-4281 X228

sports@alexcityoutlook.com

Page 10

Thursday, February 16, 2017

www.alexcityoutlook.com

Cougars punch ticket for state championship JOE MCADORY

Central Coosa varsity boys topple Greene County at home in 3A basketball subregionals

Sports Columnist

Hype train isn’t fair to Jarrett Stidham

By CATHY HIGGINS Sports Editor

Y

ou’d think Jarrett Stidham, the savior of Auburn football, was showered with rose petals riding a white horse along Donahue Drive upon arrival in January. Fans believe the Baylor transfer, one of the most sought-after dual threat quarterbacks in the land, has all of the tools to not only ignite the Tiger offense, but make Auburn a player once again on the national scene. He’s got size (6-foot-3, 209). He’s got speed. He’s got moxxy. He’s got an arm. And for the next five months, he’s got the hype. I hate to sound like Negative Nancy here, but the question bears asking: What if Stidham isn’t the next Pat Sullivan? What if Stidham throws a few early picks and the Tigers struggle out of the gate? Jeremy Johnson was an all-world recruit out of Montgomery with all the tools and was an all-world backup to Nick Marshall in 20132014. The keys to the Auburn offense was Johnson’s in 2015 and dreams of the College Football Playoff danced through people’s preseason heads. The fate of Auburn football rested on Johnson’s shoulders. Three games into the season, it was more than clear that he was a liability and lost his job to freshman Sean White. So here we are again. Whispers of a “special season” are heard, and for all intents and purposes, the tools are in place for such a season to occur. Running backs Kamryn Pettway and Kerryon Johnson return, as do an incredibly talented group of wide receivers. The offensive line figures to be an asset. Auburn’s defense loses Carl Lawson and Montravius Adams, so it could take a step back. Then again, it also has better depth than it has had in years. All this team needed was a topflight quarterback, right? It needed one at Georgia when White played with a bum shoulder. It would have won otherwise. It needed one at Alabama when Johnson was tasked to play the best defense in the nation. He never had a chance. It needed one in the Sugar Bowl against Oklahoma when White suffered a broken arm in the first quarter — his third injury in two seasons. But 2017 is a fresh start. Enter Stidham and the hype machine, which isn’t necessarily fair to him. Now he’s got the weight of high expectations on his shoulders. But if Stidham lives up to the hype, or even comes close, this Auburn football team has an opportunity to be much more competitive — and win — its most important games of the season. If Stidham, who figures to dethrone White as the starting quarterback, does not live up to the hype, then Auburn finds itself in an unenviable spot. Can you imagine the collective groans at Jordan-Hare Stadium should Stidham get pulled? It wouldn’t be a groan for whoever is placed behind center. Instead, it would be a ‘we didn’t solve anything’ groan. The entire point in bringing Stidham to the Plains was providing an upgrade at quarterback for 2017-2018. But remember – when White was healthy and at the top of his game – the Tiger offense was rolling. Stidham, however, is said to bring a stronger pass attack to the Plains than what White has shown, or been given the opportunity to show. Hope in a new decorated quarterback is worthwhile. It’s better than the alternative. But let’s not crown Stidham as an All-SEC quarterback until he’s proven it on the field in an Auburn uniform. Joe McAdory is communications editor at Auburn University’s Harbert College of Business.

Cathy Higgins / The Outlook

Central Coosa sophomore Omar Gaddis goes for a layup in the Cougars’ away game at Benjamin Russell earlier in the regular season.

After Tuesday’s 66-57 Class 3A Sub-Regional, home court win over Greene County, the Central Coosa varsity boys are joining the Lady Cougars at the Alabama High School Athletic Association State Tournament this weekend. Although Central Coosa came into the match up on the heels of a successful season, the Cougars still had to work for the win. “Like I told my kids, they were a very tall team and we are not,” Cougars acting head coach Jeremy Freeman said. “But it’s not about the size right now, and we can play bigger and with heart.” The game started off as a stalemate with a 12-all tie at the end of the first quarter. Then the Cougars’ momentum kicked in as they worked their way toward a 27-23 halftime lead. Although both teams fought as the second half opened, the Cougars maintained dominance with a 45-37 lead at the end of the third quarter. In the final quarter, the

Central Coosa varsity boys ramped up their defense. Plus, freshman forward Noel Jones, senior guard Tyus Maxwell, sophomore guard Omar Gaddis and senior forward Tyius Evans collectively made 17 out of 21 fourth quarter free-throws. “We iced it at the free-throw line,” Freeman said. “We had to have them to close this thing out.” Close it out, they did with a final score of 66-57. Jones led the Cougars in the win with 18 points. He had help from Maxwell with 15 and Gaddis with 13. Evans also had 10. “Those guys are doing a great job,” Freeman said. “We’re so thankful and so blessed.” Tuesday’s win brings the Central Coosa varsity boys’ overall season record to 17-11. The Cougars next play Midfield, which comes into the Central Alabama Regional playoff game 24-6, at 4:30 p.m. Saturday at Dunn-Oliver Acadome at Alabama State University in Montgomery. They follow the Lady Cougars’ 3 p.m. game against Midfield.

Young Lady Tigers ready to roar into season Dadeville softball team infused with new blood By CATHY HIGGINS Sports Editor The Dadeville varsity girls are all set to hit the softball diamond as the Lady Tigers’ season starts next week. “We’re really excited to get out there and see what the girls have to offer,” said Lady Tigers head coach Magan Martin. If preseason practice, which started in January, is any indication, the Lady Tigers have quite a bit to offer this year. “This is a hard working bunch,” Martin said. “It’s the best group of girls I think I’ve ever been around.” Despite their dedicated work ethic, the team does come into the season with less experience this year. “We’re still fairly young,” Martin said. “We only have three seniors, Amber Johnson, Jaylen Johnson and Tiana Alvez.” That’s only half the team’s returning starters. “We’re going to have six returning starters,” Martin said. “But those are mostly ninth and 10th graders.” Those starters include juniors Pearl Huff and Autumn Davis, Mallory Medders, Tamera Tinsley and Zoe Veras. “They played some on varsity last year,” Martin said. The Lady Tigers also has some new faces this year. “We have several girls who tried out for the first time this year and this is their first year with us,” Martin said. “So it’s given us a new dynamic that we can play with and move people around with.” One familiar athlete in the lineup is Callie Jones, who was prevented from playing last year because of an injury. “We expected her to be a big pitcher last year,” Martin said. “But she suffered a foot injury and didn’t get to play an inning. So we’re excited to see her get out there and play this year.” For the most part, the Lady Tigers are coming into the season pretty healthy. However, some team members have been working through routine soreness that comes with getting back into a dedicated routine. “We’re just having to work that out,” Martin said. Being game-day ready is

vital, especially since the Lady Tigers are heading into a challenging season. “We’re playing a bunch of bigger schools,” Martin said, “because if they’re better than you, you want to beat them.” Those tough opponents include Saint James, Benjamin Russell, Opelika and Beauregard. “We’re playing schools that are bigger than us because we want to get better,” Martin said. “Our goal is to be better at the end of the season than we were at the beginning.” Facing one foe hits especially close to home. “My sister is the head coach of Benjamin Russell,” Martin said. “So that’s always an interesting family rivalry.” Facing those giants won’t be easy. But the Dadeville varsity girls are ready for what comes. “We’re going to take our bumps and bruises at the beginning and try to be the best ball team we can at the end,” Martin said. That journey begins at home on Thursday, Feb. 23, when the Lady Tigers host Saint James at 5 p.m. Cathy Higgins / The Outlook “We just want to get out there and play,” Martin said. Dadeville sophomore Tulsa Cabaniss works on her throws during the “It’s going to be exciting.” Lady Tigers’ recent preseason practice.

DADEVILLE VARSITY SOFTBALL ROSTER NAME GRADE T’yana Alvies Tulsa Cabiniss Brittany Claybrook Autumn Davis Madison Huff Amber Johnson Isis Johnson

12th 10th 10th 11th 11th 12th 10th

Jalyn Johnson NAME Cali Jones Jailee Kirkland Malorie Meadors Quanesha Presley Tiffany Rice Timarian Tinsley Zoe Veres

12th 10th 9th 9th 11th 10th 9th 8th

GRADE

LADY TIGERS GAME SCHEDULE DATE Feb. 23 Feb. 24 Feb. 28 March 2 March 6 March 9 March 11 March 14 March 16 March 20 March 27 March 28 March 30 April 3 April 4 April 6 April 11 April 13 April 17 April 18 April 21

TIME 5 p.m. TBA 6 p.m. 4:45 p.m. 5 p.m. 5 p.m. TBA 4:30 p.m. 4:30 p.m. 4:30 p.m. 5 p.m. 4:30 p.m. 4:30 p.m. 4:30 p.m. 4:30 p.m. 4:30 p.m. 4:30 p.m. 4 p.m. 4 p.m. 4:30 p.m. TBA

OPPONENT Saint James at Central Ala, Classic at Reeltown at Benjamin Russell Opelika at Saint James at Lady Rebels Invitational at Tallassee Holtville at Sylacauga at Opelika Reeltown Elmore County Bullock County Benjamin Russell Tallassee Sylacauga at Holtville at Bullock County at Elmore County at Ldy Hornets Invit Tourn.

VENUE Saint James Softball Field Sportplex TBA Sportplex Softball Field Saint James Softball Field Reeltown Southside Softball Field TBA PineCrest Park West Ridge Softball Complex Softball Field Softball Field Softball Field Softball Field Softball Field Softball Field TBA Bullock County Softball Field Auburn Softball Complex


Feb 16, 2017 Alex City Outlook