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boilingprocess Todo tiene un proceso. Partiendo de la condición humana y la interminable serie de cambios constantes que se le adjudican, vamos en búsqueda del por qué de nuestra humanidad, analizando los procesos que nos llevan a ser seres metamórficos. Utilizando la creación colectiva para comparar el mundo terrenal con los otros planos existenciales digitales y espirituales, forzándolos a coexistir. Marcados por la frontera tijuanense que a su vez ha creado barreras conceptuales en la mente de sus habitantes, procuramos tumbar estos muros imaginarios como proceso principal. Esto con el fin de llevar el arte de una pequeña esquina a cualquier parte del mundo. / Everything has a process. Parting from the human condition and the endless series of constant changes that it conveys, we are in search of the why? In our humanity, analyzing the process that makes us metamorphic beings. Utilizing collective creation in order to compare the real world with other existential planes, digital and spiritual, forcing them to co-exist. Marked by the Tijuana border, which in turn creates conceptual borders in the minds of it’s inhabitants, the main process is seen as the tearing down of these imaginary walls, with the goal of taking the art of our small corner into any part of the world.

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Construir una contra en la era del selfie… Recuerdo que hace veinte años, los artistas de la frontera, teníamos la ilusión de que “algún día de estos podíamos hacerla como artistas”. En aquel entonces eso significaba que nuestras ideas podían llegarle a una comunidad-público que anhelaba las exposiciones e inauguraciones regionales porque allí mismo te encontrabas con circunstancias, acciones, imágenes, objetos, etc… y en base a ese encuentro generamos un diálogo; que por lo general no tiene nada que ver con “la obra”, solo que ese diálogo no existía sin que la obra lo hubiera detonado… Hoy día, casi todos vemos “la obra” en proceso o conocemos la fuente de la obra en proceso porque casi todos los artistas de cierta generación “suben” sus procesos a las redes antes de exhibir los resultados físicamente, y a veces eso nunca existe. Vivimos en un consumo masivo de información que hace veinte años se veía imposible, o ni se veía. Hoy es la norma, y ha de ser una guerra emocional tratar de competir con toda la información que se genera a diario, cuando la gran mayoría que no sirve de nada pero llena los vacíos emocionales que la falta de contacto

directo y diálogo en carne y hueso ha dejado, esa generación lo ve normal. En TJINCHINA estamos tratando de conformar a un equipo de artistas jóvenes mileneales, nuestros futuros (y en algunos casos actuales) colegas, cómplice y compañeros del trabajo de arte comprometidos con la destreza artística y empoderados con la responsabilidad social que puede lograr su práctica. Sabemos, por experiencia propia, que si la trasmisión de ideas intrageneracionales no se fomenta, pues no se dá, y también conocemos de primera mano el daño que le hace a la memoria colectiva de la región y al nivel del diálogo artístico de sus habitantes. El grupo de artistas que conforma Boiling Process son parte importantísima del día a día en TJINCHINA ProjectSpace, su entrega al proyecto nos permite pensar más en grande y saber que contamos con el equipo indicado para lograrlo. Estamos juntos en este encuentro sinérgico del arte sobre las cosas que creemos que podemos cambiar con el. Conózcanlos bien, ya que verán sus obras y las reacciones que provocarán durante muchos años más.

Mely Barragán y Daniel Ruanova directores de tjinchina project space (TJ)

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Since first meeting TJINCHINA directors Daniel Ruanova and Mely Barragan in 2009, the three of us have collaborated on multiple occasions as both artists and art promoters in Tijuana and Los Angeles. In the month of August 2014, I had the honor of participating in a group show at TJINCHINA, and the chance to meet and work with 6 young artists from Tijuana who were helping with the operations of the gallery. Without knowing their individual art work, I could see that they were energetic, committed and hungry. During the after-party at a bar called Bakbuk on 6th Street (a.k.a. Flores Magon) in downtown Tijuana, Daniel, Mely and I decided it might be fun to organize an exchange exhibition which would feature the works of these 6 artists with young artists from Los Angeles. Part 1 would be held at TJINCHINA, and Part 2 would be done at JAUS, the artist-run-space that I have here in LA. Both shows would be 1 night only pop-up exhibitions. The 6 artists who would represent Tijuana was quite straightforward; the six who were working with TJINCHINA. The artists I would choose from Los Angeles was a bit more complicated, as I don’t have a regular team besides my colleague Chris Tallon, and my domestic partner Aska Irie who are both more seasoned artists. I didn’t think they would fit conceptually with the 6 from Tijuana. So, I went down a list of about a dozen or so former students who have helped me out at the gallery at one point or another. The parameter I chose to narrow down the list was that they be current students or recent graduates from an undergraduate university program (no MFA’s), that they make respectable work, that they have a good rapport with each other, and that they be available and willing. As the TJ group was a mix of fine artists, designers and filmmakers, I also picked a group of artists with somewhat parallel profiles. The initial group to exhibit in Tijuana from Tijuana included Mariel Abarca, Spel, Paula Flores, Elsoldelrac, Joey Muñoz, and T.P. Gilbert. The group from L.A. consisted of Nathan War-

ner, Elyse Reardon-Jung, Randall Foster, Eric Vrymoed and Dasha Orlova. Lena Wolek from LA was later joined the team for the JAUS exhibit. Daniel and Mely made a point of not interfering with the process, and had the team of 11 artists build the TJ show from the ground up. I think I meddled a little bit more. Regardless, the team did all the heavy lifting and thinking themselves, they named the group Boiling Process, threw themselves in a pot, turned on the heat, and stirred gently. ‘ The first of these exhibits took place at TJINCHINA last November 2014, and the second exhibition at JAUS LA happened in February 2015. As this was a bit of a science experiment for Daniel, Mely and I, I don’t think any of us were 100% certain how it would all turn out. Frankly, and I believe I can speak for the three of us when I say this, but the Boiling Process shows at TJINCHINA and at JAUS were well beyond our expectations. The event and entire process proved to be a genuinely fruitful and gratifying experience that has fostered a meaningful bond between and among those involved, generating a two city and cross border dialogue outside of the more official channels of distribution. The results were so formidable that the Boiling Process team has since been invited to do a third installment at the legendary Mexicali Rose in May 2015 with Aaron Dadacay and Maria Villote from Alta California and L.Fructuo from Baja California added to Mexicali mix. Members of the TJ team also participated in the first Joshua Treenial in June 2015. Independent curator, and Joshua Treenial director KJ Baysa invited the group to participate after having seen the exhibition at JAUS. Needless to say, it’s been quite exciting to watch these artists work together, and expand their horizons. I personally am looking very much forward to see what the future has in store for them as individual artists and as a group.

ICHIRO IRIE

JAUS director (L.A.)

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In TJ Art Pushes Back The encyclopedia offers this description: “In the boiling process, no matter how much heat is applied, the liquid only boils faster and the temperature of the water remains constant during the process.” It is perhaps not coincidental that this core group of four young artists from Tijuana, Mexico, have assumed the name Boiling Process, a reflection of their creativity, equanimitas, and resiliency in the largest USMexico border metropolis whose infamous reputation for drugs, violence, corruption, and sex is being eclipsed by growing sectors in contemporary art, digital technologies, and regional gastronomy. It would be foolhardy to ignore the dark undercurrents that still remain. The border is never completely out of one’s mind in TJ and its physicality is more than matched by its psychic encroachment. Rather than fleeing or migrating, the founding artists of Boiling Process: Paula Flores, Mariel Abarca, Talia P. Gilbert, SPEL, and Elsoldelrac are making a spirited stand in their city, and beyond. They travel easily with their documents through the porous checkpoints. They look northward rather than south to Mexico City, embracing the idea that Southern California and Northern Baja essentially constitute one region with its creative nodes in San Diego and its Barrio Logan

district; Tijuana with CECUT and TJinChina Project Space, among others. They’re young. They’re vocal. They travel. With LA artists the members mounted Boiling Process 2, a one night pop-up at JAUS in Los Angeles, then Boiling Process Vol. 3 at the Mexicali Rose Art Gallery, and recently in the landmark exhibition, Revision Glocal Review, at CECUT. This summer they were enthusiastically received at The Joshua Treenial, in the California high desert, where they rubber shoulders with artists and visitors from Palm Springs, Santa Fe, Los Angeles, Honolulu, Dallas, Dubai, Washington DC, San Diego, Johannesburg, New York, Paris, and Joshua Tree, among other places. Museum directors, program executives, art professors, and art collectors viewed their works. They are socially conscious, tackling vital issues of social justice and sustainability through the language of art, pushing back against ignorance and apathy. Collaborators and potential new members approach them. Artist residencies and exhibitions are planned in other countries. The artists of Boiling Process are making noise, creating waves, moving forward, and not looking back. These are the artists to watch

Dr. KJ Baysa CURATOR

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M a r iel

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Ab a r c a


E L SO L D E L RAC

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P A U L A 14

F L OR E S


J O E Y

M U Ñ O Z

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T A L I A

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P É R E Z

G I L B E R T


N E S T OR

S P E L

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E L Y S E

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R E A R D O N - J U N G


E R I c

V R Y M O E D

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RANDA L L 20

F OS T E R


DASHA

OR L O V A

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NA T HAN

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C .

W ARN E R


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NA T HAN

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C .

W ARN E R


DASHA

OR L O V A

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E R I c

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V R Y M O E D


E L Y S E

R E A R D O N - J U N G

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RANDA L L

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F OS T E R


L E NA

W O L E K

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E L

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SO L

D E L

RAC


P A U L A

F L OR E S

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M a r iel

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Ab a r c a


T A L I A

P É R E Z

G I L B E R T

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AARON

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DADACA Y


DASHA

OR L O V A 37


E R I c 38

V R Y M O E D


E L Y S E

R A R D O N - J U N G

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L E NA

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W O L E K


M AR I A

V I L L O T E

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M AR I E L

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A B ARCA


E L

SO L

D E L

RAC

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P A U L A

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F L OR E S


L U I S

al o ns o

S รก N C H E Z

V A R E L A

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T A L I A 46

P É R E Z

G I L B E R T


N E S T OR

S P E L

M ONDRA G Ó N

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M AR I E L

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A B ARCA


T A L I A

P É R E Z

G I L B E R T

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L U I S

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al o ns o

S รก N C H E Z

V A R E L A


E L

SO L

D E L

RAC

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paula

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fl o r es


C a r mi n a

leรณ n

( C a r mi n o p o li s )

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meet the team TJ 57


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MARIEL

ABARCA

Nació en Tijuana, Baja California, México en 1991. Actualmente reside y trabaja en Tijuana. Me interesa el desplazamiento, los cambios, la fluidez; para mí eso es lo natural. Soy parte de una ciudad llena de gente con el deseo de cruzar fronteras, observo sus comportamientos tratando de adivinar sus pensamientos y es precisamente eso lo que me inspira. Boiling Process ha sido una constante duda que no sabe qué es o qué viene delante de él en el tiempo. Surge de una invitación a artistas emergentes tijuanenses para colaborar con artistas de Los Ángeles que no conocíamos y ha fluido de una manera muy orgánica casi de puras invitaciones. Después de las primeras dos exposiciones decidimos que queríamos exponer alternadamente entre México y Estados Unidos. Con esto íbamos a ser una clase de borrador humano, eliminando la frontera con cada cruce y conviviendo con la facilidad de que la misma cantidad de artistas, tanto de Tijuana como de L.A., estuviera en el mismo lugar y el mismo día por varias ocasiones. Seguimos…

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elsoldelrac

CARLOS CISNEROS

Artista Tijuanense, de naturalidad fronteriza. Le interesa lo cotidiano que normalmente no se toma en cuenta, aborda desde diferentes puntos y contextos el entorno que la sociedad impone haciendo pasar ciertas sensaciones como incorrectos; lo cual lo lleva al análisis del comportamiento humano atado a un sistema social que solo pretende controlar al pueblo más débil. Intenta hacerles caer en cuenta sobre sumisa realidad en la que se vive actualmente. Como artista busca permanecer en el constante movimiento y experimentación, lo cual lo aborda en disciplinas diferentes como textil, fotografía, arte objeto, escultura, pintura, etc. Trabaja su lenguaje mediante símbolos y retoma la estética popular, haciendo el folclore fronterizo parte de su detonante y material para producir. Junto con el folclore viene la textura de los alimentos, por lo que la cocina tiene presencia en su trabajo de manera complementaria en busca de un equilibrio multisensorial. El pertenecer a esta mezcla entre artistas de Tijuana y Los Ángeles hace esta experiencia muy gratificante, ya que los distintos puntos geográficos en los que se encuentra cada mitad del colectivo nos deja conocer una manera muy diferente de pensamiento y producción, pero a fin de cuentas, con un mismo propósito.

elsoldelrac.com

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PAULA FLORES

Nace 1988 en la ciudad de Tijuana. Actualmente reside en Tijuana. Imagino el sonido del papel rasgándose, puedo ver los bordes con sus rupturas que asemejan orillas de acantilados. Así retrocedo en el proceso para escindir cada idea. De esta manera encuentra el micro dentro del macro, cosa que resulta infinita. Intento capturar uniones, procesos, consecuencias y resultados lo cual todo parte de la acción. De la toma de decisiones que hacemos desde que nacemos y el despliegue ilimitado de los resultados que afectan al universo y sus incluyentes. No vemos enlace alguno con la tierra, lo intentan borrar. Como fruto de esta desconexión se pierde el ritual. Un agradecer, un sacrificio que nos une con el universo. Boiling Process es un viaje continuo con paradas constantes. No tiene ruta marcada, de repente llegan letras avisándonos a donde tenemos que ir. Dividimos el tiempo y lo poco que tenemos, junto con el sueño a medias que se quedó esperando en la almohada de cada quien. Dependemos de aparatos que te marcan la ruta para poder llegar. Cuando andamos del otro lado que no tenemos servicio del que todo lo sabe, retrocedemos unos años cuando se usaba papel y pluma para dibujar una combinación de líneas que apuntan al destino. Buscando letreros mientras los carros que vienen detrás de nosotros nos sacan la vuelta por que al parecer no tenemos tan buena vista como para poder leerlos de lejos. Llegamos a saludar, a descargar todo lo que viene encimado incluyendo nosotros. Venimos a desdoblarnos, a borrar fronteras.

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NESTOR

SPEL

Nació en Tijuana B.C. Mex. El 16 de mayo de 1987, SPEL estudió la licenciatura en Diseño Grafico por la Universidad de las Californias en TIjuana 2009. Está interesado en la interacción con la gente a través de disciplinas o formas de arte como el graffiti, experimenta con diferentes técnicas y materiales para la elaboración de su obra. Actualmente SPEL ha realizado 4 exposiciones individuales y varias colectivas. Su obra aborda temas de interés social y personal, está muy centrado en el medio ambiente urbano, los flujos migratorios y el trasfondo de las palabras.

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TALIA

PÉREZ GILBERT Tijuana B.C. Noviembre de 1987 Busco comprender e impactar el mundo que me rodea, siendo un puente que une las ideas y la sensibilidad a través de las diferentes plataformas multidiciplinarias y el trabajo en equipo. Entiendo los procesos de trabajo como parte del aprendizaje profesional, lo que me ha llevado a trabajar mas allá de la creación, y me he adentrado también en actividades de coordinación de artes, tales como logística, planeación y ejecución de proyectos de diferentes índoles, plataformas y objetivos. Formar parte de Boiling Process significa un parteaguas y corrección de objetivos personales, he aprendido a pasar de la “planeación” a la operación, en donde ya no son numeros, registro, y coordinación, sino entablar un intercambio cultural sensible, entre una pieza y el lugar que la contiene, pero... todo lo que está en medio es lo verdaderamente interesante. Me encanta haber encontrado personas que también están en el “camino del arte” y no con una necesidad de pretensión o repetición sin sentido, sino con un ánimo genuino, de expresión, experimentación, colaboración, y por ende una forma de “idealismo” que a mi, en este preciso momento, me cuadra.

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JOEY MUÑÓZ

El cinismo y la apatía como postura socio-política. Siendo parte de la Generación. Y Joey Muñoz busca proyectar la ideología exprés de sus iguales, tanto los que no están consientes de su rol sistematizado como los que toman una postura contracultural dentro del mismo sistema a través de los medios digitales. Nacido en la era del internet ve el mundo real con un ojo virgen interpretado por la cámara, tras años de ver el exterior a través de una pantalla. Siendo este el vicio de una generación, la pantalla parece la manera más apropiada de presentar una idea a un individuo o público. Consciente de la velocidad con la que recibimos estímulos en la era digital y el déficit de atención que esto provoca, se borra la línea entre la vida real y el alter-ego que nos creamos en las redes. Invitando a re-descubrir la humanidad que pusimos en pausa al empezar el siglo, sin olvidar el nuevo lenguaje que nos hemos ido creando en el mundo digital.

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LUIS ALONSO

SÁNCHEZ VARELA

21 Abril 1995 Tijuana México El folklore transfronterizo es el motor de mi obra, representar los efectos de la desintegración sociocultural en el contexto actual, el hecho de vivir en este punto geográfico te hace querer generar un cuestionamiento de cual es la realidad y por que la ignoramos o distorsionamos a nuestro favor.

 Boiling process es una red internacional de artistas, una red que no tiene una búsqueda definida, tiende a expandirse a través de la frontera o contraerse dentro de sus limites dependiendo de la situación en la que se encuentre, a través de la experiencia de estar en esta red binacional de artistas puedo llegar a tener un mejor entendimiento de como obtenemos la misma información pero no la desarrollamos de una manera similar por el hecho de tener una frontera entre nosotros, sin embargo el tratar de olvidarse de ello es algo que se busca hacer frecuentemente.

luisalonsosanchez.com

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CARMINA LEÓN

( CAR M I NO P O L I S )

Considerando que la práctica artística tiene la capacidad de transmitir sensaciones, abordo temáticas nostálgicas, poéticas y sensoriales porque creo que al ser humano nos hace falta reconectarnos con estos aspectos en medio de un sistema que a veces se vuelve caótico y destructivo. En mi producción artística son importantes los aspectos lúdicos, ya que el juego es parte importante de la infancia, época en la cual los instintos son guiados por la curiosidad y se siguen sin represión. Mi proceso creativo se alimenta de caminar, leer y explorar nuevos espacios. Es así que mi obra nace del paisaje, de los lugares, olores, sabores y texturas que me rodean, todo aquello que define mi experiencia sensorial en el planeta. Así mismo, aspectos de la psique que conforman mi identidad como mujer, como hija y como mexicana. Hago uso de colores intensos y llamativos, bailes regionales, juguetes, objetos, vestimenta y otros elementos de diferentes tradiciones mexicanas haciendo referencia a la festividad que guarda la identidad de mi país, utilizando técnicas tradicionales mezcladas con experimentación de materiales ricos en textura. Considerando lo que quiero expresar, mi obra a veces es figurativa y a veces abstracta.

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meet the team L.A. 73


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RANDALL FOSTER

Bio: Raised in the Appalachian Mountains in southwestern Virginia. Served 5 ½ years in the U.S. Navy. Graduated from UCLA with a BA in Fine Arts. Statement: My work deals mostly with the disconnect between Veteran and Civilian, and the misconceptions of Appalachia America. Experience: The Boiling Process was an amazing exchange of cultures, ideas and artistic styles. I enjoyed experiencing the different cultural reactions to the vastly different styles of artwork.

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ELYSE

REARDON-JUNG

Brief bio: Elyse Reardon–Jung is a Los Angeles bred artist. Employing primarily performance and video; her work deals with the interplay between masochism and gender roles, as an expression of the tension between personal strength and selfdestruction. Her work has been shown in the states and abroad with CoLab at Platform LA, the New Wight Gallery, JAUS and the Building Bridges Project. She is a recent graduate of the University of California in Los Angeles. Statement: All of my work is about the line between selfcontrol and selfdestruction: an exploration of masochism and power as performed by the female body. Female selfdestruction is not a new topic, but it is one that is not going anywhere. It litters the checkout lines at supermarkets; starlets on every tabloid battling depression, eating disorders, or selfinjury. It can also hit close to home. I will readily admit that my interest in these topics is personal. Making work about the inside of my head may be selfcentered, but I believe that the inside of my head is not that different from others; and this has become something of a maxim for my practice. I believe that women are trained to accept pain, degradation and selfdenial as moments of true achievement. From blisters that come from that perfect pair of heels, the horrifying recovery from plastic surgery, or the brain numbing hunger of a crash diet women accept physical pain as given. This mirrors in a very directly the way a masochist derives pleasure from a beating. For as often as these pressures become the foundation for depression and selfdestructive behavior; they also force women to derive pleasure from it, essentially institutionalizing masochism. This masochism becomes a way to reassert control, by creating the sense that giving up control and enjoying even reveling in the pain is a choice. This institutionalized masochism creates pressure around the physical beauty and presentation of the self that it also creates yet another neurotic corollary to keep up with the demands of constant selfpreening, narcissism. This narcissism, leads me to my choice of medium. My work consists almost exclusively of performances enacted by me. Part of this is a gesture of narcissism and part of this is a gesture of control. In my mind control, who has it, and who wants it, is one of the most fundamental driving forces of society. I also see that how we internalize this desire for control as the main building block of neuroses. These forces also happen to be the driving forces of our economic system. This in my mind leaves interesting avenues open in terms of how else to further complicate the investigation of women’s role (and my role) in society. Thoughts on BP: It has been a privilege to be a part of the Boiling Process team. The shows have been a remarkable opportunity to connect with the artists involved in a surprisingly intimate way. There is a quick camaraderie that forms when you are under the gun; putting a show together. Individual concerns fade and are supplanted by considerations of the group dynamic, the holistic presentation. We are fueled by the excitement of novelty; new places and faces, new conversations, and the obligatory large quantities of beer. Tom Marioni has already canonized the convivial ingesting of malted beverages as no less than the highest†form†of†art, so perhaps our research in the lab of Boiling Process is not groundbreaking, yet personally revelatory to be certain. I found that the moments I consistently reflect on are the moments inbetween and leading up to what I or we planned to do. I found that being a part of Boiling Process, really was about the process of connecting persontoperson, artistatoartist; expanding our community through a process of rapid bonding.

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ERIC

VRYMOED Brief Bio: Eric Vrymoed is an artist who lives and works in Los Angeles. A recent graduate of UCLA, Vrymoed has worked in collaboration with the Public Engagement Program at the Hammer Museum, and has shown in Santa Barbara and Los Angeles. Statement:

Much of my work continually reiterates the unconscious resurfacing of fears or objects with abject attraction. I find the process of my work is a response to anxiety and the compulsion toward pleasure. In earlier work, I was interested in the castration complex, and the dynamics of emasculation and lack. Lately I have been thinking about modes of production in relation to modernity and how cultural fetishization of objects perpetuates their very antithesis; the banal. I hope that there is a level of humor communicated through the work, pointing to the absurd as we grope toward progress within an advanced technologic society. Thoughts on Boiling Process: Boiling Process has been a great experience to help blur the lines of art making between the already porus California and Mexico border. I found it particularly interesting how each location and its specific audience shifts the dynamics of the show.

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DASHA

ORLOVA

Short Bio With a Bachelor’s from Design Media Arts | UCLA, I have experimented with multiple forms of new media as artistic expression, in addition to my background in commercial video and design. My work is in a constant state of flux, reflecting the evolution of my subject matter, and experimenting with different processes to best fit the message being conveyed. 
 Statement The recurring subject in my work is individual and collective identity as it is molded by socially constructed barriers and interconnection. Mediums used are performance, photography, video, social experiments, and interactive programming, often involving the viewer as part of the work. Experience/Thoughts about Boiling Process It was a moving experience to be part of the Boiling Process show because in addition to showing at a really cool space, I got a taste of the Tijuana culture. Sharing the space between Mexican and American artists allowed us to exchange ideas and learn about each other in a way that I’ve never experienced before.

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NATHAN C. WARNER

Los Angeles, California Nathan was born and raised in Venice, California. His work has been shown in North Carolina, San Francisco, Los Angeles, and recently in Tijuana. After studying at the San Francisco Art Institute for 3 years Nathan has returned to Los Angeles to develop a new body of work titled “The Revival of Punk Aesthetics.” This new body of work pulls from the historical development of mid century modern, skate, surf, chicano, and punk cultures that emerged post World War II, Los Angeles. Outside of his artistic practices Nathan is a graphic designer, curator, owner of an artist collective, and an event coordinator. “The Revival of Punk Aesthetics.” pulls from the historical development of mid century modern, skate, surf, chicano, and punk cultures that emerged post World War II Los Angeles. The work reflects aesthetics of early punk flyers where figures, faces, and identities were covered with bold blocks of text. In this instance the aesthetic reflects a nostalgia around the era of a Los Angeles fixated on clean, glossy paint jobs of car culture, surfboards, skateboards, and all of the elements of design that Angelenos fixated on. The contrast of landscape and figure create a conversation of tone and mood that encourages the viewer to question, create, or indulge in without explanation. It is a chance for the viewer to explore their own nostalgia and reflect. Boiling Process is in a certain sense a culmination of young artists coming together with different visions, backgrounds, and cultural upbringings to create a dialogue through art. Although our mediums, our styles, our subject matter varies from person to person, it seems to create an effortlessly cohesive conversation. It has created an awareness of my own personal work and opened up opportunities for my future as an artist. It has, in so many words, been one of the greatest experiences I’ve has.

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LENA

WOLEK

Wolek’s art rigorously references to her personal experiences growing up in post-socialist Siberian Russia. She investigates the contrast between the lingering effects of a consumer-based modern urban society that Americanism and Globalization perpetuate with that of a more nature-oriented society found in rural communities, as the one in which she grew up. After moving to Los Angeles in 2001, Lena attended the Santa Monica College Mentor Program, and obtained her Bachelor degree in Fine Arts and Art History at University of California, Los Angeles in 2012. Her art works have been selected for various exhibitions in the United States and abroad. My art investigates the range of ideological, social, economic and political fundamentals of rapid contemporary global development. Having grown up in a small town in Siberia where folk customs are still the norm, and then adapting to cosmopolitan Los Angeles, I observe and analyze the recent and rapid changes in both societies. This allows me the unique ability to integrate observations of value and loss in both social contexts in order to critique the comparative mentality and cultural attitudes between the two. These conceptual formulations are visually translated and expressed through drawings, ceramics, sculptures, videos, and installations. In addition to contemporary formal aesthetics the work incorporates old craft techniques such as sewing, weaving, and pottery that have been utilized out of necessity for centuries by common folk for simple livelihood. Drawing upon Siberian traditions of folk humor, Soviet-style animation, and biting sarcastic slogans as influences and instigators of this multivalent critical perspective, my work seeks to navigate a path between high and low cultural and socio-economical perspectives in the global world where we all now dwell. It is powerful. The Boiling Process for me refers to a stew where different ingredients join into one pot to create a dish or some substance with unique flavor and taste. The recipe keeps developing and improving with each event, adding a new member and time spent together getting to know each other and become tighter. We share power and experience as a group with the world. We can boil and melt things up and down but lets never evaporate or burn down.

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MARIA VILLOTE

Bio I was born in the Philippines and immigrated to America ten years later in order to find out the true meaning of living the American Dream- and leaving behind family and a life of luxury. In 2011, I received a Bachelor’s degree at the University of California, Berkeley in Art Practice. I’m currently stuck in what appears to be purgatory, limbo, the time void- the period between post-undergraduate art school and pre-graduate art school whilst enduring the monotony of living to work, working to live. Statement The Skin Graft Series stemmed from self-consciousness and the urge to inconspicuously transplant one’s own ‘identity’; a reiteration of the nude; and the exploration of skin tonality. Experience/thoughts about Boiling Process I applaud the amount of public support and exposure Mexicali Rose has generated for itself. The energy radiated from the obvious prescence in numbers at the BP III opening reception shows that despite the language barrier, art still has the power to resonate and create dialogue and understanding thus, a sense of community between cultures beyond borders.

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AARON

DADACAY

BIO I was born and raised in the bureaucratic capital of the Philippines during a discourse of one martial lawed regime, a successful presidential impeachment, and two People’s Power revolutions. After finishing high school in an ‘all male’ institution, I’ve acquired experience in technical drafting but quickly decided to abandon a potential architectural career and instead devote myself into fine arts. I moved to Ventura County, specifically to the agricultural town of Oxnard at the age of sixteen. I practiced studio art for four years and received an associate’s degree at Oxnard College. In fall of 2008, I was accepted in UCLA arts program and received a degree in art. STATEMENT My work revolves around recurring memories that are triggered by human perception. Psychoanalytically, I find it easy to interpret different sensory information and translate them into cultural signifiers, which I use to create emotions based on nostalgia. These emotions are then turned into physical energy to create works of art. I tend to use a set list of signifiers to determine the emotion that I want to narrate. These signifiers are as follow: 1. Mythology 2. Religion 3. Sociopolitics 4.Identity 5.Time 6.Heritage A THANK YOU NOTE I am honored to be a part of Boiling Point 3 and to work with these very talented individuals from both sides of the fence. There is a very high level of energy in Mexicali Rose that can only be described as raw and restless. The signifiers are there: Punk! Dirty! Untamed! Contagious! Perhaps I blame it on the art, the artists, the drugs, the people, the Mexican punk band and their twenty-second songs, the ‘banda’ next door. From what I can remember, the opening reception was loud. It reverberated across the border, through the fence...People are talked art lingo...Lingo...wait, its Sabado. Left over fried rice from Golden China. It really boiled down there, up in smoke, highlighted by portable work lights in the backyard. ‘Chingon’. 87


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some work

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M AR I E L

A B ARCA

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E L SO L D E L RAC 93


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paula

fl o r es

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talia

pĂŠ r ez

gilbe r t

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L uis

al o ns o

s รก nchez

va r ela 99


boilingprocess.tumblr.com

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Boiling process  

Catálogo de Artistas TJ-LA

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