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February 15, 2017 Vol. 125, No. 32 www.alexcityoutlook.com 75¢

Sex abuse charges among 300 indictments

County schools approve projects Work set for all 3 of Tallapoosa’s high schools By CLIFF WILLIAMS Staff Writer

The Tallapoosa County Board of Education approved capital projects at all three county schools and also learned that Dadeville High School and the Edward Bell Career Technical Center will serve as pilot for the Leader in Me Secondary School Program at Monday night’s meeting. The projects, lights for the football field at Reeltown, bleachers for the visitor side at the Dadeville football field and roofing and air conditioning at the Horseshoe Bend School were approved. “For those three commissioners that voted for the 1-cent sales tax, this gives them something they can see that we are doing,” Superintendent Joe Windle said. “They can see that 1-cent sales tax at work. Some things are hard to see that the tax has done, but they can see bricks and mortar.” The board also accepted the withdrawal of a bid to put a new roof on Dadeville Elementary while also accepting the next lowest See SCHOOLS • Page 5

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SPORTS, PAGE B1 Wildcats battle Stanhope in sub-regional hoops play.

WEDNESDAY

Robbery, shooting into homes, vehicles among other charges

By MITCH SNEED Editor

Donna Grier / Special to the Outlook

Gavin Fuller and Kim Mason play a young Johnny Cash and June Carter in The Depot Players production of “Ring of Fire.”

‘RING OF FIRE’

Alex City Arts, Depot Players bring Johnny Cash Story to BRHS By BETSY ILER TPI Magazine Editor

Alex City Arts will celebrate two musical phenoms of the 20th century when they bring two shows to the Benjamin Russell High School Auditorium in the next six weeks. Ring of Fire: The Johnny Cash Story this month will review the career of groundbreaking country music icon Johnny Cash through the story of his

life and music. The production will paint a portrait of “The Man in Black” that promises a foot-stompin’, crowdpleasin’ salute to this unique American legend. This Wetumpka Depot Players musical production on Feb. 21 will feature more than two dozen classic hits from the 50-year career of one of the country’s most influential musicians of See CASH • Page 3

The Tallapoosa County Grand Jury in Alexander City returned indictments on more than 300 criminal counts after hearing presentations that concluded late last month. The entire list of those charged is not released until warrants have been served, but among those on the list is a man facing multiple counts relating sexual abuse of a child. Decarlos A. Holley, 46, of New Site, was indicted on 12 counts by the grand jury. He was formally charged with four counts of attempted rape, four counts of first-degree sexual abuse and four counts of enticing a child for indecent purposes. Court records indicate that Holley is accused of having sexual contact with a child under the age of 16. He was arrested more than a month after the complaint was filed and an investigation by the New Site Police Department was completed. Holley was released on $245,000 bond, which he had originally posted at the time of his arrest last February. The judge in the case is listed as Judge Kim Taylor and a date for arraignment is set for Feb. 23 with the case also appearing in the plea docket on March 8. Holley is no stranger to legal trouble. He was one of six people convicted on charges stemming from a bust of a dogfighting ring. Holley entered guilty pleas on two counts See CHARGES • Page 3

Some go with sweets for their sweeties

Impeachment of governor effort renewed

By CLIFF WILLIAMS Staff Writer

STAFF REPORT Staff and wire reports

The effort to impeach Alabama Gov. Robert Bentley appears to be renewed. Cullman area Reps. Corey Harbison and Randall Shedd said Tuesday that they’re working on a new impeachment resolution against Gov. Robert Bentley, accusing him of neglect of duty and corruption of office. See PROBE • Page 5

Cliff Williams / The Outlook

Sweet Gaga’s Haley McDonald boxes a freshly made Valentines Day cake for a customer Tuesday morning.

Some went for something a little beyond flowers for their Valentine. Sweet Gaga’s had customers picking up sweets for the sweetie Tuesday in preparation for a Valentine get together. “I don’t have time to cook,” Gage Richardson said as he was picking up a Valentine cake for his fiancé at Sweet Gaga’s Tuesday. “Besides they can do it a thousand times better than I could ever See SWEETS • Page 3

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Husband’s affair could be more about money than love

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Directory Telephone: (256) 234-4281 Fax: (256) 234-6550 Website: www.alexcityoutlook.com Management Steve Baker Publisher, Ext. 218 steve.baker@alexcityoutlook.com Mitch Sneed Editor, Ext. 213 mitch.sneed@alexcityoutlook.com David Kendrick Circulation Manager, Ext. 204 david.kendrick@alexcityoutlook.com Lee Champion Production Manager, Ext. 220 lee.champion@alexcityoutlook.com Audra Spears Art Director, Ext. 219 audra.spears@alexcityoutlook.com Betsy Iler Magazine Managing Editor, Ext. 221 betsy.iler@alexcityoutlook.com Tippy Hunter Advertising Director, Ext. 206 marketing@alexcityoutlook.com Angela Mullins Business Manager, Ext. 202 angela.mullins@alexcityoutlook.com Newsroom Lonna Upton Assistant Magazine Editor, Ext. 227 lonna.upton@alexcityoutlook.com Cathy Higgins Sports Editor, Ext. 228 cathy.higgins@alexcityoutlook.com

Cliff Williams Staff Writer, Ext. 212 cliff.williams@alexcityoutlook.com Alethia Russell Staff Writer/Pagination, Ext. 210 alethia.russell@alexcityoutlook.com Advertising Sales Doug Patterson Newspaper Advertising, Ext. 205 doug.patterson@alexcityoutlook.com Emily Gregg Advertising Sales, Ext. 225 emily.gregg@alexcityoutlook.com Donna Jones Advertising Sales, Ext. 217 donna.jones@alexcityoutlook.com Scott Hardy Advertising Sales, Ext. 208 scott.hardy@alexcityoutlook.com Tabby Edwards Advertising Sales, Ext. 232 tabby.edwards@alexcityoutlook.com Composing Darlene Johnson Composing Department, Ext. 203 darlene.johnson@alexcityoutlook.com Hallie Holloway Composing Department, Ext. 203 hallie.holloway@alexcityoutlook.com Circulation Linda Ewing Office Clerk, Ext. 201 linda.ewing@alexcityoutlook.com

Tallapoosa Publishers, Inc. manages The Alexander City Outlook, The Dadeville Record, Lake magazine, Lake Martin Living, (USPS: 013-080, ISSN: 0738-5110) Kenneth Boone The Outlook is published five times Photography and a week, Tuesday through Saturday a commercial web mornings, by Tallapoosa Publishers, printing press. Inc., 548 Cherokee Road, P.O. Box 999, Alexander City, AL, 35011.

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POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Post Office Box 999, Alexander City, AL 35011.

How to Submit Obituaries

Wednesday, February 15, 2017

The Outlook

© 2011 Tallapoosa Publishers, Inc. Reproduction of any part of any issue requires written publisher permission.

Obituaries can be submitted to The Outlook from funeral homes by e-mail at obits@alexcityoutlook.com For more information, call (256) 234-4281.

DEAR ABBY: I am 68 and my husband is 80. I just found out he is involved with a 40-year-old woman. He says it is not an affair because they haven’t actually had sex! I don’t know what to do. Can you help me? -- HEARTBROKEN IN NEW MEXICO DEAR HEARTBROKEN: Your husband may not be having an affair in the physical sense, but he IS having an emotional affair. He may be flattered by the attention he’s receiving from a younger woman, or he may think he’s actually in love with her. Whether she is in love with HIM is open to question. However, if your husband is giving her money, you might have an argument that he is being manipulated into it, which could qualify as elder abuse. Remember, too, if you are a longtime wife in a community property state, half of the assets acquired during your marriage are yours. If he doesn’t agree

DEAR ABBY Advice

to end the relationship, this is something you might want to discuss with a lawyer. DEAR ABBY: My 7-year-old daughter, “Jessie,” has a best friend who lives next door. The neighbor, “Laurie,” has an older brother, “Jason,” who is 13. Recently, Jessie played at Laurie’s house, and when she came home she told me Jason had said some nasty things to her. When I asked what they were, she told me that one time Jason told her to pull down her underwear, and another time he told her to pull down his pants and do something that can’t be mentioned in a family newspaper.

When I heard it, I was livid. I told his mother about it, and now she will not let my daughter play with Laurie. She believes Jessie made it all up. My daughter is inconsolable because she no longer has a playmate. She believes it is her fault that Laurie can’t play with her because she told me. I don’t know what to do so the girls can play together. -- NEEDS A PLAYMATE DEAR NEEDS: It is important that you make Jessie understand that none of this was her fault -- it was JASON’S fault -- and that she did the right thing by telling you. What you need to do now is help your daughter find other playmates, preferably some whose parents supervise when children play in their home. While Jason’s mother may not want to believe what her son did, it’s highly unlikely your daughter made it up. Dealing with a problem like that by putting her head in the sand

will only invite more trouble, because Jason is sure to repeat it with some other little girl. DEAR ABBY: Today I called my church to cancel my attendance at a retreat a month from now. I had paid $25 to hold my spot. When I stated my reason for calling, the church secretary said, “Do you want a refund or would you like to donate toward tithes?” I thought this was nervy. I told her to refund the money. What is your thought on this? -- WANTS A REFUND IN BRENTWOOD, CALIF. DEAR WANTS: Just this: You were offered an option, and you chose the one you preferred. Let it go. Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Contact Dear Abby at www.DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069.

Police Reports Alexander City Police Department February 13

• Sean Jermaine Henderson Jr., 19, of Eclectic was arrested for possession of a controlled substance. • Stephanie Marie Louis Stokes, 20, of Tallassee was arrested for possession of a controlled substance. • Willie Eugene Gilbert, 57, of Rockford was arrested for driving under the influence alcohol. • Deonta Glenn Harris, 30, of Alexander City was arrested for domestic violence. • Theft was reported in Alexander City. • Possession of a controlled substance was reported on Highway 63 South. • Domestic violence was reported on Highway 280. • Unlawful breaking and entering was reported in Alexander City. • Theft was reported on Highway 280. • Criminal mischief was reported on J Street.

February 12

• Anthony Sanchez White, 45, of Alexander City was arrested for public intoxica-

tion. • Tristan Chance Meinzer, 19, of Wedowee was arrested for minor consumption of alcohol. • Domestic violence was reported on K Street. • Domestic violence was reported on 12th Avenue. • Criminal trespass was reported on Highway 280. • Theft was reported in Alexander City. • Minor consumption of alcohol was reported on Highway 22 East.

February 11

• Domestic violence was reported on I Street. • Criminal littering was reported on Daniel Road. • Harassment was reported at Greenleaf Apartments. • Domestic violence was reported on Highway 280.

February 10

• Antwoine Rodrigex Holley, 18, of Alexander City was arrested for possession of marijuana. • David Cornelious Mosley, 22, of Alexander City was arrested for domestic violence. • Terrio Lamar Davis, 20, of Alexander City was arrested for possession of a controlled substance and possession of marijuana. • Domestic violence was reported on Court Square. • Domestic violence was reported on Dogwood Avenue. • Possession of a controlled substance and possession of marijuana was reported on Church Street. • Theft was reported on Forrest Street.

• Domestic violence was reported on Cornerstone Drive. • Criminal mischief was reported on Celia Circle.

February 9

• Jervorski Montez Hutchins, 22, of Alexander City was arrested for contempt of court. • Theft was reported on Sugar Creek Road. • Theft was reported on Highway 280. • Domestic violence was reported on Highway 280. • Domestic violence was reported on Celia Circle. • Criminal littering was reported on Daniel Road.

Tallapoosa County Sheriff’s Department February 13

• Tyler Wilson of Mason Street in Alexander City was arrested on an outstanding warrant for probation violation. • Chadrick Cassiano of Third Street in Alexander City was arrested on grand jury indictments for unlawful possession of methamphetamine, possession of marijuana second, unlawful possession of drug paraphernalia and no driver’s license. • Justavious Williams of D Street in Alexander City was arrested on grand jury indictments for possession of cocaine, attempt to elude and possession of marijuana first. • A resident of Churchill Road in Camp Hill filed a report for a dog bite.

February 12

• Frank McHenry of Cheyenne Wyoming was arrested for driving under the influence. • A resident of Sunset Lane filed a report for a dog bite. • A resident of Sanford Road filed a report for a dog bite.

February 11

• A resident of County Road 79 in Daviston filed a report for criminal mischief and theft of property. • A resident of Bama Park Road in Dadeville filed a report for burglary and theft of property. • Bernard Atkinson of Alexander City was arrested on grand jury indictments for burglary third and theft of property second.

February 10

• Jimmie Landers of Jacksons Gap was arrested on an outstanding warrant for failure to appear child support. • Tracy Ray of Lanett was arrested for an outstanding probation violation warrant.

February 9

• Revander Westbrooks of Ninth Avenue in Alexander City was arrested on outstanding grand jury indictments failure to signal, attempting to elude, expire tag, resisting arrest, burglary thirf, theft of property fourth. • Sherri Odom of Veazy Road in Newsite was arrested on an outstanding warrant for domestic violence simple.

Public Meetings n Alexander City Board of Education meets on the third Tuesday of each month. Meetings are held in the board office at 375 Lee St. or local school at 5 p.m. n Alexander City Council meets on the first and third Mondays of each month. Meetings are held in the courtroom at the old city hall at 5:30 p.m. n Camp Hill Town Council meets the first and third Mondays of each month. Meetings are held in town hall at 6 p.m.

Coosa County Courthouse in Rockford at 9:30 a.m. on the second Tuesday and at 6:30 p.m. on the fourth Tuesday. n Coosa County Industrial Development Board will hold its regularly scheduled meeting the third Tuesday of each month at 7 p.m. in the Commissioners’ Board Room in the courthouse in Rockford. n Dadeville City Council meets on the second and fourth Tuesday of each month at 6 p.m. with a pre-meeting at 5:30 p.m. in city hall.

n Coosa County Board of Education holds called meetings at least once a month.

n Daviston City Council meets the third Monday of every month at 6:30 p.m. at the Daviston Fire Department.

n Coosa County Commission meets on the second and fourth Tuesday of each month. Meetings are held in the

n Goldville Town Council meets the second Monday of each month at 5:30 p.m. at the town hall.

n Goodwater City Council meets on the second Tuesday of each month. Meetings are held at the Caldwell Center at 6:30 p.m. n Jackson’s Gap Town Council meets the second Tuesday of each month. Meetings are held in town hall at 6:30 p.m., all Jackson’s Gap citizens are encouraged to attend. n Kellyton Town Council meets on the first Tuesday of the month at 6:30 p.m. at the community center in Kellyton. n New Site City Council meets the first and third Monday of the month at 5 p.m. in the Conference Room in the Town Hall. n Ray Water Authority meets on the second Tuesday of every month at 6 p.m. at the Ray Water Authority Office. All customers are invited to attend.

SOCIAL SECURITY FAYE EDMONDSON Attorney at Law

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Wednesday, February 15, 2017

Charges

continued from page 1

of dog fighting and two counts of aggravated cruelty to animals. Circuit Court Judge Tom Young sentenced Holley to serve three years in prison. Holley was arrested on Nov. 19, 2013 after an 18-month multi-agency investigation into dog fighting. In all, six people were arrested and Holley was the final defendant to be sentenced. Holley had been indicted on 68 grand jury counts, 34 for dog fighting and 34 for aggravated cruelty to animals. His arrest came at a time when he was on probation for 2012 drug charges. In other indictments, O’Hennessey D. Wright , 19, of Alexander City was formally charged with six counts of assault

• Kelvonta Lamar Woods on four counts of shooting into an occupied vehicle and two counts of reckless endangerment. • Jacob Riley Jones on four counts of shooting into an occupied vehicle and two counts of reckless endangerment. • Sonya Letita Davis on charges of robbery third and criminal trespass. • Marco Jermaine Harrell on charges of shooting into and occupied dwelling. • Kodoriss Sijun McElrath on charges of domestic violence strangulation and false imprisonment. •Dejavious Terrion Silmon on charges of third-degree robbery.

in the second degree, resisting arrest and disorderly conduct. While Wright will be arraigned on those charges on Feb. 23, he is facing more serious charges for a crime that occurred just a week after the arrest on these charges. Wright is accused of murder and attempted murder and possession of drugs, in the Oct. 30, 2016 shooting death of 28-year-old LaBrandon Lamar Herron of Kellyton in the Spring Hill community. The Outlook previously reported that Franklin Price was indicted for murder in the shooting death of Clyde Wilson. Other notable indictments include:

Cash

continued from page 1

the 20th century, including I Walk the Line, A Boy Named Sue, Folsom Prison Blues and more. The play illustrates how the home and family life, struggles and success of this American singer/ songwriter influenced the rich lyrics and emotion evident in his more than 100 hits across the rock and roll, rockabilly, blues, folk, country and gospel genres. The show features

Gavin Fuller as a young Johnny Cash and he has some string ties to Alexander City. His grandparents Jimmy and Martha Keel are longtime residents of the area. And on March 17, 7 Bridges Band of Nashville, Tennessee, will recreate the experience of an Eagles concert from the band’s most prolific period. The stunningly accurate tribute will be a faithful production that

combines musicianship, vocal precision and stage presence to replicate the music of one of the most successful bands of the 1970s without using backing tracks or harmonizers. The Eagles hit the American rock scene in 1971 and sold more than 150 million records with hits like Take It Easy, Hotel California, Already Gone, One of These Nights, Lyin’ Eyes and Heartache Tonight. After disbanding in

1980, the Eagles reunited three times over the next 36 years and performed a final farewell tribute at the 58th Annual Grammy Awards in March of last year. These Alex City Artssponsored performances will open at 7 p.m. at the BRHS Auditorium. Tickets, at $15 each, are available through Alex City Arts board members or at the door on the night of the event. Student tickets are available for $5 each for

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age 13 and older with a valid student ID; ages 12 and under admitted free. For more information about Alex City Arts, visit the website at www. alexcityarts.org.

Sweets

continued from page 1

do it.” The bakery did it many times over Tuesday even making a special deliver of Valentine treats to first responders. “Grace’s Flowers had us deliver cupcakes to the police and fire departments,” Michelle McDonald said. “They even had a special message for them, ‘From your sweethearts at Grace’s.’” One story touched Sweet Gaga’s Haley McDonald – a story of finding long lost love. “We had a customer call up just having to have a carrot cake for Valentines,” Haley said. “He was celebrating his first anniversary with his sweetheart. He said she was his first sweetheart and first kiss.” She went to explain that they both had gotten married to other people and then divorced before they stumbled across one another when they started dating again.

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EDITORIAL BOARD Steve Baker Mitch Sneed

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Opinion

Our View

Progress on Russell campus an encouraging sign

G

etting the Russell campus cleaned up quickly has been a sore subject for years, as the community has continued to live with what looks like war-zone rubble along major travel routes to our city. But this week renewed movement on the property has renewed hope that there may be light at the end of the tunnel. The remaining walls of the last two of five buildings that were set to be demolished were taken down. Alexander City Mayor Jim Nabors, who has some close ties with people like Clay Humphries and Chris Champion of Fruit of the Loom and Russell Brands said those two have helped build a fire under the people who have been tasked with cleaning up the property. The property, owned by Saucier Investments LLC a company headed by Darryl Saucier, and is being reclaimed by its contracted salvager, Regeneration LLC, a company run by Roy Granger. The salvage work began in 2013. It has been a slow, slow process that will see short flurries of work on the sites, followed by months of inactivity. Over the last three and half years, there have been many attempts to get things moving. There have been talks, pleas changes in ordinances designed to prod the work along. But it always comes back to a clause in the contract that says that the buildings must be demolished and the sites cleaned up within a “reasonable” amount of time. So why is this recent burst different? Nabors said it appears that all sides appear to be on the same page. “Now Fruit, Russell and the city are all working to do whatever it takes to get this completed,” Nabors said. We are encouraged with the progress and the attitude we see from the mayor and all those involved. We hope the push continues in the right direction and this problem becomes a memory very soon.

Outlook The

Wednesday, February 15, 2017

Will Congress stop forcing us to subsidize abortion?

L

ast month marked 44 years since the Supreme Court’s Roe v. Wade decision declaring a constitutional right to abortion. Roe remains one of the Supreme Court’s most controversial decisions. Even some progressive legal theorists who favor legalized abortion have criticized Roe for judicial overreach and faulty reasoning. Throughout my medical and political careers, I have opposed abortion. I believe abortion is the killing of an innocent human life and, thus, violates the nonaggression principle that is the basis of libertarianism. Unfortunately many libertarians, including some of my close allies, support legalized abortion. These proabortion libertarians make a serious philosophical error that undermines the libertarian cause. If the least accountable branch of government can unilaterally deny protection of the right to life to an entire class of persons, then none of our rights are safe. While I oppose abortion, I also oppose federal laws imposing a nationwide ban on abortion. The federal government has no authority to legalize, outlaw, regulate, or fund abortion. Instead of further nationalizing abortion, pro-life Americas should advocate legislation ending federal involvement in abortion by restoring authority over abortion to the states. Congress should also end all taxpayer funding of abortion and repeal Obamacare’s abortion mandates, along with the rest of Obamacare.

RON PAUL Guest Columnist

Forcing pro-life Americans to subsidize what they believe to be murder is, to paraphrase Thomas Jefferson, “sinful and tyrannical.” That is why I was glad that one of the first actions of the new House of Representatives was to pass legislation ending all taxpayer support for abortion. Hopefully the bill will soon pass in the Senate and be signed into law by President Trump. Congress should follow this action by passing legislation al-lowing antiwar taxpayers to opt out of funding the militaryindustrial complex as well. The House-passed bill also repeals Obamacare’s mandates forcing private businesses to cover abortion and birth control under their health insurance plans. Of course I oppose these mandates. But, unlike many other opponents of the mandates, I oppose them because they violate the rights of property and contract, not because they violate religious liberty. Opposing the mandates because they violate the religious liberty of a few, instead of the property rights of all, means implicitly accepting the legitimacy of government mandates as long as special exemptions are granted for certain groups of people from certain groups of mandates. President Trump has already protected pro-life

taxpayers (and unborn children) by reinstating President Reagan’s Mexico City policy. The Mexico City policy forbids US taxpayer money from being used to support any international organization that performs abortions or promotes abortions. Using taxpayer money to perform and promote abortions overseas is not only unconstitutional and immoral, it also increases resentment of the U.S. government. Unfortunately, as shown by the recent Yemen drone strikes, President Trump is unlikely to substantially change our militaristic foreign policy, which is responsible for the deaths of many innocent men, women, and children. Ending taxpayer support for abortion is an important step toward restoring limited, constitutional government that respects the rights of all. However, those who oppose abortion must recognize that the pro-life cause’s path to victory will not come through politics. Instead, pro-lifers must focus on building a culture of life through continued education and, among other things, support for crisis pregnancy centers. These centers, along with scientific advances like ultrasound, are doing more to end abortion than any politician. Anti-abortion activists must also embrace a consistent ethic of life by opposing foreign policy militarism and the death penalty. Ron Paul is a former Congressman and Presidential candidate. He can be reached at the RonPaulInstitute.org.

Emma Jean Thweatt represents District 4, which includes Dadeville, Pace’s Point, northern Camp Hill, Buttston, Dudleyville and part of Eagle Creek. She can be reached at 8254207. Her address is 585 Brookwood Circle, Dadeville. George Carleton Jr. represents District 5, which includes southern Camp Hill, Red Ridge, Walnut Hill, Union and Pleasant Ridge. His address is 630 Turner Road Road, Dadeville.

George Carleton Jr.

“I thank God every time I remember you.” – Philippians 1:3

alexcityoutlook.com

Daily Poll Tuesday Question: Are you encourage by the process of the cleanup at the Russell Complex?

Yes – 5 No – 13

Wednesday’s question: Did you purchase any gifts for Valentines Day?

To participate in this daily poll, log on each day to www.alexcityoutlook.com and vote. Find out the vote totals in the next edition of The Outlook and see if your vote swayed the results.

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The Outlook strives to report the news honestly, fairly and with integrity, to take a leadership role and act as a positive influence in our community, to promote business, to provide for the welfare of our employees, to strive for excellence in everything we do and above all, to treat others as we would want to be treated ourselves.

Opinion?

Reader: Rogers needs to make time for constituents Dear Editor, Please share my open letter to Congressman Mike Rogers with your readers. On Monday, I telephoned your office to find out when you plan to have a Town Hall or time for meeting face-to-face with constituents during next week’s recess. I was told you would be doing “committee work” and will be unavailable to meet with anyone next week. On Tuesday, I heard Greg Walden, Chairman of the House Energy and Commerce Committee announce that he had held five Town Halls in the last two weeks. He wanted his constituents’ input on

the very important legislative actions which are coming up soon. If Rep. Walden can make time for his constituents, why can’t you? The Third District elected you to represent us (and to get paid by our tax dollars for doing so). Isn’t it important to meet with us and listen to our wishes and concerns? I urge you to change your plans and make time for the people you represent. Anne Kerr Anniston

Reader: Don’t be mislead by ‘propaganda’ of milk of producers Emma Jean Thweatt

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Today’s

The subscription rate is $136.00 per year in Tallapoosa and Coosa counties and $177.99 outside the area. Periodicals paid at Alexander City, AL. Newspapers are available at 100 news racks in our area at 75 cents for The Outlook and 50 cents for The Record. We would love to deliver a paper to your door. Call David Kendrick at 256-234-4281, Ext. 204 or e-mail david.kendrick@alexcityoutlook. com.

Officials

John McKelvey represents District 3, which includes Jackson’s Gap, Hackneyville, New Site and Daviston. McKelvey currently serves as chairman. His phone number is 256-7944405. His address is 1285 Freeman Road, Dadeville.

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T.C. Coley represents District 1, including half of Coley Creek, the Andrew Jackson subdivision, the southern part of Indian Hill, North Central Avenue, part of Pearson’s Chapel Road, the Northside community and portion of Spring Hill T.C. Coley community. His phone number is 256-212-9316. His address is 2316 North Central Avenue, Kellyton.

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Steve Robinson represents District 2, which includes the southern part of Alexander City, the Cedar Creek area, Ourtown and Willow Point. His phone number is 256-654-0047. His address is 300 Heritage Drive Alexander City.

Today’s

Dear Editor, Media and health experts have occasionally provided us with healthy resources and recommendations on how and what keeps our body hearty. However, they still continue to allow falsely advertised information about the so-called “nutritional calcium” milk provides. The bad news about this? The milk industry persistently endorses funding of their deceitful sponsors pertaining to it. Unfortunately for them, their sales and consumers have been dying out bit by bit at an estimated amount of 1.0% each year. Given that statistic, it mostly involves younger children building a higher rate of lactose intolerance. Thanks to many trustworthy dairy campaigns

and other reliable research programs, the truth about the slow hazardous effects milk offers to our bodies have gotten their points across. Though, we must still fight against this dangerous culture that has been a dangerous food staple swarming the U.S. for centuries. This does not mean America is exclusive to this issue; several other countries – like Japan – have and are even still influenced by the deceiving propaganda milk has left in our lives. The impact by this particular alarming industry has left upon us will not remain any longer soon. Vivian Troung Portland, Oregon

We’d like to share your thoughts and opinions with the greater Lake Martin community. It’s free and it only takes a few moments of your time. We have two ways to get your opinion in print: letters to the editor and guest columns. The main difference is length. Letters to the editor are up to 250 words, while guest columns can be up to 500 words. Letters and columns may be sent to P.O. Box 999, Alexander City, AL 35011, faxed to (256) 2346550 or e-mailed to editor@alexcityoutlook.com. Please include your name, address and phone number. Send us your thoughts today!

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Wednesday, February 15, 2017

Schools bid. Pierce Roofing withdrew their bid of $408,622 due to an underbid. The board accepted the bid of $453,100 for FrasierOusley Construction and Engineering. Windle explained that these projects would be started this year and that the bids for them came in at $911,381, $171,000 over budget. “We budgeted $740,000 last year for these projects,” Windle said. “The $171,381 that they are over we will have to take out of the new 1-cent sales tax.” Windle was proud to announce that the Leader in Me program would be expanded to Dadeville High School and the Edward Bell Career Technical Center, a program that has been in some of the county schools for four years now. “We have volunteered to pilot the secondary model at Dadeville High School and the tech center,” Windle said. “This is the first year a secondary school model has been available. There has not been a career tech center to take the business model and apply it. We will be the first.” Windle was also happy to announce to the board about not having to make a trip to Montgomery in February. “I think this is the first time in seven or eight years that a superintendent from

Probe But both say that they will hold the resolution in anticipation of action by the House Judiciary Committee. Harbison told reporters Tuesday afternoon that House Speaker Mac McCutcheon assured him that the impeachment investigation by the House Judiciary Committee against Bentley should resume Wednesday, Feb. 22. Rep. Ed Henry

continued from page 1 Tallapoosa County will not have to attend a February meeting in Montgomery for not having one month’s operating expense in reserve,” Windle said. “It is due to the new 1-cent sales tax. Without it, we would have to make a very slow progress to that mark.” The board approved a trip by the Dadeville High School Choir to New York City in the next academic year. The trip will be six days, but a maximum of three days of school will be missed, as Windle said it will occur around Thanksgiving or Christmas holidays and has yet to be determined if they will bus or fly. “There are about 110 including chaperones that will make the trip,” Windle said. “They will be doing fundraisers. It will also the first time many will have ever travelled beyond the state. It should be exciting as they will see several Broadway shows and many of the sites.” Windle informed the board that he intended to have a draft of a letter to the county commission requesting a 3-mil ad valorem tax referendum be put on the ballot in Feb. 2018 ready for the them to review at the March 7 work session. At that March 7 work session, Windle intends to allow Reeltown School Principal Tom Cochran

continued from page 1 (R-Cullman) also said the speaker promised him there will be an up or down vote on impeachment before the session ends, according to an Associated Press report. Bentley has been battling since allegations surfaced of an inappropriate relationship between the governor and aide Rebekah Mason surfaced. Allegations have been made that Bentley used state resources to further an

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The Outlook to present reasons for separating the elementary and high schools. Windle says by doing so will give them a fulltime librarian for both schools and that additional construction at the new school is not feasible because of field lines. The board approved the 2017-2018 calendar that was overwhelming recommended by county schools staff. The first day of school for students will be August 7. A fall break will occur Oct. 9-13. Thanksgiving break will be Nov. 22-24. Christmas break will be Dec. 21 – Jan. 4. Spring Break will be March 12-16 and the last day of school will be May 24. Windle said he was working on an arrangement that will allow the Southeast District United Methodist Church to again use three classrooms for a summer program. Windle explained it was “not an if but where” as last year they used Councill Middle School and he wants to probably move them to Dadeville Elementary with the closure of the middle school. Windle is also working on a lease to allow the Town of Camp Hill to lease the gym and baseball field at the Edward Bell Technical Center for youth and recreation activities. Windle reminded board members of a visit of state officials to the Edward Bell Career Tech Center this Friday and encouraged them to attend. Windle also

told board member of the third poverty simulation that will be in the cafeteria at Dadeville Elementary School Friday starting at 12:30 p.m. The Tallapoosa County Board of Education also: • approved minutes from the Jan. 9 regular meeting and the Jan. 31 emergency meeting. • approved payment of bills. • approved the monthly financial report. • approved a resolution proclaiming February as Career and Technical Education Month. • approved a resolution proclaiming March 6-10 as School Breakfast Week. • approved the resignations of Dadeville Elementary Teacher Randy O’Steen and Bus Driver Gaines Meigs. • approved the maternity leave of Reeltown Elementary School Teacher Brittany C. Alexander. • approved the employment of John Thompson as transportation route manager/mechanic, Christy Prickett as a parapro at Dadeville Elementary and Dadeville High Schools, Katelyn Mitchell as teacher at Dadeville Elementary School and Fran Coker as payroll clerk in the Central Office. The Tallapoosa County Board of Education will hold a work session March 7 at 5 p.m. and a regular meeting March 13 at 5 p.m.

alleged affair. He has since been accused of using campaign funds to pay for Mason’s legal bills, an action that Secretary of State John Merrill indicated violated state law. The House Judiciary Committee began investigating Bentley’s possible impeachment last June. But in November, a few days before the presidential election, then-Attorney General Luther Strange asked the committee to suspend its efforts, saying it could inter-

sect with what the attorney general’s office was doing. The committee announced the suspension in a press release that said the attorney general’s office was investigating Bentley. The office has neither confirmed nor denied the existence of a probe. A month after the committee suspended its investigation, Strange interviewed for the soon-to-bevacant U.S. Senate seat, held at the time by Jeff Sessions, now the U.S. attorney general.

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Intelligence Community are being presented at the Winter Mini-Term for First Time OLLI Members Feb. 15, Feb. 23, March 1 and March 8. To register call 334-844-5100.

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Submit calendar items: Participate in your Outlook by calling 256-234-4281, faxing them to 256-234-6550, sending your event to calendar@alexcityoutlook.com or logging on to http://www.alexcityoutlook.com/. ebrating their anniversary today.

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Construction of the new Willow Point Our Town Volunteer Fire Department Station is well under way.

Now – April 15

FREE TAX ASSISTANCE: Beginning Jan. 30, free tax and electronic tax filing assistance at Volunteer Connections of Central Alabama, Inc., 5030 Hwy 280, Alex City, AL IRS certified volunteers will provide the free tax assistance and electronically file federal and state income tax forms. The free tax sites are designed to assist seniors 60+ (with no income limit), taxpayers under age 60 with incomes less than $54,000, and disabled taxpayers. Taxpayers will be assisted in the order they are registered. Please do not bring people to the site not involved in the filing of your taxes due to the limited space. Waiting may be necessary. Volunteers will provide free tax assistance and electronically file federal and state income tax forms at Volunteer Connections of Central Alabama, Inc. beginning Jan. 25. Please arrive and register for assistance at least one hour before closing time. Jan. 30, 31 and February – Mondays, Tuesdays, Thursdays – 9 a.m. - 7 p.m. March – Mondays and Tuesdays – 9 a.m. – 6 p.m. and Thursdays – 9 a.m. – 2 p.m. April 1 to April 15 - Mondays, Tuesdays, Thursdays --- 9 a.m. - 5 p.m. Information You Must Bring To The Tax Site: The following information is required by the IRS: last year’s tax return; photo ID-driver’s license-for taxpayer and spouse; social security cards for taxpayers and dependants; W-2’s; and 1099’s B, R, and SSA 1099. If you have health insurance through the government marketplace, bring your 1095-A. ALL employed taxpayers should bring a copy of their year-end pay stub. In regards to the itemized deduction list, you should bring all the documentation that applies to you. Even if you do not itemize on your Federal taxes you may be able to do so on your State return. For more info call (256) 234-0347. ENROLLMENT APPLICATIONS: Faith Christian Academy is accepting applications for the 2017-2018 school year. Applications may be picked up at Faith Temple Church on the corner of Franklin and Gorgas Streets. For more information call 256-234-6421.

February 16

Harold Cochran 256.234.2700

ARTS ASSOCIATION: The Arts Association of Central Alabama will meet Feb. 16 at 11:30 a.m. at the Senior Activity Center at the Sportplex. Diane Hough will give a demonstration on pencil drawing.

February 18

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Call 256-234-4281 or stop by our ofÚce at 548 Cherokee Road, Alexander City, AL

CLAY CLASSIC: The Ronald E Koon Sporting Clay Classic is in its 11th year of providing a fun filled day for avid shooters to help support our local Boys and Girls Club of the Lake Martin Area. The event will be held at the Lower Wetumpka Shotgun Club in Montgomery, Alabama starting at9 a.m. on Feb. 18, 2017. Team of four is $600. Team of two is $300 and a one-man team $100. Lunch, shells, goodie bags and door prizes given to each participant Call 256-234-4757 to sign up today or email bgcreynolds@ gmail.com NORRIS, HOLLEY AND EDWARDS FAMILY GATHERING: The 10th Annual Family Gathering of the Norris, Holley and Edwards family will be Feb. 18 from 12 p.m. to 5 p.m. at the Bud Porch Building. Bring a dish. COMMUNITY PRAYER: The Darian Missionary Baptist Church family and prayer team are offering prayer to the community Feb. 18 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. in the parking lot on the

corner of Laurel and E streets across from Stephens School. PANCAKE BREAKFAST: The Dadeville Kiwanis Pancake Breakfast will be Feb. 18 starting at 7 a.m. at the Dadeville High School cafeteria. Tickets are available almost every where in Dadeville for $6. For questions call Peggy Bullard at 256-8259415. POLAR PLUNGE: Wind Creek State Park is hosting its Second Annual Polar Plunge Feb. 18 from 2 p.m. to 3 p.m. Park entrance fees apply to non-campers. PANCAKES FOR ROBOTICS: Faith Christian Academy will host a Pancake Breakfast with sausage, juice and coffee at the upper level gym of Faith Temple Church on the corner of Franklin and Gorgas Streets on Saturday, Feb. 18 from 6 a.m. until 11 a.m. All you can eat in-house. Carry out is available. You may purchase tickets from FCA students or by calling the church office at 256-234-6421. Tickets are also available at the door. The proceeds will go to send the FCA Robotics teams which consist of 4th grade thru 8th grade students to the National WWII Museum Robotics Challenge in New Orleans in May. PANCAKE BREAKFAST: Bibb Graves School in Millerville will have a pancake breakfast Saturday Feb. 18, serving from 7 a.m. to 10:30 a.m. Eatin or carry out. Plate includes all you can eat pancakes, sausage, orange juice, and coffee. Cost is $6. All profit is used for renovation of the old High School section of the Community Center. Trade Day will be from 7 a.m. – 2 p.m. Hot dogs, chips, candy bars, and soft drinks will be available at lunch time. PRAYER BREAKFAST: Great Bethel Baptist Church is hosting a prayer breakfast and book signing with Rev. Sondrea L. Tolbert and her book “On the Bright Side – Morning Joy” Feb. 18 at 8:30 a:m. PANCAKE BREAKFAST: A pancake breakfast benefiting the New Site Volunteer Fire and Ambulance will be held Saturday, Feb. 18 from 6 a.m. to 9 a.m. at the New Site Town Hall.

February 19

LAKE WATCH ANNUAL MEETING: The Lake Watch of Lake Martin Annual Meeting will be Sunday, Feb. 19 from 1 p.m. to 3:30 p.m. at the StillWaters Residential Association Building. Along with a business meeting, Jimmy Lanier, founder of CRATA will be the guest speaker. FRIENDS AND FAMILY DAY: Mt. Lovely Baptist Church is hosting friends and family day Sunday,Feb. 19 at 2 p.m. with guest pastor Rev. Anthony Pogue and the Bethesda Baptist Church. Pastor of Mt. Lovely is Rev. Bernard Harris.

February 20

HORIZONS UNLIMITED: Daphne Simpkins will be speaking to Horizons Unlimited Feb. 20 from 1:30 p.m. to 3 p.m. at the Alexander City Board of Education. The winter program runs through Feb. 27. Membership is $20 per person or $30 per couple each semester.

February 20-24

BLACK HISTORY PROGRAM: Bread of Life ACOP in Kellyton will host a Black History Program Feb. 20-24 at 7 p.m. nightly with pastor Elder Neverland Tuck. Speakers will be Pastor James Blackmon, Rev. William Russell, Rev. Jimmy Brook, Pastor Ken Matthew and Minister Frankie Cousin.

February 23

BOOK SIGNING: Mary Helen Brown will visit the Adelia M. Russell

Library Thursday, Feb. 23 at 2 p.m. to discuss her newly published book “Headed for Home.” Books will be available for purchase by cash or check for $15 and Brown will be available to autograph books.

February 24-26

COMMUNITY THEATRE: The Sylacauga Community Playhouse will present “You’re a Good Man Charlie Brown” Feb. 24 at 6 p.m. and Feb. 25 and 26 at 2 p.m. at the Sylacauga High School Auditorium. Cost is $15 in advance and $18 at the door. For more information call 256-369-3003.

February 25

ART WORKSHOP: The Artists Association of Central Alabama is hosting a workshop on basic gourd art with Kay Fincher Feb. 25 from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the Sportplex Senior Activity Center. Cost is $45 and includes all materials. To register call 256-377-4918. FAMILY GAME NIGHT: Bibb Graves High School Alumni and Friends in Millerville will have Family Game Night Bingo from 5 p.m. until 8 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 25 . Begin with hot dogs, pizza, chips, and soft drinks.

•Alexander City Outlook •Dadeville Record •Wetumpka Herald •Eclectic Observer •Tallassee Tribune

256.234.4281

The Learning Tree Helping Children Learn and Grow

The Learning Tree, Inc. is Accepting Applications for Weekend Shifts in Direct Care. Applications can be picked up at: 101 S. Dubois Street Tallassee, AL 36078 Or contact Brinda Bell (334) 252-0025, Ext. 101 Email: bbell@learning-tree.org

February 27

HORIZONS UNLIMITED: Katie Simpkins will be speaking to Horizons Unlimited Feb. 27 from 1:30 p.m. to 3 p.m. at the Alexander City Board of Education. The winter program runs through Feb. 27. Membership is $20 per person or $30 per couple each semester.

March 1

LUNCHEON: Bibb Graves High School Alumni and Friends in Millerville will have their Monthly Luncheon on Wednesday, March 1 from 11 a.m. until 2 p.m. Please bring a covered dish and a small donation.

March 3-4

RECORD SHOW: The Alabama Record Collectors Association are hosting their 36th annual record and cd show March 3 and 4 at the Bessemer Civic Center East Meeting Room.

How to add a calendar item: Participate in your

March 4

MISS WINTER: The 2017 Miss Winter Pageant will be March 4 at 2 p.m. at the New Covenant Church. Tickets to watch the pageant are $10 at the door or $8 if purchased by Friday, March 3. Please email Sherri Williams at misswinterpageant@gmail. com. DIVORCE RECOVERY WORKSHOP: A workshop to help separated and divorced persons affirm themselves as whole, worthwhile persons, heal past wounds and discover new doors opening to the future. The workshop will be held on the Trinity Campus of the Alex. City First United Methodist Church on Highway 280 in Alexander City March 4 from 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Please call 256-487-2115 to register.

March 5

PASTOR APPRECIATiON: Pine Grove Missionary Baptist Church in Dadeville is hosting the 36th Appreciation of Rev. G.H. Pulliam Sunday, March 5 at 2 p.m. Guest minister will be Rev. Justin Freeman of New Canaan Baptist Church. PASTOR ANNIVERSARY: New Style Baptist Church in Nixburg is hosting the 2nd Pastoral Anniversary of Rev. Richard Ellis Taylor Sunday, March 5 at 2:30 p.m. Rev. Robert Hargrove and the Mt. Sinai Baptist Church will be the guest.

Lighting the way for Alexander City & Lake Martin since 1892

By e-mailing your event to calendar@alexcityoutlook.com or call 256-234-4281. _____ Send your news items to editor@alexcityoutlook.com

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Alexander City Outlook Dadeville Record Wetumpka Herald Eclectic Observer Tallassee Tribune


Wednesday, February 15, 2017

Alexander City Arts to present ‘Ring of Fire’

N

ow that St. Valentine’s Day is behind us, we look forward to longer days as Spring moves on in come March. I hope that most of the strong winds and heavy rains will make way for gentle showery rains to nurture the springtime flowers. Happy Birthday to Megan Jordan, celebrating her 10th on Feb. 18 and Lillie Hardy as she reaches 24 years-old Feb. 19. Jerry Sewell of Kellyton has his birthday Feb. 20. Charlie Hayes of Kellyton enjoys his special day Feb. 22, and shares this day with good company, President George Washington, famous for the admitting phrase “I cannot tell a lie.” I always like to remember the date when my late parents were married in the Sacred Heart Catholic Church in Ruislip Manor, Middlesex, England, Feb. 20, 1949. My grandparents moved to Ruislip Manor in 1932 and I was born in their home, where we lived until I was two years old. Then we moved to a small “Pre-Fab” just around the

ROSIE MORGAN Nixburg/ Equality

corner and across from the High School I would attend much later. Alexander City Arts presents for you, “Ring of Fire” with the music of Johnny Cash. This unique musical is performed by The Wetumpka Depot Players multi-talented cast. The show is about Cash’s life of love, faith, struggle, success, rowdiness, redemption, home and family. With more than two dozen hit songs including “Ring of Fire,” with a remarkable life story, crowd pleasing salute to this American Legend. Coming to Alex City at the BRHS Auditorium on Tuesday, Feb. 21, 2017 at 7 p.m. Tickets available at-thedoor starting at 6:30 p.m. Adult tickets are $15.00 and students and children get in free. If you cannot make this time and date, catch this same Musical show at The Depot Theatre in Wetumpka where it’s running from

Feb. 9 through Feb. 25. For information call: 334.868.1440. Remember, if you have room at home and your heart for an animal, there are plenty just waiting desperately for their forever home at area shelters. One such dog at the Elmore County shelter is a 10-year-old Jack Russell. This one is cratetrained, housetrained, sits, begs and smiles for treats. A small one like this smart dog would be great company for a person living alone, dogs give unwavering love. Way back in 1992, we had a foundling schnauzer mix called ‘Hobo.’ Ron picked him up from the middle of Coosa 4 one Saturday and brought him back to me in a towel. The little black pup had been outside the night before in a thunderstorm. He was wet, frightened and had a very fat tummy. All weekend I was afraid to put him down, so I carried him along with me, finding a small shoebox for his bed. Monday, we took ‘Hobo’ to the vet, where we learned he was barely four weeks old with the

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The Outlook

worst case of tummy worms our vet had ever seen. He grew up to be the very best dog, afraid of storms, but a healthy, good and loyal boy. Years later in 2000 when I had a blocked kidney artery that needed a stent, I was feeling so weak trying to recover at home. Hobo stayed at my bedside. He would not eat. Just went outside and came right back to my side. This went on for three days. Then he saw the vet, who did tests and x-rays. Turned out there was nothing wrong with ‘Hobo’ but heartache as he was showing his sadness, concern and love for me. Now that is special and one of the reasons that we have six dogs. All of them have different personalities, but all love their home, their siblings, and us. Until next week, keep smiling, Rosie

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Morgan is a community columnist for The Outlook. She is a resident of Nixburg and writes about the events and people of the Equality and Nixburg areas.

ACPR 50+ offers fitness classes for seniors

T

he Alexander City Parks and Recreation 50+ Retiree Active Center has two exercise classes available on Tuesdays and Thursdays. We offer a Chair Fit at 9:30 a.m. for those who feel more comfortable sitting. There is a Stand Fit at 10:30 a.m. for those who feel at ease exercising while standing and walking. We will also be starting a new Boxing Bag and a Group Walk in The Park program. More details will be available as soon as possible. Remember that in order for exercise programs to continue participation is highly recommended. Work at your own pace and do what you can do because doing something is way better than nothing. Doctor approved! The Queens and Couples Events which are new programs will start in April. Our Queens program is designed for single or widows to get together and either go out to eat or watch a movie. The Couples will have scheduled evenings of food and games and possibly dinner outings. Sign up sheets for participation will be located on the entrance bulletin board.

CORLEY HOLT Senior Moments

Contact Larry Luke for your Mardi Gras party on Monday, Feb. 27 11 a.m. till 1 p.m. Cost to attend is $5 per person. Skit practice on Tuesdays at Noon. Heat press transfer demonstration on Wednesday morning at 9 a.m.

“We do not stop playing because we grow old, we grow old because we stop playing!” -Benjamin Franklin Until next time keep a smile on your face and love in your heart. Holt writes about the events and the people of the Alexander City Parks and Recreation Department’s 50+ Club.

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Wednesday, February 15, 2017

The Outlook

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BEEF

NO SOLUTION ADDED

ZEIGLER REGULAR OR EXTRA HOT

RED HOTS......................................24-OZ. PKG.

CHEESE PUFFS OR CURLS

4/$

11

12

GOLDEN FLAKE TOSTADOS TORTILLA CHIPS & MINI ROUNDSS

4/$

4/$

5

11-OZ. BAG

5-6 OZ. BAG

ASSORTED VARIETIES HORMEL

STREUSEL CAKES CINNAMON OR CREAM CHEESE (13 OZ.)

SPAM LUNCHEON MEAT AT

2/$

5

2/$$ 2/

5 ¢ 79

LITTLE DEBBIE APPLE OR CHERRY FRUIT PIES 17.19-OZ. COCOA CREMES 17-OZ. OR PB RICHIES 13.03-OZ.

ASSORTED HORMEL CHILI

$ 78

WITH BEANS OR NO BEANS S 15-15.5 OZ. CAN

3/$

5

2

12-OZ. CAN

CRÈME COOKIES

SKILLET MEALS

LIL’ DUTCH MAID VANILLA WAFERS S 1-LB. BAG

¢

99

ASSORTED

KNORR RICE & SAUCE OR PASTA & SAUCE

13-O 13-OZ. P G PKG.

POWERADE.....................................32-OZ. BTLS.

5/$

$ 99

4

TOOTIE FRUITIES (24.4 OZ.), FROSTED FLAKES (30 OZ.), COCO OR FRUITY DYNOBITES (22 OZ.) OR MARSHMALLOW MATEYS (23 OZ.)

MALT-O-MEAL 2X BAG CEREAL................BAG

4-5.7 OZ. PKG.

5/$

5

5 PAPER TOWELS PIGGLY WIGGLY

VALUE STAR

FOAM PLATES............................100-CT. PKG.

2

3/$

4 2/$ 5

LAY’S CHIPS.....................................20-CT. PKG. ASSORTED 12-PK., 1/2 LTR. BTLS.

24-PACK DASANI WATER

$ 99 FUZE DRINKS.................................................. 4 1/2 LTR. BTLS.

ASSORTED PILLSBURY

MARGARINE

COOKIE DOUGH 16-16.5 OZ.

2/$

1

LBS.

POPEYE BABY

SPINACH........... ...........6-OZ. 6-OZ. BAG

FRESH GREEN

CABBAGE............. .................. .....LB. LB. FRESH CRISP

CARROTS........... ...........1-LB. 1-LB. BAG

1 ¢ 99 ¢ 39 59 ¢

PEACHES OR NECTARINES

$ 19

$ 99

1

ASSORTED AUNT JEMIMA’S FRENCH TOAST, PANCAKES OR

WAFFLES

$ 88

5 1

$ 99

CHILEAN

4 $ 88 1 $ 49 6 3/$$ 3/ 12

.........................8-ROLL PKG.

VARIETY PACK

PIGGLY WIGGLY

1

4

4

2/$

$ 88 DONUTS.........................................................BAG

FACIAL TISSUE......................68-160-CT. PKG.

$ 88

11.3-15.66 .3-15.

ASSORTED TASTYKAKE

KLEENEX

45-OZ. TUB

2/$$ 2/

$ 99

BANANAS

BELL PEPPER.......... ..........EA. EA.

VELVEETA

4

GOLDEN RIPE

RED OR YELLOW

ASSORTED VARIETIES LIL’ DUTCH MAID

2/$

Produce

5

(14.3 OZ.) CHOCOLATE OR (10.74 OZ.) COSMIC CUPCAKES &

LITTLE DEBBIE CAKES

3

BOLOGNA.......................................12-OZ. PKG.

COKE & COKE PRODUCTS

6 PK., 1/2-LTR. BOTTLES OTTLES

$ 29

ZEIGLER WIENERS OR REGULAR, THICK OR GARLIC

GOLDEN FLAKE REGULAR OR JALAPEÑO

COKE & UCTS S COKE PRODUCTS

1

VALUE PACK

ROYAL REGULAR OR HOT

12 PK., 12-OZ. CANS

3/$

LB.

$ 99

12.5-17.8 OZ. PKG.

LB.

ASSORTED VARIETIES

BLUE BELL ICE CREAM PINTS

$ 88

1

WE ACC ACCEPT CEP EPT DI D DIS DISCOVER, ISC SC SCOVER, MA MASTER ER CARD AND D VI V VISA. ISA SA.. QU Q QUAN QUANTITY U RIGHTS RESERVED. NONE SOLD TO DEALERS. WE RESERVE THE RIGHT TO CORRECT TYPOGRAPHICAL & PICTORIAL ERRORS.


CATHY HIGGINS SPORTS EDITOR (256) 234-4281 X228

sports@alexcityoutlook.com

Wednesday, February 15, 2017

Page B1

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Mustangs stampede past BRHS ANDY GRAHAM Columnist

6A subregional road loss at home ends Wildcats’ season

On the road again... Destination Oxford

I

s it just a guy thing or does the prospect of loading up in an automobile with friends and traveling hundreds of miles to parts unknown appeal to everyone? Movies have been made, books have been written and songs have been sung about that great Americana experience known as “the road trip.” Some of my fondest memories from high school and college revolve around friends, cars and the open road. It might’ve been a trip to the beach for spring break or just a ball game, but those excursions hold a special place in the heart of my memory. Last year I traveled over to Starkville, Mississippi with a couple of buddies and watched Auburn lose to Mississippi State in Humphrey Coliseum. Ardie, Justin and I had so much fun, we decided to make it an annual event. So last Saturday we loaded up again like a band of gypsies and headed down the highway. This time our destination was Oxford, Mississippi to watch Auburn play Ole Miss at The Pavilion. It’s about a four-hour drive to Oxford, so we got the old E-150 rolling on Highway 280 about 11 a.m. after a nice breakfast at Who’s Diner. Some might find the task of filling eight hours of drive time with interesting conversation a bit daunting. I like listening to music, but that was never an issue. Justin and Ardie can talk me under the table. I honestly don’t remember a single lull in the banter. I guess it makes sense. Why would three guys with 134 years of life experience run out of things to talk about? One of the most important aspects of any road trip is food. Salty snacks to munch on are a given, but I’m talking about a place to sit down and have a meal to remember. I did extensive research online and even got in touch with some locals to provide sound advice on our culinary choice. After much deliberation, we decided to go with the highly recommended Ajax Diner. It’s located in the square in downtown Oxford and has a variety of meat and vegetables on the menu. Ardie and Justin went with catfish and I had the vegetable plate. I think we all agreed that the food was excellent and the people were very friendly. Oh, and the banana pudding was homemade and delicious. Ole Miss has built a new basketball arena called The Pavilion. It’s nice. Our seats were actually very good. We were pretty high up, but at center court. Auburn shot the ball well and even outrebounded the Rebels in the first two minutes. It had all the makings of a perfect day with the Tigers leading 47-27 at the half. I mean, it would be hard for anyone to blow that kind of lead… Right? Yeah, not so much. The Tigers would be outscored 63-37 over the final 20 minutes, and I got to witness the biggest comeback in Ole Miss basketball history. Whoop-de-doo! Auburn is very young and still learning how to win, but this was a very disappointing loss for a lot of reasons. One of these days I’m actually going to witness an Auburn victory in enemy territory. Oh well, it was a tremendous experience, regardless of the collapse on the court. The three of us left Oxford insisting the world keep turning our way and rolled into town around midnight. It was a long day but time well spent with good friends and a great road trip. I can’t wait to get on the road again. Andy Graham writes a regular sports column for Tallapoosa Publishers.

Corrections:

An article on the Benjamin Russell varsity wrestling team in Tuesday’s Sports page incorrectly listed the number of athletes qualifying for this week’s AHSAA Wrestling State Championship. BRHS had 12 team members qualify, including two eighth graders and four freshmen. Also, Justavious Robinson and Cameron Oglesby are BRHS graduates and Brooks Parker won his third place bout against an athlete from Wetumpka. We apologize for the errors.

down and a pair of free throws by Stanhope Elmore junior Jaquarius Williams The Wildcats’ season had the Mustangs taking the ended in heartbreak 73-72 win. Tuesday as the Benjamin Although the win sends Russell varsity boys lost Stanhope Elmore on to state, the Alabama High School the loss was a tough one for Athletic Association 6A Benjamin Russell. Sub-Regional playoff game “We had our to Stanhope Elmore 73-72. opportunities but you’ve got It was the final moments to give Stanhope credit,” of the fourth quarter that said BRHS head coach Jeff cost the Wildcats the home Hines. “They made plays game and the chance down the stretch, we didn’t. to move on to the State That was the difference in Championship. the game. It’s disappointing, Benjamin Russell had it’s heartbreaking. But the enjoyed a comfortable lead sun is going to come up throughout the night with tomorrow.” scores of 22-17, 45-39 and Still, Hines is pleased 63-54 respectively at the end with the progress the of the first three quarters. Wildcats have made. But after the Mustangs “I’m so proud of our guys trailed the entire game, from where they were in the they shifted the contest’s middle of the year to where momentum when Stanhope they finished up,” he said. Elmore senior Alex McNeil Despite the loss, scored a shot with 1:30 left Benjamin Russell senior on the clock to put them just shooting guard Timmy a point behind with a 70-69 Lawson led the Wildcats score. in scoring with 18 points. Benjamin Russell senior He had help from senior point guard Qen Reese point guard Quen Reese expanded the Wildcats’ lead and senior shooting guard slightly to 72-69 with an Shannon Woody, who each inside shot with less than 40 had 16. seconds remaining. Tuesday’s loss ends the However, another shot by Wildcats’ season with an McNeil as the clock wound overall record of 11-13. By CATHY HIGGINS Sports Editor

Cathy Higgins / The Outlook

Benjamin Russell senior Timmy Lawson goes for a layup with Stanhope Elmore senior Jaquarius Williams fighting for the ball in the Wildcats’ home court 6A Sub-Regional game against Stanhope Elmore Tuesday.

Wildcats readying for challenging season BRHS varsity boys begin soccer season with young team, strong opponents By CATHY HIGGINS Sports Editor As with the Lady Wildcats, the Benjamin Russell varsity boys soccer team is starting the season with a young lineup of athletes. “We lost 15 players from last year,” said Wildcats head coach Austin Teel. “I had 14 seniors graduate last year and one student transferred.” That means the Wildcats are virtually a new team, filled with sophomores, juniors and seniors. So Teel is looking to his more seasoned players to prove themselves this year. “We’ve got some guys who are going to have to step up,” he said. “It’s going to be a learning curve.” Teel will also depend on his eight seniors to help provide guidance off the field to smooth out that learning curve. “I’m always looking for seniors to provide leadership for the rest of the team,” the coach said. For the most part, the entire team has been practicing since January. Junior Brooks Parker is the only Wildcat who won’t take part in games until next week. That’s because he’s ending his BRHS wrestling season this weekend at the state championship in Huntsville. “We wish him the best of luck,” Teel said. The Wildcats do have one important thing working in their favor. They’re starting the season injury-free. “I’m fully healthy coming into the season,” Teel said, “and we general don’t have any in the season either.” That’s especially important as the Wildcats face a challenging schedule this year. “I believe it’s going to be a tough schedule,” Teel said. “But I always like to play 6A and 7A teams.” That tough schedule starts Friday in Daphne as the Wildcats play in a two-day Southern Shoot-Out. “We’ve got two games Friday and one Saturday,” Teel said. Friday the Wildcats play 7A Murphy in the afternoon and then 6A Northview that night. Saturday morning, they take on 6A Daphne. These are all quality teams. But Teel views it as a positive challenge. “We’ve been doing this tournament for the past 10 years,”

he said. “It’s a good way to get our team exposed to other areas. A lot of teams go to the tournament all the way from Huntstville to locally. You get to play teams you don’t get to play during the regular season. ”Then you get to know your team while they play three games within 24 hours,” Teel added. “You get to know their stamina and to see if your conditioning has all worked out.” With that test out of the way, the Wildcats will be ready to play more familiar opponents, such as Opelika, Alabama Christian Academy, Smiths Station and Wetumpka. Including tournaments in South Baldwin County, the Wildcats have 12 road games this season. They also play for the home crowd eight times. It’s a schedule designed to help the Wildcats reach their ultimate goal. “To make it to state and win all area games,” said BRHS senior Noah Culligan. “Our goal is always to go to state,” said junior Eddie Naranjo. After this weekend’s Shootout, the Ben Russell varsity boys start their regular season at 7 p.m. Tuesday at Thompson High’s Larry Simmons Stadium. The Wildcat’s first home game Cathy Higgins / The Outlook is Thursday, Feb. 23, when they host Trinity Presbyterian at 7 p.m. Benjamin Russell junior Carson Dark works on his footwork during the Wildcats soccer practice Tuesday at Alex City Soccer Complex. at Charles E. Bailey Sportplex.

BRHS VARSITY BOYS SOCCER ROSTER NAME Brian Barnes Christopher Blair Noah Culligan Dalton Daniel Carson Dark Layne (Elliott) Evans Luke Harvey Matthew McClure Michael McGill Zavion Miles Eduardo Naranjo

GRADE 12th 12th 12th 12th 11th 10th 10th 11th 12th 12th 11th

NAME Michael (Brooks) Parker Ujal Patel Neil Radney Dylan Riley James Roberts Joaquin Sarmiento-Ramirez Christian Smith Andrew Turner Jesus Velasquez Flores Logan Wall

GRADE 11th 10th 11th 10th 10th 12th 11th 11th 11th 12th

WILDCATS GAME SCHEDULE DATE Feb. 17 Feb. 17 Feb. 18 Feb. 21 Feb. 23 Feb. 28 March 2 March 8 March 9 March 14 March 16 March 24 April 4 April 6 April 11 April 13 April 15 April 20 April 21 April 24

TIME 3:30 p.m. 6:30 p.m. 8:30 a.m. 7 p.m. 7 p.m. 7 p.m. 5:30 p.m. 7 p.m. 7 p.m. 7 p.m. 7 p.m. TBA 6:30 p.m. 7:30 p.m. 7:30 p.m. 7 p.m. 3:30 p.m. 7 p.m. 7 p.m. 7 p.m.

OPPONENT at Murphy Northview Daphne at Thompson Trinity Presbyterian Prattville at Valley Opelika at Trinity Presbyterian at Smiths Station Central , P. C. at Foley College Expo Montgomery Academy Smiths Station at Ala/ Christian Acad. at Opelika Wetumpka Prattville Valley at Pell City

VENUE Al Trione Sports Complex Al Trione Sports Complex Al Trione Sports Complex Larry Simmons Stadium Charles E. Bailey Sportplex Charles E. Bailey Sportplex Ram Stad. Valley Sports Plex Charles E. Bailey Sportplex Trinity Stadium S.S. Soccer Field Charles E. Bailey Sportplex TBA Charles E. Bailey Sportplex Charles E. Bailey Sportplex ACA Soccer Field Opelika Sportsplex Charles E. Bailey Sportplex Stanley-Jensen Stadium Charles E. Bailey Sportplex Pell City Soccer Field


Page B2

www.alexcityoutlook.com

Wednesday, February 15, 2017

The Outlook

Lady Cougars roar way to state tourney Central Coosa varsity girls topple Gordo at home in 3A basketball subregionals By CATHY HIGGINS Sports Editor

The Central Coosa varsity girls have made it to the Alabama High School Athletic Association State Championship after their 50-25 home court over Gordo in Monday’s 3A SubRegional playoff game. “What a night,” said Lady Cougars head coach Syreeta McKinney. As reflected in the final score, Central Coosa outshot Gordo two to one while keeping the Lady Green Wave at bay. “We had a solid, straight defense,” McKinney said. Central Coosa point guard Malia Kelly led the Lady Wildcats in the win

with 14 points, three steals and four rebounds. “Malia Kelly had a great shooting night,” McKinney said. So did junior small forward Ryesha Whetstone, who had nine pounds and seven rebounds. Freshman guard Eunique McKinney had eight points, six steals and four rebounds. Monday’s win brings the Central Coosa varsity girls’ season to 19-5 overall and 8-1 in the region. The Lady Cougars next head to the Girls 3A Basketball State Tournament at Dunn-Oliver Cathy Higgins / The Outlook Acodome in Montgomery Central Coosa varsity girls freshman guard Eunique McKinney on Saturday, where they drives toward the basket in the Lady Cougars’ home game match up against Midfield against Benjamin Russell earlier in the season. at 3 p.m.

Alex City wrestlers take honors in state championship By CATHY HIGGINS Sports Editor

A REFUGE FOR THE HOMELESS

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The Alexander City Youth Wrestling League, aka Alota Chaos, ended its season by placing second overall in the peewee division in the 2016-17 USA Wrestling Youth State Championship at HewittTrussville earlier this month. Staking claim to that honor for his team was Spence Wilson, who also took second in the 35-pound class. Alota Chaos also placed eighth overall as a team in the 32-team event. In addition, seven of the 11-member Alex City team received honors for their efforts. Three of them emerged state champions in their individual weight classes. They include Gabriel

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Submitted / The Outlook

Alota Chaos bantam wrestler Cannon Gregg is proclaimed the winner in the 45-pound class at the 2016-17 USA Wrestling Youth State Championship at Hewitt-Trussville.

Barnett, 55-plus pounds, peewee; Cannon Gregg, 45-pounds, bantam; and Sandlin Pike, 80-pounds, novice.

Three Alex City wrestlers took fourth place in the tourney. They include: Ayden Miller, 50 pounds, peewee; Noah

Thornton, 45 pounds, bantam; and Waylon Bradford, 75-plus pounds, bantam. “This is just showing a lot of determination and heart from the kids throughout the season has all paid off,” said Alex City Youth Wrestling League President Mason Marvel, who also coaches in the league. “It makes us, as coaches, proud.” Additional Alota Chaose grapplers competing in the tourney include Tanner Penton, 45 pounds, bantam; Ian Pace, 50 pounds; Brody Bice, 55 pounds, bantam; and Carson Bishop, 60 pounds, bantam. In addition to Marvel, the 2016-17 Alex City Youth Wrestling League was coached by Eric Gregg, Michael Ransaw, Eric Miller, Jason Wilson and Josh Bishop.

Upcoming Sports Events Today • BRHS JV soccer home game against Smith Station at Charles E. Bailey Sportplex, girls 4:30 p.m., boys 6 p.m. • BRHS varsity girls soccer at Homewood, 5:30 p.m.

Thursday, Feb. 16 • Dadeville varsity tennis home match against Valley, boys 3:15 p.m., girls 5 p.m. • BRHS varsity boys, girls tennis home match against Sylacauga, 4 p.m. at CACC. • Dadeville Dixie Youth Baseball and Softball registration for ages 3-12 at Dadeville Recreation Center, $50 for ages 3-4, $65 for 5-12, 3 p.m.-7 p.m. • BRHS and Dadeville varsity wrestling at AHSAA State Championship at

Von Braun Center in Huntsville, times TBA. Friday, Feb. 17-Saturday, Feb. 18 • BRHS varsity girls/ boys soccer at Southern Shootout at Al Trione Sports Complex in Daphne.

Friday, Feb. 17 • CACC baseball home game against West Georgia Tech, 1 p.m. • CACC tennis home match against Wallace State, 2:30 p.m. • BRHS and Dadeville varsity wrestling at AHSAA

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Saturday, Feb. 18 • Dadeville Dixie Youth Baseball and Softball registration for ages 3-12 at Dadeville Recreation Center, $50 for ages 3-4, $65 for 5-12, 9 a.m.-1 p.m. • BRHS Youth Softball Clinic, 8 a.m. at Charles E. Bailey Sportplex softball fields, onsite registration is $15 for defense clinic, $15 for hitting clinic, $125 for both clinics. • BRHS and Dadeville varsity wrestling at AHSAA State Championship at Von Braun Center in Huntsville, times TBA.

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Page B2

www.alexcityoutlook.com

Wednesday, February 15, 2017

The Outlook

Lady Cougars roar way to state tourney Central Coosa varsity girls topple Gordo at home in 3A basketball subregionals By CATHY HIGGINS Sports Editor

The Central Coosa varsity girls have made it to the Alabama High School Athletic Association State Championship after their 50-25 home court over Gordo in Monday’s 3A SubRegional playoff game. “What a night,” said Lady Cougars head coach Syreeta McKinney. As reflected in the final score, Central Coosa outshot Gordo two to one while keeping the Lady Green Wave at bay. “We had a solid, straight defense,” McKinney said. Central Coosa point guard Malia Kelly led the Lady Wildcats in the win

with 14 points, three steals and four rebounds. “Malia Kelly had a great shooting night,” McKinney said. So did junior small forward Ryesha Whetstone, who had nine pounds and seven rebounds. Freshman guard Eunique McKinney had eight points, six steals and four rebounds. Monday’s win brings the Central Coosa varsity girls’ season to 19-5 overall and 8-1 in the region. The Lady Cougars next head to the Girls 3A Basketball State Tournament at Dunn-Oliver Cathy Higgins / The Outlook Acodome in Montgomery Central Coosa varsity girls freshman guard Eunique McKinney on Saturday, where they drives toward the basket in the Lady Cougars’ home game match up against Midfield against Benjamin Russell earlier in the season. at 3 p.m.

Alex City wrestlers take honors in state championship By CATHY HIGGINS Sports Editor

The Alexander City Youth Wrestling League, aka Alota Chaos, ended its season by placing second overall in the peewee division in the 2016-17 USA Wrestling Youth State Championship at HewittTrussville earlier this month. Staking claim to that honor for his team was Spence Wilson, who also took second in the 35-pound class. Alota Chaos also placed eighth overall as a team in the 32-team event. In addition, seven of the 11-member Alex City team received honors for their efforts. Three of them emerged state champions in their individual weight classes. They include Gabriel

Submitted / The Outlook

Alota Chaos bantam wrestler Cannon Gregg is proclaimed the winner in the 45-pound class at the 2016-17 USA Wrestling Youth State Championship at Hewitt-Trussville.

Barnett, 55-plus pounds, peewee; Cannon Gregg, 45-pounds, bantam; and Sandlin Pike, 80-pounds, novice.

Three Alex City wrestlers took fourth place in the tourney. They include: Ayden Miller, 50 pounds, peewee; Noah

Thornton, 45 pounds, bantam; and Waylon Bradford, 75-plus pounds, bantam. “This is just showing a lot of determination and heart from the kids throughout the season has all paid off,” said Alex City Youth Wrestling League President Mason Marvel, who also coaches in the league. “It makes us, as coaches, proud.” Additional Alota Chaose grapplers competing in the tourney include Tanner Penton, 45 pounds, bantam; Ian Pace, 50 pounds; Brody Bice, 55 pounds, bantam; and Carson Bishop, 60 pounds, bantam. In addition to Marvel, the 2016-17 Alex City Youth Wrestling League was coached by Eric Gregg, Michael Ransaw, Eric Miller, Jason Wilson and Josh Bishop.

Upcoming Sports Events Today • BRHS JV soccer home game against Smith Station at Charles E. Bailey Sportplex, girls 4:30 p.m., boys 6 p.m. • BRHS varsity girls soccer at Homewood, 5:30 p.m.

Thursday, Feb. 16 • Dadeville varsity tennis home match against Valley, boys 3:15 p.m., girls 5 p.m. • BRHS varsity boys, girls tennis home match against Sylacauga, 4 p.m. at CACC. • Dadeville Dixie Youth Baseball and Softball registration for ages 3-12 at Dadeville Recreation Center, $50 for ages 3-4, $65 for 5-12, 3 p.m.-7 p.m. • BRHS and Dadeville varsity wrestling at AHSAA State Championship at

Von Braun Center in Huntsville, times TBA. Friday, Feb. 17-Saturday, Feb. 18 • BRHS varsity girls/ boys soccer at Southern Shootout at Al Trione Sports Complex in Daphne.

Friday, Feb. 17 • CACC baseball home game against West Georgia Tech, 1 p.m. • CACC tennis home match against Wallace State, 2:30 p.m. • BRHS and Dadeville varsity wrestling at AHSAA

State Championship at Von Braun Center in Huntsville, times TBA.

Saturday, Feb. 18 • Dadeville Dixie Youth Baseball and Softball registration for ages 3-12 at Dadeville Recreation Center, $50 for ages 3-4, $65 for 5-12, 9 a.m.-1 p.m. • BRHS Youth Softball Clinic, 8 a.m. at Charles E. Bailey Sportplex softball fields, onsite registration is $15 for defense clinic, $15 for hitting clinic, $125 for both clinics. • BRHS and Dadeville varsity wrestling at AHSAA State Championship at Von Braun Center in Huntsville, times TBA.

Sunday, Feb. 19 • Dadeville Dixie Youth umpires hands-on clinic at McKelvey Park, 1:30 p.m., $10 with onsite registration.


Wednesday, February 15, 2017

www.alexcityoutlook.com

The Outlook

Legislature will have to deal with prisons and General Fund

T

his third year of the quadrennium Regular Session of the legislature has recently gotten a lot more complex. These next four months will be trying times for the Alabama legislature. They will not only have to deal with a beleaguered General Fund Budget that has to feed a moneyeating monster named Medicaid, they have an overcrowding problem in the state prisons to deal with as well as major public school systems being taken over by the state because of mismanagement and underfunding. They now have been dealt a body blow that affects their own backyards. They will have to draw new legislative lines that will need to be in effect by June because legislative elections essentially begin this June. The primaries for 2018 political offices will be held in early June next year. All 105 House seats and all 35 Senate seats are up for election. The bell rings this June 6 for all state races to begin raising money. Folks, money is the mother’s milk of politics. It usually determines who wins a race. Campaign money equates into name identification and in most legislative races it really boils down to name identification. Therefore, they will covertly make dealing with this reapportionment wrench a paramount priority. Almost five years ago a lawsuit, which

STEVE FLOWERS Columnist

appeared at the time to be a perfunctory Hail Mary, was brought by the Alabama Legislative Black Caucus and the Alabama Democratic Conference. At the time it seemed like a vague and nebulous concept of a case. The Legislative Black Caucus and ADC argued that the Republican controlled legislature drew lines that moved black voters who vote Democratic into overwhelmingly populated black districts that prohibited them from forming alliances with like-minded white voters. The crux of the case, is that it diluted their influence in the legislature. The case surprisingly meandered through the courts all the way to the U.S. Supreme Court. The Supreme Court broke new ground when it even heard the case and set new precedent with its ruling. Prior to this, the Supreme Court had held a state legislature could draw lines along political paths as long as it did not discriminate against black voters. The case was remanded back to the 11th Circuit to seek a remedy. The Supreme Court sets the law. The federal judges in Alabama had to decide how to implement the ruling. When you look at the districts there is no question that the lines were drawn politically to put all

black voters into almost all black districts to be represented by black Senators or black Representatives. This stacking also placed most whites in almost all white districts represented by white Senators and white Representatives. The federal judges ruled on January 20, Inauguration Day, that 12 districts in Alabama must be redrawn in order to comply with the U.S. Supreme Court decision. The 2 to 1 majority of U.S. Federal Judges Keith Watkins and Bill Pryor ruled that only 12 districts were stacked. U.S. District Judge Myron Thompson wrote that he would have found 12 more districts unconstitutional. Regardless of whether 12 or 24 of the districts are out of sync, the legislative districts will have to be redrawn. When you tinker with even one district it affects the whole map. There is a ripple effect which will require redrawing most if not all of the districts in both the Senate and the House. However, the bottom line is that most of the districts in the state will change very little and more importantly it will not change the party make-up of the legislature. You will probably have the same overwhelming Republican super majority in both chambers of the state legislature. In Alabama politics essentially whites are Republicans and blacks are Democrats. There is very little

deviation. Therefore, the redistricting will have minimal or no partisan effect. However, long-term it lays the foundation for a possible future coalition between black Democrats and moderate Republicans to bridge a bipartisan coalition leadership. See you next week. Steve Flowers is Alabama’s leading political columnist. His weekly column appears in over 60 Alabama newspapers. He served 16 years in the state legislature. Steve may be reached at www. steveflowers.us.

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Wednesday, February 15, 2017

ClassiÄeds

Lake & River Phone (256) 277-4219 Fax (205) 669-4217 The Alexander City Outlook

Reaching more than 22,000 households in Tallapoosa and Elmore counties The Dadeville Record

PUZZLES & HOROSCOPE ARIES (March 21-April 19) A power play, and your unpredictable reaction to it, might deĂ„ne your day. How you deal with a friend or loved one easily could be colored by what occurs during the daylight hours. A partner will try to help you feel better. Tonight: Detach from an intense situation. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) You could feel as if your eɈorts don’t seem to get through to others. You might be upset by this, but remember to take a deep breath and think about what is happening. Gain insight from your reaction. You have the energy to handle a project on your own. Tonight: As you like it. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) Listen to news more openly than you have in the past. The power behind a great idea makes it irresistible. Decide if you can work with the negative aspects. You’ll gain insight from a meeting into what is likely to work. Stay upbeat. Tonight: The party goes on and on. CANCER (June 21-July 22) You have a tendency to dive into a situation and not be as diɉcult as others who are involved. You are more likely to work with a situation rather than buck it. Clearly, you have an advantage with that approach. Reach out to a friend for feedback. Tonight: Stay close to home. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) Keep conversations active, and do not lose the pace you are maintaining. Someone at a distance could be unpredictable. You might wonder what is motivating this person. You seem to be lucky with your spontaneous choices. Tonight: A partner gives you an earful. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) You might need to Ă„nd out what is expected of you. Be willing to nix an idea that simply does not work for you. Knowing when to say “enoughâ€? is important. Don’t allow yourself to be backed into a corner by a loved one. Tonight: Do some shopping that you have been putting oɈ. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22)

You could be in a position where you are craving a change, but when it heads in your direction, your anxiety builds. You might wonder why you are putting up with what is going on around you. You likely won’t want to take any risks right now. Tonight: Be spontaneous. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) You might want to consider your options more carefully. Consider looking at all the diɈerent possibilities that head your way. You know what you want and why. Keep your eyes open but your mouth shut for the moment. Tonight: Be cautious about your spending. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) Where your friends are is where you will feel the best. Even in a business meeting, you will feel the camaraderie among your associates. A child or loved one is full of surprises. Honor what is going on within your immediate circle. Tonight: Keep any negativity to yourself. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) Be willing to take a stand. You could discover that a loved one has a totally diɈerent perspective. Understand that your strength comes from merging diɈerent ideas together. Yet with a loved one, the situation and process might be harder. Tonight: Embrace the moment. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) Pressure builds, and you might be more reactive or more controlling than you have been in a while. How it plays out depends on your personality. You have the advantage of detachment when making decisions. Check out information on your own. Tonight: Treat your mind. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) One-on-one relating takes you down a new path, where your eyes are much more open. Honor fast changes, and be willing to look at situations in your life from this new perspective. Do not feel as if you must do anything about your new vision; just observe. Tonight: Be a duo.

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classiďŹ eds@alexcityoutlook.com public.notices@alexcityoutlook.com classiďŹ eds@thewetumpkaherald.com public.notices@thewetumpkaherald.com

The Eclectic Observer

HELP WANTED

The Tallassee Tribune

HELP WANTED

The Wetumpka Herald

HELP WANTED

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Raise your hand if you want your business to make LESS money next year. We didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t think you would. Do you need to successfully market on a tight budget? Tallapoosa and Elmore County Classifieds has customizable programs available to fit any budget.

DONâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;T WAIT! Call TODAY 256.277.4219


The Outlook

Wednesday, February 15, 2017

www.alexcityoutlook.com

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Dry & Dependable

TO S U B S C R I B E C A L L 2 5 6 . 2 3 4 . 4 2 8 1 “Neither snow nor rain nor heat nor gloom of night stays the United States Postal Service couriers from the swift completion of their appointed rounds.” ___________ The Outlook is proud to partner with the United States Postal Service for delivery of your newspaper.


Lake Martin Living People, events and culture in the Lake Region

February 2017 lakemartinmagazine.com

Get Connected - Volunteer! Are you the Missing Piece? Alabama's vast biodiversity

Lake Martin Living 1


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2 Lake Martin Living


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Lake Martin Living 3


From the Editor’s Desk

V

olunteering is all about heart health; it’s about thanking veterans with helping hands, not ones that just wave as soldiers march past in Veterans Day parades; it’s about digging into the dirt to build a community garden just as deeply as digging into the wallet to pay for it. Volunteering is about people donating time and talent to grow strong, healthy communities. From picking up litter on area roadsides at the local PATH Trash Walks to delivering Meals on Wheels to the elderly, hands-on help makes a difference. It mends fences at the Sheriff ’s Girls Ranch while it restores trust in relationships, and it offers instruction in self-control at the same time that it teaches a child to swing a bat or kick a ball. Volunteering keeps the community connected. Volunteers in the Lake Martin Living area hold hands, fight fires, sell tickets, walk dogs, build trails, read books, paint schools, make costumes, serve snacks, gather supplies, wash clothes, stock shelves, clear storm debris and bake cakes. They do it because volunteering connects their passions to progress. In the process, they make friends, impart wisdom, share smiles, feel useful and make their communities – our communities – better places to live and work and play. February is heart health month, and while Susan Foy talks about the health of our physical hearts in her column on page 32, here at Tallapoosa Publishers, we took advantage of the play on words in this issue to encourage our readers to volunteer in 2017. As Lonna Upton notes in her article on page 26, as a volunteer, you could work as few or as many hours as you want. You could lend an organization the expertise of your career or venture into a whole new endeavor; work with kids, adults, animals. The possibilities are endless. And to help you get started, we’ve listed just a few of the organizations in Tallapoosa County that could use your helping hands. Get connected. Volunteer!

Betsy Iler, Managing Editor

4 Lake Martin Living

Lake Martin Living Chairman Kenneth Boone Publisher Steve Baker Managing Editor Betsy Iler Assistant Magazine Editor Lonna Upton Contributors Dave Jennings Luke Robinson Jordan Graves Fred Muenzmay Cliff Williams Susan Foy Mitch Sneed Jim Littman Magazine Distribution Manager David Kendrick Creative Services Audra Spears Darlene Johnson Hallie Holloway Marketing/Advertising Sales Tippy Hunter Emily Gregg Donna Jones Tabby Edwards Scott Hardy Lake Martin Living P.O. Box 999 Alexander City, AL 35011 256-234-4281 www.lakemartinmagazine.com

Lake Martin Living is published monthly by Tallapoosa Publishers Inc. All contents are copyrighted and may not be reproduced without written consent of the publisher. Reader correspondence and submissions are welcome. Please address all correspondence, including story ideas, letters, pictures and requests, to: Editor, Lake Martin Living, P.O. Box 999, Alexander City, AL 35011 or email editor@lakemartinmagazine.com. Advertising inquiries may be made by calling 256-234-4281. A limited number of free copies are available at local businesses and subscriptions are $25 annually.


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Lake Martin Living 5


14

Chinese magnolia has burst upon the winter scene early this year, along with daffodil, flowering quince, forsythia and more. Photo by Audra Spears.

IN EVERY ISSUE 9. AROUND THE AREA 14. HAPPY GARDEN 18. FROM THE TEE 20. ALABAMA NATURALIST 32. MEDICAL NEWS 35. MONEY MATTERS 36. OH SNAP! 40. LAKE REGION EVENTS 50. THE LAST WORD

6 Lake Martin Living

FEATURES 10. MISSING PIECE MainStreet Alexander City launches its second Missing Piece competition to assist a downtown startup business 25. UNION AT ALL COSTS Family research leads to published work for library's associate director 26. GET CONNECTED - VOLUNTEER! Volunteering makes good communities better, so choose a club or a cause and make a difference for Tallapoosa County 34. ALEX CITY ARTS EVENTS Hosting Johnny Cash and The Eagles this month and next


ON THE COVER

Director of the Lake Martin Animal Shelter, Mia Chandler loves on a couple of the puppies that could benefit from volunteer dog walkers. Numerous organizations, including the shelter, need volunteers every day to continue providing important services. Photo by Kenneth Boone.

Lake Martin Living 7


8 Lake Martin Living


AROUND THE AREA

SL Alabama celebrates New Year

Honoring the Ancestors with Charye

SL Alabama's S.C. Kim performs a charye ceremony for guests at the annual New Year's celebration.

SL Alabama welcomed local dignitaries to their Alexander City plant Jan. 27 to honor its Korean heritage in celebration of the 12th Annual Korean Lunar New Year – Seollal. During the visit, SL Alabama President S.C. Kim demonstrated the charye in front of food that was meant to be shared with ancestors. “This is a personal celebration in Korean culture,” Kim explained. “This is a time to pay respect to our ancestors and celebrate with our family members.” Afterwards, everyone enjoyed a meal of bulgogi - a beef and vegetable dish - chicken, tteok (a rice cake), along with a Korean game of Yutnori. The celebration is the biggest holiday in Korean culture and is traditionally held over three days in which families not only have the formal charye ceremony but also enjoy time with each other by sharing gifts and traveling together. ~ Mitch Sneed

National Recognition for Teacher Horseshoe Bend teacher Felicia Williams has been honored nationally for her work with the Association of Career and Technical Education. Williams received the 2016 Outstanding Contributions Award at the organization’s VISION Conference in Las Vegas by the Family and Consumer Sciences Education Division.

According to information from the organization, the honor recognizes “outstanding people who have served and supported the organization in exceptional ways.” Williams has been teaching at Horseshoe Bend School for 11 years. This year marks her 20th year in education. ~ Staff Reports

Felicia Williams

Looking Good Downtown

Tim Rape and Ernie Luster of Sign Source last month restored another of the vintage signs painted on the exterior of Alexander City's Carlisle's. Ross Barton's Wholesale and Retail was once located in the store that now holds a clothing and gift boutique, along with a 100-yearold soda fountain. Owners Daniel and Lisa Champion have restored the vintage signage, which lends character to the downtown area. Additional changes to the historic downtown include Bonnie Luckie's art gallery in Broad Street Plaza, where Lake Martin Pizza Company also will open later this year. Photo by Mitch Sneed

Lake Martin Living 9


Missing Piece

STORYâ&#x20AC;&#x2C6;BY MITCH SNEED & BETSY ILER ART BY BOB MOODY

10 Lake Martin Living


BUSINESS MATTERS

B

y fall, there will be another Missing Piece startup in downtown Alexander City. MainStreet Alexander City last month launched an updated version of the business development competition that two years ago brought The Coffee Corner, Alabama Street Makers Market and Alexander City Theatre II to the center of town. Proposals for the revitalization project are due Feb. 20, and the contest will include a prize package that will assist the winner in opening its doors later this year. To enter, applicants will need to submit a written business plan and description of the concept. “There is something about writing it down that makes it more real,” said Stephanie Smith, chair of MainStreet’s economic revitalization committee. In addition to the business plan, entrants should include an executive summary, an example of a business model, a financial plan, management plan, marketing plan, startup timeline and value proposition, as well as a signed copy of the contest rules, a participation release, the business owner’s resume and a video pitch. MainStreet Executive Director Richard Wagoner said there is a lot to it, but it is a great way to take a shot at making a go of it downtown. Semi-finalists will be announced on Feb. 24, and by April 3, the finalists will be named. Three weeks later, the winner will be selected. The schedule was set up so that, ideally, the winner could be open downtown by this fall. In this second rendition of the project, the committee will make some changes to the selection process. “We learned a lot from the first time we did the contest, and we have made just a few changes to make it better,” Smith said. Like the first contest, this year’s endeavor will include a public voting portion, but the committee will offer more guidance to entrants and will maintain more control in the selection process. “We will spend more time talking with the applicants and give them more advocate support,” she explained. Smith noted that downtown Alexander City has some good things happening. The Broad Street Plaza project is nearing completion. Several new businesses have come to the area, and others are nearing their completion and opening days. “We are looking for businesses that will give people who come to Alexander City an incredible variety,” Smith said. “We want the downtown area to be the kind of place where people will come here not sure what they will eat or do when they get here. Imagine if there were so many great choices that they could just park and walk to one of several great restaurants or shop in a wide variety of stores and find all sorts of things to do. “That’s what we are looking for, that business that will add something special to downtown.” To learn more and complete an application package, visit mainstreetmissingpiece@gmail.com or call MainStreet Alexander City Director Richard Wagoner at 256-329-9226 or email him at rwagoner@mainstreetac.org. Looking for the Next New Downtown Business

The winner of the Missing Piece contest will receive a startup package to help launch a new MainStreet business.

Lake Martin Living 11


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Happy Garden

Fred Muenzmay 14 Lake Martin Living


Early Bloomers T

his winter’s mild temperatures have fooled a number of spring blossoms into putting on their show of color early. Take a stroll around the garden and enjoy them before more seasonal temperatures steal them with a frost.

Narcissus

Narcissus, another name for the Daffodil, meaning “narcissism,” which comes from “narke,” the Ancient Greek word for deep sleep, stupor or numbness. Narke is also the root of the word “narcotic.” 

The name is probably a reference to a toxic paralyzing alkaloid contained within narcissi bulbs. The good news is the bulbs taste just awful, making it highly unlikely that anyone could even keep down one bite. The daffodil is associated with Lent, the 40 days of fasting and penitence before Easter Sunday in most Christian churches. This flower is known as the “Lenten Lilly” in England. There is a legend that the daffodil first appeared on the night of The Last Supper in the Garden of Gethsemane to comfort Jesus in his last days. The daffodil is the American Cancer Society symbol of new life and hope that a cure for cancer will be found. “You see a daffodil and know there’s hope,” said Debbie Jaramillo, volunteer chair of California Division Daffodil Days. “And with hope, there’s a cure. There is a burst of sunshine, a ray of hope. Even if it is still cold outside, you know there’s warmth and light ahead.”

Lake Martin Living 15


Camellia, Double Pink

Flowering Quince

The genus name, Chaenomeles, derives from the Greek words “chaino,” which means “to split,” and “meles” for “apple,” a reference to the shape of the fruit. The seeming incongruity between the plant and its name is explained by the fact that it was mistakenly believed that the fruit was split. The species name, speciosa, means “showy.” While flowering quince bears fruit, the plant should not be confused with the quince tree, Cydonia oblonga, which bears fruits commonly used for making jelly and which, although a member of the same family, belongs to a different genus. Aside from being hardy and growing easily in ordinary soil, flowering quince offers many new and choice varieties. I love flowering quince for many reasons but admit the flowers are the real hook for me. It’s always a thrill to spy that first splash of color; a signal that winter is nearing its end. Right when I need it most, this plant brightens the garden and gets me excited about the season ahead. Easy to grow and pretty, flowering quince can be found in garden centers now. Although all quince species have flowers, gardeners in the West often refer to these species as “flowering quince,” as Chaenomeles are grown ornamentally for their flowers, not for their fruits.

Forsythia

Forsythia suspensa, the first to be noticed by a Westerner, was seen in a Japanese garden by the botanist-surgeon Carl Peter Thunberg, who included it (as a lilac) in his Flora Japonica 1784. Thunberg’s professional connections lay with the Dutch East Trading Company, and F. suspensa reached Holland first, by 1833. Forsythia viridissma, meanwhile, had overtaken it in European gardens. The Scottish plant-hunter Robert Fortune discovered it in a mandarin’s garden of the coastal city of Zhou Shan before Thunberg ever saw it growing wild in the mountains in Chusans province, Zhejiang. Forsythia is one of the hardiest shrubs known and blooms from sea to sea. A twig placed in water can be planted in any loose soil and will herald the season of spring for many years.

16 Lake Martin Living

Carl Linnaeus named the camellia in honor of Father George Joseph Kamel, a Jesuit missionary who worked in the Philippines. Although Kamel did extensive research in botany, he did not have anything to do with the camellia. It was inevitable that the camellia would arrive in the United States. But its arrival here is surrounded with controversy. Some say that John Stevens introduced the camellia to the United States in Hoboken, New Jersey, in 1797. Others believe — and can prove — that a French plant explorer by the name of Andre Michaux brought the first camellia to this country when he gave his friend Henry Middletown four camellias for his plantation, Middletown Place, in Charleston, South Carolina. That plantation, established in 1741, still exists, and one of the four camellias still survives: ‘Reine des Fleurs.’ Michaux, who traveled the world in search of plants for France at the request of King Louis XVI, established a botanical garden in Charleston in 1786. Camellias are evergreen shrubs or small trees that grow up to 66 feet tall. Their leaves are alternately arranged, simple, thick, serrated and usually glossy. Their flowers are usually large and conspicuous, measuring from 1 to 6 inches in diameter, with five to nine petals in naturally occurring species of camellias. The colors of the flowers vary from white through pink colors to red; truly yellow flowers are found only in South China and Vietnam. Camellia flowers throughout the genus are characterized by a dense bouquet of conspicuous yellow stamens, often contrasting with the petal colors. The so-called “fruit” of camellia plants is a dry capsule that is sometimes subdivided in up to five compartments, each compartment containing up to eight seeds. The various species of camellia plants are generally well adapted to acidic soils rich in humus, and most species do not grow well on chalky soil or other calcium-rich soils. Most species of camellias also require a large amount of water, either from natural rainfall or from irrigation, and the plants will not tolerate droughts; however, some of the more unusual camellias – typically species from Karst soils in Vietnam - can grow without too much water.


Azalea

Chinese Magnolia, Purple Lily Magnolia Shrub

Many folks think this is a pink Tulip tree, but it is not. This may be one of the largest shrubs that resemble a tree. The Lily Magnolia ushers in spring along with the Forsythia, Daffodil, Spirea (Bridal Wreath) and flowering Quince. This magnolia grows very well in Alabama climates and can be started from cuttings rooted in a growing medium or water.

Spirea

Spirea is one of those old-fashioned, heirloom shrubs that folks prized, especially when paired with spring bulbs. It’s also one of the easiest flowering shrubs to grow, perfect for mixed borders, as well as foundation plantings. Most spireas bloom in late spring to midsummer in red, pink and yellow varieties, in addition to the well-known white. And while their foliage is pretty nondescript, some types offer light green or gold leaves, while others produce fall color. Some spireas can grow as large as 10 feet tall and wide. The classic Bridal Wreath, Spirea vanhouettei, is known to spread as much as 20 feet, so leave plenty of room for it when planting. Like most flowering shrubs, these prefer full sun. Bridal Wreath is just one of many types of spirea, though it probably is the best known. That’s thanks to the cascading branches of clustered white blossoms that spill from this small to medium-sized deciduous shrub every spring.

No plant has shaped the Southern garden more than an evergreen shrub called the Indica azalea. Native to Japan, it got its name because, at the time it was discovered, Asia was known as the East Indies. Growing 8 to 12 feet tall and wide, it smothers itself in spring with mind-boggling blossoms of red, pink, white, purple and salmon. First-time onlookers were stunned. By 1845, the largest and oldest collection flourished at Magnolia Plantation and Gardens up the Ashley River from Charleston. According to azalea historian Fred Galle, in the United States, Azalea indica (in this case, the group of plants called Southern indicas) was first introduced to the outdoor landscape in the 1830s at the rice plantation Magnolia-onthe-Ashley in Charleston, South Carolina. Magnolia’s owner, John Grimke Drayton, imported the plants for use in his estate garden from Philadelphia, where they were grown only in greenhouses. With encouragement from Charles Sprague Sargent from Harvard’s Arnold Arboretum, Magnolia Gardens was opened to the public in 1871. In Chinese culture, the azalea is known as “thinking of home bush” (sixiang shu) and is immortalized in the poetry of DuFu. In addition to being renowned for its beauty, the azalea is also highly toxic; it contains andromedotoxins in both its leaves and nectar, including honey from the nectar. Azaleas and rhododendrons were once so infamous for their toxicity that to receive a bouquet of their flowers in a black vase was a well-known death threat. ~ Fred Muenzmay of Eagle's Roost Herb Farms is a Master Gardener and has been in the business of growing organic herbs, vegetables and blueberries for regional and local farmers markets for 26 years. Contact him at fmuenzmay@earthlink.net.

Lake Martin Living 17


Lighten the grip I

How relaxing could help you turn farther, add distance and play better and longer

don’t think anyone enjoys speaking with people who use terms from their profession that mean little to nothing to their audience. Most of those people who talk over our heads have their own personal egos or social issues. I believe that in golf if we bring instruction terminology down to the easiest understandable terms, the student will grasp more of this information, and positive results may be more quickly realized. Some instructors are too vague, thinking that a golfer automatically will understand what they mean when they say something, as if the player had experienced everything in the game or swing as the instructors had. This is equally as bad as the teacher with the big or misunderstood words and terms. It’s like having a jigsaw puzzle without all the pieces; a player will never be able to have a full understanding of what the instructor is attempting to convey. In watching most people on the practice tee hit balls, I notice that so many of these aspiring golfers stand extremely rigid as they are attempting to keep their left arms straight, their postures (spine angles) consistent and their heads still. These people are just confused on the terms that they heard that would improve their swings. Yes, it is important to maintain a straight or, better

18 Lake Martin Living

From the Tee

Dave Jennings

yet, an extended left arm (for right-handers), and yes, it’s important to maintain that good athletic posture throughout the entire golf swing – like Dustin Johnson – and the head should stay relatively still. But a golfer cannot do these things if his muscles are tight. Sam Snead was well known in making the statement about grip pressure by saying: “Hold the golf club with the same pressure as if you were to hold a small bird in your hands.” What this lighter grip pressure does is lessen the stress in the arms, shoulders and neck, which will allow the arms to extend farther; and this will ultimately create more speed with the clubhead at the impact area. Try this: Tighten your shoulders and your arms. Notice how your shoulders draw up higher towards your neck? This tightness lessens your extension. While you are still tight with your shoulders, try to turn your torso; see how much your head moves in doing this? There’s nothing good that comes from tight muscles in and during a golf swing. Why did I bring up the word “extension” in that last paragraph? Go on a mental trip with me. Imagine the golf swing as a circle. The center of the circle is your Rough Relaxation

Letting the tension out of hands, arms and shoulders allows the arms to extend, creating more speed with less effort at impact.


body. The circumference is the clubhead, and the radius will be your arms. While turning the center of the circle with the same speed, a longer radius and bigger circle will be faster in its circumference than a smaller circle’s circumference. So if your arms, shoulder and neck muscles are relaxed and they create a longer swing, you have a great opportunity to create more clubhead speed at impact without swinging harder. The muscles you should use in your golf swing should be relaxed so that they act and react. In relaxation, they will perform so much better if they are relatively strong with elasticity. To prove this, put a writing pen in your hand; squeeze the pen as tight as you can while trying to sign your name. Chances are, what you see doesn’t look much like your normal signature. If you write a few paragraphs with this clinched fist, you will quickly get writer’s cramp, and you’ll surely get tired and frustrated in writing. Should you hold the pen with just enough strength to keep it from falling out of your hand, you could write nearly all day long. The same thing happens in the golf swing. If you are tight, you will get worn out quickly hitting golf balls, but if you are relaxed, bring out a wagon full of balls; you’ll hit ’em all with energy to spare. When you hear the instruction, “Straight left arm,” think: extended left arm. At “Keep your head still,” think: relaxed neck and shoulders, so your noggin can stay in that general spot. For “Maintain posture or spine angle,” think: relax the muscles in your torso, shoulders, hips and neck so that your turning motion does not cause you to sway, and you will actually be able to turn farther and more efficiently. Do not become confused by the terms used by instructors during a lesson, in reading a golf magazine or watching the Golf Channel on television. During your personal lesson, stop the instructor if you need clarification; ask the questions and understand what he is telling you. If you learn well through visual examples, watch David Toms or Ernie Els swing a golf club – you won’t see much tension in their swings. Have someone video your swing, and notice the differences without referring to the mechanical differences, but rather, to the rhythmic differences between these two Tour players’ swings and yours. If you can or will focus on relaxing and simulating the tempo and rhythm of these two great golfers, I think you would become a better ball striker and increase your distance with all of your clubs. Relax, enjoy and take advantage of this mild winter. Go play golf! ~ Dave Jennings is the men's golf coach at Central Alabama Community College. Lake Martin Living 19


Vast and Diverse Course opens classmates’ eyes to scope of the state’s ecosystems STORY BY JORDAN GRAVES PHOTOS BY KENNETH BOONE & CLIFF WILLIAMS

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Alabama Naturalist

uses of many of these plants. Participants labama is a beautiful state with no familiarized themselves with the use of a shortage of natural resources. Many folks dichotomous key; they ever so carefully lookedat from other parts of the country may not each characteristic of individual plants and realize what a treasure we have here; however, systematically used the key to identify specific Alabamians are not immune to recognizing species. the wonderful flora and fauna that span our During the second session with the Master diverse state. Though most acknowledge we have Naturalist group, we discussed aquatic resources. a beautiful landscape, from the mountains of Few realize how great Alabama’s water resources the northeast to the shores of the southwest, a truly are. There are 14 river basins that form the dedicated few have embarked on an educational waterways of Alabama, and there are more than journey to expand their understanding of the 132,000 miles of rivers and streams across the great natural diversity found in Alabama. state. The journey to which I refer is the Master Although we are only one state, 10 percent Naturalist Program. Through Alabama Master of freshwater resources in the lower 48 states Naturalist, adults can participate in a multi-week either flow through or originate in Alabama. class covering a multitude of interesting topics Jordan Graves Participants in our group were within the scope of Natural shocked to find out that we Resources. This program have the highest biodiversity had been popular in the past of freshwater fish of any state but has not been hosted in – 332 species to be exact. central Alabama in several Not only does Alabama lead years. Recently, Tallapoosa in fish diversity but also our County Extension Coordinator state ranks No. 1 in number Shane Harris re-launched the of crayfish, snails, turtles and program locally. The wonderful mussels. This is why it is so staff at Wind Creek State Park important to monitor and has been instrumental in protect Alabama’s waterways. providing a suitable facility and The Alabama Water Watch beautiful backdrop to those Program is a great way for any enrolled in the program. citizen to volunteer and help The first class was held monitor local streams, creeks in early October, as the and reservoirs. leaves began to change color. At the third meeting, Alabama Co-op Extension/4-H participants discussed the Natural Resource State Secrets of the Forest vast forestlands of Alabama. Specialist Doyle Keasel led Above: A young longleaf pine gains a foothold on the forest floor; Opposite: Housefinch eggs are hidden in a Attendees learned that almost the program off with some nest among the greens. 70 percent of the state is basics in botany, specifically covered in forested land, looking at grasses, forbs and other plants native to the East Central Alabama area. Keasal approximately 23 million acres. This ranks Alabama as the provided course participants some insight into the historical third most forested state in the contiguous United States. 20 Lake Martin Living


Lake Martin Living 21


Among the Nation's Top Three Most Diverse States

Clockwise from top left: The Deadening Trail offers hikers a view of a wide variety of moss, rocks, lichen and shrubs; kayakers pause to admire Cahaba lilies in a river wetlands; a green tree frog was among the specimens herpetologist David Laurencio brought to the fifth class session; the author made a presentation on the waterfowl that use the state's rivers and lakes, including the wood duck; painted turtles are among the wildlife that ranks Alabama as one of the most environmentally diverse of all the U.S. states.

22 Lake Martin Living


Even more impressive is that nearly 87 percent of that land is privately owned. Alabama also exhibits great diversity of soil types and topography across the state. This diversity of geography leads to a mixture of both hardwood and pine forests. The most prevalent forest type is that of loblolly pine, due primarily to the use of this species in timber production. Mixed upland and oak-hickory forests are the next most common forest types in our state. Class four of the program took place in early December. Keasel led the morning session with a presentation on the diversity of mammals found in Alabama, covering everything from Odocoileus virginianus (white-tailed deer)

to Myotis grisescens (gray bat) and all others in between. The afternoon session included a lesson in ornithology (the study of birds). Anna Tucker, a graduate Ph.D. student from Auburn University, graciously came and gave the class a crash course in bird watching and basic ornithology. She introduced many in the class to a birding field guide, which shows key characteristics of individual species, as well as their native range. She also went in depth on how to identify by sight and sound several of the songbirds and raptors that we have in the state. This required teaching the class the different parts of the birds for visual identification using field guides. Following Tuckerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s presentation, I made a presentation on the variety of waterfowl species that use the rivers, lakes and wetlands across the state. The class was educated on over 20 different species of waterfowl, learning their diets, migration patterns and, most importantly, how to identify each of the species through visual characteristics. Many of the folks were intrigued with specimens brought in by herpetologist David Laurencio during the fifth class. Laurencio showed the class a plethora of amphibians and reptiles for participants to examine closely. He provided an in-depth presentation on the diversity of herpetofauna found across the state. Marbled salamanders and green tree frogs were just two of the species that class participants were able to inspect in person. In addition, Laurencio Lake Martin Living 23


Alabama's Unique Natural Beauty

Clockwise from above: Mountain laurel teacups bloom in the spring on Smith Mountain; Alabama offers wildlife, like this fox squirrel, the variety of ecosystems they need to survive; the bluegill is one of the state's 332 fish species.

presented information on the population ranges, habitat requirements and even identification of amphibians by their appearance and mating calls. The master naturalists were intrigued by volunteer opportunities to assist biologists in documenting species occurrence and abundance through projects such as the Alabama Herpetological Atlas Project and FrogWatch USA. Laurencio, who works at the Auburn University Museum of Natural History, is strongly involved in connecting Alabama citizens to each of these programs. Without the help of volunteers from across the state and country, biologists would have greater difficulty mapping out where all of these neat little creatures pop up. The help of volunteers also allows biologists to see if any species are disappearing from areas in which they once occurred, thus aiding in the 24 Lake Martin Living

conservation of several important species. This journey through the Master Naturalist Program is nearing an end in Tallapoosa County. Participants have enjoyed the experience and are looking forward to the final three classes. The remaining topics to be covered include geology and climate; Alabamaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s historic cultural landscape; and a study of invertebrates and the roles they play in the ecosystems. Over the duration of six months, participants in this program will have had an in-depth learning experience, resulting in an increase in their knowledge and understanding of the natural world around them. Anyone interested in being part of this program in the future should contact the local Alabama Extension Office. ~ Jordan Graves is Regional Extension Agent in Forestry, Wildlife and Natural Resource Management for the Alabama Cooperative Extension System. Contact him at 334-749-3353.


Family research leads to published work for library’s associate director

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STORY BY LONNA UPTON

lexander City native John Taylor labored for more than six years to deliver a book that would combine his love of American history with his own ancestry. From 2010 until 2016, Taylor blended magazine articles he had written from 1992 to 2000 with additional research and family history to create Union at All Costs: From Confederation to Consolidation, a 366-page volume with 700 footnotes. The book, which is now available at commercial book outlets, offers readers a unique perspective of the South. “Over the years of research to educate other people, I really educated myself on a lot of things I never knew,” Taylor said. A graduate of Benjamin Russell High School, Taylor attended Central Alabama Community College and then graduated Auburn University with a degree in Transportation (now generally called logistics). That degree led him to a job with Russell Corporation until he transitioned to Fruit of the Loom for a short period of time. After leaving his work in transportation, he decided it was time to write the book he had been thinking about for years. “My great-great-grandfather, Henry Hodnett, was a Confederate soldier. My mother knew him and held him in high regard, remembering him as a quiet, gentle and caring man. Her father was named after Henry. I had heard the stories my whole life about Henry walking home to Alabama from Camp Chase, a Union prison camp in Columbus, Ohio. I had lots of information, but I wanted more, and I needed it all in one place,” Taylor explained. Union at All Costs takes readers on a journey to explain another perspective on the Civil War, one that has little to do with slavery. The 70 to 75 percent of Southerners who did not own slaves were motivated to fight to defend their homes, Taylor said. “This book may ruffle some feathers, but I think mature, intelligent people should be willing to hear another position, to remain open-minded and see that there was some level of fault

on both sides – to see the whole picture and not just a broad brush look at history,” Taylor explained. The book covers history, Jeffersonian agrarian versus Hamiltonian industrial economics, free market economics, transportation and the United States Constitution, Taylor explained. In it, the author is critical of the South’s economic and strategic missteps, but he levels most of his criticism against Lincoln and the Radical Republicans whose main concerns included the industrial and economic interests of the Northeast and Upper Midwest. Taylor reviewed thousands of sources, letters and documents, to clarify Lincoln’s ideology in line with Alexander Hamilton’s, which was a strong belief in centralized government, deficit spending, corporate welfare and protective tariffs, greatly affecting Lincoln’s decision to go to war. “Slavery was not just a Southern issue. Four states in the North would not even allow freed slaves to live within their boundaries, and many people in the North opposed the war. Lincoln repeatedly said he could not let the South go since tariff revenue made up the bulk of funding for the U.S. Treasury, and his revenue would have dried up,” Taylor said. “We should never block off another person’s point of view. Throughout our lives we learn new things and change our minds about subjects we thought we knew everything about. We should never stop learning,” Taylor said. Taylor, who has worked at the Adelia M. Russell Library in Alexander City for the last four years, said he loves being surrounded by so many books of knowledge. As the associate director of the library, he has a new appreciation for all the work that librarians do to maintain written works and to keep them organized. Union at All Costs: From Confederation to Consolidation, which Taylor self-published through BookLocker, is also available at Amazon, Barnes and Noble, Books-a-Million and Kobo. Lake Martin Living 25


GET CONNECTED

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Volunteer!

STORY BY LONNA UPTON & PHOTOS BY KENNETH BOONE, MITCH SNEED & CLIFF WILLIAMS

he fabric of a strong, vibrant community requires more than visionary leaders, great schools and faithful churches. Vibrancy comes also from individuals working together to weave a strong community - shopping local businesses, attending citywide celebrations and volunteering to help make Tallapoosa County’s communities better places to live, work and play. “It takes a community to support a community, not just with giving money but with offering time,” explained Sharon Fuller, Executive Director of the Lake Martin Area United Way (LMAUW). Putting on an apron, a tool belt, yard gloves, or even reading glasses to serve someone in need of assistance allows volunteers an intrinsic reward, one that is personal and felt by

Lake Martin Area United Way

the heart, sometimes a reward much greater than the giver can imagine, Fuller said. Tallapoosa County offers dozens of ways to give the gift of time. Volunteers can choose one event a year, one event a month, a few hours here and there, or a regularly scheduled time to help. “Every non-profit organization needs assistance, and it may be as simple as being in the office to answer the phone,” Fuller said. Volunteers can select organizations from those named in this article or check with local churches to find how they can help build community through serving others. Also, LMAUW can match volunteers with the right organizations. The best way to find a good fit may be to fill out the volunteer form at unitedwaylakemartin.org and let the staff handle it from there.

LMAUW helps to fund 28 agencies across Tallapoosa County. Just last year alone, UWLM utilized 685 volunteers, and they could have used even more, said Fuller. “I cannot imagine how we could help such a large number of people without volunteers,” she said. LMAUW is an umbrella organization supporting other agencies, but the organization also holds fundraising events that require hands-on help. Among those events are the annual Rally in the Alley fashion show, a quail fry and silent auction, the summer reading program for children and an annual Day of Action during which volunteers spruce up local schools. To volunteer with LMAUW, visit unitedwaylakemartin.org.

Red Cross Red Cross Volunteer Specialist Kelly Ford said volunteers make up 90 percent of the work force in the Central Alabama Chapter of the American Red Cross. “Just last year, Alabama’s nearly 3,000 volunteers contributed over a half million hours of service to their communities, ranging from disaster relief to supporting blood drives,” Ford said. The organization is currently seeking volunteers who could join the Disaster Response Team. These volunteers are trained to respond to local disasters, such as house fires. Also, the American Red Cross needs volunteers to support veterans through regularly scheduled events at Bill Nichols State Veterans Home. To volunteer with the Red Cross, apply online at volunteerconnection.redcross.org or email kelly.ford@ redcross.org. 26 Lake Martin Living


Camp ASCCA Alabama’s Special Camp for Children and Adults (ASCCA) provides weekend and weeklong sessions year-round for children and adults with developmental disabilities. “Camp ASCCA would not exist without the generous support of donors, volunteers and our amazing summer staff,” said Matt Rickman, Camp Director. The next volunteer opportunity for Camp ASCCA is Fun Fish Weekend, March 24-26. Rickman said the camp needs volunteer boaters for this camper tournament that takes campers and counselors fishing on beautiful Lake Martin. The camp also needs additional male counselors/caregivers for the weekend. Counselors must be at least 18 years old and be able to pass a background check. Anyone interested can email Cody Graham, Outdoor Education Director, at cody@campascca. org. Throughout the year, ASCCA needs individuals or groups of volunteers who can wash windows and power wash to keep the camp facilities looking and functioning at its best. Volunteers ages 15-17 can spend a week in the summer at a Counselor-in-Training program.  Also in the summer, ASCCA needs groups of volunteers to provide ice cream sundae ingredients and sponsor Bingo nights or snack parties. Luggage handlers are needed on check-in days in July and August. “We are here to have a positive impact on our campers, and we do a great job at accomplishing that goal. The other reality is that our campers change the lives of those of us blessed enough to work with them,” Rickman said. To check on any of these volunteer opportunities, visit campascca.org.

Bill Nichols State Veterans Hospital Shonda Young, Director of Recreational Services for the Bill Nichols State Veterans Hospital in Alexander City, said she enjoys talking with volunteers about what they would like to do for veterans. “Volunteers can decide if they want to be one-on-one with a veteran or if they would like to read with a group, paint, sing – anything that they have to offer can be considered,” Young explained. Individuals are required to complete an information packet, pass a TB test and provide consent for a background check before they can volunteer, but once that is done, they are on their way to brightening the days of men and women who served in our nation’s military. Anyone interested in volunteering at Bill Nichols should email Young at syoung@ hmrvsi.com or call her at 256-329-3311. Lake Martin Living 27


Alexander City Chamber of Commerce The Alexander City Chamber of Commerce volunteer ambassadors meet monthly to discuss upcoming city events and how they could lend their hands to the effort. The events range from setting up a luncheon for a few attendants to Sun Festival, the city’s largest summer event, which requires hundreds of helping hands. The chamber offers a link to Sun Festival events and allows volunteers to choose from a list of all opportunities and time slots when help is needed. “There are always ways to volunteer and help those in the community. Whatever your interests are, there is a fit for you,” said Kim Dunn, Director of Marketing and Special Events. Dunn said the best way to find out about volunteer opportunities with the chamber is to follow the chamber at facebook.com/alexcitychamber, so you will know what’s coming up. Then, select how you might want to help and the amount of time that you have to give.

Outdoor Friends Forever Outdoor Friends Forever (OFF) hosts several outdoor events throughout the year for people with special needs and their families. OFF offers children a chance to learn more about the outdoors and the skill of hunting. Each weekend includes lodging, meals, snacks and many other activities, such as hunter education; skeet shooting; target practice; and a deer hunt for a chance at a trophy whitetail. OFF Family Fishing Weekends are unique in that they allow the whole family to learn to fish, so they can find a place to fish as a family when they get back home. Each fishing weekend includes lodging, meals, snacks, fish education, lure making, cooking the fish that are caught and lots of hours for kids only to fish in a stocked lake. Volunteers are needed for everything from help in the kitchen to baiting hooks, making s’mores around the campfire and volunteering land on which the hunting events can be held. For information, contact Jim Hardy at 334-233-5399.

City Parks and Recreation Parks and Recreation departments for local towns need volunteers for youth sports, senior activities, Boys and Girls Club after-school and summer programs and more. Volunteers can help supervise children, chaperone field trips, serve snacks and help with numerous other activities. Alexander City Parks and Recreation offers opportunities for volunteers to assist in the dugouts, coach team sports and help with swimming lessons. “We have tons of opportunities for people, just have them call me or Tammy Lumpkin, and we can get them set up,” said Sonny Wilson, Director of Parks and Recreation. Volunteers can reach Wilson or Lumpkin in the Alexander City department at 256-329-6736. To find out how to help in Dadeville, contact Scott Baker at 256-825-7455. 28 Lake Martin Living


Lake Martin Animal Shelter Shelter Director Mia Chandler welcomes volunteers at the animal shelter, which offers a clean and stress-free temporary home for abandoned dogs and cats, as well as provides education on responsible pet ownership. “We welcome anyone who has 15 minutes or several hours to call or just pop in. We always need dog walkers,” Chandler said. Volunteers may also assist with light cleaning and laundry. Volunteering at the shelter would be great for anyone who might need a canine fix but isn’t ready for a full commitment through adoption, Chandler said. To volunteer, stop by the shelter at 2502 Sugar Creek Rd. in Alexander City or call 256-234-5533.

Lake Watch of Lake Martin With a goal of keeping Lake Martin the cleanest lake in Alabama, Lake Watch is dedicated to preserving and improving the water quality of Lake Martin and the surrounding watershed. The organization takes a proactive approach to protecting and enhancing the lake. Lake Watch is an all-volunteer non-profit organization, and volunteers are trained to test and evaluate water quality and monitor legislation that could affect Lake Martin. Lake Watch also has an education arm that works with gifted students in local schools and offers education to local residents. Information can be obtained by emailing info@lakewatch.org.

Area Hospitals Lake Martin Community Hospital in Dadeville welcomes volunteers to help with visitor information and simple tasks. Anyone interested in volunteering should stop by the hospital and complete a volunteer application. At Russell Medical in Alexander City, the Auxiliary has a membership of more than 100 volunteers who assist at the information desk, surgery waiting, outpatient registration, the emergency department and The UAB Cancer Center - Russell Medical. The community relations department also needs volunteers at health fairs, hospital tours and other special events. The Auxiliary also owns and operates the Russell Medical Gift Shop. In addition, volunteers stitch and decorate Christmas stockings for all the babies born at Russell Medical in December. Area high school students are exposed to volunteer opportunities through the student volunteer program. These summer sessions are designed to introduce youth to various health occupations. To learn more about the many volunteer opportunities available at Russell Medical, contact the Volunteer Services Coordinator, 256-329-7177. Lake Martin Living 29


Feast of Sharing Feast of Sharing (FOS) is a food ministry started by the First United Methodist Church (FUMC) to serve dinner for the local community every Thursday night. St. James Episcopal Church joined in the cause to serve dinner on Tuesday nights, as well. The FOS provides food, as well as Christian fellowship, on those nights at FUMC fellowship hall. Volunteers do not have to be church members to help prepare simple meals, greet people, serve and clean up. Typically, volunteers serve from about one and one-half to four hours every seven weeks. To help with FOS on Thursday nights, contact Barbara Denney at 256-307-8175. To volunteer to help with FOS on Tuesday nights, contact Peggy Clayton at 334-663-2732.

Tallapoosa County Sheriff Girl’s Ranch More than 1,000 Tallapoosa County Sheriff ’s Girls Ranch volunteers logged 8,000 hours of service last year as they rebuilt fences, repaired and reworked decks at the pond, painted homes inside and out, laid flooring and organized the food pantry, said Jimmy Harmon, Director. “We routinely need help around the Ranch in lawn care, maintenance and on our farm. Another way we love volunteers to get involved is by using their skills. We always have need of both small engine and vehicle mechanics, and right now, we could really use someone who has a bulldozer and backhoe to help us clear some pasture,” Harmon explained. No special training is required, as most of the time volunteers will be working with Ranch staff. If someone would like to volunteer, Harmon said, a great way to get started is to come out to the Ranch on the first Saturday of each month from 9 a.m. until 12 p.m. when the Church of the Highlands has a regularly scheduled group of volunteers assisting. Volunteers can also email Harmon at jimmy@ sheriffsranch.org for information.

Food Bank of East Alabama Volunteers at the Food Bank of East Alabama join a coordinated effort to alleviate hunger through a coordinated system for collecting and distributing food. The food bank needs individuals and groups to repack bulk foods in the warehouse, pack boxes for programs, perform office tasks, sort product and stock shelves. Most volunteer opportunities are available during regular weekday hours (Monday through Friday from 7 a.m. to 12 p.m. and Monday through Thursday from 1 p.m. to 3 p.m.). To sign up for specific dates, check the volunteer calendar at foodbankofeastalabama. Occasionally, organizations and groups may schedule an evening or Saturday for volunteering by emailing Michelle Held, Programs & Volunteer Coordinator, at mheld@ foodbankofeastalabama.com or calling 334-821-9006. 30 Lake Martin Living


Libraries Our area libraries are always on the lookout for volunteers who love to read and want to share that love by reading to groups of children during designated story times; the Friends of the Library organizations assist with special events and book sales. To volunteer to read during story time at the Dadeville Public Library or learn more about opportunities for the Friends organization there, call 256825-7820. To volunteer for story time at Mamie’s Place Children’s Library in Alexander City or learn about the Friends, call 256-234-4644.

Tallapoosa County Historical Museum The Tallapoosa County Historical Museum, owned and operated by the Tallapoosee Historical Society, is located in downtown Dadeville and maintains 3,600 square feet of donated memorabilia exhibits for local visitors and others from out-of-town and out-of-state. The museum is open Thursdays and Fridays from 10 a.m. until 1 p.m. and Saturdays from 9 a.m. until 5 p.m. Volunteers are needed to help maintain the exhibits and to guide visitors through the museum. “People have a super interest in our museum, and we always need help. We do not receive any funding from any government source, so we rely on donations, dues and volunteers,” said Danny Hayes, Tallapoosee Historical Society President. Training is available for anyone who would like to volunteer as a docent or to help with general tasks. For information, contact Hayes at 256-215-0035.

These local organizations also use volunteers. Contact your favorite non-profit organization to see if your help is needed. Alex City Horse Riding Club, Jimmy Avery, 256-234-2925 Alex City Modelers RC Club, 256-749-5150, www.acmodelers.org Alex City Rescue Squad, 256-397-4532 or 256-329-8023 Alexander City Arts Council, 256-825-2140 Alexander City Photographic Society, The tacpsadmin@tacps.org Alexander City Shooting Club, 256-329-0080 American Legion Post 107, allegion@gmail.com Boy Scouts of America, 1-334-262-2697 www.tuckabatcheebsa.org Boys & Girls Clubs of America, 256-234-4757 Camp Fire, 256-496-3888 Central Alabama Artist’s Association, 256-377-4918 Civitan, 256-329-9872 Dixie Sailing Club, www.dixiesailingclub.com Elks Lodge #1878, 256-329-9152 Girl Scouts of America, 800-677-2247 Gateway to Education Scholarship Program, 256-234-3461 Habitat for Humanity, 256-329-7180 Kiwanis, Randy Dawkins, 256-263-6917 Lake Martin Amateur Radio Club, 145.330 MHz (-) tone 179.9 Goodwater

Lake Martin Amateur Radio Club, 146.960 MHz (-) tone 179.9 Wind Creek Lake Martin Archery Club, Chris Mann, 256-794-5541 Lake Martin Area Economic Development Alliance, 256-215-4411 Lake Martin Collector’s Club, Renee Wall, 256-234-6991 Lake Martin Young Professionals, www.lakemartinyp.com LifeSouth Blood Center, 334-705-0884 Lions (Alexander City), Billy Ray Walls, 256-329-8060 MainStreet Alexander City, Richard Wagoner, 256-329-9227 Meals on Wheels, 256-329-7382 Memory Makers Quilting Guild, Bonita Brooks, 256-329-3519 PATH Lake Martin, 256-825-2329 Quarterback Club, Tim Rape, 256-827-9658 Rotary Club, Abby Guy, 256-329-7502, http://www.rotary6860.org Salvation Army, 256-215-3730 Tallapoosa Christian Crisis Center, 256-329-3327 VCCA, 256-234-0347 VFW #1701, http://www.vfwwebcom.org/al/post1701 Waterwings Sea Plane School, 888-I-FLY-WET, www.waterwings.com

Lake Martin Living 31


Picturing healthy hearts R

ussell Medical unveiled the newest imaging modality - a GE Revolution CT machine during a ribbon cutting and open house at the end of last month. “This new scanner provides uncompromised image quality and clinical capabilities across all clinical areas,” said Dr. Mathieu Nader, Radiologist at Russell Medical. “We are excited to provide this sophisticated technology to our physicians and their patients.” Attributes of the Revolution CT include: n Whole organ coverage, including 4-D imaging n Reduced radiation dose to sensitive organs n Low-dose head imaging in under one second n Provides 512 image slices while reducing radiation

Imaging at Advanced Levels

Russell Medical Board Member Scotty Howell (center) prepares to cut the ribbon at the hospital's unveiling of the new GE Revolution CT machine, along with (from left) Matt Fisher, Tommy Spraggins, Buffy Colvin, Hugh Neighbors, Dr. Mathieu Nader, Shelley James, Alexander City Mayor Jim Nabors and Russell Medical CEO Jim Peace.

32 Lake Martin Living

Medical News

dose up to 80 percent n Captures entire heart in a single beat for comprehensive assessment n Can accommodate patient up to 675 pounds n Contrast exams require half the volume of IV contrast per patient n High definition bone imaging with reduced artifacts from screws and metal n Pediatric abdomen scanning Susan Foy in less than a second, reducing the need for sedation. During the month of February, Russell Medical is offering three important heart screenings at special reduced rates. If you or someone you love has known risk factors for heart disease, such as family history, obesity, stressed lifestyle, history of smoking or diabetes,


consider these potentially life-saving screenings. The calcium-score CT heart scan is a non-invasive way of obtaining information about the presence, location and extent of calcified plaque in the coronary arteries, the vessels that supply oxygen-containing blood to the heart wall. CT methods, such as this one, are the most sensitive approaches to early detection of coronary artery disease before symptoms develop. Screening cost is $90, and screenings are recommended no more than once every five years. The Stroke Prevention Ultrasound is a non-invasive procedure that can spot subtle thickening due to plaque on the carotid artery walls that can lead to stroke. Plaque build-up is an abnormal collection of calcium and cholesterol on the artery walls. This build-up can restrict blood flow to the brain or break off and lodge in a blood vessel, causing a stroke. Early detection allows personal physicians to advise patients on appropriate courses of action that could save lives. Screening cost is $75 for this important, quick test. The third heart screening is a limited echocardiogram, using sound waves (ultrasound) to generate 3-D moving images. This machine can assess the chambers and valves of the heart and help to determine how well the heart muscle and heart valves are functioning. This non-invasive screening is $125. These screenings are not covered by insurance. Appointments may be made by calling 256-329-7826, and payment must be made prior to the test. Results will be sent to the designated primary care physician and a Russell Medical cardiologist. Ladies, mark your calendars and plan to join us Thursday, Feb. 23, from noon to 1 p.m. for an informative luncheon at the Chamber’s new Innovation Center located in USAmeribank’s corporate park. “Get the Scoop on Heart Disease” will focus on pertinent health information for women of all ages. Guests will enjoy a yummy lunch from Chicken Salad Chick. This event will be held at the Betty Carol Graham Multi-Media Room, so come for a nice lunch and ‘girl talk’ as we learn important information regarding heart disease, the No. 1 killer of women. Reservations are $5 and may be made by calling Jessica Sanford, Community Relations at Russell Medical, at 256-3297145.

dB Lawn Care Darrell Brooks Licensed & Insured

• Mowing • Edging • Weed Eating • Blowing • Shrubs • Pressure Washing

256.267.0518

~ Susan Foy is marketing director for Russell Medical.

Lake Martin Living 33


Alex City Arts events host Johnny Cash and The Eagles STORY BY BETSY ILER

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lex City Arts will celebrate two musical phenoms of the 20th century when they bring two shows to the Benjamin Russell High School Auditorium in the next six weeks. Ring of Fire: The Johnny Cash Story this month will review the career of groundbreaking country music icon Johnny Cash through the story of his life and music. The production will paint a portrait of “The Man in Black” that promises a foot-stompin’, crowd-pleasin’ salute to this unique American legend. This Wetumpka Depot Players musical production on Feb. 21 will feature more than two dozen classic hits from the 50-year career of one of the country’s most influential musicians of the 20th century, including I Walk the Line, A Boy Named Sue, Folsom Prison Blues and more. The play illustrates how the home and family life, struggles and success of this American singer/songwriter influenced the rich lyrics and emotion evident in his more than 100 hits across the rock and roll, rockabilly, blues, folk, country and gospel genres. And on March 17, 7 Bridges Band of Nashville, Tennessee, will recreate the experience of an Eagles 34 Lake Martin Living

concert from the band’s most prolific period. The stunningly accurate tribute will be a faithful production that combines musicianship, vocal precision and stage presence to replicate the music of one of the most successful bands of the 1970s without using backing tracks or harmonizers. The Eagles hit the American rock scene in 1971 and sold more than 150 million records with hits like Take It Easy, Hotel California, Already Gone, One of These Nights, Lyin’ Eyes and Heartache Tonight. After disbanding in 1980, the Eagles reunited three times over the next 36 years and performed a final farewell tribute at the 58th Annual Grammy Awards in March of last year. These Alex City Arts-sponsored performances will open at 7 p.m. at the BRHS Auditorium. Tickets, at $15 each, are available through Alex City Arts board members or at the door on the night of the event. Student tickets are available for $5 each for age 13 and older with a valid student ID; ages 12 and under admitted free. For more information about Alex City Arts, visit the website at www.alexcityarts.org.


Reverse mortgage explained How it works when seniors choose to borrow against the equity in their homes We have seen the advertisements on TV in which Tom Selleck, Henry Winkler and the late Fred Thompson have told us about the benefits of obtaining a reverse mortgage; however, these advertisements sometimes leave us with more questions than answers about how reverse mortgages work.

MONEY MATTERS

How can the money be used? Cash advances can be used for any purpose. A reverse mortgage can be used to pay off a small mortgage balance or other debts. It can be used to make repairs or improvements to the home. The money can be received in monthly payments to improve the quality of life in retirement.

What is a reverse mortgage? How is a reverse mortgage paid back? A reverse mortgage is an FHA mortgage Although no payment is required, the that allows a homeowner to convert a homeowner must continue to live in the portion of the equity in his or her home into home, keep the taxes and insurance current cash. The equity that has built up over years Jim Littmann and maintain the property. The homeowner of making mortgage payments can be paid retains title and ownership of the home. to the homeowner. Unlike traditional equity The reverse mortgage is repaid when the home is sold loans, with a reverse mortgage, the homeowner receives or no longer used as the primary residence of the payments instead of making them. A reverse mortgage also could be used to purchase a primary residence if the homeowner. The property must be sold or refinanced when the homeowner dies, moves out permanently or buyer has cash on hand to pay the difference between lives somewhere else for more than 12 months, and the reverse mortgage proceeds and the sales price of the all proceeds beyond the amount owed belong to the home being purchased. homeownerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s heirs or estate. No debt is ever passed along to the heirs or estate. Who is eligible for a reverse mortgage? A homeowner must be at least 62 years of age and Is a reverse mortgage safe? occupy the property as a primary residence. The home Numerous safeguards have been built into the must be owned free and clear or have a small remaining program, including mandatory HUD-approved balance that could be paid off with the reverse mortgage counseling, capped interest rates, advanced disclosures, proceeds. The homeowner must have the financial a three-day right-to-cancel period and no-recourse resources to pay ongoing property charges, including protection for the heirs. taxes and insurance. In addition, the homeowner must Many of todayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s baby boomers are approaching complete reverse mortgage counseling with a Housing retirement with their homes, minimal liquid assets and and Urban Development (HUD) approved counselor. the prospects of Social Security income. The recent Borrowers who live in rural areas may complete the Great Recession resulted in the loss of personal wealth, counseling session by telephone. and fewer individuals have employer-paid pension plans. A reverse mortgage could be a financial planning tool to How much money can a homeowner get? improve the quality of life for an increasing number of The amount that can be borrowed is based on a HUD new retirees. formula that factors in the age of the youngest borrower or eligible non-borrowing spouse, the interest rate, ~ Jim Littman is a mortgage loan originator with Home appraised value and the county where the property is Place Mortgage in Alexander City. He has 33 years of located. Loan proceeds are tax free and can be used for banking experience and can be reached at 256-329-1410. a number of purposes, including paying off an existing mortgage, setting up a line of credit or increasing retirement income. Lake Martin Living 35


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Campfire Father Daughter Dance February 4, 2017 The Arbor 1. Katherine Harris, Laci Waldrop, Michael Ann Wagoner

and Lynley Watts 2. Derrick and Andie Lackey 3. Kirklynn Marable and Kyliegh Rowe 4. Anabelle and Andy Gordon 5. Belle and Josh Walters 6. Andrew and Lillian Pais 7. Lucy, Kelly and Katie Waldrop 8. Chole Bobo, Avery Sanders, Michael Ann Wagoner, Maggie Hamlet and KK Vardaman 36 Lake Martin Living

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Horizons Unlimited January 23, 2017 Board of Education, Alexander City 1. Elizabeth Willamson

2. Helen S. Martin 3. Jackie and Sheldon Darnell 4. Harold and Beverly Henry 5. Dick and Jane Merrifield 6. Beverly Thomas and Mark Conversino 7. Betty and Bill Chambers 8. Gordon Boyles and Gloria and Butch Myers

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Young Professionals Polar Plunge January 21, 2017 Kowaliga 1. Ava Franklin and Katherine Howorth 2. Ban Stewart and Rob McDaniel 3. Weston Blake 4. Cheri Edwards, Mallory Padgett, Chris Gaston; Emily, Thomas and Clay Sprayberry; and Randy Ellison

5. Brad Easterwood 6. Lindsey Hardy, Juniper Cassel and Merry Hardy

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Sock Hop February 7, 2017 Jacob's Ladder

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1. Dustin Smith, Emma Nolen, David Davenport, Libby Kate Bryant, Savannah Thompson, Charlotte Nader, Sadie Bishop, Toby Hodnett and Jace Johnson 2. Mallory Kate Patterson, McCrae Thornell, Kindell Hunt, Kason Sheffield, William Tapley, Hunter Jones, Hvala Collari, Kyler Basham and Brylee Muller 3. Gabe Williams, Johnny Spears, Branson Fuller, Asher Barrett, Grant Gordon, Nicholas Pais, Kayla Hayes, Sophia Barrett, Roxy Rayfield and Caroline Smith 4. Jackson Gilbert, Ally Limbaugh, Hudson Coleman, Judson Powell, Emersyn Bullard, John Walker Brown, Jax Adair and Tucker Brown 5. George Dix, Harris Goree, Silas Bishop, Scarlett Dye, Caleb Foshee, Zoe Westbrook and Miley Morgan 6. Stephanie Stoffregen, Evie Bradley, Bentley Vardaman, Briley Mann, McCayna Williams, Lynlee Jones, Parker Knox, Riggs Patterson, Colesan Wendling, Jake Kolb and Amber Wagoner

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Calendar

THE LAKE REGION

FEATURED EVENT

Run for education includes first class after-party This year’s Russell Forest Run to benefit Alexander City Schools Education Foundation will hit the beautiful trails in The Russell Forest at 7:45 a.m. on Feb. 25, but one of the best parts of the event happens after the race is over. That's when The Stables at Russell Crossroads hosts the after-party, said Race Director Robert Gunn. As race after-parties go, the Russell Forest Run event is first class. Held upstairs at The Stables, runners carb up on fare from lake area restaurants, including SpringHouse Restaurant’s signature soup, the famous grits bar and other savory treats and beer. While officials wait for the final runners to arrive, music is provided by The Bank Walkers, a favorite local band that plays classic Rock, classic Country and a little outlaw Country - great running music - and then prizes are awarded. To get an invite to the party, you have to run - or at least walk - in the 5K or 10K race that raises money for local schools through the Alexander City Schools Education Foundation. The foundation supplements local programming with equipment and funding for special projects. 40 Lake Martin Living

Race entry fees are $20 for the 5K race and $40 for the 10K. Enter at www.russellforestrun.com. Race packets can be picked up on Friday, Feb. 24, from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. and on race day from 6 a.m. to 7 a.m. at the Discovery Center at Russell Crossroads. 10K participants will receive high-performance running shirts, and 5K entrants will receive cotton T-shirts. The 10K course winds through some of the prettiest portions of Russell Forest, and it’s USATF certified, so you can compare your race time to other courses and national rankings. Prizes will be awarded in 10-year age groups from zero to 70, and then 70 and over, and race results will be posted on the website. In addition to race host Russell Lands and The Stables, the race is sponsored by Russell Medical, Russell Do it Center, Southern Food Services, SpringHouse, Lake Martin Dock Company, USAmeriBank, Catherine’s Market, Russell Marine, Kowaliga Restaurant, Sigma, LMG, Coca-Cola and The Bank Walkers. Come for the scenery; come for the exercise; come for the kids; but don’t miss the after-party. For more information, call Gunn at 256-397-1019.


LAKE REGION EVENTS Feb. 16

Arts Association of Central Alabama

Diane Hough will give a demonstration on pencil drawing at this month’s meeting, which will be held at 11:30 a.m. at the Senior Activity Center at the Charles E. Bailey Sportplex in Alexander City.

Feb. 18

Pancake Breakfast

Bibb Graves Community Center on Highway 9 at Millerville will serve breakfast from 7 a.m. until 10:30 a.m. Buy a plate of pancakes with sausage, orange juice and coffee for $6. Proceeds benefit renovation of the old high school section of the community center.

Feb. 18

Ronald E. Koon Sporting Clay Classic

Shoot at the Lower Wetumpka Shotgun Club in Montgomery to benefit Boys and Girls Club of the Lake Martin Area. Entry fee is $600 for a team of four; $300 for a team of two; $100 for individuals. Sign sponsorships available for $50. Practice shoots on Friday and Saturday mornings. Biscuits, doughnuts and coffee at 8 a.m. on shoot day; shoot starts at 9 a.m. Lunch and shells included. Call 256-234-4757 for information.

Feb. 18

Storybook Ball

Russell Medical Foundation will host a Storybook Ball from 6 p.m. to 10 p.m. at Willow Point Golf and Country Club to benefit the Russell Medical Pediatric Unit. The event will include dinner prepared by Willow Point Executive Chef Chris Doggett, dancing to the music of The Sweet Young Uns and three bar tickets. Onsite childcare will be provided with a children’s party that will include storybook characters in costume, dinner and entertainment. RSVP by Feb. 9 to reserve space at the children’s party. Event tickets are

$150 each. Attire is formal. Gold ticket sponsors will receive six tickets for dinner and dance and six tickets to the pre-ball reception in the Willow Room with open bar, as well as acknowledgment on the event sponsor board.

Feb. 18

2nd Annual Polar Bear Plunge

Meet at the Wind Creek State Park Beach at 2 p.m. for the refreshing plunge into the winter water. Day use fees apply for non-campers. For information, call 256-329-0845.

Feb. 19

Lake Watch of Lake Martin Annual Meeting

CRATA founder Jimmy Lanier will discuss the latest development on the new trails and interpretive improvements at Smith Mountain Park at this year’s annual meeting. Lunch will be served at 1 p.m. with a business meeting to follow. Donation of $8 is requested to cover the cost of food and drinks. Register at www.lakewatch.org.

Feb. 20

Horizons Unlimited

Daphne Simpkins, who has written about life in the South through essays and books for the past 20 years and teaches writing at Auburn University - Montgomery, will present W.C. Handy and Friends. The meeting will be held from 1:30 p.m. to 3 p.m. at the Alexander City Board of Education building at 375 Lee St. in Alexander City. Horizons Unlimited membership is $20 per person or $30 per couple each semester.

Feb. 21

Ring of Fire: The Johnny Cash Story

From the iconic songbook of Johnny Cash comes this unique musical about love, faith and family. More than two dozen of his classic hits, including the title tune, are performed by a multi-

talented cast, painting a portrait of “The Man in Black” that promises to be a foot-stompin’, crowd-pleasin’ salute to a unique American legend. Johnny Cash’s remarkable life story is told through his music, climaxing in a concert that will both move and exhilarate. Benjamin Russell High School Auditorium at 7 p.m. Tickets are $15 at the door; $5 for students 13 and up with valid student ID; and ages 12 and under admitted free.

Feb. 23-26 and March 2-5 Leading Ladies

Millbrook Community Players presents this hilarious comedy in which author Ken Ludwig plants two down-on-their-luck English Shakespearean actors on the Moose Lodge circuit in Amish country. When they hear that an old lady is about to die and leave her fortune to her two long-lost English nephews, they decide to pass themselves off as her relatives to get the cash - except that the nephews are actually nieces. Call 334782-7317 for performance times and ticket prices.

Feb. 24-26

You’re a Good Man, Charlie Brown

The Sylacauga Community Playhouse will present this lightspirited musical based on the Peanuts Gang cartoons by the late Charles Schultz. Performances will be Feb. 24 at 6 p.m. and Feb. 25 and 26 at 2 p.m. at the Sylacauga High School Auditorium. Tickets are $15 in advance and $18 at the door. For more information, call 256-369-3003.

Feb. 25

Wetumpka Mardi Gras

Let the good times roll at Wetumpka’s annual Mardi Gras party, hosted by The Order of the Cimarron. Vendor booths will be open from 9 a.m. until 3 p.m. with the parade start at 1 p.m. To rent a booth, contact Leeann Rouse at 334-324-8667; for Lake Martin Living 41


parade entries, contact Grif Pritchard at 256-496-0032.

Feb. 25

5th Annual Continental Pheasant Shoot

This annual event at the Shelby County property of Garry Ard benefits New Water Ministries in Tallapoosa County. Donation of $150 to enter. Register at newwater.com or contact Robert Brandon at rbrandon@ surgicaldermatology.com.

Feb. 27

Horizons Unlimited

Katie Simpkins, a former Miss Sylacauga and gifted vocalist with extensive training and experience, will present Music and Songs from WWII. The meeting will be held from 1:30 p.m. to 3 p.m. at the Alexander City Board of Education building at 375 Lee St. in Alexander City. Horizons Unlimited membership is $20 per person or $30 per couple each semester.

March 2-4

Crater Tours and Lecture

Learn about the biggest star that ever fell on Alabama and see the impact crater it left 85 million years ago at this annual lecture and tour event hosted by the City of Wetumpka and the Wetumpka Impact Crater Commission. Dr. David King, the Auburn University geologist whose research confirmed the impact of a meteor at the site, will present his most recent findings at a lecture March 2 at 7 p.m. at the Wetumpka Civic Center. The lecture is open to the public and free of charge. Teachers can reserve tours of the crater area for students on March 3 by calling Marilee Tankersley at 334-567-4637, and the public can take 1-1/2 hour tours of the crater, starting at 9 a.m., on Saturday. Cost for the public tours is $20 for adults, $10 for children up to age 12 if accompanied by an adult. For additional information and to make reservations, contact Valencia at 334-567-5147 or email her at vsmith@ 42 Lake Martin Living

cityofwetumpka.com.

March 11

Johnny Appleseed Celebration

Wind Creek State Park will host a celebration of fun activities for kids at the campground pavilion at 10 a.m. Children under age 5 should be accompanied by an adult. For information, call 256-329-0845.

March 12

Bridal Extravaganza

Find everything for a dream wedding all in one place as florists, caterers, decorators and venue representatives gather at the Wetumpka Civic Center from 1 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. for this inaugural bridal fair. Live entertainment by Eric Nettles. A fashion show at 3:30 p.m. There will be giveaways and food. Tickets are $5 and are available at the City Administration Office or on site the day of the event. For vendor information, contact LaToya King at 334-580-9770.

March 17

Tribute to the Music of the Eagles

In a stunningly accurate tribute to the music of the Eagles, 7 Bridges Band will perform at 7 p.m. in the Benjamin Russell High School Auditorium. Using no backing tracks or harmonizers, 7 Bridges Band faithfully recreates the experience of an Eagles concert from the band’s most prolific period. 7 Bridges Band is a tour de force of talent, combining incredible musicianship, vocal precision and a stage presence that has garnered them national attention.

March 18

Lake Martin Ultra 100

No walk in the park, Lake Martin’s endurance trail race at Russell Crossroads includes distance options at 100, 50 and 27 miles. Registration for all races is now open at lakemartin100mile.homestead.com.

Racers arrive from across the country for this uniquely beautiful trail on the ultra circuit. The entire race is run in Russell Forest on carriage paths and gravel roads that are not accessible to automobile traffic. Aid stations will be set up along the trail and this year will include sandwiches, hot soup, hot chocolate, coffee and more. A great race for a beginner ultra runner. Entry fee for the 100-mile race is $220; the 50-mile race fee is $100 after; and the entry fee for the 27-mile race is $55. See the website for details, schedule and contact information for race organizer David Tosch.

Season-Long Events Millerville Trade Day

Bibb Graves School on Highway 9 hosts this trade day on the third Saturday of every month from 7 a.m. until 2 p.m. Find books, toys, models, coins, lamps, original artwork, jewelry, clothing, antiques, glassware, quilts, home decor and more. Refreshments available.

Children’s Library in Alexander City

Mamie’s Place Children’s Library holds themed storytime every Wednesday at 10 a.m. and offers kidfriendly movies on the first Tuesday of each month at 10 a.m.

Gamers’ Club

Adelia M. Russell Library hosts kids ages 12 to 17 in the conference room on Fridays after school until 4:30 p.m. Bring handheld games or games from home (no games rated M allowed). Participants should be picked up by 4:30 p.m. For information, call 256329-6796.

Ladies’ Book Club

Ladies 18 and older are invited to participate in the club at Adelia M. Russell Library on the last Thursday of every month. Meet in the conference room at 4 p.m. Call the library at 256234-4644 for each month’s book title.


Electronics Recycling

The City of Alexander City Public Works Department hosts an electronics recycling event from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. on the second Thursday of each month. Items accepted include computers, computer mouse, keyboards, modems or routers, CD and DVD players, power supplies, PC mix systems, home or cell phones, printers or copiers, mainframe servers, audio/video adapters, laptop chargers, cable boxes, nickel cadmium or lithium ion batteries and flat screen monitors and televisions. CRT monitors and televisions are no longer accepted. For more information, call the Alexander City Public Works Department at 256409-2020.

Santuck Flea Market

The Santuck Flea Market is held the first Saturday of each month except January and February. The Santuck Flea Market is located at 7300 Central Plank Road, Highway 9 in Wetumpka.

Sarah Carlisle Towery Art Colony Exhibit

between 1 p.m. and 8 p.m. with a business meeting at 5 p.m., followed by show-and-tell. Bring sewing projects, machines and questions.

Real Island Supper

The Real Island community hosts a covered dish supper every third Friday of the month at the Real Island Volunteer Fire Department and Community Room, 1495 Real Island Rd., Equality. Everyone is welcome. Admission is $3 per adult; bring a covered dish to share. Some nights are “themed,” so call ahead to find out if costumes or certain types of food are in order. For more information, contact Dianne Perrett at 256-3298724.

Antique Car Cruise-in

On the first Saturday of each month, car enthusiasts cruise into Arby’s parking lot on Highway 280 in Alexander City from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. Join the fun and enjoy an era of classic cars and classic music.

Charity Bingo

The Sarah Carlisle Towery Art Colony on Lake Martin exhibit is on display at the Alexander City Board of Education building all year long. The BOE is located at 375 Lee St.

Play charity bingo at Jake’s Restaurant at 16 Broad St., Alexander City, at 6 p.m. every Thursday night. Cards are $1, and proceeds benefit local charities.

Children’s Harbor Treasures and Thrift Store

Naturalist Presentations and Guided Nature Tours

Located on Highway 63 just south of Lake Martin Amphitheater, the Children’s Harbor Thrift Store is open Fridays and Saturdays from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Proceeds are used to help fund the activities at the Lake Martin campus of Children’s Harbor and the Family Center at Children’s Hospital. Call 334-857-2008 for more information.

Memory Makers Quilt Guild

Meets the second and fourth Mondays at the Senior Center on the Charles E. Bailey Jr. Sportplex campus. Participants come and go

Naturalist Marianne Hudson fills the Naturalist Cabin at Russell Crossroads with children and adults to see and listen to her lively nature presentations

with critters, insects, snakes and fowl, just to mention a few. There is never a dull moment with this wildlife biologist as she educates on the beauty of nature in the wild and the outdoor classroom. Your children will love every minute. Check the calendar at Calendar.RussellLandsOnLakeMartin. com for scheduled subjects, dates and times.

$20 on the 20th

The Dadeville Area Chamber of Commerce is asking our community to “Spend $20 on the 20th” of each month to help our local economy.

Amateur Radio Club

The Lake Martin Area Amateur Radio Club meets the second Thursday of every month at the Alexander City Church of Christ. Dinner and fellowship follow at a local area restaurant. Interested persons may contact Club President Tim Mayfield at 256-329-1172 or Secretary John Philips at 256-212-4063.

Music at The Equality Performing Arts Center

The Equality Performing Arts Center hosts music and other events on the second and fourth Friday nights of each month at 6:30 p.m. on Alabama Highway 9 in Equality. Country/ Western, bluegrass, Southern gospel and instrumental music featured. For more information, contact Wayne Glenn at 334-541-3302.

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Marinas

Daviston

1 Kowaliga Marina 334-857-2111 255 Kowaliga Marina Rd., Alex City, AL 35010 2 The Ridge Marina 256-397-1300 450 Ridge Marina Rd., Alex City, AL 35010

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33. River North Marina 256-397-1500 250 River North Rd., Alex City, AL 35010 4 Real Island Marina 334-857-2741 2700 Real Island Rd., Equality, AL 36026 5 Smith Marina 256-444-8793

seshoe Bend tional Park

6 Blue Creek Marina 256-825-8888 7280 Hwy 49 S., Dadeville, AL 36853 7 Parker Creek Marina 256-329-8550 486 Parker Creek Marina Rd., Equality, AL 36026

Restaurants

CHAMBERS COUNTY

9 Catherineâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Market 256-215-7070 17 Russell Farms Rd., Alex City, AL 35010 10 Homeplate Cafe 256-825-0583 191 East South St., Dadeville, AL 36853

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8 SpringHouse 256-215-7080 12 Benson Mill Rd., Alex City, AL 35010

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Camp Hill

11 Harbor Docks Restaurant at Anchor Bay Marina 334-639-4723 2001 Castaway Island Rd., Eclectic, AL 36024 12 Oskar's Cafe 6684 Hwy 49 S., Dadeville, AL 36853 13 Kowaliga Restaurant 256-215-7035 295 Kowaliga Marina Rd., Alex City, AL 35010

Business & Shopping

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14 Karen Channell State Farm Financial Services 256-234-3481 5030 Hwy. 280, Alex City, Al 35010 15 Hodges Vineyards and Winery 256-896-4036 230 Lee Rd. 71, Camp Hill, AL 36850

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16 Russell Do It Center (Alex City) 256-234-2567 1750 Alabama 22, Alex City, AL 35010

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17 Russell Do It Center (Eclectic) 334-541-2132 1969 Kowaliga Rd., Eclectic, AL 36024

LEE COUNTY

18 Lake Martin Mini Mall 334-857-3900 7995 Kowaliga Rd., Eclectic, AL 36024

22 The Stables at Russell Crossroads 256-794-1333 288 Stables Road, Alex City, AL 35010 23 Dark Insurance 256-234-5026 www.darkinsuranceagency.com 410 Hillabee Street, Alex City, AL 35010 24 McDaniels Storage Center 256-234-4583 1040 Highway 280, Alex City, AL 35010 25 Kowaliga Whole Health & Pet Care Resort 334-857-1816 8610 Kowaliga Rd., Eclectic, AL 36024 26 Aronov Realty Lake Martin 256-825-4133 6928 AL-49 S Stillwaters Hwy, Dadeville, AL 36853 27 Centry 21 Lake Area Realty 256-825-4800 440 N Broadnax St., Dadeville, AL 36853 28 Nail's Convenient Store 334-857-3454 8394 Kowaliga Rd., Eclectic, AL 36024 29 Bodyworks Massage & Spa 256-395-0442 282 Dadeville Rd., Alex City, AL 35010 30 Foshee What's, LLC 256-234-3298 2802 Dadeville Rd., Alex City, AL 35010 31 Shipwreck Sam's Yogurt@ Smith's Marina 256-444-8793

Hotels & Lodges 32 Creekside Lodge 256-307-1440 6993 Hwy 49 S., Dadeville, AL 36853 33 Creekside Event Center 256-307-1441 7051 Hwy 49 S., Dadeville, AL 36853

Churches 34 Red Ridge United Methodist Church 256-825-9820 8091 County Rd. 34, Dadeville, AL 36853 35 Episcopal Church of the Epiphany 334-252-8618 2602 Gilmer Avenue, Tallassee, AL 36078

Dock Builders 36 Lake Martin Dock Company, Inc Marine Contractor License #49146 334-857-2443 180 Birmingham Rd., Eclectic, AL 36024

19 Lakeside Mercantile 334-850-6357 8246 County Rd. 34, Dadeville, AL 36853

Loachapoka

20 EastLake Coffee @ Lakeside Mercantile 334-850-6357 8246 County Rd. 34, Dadeville, AL 36853

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21 Russell Building Supply 256-825-4256 350 Fulton Street, Dadeville, AL 36853

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If you would like to advertise your business on our Lake Martin Region Map, for as little as $25 call 256-234-4281. Space is limited.

Lake Martin Living 45


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Alex City Marine American Inn Anytime Fitness Baymont Inn BB&T Big B Bar-B-Que Campus of CACC Carlisle's Carlos Mexican Grill Catherine’s Market Chamber Of Commerce Cherokee Quick stop Citgo Cloud Nine Collegiate Deli Comfort Inn Dark Insurance Darwin Dobbs Days Inn Discount Food Mart Emporium Wine Grace’s Flowers Hampton Inn Holley’s Home Furnishings Hometown Pharmacy Jackson Drugs Jake’s JR’s Sports Bar & Grill Koon’s Korner Koon’s Korner II Lake Martin Building Supply Lakewinds Golf Club Larry’s General Store Little Black Dress Longleaf Antiques Mark King's Lake Martin Furniture Mistletoe Bough Bed & Breakfast Queen’s Attic Regions Bank Ridge - Clubhouse Ridge - Marina River North Marina Riverbend Store Russell Home Décor Russell Medical Center Russell Lands Russell Retail Store Satterfield, Inc Senior Nutrition~50+ Center Sho’ Nuff Restaurant Springhouse Restaurant T.C. Russell Airport Tallapoosa Publishers, Inc The Medicine Shoppe The Sure Shot USAmeribank Warren's Appliance Parts Willow Point Country Club Wind Creek - entrance Wind Creek - store Winn Dixie 280 BP 280 Exxon

48 Lake Martin Living

DADEVILLE

American Watersports Bay Pine Marina City Hall Chamber of Commerce Chuck's Marina Dadeville Wellness Center Foodland Foshee Boat Dock Homeplate Restaurant Harbor Pointe Marina Lakay’s Flowers & Gifts Lake Martin Flowers & Gifts Lake Martin Community Hospital Lakeshore Discount Pharmacy Lakeside Marina Niffer's At The Lake Oskar's Cafe Payne Furniture Pearson’s Place Poplar Dawgs Public Library Pug's Place PNC Bank Russell Building Supply Shell Station Sigger’s Stillwaters Country Club Store 34 USAmeribank

ECLECTIC

Children’s Harbor Cotton’s BBQ Eclectic Do-It Center Johnson’s Furniture Kowaliga Marina Lake Martin Dock Lake Martin Mini Mall Nail’s Convenience Store Peoples Bank

EQUALITY

Equality Food Mart Real Island Marina Southern Star

KELLYTON

Five Star Plantation

RED HILL Citgo

TALLASSEE

Community Hospital Chamber of Commerce The Tallassee Tribune

WALNUT HILL

Lakeside Mercantile Walnut Hill Grocery

WETUMPKA

The Wetumpka Herald To be sure a copy is reserved for you, call David Kendrick at 256-234-4281 for a subscription.


AD INDEX A&M Plumbing.................................................................................... 7

Lagasse Construction Inc................................................................... 4 6

APCO Employees Credit Union............................................................ 3

Lake Martin Community Hospital......................................................... 2

Black Jack Gardens............................................................................ 5 1

Lake Martin Dock........................................................................ 19, 47

Bob Alexander Landscaping................................................................. 8

Millstone Nursery................................................................................. 7

Brown Nursing & Rehabilitation........................................................... 7

OBGYN Associates of Montgomery................................................... 1 2

C&C Wood Products.......................................................................... 3 3

Prime Management........................................................................... 4 6

Cherokee Bend Bed & Breakfast........................................................ 4 6

Radney Funeral Home.......................................................................... 5

DAVCO Development........................................................................ 4 7

Red Flag Pest Control.......................................................................... 6

DB Lawn Care.................................................................................... 3 3

Russell Medical.................................................................................. 5 2

Designs by Trish................................................................................... 7

Satterfield, Inc.................................................................................... 5

Four Seasons Irrigation....................................................................... 4 7

Southern Sash................................................................................... 3 3

George Hardy, D.M.D.......................................................................... 7

Southern Star Alpaca Farm.................................................................. 8

Harold Cochran, State Farm Insurance...................................................... 4 7

Sparkle Window Cleaning Services.................................................... 5 1

Home Place Mortgage................................................................................ 5

Summer Village................................................................................. 1 3

Jackson Thornton............................................................................. 1 2

Tallassee Community Hospital............................................................ 4 9

Karen Channell, State Farm Insurance.................................................................4 7

Troy Cable........................................................................................... 8

Kelley’s Heating & Air........................................................................ 4 7

The Swing Bed Program AT COMMUNITY HOSPITAL

805 Friendship Road Tallassee, AL 36078 (334) 283-6541 www.chal.org

Community Skilled Care and Rehab Helping Patients Transition from Hospital to Home When Rehabilitative Care is Needed. • Generalized weakness • IV medication therapy • Recovery following an accident • Rehabilitation following surgery, stroke, or heart attack • Rehabilitation following acute care inpatient hospital stay

Why Choose Community Skilled Care and Rehab? • Low patient to nurse ratio • 24-hour physician in-house • Dietary, nutritional, and social services • Team approach to recovery & discharge • Coordinated & planned activities program • Nursing care provided by experienced RNs and LPNs • Physical, occupational, respiratory, and speech therapy

For more information call: (334) 283-3848 or E-mail: bnelson@chal.org

Community Skilled Care and Rehab A division of

Community Hospital Lake Martin Living 49


Bubbly Monster

Whatever happened to Lake Martin’s floating hot tub?

E

The Last Word

infamous floater at least once.   very region of the world has its You have my word: This gigantic, own urban legend; New Jersey has buoyant hot tub was very real. It was its Devil; the Pacific Northwest like a capsized Atlantic City Merry-Gohas its Bigfoot; Loch Ness has its Round full of partyin’ people (Don’t Monster.  worry; I am not revealing names here. But did you know Lake Martin once For those who used to take that plunge, had a “monster” of its own? It was huge! your secret is safe with me). This floating It was scary! It was hot and nasty and tub of bubbles was a bona fide Center for round and, at times, a little bubbly.  Disease Control nightmare.  That’s right: Bubbly.  Can you even imagine such a thing? This was no real monster like a The contagions alone should have been giant catfish, freshwater alligator Luke Robinson un-countable.  or Chupacabra; no, this was even more How is it that all of those people frightening: A 20-foot wide floating hot who were submerged in this hovering Petri tub that prowled the sloughs of Lake Martin.  dish are not sick right now? I can only assume Terrifying, right?  that mankind hadn’t cut down enough of the Before I explain, let’s just discuss hot tubs in Brazilian Rain Forest to unleash many of the more general for a moment. In theory, they are awesome. powerful diseases with which we now contend.  Warm, soothing water melting your stresses away Well, I guess this was the late 1970s; the only and pulsating bubbles easing your worries while illness that was sweeping the country then was you sip a chilled Chardonnay.  In reality, they are lukewarm outdoor community “Boogie Fever.”  The real question here is where is that thing bathtubs that are somehow both over-chlorinated now? What does one do with a humongous floating and under-cleaned. The bubbles are less relaxing hot tub once its run its course? Tow it to a watery and provide an unwilling disguise for the chatty, dump? Yard sale? Craigslist?  gassy stranger from Des Moines who joined you in I bet the eBay “Buy It Now” price would be the pool area after checking in at the hotel.  “Whenever you can come get this nasty thing it’s Even Jerry Seinfeld was anti-hot-tub when yours: No questions asked.” Kramer invited him for a “soak.” Seinfeld replied to In the end, we may never know what happened to Kramer’s invitation with, “I am not taking a soak in this Jacuzzi of Death. For all I know, it still silently that human bacteria frappe you have going on.” patrols the murky depths of Lake Martin, waiting Of course, we all dig hot tubs. Maybe more for for unsuspecting prey.  the idea of what they are than what they actually More likely, though, it drifted down some are. But if they are so awesome, why do we always backwater and is covered by pine straw and beer want to take a shower after being in one?  But back to the floating monstrosity that haunted cans. our lake back in the late 1970s or perhaps early 80s; ~ Luke Robinson is an Alexander City native who it should be noted that I did little to no (mostly also writes a weekly column for The Alexander City “no”) research prior to writing this column. I am Outlook. strictly going off of my really bad memory here, but I could swear under oath that I did see the

50 Lake Martin Living


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LAKE REGION EVENTS Feb. 16

Arts Association of Central Alabama

Diane Hough will give a demonstration on pencil drawing at this month’s meeting, which will be held at 11:30 a.m. at the Senior Activity Center at the Charles E. Bailey Sportplex in Alexander City.

Feb. 18

Pancake Breakfast

Bibb Graves Community Center on Highway 9 at Millerville will serve breakfast from 7 a.m. to 10:30 a.m. Buy a plate of pancakes with sausage, orange juice and coffee for $6. Proceeds benefit renovation of the community center.

Feb. 18

Ronald E. Koon Sporting Clay Classic

Shoot at the Lower Wetumpka Shotgun Club in Montgomery to benefit Boys and Girls Club of the Lake Martin Area. Entry fee is $600 for a team of four; $300 for a team of two; $100 for individuals. Sign sponsorships available for $50. Practice shoots on Friday and Saturday mornings. Biscuits, doughnuts and coffee at 8 a.m. on shoot day; shoot starts at 9 a.m. Lunch and shells included. Call 256-234-4757 for information.

Feb. 18

Storybook Ball

Russell Medical Foundation will host a Storybook Ball from 6 p.m. to 10 p.m. at Willow Point Golf and Country Club to benefit the Russell Medical Pediatric Unit. The event will include dinner prepared by Willow Point Executive Chef Chris Doggett, dancing to the music of The Sweet Young Uns and three bar tickets. Onsite childcare will be provided with a children’s party that will include storybook characters in costume, dinner and entertainment. RSVP by Feb. 9 to reserve space at the children’s party. Event tickets are $150 each. Attire is formal. Gold ticket

sponsors will receive six dinner tickets and six tickets to the pre-ball reception in the Willow Room with open bar, as well as acknowledgment on the event sponsor board.

Feb. 18

2nd Annual Polar Bear Plunge

Meet at the Wind Creek State Park Beach at 2 p.m. for the refreshing plunge into the winter water. Day use fees apply for non-campers. For information, call 256-329-0845.

Feb. 19

Lake Watch of Lake Martin Annual Meeting

CRATA founder Jimmy Lanier will discuss the latest development on the new trails and interpretive improvements at Smith Mountain Park at this year’s annual meeting. Lunch will be served at 1 p.m. with a business meeting to follow. Donation of $8 is requested to cover the cost of food and drinks. Register at www.lakewatch.org.

Feb. 20

Horizons Unlimited

Daphne Simpkins, who has written about life in the South through essays and books for the past 20 years and teaches writing at Auburn University - Montgomery, will present W.C. Handy and Friends. The meeting will be held from 1:30 p.m. to 3 p.m. at the Alexander City Board of Education building at 375 Lee St. in Alexander City. Horizons Unlimited membership is $20 per person or $30 per couple each semester.

Feb. 21

Ring of Fire: The Johnny Cash Story

From the iconic songbook of Johnny Cash comes this unique musical about love, faith and family. More than two dozen of his classic hits, including the title tune, are performed by a multitalented cast, painting a portrait of “The Man in Black” that promises to

be a foot-stompin’, crowd-pleasin’ salute to a unique American legend. Johnny Cash’s remarkable life story is told through his music, climaxing in a concert that will both move and exhilarate. Benjamin Russell High School Auditorium at 7 p.m. Tickets are $15 at the door; $5 for students 13 and up with valid student ID; and ages 12 and under admitted free.

Feb. 23-26 and March 2-5 Leading Ladies

Millbrook Community Players presents this hilarious comedy in which author Ken Ludwig plants two down-on-their-luck English Shakespearean actors on the Moose Lodge circuit in Amish country. When they hear that an old lady is about to die and leave her fortune to her two long-lost English nephews, they decide to pass themselves off as her relatives to get the cash - except that the nephews are actually nieces. Call 334782-7317 for performance times and ticket prices.

Feb. 24-26

You’re a Good Man, Charlie Brown

The Sylacauga Community Playhouse will present this lightspirited musical based on the Peanuts Gang cartoons by the late Charles Schultz. Performances will be Feb. 24 at 6 p.m. and Feb. 25 and 26 at 2 p.m. at the Sylacauga High School Auditorium. Tickets are $15 in advance and $18 at the door. For more information, call 256-369-3003.

Feb. 25

Wetumpka Mardi Gras

Let the good times roll at Wetumpka’s annual Mardi Gras party, hosted by The Order of the Cimarron. Vendor booths will be open from 9 a.m. until 3 p.m. with the parade start at 1 p.m. To rent a booth, contact Leeann Rouse at 334-324-8667; for parade entries, contact Grif Pritchard at 256-496-0032. Lake Martin Living 41


Feb. 25

5th Annual Continental Pheasant Shoot

This annual event at the Shelby County property of Garry Ard benefits New Water Ministries in Tallapoosa County. Donation of $150 to enter. Register at newwater.com or contact Robert Brandon at rbrandon@ surgicaldermatology.com.

Feb. 27

Horizons Unlimited

Katie Simpkins, a former Miss Sylacauga and gifted vocalist with extensive training and experience, will present Music and Songs from WWII. The meeting will be held from 1:30 p.m. to 3 p.m. at the Alexander City Board of Education building at 375 Lee St. in Alexander City. Horizons Unlimited membership is $20 per person or $30 per couple each semester.

March 2-4

Crater Tours and Lecture

Learn about the biggest star that ever fell on Alabama and see the impact crater it left 85 million years ago at this annual lecture and tour event hosted by the City of Wetumpka and the Wetumpka Impact Crater Commission. Dr. David King, the Auburn University geologist whose research confirmed the impact of a meteor at the site, will present his most recent findings at a lecture March 2 at 7 p.m. at the Wetumpka Civic Center. The lecture is open to the public and free of charge. Teachers can reserve tours of the crater area for students on March 3 by calling Marilee Tankersley at 334-567-4637, and the public can take 1-1/2 hour tours of the crater, starting at 9 a.m., on Saturday. Cost for the public tours is $20 for adults, $10 for children up to age 12 if accompanied by an adult. For additional information and to make reservations, contact Valencia at 334-567-5147 or email her at vsmith@ cityofwetumpka.com.

42 Lake Martin Living

March 11

Johnny Appleseed Celebration

Wind Creek State Park will host a celebration of fun activities for kids at the campground pavilion at 10 a.m. Children under age 5 should be accompanied by an adult. For information, call 256-329-0845.

March 12

Bridal Extravaganza

Find everything for a dream wedding all in one place as florists, caterers, decorators and venue representatives gather at the Wetumpka Civic Center from 1 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. for this inaugural bridal fair. Live entertainment by Eric Nettles. A fashion show at 3:30 p.m. There will be giveaways and food. Tickets are $5 and are available at the City Administration Office or on site the day of the event. For vendor information, contact LaToya King at 334-580-9770.

March 17

Tribute to the Music of the Eagles

In a stunningly accurate tribute to the music of the Eagles, 7 Bridges Band will perform at 7 p.m. in the Benjamin Russell High School Auditorium. Using no backing tracks or harmonizers, 7 Bridges Band faithfully recreates the experience of an Eagles concert from the band’s most prolific period. 7 Bridges Band is a tour de force of talent, combining incredible musicianship, vocal precision and a stage presence that has garnered them national attention.

March 18

Lake Martin Ultra 100

No walk in the park, Lake Martin’s endurance trail race at Russell Crossroads includes distance options at 100, 50 and 27 miles. Registration for all races is now open at lakemartin100mile.homestead.com. Racers arrive from across the country for this uniquely beautiful trail on the ultra circuit. The entire race is run in

Russell Forest on carriage paths and gravel roads that are not accessible to automobile traffic. Aid stations will be set up along the trail and this year will include sandwiches, hot soup, hot chocolate, coffee and more. A great race for a beginner ultra runner. Entry fee for the 100-mile race is $220; the 50-mile race fee is $100 after; and the entry fee for the 27-mile race is $55. See the website for details, schedule and contact information for race organizer David Tosch.

Season-Long Events Millerville Trade Day

Bibb Graves School on Highway 9 hosts this trade day on the third Saturday of every month from 7 a.m. until 2 p.m. Find books, toys, models, coins, lamps, original artwork, jewelry, clothing, antiques, glassware, quilts, home decor and more. Refreshments available.

Children’s Library in Alexander City

Mamie’s Place Children’s Library holds themed storytime every Wednesday at 10 a.m. and offers kidfriendly movies on the first Tuesday of each month at 10 a.m.

Gamers’ Club

Adelia M. Russell Library hosts kids ages 12 to 17 in the conference room on Fridays after school until 4:30 p.m. Bring handheld games or games from home (no games rated M allowed). Participants should be picked up by 4:30 p.m. For information, call 256329-6796.

Ladies’ Book Club

Ladies 18 and older are invited to participate in the club at Adelia M. Russell Library on the last Thursday of every month. Meet in the conference room at 4 p.m. Call the library at 256234-4644 for each month’s book title.


Electronics Recycling

The City of Alexander City Public Works Department hosts an electronics recycling event from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. on the second Thursday of each month. Items accepted include computers, computer mouse, keyboards, modems or routers, CD and DVD players, power supplies, PC mix systems, home or cell phones, printers or copiers, mainframe servers, audio/video adapters, laptop chargers, cable boxes, nickel cadmium or lithium ion batteries and flat screen monitors and televisions. CRT monitors and televisions are no longer accepted. For more information, call the Alexander City Public Works Department at 256409-2020.

Santuck Flea Market

The Santuck Flea Market is held the first Saturday of each month except January and February. The Santuck Flea Market is located at 7300 Central Plank Road, Highway 9 in Wetumpka.

Sarah Carlisle Towery Art Colony Exhibit

between 1 p.m. and 8 p.m. with a business meeting at 5 p.m., followed by show-and-tell. Bring sewing projects, machines and questions.

Real Island Supper

The Real Island community hosts a covered dish supper every third Friday of the month at the Real Island Volunteer Fire Department and Community Room, 1495 Real Island Rd., Equality. Everyone is welcome. Admission is $3 per adult; bring a covered dish to share. Some nights are “themed,” so call ahead to find out if costumes or certain types of food are in order. For more information, contact Dianne Perrett at 256-3298724.

Antique Car Cruise-in

On the first Saturday of each month, car enthusiasts cruise into Arby’s parking lot on Highway 280 in Alexander City from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. Join the fun and enjoy an era of classic cars and classic music.

Charity Bingo

The Sarah Carlisle Towery Art Colony on Lake Martin exhibit is on display at the Alexander City Board of Education building all year long. The BOE is located at 375 Lee St.

Play charity bingo at Jake’s Restaurant at 16 Broad St., Alexander City, at 6 p.m. every Thursday night. Cards are $1, and proceeds benefit local charities.

Children’s Harbor Treasures and Thrift Store

Naturalist Presentations and Guided Nature Tours

Located on Highway 63 just south of Lake Martin Amphitheater, the Children’s Harbor Thrift Store is open Fridays and Saturdays from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Proceeds are used to help fund the activities at the Lake Martin campus of Children’s Harbor and the Family Center at Children’s Hospital. Call 334-857-2008 for more information.

Memory Makers Quilt Guild

Meets the second and fourth Mondays at the Senior Center on the Charles E. Bailey Jr. Sportplex campus. Participants come and go

Naturalist Marianne Hudson fills the Naturalist Cabin at Russell Crossroads with children and adults to see and listen to her lively nature presentations

with critters, insects, snakes and fowl, just to mention a few. There is never a dull moment with this wildlife biologist as she educates on the beauty of nature in the wild and the outdoor classroom. Your children will love every minute. Check the calendar at Calendar.RussellLandsOnLakeMartin. com for scheduled subjects, dates and times.

$20 on the 20th

The Dadeville Area Chamber of Commerce is asking our community to “Spend $20 on the 20th” of each month to help our local economy.

Amateur Radio Club

The Lake Martin Area Amateur Radio Club meets the second Thursday of every month at the Alexander City Church of Christ. Dinner and fellowship follow at a local area restaurant. Interested persons may contact Club President Tim Mayfield at 256-329-1172 or Secretary John Philips at 256-212-4063.

Music at The Equality Performing Arts Center

The Equality Performing Arts Center hosts music and other events on the second and fourth Friday nights of each month at 6:30 p.m. on Alabama Highway 9 in Equality. Country/ Western, bluegrass, Southern gospel and instrumental music featured. For more information, contact Wayne Glenn at 334-541-3302.

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9

Goldville 280

Goodwater To Sylacauga

Legend

TALLAPOOSA COUNTY

63

New Site

Public Boat Ramps 22

280

Churches

Camps & Parks

Timbergut Landing

9

Power lines

22

280

21

U.S. Highways

Alexander City

County Roads

15

Flint Hill Church

22

Camp ASCCA

Alex City Boat Ramp

13 28 27

Rockford

3

49

128

22

Piney Woods Landing

Wind Creek 63 State Park

COOSA COUNTY

Horseshoe National P

Jaybird Landing

Jacksons Gap

Pleasant Grove Church

11

9

Mt. Zion Church Russell Farms Baptist Church Friendship Church New Hope Church

259

Bethel Church

D.A.R.E. Park Landing

25 57

23

5

Smith Landing

Willow Point 24

8 22 9

Equality

Seman

4 Camp Kiwanis

9

12 1

Church in The Pines

Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Harbor

Trillium

The Amp

Ko w

ali

26 28 34

80

11

Camp Alamisco

Church of the Living Waters

The Ridge

17

Pleasant Ridge Church

34

63

Kowaliga Boat Landing 55

20

10

Liberty Church

20

231

Dadevill

280

ga

2

Union Landing

Ba

y

Lake Martin 18 Baptist Church 19

Stillwaters

24 8

7

32

Red Ridge United 49 Methodist Church

30 31

Walnut Hill

Union

90

50

Central

Red Hill

16

63

Union Church

Refuge Church 229

49

Eclectic Santuck Kent

Reeltown

231

14

ELMORE COUNTY

120

14

33 14

Lake Martin Region Wetumpka

44 Lake Martin Living

Tallassee 229

MACON COUNTY


Marinas

Daviston

1 Kowaliga Marina 334-857-2111 255 Kowaliga Marina Rd., Alex City, AL 35010 2 The Ridge Marina 256-397-1300 450 Ridge Marina Rd., Alex City, AL 35010

22

te

33. River North Marina 256-397-1500 250 River North Rd., Alex City, AL 35010 4 Real Island Marina 334-857-2741 2700 Real Island Rd., Equality, AL 36026 5 Smith Marina 256-444-8793

seshoe Bend tional Park

6 Blue Creek Marina 256-825-8888 7280 Hwy 49 S., Dadeville, AL 36853 7 Parker Creek Marina 256-329-8550 486 Parker Creek Marina Rd., Equality, AL 36026

Restaurants

CHAMBERS COUNTY

9 Catherineâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Market 256-215-7070 17 Russell Farms Rd., Alex City, AL 35010 10 Homeplate Cafe 256-825-0583 191 East South St., Dadeville, AL 36853

deville

20

CON NTY

8 SpringHouse 256-215-7080 12 Benson Mill Rd., Alex City, AL 35010

50

Camp Hill

11 Oskar's Cafe 6684 Hwy 49 S., Dadeville, AL 36853 12 Kowaliga Restaurant 256-215-7035 295 Kowaliga Marina Rd., Alex City, AL 35010

Business & Shopping 13 Karen Channell State Farm Financial Services 256-234-3481 5030 Hwy. 280, Alex City, Al 35010

280

Waverly

14 Hodges Vineyards and Winery 256-896-4036 230 Lee Rd. 71, Camp Hill, AL 36850 15 Russell Do It Center (Alex City) 256-234-2567 1750 Alabama 22, Alex City, AL 35010

50

16 Russell Do It Center (Eclectic) 334-541-2132 1969 Kowaliga Rd., Eclectic, AL 36024

14

17 Lake Martin Mini Mall 334-857-3900 7995 Kowaliga Rd., Eclectic, AL 36024

LEE COUNTY

22 McDaniels Storage Center 256-234-4583 1040 Highway 280, Alex City, AL 35010 23 Kowaliga Whole Health & Pet Care Resort 334-857-1816 8610 Kowaliga Rd., Eclectic, AL 36024 24 Aronov Realty Lake Martin 256-825-4133 6928 AL-49 S Stillwaters Hwy, Dadeville, AL 36853 25 Centry 21 Lake Area Realty 256-825-4800 440 N Broadnax St., Dadeville, AL 36853 26 Nail's Convenient Store 334-857-3454 8394 Kowaliga Rd., Eclectic, AL 36024 27 Bodyworks Massage & Spa 256-395-0442 282 Dadeville Rd., Alex City, AL 35010 28 Foshee What's, LLC 256-234-3298 2802 Dadeville Rd., Alex City, AL 35010 29 Shipwreck Sam's Yogurt@ Smith's Marina 256-444-8793

Hotels & Lodges 30 Creekside Lodge 256-307-1440 6993 Hwy 49 S., Dadeville, AL 36853 31 Creekside Event Center 256-307-1441 7051 Hwy 49 S., Dadeville, AL 36853

Churches 32 Red Ridge United Methodist Church 256-825-9820 8091 County Rd. 34, Dadeville, AL 36853 33 Episcopal Church of the Epiphany 334-252-8618 2602 Gilmer Avenue, Tallassee, AL 36078

Dock Builders 34 Lake Martin Dock Company, Inc Marine Contractor License #49146 334-857-2443 180 Birmingham Rd., Eclectic, AL 36024

18 Lakeside Mercantile 334-850-6357 8246 County Rd. 34, Dadeville, AL 36853 19 EastLake Coffee @ Lakeside Mercantile 334-850-6357 8246 County Rd. 34, Dadeville, AL 36853

Loachapoka

20 Russell Building Supply 256-825-4256 350 Fulton Street, Dadeville, AL 36853

14

Notasulga 85 81

21 Dark Insurance 256-234-5026 www.darkinsuranceagency.com 410 Hillabee Street, Alex City, AL 35010

The Stables at Russell Crossroads 256-794-1333 288 Stables Road, Alex City, AL 35010

If you would like to advertise your business on our Lake Martin Region Map, for as little as $25 call 256-234-4281. Space is limited.

Lake Martin Living 45


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TOTAL FITNESS

Summer slim down begins now! • No contract • No enrollment fees • Aquatic exercise classes & open swim • 2 fitness gyms & an aerobics room • Fitness assessment • Strength training • Personalized health assessment & wellness plan • Only local indoor pool

Jump in with Total Fitness! Pick your favorite class or try them all! AQUATICS •

Fitness Specialists: Cara Tidwell, Hunter Lewis and Amy Jones

Our fitness instructors can customize an exercise regimen for your personal needs. Call Cara Tidwell, Fitness Coordinator, for more information at (256) 329-7624 or visit www.russellcares.com. 52 Lake Martin Living

• Synergy Seniors • Arthritis • Aqua Fit • Boot Camp • Intense Aquatics • NoodleBlast • Strong Bones • Tabata Water • Strength & Conditioning

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Feb 15, 2017 Alex City Outlook