Rise of the Trades

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RISE OF THE

TRADES EDUCATION | CAREERS | HOUSING

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DESIGN AND COMMUNITY.

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Granville “Dan” Fain, standing Norman Fain, kneeling second from far right Rafter Eleven Ranch, Prescott Valley, AZ | Circa 1940’s 4 TG MAGAZINE


You're Invited

The Fain Signature Group and its publishing arm, Talking Glass Media, are excited to bring you the latest edition of TG Magazine, Rise of the Trades. This is not a simple topic nor one that can be fully presented in a single edition. This marks the beginning of an ongoing conversation that we feel is important to discuss: our strengths, our vulnerabilities, and our challenges. It’s about the fundamental desire of each of us to live a good life, together as a community.

AN ONGOING DISCUSSION

Over the past six months we have been preparing for this conversation and are pleased to bring you the first of an ongoing series of discussions focused on the important topics for a community’s well-being. In this edition we discuss the importance of our trades both from an employment perspective and from a business perspective. The trades are a key element to the strength of our region. They are essential, they are valued, and we want to celebrate their contribution to our quality of life. To continue the dialogue with the community, we are launching this conversation online. We will explore key topics including the trades, jobs, housing, water, tourism, and more. We see these as essential to the design of a community. We want to share our philosophy and what has gone into the design over the previous 60 years, as well as explore how we can work together over the next 60 years to make our region a great place to live. By doing so on our podcast, Cast11, we intend to keep our discussions positive, informative, and collaborative rather than divisive and pulling the community apart, which is so often found in the media and social media today.

DESIGN & LONG TERM VISION

At Fain Signature Group, it’s not just about the next project, retail outlet, or home. It’s about design and long-term vision, which is our craft. It is what we have been doing for over 60 years. Our aspiration is to include our local businesses, employees, retirees, and public officials to be a part of the conversation. It takes all of us working together to create a strong and vibrant community. This conversation is critical for our future and must take place in a collaborative manner that respects different opinions, perspectives, and desires. We want to share our thinking and our processes, which follow generational timelines. Compare that to most people who think in the “now” and in 1-to-2-year timelines. Our perspective brings a different context to difficult decisions that, from a short-time view, may not be an obvious benefit for the community. However, taken in the context of a generational timeline perspective, these decisions make much more sense for the community. We have learned from those who have walked this path before us. This is a gift that has been handed down in our family and is embodied by our entire team at Fain Signature Group. Our chosen craft, the design of a community, comes with great responsibility. We embrace it with humility and honesty, understanding that it takes all of us to succeed.

AN INVITATION FOR ALL

We invite all of you to listen and participate. To be a part of the dialogue. To keep an open mind and be respectful to the process. A community is not defined by one decision, nor is it created overnight. This is a process that evolves over time and across generations. We are grateful for those that participate in the process of collaboration and open mindedness. Join us.

Publisher | Fain Signature Group

Email Brad Fain at: info@TalkingGlass.Media

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W E ’ V E H E A R D T H E B E S T PAT H F O R M O S T P E O P L E IS A FOUR-YEAR DEGREE. THESE THINGS BECOME P L AT I T U D E S A N D B E F O R E LO N G I T ’ S I N C U L C AT E D I N O U R M I N D S T H AT T H E R E I S A PAT H T O S U C C E S S A N D T H I S I S W H AT I T LO O K S L I K E . W E H AV E T O B E M I N D F U L T H AT T H E S E S T E R E O T Y P E S A N D S T I G M A S A C T U A L LY E X I S T, A N D R AT H E R T H A N P R E T E N D T H E Y D O N ’ T, I T ’ S U S E F U L T O TA L K A B O U T T H E M H E A D - O N .

-Mike Rowe

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EDITOR'S NOTE Growth Is Inevitable. Bad Design Doesn’t Have To Be. A NEW WORLD

Social, environmental, economic and geopolitical concerns are driving significant changes in our communities. What was once socially acceptable is now questioned. How we address inflation, our housing challenges, and use of water continue to create division. Navigating the growing political schism in our country leaves many feeling frustrated while others see vast plains of opportunity as they seize the day. It is truly a new world.

MAKE CHANGE FOR A GOOD LIFE

Intelligent, meaningful collaboration is key to addressing these issues in our communities. This is why Fain Signature group has decided to host these discussions using its multimedia platforms, in print (TG Magazine), digital (SignalsAZ.com), and streaming (CAST11 podcast). The intent is to bring together the many parties in the community to exchange knowledge while developing longterm solutions for our residents, families, businesses, and natural resources. This edition, “Rise of the Trades,” is not a one-off. The next edition of TG Magazine will cover “Design of a Community.” Between print editions, we will be sharing information and having discussions on our CAST11 podcast and online at SignalsAZ.com.

EDUCATION AND THE TRADES

Education and training are integral to a thriving community. How long have you recently waited for someone to come to your home to fix a window, repair a plumbing leak, or replace your HVAC unit? How long did you wait for that delivery? These trade professionals are the backbone of our business community, and yet, we have a serious shortage of these experts to help us. Industry reports state that we are short 80,000 commercially licensed truck drivers in the U.S. This is why we have partnered with Yavapai College and its Career and Technical Education (CTE)

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programs to cover 20 trades programs across four campuses throughout central Arizona. CTE creates the professionals we need.

ATTAINABLE HOUSING

Education is really not the centerpiece of this edition. The focus of this effort is on attainable housing. The long-term goal is to create it. Without attainable housing our employees, small business owners, teachers, and first responders won’t stay. Without our trades professionals, services dry up, stores shut down, the local economy stagnates, roads begin to fall apart, schools suffer, and our quality of life diminishes. As reported in the Arizona Republic on June 20, 2022(1), at least 30 apartment projects were put on hold in Phoenix in 2021 because of a myriad of issues, including a “not in my backyard” (NIMBY) attitude. According to the Arizona Department of Housing, to prevent the current housing challenges from becoming a real crisis, Arizona needs up to 270,000 additional dwellings with prices and rents below current market costs. This is why the centerpiece article in this edition covers the first of many roundtable discussions on our housing challenges with industry leaders, business owners, communities, educators, students, first responders, land owners, healthcare professionals and community builders. We must all be talking to each other while including the residents in our community so they can hear and share input. What does attainable housing really look like and who needs to be collaborating to make it happen? Recently, we have seen forms of this collaboration developing in cities like Tempe, where leadership attempted to direct permit fee revenues towards a fund to develop housing for low-income earners. Tempe’s “Hometown for All Initiative” was created after the city realized that non-profit partnerships and use of one-time money weren’t enough to meet the affordable housing demands.(2) However, that effort was recently tabled as the political wrestling matches continue.(3)

PERSONAL RESPONSIBILITY

Another important component of further discussions in this effort will be personal responsibility. The reality is, it’s not just about the home builder, the land owner, prevailing wage rates, or local taxes. It is also about the individual. How can we help and mentor individuals to become better versions of themselves and to lift themselves up, not for a hand out, but a hand up in our community? What is everyone doing at the individual level to make this a better place? That includes both the individual struggling to get ahead and the business leader or parent who has a wealth of knowledge to share. If 71% of Fortune 500 companies have mentoring programs and 97% of those with a mentor say they are valuable(4), it’s time we discussed personal responsibility, it’s power, and the data behind mentoring. By the way, 25% of those who participated in a mentoring program experienced an increase in salary, compared to the only 5% of those who experienced a salary increase while not participating in a mentoring program(4). Good choices, great rewards.

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ONE MAN’S VISION

Bill Fain seeded Prescott Valley in 1960. Now, Prescott Valley is one of the most successful communities in central Arizona. His vision established the pillars of our community. He created the water company that the Town of Prescott Valley now owns and operates for its residents. His vision enabled the development of the region’s premier events center, The Findlay Toyota Center, and so much more. Now is our time to design together for a future and be inspired by those before us like Bill Fain, who in one man’s lifetime had an idea for a community, designed it, nurtured it, and watched it grow into a community for all of us to make a great life.

GROWTH IS HERE

You can find growth everywhere. Not just here in central Arizona, but globally. Take a look at the Google Earth Engine Timelapse. Human population won’t stop growing. We can’t shut the gate and keep people out just because we got here first. What we can do is design better together. How do we build our communities going into the future for a better life? If one man can create a town, imagine what many working together can do to build a good life for all. Growth is inevitable. Bad design doesn’t have to be. Carpe Diem Unum,

Guy Roginson

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Guy C. Roginson Executive Editor | Talking Glass Media | A Fain Signature Group Company

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References (1) Catherine Reagor. Jan 30, 2022. We’re at the precipice: Why this business group is taking on NIMBYism in metro Phoenix. Arizona Republic. (2) Paulina Pineda. Feb 01, 2022. What Tempe is doing with millions in Hometown for All affordable housing funding. Arizona Republic. (3) Catherine Reagor. Feb 10, 2022. Controversial Arizona bill to override city zoning rules, address NIMBYism tabled. Arizona Republic. (4) Nicola Cronin. Feb 03, 2020. Mentoring Statistics: The Research You Need to Know. Guider.

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ASSISTANT EDITOR'S NOTE For many people, the trades are almost invisible until we have a problem and need a skilled person to help. Air conditioner goes out in the middle of summer? You’re going to need an HVAC technician to get that cool air going again. Car not running properly? You need an automotive tech. Electricity goes out? Better have a utility lineworker available. Need a baker for that wedding cake? That’s another skilled tradesperson. As our world integrates more technology in every aspect of our lives, the trades are both more in demand and more complex than ever before. From manufacturing to auto mechanics, workers need to have sophisticated technical skills at a level almost unimaginable in previous generations. These jobs are not only vital, but many of them pay very well and do not require a four-year college degree. Instead, students can enroll in a career and technical education (CTE) certificate program right here at Yavapai College. The advantages for students – whether they are dual enrollment high school students, recent high school graduates, or adults looking to change careers – are numerous. CTE certificates take a fraction of the time to complete and offer hands-on, realworld experience to prepare students to move directly from completion to employment. Some trades are in such high demand now that students are being hired while still working on their certificates. It has been all too easy to overlook these essential workers, and we aim to remedy that with this edition.

Angie Johnson-Schmit -Angie Johnson-Schmit Assistant Editor, Talking Glass Media, LLC

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CONTRIBUTORS

SPRING 2022 To Advertise 928-257-4177 Assistant Editor | Print Angie Johnson-Schmit

DREW DESMOND PrescottAZHistory.blogspot.com Drew Desmond is Secretary of the Prescott Western Heritage Foundation, co-author of Murder & Mayhem in Prescott, and author of the Prescott, AZ History blog.

ANDREW JOHNSON-SCHMIT Andrew Johnson-Schmit is a freelance writer who specializes in historical “deep dive” articles about the arts and culture of the 20th century.

Art Direction Dina Ponder Assistant Editor | Digital Kristina Abbey Videographer Austin Morrison Media Manager Merilee Mills Sales & Events Director Elicia Morigeau Executive Editor Guy Roginson

AUSTIN MORRISON Austin Morrison is a videographer and video editor with Talking Glass Media in Prescott Valley, Arizona.

JANET WILSON Janet Wilson is a passionate plant enthusiast and owner of Prescott Gardener. She loves to inspire and teach people how to grow successful, abundant gardens in the Central Arizona Highlands.

Contributing Writers Drew Desmond Andrew Johnson-Schmit Robin Layton Austin Morrison Janet Wilson Contributing Photographers Blushing Cactus Photography

TALKING GLASS MEDIA, LLC Publishing | Advertising | Marketing 2982 N. Park Ave., Ste F Prescott Valley, AZ. 86314 Tel: 928-257-4177 Email: Editor@SignalsAZ.com

ROBIN LAYTON Communications & Marketing Director Yavapai Big Brothers Big Sisters

Publisher

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RISE OF THE

TRADES TABLE OF CONTENTS

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PUBLISHER’S LETTER

CULINARY

AUTOMOTIVE TECH

An invitation to the community from Brad Fain

Sharpening kitchen skills

Vehicle care, inside and out

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FILM & MEDIA ARTS

COMPUTERS

Video production, editing, and screenwriting

Digital networks and cybersecurity

A BRIEF HISTORY OF CAREER AND TECHNICAL EDUCATION IN THE U.S. How trades education began and evolved in the U.S.

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A CONVERSATION WITH YAVAPAI COLLEGE PRESIDENT, DR. LISA B. RHINE Dr. Rhine on Career and Technical Education and the state of the trades in our region

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WINE Viticulture and Enology, from grape to glass

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BREWING TECH Craft beer brewing

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70

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AMERICAN RANCH

ELECTRICAL AND INSTRUMENTATION

The evolution of a Territorial ranch to modern day home development

Installation, care, and repair of electronics.

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BADGERS BOUND FOR SUCCESS:

CAREER AND TECHNICAL EDUCATION AT PRESCOTT HIGH SCHOOL

A conversation with Francisco Ortiz y Davis and Rebecca Horniman

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AVIATION Pilots and drone operators take on the skies

BEARS IN CHARGE:

CAREER AND TECHNICAL EDUCATION AT BRADSHAW MOUNTAIN HIGH SCHOOL

A conversation with David Capka and Cynthia Perpich

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3-D PRINTING Additive manufacturing with modern technology


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ADVANCED MANUFACTURING

APPLIED PRE-ENGINEERING

ELECTRICAL UTILITY LINEWORKER

Working smarter in high tech manufacturing

Engineering for the future

Keeping the power flowing

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FIRE SCIENCE

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CONSTRUCTION

CDL

Better building skills and techniques

In the driver’s seat

A new generation of first responders

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GUNSMITHING Design, repair, and restoration of firearms

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THERE’S NO PLACE LIKE HOME: A GENERATIONAL PERSPECTIVE

Gillian Haley talks construction, community, and coming home

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YAVAPAI BIG BROTHERS BIG SISTERS Mentoring local youth for a brighter future and stronger communities

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MACHINING (CNC)

AGRICULTURE

Automating tools through computer controls

HORTICULTURE & ANIMALS

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WELDING Making safe, strong connections in fabrication

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COUGARS ON THE MOVE: CAREER AND TECHNICAL EDUCATION AT CHINO VALLEY HIGH SCHOOL

The future of flora and fauna

IN THE GARDEN WITH JANET WILSON Get a jump start on your garden by starting seeds indoors

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PRESCOTT VALEY COMMUNITY DIRECTORY

A conversation with Brian Pereira

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LEARNING 40

CHINO VALLEY CENTER 89

VERDE VALLEY CAMPUS CTEC

89A

PRESCOTT CAMPUS 89 93

APPROX. 15 MILES

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PRESCOTT VALLEY CENTER

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SEDONA CENTER


NEVER STOPS AT THE YAVAPAI COLLEGE CAREER & TECHNICAL EDUCATION CAMPUSES.

CHINO VALLEY AGRIBUSINESS CENTER 2275 Old Home Manor Way | Chino Valley, AZ 928-717-7720 PROGRAMS: Agricultural Technology | Animal Care | Canine Construction | Equine | Horticulture | Lineworker

CAREER & TECHNICAL EDUCATION CENTER 220 Ruger Road | Prescott, AZ 928-776-2002 PROGRAMS: Advanced Manufacturing | Additive Manufacturing Applied Pre-Engineering | Aviation | Auto Technician Diesel Technician | Auto Body & Paint | Fire Science Electrical Instrumentation | Computer Numerical Control Welding | Gunsmithing | Unmanned Arial Systems

SEDONA CENTER 4215 Arts Village Drive | Sedona, AZ 928-649-4265 PROGRAMS: Culinary Arts

VERDE VALLEY CAMPUS 601 Black Hills Drive | Clarkdale, AZ 928-634-7501 PROGRAMS: Viticulture & Enology | Film & Arts | Hospitality

WHERE THEORY MEETS PRACTICE. 15


A BRIEF

HISTORY CAREER TECHNICAL OF

AND

EDUCATION IN THE UNITED STATES By Andrew Johnson-Schmit

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ounding Father Benjamin Franklin recognized Americans needed a new kind of education as early as 1749. He joined with other colonial leaders to create the Academy and College of Philadelphia in 1749.

of the Declaration of Independence were either alumni or trustees of the school.

The goal of the school was to teach useful and practical work skills. Previously, schools were based on the European model which emphasized Latin, Greek and religion. These early schools were finishing schools for gentlemen and church leaders.

students – whether to focus on classical

As president of the Academy’s board of trustees, Franklin drew up a constitution that emphasized the sciences and languages needed for a frontier society. The new school turned out engineers, surveyors, doctors, and business leaders.

During the Revolutionary War, the school split into two different ones, each emphasizing a different approach. Eventually, the two schools came back together and became the basis of the University of Pennsylvania.

These graduates not only helped establish their trades in the New World, but they also gave back to the new Republic. Twenty-one members of the Continental Congress and nine signers

As the new country went through its early growing pains, business leaders realized that the traditional British model of apprenticeships was not working. In Europe, a master craftsman

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Debate about the best way to educate or vocational subjects – has been an ongoing discussion for years.


would take on one or more young workers and teach them his craft over several years. In the 1800s, a growing country needed more skills taught and needed them taught more consistently. Today, it’s hard to remember how revolutionary the idea of universal education, or public school for all young citizens, was. One of the key issues driving that idea was the need to create a continuous stream of workers. Mechanic Institutes sprang up in Maryland, Ohio, and Pennsylvania. In Maine, the Gardiner Lyceum offered a mix of training in the mechanic arts and liberal education including logic, modern trade languages, and public speaking. While that may sound like a regular community college to us, in 1823, it was a new and unusual approach to raising the amount of knowledge in a community. The late 1800’s marked the emergence of vocational educa-

tion, which would become the Career and Technical Education (CTE) we know today. American factories, railroads, and farms were changing the way the world approached productivity. New methods, new markets, and new machinery called for trained manpower. This need was met by a new kind of education called The Manual Training Movement. Prior to this movement, teaching trade skills was mostly taught in a “do as I do” approach with a master tradesman. In 1879, Victor Della Vos came up with the idea of breaking work down into tasks and sub-tasks. He suggested teaching the easiest tasks first and then increasingly difficult ones to build on the knowledge and success of earlier classes. John D. Runkle, from the brand-new Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), thought this new approach could really speed up the teaching of tool work. He convinced MIT to cre-

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ate a combination of lectures and hands-on training. Soon MIT was turning out graduates who were educated in both the theoretical and practical aspects of the machines they worked on. If this would work for people already in the workforce, Calvin M. Woodward at St. Louis’ Washington University thought, it might work even better for high school students preparing to go into the workplace. He created the Manual Training School of Washington University and started interviewing prospective students. In 1880, factories were the cutting edge of technology in the workplace. The St. Louis Manual Training School was swamped with applications. Woodward and his teachers whittled their application list down to 50 of the best and brightest. On September 16, 1880, this pioneering manual training school opened its doors. Students entered the building under a sign with the school’s motto that read, “Hail to the skillful cunning hand! Hail to the cultured mind! Contending for the World’s command, here let them be combined.” These school’s first graduates came into their own as the nation geared up to enter World War I. Factories had to be built and manned at a pace never seen before. Fortunately, the Manual Training School graduates were used to picking up new job skills and building on old ones at a rapid pace. This was a work force ready for a dizzying array of new manufacturing methods. The five decades after that might be considered the First Golden Age of Career and Technical Education. Between the world wars, educators built on the lessons of the wartime economy. Every manufacturing job was taken apart and studied to determine the easiest way to teach its skills. For the first time, schools were designed to transition students from one industry to another. World War II caused a surge in CTE as even more technical skills were needed for defense purposes. When that war ended, there was a massive change as soldiers and sailors came home ready to get out of uniform and into work that paid better and challenged them in ways they hadn’t experienced previously. CTE programs exploded in popularity post-war. The GI Bill made CTE possible for people who’d never imagined they could complete an education past the high school level. The popularity of CTE began to slow in the 1970’s as manufacturing began to change in America. Education funding began to shift from vocational programs to purely academic programs. Part of this was the shift of major manufacturing companies from local production to overseas production. The educational theory of that time held that the only econom18 TG MAGAZINE

ic safety was in an academic degree because you can’t “offshore” knowledge or creativity. Also, several studies done in that time period seemed to show that people with Bachelor of Arts (BA) or Bachelor of Science (BS) degrees made more money than people with two-year CTE degrees. However, studies began to show data that seemed to indicate the reverse.

People with CTE degrees finished school and entered their fields two or more years ahead of people getting BA/BS degrees. During those years when the person with a CTE degree was in the workplace and the person going for a BA/BS degree was still in the classroom, the person with a CTE degree was already making money and moving ahead in their field. This gave them a head start on their careers. And, people with CTE degrees emerged from school with significantly less student loan debt in a market with more job possibilities. Technologies and industries shifted over time. It became apparent that people with CTE degrees could adapt and change better with new technology and work methods than people with only high school degrees and, in some cases, people without the classroom and hands-on model of education that is the core of CTE. As it turns out, our communities are supported by many kinds of skilled trades that depend on workers who’ve either done lengthy apprenticeships or have completed a CTE program combined with real-world work experience. As skilled workers began to retire, communities began to depend more and more on younger workers coming out of CTE programs. Many industries also began to develop factories in America that depended on workers who could work smarter and more flexibly. Rather than do the brute work of early factory workers, this workforce programmed and maintained robots, managed complicated logistics systems or created very individualized goods and services that depend on technological savvy. Workers educated in CTE programs are open to these challenges in a unique way that has been true ever since Benjamin Franklin suggested the approach back in the 1700s. When it comes to connecting students with the knowledge that empowers them to get ahead, CTE is the right tool for the job.


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Photo courtesy of Yavapai College


A CONVERSATION with Yavapai College President,

DR. LISA B. RHINE -Angie Johnson-Schmit

Career and Technical Education (CTE) has been at the heart of Yavapai College for decades. Over the past several years, the college has expanded their programs and facilities in a big way. In the fall of 2007, Yavapai College opened the Career and Technical Education Center (CTEC) in Prescott, Arizona. CTEC is home to many of the CTE certificate programs offered by the college, especially those programs that require a significant amount of physical space.

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e sat down with Dr. Lisa B. Rhine, President of Yavapai College to discuss the college’s role in career and technical education as well as her thoughts on the current state of the trades in our region. What follows is that conversation, lightly edited for clarity and length. TG Magazine: How would you describe Yavapai College’s approach to CTE programs? Dr. Rhine: Three things, and I call them the three “R’s.” The first “R” is Responsiveness. And that’s going to the industry partners and identifying what the need is. These are local businesses, local industry clusters. We hold summits with industry clusters to find out what kind of employees they need, and then we endeavor to meet that need. We also try to understand who the employees are so that we can place our students. Because in the end, it’s about them getting a living wage job.

TG Magazine: What need does CTE fulfill for the community as a whole? Dr. Rhine: One of the things I talked about in my first convocation speech was the concept of the real ratio of jobs in any successful economy. It’s one to two to seven. For every one advanced degree you need in any industry, you also need two professional or bachelor level degrees, and seven technicians. Those seven technicians need to have skills beyond high school, typically either a certificate or an associate degree. In any industry, it’s been that way since the 1950s and it’ll be that way in the 2030s.

What’s happening in the various fields, particularly in manufacturing, is they’re facing a double whammy. They just cannot find entry-level workers with the skills necessary to fill jobs and they also have a “graying of the workforce” where all these experienced workers are retiring. And both are happening at the same time.

THESE ARE ADVANCED SKILLED JOBS THAT LEAD TO HIGH WAGES AND THEY’RE IN HIGH DEMAND. IT’S CRITICAL THAT WE DO WHAT WE CAN TO MEET THAT NEED.

The next “R” is Relevant. We need to be constantly These are advanced, looking at what we’re skilled jobs that lead to teaching in the career and high wages and they’re in technical areas and make high demand. It’s critical that sure that it’s relevant to the we do what we can to meet field, which is changing all the that need. What would the econtime. If you think about the auto omy look like if we didn’t have Dr. Lisa B. Rhine industry for example, it’s transYavapai College? And what would formed from down-and-dirty, hands-on that mean for our local community? And machining and now we’re teaching computworkers, jobs, and employers? The economy er numerical controls. Our desire is that they inform could virtually collapse if we didn’t keep producing us about the changes in the industry and that we make sure technicians. Employers would have to figure out on their own we have relevant curriculum. how to train people.

The other thing, and I know John Morgan, our Dean of Career and Technical Education, would tell you this, is we try to do real world exposure. That’s the third “R,” Real World. We try to have equipment that is identical to what you’ll see on the floor in the industry. We also try to make sure that we have individual attention and stations. So instead of having five students working on one trainer, one piece of equipment, we try to make it one-onone as much as possible. The students get the most real world, hands-on experience that they can. Those are the three things that I would say are important to me. 22 TG MAGAZINE

TG Magazine: Businesses would have to go back to old school apprenticeship. That’s time intensive and they don’t really have time to do that. Dr. Rhine: It’s a real concern. What does it mean for all of us if we can’t fill these jobs and we can’t keep these companies here? TG Magazine: Is there trouble filling these jobs right now? Dr. Rhine: Yes. John Morgan would tell you that businesses snatch them up even before they finish the program. For the


Yavapai College students head to class at the Career and Technical Education facility in Prescott, AZ.

first time, we’re having people call in September for June grads and we don’t have any available because they were already all placed. And these students, within three to five years of graduating, are in six figures in terms of income. They’re so in demand. It’s just a critically important element but it’s also something that the community needs as a whole. We’re doing the best we can. Even if we produced all that we could, we’d still probably not have enough. But we’re doing our part to try to keep the economy thriving and to keep the businesses here.

Photocredit: Blushing Cactus Photography

TG Magazine: How do you help local businesses connect with the CTE students? Dr. Rhine: We have a Regional Economic Development Center. They host job fairs on the regular and are the ones that are connected most closely with our industry partners. They arrange for internships and career opportunities for students. They’re the connector in that regard. TG Magazine: So, students see there’s a job fair coming up and they can go and find out who’s hiring? Dr. Rhine: Yes, and they are always well attended. Sometimes we have to turn industries away because we don’t have a space for them because there are so many jobs available. TG Magazine: What have you found leads students to pursue a CTE certificate rather than a transfer program or a traditional degree program?

Dr. Rhine: This is a challenge for us. I have parents of college-aged kids and I’ll say, wow, look at all these opportunities in career tech and they pay very well and they’re in high demand. And everybody’s always like, oh, that’s great, but not for my kid. It’s a perception that career technical programs are somehow dirty jobs perhaps, or less affluent or in some way “less than,” which is absolutely not the truth. It’s, again, that false bill of goods that you have to have the Bachelor’s degree for a prosperous life, right? TG Magazine: It seems like the focus in public schools has been on college prep for quite a while, but now more people are becoming aware that we need our plumbers and our welders and our 3-D printer technicians. Dr. Rhine: But that was also happening at the high school level when they had vocational programs or vocational tracks, which seem to have gone away. It’s kind of migrated to the college from the high school option. The other thing, and this is just my own little theory is that everybody that’s [working] in a high school has a bachelor’s degree or above, and that was successful for them. I think that that’s what they know. TG Magazine: You mean the teachers in high school? Dr. Rhine: Teachers, and all the others that work there. We’ve been working really hard with the advisors and the teachers in the high schools and with our recruiting folks in our admis23


TG Magazine: Are you talking about the career counselors? Dr. Rhine: Yes. A student might come and say, oh, I want to be in the medical field, but they think nursing, doctor. When there’s all these other options and technicians, right? I don’t think folks really know the options and once they do and they learn about the demand and the possibility, that sells it. Getting them out to the Career and Technical Education Center, people always are like, oh my gosh, this is amazing. TG Magazine: Is there anything in particular that you’re looking at for Yavapai College in the next five to ten years? Dr. Rhine: We conducted a gap analysis with a third-party provider, and we did it to look at the possibility of offering four-year degrees. We also want to see if there’s gaps in need and programs that we offer in the CTE areas. We did create a new Verde Valley Skilled Trade Center that has four career technical programs in it currently. We’re talking about phase two and what do we include in that? That gap analysis will hopefully tell us.

Students in the Construction certificate program put their new knowledge and skills to work.

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We know definitely that healthcare is going to be a big one, just because of the aging population and the expansion of health services here. So, we know that’ll be a big one. Artificial intelligence is big in Arizona. Manufacturing is big in Arizona, so we’re expecting to see some of that here. More and more companies are migrating up here, which is exciting. TG Magazine: A lot of people are considering career changes right now. What does Yavapai College offer for them? Dr. Rhine: We have a couple of programs that are very attractive for career switchers or people that are in the second phase of life and want to do something different. A real popular one is our Viticulture and Enology program. The folks that go into that program know what they want. It attracts a certain demographic. And that’s probably true with gunsmithing too. It’s an older group typically, but they’re very, very focused on that craft. We did add a brewing technology track. We’re considering distilling as a third. You know we’re in a tourism area and we need to figure out a way to create jobs that would support someone creating their own winery or brewery. When I was

Photocredit: Blushing Cactus Photography

sion office to try to help them to understand the possibilities.


in Virginia, I lived in coastal Virginia Beach Chesapeake area, and there were craft breweries just popping up everywhere. And, very much like the wine community, they didn’t compete with one another.

and I believe some communication courses, but it’s a collection. We worked with Spectrum and they said, we want this one, this one, and this one. Now they want to expand so that they have an upper level.

They worked together to support and build each other up. They created what they called warehouse districts where there’d be all these breweries. It became a destination for visitors, but also for the locals. I thought that would work perfectly here. It would be a destination for tourists and locals, and could work in the same way as the wine tourism regions have in Yavapai County.

That’s a great partnership because they’re actually funding their folks to go through those programs and then when they do, they get an increase in pay. TG Magazine: How do you find your instructors for the CTA courses? What are the requirements? Dr. Rhine: Again, it varies by program. It typically comes from industry partners. It usually starts as adjunct where they’ll teach a course. Often, we’ll get folks that are retiring, second career. They want to come back and teach. We rely heavily on adjuncts that are in industry. We like that because they’re doing the latest, greatest work, so they can teach the latest, greatest.

TG Magazine: How long does it typically take to complete a CTE certificate program?

...IT CAN SET YOU ON A TRAJECTORY FOR LIFE AND ONE THAT YOU NEVER EVEN KNEW YOU LOVED.

Dr. Rhine: Basically, we have three different kinds. The associate degrees are typically 60 credits, which takes two years. Then, there are what we call regular certificates that are 30 credits or more, and then shortterm certificates are less than 30 credits. We try and make sure that those are stackable to the higher-level degree for the higher-level credential. So if you take a micro or a short-term credential, it stacks to the certificate and then can stack to the associate’s degree if it’s offered in that area.

Dr. Lisa B. Rhine

For instance, there’s behavior health technicians. Spectrum Health and several other mental health and addiction recovery organizations need behavior health technicians. Individuals that are coming to them to take those entry level jobs have no training at all and they needed them to come with a core set of skills. So, we created a behavioral health technician certificate, 18 credits. It’s a lot in one semester, but easily it can be done in a summer and a fall. And Spectrum Health is paying for their folks to go through because they want all of their folks to be trained at a certain level.

It’s been challenging sometimes to get faculty. You know our housing issues in terms of housing costs. When I got hired, people said, oh, look in Prescott Valley, look in Chino. And that was true then, but that was three short years ago. Now, everything’s top dollar.

TG Magazine: What do you wish more people knew about Yavapai College’s CTE programs? Dr. Rhine: Just how life changing they can be. I mean, it can set you on a trajectory for life and one that you never even knew you loved. It’s been true for my son when he came here and got a degree in computer science. He found his gift and I think we can do that for more people.

What we do is help students change their lives by leaving them

TG Magazine: What kind of coursework is involved in that?

better off than when they came

Dr. Rhine: There are sociology courses, psychology courses,

to us. That’s our goal. 25


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WINE W I N E M A K E R S , V I N E YA R D C R E W M E M B E R S , A G R I C U LT U R A L M A N A G E R S , L A B T E C H S 15,620 NEW WINE CELLAR WORKERS NEEDED EVERY YEAR FROM 2020 TO 2026. -U.S. BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS The Yavapai College Viticulture and Enology program prepares students for a variety of careers in the wine industry from vineyards (vineyard workers, crew leaders, managers, viticulturists) to wineries (winemakers, cellar workers, lab technicians)

DEGREES & CERTIFICATES Viticulture & Enology - AAS Enology Certificate Viticulture Fundamentals Advanced Viticulture

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GLASS By Angie Johnson-Schmit with contribution by Austin Morrison

Wine and wine tourism is growing rapidly in central Arizona, and Yavapai College’s Wine program is aimed at students who want to enter the field. Offering two certificate programs in Enology and Viticulture, as well as an Associate of Applied Science (AAS) degree track, Yavapai College’s Wine program prepares students for a variety of jobs in the wine industry.

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he Enology certificate program focuses on wine production while the Viticulture certificate program teaches students how to design a vineyard and grow healthy grape crops for wine production. For students who want a well-rounded wine education and want to earn a degree, an Associate of Applied Science degree program covers both enology and viticulture.

Located at Yavapai College’s Verde Valley campus, the Southwest Wine Center is home to the program and features an on-site vineyard, winemaking facility, and tasting room. Students participate in every step of the process, from choosing which grape varieties to grow for specific wine varieties to selling their product in the tasting room. Program students have consistently won awards for their wines, making the tasting room a popular stop for tourists in the Verde Valley wine region.

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The Enology and Viticulture programs are among the college’s newest programs, and the wine program has rapidly become one of its most popular, drawing students from across the state and region. Some of the wine program students are interested in starting their own vineyards or learning how to make wine. Others, like Mercy Clark, are already employed in the industry and want to improve their knowledge and skills base. Clark, who works at the Mogollon Vineyards tasting room in Dewey-Humboldt, AZ, started the program in January of 2021. “I’m the tasting room slash Jane-of-all-trades there,” said Clark. “And I figured why not jump kind of headfirst into the wine industry and learn a little bit more in depth about wine itself and not just, you know, pour people glasses of wine and tell them that it’s good or not.”

The certificate and degree wine programs use a combination of reading, lectures, and hands-on experience, which allows students to put their newly acquired knowledge into action quickly. Viticulture students work in the vineyards at the Southwest Wine Center where they learn how to grow and care for wine grapes, while enology students spend time in the winemaking facility learning how to make wine.

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Although Clark had vineyard and tasting room experience before enrolling in the Enology and Viticulture program, she was surprised by the amount of chemistry knowledge needed. “I would say the chemistry took a little bit getting used to,” she said. “I would recommend maybe taking chemistry prior to taking the winemaking classes to get a better understanding of how everything works together.”

I FIGURED WHY NOT JUMP KIND OF HEADFIRST INTO THE WINE INDUSTRY AND LEARN A LITTLE BIT MORE IN DEPTH ABOUT WINE ITSELF AND NOT JUST, YOU KNOW, POUR PEOPLE GLASSES OF WINE AND TELL THEM THAT IT’S GOOD OR NOT. ”

A benefit of the program design is that Clark has been able to integrate her class schedule with her work schedule. “I typically work in the vineyard (Mogollon Vineyards) a couple days a week,” she said. “Then I also come here every Tuesday and I kind of make an entire day of it.”

Mercy Clark

Some class days include additional workshops and speakers for those who are members of the Grand Crew, an organization for students and alumni of Yavapai College, and local and global wine industry supports. Members of the Grand Crew pay a nominal membership fee and are invited to participate in these supplemental educational opportunities. “Basically, they send out emails and there’s all these extra workshops, and they do tours of vineyards,” she said. “That’s in addition to the program itself, which I think is a phenomenal addition.” Clark is a fan of the hands-on approach and suggests new students consider enrolling in practicums at the same time as the classes. “It just makes a lot more sense when you’re doing them together,” she said. “The practicum actually allows you to walk around the vineyard and go over the different parts of the plants. Because if you’re looking at it in the book, it might not make as much sense as if you’re standing in the field and you’re actually looking at the physical grapevine.” There is a lot of effort, skill, and knowledge that goes into making a good wine and Clark is drinking it all in with gusto. For Clark, putting that passion into the process and then being able to taste the result of that hard work and skill makes it all worth it. “I’ve definitely found a new appreciation for it,” she said. “It is ultimately a labor of love.”

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TEC

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BREWING CHNOLOGY BREWER, BREWMASTER

EMPLOYMENT OF BREWERS AND BREWMASTERS PROJECTED TO GROW 8% FROM 2020 TO 2030. -U.S. BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS The Brewing Technology program provides students with the knowledge and skills to enter into the brewing industry in entry-level positions. These courses include brewing equipment and maintenance, beer production, styles, and food safety principles.

CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS Brewing Technology Certificate

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BREW By Angie Johnson-Schmit with contribution by Austin Morrison

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ne of the oldest and most beloved beverages in the world, beer is big business. Modern hobby brewing didn’t start until 1979, but it sparked a craft beer revival that, according to the Brewers Association, added over $1 billion dollars to Arizona’s economy in 2020. That same year, craft breweries in Arizona accounted for 7,686 full time employees and generated over $320 million dollars in labor income.

Yavapai College’s newest career and technical education certificate program, Brewing Technology, provides students with the knowledge and skills needed to successfully enter the brewing industry. The program’s coursework ensures students who earn their certificate have a solid understanding of brewing equipment and maintenance, beer production, beer styles and types, and food safety principles. Richard Graham, a student who joined the program as a hobbyist, now is considering making a career out of brewing beer. “I got into the program to learn a lot more about the brewing process and how to make beer so that I could make beer at home for myself and my family,” he said. “I got a lot more than I bargained for though, ‘cause now I feel like I can run the brewing operation at a brewery if I was asked to.” One thing Graham had not expected was just how long it takes to brew beer. “I had no idea what was involved in it or the time commitment that was involved,” he said. “It’s a long process to make beer, but there’s a lot of ‘hurry up and wait’ type of activity. It’s a lot like cooking, which I wasn’t really expecting and there’s a lot of chemistry involved in it. Plus, there’s a lot more math and science involved than I really thought that there would be.”

According to Graham, brewing beer “encompasses a lot of things: intellectually, physically, mentally.” He enjoys the program’s mix of lecture and labs. “In the first eight-week period, we had a morning class where we learned a lot about the biology of beer. A lot about yeast and how they work and the chemical process of how beer is actually made,” he said. “Then, in afternoon classes, we’d actually get to put that knowledge into practice.” 35


The basic brewing process follows a series of steps, with each one affecting everything from the flavor of the beer to the type of beer produced. The grains are milled, then added to a mash tun, a container for mixing ground malt with temperature-controlled water. After the grains are steeped for about an hour and the fermentable sugars are released, the mixture is put into a boil kettle. After boiling is complete and hops are added, the liquid is transferred into fermentation tanks. “During the whole process, while we’re doing those steps, there’s a lot of downtime while it’s boiling or steeping,” said Graham. “But we’ll be cleaning the equipment, getting it ready for the next step. Or, once the beer is transferred to a different tank, then we clean the previous one. So, there’s a lot of activity, but there’s also a lot of downtime.” “During the whole thing, we talk about beer a lot. So, there’s a lot of knowledge gained just from that. Just from being around everybody and finding out what they know about beer and just the different styles of beer,” said Graham.

From the very first class in the program, students are taught the different beer styles, their history, and food pairings. This leads to beer tastings. “That’s so we can get familiar with what kind of beers we might want to try to make or ingredients of different beers.” Asked about his favorite beer, Graham gave this some thought and then said, “I think that would be the Double Espresso Porter. We tried that at the festival last weekend…and that was probably my favorite beer that we’ve made here in the class so far.” The Brewing Technology program has increased Graham’s appreciation for beer. “It totally changes your experience when you go back out into the world and you actually drink beer that you’ve drank forever and you now know everything about it, and you can tell your friends all about it,” he said. “You can speak intelligently about the ingredients and the process.” Graham’s plans in the near term are to continue homebrewing, but he is open to turning it into a career. “If an opportunity presents itself where I can do this for a living, I think that would be fantastic,” he said. “I mean, I can’t think of anything better to do with my time than sit around and make beer then enjoy it with everybody or have other people enjoy what I make. I think it would be exciting.”

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BUSINESS

• Creation • Expansion • Recruitment • Retention

REGIONAL COLLABORATION

• Public/Private • Local, State and Federal • Economic Development Education

ECONOMY AND DATA ANALYSIS

• Economic Trends • Forecast Economic Conditions • Policy and Data Analysis

GRANT AND PROPOSAL WRITING

• Federal, State and Local Grants • Private Funding

The Regional Economic Development Center provides regional support for a prosperous economic environment through job creation, business and workforce development, technological innovation, and regional collaboration.

Find out what we can do for you. Visit us online at yc.edu/redc


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CULINARY ARTS H E A D C O O K , F O O D S E RV I C E M A NAG E R S , C H E F, PA S T R Y C H E F, P R I VAT E C O O K EMPLOYMENT OF RESTAURANT COOKS IS PROJECTED TO GROW 15% FROM 2020 TO 2030. -U.S. BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS The Culinary program prepares students for culinary concepts and terminology, kitchen safety and sanitation, equipment usage, basic nutritional guidelines, standard and metric measurements, food costing, and theory and practice in the production of culinary products. Courses emphasize fundamental cooking techniques and preparation methods for hot foods, breakfast items, salads, sandwiches, dressings, prebaking and pastries.

CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS Culinary Arts Fundamentals Certificate

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GREAT By Angie Johnson-Schmit with contribution by Austin Morrison

Any restaurant or food service company will tell you that one of the most important assets for their business is their skilled staff. For those entering the food and beverage industry, one of the fastest ways to land a higher paying job is to have both hands-on experience and certification. Yavapai College’s Culinary Arts program in Sedona, Arizona provides both in their Culinary Arts Fundamentals certificate program and the newest addition, the Bakery and Pastry certificate program. 40 TG MAGAZINE


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he Culinary Arts program offers students the opportunity to sharpen their culinary skills, from food prep to plating, in the college’s multi-million-dollar state-ofthe-art kitchen facilities. The program has a hybrid design that incorporates online lectures and coursework with in-person labs. With world class chef, Robert Barr, serving as Program Director and top Pastry Chef Javier Franco, students have the opportunity to learn from two of the best chefs in the region. While the program is firmly focused on teaching technical culinary skills, Chef Barr is also keenly aware of the need for students to develop soft skills like clear communication, working as a team, leading a team, following instructions, and getting a job done on time. These soft skills are vital for commercial kitchens to run smoothly and efficiently, and Barr makes sure to incorporate soft skill learning moments whenever possible.

In addition to the hands-on practical learning that happens during lab time, students are also working in the cafés at the Yavapai College Verde Valley campus and the Sedona Center. Adding opportunities for real world experience on top of the hands-on learning is part of what makes the certificate programs so valuable. Graduates can feel confident that they have a solid foundation they can bring to their culinary jobs.

Trained culinary professionals are in high demand in Yavapai County. The focus of the Culinary Arts program is to give students the necessary knowledge and skills to enter the workforce.

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Jamee Chenowith

Chef Robert Barr, the Culinary Arts Program Director, regularly fields phone calls and emails from restaurants and businesses in the industry asking for skilled cooks, bakers, and restaurant workers. Students range from adults who are changing careers to high school students from Valley Academy for Career and Technology Education (VACT) in Cottonwood, Arizona.

Choosing the Culinary Arts program was an easy call for VACT and Mingus Union High School student Jamee Chenowith. “My entire life I’ve been fascinated by culinary,” said Chenowith, who went on to note that her father is a good chef, but never received professional training. “I wanted to get more experience in order to bring that back into my own house.” When asked what she finds challenging to master in the program, Chenowith pointed to technique. “Something that you really have to work on is watching that you’re doing proper knife cuts…making sure that things are cooked properly,” she said. “When you’re at home, if you mess up it’s not as big of a deal.” Chenowith also noted that “the hardest dish I’ve ever had to learn is probably anything involving meat.” She pointed out that it can be a challenge to know exactly when it’s time to take it off the heat. “It has to be tender,” she said. “You can’t make any mistakes or overcook it or else you’ve ruined the dish.” A typical day in the culinary program for Chenowith starts with “getting our instructions from our instructor, Robert Barr, and getting to work almost immediately.” Chef Barr typically has recipes planned out for each lab session. Students follow the recipes under his guidance. “I think the most interesting recipe I’ve made is potato-like croquettes,” said Chenowith. “It’s a fried potato that is mixed with flour and different types of cheeses and stuff.” Chenowith’s bit of advice for future students is to maintain an open mind. “Just come here with a willingness to learn,” she said. “Coming in with a closed mind space is the worst thing that you could do.” She’s keeping her own mind open about what type of job she’d like to pursue in the field once she completes her Culinary Arts certificate program, although she noted catering as a possibility. For now, Chenowith is happy to be focused on the coursework. “I’m very grateful that through the high school I’m able to take this course and learn more about something that I’ve always wanted to study,” she said. “It’s a great opportunity.”

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Photocredit: Bob Larson Photography

I’M VERY GRATEFUL THAT THROUGH THE HIGH SCHOOL I’M ABLE TO TAKE THIS COURSE AND LEARN MORE ABOUT SOMETHING THAT I’VE ALWAYS WANTED TO STUDY.



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FILM & MEDIA ARTS

A N I M AT O R , D I R E C T O R , E D I T O R , PRODUCER, SCREENWRITING EMPLOYMENT OF FILM AND VIDEO EDITORS IS PROJECTED TO GROW 15 - 20% FROM 2020 TO 2030. -U.S. BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS

The Film & Media Arts Program provides hands-on training for producing well-crafted, engaging content across all platforms including film, television, and social media channels. The program also focuses on storytelling across media, including podcasting, marketing/sales, social media, video games, VR, citizen journalism, education, YouTube, client based content, film and television. SC

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IN By Angie Johnson-Schmit with contribution by Austin Morrison

Over 200 movies and television shows have been shot in Yavapai County, starting in July 1912. As film production because more centralized in Hollywood, productions filming in Northern Arizona became fewer. However, over the last couple of decades, producers began looking for alternatives to the high cost of shooting in California. One of the things they are looking for are locations with trained film crewmembers in the area. Yavapai College, situated near locations used for many Tom Mix cowboy movies, is uniquely suited to prepare students for careers in film and media arts. 46 TG MAGAZINE


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he Film and Media Arts program at Yavapai College offers students two certificate tracks: the Media Production Certificate, and the Writing for the Screen Certificate. With the explosion of high-quality video used in an array of modern industries and the entertainment industry becoming ever more decentralized, there are more employment options for Film and Media Arts program graduates than ever. Coursework for the Writing for the Screen Certificate program includes Screenwriting, Podcasting, Citizen Journalism, and Writing for Games and Virtual Reality, among others. The focus of the program is on storytelling across multiple platforms, ranging from YouTube and social media to marketing and sales. Students who complete the program can use their newly acquired screenwriting skills to create screenplays using the three-act structure or to create a podcast. Because Writing for the Screen classes are completely online, students do not have to live close to campus and many have praised the flexibility of classwork. Considering the changing nature of screenwriting, students are learning the way they will be working – self-paced and working remotely.

Hands-on, practical learning opportunities for students interested in film and media production are at the heart of the Media Production Certificate program. The coursework is designed to allow students to experience every part of the process, from script to screen. Classes typically combine lectures and lab components, allowing students to gain practical experience in all areas of production, including lighting, camera, sound, and directing. Program participants also gain skills in video editing and sound design. Students have access to an impressive collection of filmmaking gear, including RED cinema cameras. Computer labs are also available for editing students, and the college offers a range of filming locations for their students. The program attracts a variety of students interested in learning the film and television process. Johana Pena is one of those students and she is currently working on completing a Film and Media Arts certificate. When Pena entered the program, she was interested in directing, but quickly realized that it wasn’t her favorite part of filmmaking. “While taking this class (Production II), I’ve kind of noticed that I don’t like being a director so much,” she said. “I think what I want to do is become a film editor instead.” Pena also enjoys camera work and cinematography but learning how to edit video is where she found herself getting excited. “I think it’s cool that you can change the aspect of the film itself just by editing it,” she said. “You can turn it from like a comedy to like a sad story, things like that.” She puts that editorial eye to work when she is behind the camera, too. “I kind of just picture it, how it’s going to look while I’m editing it,” said Pena. She finds herself think-

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ing about “how it would cut and if that cut would look nice with the next clip that’s going to be added in.” Currently, Pena is working on a fresh edit for a short film project she made as a high school project. Editing is one filmmaking job that can be done from any location in the country. Movies shot in one state, can be edited in another. Because movies and videos are edited digitally, clients can send the digital video files to the editor via internet or they can ship the files on a hard drive directly to the editor.

Students have access to computers and software with industry standard production planning, editing and stop motion animation software. Pena praises the flexibility of class work. Students can use the school computers or bring in their own laptops to work in the way they feel most comfortable. With a chance to try all the major film production and screenwriting jobs, students can not only see if film is for them but what part of the process most excites them. Pena thinks this may be the most valuable resource the program has. “There’s so many things that you get to try that is a part of the film production, from screenwriting, the actual camera work, lighting, mic, all of that. I think it’s just really cool that we have a variety of things we can do.”

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29,808,000 IMPRESSIONS IN 2021

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REMEMBERING THE

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ne can still find old-timers who remember passing by her on their way to school. But by then, she was a mere ghost of her once glorious past. For the “American” was not only a livestock ranch, but a farm, a dairy, a stage stop, a hotel, a locale for social events, and a landmark for nearly a century.

Jefferson Harrison Lee brought his wife Agnes to Prescott, AZ, in July of 1864. “There were seven houses in the village,“ the Prescott Courier wrote. Lee took up several odd jobs until he homesteaded 160 acres about a mile down Granite Creek from Ft. Whipple. This property was named the City Ranch. Yet Lee was desirous of the ranch owned by Dan Conner, who came to Prescott with the Walker party. At one point Lee offered to trade the City ranch for the American ranch property, but it fell through. However, Conner eventually became restless and desired to go to California to search for more gold, so he offered the property to Lee. The price was incredibly cheap. Reportedly, Conner told Lee: “Well, that is a pretty good-looking six-shooter you have there. Suppose you give me the six-shooter and some ammunition, and we will make the trade.” Lee was overjoyed to take the bargain.

Lee started developing the American Ranch by himself while his family remained at City Ranch. He constructed an adobe house with an escape tunnel that had to be used at least twice to save his life. But when the danger faded away, Lee brought his family to the ranch, and he began to prosper. It was in 1876 when Lee built the large two-story hotel and stage stop. It was located at a prime intersection on the Prescott to Hardyville tollroad. This grand building in the middle of the wilderness was 34 feet wide by 44 feet long. The first floor contained a saloon, a front parlor, an office, a dining room, a kitchen, two storage rooms and two bedrooms. The second story had a row of 4 bedrooms, an upstairs parlor, and a gen-

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RANCH

-Drew Desmond | Secretary Prescott Western Heritage Foundation

eral hall which could be combined with the parlor (via folding doors) making a sizable dance floor of 21 by 43 feet. A veranda extended around three sides of the building, and on top of it all was an open observatory. To celebrate the completion of his new building, Lee held a ball at a cost of $5 a ticket (a day’s pay for many laborers). The Weekly Miner reported that a large crowd attended the event and “those who went [were] enthusiastic in praise of the entertainment. It is just the right distance from town for a pleasant drive over a splendid road, making it almost impossible for the young people to stay away.” It would be the first of many successful dances and balls. “When Agnes moved to the ranch she immediately expanded the dairy and poultry operations,” the Courier related. “Selling to Ft. Whipple that which could not be utilized at the ranch. A large acreage of beans, potatoes and other vegetables was planted. Apple and pear trees set out earlier came into bearing, and the meals she began serving to people passing by soon gained a wide reputation among regular travelers from California to New Mexico and points in between.” They raised pork, mutton, beef, chicken, eggs, corn, various fruits and vegetables, and silage. Two or three freight or stage parties would pass by each day. At other stops freighters often cooked their own meals outside, but Agnes’ cooking was so good that many looked forward to eating in the ranch dining room. The Lees would also sell silage for the horses and mules and fresh food for the drivers as well. However, the stage business melted away after the Miller brothers constructed a new, shorter tollroad called (and still known as) Iron Springs Road. Eventually, the Lee family passed on and the ranch house fell victim to weather and vandals. After standing nearly 100 years, it was finally, and unfortunately, bulldozed to the ground. Today the ranch is the setting for luxury homes.

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BADGERS BOUND FOR

SUCCESS: CAREER AND TECHNICAL EDUCATION AT PRESCOTT HIGH SCHOOL

Callie Oryall, JROTC Cadet Commander

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odern Career and Technical Education (CTE) high school programs don’t look much like your grandpa’s woodshop class. That’s especially true at Prescott High School (PHS). Some of these outdated perceptions of CTE still persist, although this is finally shifting as students, parents, and business leaders become aware of just how incredible many of these programs are. “Part of shedding that image…is understanding that students who complete CTE are 97% more likely to enroll in a post-secondary education within eight years past their graduation,” said Francisco Ortiz y Davis, Director of CTE at Prescott High School. “And that’s compared to the 75% average for all high school students. CTE completers are much more likely to go on to two-year college, four-year college, or a tech school and their earnings are higher within the eight years past graduation as well.” Ortiz y Davis believes the reason for these impressive statistics is that students who complete CTE programs graduate with more than just a high school diploma. They also have marketable certifications and skills, transferable college credits, and “soft skills.” 52 TG MAGAZINE

-Angie Johnson-Schmit

These soft skills include leadership, problem-solving, communication, team building, time management, persuasion, and collaboration. Soft skills not only prepare students for employment but also provide the basis for students to become well-rounded citizens within the community. According to Rebecca Horniman, Prescott Unified School District (PUSD) Director of Marketing and Public Relations, the high school’s CTE program is an integral part of their educational approach. “Prescott High School is over 150 years old and CTE has been embedded in our curriculum since the beginning, whether it was called CTE in days of yore or not,” she said.

The Prescott High School CTE program is a partnership between Prescott Unified School District, Mountain Institute Career Technical Education District (MICTED) and Yavapai College.


MICTED is the youngest of the three institutions. A specialized school district in Yavapai County, MICTED was founded in 2008 and provides CTE classes for each of the regular school districts. This allows training opportunities to be more evenly distributed throughout the county.

In addition to taking classes at Prescott High School, CTE students can also take courses at the MICTED building, co-located in the Yavapai College Career and Technical Education Center (CTEC) near the Prescott Regional Airport. Together, Prescott High School CTE and MICTED have provided programs in Accounting Services, Automotive Repair Technology, Business Management, Digital Communication, and Networking Technologies.

THIS IS ONE OF THE COOLEST PROGRAMS THAT THEY HAVE OUT THERE AT YAVAPAI COLLEGE BECAUSE THEY GET TO WORK WITH SO MUCH CUTTING-EDGE TECHNOLOGY, INCLUDING 3-D HOUSE PRINTING AND THINGS LIKE THAT. Francisco Ortiz y Davis

These young learners work side-by-side with Yavapai College CTE students and can go on to enroll in more advanced classes through the college. This coursework gives them the opportunity to earn dual credits – both high school and transferable college credits – in subjects like Automotive Collision Repair, Automotive Repair Technology, Aviation Technology, Certified Nursing Assistant, Electrical Lineworker, Medical Assisting, Pre-Engineering, and Welding.

lots of programs that will feed right into the high school CTE programs and then, of course, Yavapai College. So that scaling really does start at fifth and sixth grade in PUSD.”

In fact, studies show that CTE classes boost student retention as they provide students with immediate, real-world connections between their studies and their future careers. “During Freshman Academy, every freshman has an opportunity to experience CTE, even if that’s not the path they choose going forward,” said Horniman. “They not only bond with their freshmen class and see what their high school has to offer, but they also get exposed to a lot of options and are able to make some decisions on their own at that time.”

sure they’re still relevant for students and

As the nature of career and technology jobs change over time, Prescott High School CTE re-evaluates its programs to make potential employers. This is accomplished in two ways. First, local businesses and organizations are invited to join parents and students in a CTE advisory council.

But ninth grade isn’t the first time students are thinking about careers or technology at PUSD. “It starts at the fifth and sixthgrade level,” said Horniman. “We have the only STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics) certified fifth and sixth-grade school in the state and only one of 153 in the nation.”

Every year, CTE teachers and leadership meet with the advisory council to see what new opportunities there are to prepare students for the emerging economy. “We were approached by the Prescott Police Department to help promote a cadet program that they would like to continue,” said Ortiz y Davis. “We’re also considering a culinary program, an early childhood education program, and technical stagecraft.”

“So that starts early in PUSD,” she said. “Then they go to the middle school, which is seventh and eighth grade. They have

Another field getting serious consideration is Advanced Manufacturing Methods. Ortiz y Davis said, “This is one of the cool-

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est programs that they have out there at Yavapai College because they get to work with so much cutting-edge technology, including 3-D house printing and things like that.” Prescott High School already has its own Maker Lab, featuring a 3-D printer, put together by Prescott High School Media Productions Teacher/Technology Integration Specialist Robyn Bryce. Ortiz y Davis thinks Advanced Manufacturing Methods could start with making something as simple as a smartphone stand at the Maker Lab and continue up through cutting-edge work like printing a whole house that’s being developed at Yavapai College. All of it creates an intentional path for students. The second thing Prescott High School does to make sure their CTE programs are relevant is follow up with recent graduates. “One of the data pieces we provide to Arizona Department of Education is our placement surveys for graduates,” explained Ortiz y Davis. “Once students graduate, we’re going to reach out to them within the next year and find out about their work experiences and whether they’re going to continue in industry, or plan to go on to post-secondary school or a technical

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school in the coming year.” The answers they get help steer the next year’s CTE program.

Horniman said the core question is, “How can we build programs that suit our community and suit the needs of our students, to set them up for success so they don’t necessarily have to move out-of-state, and they can make a great living here?” Prescott High School has been answering that for the past 156 years. While the answers to that question have shifted as new industries come to the fore, PUSD’s commitment to career and technical education remains constant. As technology advances, so do PUSD’s efforts to educate and prepare their CTE students not just for today’s job market, but for the emerging markets and industries on the horizon.


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AVIATION P IL OT, AI R T RA F FI C CO NT RO L L ER , UNMA N N E D A I R C RA F T O P ER ATO R

EMPLOYMENT OF AIRLINE PILOTS, COPILOTS, AND FLIGHT ENGINEERS IS PROJECTED TO GROW 15% FROM 2020 TO 2030. -U.S. BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS

The Aerospace Science degree program prepares students for careers in aviation as airplane pilots, flight service specialists, instructors, and unmanned aircraft operators. The degree also prepares students for the FAA Air Traffic Control Academy entrance exam.

DEGREES AND CERTIFICATES FAA Remote Pilot Certificate Commercial Single-Engine, Commercial Multi-Engine, Instrument, Certified Flight Instructor, and Certified Flight Instructor Instrument FAA ratings Aerospace Science with a concentration in Airplane Operations. - AAS

FOR MORE INFORMATION

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PHONE: 928-717-7375

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EMAIL: Matthew.Mintzmyer@yc.edu

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Unmanned Aircraft Systems Certificate

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Aerospace Science with a concentration in Technical Aviation - AAS

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Photocredit: Blushing Cactus Photography

Aerospace Science with a concentration in Unmanned Aircraft Systems - AAS


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WHEELS

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UP!

By Angie Johnson-Schmit with contribution by Austin Morrison

Situated right next to Prescott Regional Airport with plenty of wide-open sky around it, Yavapai College’s Career and

Technical Education Center (CTEC) is home to the Aviation program. The Aviation program offers an Associate degree track designed to prepare students for careers as airplane pilots, flight service specialists, dispatchers, and instructors, as well as a certificate track Photocredit: Blushing Cactus Photography

for students who want to become unmanned aircraft operators.

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AEROSPACE SCIENCE - AAS

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ver the next decade, the U.S. Department of Labor predicts an acute need for airplane pilots, primarily due to the high number of pilots forecast to retire or exit the field. Filling these positions can be challenging, in part because of the amount of time many certification programs or degrees take to complete. Students in Yavapai College’s Associate of Applied Science (AAS) in Aerospace Science program are ideally positioned to help fill those vacancies. Aerospace Science student Cassidy Farias is one of those students. Farias is taking advantage of the partnership between Yavapai College and North-Aire Aviation to get her Certified Flight Instructor (CFI) license, which will allow her to teach students how to fly while adding to her flight hours. “I heard of the program from one of my friends who was going to another university in the area,” said Farias. What attracted her most is that it is a two-year program. “You get done a lot faster and it’s also a lot cheaper than going to a different school. I have my classes here at North-Aire typically. I’ve also had a few classes at Yavapai College’s Career and Technical Education Center (CTEC).” A regular class day starts with Farias checking in with the dispatcher at North-Aire. “If it’s for a ground lesson, I’ll go into my instructor’s office, and we’ll go through my ground lesson,” she said. “If not, if it’s a flight, then they’ll give me the book. I’ll come out here to one of my planes and then I’ll preflight and wait for my instructor to come. And then we’ll go on our flight together.”

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Not only are CTEC and North-Aire physically close to each other, there are a lot of other connections that make the two schools come together seamlessly for students. Farias said, “All my classes at CTEC are with instructors for North-Aire so a lot of times you’ll have the same instructor for your license as you do for your ground school classes, which is great because then they don’t have to repeat themselves. They know what they’ve taught you. Even if it’s a different instructor, they all work very closely. They’re all super close. All the instructors are very tight-knit. You’re going to get the same instruction there as you will here. It’s just as good of quality. It’s the same exact instructors, so of course it has to be the same in quality.”

Farias’ excitement to be flying is hard to miss. “What doesn’t excite me about flying, to be honest? The views are amazing. When I’m taking off, the feeling of just lifting off the ground, like nothing can stop you,” she said. “It’s almost indescribable to feel just like freedom, like complete freedom.”



UNMANNED AIRCRAFT SYSTEMS CERTIFICATE

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s unmanned aircraft, often referred to as drones, have become more common, so have the employment opportunities for skilled operators. The Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) certificate program at Yavapai College was established in 2016 and is designed to prepare students who want to pursue a career as professional unmanned aircraft operators. In 2020, Yavapai College’s UAS program became part of the Federal Aviation Association’s national Collegiate Training Initiative program (FAA UAS-CTI). According to the FAA, participating schools must “offer a Bachelor’s or Associates degree in UAS or a degree with a minor, concentration, or certificate in UAS.” In addition, the curriculum is required to include “hands-on flight practice, maintenance, uses, applications, privacy concerns, safety, and federal policies concerning UAS.” In the last 12 months in Arizona, pilots flew drones in the Four Corners region to assess flood damage and deliver insulin, medicine, and anti-venom, while giving wildland firefighters instant “eyes on the scene” for back country blazes. In July 2021, Yavapai County Sheriff’s Office joined forces with the UAS programs at Yavapai College and Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University to fly drones with thermal sensors over a flooding Verde River as they searched for a missing person. For Yavapai College student Roman Celik, the UAS program is a way to combine his interest in drones with his aspiration to become a helicopter pilot. He pointed out that “drones tie in a lot with helicopters,” noting that he has “learned a lot about drones and, because of that, I’ve learned a lot about helicopters.”

A typical class day for Celik may find him working on his DJI drone. “We do a lot of building, bench testing, programming, and tuning,” he said. The class also frequently travels to the Chino Valley campus to fly the drones. “It’s open there, so it’s very fun, actually,” said Celik. 62 TG MAGAZINE


While the goal is a successful flight, Celik also appreciates the knowledge and experience gained from unsuccessful ventures. “Every day is different,” he said. “A lot of crashes, but there’s quite a few successful flights and you learn a lot from the mistakes you make.”

Mistakes may lead to a learning opportunity, but Celik says there’s nothing quite like the feeling of operating a successful flight. “It doesn’t always happen, but you feel very happy about it when it does,” he said.

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AUTOMOT AU TO MEC HA N I C S , D IESEL T ECH S, PA INT / BO DY

46,000 NEW AUTOMOTIVE SERVICE TECHNICIANS NEEDED FROM 2020 TO 2026. -U.S. BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS The Automotive Technology program is designed for individuals preparing for positions utilizing a combination of automotive technology and business management skills including service managers, insurance adjusters, and small business owners. This program will prepare students for the National Automotive Service Excellence (ASE) certification examinations to become ASE Certified Automobile Technicians. ASE certification requires handson working experience as well as completion of written examinations.

DEGREES AND CERTIFICATES Automotive Technology - AAS Diesel Technician - AAS National Automotive Service Excellence (ASE) Certification Automotive Technician Certificate Diesel Technician Certificate Auto Body Paint and Collision Technology Certificate

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EMAIL: YCAdmission@yc.edu

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Automotive Master Technician Certificate


TIVE

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VICT RY LAP

By Angie Johnson-Schmit with contribution by Austin Morrison

love their cars and trucks. We rely on our vehicles to transport us to our jobs, our schools, our hospitals, our churches. For many people, one of the most important assets in their life is their car or truck. We also rely on an array of automotive technicians to keep those vehicles running strong and looking great.

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here is an ongoing need for automotive technicians of all kinds to fill the jobs of this $800 billion industry. And, with the ever-changing nature of auto technology, those technicians need to be ready for a career of constant education.

The Yavapai College Automotive Technology program offers students professional certificates in Auto Body Paint and Collision Technology, Automotive Master Technician, Automotive Technician, and Diesel Technician. Two Associate of Applied Science (AAS) degrees, Automotive Technology and Diesel Technician, are also available. Like many of the other Yavapai College Career and Technology Education (CTE) programs, Automotive Technology is taught with a mix of classroom and hands-on training. And that’s an approach that student Thomas Corkery appreciates.

Photocredit: Blushing Cactus Photography

It’s no secret that Americans


He said, “Probably my favorite thing is that right after each of our lectures, we go out in the shop and go do what we learned right away. It’s really nice having that opportunity.” Corkery is in the Automotive Master Technician certificate program. “I want to open up a shop with my buddy in Oregon, just think that’d be a really cool thing for me to do,” he said. “I’m really excited about it. I like the electrical side most of all, with all the new auto electrical systems they’re coming out with nowadays. It’s really crazy to think about how they work, and I’m really interested in learning about it and just figuring out how to work on them.” He also appreciates that the program is giving him a feel for what a Master Automotive Technician’s job is really like. “Sometimes it can get frustrating,” said Corkery. “Like when you’re out on a job, not just in class, when you’re getting rushed to do things, or it feels like a job more than a hobby. Which I

guess is why they do it. It does feel like this is the work. This is real life.” Corkery brought his own Ford Focus to work on in class. “I’m just rotating tires today but being in this program really helps me understand how to do maintenance on that vehicle,” he said. “And just being able to understand how to work on my own personal vehicle really is helping me out.” Vanessa Ballard, a student in the Auto Body Paint and Collision Technology Certificate program, was working on her own vehicle, too. “I’m repainting my vintage Jeep that needed some help,” she said. Ballard echoed Corkery’s appreciation for the way Automotive Technology courses are taught. “My favorite part about the program is that it’s hands-on, you get to come in and learn as you do,” she said. “It’s kind of self-paced. You can go as fast as

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you want to go or take as much time as you need to take to get your goals accomplished.” Enrolling in the program has been a big change for Ballard, who already has a degree in psychology. She believes it has opened up a lot of options for her. “I can work at an auto body shop. I can restore classic cars. I can do it for fun. I can turn it into a living and surprisingly make more money than I did with my four-year degree in psychology,” she said. “Which is exciting. And I can also just paint my cars and have fun and restore classic cars. I can do it for a living or completely for myself.” For Ballard, her teacher played a big part in her enjoyment of the program. “Sonny teaches you everything that you need to know,” she said. “He’s very involved. He’ll hold your hand and push you out of the nest when you’re ready to go.” “The most challenging thing that I’ve had to overcome in this program is probably fear to just take this step and plunge into

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doing what you want to do,” said Ballard. “And also, time management has been a little bit of an issue. You think it’s only going to take a little bit of time to paint or tape or sand, and it takes a lot longer, which I’m learning to remember.”

The challenges in no way have dimmed Ballard’s enthusiasm for the program. “This is the most awesome thing that I’ve done in a really long time. I highly recommend coming to this program. I came because I needed something to focus on, something fun to do, an outlet,” she said. “I’m excited. This is my favorite day of the week.”



COMPUTER

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NETWORKING TECHNOLOGY S P E C I A L I S T, T E C H N I C I A N , A N A LY S T, S Y S T E M S A D M I N I S T R AT O R EMPLOYMENT OF INFORMATION SECURITY ANALYSTS IS PROJECTED TO GROW 15 - 20% FROM 2020 TO 2030. -U.S. BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS The Computer Networking Technology program is designed to provide students with the necessary skills to gain employment as an information technology professional with a focus on cybersecurity or network administration. Core classes focus on network configuration including routing and switching and operating systems. Cybersecurity concentration students learn how to secure a network with topics such as cybersecurity operations, network forensics, and penetration testing. Network Administration concentration students learn advanced routing and switching techniques and Windows and Linux server administration.

DEGREES & CERTIFICATES Computer Networking Technology - AAS Computer Systems and Applications - AAS Cisco Networking Specialist Certificate Computer Networking Technician Certificate Windows Server Administrator Certificate

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Cybersecurity Technician Certificate Computer Programming Certificate

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PHONE: 928-776-2104 71


With the tremendous amount of information traveling on the digital freeways, we rely more than ever on specialists in computer networking and cybersecurity to keep our computer connections running smoothly and our data secure. Almost a third of the world’s population uses the internet for business, industrial, and personal use.

SECURE

CONNECTIONS By Angie Johnson-Schmit with contribution by Austin Morrison

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erhaps the largest application of computer networking is the world wide web, which is supported by a series of connected servers, computers, mainframes, and other devices. When the internet as we know it was introduced in the early 1990s, no one fully understood what a revolution it would prove to be. With the increased volume of sensitive data coursing through the internet has come the need for better security to protect that information. Computer viruses - from malware to ransomware - seek out vulnerabilities in digital connections and can cause serious problems. A computer virus from “bad actors” on the other side of the globe can cost a business millions of dollars, or a hospital could find themselves locked out of all their medical data systems with a ransom demand from hackers. Trained, skilled cybersecurity workers are in high demand to help combat these types of digital attacks. Under the banner of Yavapai College’s Computer Networking Technology/Cybersecurity (CNT) program, students can pursue professional certificates for Cisco Network-

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ing Specialist, Computer Networking Technician, Cybersecurity Specialist, Cybersecurity Technician, Windows Server Administrator. Students may also opt to enroll in the degree program for Computer Networking Technology.

Jillian Wildman is studying cybersecurity to become a defender of these computers in the CNT program at Yavapai College. She said, “I’ve always liked computers. And so, this was just kind of something that I fell into, and I really liked it.” Wildman described a typical day in class as a mix of lectures and labs. “Our professor will start the lecture and then we will do the lab after that. Usually either on the bench, our own computers, or on Packet Tracer (simulation software that maps a computer network),” she said. Recently, Wildman worked on a switch configurations project. “You’d think configuring a switch would be pretty easy. Well, if you mess up one space or one punctuation, nothing’s going to work,” she said. “And so, you have to really pay attention to detail and know what you’re doing, or you’re going to have to redo it and spend a lot of extra time on something that should just be very quick and easy.”

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One of the things that makes Wildman’s task easier is Packet Tracer. The visual simulation tool from Cisco Systems allows students to try out different networking configurations of routers and switches. “Packet Tracers are really good because it’ll show you your progress as you go through,” said Wildman. “So, if you miss something, you’re not going to see your percentage change and you’d be like, oh, okay, I’m not doing this right. I need to go back and see what I need to do. It’s like a language. If you’re speaking and you say a word wrong, it’s not going to make sense.” Once she figures out what’s wrong with her exercise, the challenges of troubleshooting and correcting the errors give way a real sense of satisfaction. “When you do get a program that you created to work it is very rewarding and it just makes every little tedious hair-pulling moment very worth it,” said Wildman. “I feel like I can breathe again. I can feel it. Like just happiness.”

On top of that good feeling, Wildman can look forward to a very bright employment outlook. There is a significant need for more certified cybersecurity employees, with the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics projecting that the field is projected to be the 10th fastest growing job over the next decade.

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As lucrative as the starting pay is and as satisfying as the work can be, Wildman cautions potential CNT students to make sure they are doing it for the right reasons. “Cybersecurity sounds cool but it’s a lot of work. Make sure that you’re not going into this just because you think it’s cool,” said Wildman. “I’ve seen a lot of people come into the beginning classes, like 20, 30 students. And now we’re down to ten,” she said.

“Be prepared for the amount of work that is involved with this program and the responsibility that comes with it because this is a field where people trust you to keep their information and their data safe and secure,” said Wildman. One thing new students should not worry about is how much they know about computer networks before starting the program. “More important is being naturally curious and comfortable with a lot of information because that’s what’s going to prepare you for the next class,” said Wildman. “After that, there’s internships at really interesting cybersecurity companies like Fortinet. There’s a lot of possibilities. If you really like computers and are comfortable with the work, there really are a lot of possibilities.”

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ELECTRON ELE C TRO N I C S R E PA IR , P RO CESS CO NT RO L L E R, ELE C TRO M E C HA N I CA L T ECH NICIA NS

9,600 NEW ELECTRICAL AND ELECTRONICS INSTALLERS AND REPAIRERS NEEDED EVERY YEAR FROM 2020 TO 2026. -U.S. BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS

The Electrical and Instrumentation program is designed to prepare students for positions in the installation, repair and maintenance of commercial electrical and electronic equipment.

DEGREES AND CERTIFICATES Electrical and Instrumentation Technology - AAS Electrical Instrumentation Technician Certificate Analog Electronics Certificate Advanced Electronics Certificate Digital Electronics Certificate Industrial Electronics Certificate

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Electronics Technology Certificate


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By Angie Johnson-Schmit with contribution by Austin Morrison

Students interested in pursuing a career in Electrical & Instrumentation have two education track options at Yavapai College, the Electrical Instrumentation Technician Certificate and the Electrical & Instrumentation Technology AAS degree program. The coursework teaches students the installation, repair, and maintenance of commercial and electronic equipment.

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Photocredit: Blushing Cactus Photography

WIRED FOR SUCCESS


A LOT OF PEOPLE LOOK AT ELECTRONICS, THEY LOOK AT ELECTRICITY, THEY LOOK AT HOW A COMPUTER WORKS AND GO, ‘OH, IT’S MAGIC.’ IT’S NOT MAGIC. WE KIND OF DEMYSTIFY IT HERE. Tobias Buettner

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ccording to Yavapai College student Tobias Buettner, the Electrical and Instrumentation Technology program is ideal for preparing students for careers in multiple industries. “You can go into the aerospace industry doing electronics, you could work on big industrial processes. You could work on smaller industrial processes. You could do programming, troubleshooting for just about anywhere that needs a control system or has electronic equipment,” he said. In addition to his studies in the program, Buettner also has an internship with a local company aerospace company, Canyon AeroConnect. The internship gives Buettner the opportunity to see how his freshly acquired skills can be used on the job. “There (Canyon AeroConnect) I get to deal with electronic communications for aircraft and the radio systems and audio systems that are inside airplanes,” said Buettner. “So, in the classroom, I learned a lot of the theory. And then over there I get to apply it, kind of figure out what it all means. Then I get to come back here and learn more, explore more, figure out what’s going on.” A class day in the Electrical and Instrumentation program includes a mix of lectures and labs. Typically, students go into a lecture first. “We might take a test on the previous unit, whatever we’re doing, because we have to know the theory behind what we’re touching,” said Buettner. “And then we come into lab, and we get to either build circuits or troubleshoot systems. We’re proving a lot of the theory that we know to make it work and learning the capabilities to troubleshoot and build these systems. According to Buettner, the program instructors are “very serious on safety.” Students are required to wear safety glasses whenever they are working in the lab. Buettner


sees safety as an important part of the whole process. “The instructors always keep a watchful eye on us and are there if anything ever happens,” he said. Buettner likes that “we get to solve a lot of problems with our brains as well as our hands.” He also likes being on the cutting edge of technology. “It’s being able to see everything as it’s happening, current industrial processes as they’re developing, getting to sit and learn kind of from the ground up and watching technology develop,” he said. It’s a good thing Buettner likes using his brain, as there is a lot of information to take in. “The instructors like to say they take a data stick and inject it into your brain, kind of like that scene from The Matrix where they’re just downloading everything,” said Buettner. “That’s what it feels like a lot. It’s a lot of information. We need to be able to retain 90-95% of everything we learned in the class, because...it does have real life consequences.” Buettner knows that most people don’t really understand how electronics work. “A lot of people look at electronics, they look at electricity, they look at how a computer works and go, ‘oh, it’s magic.’ It’s not magic,” he said. “We kind of demystify it here. And you get to learn how all of that works. How to fix it…the process of how our current world is built up.” There is a lot to learn, but Buettner doesn’t think that should discourage anyone interested in enrolling in the certificate program. “It’s one of the really great things about

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this program,” he said. “You can know absolutely nothing about electronics, computers, anything. The instructors will get you up to date and running a hundred percent very quickly.”

All of that hard work pays off when students complete their certificates. There is a high demand for Electrical and Instrumentation Technicians. Buettner noted that he knows several of his classmates are already working. “We have job offers come in all the time for people in our program, especially second years,” he said. “There’s a lot of career opportunity.” Buettner is confident he will find a good job after he’s finished the program and been certified. “I’m already looking at jobs that are coming up,” he said. “One of the best experiences I’ve ever had,” is how Buettner describes his time in the program. “It’s an entire field that I didn’t really know about. Now I’m very thankful I do.”

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BEARS IN

CHARGE

CAREER AND TECHNICAL EDUCATION AT BRADSHAW MOUNTAIN HIGH SCHOOL -Angie Johnson-Schmit

Humboldt Unified School District’s Career and Technical Education (CTE) program does more than teach students the skills needed to get jobs. The program starts off by introducing students to career possibilities they may never have even heard of, and then helps them shape their studies into a plan for a post-graduation future.

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“When I first went into college, I had no idea what I wanted to do,” said David Capka, Humboldt Unified School District (HUSD) CTE Director. “I went into business management, got my degree, Bachelor of Business Administration, but couldn’t find a job. I was in sports all through college, so I didn’t have time to work. When I went out looking for jobs in the business arena, I had no experience. So, it was tough finding a job.” Eventually, Capka found his way into teaching. More importantly, he landed in CTE, the one school program designed to help students navigate that abrupt change from a life of school and sports to entering the work force rapidly and well-prepared. “Currently, our CTE is mostly in high school. We would like to take it down to the lower level, at the junior high, eventually down to elementary school,” said Capka. “We do have a new grant, so we can spend some funds at the elementary level. It’s for exposing kids to different careers that are out there that they can look into. And then, relate those to what they can do once they get up to the high school level as to what we’re offering.”

HUSD offers eight CTE programs at Bradshaw Mountain High School in Prescott Valley, AZ. “We have our Certified Nursing Assistant (CNA) program,” said Capka. “We also have Sports Medicine, Digital Communication, Software Development, Network Security, which is basically cybersecurity, which is taught through Yavapai College on our campus. We also have Stagecraft, which is part of the drama program, and Army JROTC.” The options waiting for those students entering HUSD’s Bradshaw Mountain High School have been growing every year, as have investments in the programs and facilities. Recently, the Digital Communication program received a $20,000 grant from the Jewish Community Foundation of Greater Prescott. The grant allowed HUSD to do a major upgrade of their production studio, where students create, among other things, the campus morning announcements. “We’ve upgraded with a whisper booth, a lighting grid, new lighting system, and DMX control board,” said instructor Cynthia Perpich. “It’s really exciting for our kids to see where we might be able to integrate a lot more with the athletic department and get some things going with them.” Capka added, “Also, we’re building a new facility for our Sports Medicine program. About 2,000 square foot classroom/training room, which will be state-of-the-art. It should be ready to go for the 2023 school year. And, within that building, we’re going to upgrade our cybersecurity program and our software development program, that’s two state-of-the-art classrooms for those two programs as well.” Also, one CTE program may be returning soon. “We’re looking at bringing back Con-

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THE CTE PRO GRAMS ARE REAL

LIFE EXPERIENCES FOR THESE KIDS THAT EXPOSE THEM TO WHAT THEY ARE GOING TO ENCOUNTER ONCE THEY LEAVE HIGH SCHOOL. AND THAT EXPOSURE CAN BE INVALUABLE. David Capka

struction,” said Capka. “We had it and then the recession hit. Construction’s coming back so we’re looking at bringing back the Construction program. 3-D (printer) Construction is even becoming popular in some areas. We are planning on partnering with Yavapai County Contractors Association and Yavapai College. So, between the three of us, we’ll all partner together for the program.” Capka suggests parents consider this: “The CTE programs are real life experiences for these kids that exposes them to what they are going to encounter once they leave high school. And that exposure can be invaluable.” Capka went on to say, “For example, I’ve had kids in the CNA program and they think this is what I want to do with my life: dealing with patients, helping them get better. Then, once they got out there, all of a sudden there’s blood, real blood, and ‘oh, I can’t deal with that.’ So, instead of being out there as an adult having to change careers, they’ve learned as a student that this isn’t their particular career path.”

CTE students learn more than just job skills in Bradshaw Mountain High School’s programs. “They’ve learned some skills that they’ll be able to use with another career because we do teach the soft skills in every program,” said Capka. “Skills like being a member of a team, showing up on time for work, communicating clearly, etc. These are the soft skills kids are going to need and they’re learning those soft skills in our programs.”

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For students, the whole process of deciding what program to take begins in freshman computer science class, which is offered to 95% of freshmen. In this class, students and staff create an Educational Career Action Plan (ECAP). “Our computer science instructors give the students career interest inventory exams to see what kind of interests these kids will have, as well as expose kids to what kind of careers there are out there,” said Capka. Last fall, Bradshaw Mountain’s Cybersecurity program participated in the National Cyber League competition, which includes a variety of contests from penetration testing to forensic data analysis. The event brings together hundreds of high schools, universities, and independent teams to solve real-world cybersecurity threats. “It was all online and the kids took first place in the nation for two of the nine categories in that competition,” said Capka. “There was a total of 542 high schools throughout the U.S. in that competition and they finished 18th overall with first place in two of the nine categories. So, we finished in the top 3% of the high schools across the nation.” Students who completed a CTE program are going on to use skills they first encountered in the classrooms of Bradshaw Mountain. One of Perpich’s recent graduates, Savannah Nugent, landed a prime internship at Arizona State University. “She’s an electronic journalism major and a huge Coyotes fan. Like, hockey is in her blood. If you drew blood, it would come out as a hockey fan,” said Perpich. “There was an internship program (in the Coyotes publicity department) that they were only offering for juniors and seniors. She went out for it as a freshman, beat out everybody, and got it,” she said. The school administration understands that students may change their plans over the course of their time in high school. “Of course, that can obviously change. Kids often have different plans by their junior year. But it’s easier to have a plan and change it, than to try to come up with one the day after graduation.”

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3-D

PRINTING 3-D DESIGNER, CAD MODELER, A R C H I T E C T U R A L A S S I S TA N T EMPLOYMENT OF ADDITIVE MANUFACTURE TECHNICIANS IS PROJECTED TO GROW 10% FROM 2020 TO 2030. -U.S. BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS

The 3-D Printing and Manufacturing Certificate is designed for students, professionals, or those with a personal interest, to enter into the additive manufacturing industry. Through a multifaceted hands-on experience, students will learn the principles, standards, materials and application of additive manufacturing.

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CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS


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•• C O D E ••

PRINT New times call for new tools and Yavapai College’s 3-D Printing and Manufacturing certificate program is at the cutting edge. By Angie Johnson-Schmit with contribution by Austin Morrison

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s 3-D Printing technology matures, the potential applications are extensive. Using 3-D printers to design and “print” segments for construction is still being perfected, but it is a tech advancement that may well transform the construction industry. 3-D Printing has become a popular CTE program for students with a variety of interests, including Jacob Veater. Veater is an adjunct instructor in Yavapai College’s Gunsmithing program and a student in the 3-D Printing and Manufacturing certificate program. According to him, the new tools he is learning will benefit his area of expertise and he wants to get in on the ground floor. “I’m a student in the 3-D printing program,” said Veater. “I’m also taking a few miscellaneous classes like SOLIDWORKS (software). That’ll come in handy with modeling and getting it through the program and onto the printer itself.”

In addition, SOLIDWORKS can also be used to estimate costs for manufacturing tools, analyze those tools for possible stress flaws, and help create the instructions a 3-D printer needs to produce objects. The possibilities of 3-D printing fascinate Veater. “I’ve always found it really neat to be able to think of something in my head and if I have the modeling program, I can model it out. And then with my printer next to me, I can have it start printing while I do something else,” he said. “Or if I have a prototype in my head and I just want to get it in front of me really quick…it can be right there in a matter of hours or maybe a day or two.”

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SOLIDWORKS is a well-established solid modeling computer-aided design (CAD) computer program used in the 3-D Printing program. It is used to create fast and accurate designs, including 3-D models of complex parts and assemblies.


Like many students, he sketches his ideas on paper first. However, Veater often finds himself jumping right onto SOLIDWORKS to start modeling the tool or object. “I can turn it into an STL file and throw it right on the printer in a matter of 10 to 15 minutes.” Some of the ideas he tries out on the 3-D printer help him with his gunsmithing. “Every now and then we have some crazy part ideas. We need to kind of see if it’ll work before we put the labor time and the material cost into it,” he said. This was true of a particular shotgun he worked on. “I just wanted to give it a crazy ridiculously long handle to be able to bring the bolt back,” said Barnes. “And rather than just start taking a piece of metal and start chopping it up on a mill where I risk blowing cutters out and destroying the material altogether, I modeled it up on SOLIDWORKS.” He measured the dimensions off the existing handle and then experimented, drawing a much longer one, and adding extra details in SOLIDWORKS. “I had it on my printer in about 45 minutes. I had a prototype the next day, proved it worked, and I still haven’t gotten around to actually making it, but now that I know it works, I can get to that anytime I want to,” said Barnes.

You might think Veater had previous experience with 3-D printing, but he did not have much. “I had a little bit of knowledge, but this class took it way past what I thought I knew. And there’s people in this class that had no experience,” he said. “They’re probably at the same level I’m at now.”

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IF YOU’RE A PERSON WHO LIKES TO UNDERSTAND HOW THINGS WORK MECHANICALLY, IF YOU JUST LIKE TO SEE THINGS GET CREATED IN FRONT OF YOU, DO IT.

What Veater shares in common with those students is the excitement of creating a tool or object almost out of thin air, using a combination of software and a 3-D printer. “After the first 10 to 20 layers, you’ll start to see whether it’s actually going to go sideways or it’s going to be successful,” he said. “You look at your model and look at the table look back and forth a few times and realize it’s going to be in front of you in a matter of hours. I find that to be really incredible.”

Jacob Veater

Asked what kind of student would enjoy the 3-D Printing and Manufacturing Certificate program most, Veater said, “If you’re a person who likes to understand how things work mechanically, if you just like to see things get created in front of you, do it.” He added, “Even if it doesn’t become your career, you gain knowledge that branches off into a lot of other subjects. If I decided I’m never 3-D printing again, well now I still know how to 3-D model with it. I know how to do all the neat stuff.”

Photocredit: Blushing Cactus Photography

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EMPLOYMENT OF MILLWRIGHTS IS PROJECTED TO GROW 10 - 15% FROM 2020 TO 2030. -U.S. BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS The Advanced Manufacturing program is designed to teach students marketable skills in high tech automated manufacturing processes that incorporate innovative technologies to improve production of products from design to manufacturing stages.

DEGREES AND CERTIFICATES Advanced Manufacturing - AAS Industrial Machine Mechanic Certificate Hydro Utility Technician Certificate

Mechanic Assistant Certificate

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Machine Fabrication Technician Certificate

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IT’S DEFINITELY INSPIRING TO DO AS A WOMAN AND SOOTHING ACTUALLY, TO WORK ON DIFFERENT MACHINES AND PIECES.

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Erica O’Brien


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MACHINE By Angie Johnson-Schmit with contribution by Austin Morrison

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he revolution of the Industrial Age was uniformity. A widget was a widget. If you were rebuilding an engine in Prescott Valley, you could order parts made at a factory in Detroit with confidence that it would fit. This was a big improvement from the handmade machinery that came before that, where one person had to make the entire machine, one at a time. At the time, businesses couldn’t imagine what could be an improvement on uniformity. When manufacturing began to give way to advanced manufacturing, that improvement turned out to be custom-made parts. These custom parts allowed the user to tailor the tool or object to work exactly as needed.

Yavapai College’s Advanced Manufacturing

The program offers an Associate of Applied Science (AAS) degree in Advanced Manufacturing Technology and professional certificates in Machine Fabrication Tech, Industrial Machine Mechanic, Mechanic Assistant, Hydro Utility Tech, as well as 3-D Printing and Manufacturing. With degrees and certificates like these, students can quickly get on career paths to positions like machinists, millwrights, riggers, and boilermakers. All of these positions are predicted to grow faster than the national average, year-over-year, for the next decade. While some Advanced Manufacturing students enrolled with their eyes already on jobs in these fields, others don’t realize what they want to do until after they have explored the coursework and the machines.

the production of products from

Erica O’Brien is a student in the Machine Fabrication certificate program. She is working towards her Automotive Degree and wanted to learn how to make parts for different cars and different diesel machines. “I find it very fun and very intriguing to learn how to make these different little parts for that kind of stuff. And starting out in this class, I’m learning how to use different machines, such as lathes and grinders, for the very first time,” said O’Brien.

design to manufacturing.

The program’s focus is on making sure students learn the job

degree is designed to teach students marketable skills in automated manufacturing processes that incorporate innovative technologies to improve

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tell you how to do it. You have to work at the machine. You have to physically take time with it and get into what you’re doing to be successful at this kind of learning.”

O’Brien suggests new students try sampling different courses. Not only does this allow students to discover the subjects that are most interesting for them, but it also provides an opportunity to find out what style of learning works best for them. It’s an approach that has worked for her. “As a veteran, I definitely recommend doing different courses like this. This class has definitely helped me start looking at things differently. And it’s helping my other classes,” said O’Brien. “Now I understand how to take apart machines and put them back together. Doing that, I understand my automotive classes better.” skills necessary for their field of interest. Completing the certificate program allows graduates to walk in the door and apply for an entry-level job with confidence. “These are the skills I need, so I find it very positive and encouraging to take these classes,” she said. “It’s definitely inspiring to do as a woman and soothing actually, to work on different machines and pieces.”

O’Brien said her experiences in the program have influenced her future employment plans. “I’m looking to be in an automotive shop, but my specialty, since I’m taking these classes, is going to be the intricate pieces that go into automotive parts.”

This kind of supportive teaching helps a student who is starting with very little knowledge of the field progress to a state of comfort and confidence. Having this kind of experience with the coursework means a lot to O’Brien. “I definitely recommend this class, even if you’re just a tiny bit interested in how to make things because you literally learn from ground zero and get to a place where you’re comfortable so you’re able to run the machines without being hesitant.” She does caution that these classes appeal to a certain kind of learner. “I would definitely recommend figuring out if you are a hands-on type of person or if you’re more of like a book learner because if you’re more of a hands-on type of learner, this is definitely a thing for you,” said O’Brien. “If you’re more of a book learner, there are written specifications, but it doesn’t exactly

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O’Brien did not feel that way at first. “I found it challenging because I knew absolutely nothing about any machines or how to even use the dial caliper,” she said. “So, I found it challenging to use those tools until I was taught how to use them and ask questions about them.”


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FIRE SCIENCE FIREFIGHTER

27,000 NEW FIREFIGHTERS NEEDED EVERY YEAR FROM 2020 TO 2026. -U.S. BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS The Fire Science degree program is an interdisciplinary program of study which prepares students for a broad range of employment opportunities including Firefighter, Hazardous Materials Technician, Fire Marshal/Inspector, Fire Investigator, and Fire Service Supervisor/Manager.

DEGREES & CERTIFICATES Fire Science - AAS Fire Science Certificate Fire Science Community Risk Manager Certificate Fire Science Officer/ Manager Certificate

Fire Science Driver/ Operator Certificate

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Fire Science- Basic Firefighter Certificate

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RED HOT

HEROES By Angie Johnson-Schmit with contribution by Austin Morrison

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ire has long been a public safety challenge on both public and private land. Residents of Central Arizona are acutely aware of the importance of trained fire personnel. Yavapai College offers a range of accredited Fire Science degrees and certificates aimed at ensuring graduating students from the Fire Academy are fully prepared to step into jobs ranging from Firefighter to Hazardous Materials Technician.

In addition to three Associate of Applied Science (AAS) degree tracks and a university transfer track, Yavapai College Fire Science students can pursue four different certificate programs: Fire Science – Basic Firefighter, Fire Science Community Risk Manager, Driver/Operator, and Fire Service Officer/Manager.

Like the majority of Career and Technical education (CTE) programs, Fire Science uses a hybrid approach that combines a combination of classroom instruction and Photocredit: Blushing Cactus Photography

hands-on training. Unlike many other CTE programs, students like Durango, Colorado native Thomas Barnes are also required to get into excellent physical shape. People are drawn to Fire Science for a variety of reasons. For Barnes, the inspiration came from his firefighter father. “I felt like I had something to give to the people that helped me out,” he said. “I felt like, you know what, it’s time to start making a difference and helping others.”

Barnes knew the program would require a big commitment and started working on his physical training before he enrolled. When asked what the most challenging part of the program for him has been, Barnes said, “It’s probably just communication. That’s like the biggest part of the whole thing is communication, being on the same page.” Students are paired up with a partner or “par” during training. When they are getting hands-on experience working a live fire exercise, communication with their partners is vital. “It’s all up to your info…and making sure the other guy right next to you has the same knowledge and you guys are ready to go,” said Barnes. While most people think of the physical endurance required for firefighters – and it is a key part of the job – Barnes also encourages students just entering the program to pay attention to the academic component, too. “Study, read the book, work out,” he said. “Working out is a big part, but it’s mostly classroom stuff. Everyone’s going to be trusting you.” Barnes also appreciates that “all of them, basically even the techs, they’ll tell you, ‘This is what you need to do,’ so just communicating with instructors too, it’s a big deal.” The communication is also important because students, just like working firefighters, need to depend on each other to be successful. Every student brings certain strengths and areas that need more support. While that sounds like any education situation, the jobs these students are training for involve life or death situations for everyone involved. Students learn very quickly to support each other so that the group, as a whole, can succeed.

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dents find themselves reaching to attain. Barnes admits that he puts in extra effort so he doesn’t let his fellow students down on exercises. “You work hard staying on top of your stuff, checking your gear. Obviously, that’s a big deal. You don’t want to go into a burn building with low air in your tank and your alarm goes off because first of all, people will make fun of you and then you’ll be like, oh man, I looked really stupid out there. You don’t want to be that guy. That’s kind of a big deal.”

On top of the classroom work, there is

As Barnes and his fellow students challenge their bodies and minds to graduate, one thing that may inspire them is a future doing a job they love. CareerExplorer reported firefighters as having some of the highest job satisfaction in the country. And, there’s a lot of variety out there, with wildland firefighting and structure firefighting, specialized areas like airport firefighter, firefighter engineer, fire marshall/inspector, fire investigator, firefighter/EMT and many other types.

the physical training (PT). These workouts to build strength, flexibility and stamina include individual exercise two days a week and mandatory group PT on Saturdays. This group PT not only builds stronger bodies but also acts as a teambuilding exercise for the students. That teambuilding not only supports the individual students in learning but also raises a standard of competency that stu-

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That work can take a recent graduate to any number of work situations and locations. Asked where he thinks he’ll work after graduation, Barnes illustrated the wide choices ahead of him by saying, “Work in wildlands or structure firefighter - anywhere, actually anywhere on the West Coast or Southwest. That’d be nice. I love the work and there’s some great communities out there to do it in.”

Photocredit: Blushing Cactus Photography

As Barnes put it, “You can ask for any help from your other cadets, ‘cause they’ll always help out. Always. They might like ropes and knots. That’s my weakness. And ropes and knots are pretty important too. So yeah, I’ll ask some of my guys, ‘Can you help me tie this knot out? I don’t remember it, or I need help with it.’ And they will make a point to help me learn, because they know they can come to me for something I can help them out with. That kind of communication is a big deal.”



GUNSMITH P R O D U C T I O N S U P E R V I S O R , R E S T O R AT I O N , M A N U FA C T U R I N G E N G I N E E R , G U N S M I T H

10,000 NEW WORKERS GAINED IN GUN INDUSTRY THIS YEAR. -NATIONAL SHOOTING SPORTS FOUNDATION

The Gunsmithing program prepares students for employment for positions in firearm and metal industries. The program offers highly specialized training in your choice within areas of CNC machining, competition firearms, and guild firearms production.

DEGREES & CERTIFICATES Gunsmithing - AAS Gunsmithing Certificate Gunsmithing Advanced Certificate

FOR MORE INFORMATION EMAIL: Brenda.Giese@yc.edu

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ARGET Building, repairing, and calibrating firearms typically requires a skilled gunsmith. Gunsmiths can put their knowledge and skills to use in a range of jobs, including

firearm restoration and design. This in-demand trade is also one of Yavapai College’s most popular Career and Technical Education (CTE) programs, attracting students for both its Associate of Applied Science degree in Gunsmithing, and

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its Gunsmithing and Gunsmithing – Advanced certificate tracks.

here are a variety of skills required for gunsmiths, including an understanding of the history of firearms, how to design a gun, and excellent machining skills. Shop and firearm safety are vital skills. With no room for error in gunsmithing, it’s no surprise the job requires precision and keen attention to detail.

satile machine to me,” he said. “The lathe, it’s kind of a one trick pony to me. I know the lathe can reproduce itself and the mill can’t, but the mill just seems to work with me better.” Porter is already thinking about returning for a third year. “Third year is more about making Guild quality weapons, high quality guns, just learning a little bit more about the stuff that we didn’t get to learn in the first two years,” he said.

Students in Gunsmithing at Yavapai College are attracted to the program for a variety of reasons. Some are passionate about working on and restoring antique guns, while other are more interested in firearm design or repair. However, a love of machines and a deep interest in firearms are common themes. This is certainly true of Gunsmithing students Neil Porter and Chris McDowell. For Porter, a second-year student in the Gunsmithing program, part of the allure was his interest in machinery. “The machinery is really fun to use, to play with, to learn about,” he said. Porter is inspired by the possibilities and frequently asks himself, “What parts can I make for guns? What parts can I make for anything else?” Porter enjoys the challenge of learning about the different guns. “I mean, who even knows how many thousands or tens of thousands of different designs there are? And they don’t all work exactly the same, so the mechanical stuff is not easy,” he said.

His decision to enroll in the Yavapai College Gunsmithing program was an easy call. “I chose Yavapai because I heard it was one of the best programs in the country,” said Porter. “When I was looking at programs, I was thinking after I got out of the Marine Corps, might as well go to one of the better colleges. It just happened to work out that Yavapai was close to where I live. So why not go to one of the top ones and not have to move anywhere?”

The program’s excellent reputation was also a draw for McDowell, another second-year student in Gunsmithing. “I looked into several colleges and Yavapai had a good reputation and they also were convenient because there are direct flights from Idaho, right down to Mesa (Arizona),” he said.

I CHOSE YAVAPAI BECAUSE I HEARD IT WAS ONE OF THE BEST PROGRAMS IN THE COUNTRY.

When it comes to shop machinery, Porter definitely favors using the mill. “I can make more things with it. It just seems more of a ver-

Neil Porter

McDowell also enjoys working with machinery, although he noted that it’s also his biggest challenge in the program. “I’ve been out of high school for almost 40 years,” he said. “And the only time I’ve been on a machine like a lathe was in high school.”

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He struggled with his machine skills during the first year of the program. “Everything’s got to be a real tight tolerance. Everything’s gotta be precise,” he said. “And that’s been a challenge for me because over the years, I’ve had more experience in construction where a quarter of an inch is fine and now three thousandths of an inch is now fine.”

McDowell may have found the first year challenging, but he is more confident in his skills in the second year. “It’s really coming along,” he said. McDowell credits his machine skills. “As long as you’re willing to learn, they’re willing to teach,” he said. Both Porter and McDowell are planning to put their gunsmithing skills to work. “I’ll probably end up doing something in guns,” said Porter. “And then I’ll continue my education.” Porter also intends on staying the area. McDowell plans on “going back to Idaho and opening up a small gun shop.” His intention is to do repair work, refinishing and restoration work.

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instructors for helping him improve his


WHERE THEORY MEETS PRACTICE.

YC’s state-of-the-industry facilities allow student to develop their respective craft hands-on, and refine their approach and technique before entering the workforce. Rewarding, well-paying careers with openings across the nation in fields like construction, 3D house printing, advanced manufacturing, diesel technology, aviation, and more.

Visit us online at yc.edu/cte today.


THERE’S NO PLACE LIKE

HOME A GENERATIONAL PERSPECTIVE -Angie Johnson-Schmit

Gillian Haley, co-owner of Haley Construction with Allan Crary. Gillian is the third generation in the family-owned business.

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ment. Gillian Haley’s grandmother, Fran, was not thrilled with Winslow and by 1960, the family had moved to Prescott.

Founded in 1955 by her grandfather, Jim Haley, the business got its start when the mayor of Globe, AZ asked Jim Haley to move to Globe to build housing for mine workers. According to Gillian, her grandfather’s famous quote about the start of the business was, “I headed up there with a used Ford truck and a borrowed thousand dollars. And so began Haley Construction.”

Jim Haley was a residential home developer and a contractor. His dream, though, was to build custom homes. Prescott proved to be the perfect place to make that dream a reality. “Some of the first custom homes on the west side of town were his,” said Gillian. “His signature was the lamp you see in our logo. Every home that they built, they would put one of those lamps outside.” Some of those lamps can still been found in Prescott.

After the project in Globe was completed, Jim and Fran Haley moved to Winslow, AZ to build a housing develop-

Gillian’s father, Tom Haley, and his brother, Bill Haley, took over Haley construction in the 1970s. “My uncle was also a

“They loved Prescott, so they moved to Prescott and the business has been here ever since,” said Gillian. “Where I’m sitting right now was actually my dad’s office at one point, and my grandfather’s before that.”

Photos courtesy of Gillian Haley

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illian Haley laughs about it now, but when she graduated from high school in Prescott, AZ, working in the family construction business was the last thing she wanted to do. “I was on a plane to New York City, moved to Europe and then was like, I’m never coming home,” she said. “I never thought that I would end up in the family business, but I did.” She is now the third generation Haley family member at Haley Construction and co-owns the business with her stepbrother, Allan Crary.


structural engineer,” said Gillian. “They brought it to a whole new level of custom home building…but also really expanded the commercial side of the business.” According to Gillian, her father and uncle were less about building developments than her grandfather had been. “He (Jim Haley) was involved in several residential developments. You name it and he probably had something to do with it, whether he was building it or helping to develop it. My dad and my uncle didn’t really do that,” she said. Gillian was eager to leave home and do something other than construction. She got a degree in International Relations, a far cry from construction. “I was into politics. I thought I was going to go to law school. I did not have a construction degree. And the last job that I had before I got my master’s degree was with the second largest law firm in the world,” she said. She was living a big city life, moving from New York City to London and back to New York. Still, there was something about Prescott that Gillian missed. “I was home visiting for Christmas and I realized how beautiful the Prescott area is,” she said. “I missed the home-

town feel.” After an internship with the developers of the World Trade Center fell through in 2009, Gillian moved back to Prescott. “I was living in my grandmother’s house, I had just completed my Master’s in Real Estate Development and had expected to move back to the city when the real estate and development market in the entire world crashed,” she said. “Talk about bad timing! I just wasn’t sure I was going to find my way in the family business.” It didn’t seem like it at the moment, but it turned out to be a fortunate turn of events for Gillian.

Haley Construction was working on the restoration of the theater in Elks Theatre and Performing Arts Center in 2010. While her father and uncle were deeply involved in the project, her stepbrother, Allan, was serving as the main project manager.

Gillian and Allan had not grown up together and weren’t particularly close at the time, but when Gillian began helping him with the Elks project, they soon realized they were a good team. “The phone wasn’t ringing off the hook,” she said. “The recession had started, and construction had come to a screeching halt, but we had the Elks Theatre project and it proved to be the project that led to our business partnership.” Working on the project with Allan was a game changer for Gillian. Based on the research done by architect Bill Otwell, Allan and Gillian began combing through construction supply catalogues. “We went through them and found different types of trim and moldings,” she said. “We ended up finding a way to match everything that was in there to the original pictures.” Gillian went through the historic photos with a magnifying glass and compared the photos with the construction supply catalogues. She identified decorative items that could be cut and pieced together to recreate the original decor. “Allan and I worked really well together, and we just ended up having so much fun,” she said. “We became friends and then felt like siblings. Now I call him my brother and he’s my best friend.”

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In 2014, Gillian and Allan bought the business from her father and uncle. The two have been running it since then. “My dad was very excited to retire,” she said. “He (Tom) didn’t even sign on the dotted line. He was like, see ya!” Famous last words, considering that her father came out of retirement to supervise the remodeling of her home. Although Gillian and Allan Crary were co-owners of the business, she stepped away for a year to work on an interior design program. Her uncle Bill stayed with the business in a primary management role until about 2017. “It’s certainly challenging when the patriarch of your family and your business moves on,” said Gillian. Fortunately, Haley Construction CFO and Operations Manager Diane Travis and Project Manager Jeff Falls “immediately stepped into the role of helping us fill in the gaps between my skillset and Allan’s skillset when Bill retired.” Gillian credits part of Haley Construction’s success to having the right of people on board, including Travis and Falls. “My stepbrother and I, yes, are the owners of the business,” she said. “But it’s run by everybody in our office. I mean, honestly, I can’t say I’m running the business or Allan’s running the business or it’s just the two of us running the business. Diane (Travis) and Jeff (Falls) are a huge, huge part of making that happen.” That team mentality extends beyond the top level. One thing Gillian realized

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early on is that she doesn’t have to know everything, but she does need a core group of people with specialized skills. “We’re lucky,” she said. “We have an amazing team of superintendents that are in the field…from one of our younger guys in his early thirties to a guy that’s been with us 30 plus years.”

Gillian maintains that the construction industry is a great way to make a living. “There’s good money in construction,” she said. “And I don’t just mean on the general contracting side. There are endless opportunities for skilled trades people to build very successful, well-paying careers. There’s huge demand for skilled labor, both locally and on a national level.” She is also very much in favor of bringing the benefit of generational mindsets to the business, especially as many of the more experienced construction workers are retiring from the field. “There’s a generation that’s retiring, that’s taking so much knowledge with them, and experience, and craft,”

she said. “And there’s a generation that can benefit from that but has been taught literally from birth an entirely different way of learning and been socialized completely differently in the way that they approach how we live.” These generational differences can lead to friction, but Gillian sees both viewpoints as having benefits, too. She believes there is something to be learned from the ingrained work ethic of the older generation. Gillian also appreciates that the younger generation likes to incorporate new technology to create smarter, more efficient work methods. She is also a fan of career and technical education (CTE) training. “I love to see people becoming engaged in these programs,” said Gillian. “In fact, I just asked two of the guys in my company if they wanted to do the 3-D printing program. I know that there’s mixed feelings about it in the construction industry and with trades. I will just stand behind what I think. I’m on board.” Gillian’s path to the industry was much more circuitous. “I definitely took the long route and enjoyed myself, but I also didn’t get any hands-on experience,” she said. She had to go do an internship to get that experience, and while she says she had fun, she sees the advantages for workers who graduate from a CTE program. “The training that you get in a CTE program, it’s a shortened period of time and it’s specialized,” she said. “One benefit of hiring people that have


gone through the CTE program is going back to what I was saying about using people’s skillsets and realizing you don’t have to know everything,” said Gillian. “In these programs that are trade specific, there’s so much opportunity to enter the workforce with a skillset and a trade. And you don’t necessarily find that coming out of a traditional college setting.” While Gillian doesn’t believe traditional building methods are going away, she also believes the future of construction is likely to be much more tech heavy. “I mean, we’re looking at really advanced technology, coding, BIM (building information modeling),” she said. “And if you can figure out how to code a 3-D printer to build a house and how and where to read the plans for it...that is the wave of the future.” She sees the possibilities of 3-D printing as a huge opportunity for the construction industry. “I think it’s going to be really interesting to see what happens with 3-D printing and custom work, custom touches, people who want a very specific thing that is not easy to do by craftsmen terms,” she said.

After attending a demonstration at Yavapai College’s CTEC facility, she got even more excited about the applications of 3-D printing for construction.

I ASKED TWO OF THE GUYS IN MY COMPANY IF THEY WANTED TO DO THE 3-D PRINTING PROGRAM. I KNOW THAT THERE’S MIXED FEELINGS ABOUT IT IN THE CONSTRUCTION INDUSTRY AND WITH TRADES. I WILL JUST STAND BEHIND WHAT I THINK. I’M ON BOARD. Gillian Haley

“At some point when it’s not cost prohibitive, it could provide lower costs to building,” said Gillian. “It could become cost-efficient in some building elements.”

When asked what qualities Haley Construction looks for when making new hires, Gillian did not hesitate. “Character and integrity will get you hired,” she said. “It’s really what we’re looking for.” She went on to say, “If you want to invest in your company, you have to invest in people, and you have to invest in their training.” As for what she wishes more people un-

derstood about Haley Construction, Gillian said, “I think there is a misconception about people in the industry, that we’re looking to make a quick buck or want tons of new development. We’re all after the same goals.” “We want to make sure that our built environment doesn’t destroy our natural environment, and I feel like there’s a misconception there,” said Gillian. “Small business owners, our kids’ generation, and families are getting caught in the crossfire of what seems to be a conversation that should just be a collaboration to create and maintain a wonderful quality of life for everyone.”

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FOUNDATION FOR

SUCCESS -Robin Layton

Yavapai Big Brothers Big Sisters (YBBBS) believes that

mentoring allows everyone to achieve their full potential.

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s the #1 mentoring agency in Yavapai County, we are proud to join the conversation here today, recognizing that education and training are the foundations of thriving communities. The agency is in the planning stages of implementing a program for college or trade-career readiness, extending our reach to 18- to 24-year-olds. YBBBS has a simple, effective approach. Adult mentoring volunteers (Bigs) are matched with youth (Littles). While successful mentoring matches tend to last at least a year, the average duration for YBBBS Big/Little matches is 46 months. These long-term Big/Little matches make for more meaningful interactions, leading to more civic engagement for Littles. “This year we will be expanding into workforce development programming to include those young adults entering the workforce by professionally and strategically creating and aiding mentor relationships through partnerships with local businesses, high schools, and colleges or vocational institutions,” said Erin Mabery, Executive Director of YBBBS. “We have recognized that positive mentoring impacts the ability to break the cycle of systemic poverty and the resulting social implications,” said Mabery. “Our program also adds a layer of protection for children who have become increasingly disconnected from their normal supports. These things together help create a net for catching youth to assist them in becoming productive and participatory citizens, parents and employees.” To learn more about becoming a Big, call 928-778-5135.

PROVEN OUTCOMES FOR YAVAPAI BIG BROTHERS BIG SISTERS MENTORING

52%

Less likely to skip school

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55%

More likely to enroll in higher education

46%

Less likely to start using drugs


ERIC& CHASE BIG BROTHER

LITTLE BROTHER While still in middle school, Little Brother Chase was matched with Big Brother Eric. Now a high school senior, Chase counts Eric as a lifelong friend. School wasn’t always easy for Chase, but with Eric’s encouragement, that changed. Chase noticed that Prescott High offered welding as an option in the JTED program. Eric encouraged him and would mention how important school, and particularly math, was to becoming a welder. “I would let him know as hard as it might be, he needed to do his best to understand math,” shared Eric. Eric didn’t push Chase over the years about careers or the future, but would casually mention those topics occasionally. “My goal was just to make sure he stayed in school.” Chase is now looking forward to receiving more training after high school in the welding field.

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APPLIED PRE-ENGIN ELECTRONICS ENGINEERING TECH, INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING TECH

EMPLOYMENT OF MANUFACTURING ENGINEERS IS PROJECTED TO GROW 10 - 15% FROM 2020 TO 2030. -U.S. BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS

The Applied Pre-Engineering program is designed to prepare students for entry level CNC machining and programming positions. The program offers a series of skill-building courses in CNC machining and CAM programming for the individual desiring full-time employment in the CNC manufacturing industry.

DEGREES AND CERTIFICATES Applied Pre-Engineering - AAS

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Integrated Systems Engineering Technician Certificate


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MANUFACTURING By Angie Johnson-Schmit with contribution by Austin Morrison

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ENGINEERING


When critics worry about the future of work in America, the image of empty factories filled with robots making things is a common theme. But who designs those robots? Who plans the robots needed, repairs them when they break, and re-tools them when their tasks change?

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hat would be Systems Engineering Technicians and they are changing the way we look at work. The day is fast approaching when a robot endlessly putting on bolts in a factory while a person programs that robot is seen as a better use of the person’s time.

Yavapai College’s Associate of Applied Science (AAS) degree in Applied Pre-Engineering program is designed to equip students with these skills, using a working knowledge of engineering concepts. In addition to the degree track, the program also offers an Integrated Systems Engineering Technician professional certificate track.

Jason Weiss is preparing for his working future by getting both. “I figured this was probably one of the best programs for me in terms of systems integration, because I wanted to have a good, well-rounded systems engineering background, where I can go into pretty much as many fields as I can learn from engineers, work with them and get hands-on experience.” Approaching engineering from both a theoretical and a handson perspective has its challenges, according to Weiss. “I think that’s probably a challenging thing with everybody. Diagnosing electronics is pretty difficult as well. There’s no ‘almost’ when it comes to electronics,” he said. “But, as hard as it is, it’s also re-

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I LOVE RENEWABLE ENERGY. I LOVE SUSTAINABLE ENERGY. I LOVE SPACE, YOU KNOW, ANYTHING SCIENCE FICTION. I’M PRETTY MUCH ABOUT MAKING SCIENCE FICTION A REALITY. Jason Weiss

ally fun at the same time. And also, the fact that it’s frankly needed nowadays with how much engineering and electronics we’re dependent upon nowadays. Yeah, it’s tough, but I love it.” According to Weiss, a typical class day involves students getting to work on breadboards. Breadboards are a what students use to build prototypes. “You go in, look at what lab you have to do, and you start looking at your breadboard, start going through all the circuits and you start frankly, just playing, starting to figure out how it works,” he said. “Don’t be scared of not knowing what to do or whatever, just start doing it and start screwing up,” advised Weiss. He pointed out that making mistakes is “the best thing to do with technical things, science things, just learn how to do it and make mistakes as you’re going on.” Recently, Weiss worked on a robotic arm. “If anybody’s ever looked at the manufacturing of cars, they’re one of the bigger users of these FANUC robots and there you’ll see the arms jogging back and forth and you see they can make a turn that is safe, like in welding or assembly,” he said. “All that’s basically done through here with the program. In the program, you can say ‘Point One is Weld One, then here is Weld Two,’ and you get to see exactly how the robot articulates around to a certain point,” said Weiss. “It’s really cool to watch everything in motion, and you actually get to see how everything in the manufacturing world is done at the very basic level here, from simple jogging movements and little, tiny bits of programming.”

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“To do this well, it takes passion. If you love electronics, if you love creating things, if you love designing, if you love using your creativity, your smarts, whatever it is, this is definitely something for you,” he said. Weiss went on to say there will be challenges in the program, “But just go through them because that’s what it is. And that’s what’s going to make you grow.” Weiss has big plans after completing the program. “If I could have a company of my own later, that would be ideal,” said Weiss. “Before that though, I’d like to get as much experience as I can, whether I work within a defense contractor or Tesla or Space X. I’ve always been interested in them and how they do their work,” he said. “I love renewable energy. I love sustainable energy. I love space…I’m pretty much about making science fiction a reality.” Weiss truly thinks the future of manufacturing work is applied engineering rather than repetitive tasks performed by humans. “It sounds like science fiction, but if you look at automation and…artificial intelligence, machine learning, all of this in the workplace is starting to rise exponentially,” said Weiss. “Things won’t be the same, you know, technology advances so fast you might go, ‘Oh my God, I have to learn some more?’ But things are changing. We can’t do anything about it. Best thing to do is say, ‘Hey, embrace it, learn how it works,’” he said. “And it’s actually really fun,” said Weiss. “Basically, with robotics replacing a lot of stuff it’s good for everyone to understand how things work. Someday it’ll be just like knowing how to fix a car.”


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CONSTRU BUILDING CO N STRU C T I O N M A NAGER , CA R P E N T ER , L A BO RER

EMPLOYMENT OF CONSTRUCTION LABORERS IS PROJECTED TO GROW 10% FROM 2020 TO 2030. -U.S. BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS The Construction Building Technology program prepares students to apply basic skills and knowledge in the core trades of residential carpentry, electrical, HVAC, and plumbing. Includes NCCER curriculum and instruction in safety, employment, tool usage, measurement, plan reading, codes, supplies, equipment, fixtures, installations, and finishes in these core trades.

DEGREES AND CERTIFICATES Basic Carpentry Certificate HVAC Service Technician Certificate

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COMMUNITY

FOUNDATIONS By Angie Johnson-Schmit with contribution by Austin Morrison

From houses to hospitals, airplane hangars to apartment complexes, the buildings where we live, work, learn, play, and worship would not exist without construction workers. According to the United States Census Bureau, in 2021 Arizona ranked 3rd in the nation for population growth, and that growth is projected to continue over the next several years. With that growth comes the need for more construction workers to keep our communities thriving.

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he Construction Building Technology program at Yavapai College has several certificate courses for people looking to enter the construction industry, including Basic Carpentry, Basic Residential Trades, HVAC (Heating, Ventilation, and Air Conditioning) Service Technician, Plumbing Technician, and Residential Electrical Technician. High School student Kristian Swift is currently enrolled in the Construction Building Technology program at Yavapai College. Swift is using the class to prepare him for building his 126 TG MAGAZINE

own home in the future. “I do want to build my own house and I’ve already thought of different plans to, in blueprints, to make it,” he said. Swift believes the program is the best way to develop construction skills. “Yes, somebody could go off and just watch YouTube and just start building their own house,” he said. “But through this, you learn the correct ways to do it, the safety, and you will actually build a house correctly and it won’t fall down in 10 years.”


As with most career and technical education certificate programs, the Construction Building Technology students learn through a combination of lectures and labs. Swift recommends new students stay up to date on reading and lectures, because that information is “vital to the project you’re working on during that week.” But he also pointed out that students must “be ready to work with your hands, not just to sit around and be reading books all day.” Working with his hands is a big part of the program’s appeal for Swift. “I would rather be doing the work than watching somebody else doing it,” Swift said. “I like being creative, building all the different stuff and learning how to create different things as the project goes on.”

In addition to construction techniques, Swift is also learning how important creative problem-solving skills are. He tries to take advantage of the opportunities to learn as he is “learning to cope with them and improve my building techniques because of it.” He pointed out that he can take what he’s learned and use it to “build something better and more efficient, and that costs less.”

One of the most challenging parts of the program for Swift has been improving communication. “I’ve never worked on a job site before,” he said. “And so, learning how everybody interacts with each other and how (to) communicate is really important.” Swift was used to working with his brother and had a very different communication style with him. “My brother and I would move stuff and we got to a point where we could communicate without really talking,” he said. “Through this program, I’ve learned to communicate more and show how different stuff needs to be done without getting mad at each other and confused.” He also has learned that teamwork and good communication means “we can get the job done faster, more efficient, and through that, cost less money for the person employing us.” Seventeen-year-old Hannah McCarrick agrees that communication is important, but it can be challenging. “Some people might be working with very loud tools or the people around you that aren’t in the class that are working on stuff in their own classes can get very loud,” she said. “We try to keep two people together and make sure everyone’s paying attention and listening to everyone around. It does get tiring after a while, but we all work it out and get it together.” McCarrick is pursuing the Basic Carpentry certificate to prepare her to go into home remodeling. “The main reason why I

BE READY TO WORK WITH YOUR HANDS, NOT JUST TO SIT AROUND AND BE READING BOOKS ALL DAY. Kristian Swift

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took this class is because it teaches me the basics of how houses are built,” she said. “And it helps me learn the different types of woods and other materials I would need to know if I was to go renovate a house where I live.” The most interesting part of the Basic Carpentry program for McCarrick has been pulling apart a house. “We get to see how the house is built along with what we can change and what we can’t change off of the blueprint, too,” she said. “We got to demo a couple parts of the house – a demo house in a classroom – which was very fun,” she said. “But we’re always careful about safety in the class. We all check each other. And if we notice something’s wrong, we let each other know.”

McCarrick thinks the program is good for anyone interested in learning about construction, regardless of gender. “It’s a mixture of trade, so it brings in different things you can learn and no one in the class discriminates you based on your gender,” she said. She went on to point out that she is not the only female in the class. “There is another one and we both get to do heavy work. We don’t get told ‘No, no, no. Let the guys do it.’ No, it’s ‘Hey, get out of the way, let the girls go do it and have some fun.’”

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MACHINING

O P E R AT O R , T E C H N I C I A N , M A C H I N E T O O L O P E R AT O R

EMPLOYMENT OF CNC OPERATORS IS PROJECTED TO GROW 15% FROM 2020 TO 2030. -U.S. BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS The Computer Numerical Controlled (CNC) Machining program is designed to prepare students for entry level CNC machining and programming positions. The program offers a series of skill-building courses in CNC machining and CAM programming for the individual desiring full-time employment in the CNC manufacturing industry.

CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS Computer Numerical Controlled (CNC) Machining Certificate

FOR MORE INFORMATION EMAIL: YCadmission@yc.edu PHONE: 928-717-7777

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You may never have heard of Computer Numerical Controlled (CNC) Machining, but this method of running drills, lathes, mills, and now 3D printers, has been in use since 1949. It was a revolutionary advancement that continues to transform the role of humans in manufacturing and production. Simply put, CNC machining is the automated control of machining tools by means of a computer. A CNC machine processes a piece of material – metal, plastic, wood, ceramic, or composite – to strict specifications. It accomplishes this by following coded, programmed instructions and without requiring a human operator directly controlling the machining operation. Where once a machine operator would spend hours a day standing at a factory machine, workers can now spend their time perfecting the steps of making a tool or object and then programming a computer to do that for as long as the item is made. The human operator’s job is to program the CNC machine at the start of the process. They make the tool or object time many times, seeking the best method with the least waste. Each attempt is captured in computer code, so that the operator can run computer simulations to check the efficacy of the program before it is put into action. Because of this, when the final CNC program is run on the machine, it will produce consistent results and deliver value from the first production run. It is a vast improvement over the trial-and-error method that was used in the past. There are numerous advantages of having a human CNC operator make a perfect version of the tool or object and then programming a machine to do it. CNC machining makes objects with zero defects and greater accuracy, allowing for faster and more efficient produc-

PRODUCTION By Angie Johnson-Schmit with contribution by Austin Morrison

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tion. In addition, it has the advantages of providing better personal safety for workers, lower production costs, reduced energy consumption, and faster training. Hunter Hooper is learning CNC machining first-hand through a Yavapai College internship at Freeport-McMoRan. This mining company is the world’s largest producer of molybdenum and one of the largest producers of copper.

DEFINITELY KEEP UP TO WORK WITH YOUR COLLEGE. STAY ON TOP OF YOUR GRADES, PAY ATTENTION AND ASK AS MANY QUESTIONS AS YOU CAN BECAUSE IT’S ALL ABOUT WORKING SMARTER INSTEAD OF HARDER. THAT’S WHY THEY HIRE US, TO DO THE WORK SMARTER. Hunter Hooper

Hooper’s internship will also provide him with a Computer Numerical Controlled (CNC) Machining certificate. This includes both CNC machining and Computer-Aided Manufacturing (CAM) programming for entry-level positions in the CNC manufacturing industry.

He’s definitely sold on the hands-on approach both Yavapai College and Freeport-McMoRan use for this program. “It’s a 50/50 class,” he said. “So, we spend half of our time in the classroom doing lectures, and then we get to spend the other half of our time in the lab, actually working on the machines.”

Millwrights (sometimes called industrial mechanics) install, maintain, repair, and troubleshoot stationary industrial machinery and mechanical equipment in sites such as factories, mines, production plants and recreational facilities.

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Photocredit: Blushing Cactus Photography

Becoming CNC certified is essential to Hooper’s career plans. “I’m an industrial plant technician,” he said. “It’s a millwright - basically a plant mechanic. Basically, we work on different types of machinery, pumps. We fabricate a lot of stuff, making stuff out of metal, a lot of welding, just basically keeping the plant running.”


The ability to program and operate a CNC machine allows a millwright to create custom tools and parts for machinery. This allows for more efficient repairs and installation, which is especially helpful at worksites in remote locations. Hooper decided he wanted to be a millwright early in life. “I chose this field because as a freshman in high school, I took a welding course. And, in that welding course, I learned that I really liked welding,” he said. “Being an industrial mechanic is one of the few trades that you can actually weld as well as do different jobs.” While Hooper could pick up millwright skills by working out in the field as an assistant, he thinks getting a professional certificate has additional advantages for a new worker. “In the real world, already having professional knowledge can get you pretty far right off. It opens up a lot of job opportunities,” he said. “And if you have a degree in it, you can definitely advance a lot further in your career than most people.” After graduating from the program, Hooper has a clear idea of his next step. “I plan to use pretty much all the classes that I take at Yavapai College to go work at the mine. My internship is really helpful preparing the way for that.” To incoming students, Hooper suggests, “Definitely keep up to work with your college. Stay on top of your grades and pay attention and ask as many questions as you can because it’s all about working smarter instead of harder. That’s why they hire us, to do the work smarter.”

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WELDING W E L D E R , P I P E F I T T E R , S T E E L WO R K E R EMPLOYMENT OF WELDERS, CUTTERS, SOLDERERS, AND BRAZERS IS PROJECTED TO GROW 8 PERCENT FROM 2020 TO 2030. -PER US BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS

The Welding program is designed to prepare students for employment in welding positions requiring competency in the field of Gas Metal Arc, Gas Tungsten Arc, Pipe, and Structural Welding for the individual desiring employment in the welding industry.

CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS Gas Metal Arc Certificate Structural Certificate Gas Tungsten Arc Certificate Pipe Welding Certificate

FOR MORE INFORMATION PHONE: 928-717-7777

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SPARKS

FLY By Angie Johnson-Schmit with contribution by Austin Morrison

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hen people hear the word welding, images of sparks flying and heavy welding face masks spring to mind. But at its simplest, welding is a way to fuse pieces of metal, plastic, or wood together with heat and/or pressure. A range of businesses need skilled welders, including Superior Industries in Prescott Valley, AZ. Superior Industries specializes in building equipment to transport mining gear and the company is always in need of skilled welders like Drew Copeland and Emilio Delacruz.

Copeland has been a professional welder since he graduated from the Yavapai College Welding program in 2012. Within a year of getting his certifications, Copeland landed his first welding job. He noted that he is specialized to weld and specialized to fit, “so I can build and I can weld.”

ONE OF THE MOST EXCITING THINGS FOR ME IS WHEN I BUILD SOMETHING OFF OF A BLUEPRINT AND IT’S WELDED UP AND I GET TO SEE IT BEING PUT ON BY ASSEMBLY... Emilio Delacruz

He’s used those specialized skills to work for companies from Phoenix, AZ to South Dakota. Now that he’s back in the area and working as a welder at Superior Industries, he has every intention of staying. “As long as I can afford to live here, I don’t plan on going anywhere,” said Copeland.

Photocredit: Blushing Cactus Photography

While Copeland acknowledges that the pay and benefits of working as a welder are excellent, he also values the camaraderie and community he’s found at Superior Industries. For Copeland, the “most exciting thing is honestly just getting to be with the crew.” He pointed out that he spends most of his day with these people and he enjoys working with them and “just having that sense of accomplishment every day.” Emilio Delacruz is a more recent graduate from Yavapai College’s certificate program. The welder and fitter has been with Superior Industries for less than a year. Like Copeland, Delacruz has found it to be a friendly work environment. “You can walk up to anybody here and ask a question,” he said. “I’ve had a pretty good experience here.” Delacruz gets a kick out of seeing his work go through the entire process at Superior Industries. “One of the most exciting things for me is when I build something off of a blueprint and it’s welded up and I get to see it being put on by assembly over here,” he said. “Just watching it get put on, it’s just awesome knowing that I welded on it.” He enjoys knowing that his work is going out into the world. “It’s a sense of accomplishment knowing that my welds are go-

ing to be on something that’s going to do some work and be reliable,” said Delacruz. “One of the pieces we’re working on is going to Australia and it’s kind of cool that one of my welds gets to go ‘down under.’”

A typical workday for Copeland and Delacruz starts at 6 am when the crew gathers for a safety briefing to discuss potential hazards and review safety protocols. Then, everyone does a stretching routine to get ready for the physical work ahead. “Everybody gets loose, ready to go,” said Copeland. “Nobody pulls a back or anything like that. It’s become very popular.” After the safety briefing, the crew gets down to the actual work at hand. “Then, depending on what we were working on last week, we go straight to that, or we start a new job,” said Delacruz. “It normally keeps us pretty busy throughout the day, building the parts and welding out stuff.”

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IF I CAN GIVE ANY ADVICE, DEFINITELY KNOW HOW TO READ A TAPE MEASURE.

ing from the two-year certificate program and hitting the job market ready to go.

Emilio Delacruz

Copeland and Delacruz both offered practical advice for students entering the program at Yavapai College. Copeland appreciated that the coursework covered everything he would need to know to start a job as a welder. He admits he “wasn’t great at reading blueprints” and “could barely read a tape measure” when he enrolled. “Luckily the guys that trained me were patient…here I am today, and I can do all those things perfectly.”

Copeland credits his training at Yavapai College with giving him the knowledge and skills needed for the job. The college’s Career and Technical Education Center (CTEC) had just opened when he attended. “It’s good that it’s still there,” said Copeland. He went on to say the education he got was “enough to get your foot in the door and then some.”

Delacruz echoed that advice. “Definitely know how to read a tape measure,” he said. He also pointed out that knowing how to read blueprints and learning how to make a good weld are important skills covered in the welding program. Finally, he encouraged students to focus on “staying on top of things, making sure you have all your PPE or protective gear.”

Delacruz also enjoyed his classes at Yavapai College’s CTEC and attributes a significant part of that to CTE instructor Robert Smith. “He really pushed me,” said Delacruz. “I was horrible at math, and he’d let me stay after class and he’d tutor me a bit.” That encouragement and support led to Delacruz graduat-

While Copeland noted that there wasn’t much welding work when he graduated in 2012, the region has changed. “It’s grown quite a bit,” he said. “And there’s a lot more work in the area.” As the communities and small cities of Yavapai County grow, so does the need for skilled welders like Copeland and Delacruz.

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COUGARS MOVE ON THE

CAREER AND TECHNICAL EDUCATION AT CHINO VALLEY HIGH SCHOOL

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-Angie Johnson-Schmit

rian Pereira has a uniquely grass-roots view of Career and Technical Education (CTE) in a rural community. Pereira has been the Assistant Principal and Director of the CTE program at Chino Valley High School (CVHS) in Chino Valley, Arizona, for five years. Before taking on his dual role at CVHS, Pereira worked in the school system in Ash Fork where he served as Assistant Principal/School Counselor/CTE Coordinator. It was during his time in Ash Fork that Pereira began to really understand the importance of CTE programs and the challenges of communicating the benefits of those programs with parents. He learned he needed to adjust his approach. “I quickly realized that these kids were brought up in these working-class homes,” he said. “Their parents understand how

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important skills are and how skills learned for one job can help you in a different job. How one job can lead to another job if the skills are there.” This realization led him to change the way he talked to parents and students about CTE classes. “I stopped spitting out statistics and spitting out data to families. Because to most of them, it didn’t stick,” said Pereira. “But, the big picture, how to get a good job and how that can lead to a better one, that did stick.” He discovered that one thing in particular connected with parents. “What really got their attention was the career paths,” said Pereira. “So, let’s say they start studying automotive, for instance. They knew from their own experience how that could branch off. How you could start with these skills and education at an entry level job and that can lead to the next step up and


the next step up.” “The biggest piece is reversing the idea of let’s get them data,” Pereira said. “Job data on its own doesn’t explain how these jobs are growing, that this is an opportunity for your kids to earn college credits while they’re still in high school, that learning the trade this way can earn them certifications to help get them in the door when they’re looking for a job.” Pereira uses that same approach to talk with parents about CTE options at CVHS. But those conversations about CTE classes begin well before high school in Chino Valley. “It starts in the seventh and eighth grade at the middle school,” Pereira said. “They call it a career exploration class and it’s an opportunity to look at different careers and take a tour of Yavapai College’s CTEC (Career and Technical Education Center).” Those middle school programs are growing, too. “This year, the middle school was able to bring in a skilled instructor,” said Pereira. “He was teaching welding out there as a trade. He developed a pretty good welding program, plus he was teaching woodwork, doing finishing work in new homes.” Those students will meet Pereira even before they come to the high school. “I’ll be working with that instructor to get them some materials,” he said. “And I’ll introduce the kids to what we offer here at the high school, along with what they offer at the college as well.” Once students move up to the high school, freshmen start with one available CTE program. Pereira said, “In ninth grade, the only CTE program we have available is agriculture. And that’s because it is a three-to-four-year program. So, it takes multiple years to progress through that program.” Freshmen also have a career exploration program. This was recently revamped to include introductions to various trades, specifically careers, colleges, and scholarships. “But, the big emphasis,” said Pereira, “is career interest profiles. Students take several online assessments to help them understand what careers they might be interested in. That exploration begins now.” One thing that is often inspiring for students is the annual tour of Yavapai College’s CTEC building. Pereira is quick to agree that the college’s programs are impressive, with CTE certificate programs running the gamut from culinary to agriculture and 3-D printing. Currently, Chino Valley High School’s CTE program features eight different programs, including bioscience, sports medicine, cybersecurity, welding, agriculture, architectural drafting

and design, culinary arts, and business management. Pereira said they review those programs to make sure they are offering relevant education for the real world job market. “We look at the labor data about the job market and see how we compare with some of those items right there.

“For instance, five of our eight current programs would fit into career fields identified by the U.S. Bureau of Labor as some of the highest paid and fastest growing occupations. Also, six of the eight programs are also identified as career fields with the most new jobs coming up in the upcoming future.” Choosing which programs to offer is also influenced by investigating the local job market. “We do have a formalized process where we’ll have an end of the year advisory board meeting,” said Pereira. “Plus, throughout the year instructors will meet with different business owners or groups to understand some of the needs that they have.” Those meetings can lead to service projects which give students an insight into the business, and benefit the community. Pereira said, “You may have read in the paper about the culinary program between our CTE and the Mountain Institute Career and Technical Education District (MICTED). Students in that shared program had the opportunity to do service projects with a local restaurant, Essence Kitchen. One of those was a dinner for local veterans.” Pereira praises his CTE staff for helping make that happen. “Our culinary arts teacher, she’s put a lot of time in there and she was able to get some of the kids jobs in there as well.” In the end, Pereira thinks students and their families should approach CTE with an open mind. “If you’re not really set on where you’re going to go to college, then maybe that isn’t the right path for you,” he said. “I don’t think that going to a vocational school after high school is a bad path, or is a black eye on your family name at all,” said Pereira. “It can be ‘My son is going to the college CTE, they’re going to bypass all the thousands of dollars they might have spent on a four-year degree and they’re going to get right into a career.’ It’s all a matter of approaching this with an open mind and finding the right path to get on for your future.”

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LINEWORK TE C H N I C I A N S , L I N E MA N

23,300 NEW LINE INSTALLERS AND REPAIRERS NEEDED EVERY YEAR FROM 2020 TO 2026. -U.S. BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS

The Electric Utility Lineworker program is designed to prepare the student for a position as a pre-apprentice level lineworker who is familiar with the use of tools, materials, and equipment of the electric utility industry. Students will be trained in power line installation and maintenance, pole climbing and use of tools, truck and equipment operation, and overhead and underground distribution, construction and maintenance of electrical lines.

CERTIFICATE PROGAMS An Electric Utility Lineworker certificate Earn their ADOT Commercial Class A, B, or C license Commercial Driver Training Certificate

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POWER PLAYERS By Angie Johnson-Schmit with contribution by Austin Morrison

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Students are trained in utility pole climbing, power line installation and maintenance, use of tools, truck and equipment operation, overhead and underground distribution, as well as construction and maintenance of electrical lines.

THERE’S NO BETTER FEELING THAN BEING ON TOP OF A POLE AND GETTING TO LOOK AT WHAT’S AROUND YOU AND CHECK OUT YOUR SURROUNDINGS. NO ONE ELSE GETS TO DO THAT EVERY DAY. IT’S PRETTY AWESOME. Kohl Anderson

Lineworkers follow the apprenticeship model, but applicants must pass an aptitude test before becoming apprentices in the industry. The subjects on that test and many of the skills they will need as an apprentice are covered in the Electric Utility Lineworker Certificate program at Yavapai College.

“I saw it as a good way for me to go ahead and get the certifications I needed to get into the linework industry,” said student Kohl Anderson, “It’s a great way to make connections with people you might work with later in the industry.” Some of the things Anderson is learning are obvious, like how to safely climb a utility pole and how to use the tools of the trade to fix or replace electrical equipment in mid-air. But there’s also cable splicing, how to read voltages in electrical systems, and calculating the tension of a power line so you can hoist equipment onto it. As Anderson puts it, “We work on high voltage electricity, anything from the substations to where it reaches the transformer at your house.”

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he modern world runs almost exclusively on electricity. Regardless of how that electricity is generated, powerlines are the electric arteries that keep our communities thriving. All of that is dependent on electrical line workers to keep that energy flowing.

Yavapai College’s Electric Utility Lineworker Certificate program is designed is to prepare students to enter the field. Graduates of the certificate program are taught the tools, methods, materials, and equipment skills needed for employment.

For apprentice programs in the electrical utility industry, completion of a pre-apprentice program like the one Anderson is in not only guarantees graduates have a clear understanding of the information needed for the profession, but it also shows the person has the capability to learn even more. The apprentice programs cover every type of information about electrical linework that someone would need to become a journeyman lineworker, from how to insulate wires to how to build a telephone pole. It’s a lot of information and a professional certificate is a good way to show the student’s perseverance and skill. Students in the program spend a lot of time learning the practical skills of the trade. “Right now, we do a lot of knot tying and that’s a very important thing in line work, “ said Anderson. “And we review safety a lot, and we study electrical theory so we can comprehend it well.”

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One of the core skills the program teaches is pole climbing. If a student can’t comfortably climb a standard 40-foot power pole multiple times a day with 25 pounds of climbing gear and up to 40 pounds of equipment, then this job may not be for them. On top of any fear of heights the student might have, climbing poles uses one set of muscles to get up and a different set of muscles to get down. Linemen can end up exhausted by the end of the day. “I’m not one to be super afraid of heights, but I guess I am a little bit,” said Anderson. “You’ve got to have a respectable fear of heights…and there’s people that come into the program that have a real big fear of heights, but we work with them. And at this point everyone’s pretty comfortable with climbing.” According to Anderson, safety is key. “And once you get used to it, you’re always hooked in, you’ve always got your primary or secondary going, and that’s comfortable and it’s fun,” he said. “There’s no better feeling than being on top of a pole and getting to look at what’s around you and check out your surroundings. No one else gets to do that every day. It’s pretty awesome.”

As important as the physical tasks of the job are, a lineman can’t solve the problems he finds at the top of a pole if he doesn’t have a solid background in the theory and knowledge of electrical utilities. Students in the program move between classroom to build knowledge and outdoors to put it into practice. “So, in the classroom we primarily study electricity,” Anderson said. “Right now, we’re working on parallel series circuits and although it’s complicated, you start from the very beginning, so you don’t have to have any electrical knowledge going into it.” Anderson is confident in the skills he is learning and points to the program’s educators as playing a big role in that. “The instructor’s amazing and (its) really helpful,” he said. “And there’s good worksheets to guide you through, and you’ll get to learn about electricity, and you’ll really comprehend it. Specifically, the instructors are really good at explaining it and taking the time to work with you.”

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COMMERC DRIVER T D R I V E R , E Q U I P M E N T O P E R AT O R

EMPLOYMENT OF HEAVY AND TRACTOR-TRAILER TRUCK DRIVERS PROJECTED TO GROW 10% FROM 2020 TO 2030. -U.S. BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS

The Commercial Driver Training program is designed to prepare the student to take the Arizona Department of Transportation (ADOT) commercial drivers license (CDL) permit exam, and to complete 30 hours of driver training needed to pass the ADOT CDL Class A, B, or C commercial license road test.

CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS Prepare for ADOT Commercial Class A, B, or C learner permit Take ADOT Commercial Class A, B, or C Learner permit Explain all items on the pre-trip inspection check list

Earn an ADOT Commercial Class A, B, or C license E

FOR MORE INFORMATION EMAIL: ChinoValleyCenter@yc.edu

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Demonstrate competency in ADOT road test skills


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CARE E R If there’s one thing the last couple of years has taught us, it’s the importance of truck drivers. To get the daily items we need, from medications to groceries and durable goods, it takes truck drivers hauling those items from the far-flung factories where they are made to giant warehouses spread across the country, and from there to store shelves in our communities.

Truck driving is not only an in-demand job, but also an essential service. Yavapai College’s Commercial Driver Training Certificate program prepares its students to take the Arizona Department of Transportation (ADOT) commercial driver’s license (CDL) permit exam, and to complete 30 hours of driver training needed to pass the ADOT CDL Class A, B, or C commercial li-

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cense road test. Every class the program graduates puts more essential workers out on the road. And that is good news to Pedro Leon, who is enrolled in two professional certificate programs at once Commercial Driver Training (CDT) and Electric Utility Lineworker. Leon is excited about the CDL program and sees it as a great career choice for himself. “I know I’ll be guaranteed to have a good paying job with a steady paycheck coming in,” he said. “I’m a veteran and I was able to travel when I was in the military, so another thing I like about being a trucker, you can do the same thing, get to go places you’ve never been to before and get to see just how beautiful America is. So, great pay,

Photocredit: Blushing Cactus Photography

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ruck drivers are a key link in the distribution chain that keeps our economy running strong. As our shipping needs increase, the importance of truck drivers is only going to become more important over the next few years. But, at the same time, the U.S. Department of Labor reported that the US is currently short 60,000 drivers and the increase in freight shipped over the road means the need for certified, trained drivers is going up, not down.


OVERDRIVE By Angie Johnson-Schmit with contribution by Austin Morrison

great benefits, work with good people, what’s not to like?” According to CDL instructor Josh Hoover, the program covers the basics of the trucker trade. From pre-trip vehicle inspection to post-trip paperwork, the aim of the program is to equip students with everything they need to pass their CDL test and be successful in a new career on the road. “It basically teaches me all the basics of driving a semi-trailer,’’ said Leon, “Learning about everything, like all the engine compartment parts, the inline cab inspection, the steering, alignment, turning, also the straight line backing, and the parallel parking.” Hoover teaches all these skills as the instructor for the Commercial Driver Training (CDT) 255 program which covers everything the student needs to know to pass the CDL test. He also teaches CDT 200 which is for people that have had their license and let it lapse. Hoover breaks the CDT 255 program down into three parts. “First, there’s the pre-trip inspection of a vehicle, which is going

from the front of the vehicle and cab doing the air brake test, and then continuing down the side of the truck,” he said. “Next course, I teach the skills part of the test, which includes straight line backing plus offset to the left and then parallel parking. The third part of the class is over the road (OTR) driving. During that part, I will take you through town. And then, I’ll take you up to the interstate, get you up to gear speed, you know, highway speed of 70, 75 miles an hour, just to experience what it’s like to be a truck driver.”

One of the things Hoover loves best about the job is the chance to travel. “You do get to see the country. There’s lots of places that normal students wouldn’t get to go to on an average day. But, as a truck driver, you can go from East Coast to West Coast, from the Canadian border all the way down to Mexico.” 153


On top of the CDL license preparation, students can get a reference from their instructor. “When you get out of this class, I will give you references,” Hoover said, “That’s a good reference to go to a top company which has good benefits. All of this sounds great to Leon. “I’m really excited about becoming a truck driver, with the high demand for them right now because of the shortages. But you know what else? I’m also excited to be a part of helping out, you know, being part of the solution.” Leon believes he has made a good investment in his future. “I’ll have two certificates, for truck driving and as a lineworker,” he said. “That’s like money in the bank and I’m excited where these will take me. Nobody knows what the future holds, but I know it’s going to be bright.”

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I’M REALLY EXCITED ABOUT BECOMING A TRUCK DRIVER, WITH THE HIGH DEMAND FOR THEM RIGHT NOW BECAUSE OF THE SHORTAGES. BUT YOU KNOW WHAT ELSE? I’M ALSO EXCITED TO BE A PART OF HELPING OUT, YOU KNOW, BEING PART OF THE SOLUTION. Pedro Leon



AGRICULTU FA R M E R , R A N C H E R , G R E E N H O U S E G R OW E R , A G R I C U LT U R A L M A N A G E R , F O R E S T E R 138,900 NEW AGRICULTURAL WORKERS NEEDED EVERY YEAR FROM 2020 TO 2026. -U.S. BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS The Agriculture Technology Management program prepares students for entrepreneurship, employment, or advancement in a variety of agricultural fields including horticulture, aquaculture and fisheries, and animal care and management.

DEGREES & CERTIFICATES Agriculture Technology Management - AAS Production Horticulture Certificate Animal Care and Management Certificate Equine Care and Management Certificate Canine Care and Handling Certificate Service Dog Certificate Therapy and Service Dog Team Skills Certificate E

EMAIL: ChinoValleyCenter@yc.edu

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By Angie Johnson-Schmit with contribution by Austin Morrison

Everybody remembers the cowboys and miners of early Yavapai County, but without the Territorial farmers and gardeners, life would have been a whole lot harder. From horse feed grown in Chino Valley for the US calvary to the Chinese vegetable farms of Miller Valley, people who made plants thrive in Arizona’s High Desert always had plenty of work. 158 TG MAGAZINE


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hat spirit lives on at Yavapai College’s Chino Valley Center, where the Horticulture program offers students the option of an Associate of Applied Science (AAS) degree track with Agriculture Technology Management or a Production Horticulture certificate track. Careers include a variety of employment opportunities in the horticulture and greenhouse industry, including nursery technician, greenhouse management, and integrated pest management.

Geared towards students interested in pursuing a career in horticulture, the Production Horticulture certificate program is designed to ensure graduates have the knowledge and skills to successfully enter the field. The program’s coursework covers how to manage a large agricultural facility, develop a water management system, propagate plants, and develop and implement an integrated pest management system. The program attracts a variety of students who are interested in making a career out of their love of growing plants, including Naya Jones. Jones said she chose to enroll in the program because “I want to learn how to be self-sufficient in the future – have my own garden, grow my own crops.” Her father and grandmother were both avid gardeners, so horticulture is something that Jones has grown up with. “I get my green thumb from them,” she said, noting that every year, her family has a garden they grow vegetables and sunflowers in. Her father has also fostered her interest in plants. “My dad always gives me new plants to keep in my room and he always has something going on,” said Jones. “So, we have plants around the whole house.”

The Horticulture program offers classes that build on knowledge of basic biology and soils, leading up through mountain growing in spring and fall, water management, community supported agriculture, agribusiness management and many others. The program format is a hybrid one, consisting of a combination of lectures and labs. Students split their time between learning the science behind the techniques and putting that newfound knowledge to work in the facility’s greenhouse located at the Chino Valley Agriculture Business Center. Jones genuinely seems to enjoy getting her hands dirty and

EVEN IF YOU JUST WANT TO LEARN HOW TO KEEP YOUR HOUSE PLANTS ALIVE, YOU CAN JUST COME ON DOWN AND TAKE A CLASS AND REALLY GET TO KNOW PLANTS BETTER. Naya Jones

finds the labor to be therapeutic. “It is really good for your mental health,” she said. “It’s just good to get in the soil. It helps release endorphins, actually.” While her love of horticulture runs deep, Jones also enjoys the challenges. She noted that plant biology is more complex than she had initially imagined. “There’s a lot of specifics that go into plants that I wasn’t quite prepared for,” she said. “But as you study it, you tend to get it.” Asked about her current favorite plant at school, Jones hesitated to name just one, but did say, “I really like these coleuses right here. They get really nice colors. They come in like hot pink, light pink, some yellows, and they propagate super easy. So you can take a bunch home after a while, and then you just have your own little jungle at home. So those are my favorite here.” Jones believes gardening and horticulture is something just about everyone can enjoy. “Even if you just want to learn how to keep your house plants alive, you can just come on down and take a class and really get to know plants better,” she said. The one bit of advice she has for students new to the program is to “just come with an open mind.” She’s especially grateful for the support she received from her college instructor as she was learning her way in the greenhouse. “Our teacher, Justin, covers everything you need to know and is so inclusive. You can start knowing nothing or you could start knowing a bunch of things and his classes are so well-rounded that you can get whatever you need out of the program.”


While the knowledge she’s gained will help her with gardening at home, Jones also thinks about the professional options this has given her. “I hope to get a job my certificate and my degree, it will help me in that experience. I want to get more hands-on and be able to get to know different types of greenhouse production.” As agriculture and gardening change with the times, the new tools, new techniques and new approaches taught in the Horticulture program aim to keep things green in the fields that first fed people in Yavapai County.

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Photocredit: Blushing Cactus Photography

somewhere in a nursery, hopefully with


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FINS

& FUR By Angie Johnson-Schmit with contribution by Austin Morrison

The Animals program at Yavapai College offers a diverse collection of certificate tracks, including Animal Care and Management, Canine Care and Handling, Equine Care and Management, Service Dog, and Therapy and Service Dog Team Skills. In addition, students can also opt to pursue an Associate of Applied Science degree in Agriculture Technology Management.

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here is a bright future for students in the Animals program, with job opportunities in areas like Veterinary Assistants and Animal Caretakers, Farmworkers, Ranchers, Aquaculture, and Animal Trainers, to name but a few. With such wide-ranging options, it is no surprise that students are motivated to enroll in the Animals certificate or degree programs for equally diverse reasons.

Jessi Phillippi, a student enrolled in the Equine Care and Management certificate program wants to open her own horse training business. The Pennsylvania native is also working on 162 TG MAGAZINE S P R I N G 2 0 2 2

her Associate of Applied Science degree in Agriculture Technology Management at Yavapai College. Phillippi found her way to Yavapai College’s Equine program when her best friend moved to the area to attend Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University. She was in the middle of looking at different colleges when she visited her friend. “I knew if I went to college, I wanted to move away,” said Phillippi. “And whenever I came out, I started looking at colleges and I saw that they had… programs here that I was super interested in, like the equine programs.”


Never a fan of classroom instruction, Phillippi enjoys the practical, hands-on approach at Yavapai College. “Whenever I thought of colleges, I just think of big classrooms with huge lectures and just assumed that it was just going to be me in the background, a professor 50-feet in front of me working on a board or something, but it’s been super hands-on.” She is equally happy with her instructor. “Gary (Gang) is super helpful,” said Phillippi. “If I need any extra help, I’m always more than welcome to trailer my horse over to his training facility and work with them there. And I’m going to try to do maybe like an internship program with him this summer to get some more time under my belt with actual horse training.” Canine Care and Handling certificate program student Donna

Richardson has a very different story. A recent retiree from the National Park Services, Richardson enrolled because she wanted to better understand how to train dogs. “I wanted to get more of the theory behind it, the science behind training dogs,” she said. Richardson has had several dogs over the years. “We often take obedience classes or agility classes that are about training dogs, but we never learned in those classes about how the dog is reacting,” she said. “Now I truly understand the information behind it and how the dog responds and how to better train my dog.”

Enrolling in the Canine Care and Handling program has been such a positive experience for Richardson that she is now planning to continue her education in the Therapy and Service Dog Team Skills program.


Johnathon Damschroder didn’t anticipate working with animals at all when he started at the college. “Initially, I got into the program because I really enjoyed the science of soils and plants. And once I started taking classes out here, I noticed pretty quickly that I had a calling for the fish. I really like the aquaculture side of things, so I kind of dove into that and it’s been like that ever since.” Damschroder is finishing up his Associate of Applied Science degree in Agriculture Technology Management and will transfer his credits to the Environmental Science program at University of Arizona. “I will be transferring down to there for the Environmental Science program in January on a full ride scholarship, thanks to Yavapai College.” A typical day in the program for Damschroder is spent mainly at the Chino Valley Agribusiness & Technology Center. “You’re going to be in a classroom for maybe an hour during a class day that is four hours long,” he said. “So you’re going to be in the fish tank doing things that you would in a normal day in that job.”

“You put on the waders and you’re just fully immersed in the program. Truly the definition of fully immersed right there. I mean, it’s 10,000 gallons and we get to jump in and take care of the fish,” said Damschroder.

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YOU CAN DO THIS JOB RIGHT OUT OF HERE, YOU KNOW, GO GET YOUR BACHELOR’S DEGREE AND GO WORK FOR GAME AND FISH. THIS COULD BE YOUR LIFE EVERY DAY. AND I MEAN, THAT’S PRETTY ROCK STAR TO ME. Johnathon Damschroder

Damschroder is always excited to share his passion. “You know, I had some high schoolers out here today,” he said. “They got in and they’re having fun, but I explained to them, this is a job. You know, this is a job with Arizona Game and Fish. You can do this job right out of here, you know, go get your bachelor’s degree and go work for Game and Fish. This could be your life every day. And I mean, that’s pretty rock star to me.”


delicious

bbq

Entire menu made from scratch

BA BY BACK R IBS SMOK ED CHICK EN PULLED POR K BURGER S CAT ER ING

three locations 804 N. Main St., Cottonwood 2970 N. Park Ave., Prescott Valley 6101 SR 179, VOC, Sedona

COLTGRILL.COM


ALL YOU

NEED TO

START SUCCESSFUL SEEDS -Janet Wilson | Prescott Gardener

STARTING SEEDS INDOORS IS A GREAT WAY TO GET A JUMP-START ON THE GROWING SEASON. I recommend following the local extension office’s “Vegetable Planting Dates” guide to know when to start your seed varieties. Visit the Prescott Gardener website by clicking the QR code below.

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SUPPLIES: SEED SOURCES: • Prescott Public Library Seed Library • Terroir Seeds • Native Seeds • Prescott Farmers Market seed exchange events • Baker Creek Heirloom Seeds (my favorites) Look for heat and drought tolerant seeds. CONTAINERS, POTS & TRAYS: Plastic pots and cell packs with trays from nurseries can be washed, sterilized, and reused. If using yogurt cups or clamshell salad boxes, be sure to cut holes in the base for drainage.. SEED STARTING MEDIUM: Any sterile seedling mix will do, but avoid gardening soil and potting mixes as they do not have the right texture or water holding capability, and may harbor diseases that harm seedlings. LABELS: Use popsicle sticks, masking tape, or duct tape to mark seedlings with name and date seeded. LIGHT: Full spectrum LED or T5 lights are ideal. WATER: Check your seedlings daily and keep the seed starting medium evenly moist. HEATING MAT: The ideal temperature range for most seedlings is between 70-80°F. Keep the temperature below 80°F to avoid killing the young seedlings. FAN: Use an oscillating house fan to prepare seedlings for windy outdoor conditions and to reduce risk of disease and mold growth.

1 2 3 4 5

PROCESS: Dampen the sterile seedling mix and fill containers to the top, gently tamping soil to ensure the container is full.

Select your seed, create a label, and plant at the recommended depth.

Lightly cover seedlings with the growing medium and keep evenly moist until they emerge. As they begin to sprout, set the timer for the lights and fan to be on for 16-18 hours daily, and off for 6-8 hours at night.

Check seedlings daily for watering needs and raise the height of the lights as they grow.

When outdoor conditions are clear of freezing temperatures, begin “hardening off” plants by easing them outdoors into the sunlight and wind. Transplant seedlings outdoors after one week of hardening off and enjoy watching your garden grow!

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PRESCOTT VALLEY ADVERTISING AGENCIES Talking Glass Media, LLC 2982 N. Park Ave. Ste. F (928) 257-4177 TalkingGlass.Media

Home to SignalsAZ.com, Cast11.buzzsprout.com, TalkingGlassMag.com

APARTMENTS Homestead Talking Glass Luxury Apartments 3131 N. Main St. (928) 277-0184

Parke Place Rental Homes

3901 N. Main St. (928) 583-9997

BEAUTY - HEALTH SPA Cosmopolitan Salon 2982 N. Park Ave., Ste. A (928) 759-3397

Fantastic Sam’s

7025 Florentine Rd. Ste. 101 (928) 759-3550

Great Clips

3298 N. Glassford Hill Rd. Ste. 106 (928) 775-9952

Lynn’s Nail & Spa

7025 Florentine Road Ste. 103 (928) 775-4339

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DINING–FOOD Baskin-Robbins

3015 N. Glassford Hill Rd. (928) 458-5600

The Boba Bliss

Fry’s Shopping Center Ste. 106 (928) 775-5823

Buffalo Wild Wings 2985 N. Centre Ct. Ste. A (928) 759-9800

Casa Perez

3088 N. Glassford Hill Rd. Ste. 102 (928) 772-7777

Chili’s

7281 Pav Way (928) 775-6918

Colt BBQ & Spirits 2970 N. Park Ave. (928) 277-1424 ColtGrill.com

Dunkin’ Donuts

3015 N. Glassford Hill Rd. (928) 458-5600

Firehouse Subs

3088 N. Glassford Hill Rd. Ste. 101 (928) 227-0557 FirehouseSubs.com

Flour Stone Café

2992 N. Park Ave. Ste. C (928) 277-8197 FlourStoneBakery.business.site

Gabby’s Grill

2982 N. Park Ave. Ste. B (928) 277-1787 GabbysGrill.com

Grumpy Sicilian

7025 E. Florentine Rd. Ste. 102 (928) 756-2783 GrumpySicilian.com

Mod Pizza

3007 N. Glassford Hill Rd. (928) 212-1980 ModPizza.com

Panda Express

3140 N. Glassford Hill Rd. Ste. 105 (928) 775-5612

Papa Murphy’s Pizza

3298 N. Glassford Hill Rd. Ste. 105 (928) 775-7171

Rafter Eleven

2985 N. Centre Ct. Ste. B (928) 227-2050 RafterEleven.com

Robeks Juice

3140 N. Glassford Hill Rd. Ste. 102 (928) 227-0535

Rosa’s Pizzeria

2992 Park Ave. Ste. B (928) 277-0633 RosasPizzaria.com

Starbucks

3322 N. Glassford Hill Rd. Ste. A (928) 642-7505

EDUCATION UNDERGRAD Humboldt Unified School District 6411 N. Robert Rd. (928) 759-4000


COMMUNITY DIRECTORY Yavapai College, Prescott Valley Campus

One Main Financial

The Landings Senior Living Community

2982 N. Park Ave. Ste. C (928) 772-0240

3500 N. Windsong Dr. (928) 445-3669

Post Net

Yavapai Pediatrics

FAMILY ENTERTAINMENT

3298 N. Glassford Hill Rd. Ste. 104 (928) 759-3700

3201 N. Main St. (928) 772-1819

Scott A. Smith Insurance Agency

YRMC – East

6955 E. Panther Path (928) 717-7911

Findlay Toyota Center

Harkins 14 Theaters 7202 Pav Way (928) 775-2284

In The Game – Family Entertainment Group 2992 Park Ave. Ste. A (928) 775-4040

3298 N. Glassford Hill Rd. Ste. 103 (928) 772-7100

Yavapai Regional Medical Center 7700 Florentine Rd. (928) 445-2700 YRMC.org

HEALTH CARE — IN-HOME CARE & COUNSELING

IN SERVICE OF COUNTRY

Arizona Dermatology Group

FINANCES – PROFESSIONAL SERVICES

3001 N. Main St. Ste. 1E & 1F (928) 772-8553

Allied Cash Advance

3001 N. Main St. Ste. 2A (928) 968-5240

3140 N. Glassford Hill Rd. Ste. 104 (928) 772-1290

BMO Harris Bank

7221 Florentine Rd. (928) 775-7600

Desert Financial Credit Union 3100 N. Glassford Hill Rd. Inside Fry’s (928) 233-7000

Edward Jones

7025 E. Florentine Rd. Ste. 105 (928) 772-5474

Foothills Bank

3001 N. Main St. Ste. 1C (928) 458-5470

Hospice of the West

Miracle-Ear

3140 N. Glassford Hill Rd. Ste. 103 (928) 955-8109 Miracle-Ear.com

Mountain Valley Rehabilitation Hospital 3700 N. Windsong Dr. (928) 759-8800

Sage Counseling 3001 N. Main St. Ste. 1A (928) 237-9089

US Armed Forces Recruitment Offices 2982 N. Park Ave. Ste. D (928) 443-8958

MAGAZINES PRINT MEDIA TG Magazine

2982 N. Park Ave. Ste. F (928) 257-4177

MISCELLANEOUS AZ Dept Of Corrections 3001 N. Main St. Ste. 2C (928) 277-2786

Colt Cleaners

7025 E. Florentine Rd. Ste. 108 (928) 775-0599

3044 N. Glassford Hill Rd. (928) 759-8600 169


COMMUNITY DIRECTORY NEWS - DIGITAL MEDIA CAST11 Podcast 2982 N. Park Ave. Ste. F (928) 257-4177

SignalsAZ.com Website 2982 N. Park Ave. Ste. F (928) 257-4177

REAL ESTATE Fain Signature Group Properties, Inc. Ron Fain - Broker 3001 N. Main St. Ste 2B (928) 772-8844

Real Estate Development Residential – Commercial – Industrial Build To Suit

FainSignatureGroup.com

RETAIL – HOME – GARDEN Boot Barn

7321 Pav Way (928) 772-6665

Kohl’s

3280 N. Glassford Hill Rd. (928) 772-0989

Mattress America

3298 N. Glassford Hill Rd. Ste. 101 (928) 775-5699

Peddler’s Pass

6201 E. State Rte. 69 (928) 775-4117

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Queen Esther’s Closet 7025 E. Florentine Rd. Ste. 104 (928) 899-5516

Walmart

3450 N. Glassford Hill Rd. (928) 499-3136

TOWN RESOURCES

Central Arizona Fire and Medical (CAFMA) 8603 E. Eastridge Dr. (928) 772-7711

Prescott Valley Chamber of Commerce 7120 Pav Way Ste. 102 (928) 772-8857

Prescott Valley Civic Center – Recreation Area 7501 Skoog Blvd (928) 759-3000

Prescott Valley Economic Foundation (PVEDF) 7120 Pav Way Ste .106 (928) 775-0032

Prescott Valley Police Department 7601 Skoog Blvd (928) 772-9261

Prescott Valley Public Library

7401 Skoog Blvd (928) 759-3040

Town Of Prescott Valley, AZ. 7501 Skoog Blvd Switchboard: (928) 759-3000 Water Billing: (928) 759-3120

TRANSPORTATION Groome Transportation Shuttle Service Pick-Up Location: 3001 N. Main St. (800) 888-2749

Maverick Gas Station & Convenience Store

3576 N. Glassford Hill Rd. (928) 772-1126

VETERINARIAN – PET CARE Premier Pet Hospital

3322 N. Glassford Hill Rd. Ste. B (928) 460-4211


Celebrating 60 Years of Building Community Residential | Commercial | Industrial | Build to Suit | Publishing

We understand that careful planning and community building require strong partnerships for thoughtful and meaningful growth that support opportunities for living a good life. Fain Signature Group has been here for generations, and will work with the community for generations to come. You have our word on it.

www.FainSignatureGroup.com


THE {FULL} LIFE AWAITS What makes Touchmark a great place to live? The same thing that makes it a great place to work: the people! Touchmark at The Ranch offers spectacular retirement living just miles away from the Prescott National Forest. Guided by our mission to enrich lives every day, we provide first-class services and resort-style amenities, including well-appointed living spaces, multiple on-site options for dining, a Health & Fitness Club, and programming for every interest.

Call

928-515-2486 to learn more and schedule a tour.

TOUCHMARK AT THE RANCH ∙ FULL-SERVICE RETIREMENT COMMUNITY 2227595 © Touchmark, LLC, all rights reserved


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