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INSPIRING PROJECTS for Creative Crocheters

STEPBY-STEP GUIDE

How to crochet Get hooked today!

Inside

21 BEAUTIFUL PROJECTS from beginner to expert!

WWW.INSIDECROCHET.CO.UK

Autumn Fashion

New season trends revealed

Quick & easy

MAKE A STRIPEY SCARF Perfect for trying colour changes

SUPER SOCKS!

Tips for a perfect fit

Fun project

SCANDI COOL HOOK A ZOMBIE! A spooky Halloween character

Update your wardrobe

Designer duo Arne & Carlos reveal their Norwegian home

Must-make patterns

PLEATED CARDIGAN Treat yourself to a fresh new look

French chic

STYLISH HOMEWARE WARM WOOLIES CREEPY CROCHET COSY ACCESSORIES

SWEET STRAWBERRY Make a delicious child’s cardie

INSPIRATION | NEWS | PRODUCTS | DESIGNERS & MORE! 01_IC#46[CoverGloves]CMSP6LHRDLH.indd 1

£4.99

ISSUE 46 OCTOBER 2013 46

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10/09/2013 16:57


Purplelinda Crafts

Love to Crochet

Knit Pro Waves Hooks

These bright coloured fun hooks have an easy grip handle for your comfort. For all your Crochet needs visit Europe's largest online Crochet store

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PO Box 6337, Bournemouth BH1 9EH Subscription enquiries t. +44 (0)1202 586848 chris@tailormadepublishing.co.uk

Meet the team Editor Claire Montgomerie claire@tailormadepublishing.co.uk Managing Editor Sarah Moran sarah@tailormadepublishing.co.uk Deputy Editor Lindsey Harrad lindsey@tailormadepublishing.co.uk Technical Editors Carol Ibbetson, Sara Sinaguglia, Charles Voth, Rachel Vowles Sub Editor Rhian Drinkwater Online Marketing Executive Adrian Lito adrian@tailormadepublishing.co.uk Contributors Brenda KB Anderson, Bianca Boonstra, Sarah Coad, Jane Crowfoot, Simone Francis, Helen Free, Melanie Galloway, Kat Goldin, Nicky Hale, Susan Koffler, Helda Panagary, Deanne Ramsay, Karen Ratto-Whooley, Lynne Rowe, Joanne Scrace, Sally Shepherd, Sara Sinaguglia, Rohn Strong, Tracey Todhunter Models Ida Balbina, Molly Casey, Jenny Fisher, Millicent Miles Photography Britt Spring www.brittspring.com Hair and makeup Nicki Henbrey Design Stephanie Peat Ad Production Leila Schmitz Main cover image Britt Spring Smaller cover images Britt Spring

Publishing Publisher Tim Harris Group Advertising Sales Manager Julia O’Gorman julia@tailormadepublishing.co.uk t. +44 (0)1491 874440 Advertising Sales Manager Lindsay Taylor lindsay@tailormadepublishing.co.uk t. +44 (0)1920 318078 Circulation Manager Tim Harris Production Manager John Beare IT Manager Vince Jones Subscriptions Manager Chris Wigg (See page 52 for subscription details) Published by Tailor Made Publishing Ltd PO Box 6337 Bournemouth BH1 9EH t. +44 (0)1202 586848 Printed by Precision Colour Printing Haldane, Halesfield 1 Telford, Shropshire TF7 4QQ t. +44 (0)1952 585585

Welcome I may have mentioned before just how much I adore autumn. It is most definitely my favourite season, not only because of the gorgeous colours associated with the falling leaves, foliage and autumn veg, but also because the fashions just get so much better! I might be biased, but as soon as the needles and hooks come out for cosy sweaters and scarves I want to layer up in snuggly wools and go on long walks through golden coloured fields. Admittedly, this might be quite a romantic view as it will probably also be pouring with rain for the rest of the year, but the new season certainly brings with it a lot more choice in the crocheted and knitted fashion department. If you are interested in what the new trends are, take a look at page 12 for our guide to what you should be wearing this autumn and winter. As the temperatures drop, handmade socks will definitely be the hero of this season, as they are warmer and more comfortable than most pairs you can buy. Karen Ratto-Whooley’s feature on page 38 is a handy how-to guide for hooking a perfectly fitting pair, and you can apply her tips while making Rohn Strong’s gorgeous socks on page 70, which use a cosy ribbed stitch for warmth and comfort. At the top of my queue this month is Lynne Rowe’s fabulous Boo! Bunting, perfect for any Halloween party, with just the right amount of humour and horror for my tastes. It will take pride of place above the toffee apples and baked potatoes!

page 38

©Tailor Made Publishing Ltd 2013 All rights reserved. No part of this magazine, or digital versions of the magazine, may be used, reproduced, copied or resold without written permission of the publisher. All information and prices, as far as we are aware, are correct at the time of going to press but are subject to change. Tailor Made Publishing Ltd cannot accept any responsibility for errors or inaccuracies in such information. Unsolicited artwork, manuscripts or designs are accepted on the understanding that Tailor Made Publishing Ltd incur no liability for their storage or return.

Claire Montgomerie, Editor

www.pinterest.com/insidecrochet www.facebook.com/insidecrochet @insidecrochet www.insidecrochet.co.uk 03

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ISSUE 46

CONTENTS

07

74

28

09

16

NEWS & REVIEWS

FEATURES

06 IN THE LOOP

16 HOOKS & HEDGEROWS

All the latest news from the world of crochet, including new yarns, designer interviews, free patterns, dates for your diary, competitions and much more!

12 OFF THE HOOK Discover the new season trends, from folk patterns to faux fur, and be inspired by our pick of the best high street finds.

14 GETTING HOOKED Our beginner crocheter tackles Claire Montgomerie’s Chamomile Socks – a pretty lacy pair that will put a smile on anyone’s feet!

15 BOOKS We review Brenda KB Anderson’s amazing creepy crochet book, plus fast-makes, wedding designs and amazing amigurumi.

This month Sara is preparing for olivepicking season in Sicily, and working up a vibrant rainbow top for the beach.

28 STUDIO STYLE We explore the Norwegian mountain home of Carlos Zachrison and Arne Nerjordet – otherwise known as design duo Arne & Carlos.

38 SOCK CUSTOMISATION Learn how to achieve the perfect fit with Karen Ratto-Whooley’s guide to crocheted socks – from cuff to heel to toe, it’s time to measure up!

12

98 FINAL THOUGHT We chat to Inside Crochet designer Joanne Scrace about her varied career.

04 Inside Crochet OCTOBER 2013

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Make it

Patterns in this issue

38

Crochet socks that fit! 44 Emmeline Cardigan

46 Alabama Shawl

48 Dorothea Sweater

51 Edith Hat and Scarf

54 Ellie Project Basket

56 Arianna Cowl

57 Eliza Scarf

58 Petite Fraise Cardigan

60 Pleated Cardigan

64 A Zombie Named Skip

68 “BOO!” Bunting

70 Ribbed Socks

72 Up and Away Mobile

74 Genevieve Gloves

78 Log Cabin Quilt

79 Log Cabin Cushion

84 Gabrielle

86 Duck Flannel and Bathmat

6

Win!

64 REGULARS 52 SUBSCRIPTIONS Save money every month by having Inside Crochet delivered direct to your door – subscribe today and never miss another issue.

55 BACK ISSUES Order digital and print back issues here – perfect if you missed a month.

81 NEXT ISSUE Count down to Christmas with next month’s festive issue, packed with gifts, seasonal decorations and more.

89 HOW TO CROCHET Never crocheted before? Don’t worry; here we explain everything you need to know to get started, from chains to trebles to tension squares.

SUBSCRIBE TODAY No need to head to the shops – save money and have Inside Crochet sent straight to you! Turn to page 52 for details

www.insidecrochet.co.uk 05

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News etc

IN THE LOOP BLOGS | BOOKS | REVIEWS | EVENTS | INTERVIEWS

SAVE MONEY!

SPOT T ED! ➻ What could be cuter than this crocheted owl hat? With cosy ear flaps and bright colours, this hat comes in two sizes for children aged 3–13. £12 from www.monsoon.co.uk

We’ve teamed up wit h the Country Living Christm as Fair to offer readers a 25 per cent discount on tickets boo ked in advance compared to prices on the door – simply quo te code CLX132 to get your disc ount.

We Love

[COMPETITION!]

Pony Hooks ➻ We’ve got five sets of five luxurious Pony bamboo crochet hooks to give away to readers. To win a set, simply answer the following question: Q. What is the largest size available in the Pony bamboo hook range? Send your answer to competitions@ tailormadepublishing.co.uk by Friday 25 October 2013. Please include your full name, postal address and daytime contact number.

[ S H O P S W E LOV E ]

Craft Corner ➻ Craft Corner in Phillimores Garden Centre in Melbourn, Hertfordshire is a hub of crafting activity, with a range of workshops and regular drop in Knit and Natter sessions for knitters and crocheters. Owner Mandy Hague also runs a knit and crochet pattern loan service, with donations going to charity. The shop stocks a range of craft supplies, fabric and yarns, including brands such as King Cole, Wendy and Adriafil crochet cotton. www.craftcornerltd.co.uk

[COMPETITION!]

Win tickets to Country Win! Living Christmas Fair ➻ The Country Living Magazine Christmas Fair is always a wonderful way to get excited about the festive season. Discover all manner of festive trends, treats and secrets at the Business Design Centre, Islington, London N1, from 30 October–3 November. To find out more or to book tickets call 0844 848 0160 or visit www.countrylivingfair.com. We’ve got three pairs of Country Living Christmas Fair tickets (worth £35 a pair) to give away. To win a pair, simply answer the following question: Q. The fair will also be visiting a Scottish city in November, will this be: A. Edinburgh B. Glasgow C. Aberdeen Send your answer to competitions@tailormadepublishing.co.uk. Closing date is 16 October 2013. Please include your full name, postal address and phone number.

[ N E W YA R N ]

Zingy colours from MillaMia ➻ The Swedish duo behind the MillaMia yarn brand have launched their first ever limited edition colours – Lime (181) and Cobalt (180) – for autumn 2013. The vibrant shades are a bright complement to the company’s Naturally Soft Merino yarn palette and will be available in limited stock only – so add to your stash now! RRP £5.50 per ball, available from www.millamia.com. 06 Inside Crochet OCTOBER 2013

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[CHARITY CROCHET]

Twiggy hooks in support ➻ Model, designer and actress Twiggy Lawson is supporting a campaign that encourages people to get knitting to help raise funds for international animal welfare charity SPANA (the Society for the Protection of Animals Abroad). As part of the Big Knit for Vet Kit fundraiser, knitters and crocheters can make Duncan the donkey, Hattie the horse or Clarence the camel and get sponsored whilst they stitch to raise funds for sick and injured working animals. Animal welfare campaigner and keen knitter Twiggy says: “I know everyone will have so much fun knitting or crocheting their very own gorgeous camels, horses and donkeys, with the money raised helping SPANA treat a real working animal in one of their clinics in Africa or the Middle East. It’s a privilege to be supporting this campaign as SPANA continues to work tirelessly in some of the world’s poorest countries, ensuring working animals are well looked after and given the care they deserve.” The free Big Knit for Vet Kit patterns can be ordered from www.spana.org/knit or by calling 020 7831 3999.

W E LOV E …

IN THE LOOP

News etc

DIARY ✽ 5 & 12 OCTOBER

VINTAGE AND HANDMADE FAIR & NEW JUMBLE SALE On 5 October the Original Vintage & Handmade Textile & Fashion Fair will be held at The Town Hall, Chipping Sodbury, from 10am–4pm, £1 admission. On 12 October, a new event, the V&H Jumble Sale, will take place at Selwyn Hall, Corsham, Wiltshire, from 10am–1pm. Free admission. www.vintageandhandmade.co.uk

✽ 10–13 OCTOBER

THE KNITTING AND STITCHING SHOW

Don’t Miss!

Don’t miss the big show of the autumn at Alexandra Palace, London. The Knitting and Stitching Show covers knitting, stitching, crochet, jewellerymaking, quilting, card-making and more. www.twistedthread.com

✽ UNTIL 8 DECEMBER

If you don’t have time to hook a crochet version, we spotted this cute trick or treat black cat bag on the high street. It’s the perfect place for kids to stash their goodies when they go to Halloween parties! £5 from uk.accessorize.com

VICTORIANA: THE ART OF REVIVAL From the macabre to the quaint, this exhibition at the Guildhall Art Gallery in East London explores the work of artists over the last 20 years who have been inspired by the 19th century. www.craftscouncil.org.uk/whats-on

✽ 25–27 OCTOBER

[ F E S T I VA L O F I D E A S ]

Hook, yarn and lichen

MUST SEE!

MADE BY HAND

The East Sussex Guild of Weavers, Spinners & Dyers presents a celebr ation of yarn crafts. 25 October, 10am–5pm & 26 October, 10am–4pm; Lewes Tow n Hall.

➻ The Cambridge Festival of Ideas will feature a display of crocheted flora and fauna created in natural fibre yarns by a group of WI crocheters, led by Inside Crochet designer Joanne Scrace (read our interview with Joanne on page 98). The Festival of Ideas runs from Wednesday 23 October to 3 November and will include a range of fascinating events around the city. The two crochet displays, one of crocheted lichen and the other of trailing plants, will be on show in the glass houses in the Cambridge University Botanic Gardens. For information on visiting go to www.botanic.cam.ac.uk. Normal entry times and prices will apply. More details of all the festival events and activities can be found at www.cam.ac.uk/festival-of-ideas.

MADE LONDON Made London, the design and craft fair, will be opening its doors again this year. www.madelondon.org

✽ 26–27 OCTOBER

THORESBY PARK CRAFT, FOOD & GIFT FAIR Thoresby Park is a beautiful setting for this show, which attracts a range of UK makers and demonstrators, while the park includes family entertainment, make and take areas and refreshments. www.livingheritagecraftshows.co.uk

WORKSHOPS ✽ SATURDAY 12 OCTOBER

INTERMEDIATE CROCHET ✽ SATURDAY 9 NOVEMBER

INDULGENT CROCHET Tracey Todhunter will be running a class at Make with Mabel in Knutsford for anyone who is confident with basic stitches. Intermediate crocheters can also enjoy a day of indulgent crochet using beads, ribbons, luxury yarns and buttons. To book telephone 01565 650884 or email rebecca@auntymabelsseat.com.

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Our a

FAVOURITE BLOGGER

Matt Farci

ACCORDING TO MATT… We chat to the man behind some of our favourite colourful crochet www.accordingtomatt.blogspot.de

Tell us about your life… I’m originally from Bristol, England, but I now live in Hamburg, Germany. I moved to Hamburg a couple of years ago for my job and am thoroughly enjoying living in my little loft apartment in this beautiful city. I’ve always had a passion for arts and crafts and as a child was forever drawing pictures, painting and sculpting. It was about two years ago that I rediscovered my passion for all things crafty and started drawing, creating and learning to crochet. What inspired you to first start blogging? I celebrated my second “blogiversary” in June, but it all started when I had the idea to start writing some kind of online journal. I started off talking about my life and subjects that I felt inspired by. It’s now become a lot less general and I tend to focus mainly on crafting. I like to think my blog is a happy and colourful place where I can share my love for crafting, creating and crochet. I always try my best to blog at least once a week but when life gets hectic I’ll be blogging

“My blog is a happy and colourful place where I can share my love for crafting, creating and crochet” once a fortnight. My blog is always on my mind, it’s become a way of life, a way of thinking. I always have my camera ready to take a picture, to document my life and save until I have time to share it with my readers. Have you made new friends through blogging? Before I started blogging I wasn’t aware of the huge online community of crafters. Since having

my blog I’ve connected with so many like-minded people. We’ve shared stories, projects and tips and I’ve been welcomed with open arms into a world of crafting. The ladies at my local yarn store are also extremely lovely and I have enjoyed chatting with them during their “knit nights” – it’s also a great chance for me to practise my German. So yes! I’ve definitely made some friends along the way – who’d have thought that crochet was going to turn out to be such a sociable hobby! Do you ever feel a little outnumbered in the predominantly female crafting world? Sure, there are a lot of female crafters out there, but being a guy in a mostly female world means that I offer something a little different. People encourage me to keep at my crafting and I hope that I can encourage other guys to maybe be a little more creative with their own hobbies. What’s your “day job”? In real life I’m a dancer, my number one passion in life! I’m currently working on the Disney musical Tarzan here in

Hamburg. It’s an extremely fun and fulfilling job where I not only dance, but also perform many aerial stunts each night high above the audience. I’m very fortunate to have a job that I love. How did you become hooked on crochet? I started crocheting about three years ago and learned from my boyfriend, Dennsi. He’s an amazing crocheter and a phenomenal knitter. He taught me the basics and together we learned new techniques from blogs, books and YouTube. What are you working on at the moment? I’m making a lovely light Japanese flower afghan. I’m using bright and bold colours and some very luxurious and soft baby alpaca yarn. The yarn is almost lacy when worked up, with a very delicate feel. I can’t wait to have it finished! Where do you find inspiration? I’m hugely inspired by colours. Colours make us all feel a certain way and so I like to create things that make me feel a certain mood. I love working with bright happy colours and enjoy taking pictures of bright bold objects. It’s colour that inspires me and is a huge focus on my blog. Who are your favourite bloggers? There are so many amazing blogs out there! I’m hugely inspired by people who have a like-minded style but with a slightly different spin to the work I create. I love to check out crejjtion.blogspot. com, sandra-cherryheart.blogspot.com and onesheepishgirl.blogspot.com. When I’m lacking in the inspiration department, I always turn to French artist Isabelle Kessedjian for a dose of colour, crochet and inspiring creativity. She is really a fabulous artist!

08 Inside Crochet OCTOBER 2013

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11/09/2013 18:34


IN THE LOOP

News etc

Make it!

Jammy Biscuit MATERIALS ● DK weight cotton yarn Yarn A: Pastry-coloured yarn x 1 ball Yarn B: Strawberry jam-coloured yarn x 1 ball ● 4.5mm hook ● Scissors ● Stitch marker ● Yarn needle TENSION Tension is not important for this pattern. MEASUREMENTS The finished biscuit is around 8cm diameter. JAM FILLING With yarn B, make an adjustable ring (see page 94). Rnd 1: 11htr in ring, join with a sl st to first htr – 11 sts. Pull the end of yarn tight to close the adjustable ring. Rnd 2: 2ch (counts as one htr), htr into same stitch, [2htr in next stitch] 10 times, join with sl st to initial 2ch – 22 sts. Fasten off and weave in ends. START

We Love

Matt shares his popular Jammy Biscuit pattern with Inside Crochet readers! For Matt’s original online photo tutorial, go to www.accordingtomatt.blogspot. de/2011/07/jammy-dodgerpattern.html

JAMMY BISCUIT BASE With yarn A, rep rnds 1 & 2 of Jam Filling. For this next round we are going to continue making the Jammy Biscuit Base, but we are also going to join the Jam Filling as we work. Rnd 3: 2ch (counts as 1htr). Place the Jam Filling finished piece of crochet on top of your Jammy Biscuit Base. For the rest of this round, for every new stitch you make you should pass your hook through both the stitch on the Jam Filling and the stitch below on the Jammy Biscuit Base. 1htr in same stitch as your 2ch, making sure to pass the hook also through the Jam Filling, 1htr in next stitch, [2htr in next stitch, 1htr] 10 times, join with sl st to initial 2ch – 33 sts. Place a stitch marker to mark the start of each round. Rnd 4: 1ch (counts as 1dc), 1dc in same stitch, 2dc, [2dc in next stitch, 2dc] 10 times – 44 sts. Rnd 5: 1ch (counts as 1dc), dcflo around, join with sl st to initial 1ch. Fasten off and weave in ends. JAMMY BISCUIT TOP With yarn A, make an adjustable ring leaving a nice long end to your yarn – you will use this to shape the heart at the end.

Rnd 1: 22htr into adjustable ring, join with a sl st to form a circle – 22 sts. Pull the yarn to make the adjustable ring smaller but not too tight. The hole in the middle should measure approximately 1.5cm/½in in diameter. Rnd 2: 2ch (counts as 1htr), 1htr in same stitch, 1htr, [2htr in next stitch, htr] 10 times, join with sl st to initial 2ch – 33 sts. Rnd 3: 1ch (counts as 1dc), dc in same stitch. 2dc, [2dc in next stitch, 2dc] 10 times – 44 sts. We are now going to join the Jammy Biscuit Top onto our previously made Base and Filling. Rnd 4: 1ch (counts as 1dc), dc into remaining 43 stitches, making sure to also pass your hook through the stitch of the Base and Filling, join with sl st to initial 1ch – 44 sts. Fasten off. With your yarn needle thread the long piece of yarn that is left over from the adjustable ring of the Jammy Biscuit Top. Place a stitch through the very centre of the Jam Filling. Repeat this several times until you have fashioned the circle into a heart shape you are happy with. If you wish, you can also place a stitch at the bottom of the heart END to make the shape a little sharper. Weave in any remaining ends.

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N E W YA R N S H A DE S !

We Love

[CAREERS]

CROCHET ENTREPRENEURS

We can’t resist these ultra-bright shades in the Barisienne yarn range from Bergère de France. Perfect for making colourful – and unmissable – autumn projects!

www.bergeredefrance.co.uk

Find out more about the Knitting & Stitching Show at www.twistedthread.com

Inside Crochet meets designer Vanessa Mooncie, author of Crocheted Wild Animals, who will be appearing at the Knitting & Stitching Show this month.

[COMPETITION]

Win! Tickets for Christmas Craft Show ➻ If you’re dreaming of a handmade Christmas, visit Crafts for Christmas and Hobbycrafts at the SECC, Glasgow from 24–27 October and at the NEC, Birmingham from 7–10 November. To book tickets please visit www.ichfevents. co.uk or call 01425 277988. We’ve got five pairs of tickets to give away for each of the shows. To enter the draw, simply answer the following question: ICHF Events also organizes the Craft Hobby & Stitch International Show to be held next February. What is the venue for this event? Send your answers by 16 October 2013 to competitions@tailormadepublishing. co.uk. Please include your full name, postal address and telephone number and state whether you’d prefer Birmingham or Glasgow.

[BOOK REVIEW]

New season, new hat! ➻ The latest in the “20 to Make” series from Search Press is Crocheted Beanies by Frauke Kiedaisch, £4.99, which shows just how versatile the classic beanie hat is. Each design incorporates interesting variations and extra details to make each hat look quite unique, so whatever look you want, there’s a pattern to suit.

Where do you call home? I live with my husband, Damian Mooncie, who is a sculptor, and three of my four children in the former home of Virginia Woolf, in the lovely rural Sussex village of Firle, looking out towards the South Downs Way. How long have you been crocheting? I was taught to crochet as a child by my Mum and Nana. They showed me how to make squares, which I turned into blankets and cushions for my dolls. I collect old sewing, knitting and crochet patterns and it was when browsing through these and spotting some vintage doily patterns that I was inspired to pick up a hook and yarn again around ten years ago. Is crochet your main career? Crochet is a passion, as is knitting and textile design. I also work as a silkscreen artist, although more recently I have been working with GMC producing a range of books which cover a variety of creative disciplines. Have you always worked in the creative industry? After leaving college I worked in retail. Then, when we started a family, I worked from home doing various things, all in the creative field. I created a small range of childrenswear, designed and painted wooden jigsaw puzzles, then worked in commercial interior design. When my youngest child started school I began selling fabric corsages, which led to creating knitted and crocheted jewellery. What will you be doing at the Knitting & Stitching Show? I will be doing a book signing through GMC Publications, including a “make and take” crochet project. Visitors can sit and crochet a little mouse to take home with them. I will also be visiting other stands to see what other

designers and makers are up to, and meet contacts for yarns and other supplies. Tell us about your book. The projects in Crocheted Wild Animals are inspired by illustrations from old children’s books or vintage toys. Most of them are simple but I wanted to introduce texture and pattern, such as the flamboyant flamingo’s feathers, the patterned snakeskin and the plumage of the owl. My favourite animal is the chameleon. There is a twist to this project, as it actually changes colour – you just turn it inside-out. My son gave me the idea, which makes me love it even more. Do you prefer designing or making? When I design a crocheted piece I will make it as I go, writing the pattern down and changing elements that don’t work or don’t look right. I really enjoy that part, but need to be able to concentrate in the quiet of my workroom. In the evening, that’s when I can sit with my family and crochet or knit while following a finished pattern. What’s the best aspect of having a creative life? Being able to work doing something I love is wonderful. I get immense fulfillment from the process of having an idea and being able to spend my working day bringing it to fruition. There are some fantastic events happening on the GMC stand (F5) at this year’s Knitting and Stitching Show, which runs from 10–13 October at Alexandra Palace, London, and is a must-visit for all crafters. Meet Vanessa Mooncie, Sarah Fordham, Jean Moss, Kath Orsman and Susie Johns, who cover a range of crafts from crochet and knitting to cross-stitch and jewellery-making.

10 Inside Crochet OCTOBER 2013

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Mirasol Paqu Pura

Gomitoli’s Tweed

IN THE LOOP

News etc

[QUESTION TIME]

W E A SK ED OU R R E A DER S… Bergere de France Chinaillon

Bergere de France Goomy 50

Debbie Bliss Milano

[ YA R N R E V I E W ]

Add to your stash

YARNS WE LOVE

WORDS CLAIRE MONTGOMERIE

Bergere de France Goomy 50 75% wool/25% polyamide 50g/215m/235yds ➻ The variegated colours of this yarn were developed to create Fair Isle type patterns in knitted fabric, but when crocheted the effect is softer, with subtle, graded colour changes in the pretty Imprim Rose pink shade we tried. For those of you who prefer plain colours, it is also available in a small range of solids. The soft and warm, yet hardwearing, qualities of the fibre mix make it a perfect choice for socks. £4.59 from www.deramores.com

Mirasol Paqu Pura 100% alpaca 100g/300m/329yds ➻ This is a gorgeous, lightweight alpaca yarn that we just can’t stop squishing. It does seem hairier than most alpaca yarns, perhaps due to the lightly spun, roving-like construction, and it tends to moult as you work, but it is incredibly soft and the single ply makes it really smooth to crochet with. The long colour changes create strong graded stripes in the fabric and the shade shown, Horizon, is especially soft and pretty. Paqu pura is available in a range of classic, wearable colourways. £12.95 from www.celticove.com

Debbie Bliss Milano 40% wool/28% polyamide/18% silk/ 8% polyester/6% acrylic 50g/95m/103yds ➻ The construction of this unique yarn is made up of a predominantly woollen core, wrapped with a light, contrasting manmade fibre, lending a “tweedy” texture. The result

is a very strong, quite thin looking Aran weight yarn that makes a firm fabric which would work well for jackets and outerwear. Milano’s wrapped structure means that the yarn often catches as you hook, making work a little slower. £6.95 from www.laughinghens.com

Gomitoli’s Tweed 70% wool/30% cashmere 50g/175m/191yds ➻ Tweed yarns are just perfect for this time of year, and this quality yarn with its blend of cashmere fits the bill. The heather shades with contrasting nupps running through the yarn make for a beautifully textured, richly coloured fabric. Despite the uneven ply and haphazard nupps, the yarn is easy to crochet and the resulting fabric feels substantial and tough, yet velvety at the same time. Perfect for cosy hats and accessories. £7.67 from www.gomitolis.it

Bergere de France Chinaillon 56% acrylic/30% wool/10% alpaca/ 4% viscose 50g/140m/153yds ➻ Chinaillon is a good quality tweed-style yarn. The contrasting flecks of colour throughout the yarn add texture and create a pretty fabric. The yarn also has a slight halo, which adds to the traditional tweed appearance. As you would expect from Bergere de France, the yarn has all the best qualities of natural and manmade fibres – it is strong, durable, soft against the skin and is so easy to use. A great choice for autumn crochet. £3.95 from www.the-stitchery.co.uk

With evenings drawing in and children back at school, what plans does everyone have for cosy crochet ready for colder days? Don’t forget, we’re now offering a free one-year digital subscription to Inside Crochet for our favourite response on Facebook and Twitter, so send us your comments!

WINNER! Evie May on Facebook: “I’m planning on crocheting a few jumpers for pets at rescue centres. My partner also wants a suit of armour crocheted for his dog… :o)” (Evie – please send us a pic when you’ve finished the suit of armour! – Inside Crochet team)

➻ Kerri Chappell I’ve set myself a number of ‘crafting resolutions!’ Including one to FINALLY make that blanket I keep starting and never finishing; and another to make at least one thing from all the crochet books I’ve been given as gifts but never found the time to make anything from. ➻ Kirsty Jane Wise I am in the process of doing my handmade wedding. Crocheting my bouquet, bridesmaids posies, buttonholes, bunting and tables flowers, taking me a while but I am so enjoying it. ➻ @GeekLass I plan to start crocheting things for Christmas. Flower brooches, handwarmers and a blanket for my niece who’s arriving in December. ➻ @BradsMommy210 I’m working on a camouflage & green twin afghan for my 3-year-old son’s bed! It keeps me warm while working on it.

LIKE We’re fans of Laura and Deborah’s gorgeous crochet pattern s at Happy Berry Crochet. Like them on Fac ebook at www.facebook.com/ha ppyberrycrochet or check out their range of designs at www.happyberry.co.uk – they’ve even got a few freebie pattern s to try.

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[ F O L K , FA I R I S L E & OV E R S I Z E D K N I T W E A R ]

Bella Fair Isle cardigan £48, Fat Face

Sunrise Fair Isle skirt £45, White Stuff

© Christopher Dadey

Navajo poncho £35, Accessorize

Crochet and oversized knits Sister by Sibling Geometric Fair Isle scarf £30, John Lewis

Winter Wardrobe This season we'll be swathed in oversized knits, sporting traditional folk patterns and keeping cosy in faux fur. Go for ladylike style with trim tailoring, tapestry-inspired prints or bandeau tops for evening elegance.

Nordic mitts £32.50 Donna Wilson

[ TA P E ST RY, T W E E D & TA R TA N ]

Feather print scarf & houndstooth tweed coat, Somerset by Alice Temperley, £89 & £299, John Lewis

Tapestry floral dress £130, Phase Eight

Tapestry skater dress & faux fur collar coat £45 & £85, AWear

Limited Edition tartan skirt £35, Marks & Spencer Chloe tweed dress £69, Monsoon

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IN THE LOOP

[ FAUX F U R & A N I M A L P R I N TS ]

Off the hook

Animal intarsia knit dress £99, Mint Velvet Fur trim padded jacket £275, Jaeger

Rocha.John Rocha ear muffs £16, Debenhams

Faux fur gilet £75, White Stuff

Furry satchel £26, Next

BIBA snow leopard coat £199, House of Fraser

[ F LO RA L E L EG A N C E ]

Prints perfect trousers £45, Yumi

Bandeau beauty Dior Ready to Wear AW13

Rose jaquard bandeau dress £89, Monsoon

We Love

Needlework dress £159, Hobbs

Sunset Flora Iris bag £168, Orla Kiely

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Getting Hooked This month our beginner tackles some pretty lace socks – the perfect antidote to colder autumn days ➻ Hand-made socks are a real luxury, and one I wanted to try, so when I saw Claire’s Chamomile Socks in issue 44 I had to give them a go! I used some bright yellow sock yarn from Laughing Yaffle, for cheery socks to make me smile even when summer was over. D AY 1 The sock starts at the toe, working around both sides of a chain in double crochet. I find it a bit fiddly to use stitch markers on such a small piece so I place the increases at the ends by eye – I think I get it right! I’m making the larger size, but soon realise it’s coming out far, far too big. I don’t have a smaller hook to hand (I’m using a 3mm as called for in the pattern) so I decide to reduce the stitch count. After measuring I realise I need to work to a circumference of 48 sts, so I rip back and then start the main pattern of the foot after I’ve reached this number.

D AY 2 The lace pattern on the sock is a simple repeat of trebles and chains, so it works up quite quickly. I’m almost at the break for the heel when I look closely again at my work and the photograph, and realise I’ve been working it wrong the whole time – disaster! It’s a really sickening feeling. I’ve been working the two trebles of the lace round into one stitch, but they weren’t supposed to be. However, the pattern I’ve made is pretty – maybe I should stick with it? I hate the thought of ripping back all my work. I decide to go to bed and make my mind up in the morning.

DAY 3 Today I feel a lot less emotional about “wasting” yesterday’s work, and decide to rip it back and do the pattern properly! I do make another change as well though – the toe of my sock was quite small, as I’d finished earlier after working fewer increases. This time I make the double crochet toe a bit longer by working a few dc rounds plain before starting the trebles pattern – correctly this time! Again though, it works up quickly and I’m soon back ready to start the heel.

DAY 4 I’m quite intrigued by the way the heel of this sock is worked – it’s not a traditional short-row or heel-flap heel, but an “afterthought” one instead. I create a gap to insert the heel later by chaining across half my round, then working back across the chain in pattern and carrying on up the leg of the sock. Again this works up quickly and I’m at the cuff before I know it – though it helps that I’m taking it everywhere with me as I’m really enjoying it, crocheting away on a family trip to the beach! I’m soon creating a pretty ruffle by increasing rapidly, then adding a lacy chain edging.

DAY 5 All that’s left to do is work the heel. The construction seems simple: I pick up stitches all around the gap, then decrease at the edges, just as I increased on the toe. The only problem I have is working in joined rounds rather than as a spiral – I always find this tricky with double crochet as

I find it difficult to see where I am with the stitches. I decide that it doesn’t really matter if I work in spirals instead so just keep working around, and find it much easier (and neater!). I realise there’s a slight mistake in the pattern as the instruction to seam the heel is missing, but once I’ve checked with the magazine (see errata on page 85) I know what I’m doing and my sock is quickly finished. And it fits! Now to make another…

DAY 8 The second sock also worked up quickly, and very soon I have a pair. The frilly cuffs and bright yarn definitely bring a smile to my face! I was a bit worried that the lace would feel uncomfortable under my feet, but I wear them all day with no problem at all. I have to admit I wear them with jeans rather than a dress though – it is autumn now!

To buy back issues turn to page 55, or download digital editions at www.pocketmags.com

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BOOKS

IN THE LOOP

Books

WE ARE A L SO R E A DI NG... 30-minute Crochet

WE REVIEW NEW AND EXCITING RELEASES

Carol Meldrum Search Press, £9.99 • UK terms A collection of patterns that offer almost instant crochet gratification, complete with a useful picture index with each project colour coded for skill level. At a glance you can choose a project and get started creating everything from a sweet and simple gift – try the zig-zag cup cosy or the chunky bracelet – to a cute toy such as the owl mask or animal ears. There’s an illustrated “how to” section, with clear photography and diagrams where needed. A fantastic book for anyone who likes a quick fix.

Wedding Crochet

© Keiko Oikawa

Sandy Powers Sellers Publishing, £14.99 • US terms

Beastly Crochet: 23 Critters to Wear and Love Brenda K B Anderson Interweave press, £15.99 • US terminology

➻ With Halloween coming up, this is a fabulously fun book to read and work from, packed full of creepy creatures and silly monsters. The book contains not just run of the mill monsters like vampires and zombies but also a Tiki head, robots and mythical creatures like gnomes and the Loch Ness monster. We also loved the Day of the Dead-themed skeletons, which bring a pretty twist to what could easily have been some very scary, gothic-looking projects! Each creature is both spooky and adorable at the same time. Of course you would not expect anything less from Brenda, whose day job is working for “Creatures and Costumes”, designing for the likes of children’s programme Sesame Street. The patterns are not just toys or creatures, either. Brenda has also designed quirky homewares and wearable garment and accessory projects. The ghostly sweetie container is inspired, and the gnome and big head coin purses are brilliantly cute and practical projects for children. The final chapter concentrates on very useful finishing tips, such as how to sew in a zip, plus basic crochet and simple embroidery techniques. Possibly the most interesting tips are for the sewing of features, with diagrams showing the different expressions you can create just by positioning the pupils, so that you can make your monsters as menacing or endearing as you wish.

Sandy Powers has designed a beautiful collection of elegant crochet pieces perfect for brides and bridesmaids. The book features 20 patterns, including garments such as delicate wraps, shawls, cardigans and shrugs, plus accessories including a ring bearer pillow, lace gloves, pretty purses, a wrist corsage and favour baskets. There’s no “how to” section but each design has clear photography and plenty of projects are easy or intermediate, so it’s not an intimidating collection – despite the inevitable pressure to achieve perfection!

AmiguruME: Make Cute Crochet People Allison Hoffman Lark Crafts, £11.55 • US terms Even keen amigurumi makers can struggle to make authentic looking people, but Allison Hoffman has become something of a phenomenon in the States for her lifelike characters. AmiguruME offers a mix and match approach, with sections on making faces and heads, clothing, upper and lower body parts plus feet and shoes. It’s easy to put together any combination, whether you’re trying to create a celebrity or a member of your family. This is a fun book with charming photography to inspire you. www.insidecrochet.co.uk 15

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HOOKS & HEDGEROWS

Sara Sinaguglia ✶g

RAINBOWS & OLIVE GROVES Sara works up a pretty striped sweater ready for olive picking season.

A

s winter fast approaches, our thoughts and wardrobes turn to sunnier climes. Each year, in October, we swap the Dorset hedgerows for the Sicilian olive grove. The annual family olive harvest awaits us and it’s a chance for some late sunshine before we bed down for the English winter. The Sicilian always looks forwards to a trip home: his Mamma’s home cooking; his Papa’s vegetable patch full of aubergines, peppers and pomegranates; the warm sand of Siculiana Marina between his toes.

abundance of local produce and the warmth of my husband’s family. In fact, it was seeing the exquisite crochet of Aunt Nena that started me hooking with fine cottons and linens. Crochet is an integral part of Sicilian culture and mothers and grandmothers still crochet intricate bedspreads and tablecloths for the unmarried girls’ trousseaus. The aforementioned Aunt even crocheted sugared almond favour sachets for each of the 160 guests at cousin Rosalba’s wedding. I’m not sure what they’d make of this more contemporary approach to the craft, but with Sofia quickly developing her own sense of style, it seemed only fitting to crochet her a sweater for the Sicilian sun. After a long day, handpicking olives and snacking on pomegranates, we often head home via the beach and dive in for a swim to cool down. This month’s project is designed for Sofia to wear on these impromptu beach trips. She chose the colours in this jumper, all six of them! My instinct was to work three quarters in one of the neon colours and the top quarter in one of the pastel shades. But I’m glad I followed her lead, I think it’s a beautiful, vibrant combination that is entirely suited to her age. It’s perfect for those late afternoon trips to the beach, it rolls to fit neatly at the bottom of a bag and looks instantly fresh and wrinkle-free when slipped on over a swimming costume for a stroll to Uncle Beppe’s pizzeria. Maybe I’ll have time to make one for myself in a softer colour combination more suited to my age!

“Crochet is an integral part of Sicilian culture and mothers still crochet bedspreads and tablecloths for unmarried girls’ trousseaus” But leaving Dorset is accompanied by a twinge of regret. Unfortunately, olive harvest collides with the English mushroom season and invariably the ceps (porcini) make an appearance just as we head to the airport. A good dose of summer rain means fungi foraging is in full swing by late October, the airing cupboard is filled with wafer thin ceps and chanterelles drying, whilst the stove bubbles with clinking jars being sterilised ready for pickling. So with the earthy smell of mushrooms all about us, the children and I are ready to pack our suitcases for ten days of Mediterranean sun. I’ve been travelling to Sicily for over 15 years now and I never get tired of the gentle pace of life, the

GET CREATIVE ➻ There are always patterns that I love to re-visit and others where once is enough! This month I’ve used last month’s pattern for circle, flower and traditional grannies to make this linen cushion. You can never have too many scatter cushions! And don’t be afraid to adapt a pattern to a different project. The important thing is to measure and plan how an existing design will fit a new project. Just by changing the colours and the context you can reinvent a pattern many times over. Sara is a mother of two who enjoys craft, vintage and home-making. She loves anything a bit old and a bit battered, natural yarns and all sorts of vintage finds. Read her blog at onechurchillsgreen.typepad.com

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Hook Sara’s simple monthly project, perfect for beginners

MACRAME CORD TUTORIAL

Visit our website for an easy step by-step guide to this technique. www.insidecrochet.co.uk/blog /

BACK With yarn A and 2.5mm hook work a 206 stitch (103 sts top, 103 sts bottom) macramé cord, followed by 5ch. Row 1: Working back along the top of the cord, miss 5ch and 2 sts of cord, 1tr in 3rd st of cord, (4ch, miss 3 sts, 1tr) across, turn – 26ch-sps. Row 2: 5ch, 1tr in first ch-sp, (4ch, 1tr in next ch-sp) across, turn. Fasten off. Row 3: Attach yarn B, 5ch, 1tr in first ch-sp, (4ch, 1tr in next ch-sp) across, turn. Row 4: 5ch, 1tr in 4ch-sp, (4ch, 1tr in next ch-sp) across, turn. Fasten off. Repeat rows 3 & 4 for each subsequent colour in order C, D, E, F and then repeat full colour repeat A–F twice more. Finish with two rows of A, B, C and D. Fasten off.

Rainbow Jumper MATERIALS ● Yeoman Panama 4ply, 50% cotton/ 50% acrylic, 500g/2000m/2187yds Yarn A: Turquoise 213 x 1 cone Yarn B: Lilac 218 x 1 cone Yarn C: Peony 513 x 1 cone Yarn D: Mallow 209 x 1 cone Yarn E: Lime 509 x 1 cone Yarn F: Linen Mix 302 x 1 cone ● 2.5mm hook ● Yarn needle SPECIAL YARN PACK OFFER! Yeoman yarns have created packs containing 100g of each of the yarns needed for this project to minimise leftovers. Order IC46 Pack online or by phone sales@yeoman-yarns.co.uk or 01162404464 TENSION 56 st cord plus 5ch (7ch-sps) x 9 rows to measure 10 x 10cm/4 x 4in using a 2.5mm hook, or size required to obtain tension. MEASUREMENTS As written, the pattern has a chest

of cord, (4ch, miss 3 sts, 1tr) across, turn – 25ch-sps. Row 2: 5ch, 1tr in 4ch-sp, (4ch, 1tr in next ch-sp) across. Fasten off. Row 3: Attach yarn B, 5ch, 1tr in 4ch-sp, (4ch, 1tr in next ch-sp) across. Row 4: 5ch, 1tr in 4ch-sp, (4ch, 1tr in next ch-sp) across. Fasten off. Repeat rows 3 & 4 for each subsequent colour in order C, D, E, F and then repeat full colour repeat A–F twice more. Finish with two rows of A, B, C and D. Fasten off.

measurement of 74cm/29¼in, with the length from the neck 50cm/19¾in, to approximately fit an 11-year-old. To adjust the size, simply allow 1 additional ch-sp (+4ch on foundation ch for sleeve, 8 sts for macramé cord) for each extra cm of width required (allow 2ch-sps for each additional inch) and approximately 1 row per extra cm (2 rows per inch) of length. PATTERN NOTES There is no shaping required for this garment, it is simply a rectangular front and back with two identical rectangles for the sleeves. Attach each new colour of yarn by working 5ch into the last tr of the previous row, then knot the ends of the two colours together to keep them in place until you are ready to seam. As you seam, undo the knots and weave in the yarn. FRONT With yarn A and 2.5mm hook work a 198 stitch (99 sts top, 99 sts bottom) macramé cord, followed by 5ch. Row 1: Working back along the top of the cord, miss 5ch and 2 sts of cord, 1tr in 3rd st START

SLEEVES Make 2 With yarn C and 2.5mm hook work 68ch, turn. Row 1: 1tr in 8th ch from hook, (4ch, miss 3 sts, 1tr) across, turn – 16ch-sps. Row 2: 5ch, 1tr in first ch-sp, (4ch, 1tr in next ch-sp) across, turn. Fasten off. Row 3: Attach yarn D, 5ch, 1tr in first ch-sp, (4ch, 1tr in next ch-sp) across, turn. Row 4: 5ch, 1tr in first ch-sp, (4ch, 1tr in next ch-sp) across, turn. Fasten off. Repeat rows 3 & 4 to row 32, stripe sequence is as follows: 2 rows of each: yarn E, yarn F, yarn A, yarn B, yarn C. yarn D, yarn C, yarn B, yarn A, yarn F, yarn E, yarn D, yarn C Fasten off. FINISHING Match the stripes and seam front and back from the bottom up, stopping at row 28. Seam across the neckline, starting at the outer edge and working across 4ch-sps on each side. Fold the sleeve horizontally and seam the two edges in yarn C, insert into the END sweater and seam with the coloured stripes aligned. www.insidecrochet.co.uk 17

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changing seasons

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A collection of transitional pieces perfect for autumn that are stylish, lightweight and easy to wear Photographs Britt Spring Hair and makeup Nicki Henbrey Styling Claire Montgomerie and Jessica Welch

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opposite: Emmeline Cardigan by Simone Francis Using Wendy Mode Chunky Pattern page 44

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Alabama Shawl by Bianca Boonstra Using Rowan Tweed Pattern page 46

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Edith Hat and Scarf Set by Melanie Galloway Using Patons Diploma Gold DK Pattern page 51

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CHANGING SEASONS

BELOW: Arianna Cowl by Susan Koffler Using Sirdar Snuggly Smiley Stripes DK Pattern page 56

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Genevieve Gloves by Nicky Hale Using Rowan Wool Cotton 4 Ply Pattern page 74

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CHANGING SEASONS

BELOW: Dorothea Pocket Sweater by Joanne Scrace Using Debbie Bliss Blue Faced Leicester Aran and Debbie Bliss Rialto 4ply Pattern page 48 OPPOSITE: Pleated Cardigan by Kat Goldin Using Jeanette Sloan Baby Alpaca/Silk 4ply Pattern page 60

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Eliza Scarf by Deanne Ramsay Using Noro Taiyo Sock and Brown Sheep Cotton Fine Pattern page 57

26 Inside Crochet OCTOBER 2013

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11/09/2013 20:41


Arne and Carlos enjoy alfresco crochet in their beautiful garden.

Photographs © Arne & Carlos

MY SPACE Lindsey Harrad chats with Carlos Zachrison, one half of Scandinavian design duo Arne & Carlos.

S

candinavian knit and crochet designers Arne Nerjordet and Carlos Zachrison live with their dog Freja in the Norwegian fells, 682 metres above sea level, surrounded by picture-perfect scenery of lakes, mountains and thousands of Christmas trees. Their house offers the kind of splendid isolation many can only dream of, but this idyllic home has taken thirteen years to create, and it’s still a work in progress. “Arne bought our house without telling me,” laughs Carlos. “It’s an old train station that was built in 1901 for the new railway, and was abandoned in 1988 when the line was closed. By the time he bought it in 1999 it hadn’t been occupied for many years. Arne had never renovated a house before, and it’s literally in the middle of nowhere on the side of a mountain.” As with any major renovation project, transforming the old wooden station into their dream home and studio space has involved

a lot of back-breaking work. “I have a love/hate relationship with the house,” admits Carlos. “I would never have bought it, but Arne fell in love with it, so what can you do? It’s a wonderful place to work and we have beautiful, peaceful, inspiring surroundings, and there is plenty of space so we’ve been able to create our own universe. But

“We used to create samples on Barbies so we could see how the design worked – then enlarge it” on the other hand, it has been a lot of work and it’s still ongoing as there are four houses on our property and we’ve only renovated one of them. House number one is where we live, house number two will eventually be our studio. We have a lot of plans but we have to do things bit by bit when we have the time and money.” The Arne & Carlos brand was established in 2002, and although the pair started out in business together designing women’s fashion, the brand evolved into a knitwear line with garments and accessories for men and women. When they first met, Arne was teaching fashion design and pattern construction, while Carlos had studied political science at university. “Arne was born in the 1960s and has been knitting and crocheting since he was around four years old,” says Carlos. “He was taught by his great-grandmother and grandmother, they come from a tiny farm in a traditional area of Norway, near Lillehammer, and they had four generations of the family living in one tiny house, in just four rooms. His family had lived there since the 17th century.” Carlos enjoyed crafting while he was growing up in the 1970s, but it wasn’t until he met Arne that he started taking a serious interest. “We always had an element of crafts in our collections,” he says. “So we started spending more time at home creating swatches and Arne started to teach me more about knitting and crocheting.”

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STUDIO STYLE

Inspirations! follow "We’re quite traditional, we don’t do like we h oug alth blogs or use Twitter, Mostly we k. boo Face on e we’r and Instagram le of our coup a read newspapers online, but are: ent mom the at favourite books is Knitting with Icelandic Wool by Ved rie Finnis Vale ple: Peo en Gard Jonsdottir and ening by Gard sh Briti of Age en Gold The and Brent Elliott" Ursula Buchan, Anna Pavord and

Keeping cosy in their thrifty throw knits made with leftover yarn!

The couple have a verandah with a roof overlooking the lake, which they use as an outdoor crafting space in the summer months– a truly inspiring place to work.

As the Arne & Carlos knitwear line grew, the pair created their own unique method of developing samples and pattern swatches. “We used to create samples on Barbies so we could see how the design worked – then we would take the pattern and enlarge it to make it proportionate to a real human being, then create a swatch for our machine knitters in Peru to follow,” says Carlos. Designing small-scale fashion in this way led to the creation of their dolls’ house, a delightful world in miniature that is featured in their new book, Arne & Carlos Knit-and-Crochet Garden, complete with patterns for a crocheted mini blanket and pillow, cute knitted “hippie” dolls and beautiful knitted dresses and flower shoes with delicate crochet edging for the dolls to wear. “Working with miniatures has been our way to create clothing and get inspiration. Then because the dolls had such a fabulous wardrobe we decided to give them a fabulous house as well, so it became a bit of a hobby for us,” explains Carlos. “We use the dolls to develop many ideas actually, it’s a kind of parallel universe.” As the title of their new book suggests, their garden is a vivid source of inspiration, and the stunning photographs in the book reveal a plot more closely related to an English country garden than something in the Norwegian mountains – partly because Arne and Carlos are enthusiastic National Trust members and often come to the UK to explore our finest gardens. “There was no garden here originally, it was just a train platform with no earth below, so we have built our walled garden on top of the platform. We’ve had to transport a lot of stones to create islands in which to plant and the stones get a lot of sunshine, which creates its own microclimate, so we can plant things that really shouldn’t be able to grow up here, it’s very lush and unexpected.”

One of the most stunning crochet projects featured in their new book is the primrose throw (pictured left), a design that was never originally intended to be published, but which started simply as a means to get rid of leftover yarn. “We deliberately don’t look when we pick a yarn colour and we try not to make any two flowers in the same colourway so that every one is different,” says Carlos. “Some people may be put off by taking on such a big, long-term project, but when you start you’ll soon have a scarf, then a shawl, then you can keep working on it until it becomes a blanket, you can enjoy each stage of the project.” ➻ Arne & Carlos Knit-and-Crochet Garden: Bring a little outside inside with 36 projects inspired by flowers, butterflies, birds and bees, by Arne Nerjordet and Carlos Zachrison. Published by Search Press, £12.99 ➻ You can view a video of their beautiful Norwegian home at www.arne-carlos.com.

tform Their garden on the pla look. y ntr has an English cou

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Butterfly Wools Tel. 01926 511377 Located in the centre of Leek Wootton in the heart of Warwickshire.

We have a constantly growing selection of yarns, patterns, needles and a selection of knitwear ready knitted. Order them online from our website. Knitting up service available. If you can’t knit or you would like to have something knitted up, bring your pattern to our wool shop or come and have a look at ours and we can arrange for that to be made for you. We also offer yarns for machine knitting as well as fibres for spinning and felting. Shop is open Tues - Fri 9.30am-4pm

1a Home Farm, Leek Wootton CV35 7PU

www.butterflywools.co.uk

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HALF-TERM HOLIDAY Hook a cute and quirky project to brighten up a dull day PHOTOGRAPHS BRITT SPRING HAIR AND MAKEUP NICKI HENBREY STYLING CLAIRE MONTGOMERIE

Ellie Project Basket by Helda Panagary Using New Lanark Mills Natural Blend Aran and DMC Petra 3 Pattern page 54 www.insidecrochet.co.uk 31

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H A L F -T E R M H O L I DAY

ABOVE: “BOO!” Bunting by Lynne Rowe Using King Cole Smooth DK Pattern page 68 ABOVE RIGHT: A Zombie Named Skip by Brenda KB Anderson Using Red Heart Soft Pattern page 64

32 Inside Crochet OCTOBER 2013

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Š Harrison Stone

BELOW: Ribbed Socks by Rohn Strong Using Rowan Fine Art Pattern page 70

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âžť

H A L F -T E R M H O L I DAY

ABOVE: Up and Away Mobile by Sally Shepherd Using DMC Natura Just Cotton Pattern page 72 ABOVE RIGHT: Log Cabin Cushion by Sarah Coad Using Katia Merino 100% Pattern page 79

34 Inside Crochet OCTOBER 2013

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BELOW: Log Cabin Quilt by Tracey Todhunter Using Debbie Bliss Blue Faced Leicester Aran Pattern page 78

www.insidecrochet.co.uk 35

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âžť

H A L F -T E R M H O L I DAY

ABOVE: Gabrielle by Jane Crowfoot Using Rowan Siena 4 Ply Pattern page 84 ABOVE RIGHT: Duck Flannel and Bathmat Set by Helen Free Using DMC Natura Just Cotton and Hoooked Zpagetti Pattern page 86

36 Inside Crochet OCTOBER 2013

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BELOW: Petite Fraise Cardigan by Joanne Scrace Using MillaMia Naturally Soft Merino Pattern page 58

www.insidecrochet.co.uk 37

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11/09/2013 12:12


SOCK CUSTOMISATION

Sock Customisation Karen Ratto-Whooley explains how to create the perfect fit

O

ne of the most common complaints made about crocheted socks is that they are too bulky and will not fit in a shoe. The next most common remark? “The pattern I am trying to make doesn’t fit my feet!” But both of these issues can easily be overcome, and here we present some of our best tips on how to take a crochet sock pattern and make it perfect for you.

Here, we’re using “cuff-down” socks to demonstrate the principles – socks that are started at the cuff and worked down, around the heel, finishing with the toe. There is a difference in working “toe-up” socks, so for information on measuring for these, visit Karen’s blog from late October (www.karenwhooley.com/blog). In order to make your sock fit well there are several measurements you need to take. Make sure you are standing for all of these, except for “D”

YARN ➻ While it is true that crochet stitches are much denser than knitted stitches, that doesn’t mean you can’t create beautiful socks that actually fit in your shoes! Socks really should be made with a 4ply/fingering weight sock yarn – why would you use anything else? Anything heavier is more suitable for slippers or house socks, rather than socks to wear with shoes. Because of the variety of sock yarns out there, you will have to do a little homework. There are three watchwords in selecting the perfect sock yarn for you: Comfort. How does the sock feel on your foot? Yarns with soft fibres, such as cashmere or alpaca, will be considered more comfortable – though potentially less durable or harder to wash. Which brings us to… Washability. Do you need to hand wash the socks or are they superwash? Stretch. It’s important to pick out yarn that has some stretch to it. Crocheted socks are made slightly tighter than the actual measurements of your foot and leg. This is called negative ease, and allows the sock to stay on your foot without bagging.

SIZING ➻ We all want our socks to fit properly, and it is really important that you get good measurements in order to choose the correct size for you sock. Also, these measurements will go far in helping you to customise any pattern to work for you!

➻ A: Circumference of your leg: This is the topmost part of the sock ➻ B: Height of leg: From where you measured “A”, to the floor ➻ C: Length of your foot • Ca: For cuff-down: Measure from the tip of your longest toe to the back of your heel. • Cb: For toe-up: Measure from the tip of your longest toe to just under the middle of your anklebone. ➻ D: Circumference of your foot – Measure around the ball of the foot where your foot is the thickest. The actual finished sock will be approximately 0.5–1cm/ ¼–½in narrower than this measurement. If you need to adjust the sock to a larger or smaller size than given on the pattern, or you want to create your own sock pattern, these measurements will help you determine how to calculate your starting number of stitches, as well as how to increase or decrease as needed to adjust socks for your foot, leg and heel. If your socks are meant as a gift, and you’re not able to measure the recipient’s feet, then the best thing to do is to ask for their shoe size and width. You can then check a chart such as the one found at www.craftyarncouncil.com/footsize.html – though please note that this uses US shoe sizes, so you will need to convert UK sizes first. Shoe websites also have some good charts that you can reference.

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CALCULATING GAUGE ➻ Once you have all of these measurements, make sure you crochet a tension swatch. In order to calculate the gauge properly, you should work in the round. Your tension can change greatly in the round versus working back and forth in rows. To check your tension using the main pattern of the leg or foot: • 24ch (or more if the main pattern repeat needs more stitches, but don’t work less than 24 stitches for accuracy) with the required hook and yarn. • Join with a slip stitch to form a ring. • Work the leg pattern for 20 rows. • Measure the circumference of the swatch. • Divide the measurement by the number of stitches in each round (so if you have 24, use 24). This will give you the number of stitches per cm/inch. If you have fewer stitches than the pattern calls for, try again with a smaller hook. If you have more stitches, increase the hook size. Repeat this until you achieve the gauge required for the pattern.

MATHS ➻ Most crocheters don’t want to do the maths. Unfortunately, socks are one of the few garments that have to fit “just right.” If they don’t, you won’t wear them. Why put in all that time if they don’t fit? Socks really don’t have much maths involved. There can be a bit of trial and error though if the heel is narrower than the rest of the foot. In that case, you may want to take these measurements and fuss with them even more, and there may be a lot of increasing or decreasing as the case may be. But for most people, these formulae should be enough. To determine the number of stitches needed for cuff of sock • (Measurement “A”) x (Number of stitches per cm/in) = Number of stitches needed for cuff To determine the number of stitches needed for foot • (Measurement “D”) x (Number of stitches per cm/in) = Number of stitches needed for foot To determine the number of stitches to start heel • (Number of stitches around foot) x (50%) = Start of heel using heel flap and gusset • (Number of stitches around foot) x (60%) = Start of heel for medium to wide foot using short row heel • (Number of stitches around foot) x (40%) = Start of heel for narrow foot, using any type of heel

A

B

D Ca Cb

NEGATIVE EASE ➻ Because socks are made to be tighter than the actual foot measurement, when selecting a size, make sure your “Finished Measurements” are 0.5–1cm/¼–½in less in circumference than your actual foot / leg circumference. www.insidecrochet.co.uk 39

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SOCK CUSTOMISATION

Parts of a sock

CUFF

TYPES OF HEELS

➻ There are many styles of crocheted sock heels out there, but we’re just going to discuss the two main types:

LEG

HEEL FLAP AND GUSSET ➻ This heel shaping is probably the most widely used. It uses a rectangular “flap” that comes down from the leg of the sock and covers the back of the heel. At the bottom is the “heel turn” that will cup the heel of your foot. The gusset is a triangular wedge that forms when you complete the heel flap by picking up stitches around the flap and return to working in the round.

SHORT ROW HEELS ➻ Short row heels are created by leaving an unworked stitch at the end of each row of the “heel flap” to create” steps” on either side. Then as you work the underside of the heel, stitches are added back one row at a time until you have returned to your original stitch count and resume working in the round.

CUSTOMISING A PATTERN ➻ The next step is taking a sock pattern and making it fit your own foot.

THE INSTEP/FOOT ➻ A frequent issue with hand-made socks is when a person cannot get their foot in past the heel. Usually this is because the instep isn’t large enough. Your foot’s instep could be larger because of a high arch, an injury to the bone, or many other reasons. To make the instep on your sock larger, instead of decreasing (or increasing if working from the toe up) at the gusset on every row, decrease at a slower rate. Maybe every other row works for you, or possibly every third row. You just want to make sure that the gusset doesn’t end in the middle of your foot. Ideally the gusset ends in the first third of the foot from the heel. Using the decreases can also help with the circumference of the foot. You may need to lose 10 stitches because you have a narrow foot compared to that given in the pattern. Simply continue the gusset decreases until you reach the required stitch count, but be careful not to make the instep too long.

THE CUFF/LEG ➻ Let’s face it, no one has a foot that is the same circumference as their leg. Or maybe we should say that it is rare. Most sock patterns will have the foot circumference and the leg circumference the same. In knitting that might work because the stitches will

GUSSET TOE

HEEL FLAP

HEEL TURN FOOT

stretch more than they do in crochet. But as a crocheter, you will have to do a few more calculations. Using the formulae given above, you will know how many stitches you need for the cuff. Remember to subtract 0.5–1cm/¼– ½in from your actual measurement first to allow for negative ease. If the cuff needs more stitches than the pattern calls for, add those stitches to the starting chain. If you need less, just subtract the number of stitches called for. If the leg is patterned with cables or other stitch patterns, you will have to make adjustments. For example, if you need to add 4 stitches, and there are cables in the pattern, try adding 1 extra stitch between cables randomly around the sock.

That might seem like a lot of work, but it really isn’t! Once you know what the peculiarities of your own feet are, it makes customising your socks much easier. Every once in a while you might have trouble with a particular stitch pattern, but those should be few and far between. Don’t expect your first attempt at customisation to be perfect – you may even want to make one sample sock exactly as the pattern specifies before you begin. That way you will understand all the parts and construction of the sock. Then take the time to work at customising it.

If all else fails, Karen is always happy to help out when it comes to customisation. You can contact her at her website, www.krwknitwear.com.

SUPER SOCK PATTERNS You'll find the frilly Chamomile Socks in issue 44 (August 2013), and the Dowding Socks in issue 34 (October 2012). Turn to page 55 to order back issues. Alternatively, turn to page 70 for Rohn Strong's stylish new sock design, and get crochetin g straight away!

SOCKS ROCK! Crochet Rocks Socks KRW Knitwear Studio, £6.29 (www.amazon.co.uk) US terminology

➻ If you're excited by crocheted socks, grab Karen's book Crochet Rocks Socks and try some of her clever designs for yourself. This original book is a fabulously fun publication of seven designs all inspired by rock music.

40 Inside Crochet OCTOBER 2013

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AND

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tel: 07547 006 618

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0118 950 3350

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! w e N

If you love fabric, you’ll love

Also available as a digital edition

Packed full of pretty projects! Available in all good newsagents. You can also buy your copy online at www.selectps.com or by calling 01202 586848

On sale from August 29th

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14/08/2013 14:26


Make it YOUR PATTERN INSTRUCTIONS START HERE

BEGINNER

EASY

INTERMEDIATE

ADVANCED

EXPERT

Emmeline Cardigan

Alabama Shawl

Dorothea Pocket Sweater

Edith Hat and Scarf Set

Ellie Project Basket

Arianna Cowl

Simone Francis

Bianca Boonstra

Joanne Scrace

Melanie Galloway

Helda Panagary

Susan Koffler

Page 44

Page 46

Page 48

Page 51

Page 54

Page 56

Eliza Scarf

Petite Fraise Cardigan

Pleated Cardigan

A Zombie Named Skip

“BOO!” Bunting

Ribbed Socks

Deanne Ramsay

Joanne Scrace

Kat Goldin

Brenda KB Anderson

Lynne Rowe

Rohn Strong

Page 57

Page 58

Page 60

Page 64

Page 68

Page 70

Up and Away Mobile

Genevieve Gloves

Log Cabin Quilt

Log Cabin Cushion

Gabrielle Jane Crowfoot

Duck Flannel and Bathmat

Sally Shepherd

Nicky Hale

Tracey Todhunter

Sarah Coad

Page 72

Page 74

Page 78

Page 79

Page 84

Helen Free Page 86

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MAKE IT

Pattern instructions

Emmeline Cardigan BY SIMONE FRANCIS

This easy-to-wear circular cardigan has a relaxed look and will see you through autumn and winter in comfort.

MATERIALS ● Wendy Mode Chunky, 50% Merino wool/50% acrylic, 100g/140m/153yds Yarn A: True Navy 228 x 5 (6, 7) balls Yarn B: Denim 227 x 1 ball Yarn C: Vanilla 202 x 1 ball Yarn D: Orchid 253 x 1 ball ● 6mm, 7mm and 8mm hooks ● Yarn needle YARN ALTERNATIVES You can use any chunky weight yarn to achieve a similar effect, though please check tension to ensure best results. TENSION Work 10tr and 6 rows to measure 10 x 10cm/4 x 4in using 6mm hook, or size required to obtain tension. PATTERN NOTES The cardigan is worked in one piece, making a “granny” square for the back and increasing stitches to form the front and collar in one. The sleeves are then worked from the armholes down, and the length is easily adjustable by increasing rows.

The joining seam is placed at the top, neck edge of the collar, making it invisible when the collar is folded back; extra rows added to the collar will ensure a good fit for a larger bust. DESIGNER BIOGRAPHY Simone is a mum of two who crochets every day. Her designs can be found on Ravelry at www.ravelry. com/designers/simone-francis. BACK With 6mm hook and yarn A, make 6ch, sl st into the first ch to form a ring. Rnd 1: 2ch (counts as 1tr), 2tr, *(2ch, 3tr) into the ring, rep from * 3 times, ending with 2ch, sl st into the 2nd ch, turn work. Rnd 2: 2ch, (2tr, 2ch, 3tr) into the 2ch-sp to form a corner, *1ch, (3tr, 2ch, 3tr) into the next corner 2ch-sp, rep from * twice, ending with 1ch, sl st into the 2nd ch, turn. Rnd 3: 2ch, 2tr into the 1ch-sp, *1ch, (3tr, 2ch, 3tr) into the following corner 2ch-sp, (1ch, 3tr) into the 1ch-sp, rep from * twice, ending with 1ch, (3tr, 2ch, 3tr) into START

44 Inside Crochet OCTOBER 2013

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DIVIDE FOR FRONT AND COLLAR Foundation Rnd: 1ch, 21 (21, 25) dc evenly across to corner edge, 40 (44, 48)ch, miss 41 (45, 49) sts, dc into the next corner st, 41 (45, 49)dc evenly across bottom, 40 (44, 48)ch, miss 41 (45, 49) sts, dc into the next corner st, 18 (22, 22)dc, sl st into 1ch at beg of rnd, turn work. Rnd 1: 3ch (counts as 1tr), 19 (23, 23)tr along front edge, 40 (44, 48)tr into the ch sts to form sleeve/front, 41 (45, 49)tr along bottom, 40 (44, 48)tr along ch sts to form sleeve/ front, 17 (21, 21)tr along neck edge, turn – 162 (178, 194) sts. Rnd 2: 3ch, tr into each st around, sl st into t-ch, turn. Rnd 3: Change to yarn B, 3ch, tr around, sl st into t-ch, turn. Rnd 4: Change to yarn C, 2ch, htr into the front (back, front) loop only, around, sl st into the t-ch, turn. Rnd 5: Change to yarn D, 3ch, tr into the back (front, back) loop only, around, sl st into t-ch, turn. Rnd 6: Change to 7mm hook and yarn A, 3ch, tr into the front (back, front) loop only, around, sl st into the t-ch, turn. Rnd 7: 3ch, tr around, sl st into the t-ch, turn.

Rnd 8: 3ch, tr around, sl st into the t-ch, turn. Rep rnd 8 for 3 more rounds. Rnd 12: Change to 8mm hook, 3ch, tr around, sl st into the t-ch, turn. Rnd(s) 13 (13–14, 13–15): Repeat rnd 12. EDGE ROW With Right Side facing: 2ch, htr around the edge evenly. Fasten off.

67 (74, 80)cm 26 (29, 31½)in

the final corner 2ch-sp, 1ch, sl st into the 2nd ch, turn. Rnd 4: Continue working in rounds, making (1ch, 3tr, 1ch) into each 1ch-sp, and (3tr, 2ch, 3tr) into the corner 2ch-sp, turn work. Continue for 6 (7, 8) more rounds.

38cm / 15in

RIGHT ARM With 6mm hook and yarn A, rejoin yarn at bottom right armhole. Foundation Rnd: 3ch (counts as 1tr), 40 (44, 48)tr evenly across “granny” edge, 41 (45, 49)tr down front side, turn – 82 (90, 98) sts. **Rnd 1: (dec rnd) 3ch, 3tr, tr2tog, *4tr, tr2tog, rep from * to last 4 (0, 2) sts, tr to end, sl st into t-ch, turn – 69 (75, 82) sts. Rnd 2: 3ch, tr to end, sl st into t-ch, turn. Rnd 3: (dec rnd) 3ch, 2tr, tr2tog, *3tr, tr2tog, rep from * to last 4 (0, 2) sts, tr to end, sl st into t-ch, turn – 56 (60, 66) sts. Rnd 4: 3ch, tr to end, sl st into t-ch, turn. Rnd 5: (dec rnd) 3ch, 1tr, tr2tog, *2tr, tr2tog, rep from * to last 0 (0, 2) sts, tr to end, sl st into t-ch, turn – 42 (45, 50) sts. Rnd 6: 3ch, tr to end, sl st into t-ch, turn. Rep rnd 6 for 13 more rnds, try on cardigan and work extra rnds here if desired. Rnd 20: Change to yarn B and with Right Side facing, 3ch, tr to end, sl st into t-ch, turn. Rnd 21: Change to yarn C, working into the back loop only, 2ch, htr to end, sl st into t-ch, turn. Rnd 22: Change to yarn D, working into the front loop only, 3ch, tr to end, sl st into the t-ch, turn.

86.5 (102, 112)cm 34 (40, 44)in

TO FIT BUST LEFT ARM With 6mm hook and Right Side facing, rejoin yarn to bottom corner and make 3ch, pick up and work 40 (44, 48)tr up front, 41 (45, 49)tr up the “granny” edge, sl st into the t-ch, turn – 82 (90, 98) sts. Complete Left Arm by repeating the instructions from ** for Right Arm. END Fasten off and weave in all yarn ends neatly.

76.5–86.5

91–102

107+

cm

30–34

36–40

42+

in

235

258

281

cm

95

102

125

in

38

38

38

cm

15

15

15

in

YARN A

5

6

7

balls

YARN B

1

1

1

ball

YARN C

1

1

1

ball

YARN D

1

1

1

ball

CIRCUMFERENCE SLEEVE SEAM

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MAKE IT

Pattern instructions ADVANCED SKILLS USED Twisting and cable crocheting. MATERIALS ● Rowan Tweed, 100% wool, 50g/118m/129yds Shade: Arncliffe 580 x 7 balls ● 4mm hook. ● Stitch markers ● Yarn needle TENSION Work 15tr and 10 rows to measure 10 x 10cm/4 x 4in using 4mm hook, or size required to obtain tension. MEASUREMENTS The finished shawl is 189cm/ 74in wide and 78cm/31in tall. DESIGNER BIOGRAPHY Bianca is a knitter, crocheter and spinner – not necessarily in that order. She is new to the world of publishing patterns, but loving the experience so far. Bianca is married and the mother of four children aged 5–22. Check out her website at www.biancaboonstradesigns. blogspot.nl, or on Twitter @BiancaBoonstra. SPECIAL STITCH PATTERNS Left Cross Cable over 4 sts (LC4): Miss 2 sts, tr in next 2 sts, reaching across sts just made, tr in 2 missed sts.

Alabama Shawl

START

SHAWL Foundation Row: Make 9ch, tr in 4th ch

from hk, tr in ea ch to end, turn – 7tr. Row 1: 1ch, 1dc in ea of first 2 sts, 2dc in next st, dc in next st, pm in st just made, 2dc in next st, 1dc, dc in t-ch, turn – 9dc. Row 2: 1ch, dc in each st to 1 st before marked st, 2dc in next st, dc in marked st, move marker up, 2dc in next st, dc across, turn. Rep row 2 until there are 171 sts. Row 41: 3ch, tr in first st, tr in each st to 1 st before marker, 2tr in next st, 1tr in marked st, move marker up, 2tr in next st, tr to last st, 2tr in last st, turn – 175 sts. Rep row 41 for 14 rows until there are 231 sts. LACEWORK Row 1: 3ch, 1tr in first st, 3tr [{2ch, miss 2, 1tr} twice, LC4 (see Special Stitch Patterns), 1tr] 9 times, [2ch, miss 2, 1tr] twice, tr to marked st, 3tr in marked st, move marker to centre of 3 sts just made, 7tr, [{2ch, miss 2, 1tr} twice, LC4, 1tr] 9 times, [2ch, miss 2 sts, 1tr], tr to last st, 2tr in last st, turn – 83tr, 20ch-sp, 18LC4. Row 2: 3ch, tr in each tr to ch-sp, [{2ch, tr in next tr} twice, 5tr] 9 times, [2ch, tr in next tr] twice, tr to marked st, 3tr in marked st, move marker to centre of 3 sts just made, tr to ch-sp, [{2ch, tr in next tr} twice, 5tr] 9 times, [2ch, tr in next tr] twice, tr to last st, 2tr in last st, turn – 159tr, 20ch-sp. Row 3: 3ch, tr in each tr to ch-sp, [{2ch, tr in next tr} twice, LC4, 1tr]

BY BIANCA BOONSTRA

Dependent on the autumn weather, this cabled triangular shawl is perfect layered over a jumper, dress or coat.

m

ROWS 1 AND 2

46 Inside Crochet OCTOBER 2013

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9 times, [2ch, tr in next tr] twice, tr to marked st, 3tr in marked st, move marker to centre of 3 sts just made, tr to ch-sp, [{2ch, tr in next tr} twice, LC4, 1tr] 9 times, [2ch, tr in next tr], tr to last st, 2tr in last st, turn – 91tr, 20ch-sp, 18LC4. Row 4: Rep row 3 – 95tr, 20ch-sp, 18LC4. Row 5: Rep row 2 – 171tr, 20ch-sp. Row 6: Rep row 3 – 103tr, 20ch-sp, 18LC4. Row 7: 4ch, 2dtr in first st, 3ch, miss 3, 5dtr in next st, 3ch, miss 3 sts, 3dtr in next st, 3ch, miss (2tr, ch-sp), tr in next tr, *[3ch, miss (ch-sp, 5tr), trtr in next tr, 3ch, reaching behind st just worked, trtr in first of 5 missed tr, 3ch, tr in next tr] 9 times, 3ch, miss (ch-sp, 2tr)*, [3dtr in next st, miss 3 sts, 3ch] 3 times, miss 1 st, 5dtr in marked st, move marker up to centre of 5 sts just made, miss 4tr, [3ch, 3dtr in next st, miss 3 sts] twice, 3ch, 3dtr in next st, 3ch, miss ch-sp, tr in next tr, rep between * and *, 3dtr in next st, 3ch, miss 3, 5dtr in next st, 3ch, 3dtr in last st. Row 8: 4ch, dtr in each st to ch-sp, [4ch, miss ch-sp, dtr in each dtr] twice, *[4ch, miss ch-sp, dtr in next st, 4ch, miss (trtr, ch-sp), trtr in next trtr, reaching behind st just worked, trtr in missed trtr] 9 times, 4ch, miss ch-sp, dtr in next st*, [4ch, miss ch-sp, dtr in each dtr] 7 times, rep btwn * and *, [4ch, miss ch-sp, dtr in each dtr] across, ending with 2dtr in last st. Rows 9 & 10: Rep row 8. Rows 11–14: Rep row 8 working 5ch instead of 4ch each time. Row 15: 4ch, 2dtr at base of 4ch, [miss 3 sts, 5ch, 7dtr in next st] twice, *[5ch, miss ch-sp, 7dtr in next st, 5ch, 7dtr in ch-sp btwn next 2 trtr] 9 times, 5ch, 7dtr in next dtr*, [5ch, 7dtr in centre st of next group of dtr] 7 times, rep btwn * and *, 5ch, miss ch-sp, 7dtr in next st, 5ch, miss (ch-sp, 1dtr), [7dtr in next dtr, miss 3 sts, 5ch] twice, 3dtr in last st. Row 16: 4ch, 2dtr at base of 4ch, 5ch, [7dtr in centre st of next group of dtr, 5ch] rep across, 3dtr in last st. Fasten off. FINISHING Weave in ends and block lightly.

END

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MAKE IT

Pattern instructions

START

Dorothea Pocket Sweater BY JOANNE SCRACE

A casual sweater with a relaxed fit and a little waist shaping. Optional granny square pockets give a pop of colour.

MATERIALS ● Debbie Bliss Blue Faced Leicester Aran, 100% wool, 50g/75m/82yds Yarn A: Charcoal 03 x 13 (14, 16, 17, 19, 21, 22, 24) balls ● Debbie Bliss Rialto 4ply, 100% Merino wool, 50g/180m/198yds Yarn B: Silver 27 x 1 ball Yarn C: Willow 36 x 1 ball Yarn D: Teal 18 x 1 ball ● 3mm, 4.5mm and 5.5mm hooks ● 2 removable stitch markers YARN ALTERNATIVES For yarn A you can substitute any aran weight yarn in wool or a wool/acrylic mix. For yarns B, C and D any 4ply scraps can be used. TENSION Work 14dc and 18 rows to measure 10 x 10cm/4 x 4in using 5.5mm hook, or size required to obtain tension. DESIGNER BIOGRAPHY Joanne Scrace (aka Not So Granny) specialises in seamless knitting and crochet, often vintage inspired but always with a fresh modern feel. She blogs about this and the trials of mixing kids and hooks at notsogranny.blogspot.com. Learn

about Joanne’s other projects in our interview on page 98. SPECIAL STITCHES Edge stitch: Yoh, insert hook into front loop of next st, yoh, draw through st, yoh, draw through 2 loops, yoh, insert hook into back loop of same st, yoh, draw through st, yoh, draw through 2 loops, yoh, draw through remaining 3 loops. PATTERN NOTES This sweater is worked seamlessly. Starting at the shoulder you will create the back, work short rows to shape the shoulders and work down to the underarm. You will then reattach the yarn at the shoulder to work the fronts separately to the neckline and then in one piece to the underarm. At the underarm front and back are joined and worked in the round, turning every row to keep the stitch pattern consistent. The set in sleeves are created by working short rows around the armhole. When working short row sections do not make turning chains. Turning chains do not count as a stitch unless otherwise stated. The BFL yarn blooms and softens significantly on washing.

48 Inside Crochet OCTOBER 2013

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BACK START Starting at the shoulder, with yarn A and largest hk, 51 (54, 59, 62, 63, 64, 65, 66)ch. Row 1: (RS) Starting in 2nd ch from hook, dc across – 50 (53, 58, 61, 62, 63, 64, 65)dc. Row 2: 1ch, dc across. SHORT ROW SHAPING Row 3: 1ch, 36 (38, 41, 43, 44, 45, 46, 46)dc, turn, leaving rem sts unworked. Row 4: 22 (23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 27)dc, turn, leaving rem sts unworked. Row 5: 25 (26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 30)dc, turn, leaving rem sts unworked. Cont in this fashion, adding 3 more sts each row until all sts from row 2 have been worked, ending on a WS row (work 1 row even if you end on a RS row) – 50 (53, 58, 61, 62, 63, 64, 65) sts. Work even on back for 27 (28, 28, 30, 30, 29, 30, 30) rows. SHAPE ARMHOLE Row 1: 1ch, 1dc, 2dc in next, dc to last 2 sts, 2dc in next, 1dc. Row 2: 1ch, dc across. Work last 2 rows a total of 1 (1, 2, 2, 3, 4, 4, 5) time(s) – 52 (55, 62, 65, 68, 71, 72, 75) sts. Then work row 1 a total of 1 (2, 2, 3, 3, 4, 5, 6) time(s) – 54 (59, 66, 71, 74, 79, 82, 87) sts. Fasten off. LEFT FRONT Note: Right handers will be working from centre to outer edge. Row 1: (RS) With RS facing, using largest hook, attach yarn A to the left shoulder (as worn) and work

SHAPE NECK Row 1: (RS) 1ch, 1dc, 2dc in next, dc across. Row 2: 1ch, dc across. Work last 2 rows a total of 3 (3, 3, 3, 4, 4, 4, 4) times – 20 (21, 23, 24, 25, 25, 25, 26) sts. Fasten off. RIGHT FRONT Row 1: (RS) With RS facing, using largest hk, attach yarn A to the right shoulder (as worn) and work 17 (18, 20, 21, 21, 21, 21, 22)dc into the other side of the foundation chain. Rows 2 & 3: 1ch, 17 (18, 20, 21, 21, 21, 21, 22)dc. SHORT ROW SHAPING Row 1: (WS) 1ch, 3dc, turn. Row 2: 3dc, turn. Row 3: 1ch, 6dc, turn. Row 4: 6dc, turn. Continue in this fashion working 3 sts more each time until all sts in the row are worked, ending on a WS row – 17 (18, 20, 21, 21, 21, 21, 22) sts. SHAPE NECK Row 1: (RS) 1ch, dc to last 2 sts, 2dc in next, 1dc. Row 2: 1ch, dc across. Work these 2 rows a total of 3 (3, 3, 3, 4, 4, 4, 4) times – 20 (21, 23, 24, 25, 25, 25, 26) sts.

57 (58, 60, 61, 62, 64, 65, 66)cm 22½ (23, 23½, 24, 24½ , 25, 25½, 26)in

cm , 47) )in 6, 46 8, 18½ 44, 4 ,1 , 44, 17½, 18 , 3, 43 42 (4 , 17, 17½ (17

SHORT ROW SHAPING Row 1: (RS) 1ch, 3dc, turn. Row 2: 3dc, turn. Row 3: 1ch, 6dc, turn. Row 4: 6dc, turn. Cont in this fashion working 3 sts more each RS row until all sts in the row are worked, ending on a WS row – 17 (18, 20, 21, 21, 21, 21, 22) sts.

16½

17 (18, 20, 21, 21, 21, 21, 22)dc into the other side of the foundation chain. Row 2: 1ch, 17 (18, 20, 21, 21, 21, 21, 22)dc.

84 (94, 104, 114, 124, 135, 145, 155)cm 33 (37, 41, 45, 49, 53, 57, 61)in

JOIN FRONT AND BACK With RS facing and without breaking yarn, turn and work 50 (53, 58, 61, 62, 63, 64, 65)dc across front, 4 (6, 6, 8, 12, 14, 18, 20)fdc, work 50 (53, 58, 61, 62, 63, 64, 65)dc across back, 4 (6, 6, 8, 12, 14, 18, 20)fdc, sl st to first st to join in round – 116 (130, 144, 158, 172, 186, 200, 214) sts. On the next rnd work to half way across armhole, place marker to form rnd end. Work 23 rnds even turning each rnd, ending on a WS row. SHAPE WAIST Rnd end marker is the point of first side seam, place markers where side seams would be on opposite side – move these markers up to the new row each time you pass them. Rnd 1: 1ch, 1dc, dc2tog, dc to 2 sts before marker, dc2tog, dc in

marked st, dc2tog, dc to 2 sts before end, dc2tog, sl st to join, turn. Rnds 2–4: 1ch, dc around, sl st to join, turn. Work these 4 rnds a total of 4 times – 100 (114, 128, 142, 156, 170, 184, 198) sts. Work even for 4 rnds continuing to move markers up as you work. SHAPE FOR HIPS Rnd 1: 1ch, 1dc, 2dc in next, dc to st before marker, 2dc in next, dc in marked st, 2dc in next, dc to st before end, 2dc in next, sl st to join, turn. Rnds 2–4: 1ch, dc around, sl st to join, turn. Work these 4 rnds a total of 5 times – 120 (134, 148, 162, 176, 190, 204, 218) sts. Remove markers. Work 4 rnds even.

JOIN FRONTS With RS facing and without breaking yarn, 20 (21, 23, 24, 25, 25, 25, 26)dc across right front, 10 (11, 12, 13, 12, 13, 14, 13)fdc, 20 (21, 23, 24, 25, 25, 25, 26)dc across left front – 50 (53, 58, 61, 62, 63, 64, 65) sts. Work 20 (21, 21, 23, 21, 20, 21, 21) rows even (ending on a WS row). Work armhole shaping as for back. www.insidecrochet.co.uk 49

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MAKE IT

Pattern instructions

EDGING With RS facing and without breaking yarn, using medium hook, 3ch, work Edge stitch (see Special Stitches) around, sl st to join. Fasten off. SLEEVES Using largest hook, with RS facing, attach yarn A at centre of the underarm, 1ch, work 1dc in each underarm st and dc2tog over every 2 rows ends around the armhole sl st to join, turn – 38 (42, 44, 49, 55, 59, 65, 70) sts. SHAPE SLEEVE CAPS Row 1: (WS) 1ch, 26 (29, 30, 34, 39, 42, 46, 50)dc, turn, leaving rem sts unworked. Row 2: 12 (13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 19, 20) dc, turn, leaving rem sts unworked. Row 3: 13 (14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 20, 21) dc, turn, leaving rem sts unworked. Continue in this fashion picking up 1 st each row until you have 34 (36, 38, 41, 43, 45, 47, 50) sts. If on a RS row, turn and work each st around to the middle of the underarm, sl st to join. If on a WS row continue to middle of underarm, sl st to join. Place marker to show rnd end – 40 (42, 44, 49, 55, 59, 65, 70) sts. Work even for 40 (40, 40, 40, 36, 34, 36, 30) rnds, turning each rnd. SHAPE SLEEVES Dec Rnd: (RS) 1ch, 1dc, dc2tog, dc to last 2 sts, dc2tog, sl st to join, turn.

Work Dec Rnd on the next rnd and every 14th (10th, 10th, 8th, 6th, 6th, 4th, 4th) rnd until stitch count is 32 (34, 36, 39, 41, 43, 43, 44). Work 3 rnds even. Next Rnd: (RS) Decrease 6 sts evenly around – 26 (28, 30, 33, 35, 37, 37, 38) sts. Edging: (RS) Without breaking yarn or turning, using medium sized hook, 3ch, work edge stitching around. Fasten off. NECK EDGING Rnd 1: With larger hook and RS facing, attach yarn A to centre back of neck, 1ch, dc evenly around neck edge, sl st to join, do not turn. Rnd 2: Change to medium sized hook, work Edge stitch around working 5 dc2tog around the corner where the back of neck meets the sides and (dc2tog, 1 edge st, 2dc2tog, 1 edge stitch, dc2tog) over 10 sts around the curve where the fronts were joined on each side. TO FIT BUST FINISHED BUST SLEEVE LENGTH YARN A

Rnd 5: Sl st across to the next ch-sp, 3ch, (2tr, 2ch, 3tr) in ch-sp, [{3tr in next sp} 3 times (3tr, 2ch, 3tr) in next ch-sp,] 3 times, [3tr in next sp] three times, sl st to top of t-ch to join, fasten off – 60tr.

SMALL POCKET With yarn B and smallest hook, 6ch, sl st to form a ring. Rnd 1: 3ch, working into the loop, 2tr, 2ch, [3tr, 2ch] 3 times, sl st to top of t-ch to join, fasten off – 12tr. Rnd 2: With yarn C, join yarn at any corner with sl st, working in ch-sps only, 3ch, (2tr, 2ch, 3tr) in ch-sp, [(3tr, 2ch, 3tr) in next ch-sp] 3 times, sl st to top of t-ch to join, fasten off – 24tr. Rnd 3: With yarn D, join yarn at any corner with sl st, working in ch-sps or spaces between groups of trebles only, 3ch, (2tr, 2ch, 3tr) in ch-sp, [3tr in next sp, (3tr, 2ch, 3tr) in next ch-sp] 3 times, 3tr in next sp, sl st to top of t-ch to join, fasten off – 36tr. Rnd 4 : With yarn B, join yarn at any corner with sl st, working in ch-sps or spaces between groups of trebles only, 3ch, (2tr, 2ch, 3tr) in ch-sp, [{3tr in next sp} twice (3tr, 2ch, 3tr) in next ch-sp,] 3 times, [3tr in next sp] twice, sl st to top of t-ch to join – 48tr.

LARGE POCKET Work as for small pocket to rnd 5. Continue working in granny square using these colours: Rnds 6 & 7: Yarn C. Rnds 8 & 9: Yarn D. Rnd 10: Yarn B. FINISHING Weave in all ends. Block pockets and jumper. Using photo as guide for placement sew pockets to jumper using yarn B. Smaller pocket should be sewn on bottom edge and both sides so opening is at the top. Large pocket should be sewn on bottom edge, right edge, half of top edge and half of left edge so the corner END flaps down and creates the opening.

76

86

97

107

117

127

137

147

cm

30

34

38

42

46

50

54

58

in

84

94

104

114

124

135

145

155

cm

33

37

41

45

49

53

57

61

in

42

43

43

44

44

46

46

47

cm

16½

17

17

17½

17½

18

18

18½

in

57

58

60

61

62

64

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66

cm

22½

23

23½

24

24½

25

25½

26

in

13

14

16

17

19

21

22

24

balls

50 Inside Crochet OCTOBER 2013

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MATERIALS ● Patons Diploma Gold DK, 55% wool/25% acrylic/20% nylon, 50g/120m/131yds Yarn A: Apple Green 06125 x 4 balls (2 for hat, 2 for scarf) Yarn B: Warm Beige 06307 x 2 balls (for scarf) ● 4mm hook ● Yarn needle

Edith Hat and Scarf Set BY MELANIE GALLOWAY

This seasonal set is perfect for long walks on chilly autumn days.

YARN ALTERNATIVES You can use any DK weight yarn to achieve a similar effect. TENSION Work 20tr and 14 rows to measure 10 x 10cm/4 x 4in using 4mm hook, or size required to obtain tension. MEASUREMENTS Hat circumference is 53cm/21in. The scarf measures 140 x 15cm/ 55 x 6in. DESIGNER BIOGRAPHY Melanie loves to design and create and has won several awards for her work. Visit her website at www.cosyliving.info. HAT With yarn A, 6ch join with a sl st to form ring. Rnd 1: 3ch, work 11tr into ring, join with a sl st to top of 3ch – 12 sts. Rnd 2: 3ch, rtrf around post of 3ch directly below, *tr in next tr, and rtrf around post of same tr; rep from * around, join with a sl st to top of beg 3ch – 24 sts. Rnd 3: 3ch, tr in next tr, and work rtrf around post of same tr, *2tr, rtrf around post of last tr made; rep from * around, join with a sl st to top of 3ch – 36 sts. START

Rnd 4: 3ch, 2tr, rtrf around post of last tr made, *3tr, rtrf around post of last tr made; rep from * around, join with a sl st to beg 3ch – 48 sts. Rnds 5–13: Rep rnd 3, working additional tr btwn each rtrf on each round, until there are 12 sts between each rtrf. Rnds 14–16: 3ch, tr in each tr and rtrf around each rtrf around, join with sl st to beg 3ch. Rnds 17–24: 3ch, *tr to 1 st before next rtrf, miss 1 st, rtrf around rtrf; rep from * around, tr across, sl st to beg 3ch – 60 sts after rnd 24. Rnds 25: 1ch, dc in each st around, join with a sl st to beg ch. Fasten off. SCARF With yarn A, 26ch. Row 1: 2tr in 4th ch from hk, * miss next ch, 1dc, miss next ch, 5tr in next ch (shell made); rep from * across, ending with a dc in last ch, turn. Row 2: 3ch, (counts as first st here and throughout), 2tr in same st, *dc in 3rd tr of next shell, 5tr in next dc; rep from * across, dc in top of 3ch. Row 3: With yarn B, rep row 2. Row 4: Rep row 2. Rows 5–182: Repeat row 2, following this sequence: 2 rows of yarn A, 2 rows of yarn B throughout. Fasten off. EDGING With yarn B, dc evenly along edges of scarf. FINISHING Weave in ends.

END

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MAKE IT

Pattern instructions MATERIALS ● New Lanark Mills Natural Blend Aran, 100% wool, 100g/161m/176yds Yarn A: Pebble x 4 balls Yarn B: Sandstone x 1 ball ● DMC Petra 3, 100g/280m/306yds Yarn C: Cream 53823 x 1 ball ● 2.5mm and 6mm hooks ● Stitch marker (optional) TENSION Work 9 sts and 4.5 rows to measure 10 x 10cm/4 x 4in worked over trblo using 6mm hook, or size required to obtain tension. MEASUREMENT This pattern creates a basket that is 38cm/15in in diameter, and 28cm/11in deep. To make it bigger, simply keep increasing the base section and add more rounds for the height. DESIGNER BIOGRAPHY Helda is hopelessly devoted to yarn and is constantly working to transform it to modern wearable crochet. She can found at www.heldasland.blogspot.co.uk.

Ellie Project Basket BY HELDA PANAGARY

This stylish monochrome basket is perfect for housing all your crochet works-in-progress.

PATTERN NOTES Yarn is used doubled. The 6mm hook will produce a floppy styled bag/basket – if you want a sturdier fabric use a smaller hook. Rounds are joined with sl st, but not turned. If you wish, you can work the sides in a continuous spiral. BASE START With 2 strands of yarn A held together and using 6mm hook, 2ch. Rnd 1: 8htr in 2nd ch from hk. Rnd 2: 2htr in each st, join with sl st – 16htr. Rnd 3: 2ch, 1htr in st at base of ch, 1htr, *2htr in next st, 1htr; rep from * around, sl st to 2ch to join – 24htr. Rnd 4: 2ch, 1htr in same st as join, 2htr, *2htr in next st, 2htr; rep from * around, sl st to 2ch to join – 32htr. Rnd 5: 2ch, 1htr in same st as join, 3htr, *2htr in next st, 3htr; rep from * around, sl st to 2ch to join – 40htr. Rnd 6: 2ch, 1htr in same st as join, 4htr, *2htr in next st, 4htr; rep from * around, sl st to 2ch to join – 48htr. Rnd 7: 2ch, 1htr in same st as join,

5htr, *2htr in next st, 5htr; rep from * around, sl st in 2ch to join – 56htr. Rnd 8: 2ch, 1htr in same st as join, 6htr, *2htr in next st, 6htr; rep from * around, sl st in 2ch to join – 64htr. Rnd 9: 2ch, 1htr in same st as join, 7htr, *2htr in next st, 7htr; rep from * around, sl st in 2ch to join, turn – 72htr. To make the base larger, increase in the same fashion, saving turn for the end of the last rnd. BASKET SIDES The next rnd will be the first row of the body of the basket. Work into the back of each htr as folls: Rnd 10: 2ch, 1dc under the line or ridge on the back of the first st of previous round, htrblo in every st around. Next 4 Rnds: 2ch, tr in back loop of each st to end. Join with sl st. Change to yarn B. Next 3 Rnds: 2ch, trblo around. Join with sl st. Change to yarn A. Next 2 Rnds: 2ch, trblo around. Join with sl st. SHAPE HANDLES Next Rnd: 2ch, 14trblo, 12ch, miss 13 sts, 29trblo, 12ch, miss 13 sts, trblo in rem sts around, join with sl st in top of first tr. Last Rnd: 2ch, trblo in ea st and tr in ea ch around, sl st to join. Fasten off. EDGING With 2.5mm hook and yarn C, join with sl st in any tr on side of bag, 3ch, 5tr in same st, *dc in next st, 6tr in next st; rep from * around. Fasten off. FINISHING Weave in all ends.

END

54 Inside Crochet OCTOBER 2013

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MAKE IT

Pattern instructions MATERIALS ● Sirdar Snuggly Smiley Stripes DK, 80% bamboo/20% wool, 50g/95m/104yds Yarn A: Crackerjack 255 x 2 balls Yarn B: Giggly Green 256 x 1 ball Yarn C: Hulabaloo 257 x 1 ball ● 4.5mm hook ● Yarn needle YARN ALTERNATIVES You can use any DK weight yarn but please ensure that it has some viscose or bamboo content for drape. There are now 18 colourways available in this yarn, and as long as there is one colour family repeated in each of your three chosen colourways, you can try dozens of combinations. TENSION Work 26 sts (4 ladder spaces) and 18 rows in stitch pattern to measure 10 x 10cm/4 x 4in using 4.5mm hook, or size required to obtain tension.

Arianna Cowl BY SUSAN KOFFLER

Inspired by Kaffe Fassett, this is easy to work and sublime to wear, adding a blast of colour to any ensemble.

MEASUREMENTS The finished cowl is 24cm/9½in deep and 72cm/28½in in circumference. DESIGNER BIOGRAPHY Susan learned to crochet at her grandmother’s knee during Listen With Mother on Radio 4, but it didn’t become her passion until 2005. She teaches crochet workshops at a number of venues in Buckinghamshire and Oxfordshire. Find Susan on Ravelry as Merrystitcher.

been known to felt due to the wool content. COWL With yarn A, work 63ch. Row 1: Work 1dc in 2nd and 3rd ch from hk, *4ch and miss 4ch, 2dc; rep from * to end, turn – 10 ladder spaces. Row 2: 1ch, 2dc, *4ch, miss 4ch, 2dc; rep from * to end, turn. Rows 3 & 4: Rep row 2 in yarn A for 2 more rows. ** Rows 5 & 6: With yarn B, rep row 2, carrying the non-working yarn (A) along the side, twisting it into the border t-ch as you work. Rows 7–10: With yarn A, rep row 2. Rep rows 5–10 four more times. Using yarn C instead of yarn B, rep rows 5–10 five times. Rep from ** once ending with a row 7. Do not fasten off. START

ASSEMBLE MOEBIUS Fold rectangle in half, aligning two short ends, WS together. Take the top right corner of the top short end in your left hand and the bottom right corner in your right hand, then swap your hands over by rotating the fabric so your left hand crosses over your right hand. The fabric is twisted and you now have your right hand at the top and your left hand at the bottom. Pin the top layer corners as they are now to the flat corners of the bottom layer. Pin short edges together. Work the two edges together by working the 2dc, 4ch patt across but work the 2dc into BOTH the top and bottom layer dc stitches. FINISHING Weave in all ends neatly.

END

PATTERN NOTES The moebius effect is made by crocheting a rectangle, then twisting it and joining with a crocheted seam. Carry the non-working yarn alongside, but twist it around the working yarn every row. When changing from yarn B to yarn C, cut the previous colour leaving an end to darn in. Do not try to carry yarn B when working with A and C. If you do not wish to carry any yarn alongside, cut it leaving a long length to sew in later. Please take care when washing as though the ball band says that the yarn is machine washable, it has 56 Inside Crochet OCTOBER 2013

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MATERIALS ● Noro Taiyo Sock, 50% cotton/ 17% polyamide/17% wool/ 16% silk,100g/420m/460yds Yarn A: Colour 6 x 1 ball ● Brown Sheep Cotton Fine, 80% cotton/20% wool, 50g/203m/222yds Yarn B: Putty CW105 x 1 skein ● 4.5mm hook ● 2 stitch markers ● Yarn needle YARN ALTERNATIVES You can use any light fingering weight yarn to achieve a similar effect. If you use a cotton/wool blend in a different weight, then adjust stitch count, row count, hook size and yardage using tension guide to achieve a similar size. TENSION Work 20dc to measure 10cm/4in using 4.5mm hook, or size required to obtain tension. Row gauge is not essential.

Eliza scarf BY DEANNE RAMSAY

An eye-catching striped scarf that shows off the yarn’s gentle colour changes to perfection.

MEASUREMENTS Finished scarf measures 10 x 178cm/4 x 70in, after blocking. DESIGNER BIOGRAPHY Deanne is an Aussie with a passion for crochet. Her mission is to change the world’s perception of crochet from granny-cliché to modern everyday. For more of her designs visit www.addydae.com. PATTERN NOTES When working into the starting chain, work your stitches into each “bump” at the back of the chain, rather than through the “v”s at the front. This creates a starting edge that mirrors your finishing edge. This pattern is worked in a spiral in the round with the right side facing at all times. Do not join rounds but use a stitch marker or piece of contrasting yarn to mark the beginning of each round. When joining a new colour, work into the blo (back loop only) of the sl st as with all the other sts. (This does not apply to the sl st that joined your starting chain.) SCARF With 4.5mm hook and yarn A, work 50ch and join with a sl st to first ch, being careful not to twist sts. Rnd 1: Dc around into back START

bumps of starting chain, do not join rnd. Place a stitch marker in the working loop to hold it, join yarn B. Mark the beginning of the round with another stitch marker – 50 sts. Rnd 2: With yarn B, sl st into blo of first dc, dcblo around. For this and all subsequent rounds, attach the stitch marker to the working loop before changing colour. After working rnds 1 and 2, the pattern is created by working sections A, B and C in the following sequence: A, B, C, B, A, B, C, B, A, B, C, B, A, B, C, B, A. SECTION A Rnd 1: With yarn A, 1dcblo around. Rnd 2: With yarn B, 1dcblo around. Repeat rnds 1 & 2 a further 7 times – 16 rounds. SECTION B Rnd 1: With yarn A, htrblo around. Rnd 2: With yarn B, 1dcblo around. Rep rnds 1 & 2 a further 6 times – 14 rounds. SECTION C Rnd 1: With yarn A, 1trblo around. Rnd 2: With yarn B, 1dcblo around. Rep rnds 1 & 2 a further 4 times – 10 rounds. FINISHING When you complete your last round (section A, rnd 16, yarn B), work a sl st into the blo of next st. Fasten off. With yarn A, complete a round of dcblo, sl st into the blo of the next st. Fasten off. The tails left after you fasten off are easily incorporated into the fringe – no need to weave them in! FRINGE Using leftover yarn, cut 72 lengths, each approximately 26cm/10¼in long. An easy way to do this is simply wrap the yarn around your copy of Inside Crochet (side to side, not top to bottom) and cut at each edge. Lay your scarf flat. Take 3 threads and fold them in half. Insert your hook through the back loop of corresponding stitches either side of the opening at the end of your scarf. Pull through the folded end of tassel threads to form a 1cm loop, hook the loose ends and pull all the way through the loop. Pull tight to secure. Repeat every second END stitch, giving 12 tassels at each end. Trim to neaten. www.insidecrochet.co.uk 57

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MAKE IT

Pattern instructions

Petite Fraise Cardigan BY JOANNE SCRACE

This pretty cardigan for babies and young children was inspired by French style. The simple strawberry motif gives a pop of colour.

MATERIALS ● MillaMia Naturally Soft Merino, 100% Merino wool, 50g/125m/137yds Yarn A: Midnight 101 x 2 (3, 3, 4, 4) balls Yarn B: Grass 141 x 1 ball Yarn C: Scarlet 140 x 1 ball ● 5mm hook ● 1 button, 2cm/¾in diameter YARN ALTERNATIVES Any light DK wool or wool blend will achieve a similar effect. MillaMia yarn has a bouncy twist that makes the strawberries really pop. TENSION Work 4 sts and 11 rows in alternating rows of double and treble crochet (starting with double) to measure 10 x 10cm/ 4 x 4in using 5mm hook, or size required to obtain tension. DESIGNER BIOGRAPHY Joanne Scrace specialises in seamless knitting and crochet, often vintage inspired but always

with a fresh modern feel. She blogs about this and the trials of mixing kids and knitting needles at www.notsogranny.blogspot. com. View her designs at www. ravelry.com/designers/joannescrace and read our interview with Joanne on page 98. SPECIAL STITCHES Treble 5 together (tr5tog): [Yoh, insert hook in next st, yoh, pull up loop, yoh, draw through first 2 lps on hk] 5 times, yoh, draw through all sts on hk. PATTERN NOTES Cardigan is worked seamlessly from the top down. CARDIGAN Starting at the neckline: With yarn A, 38 (38, 45, 50, 50)ch. Row 1: (WS) Starting in 2nd ch from the hook, dc across – 37 (37, 44, 49, 49) sts. Row 2: 3ch, 2tr, miss 1, 1ch, 34 (34, 41, 46, 46)tr – 38 (38, 45, 50, 50) sts. START

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20 (23, 25, 30, 33)cm 8 (9, 10, 12, 13)in

15 (18, 23, 25, 28)cm 6 (7, 9, 10, 11)in

43 (48, 53, 64, 66)cm 17 (19, 21, 25, 26)in Row 3: 1ch, 31 (31, 38, 43, 43)dc, turn, leaving rem sts unworked – 31 (31, 38, 43, 43) sts. Row 4: 3ch, 2 (2, 5, 1, 1)tr, [2tr in next, 1 (1, 1, 2, 2)tr] 14 times, 1 (1, 5, 0, 0)tr – 45 (45, 52, 57, 57) sts. Row 5: 1ch, dc across. Row 6: 3ch, 2 (2, 5, 1, 1)tr, [2tr in next, 2 (2, 2, 3, 3)tr] 14 times, 1 (1, 5, 0, 0)tr – 59 (59, 66, 71, 71) sts. Row 7: (WS) 1ch, 5 (5, 5, 4, 4)dc, [3dc, change to yarn B, 3dc in next, change to yarn A, 3dc] 7 (7, 8, 9, 9) times, 5 (5, 5, 4, 4)dc, break yarn B – 73 (73, 82, 89, 89) sts. Row 8: (RS) 3ch, 5 (5, 5, 4, 4)tr, [1tr, 2tr in next, change to yarn C, tr5tog (see Special Stitches), change to yarn A, 2tr in next, 1tr] 7 (7, 8, 9, 9) times, 5 (5, 5, 4, 4)dc, break yarn C – 59 (59, 66, 71, 71) sts. Row 9: 1ch, 2 (2, 5, 1, 1)dc, [2dc in next, 3 (3, 3, 4, 4)dc] 14 times, 1 (1, 5, 0, 0)dc – 73 (73, 80, 85, 85) sts. Row 10: 3ch, 2 (2, 5, 1, 1)tr, [2tr, 2tr in next, 2 (2, 2, 3, 3)tr] 14 times, 1 (1, 5, 0, 0)tr – 87 (87, 94, 99, 99) sts. Row 11: 1ch, dc across. Row 12: 3ch, 2 (2, 5, 1, 1)tr, [3tr, 2tr in next, 2 (2, 2, 3, 3)tr] 14 times, 1 (1, 5, 0, 0)tr – 101 (101, 108, 113, 113) Row 13: Rep row 11. Row 14: 3ch, 2 (2, 5, 1, 1)tr, [3tr, 2tr in next, 2 (3, 3, 4, 4)tr] 14 times, 1 (1, 5, 0, 0)tr – 115 (115, 122, 127, 127) sts.

Sizes 6–12m, 2–3yr, 3–4yr and 5–6yr only Row 15: Rep row 11. Row 16: 3ch, (2, 5, 1, 1)tr, [4tr, 2tr in next, (3, 3, 4, 4)tr] 14 times, (1, 5, 0, 0)tr – - (129, 136, 141, 141) sts.

BODY Next Row: (RS) With yarn A still attached, 3ch, tr in each st and ch across – 69 (77, 84, 99, 105) sts. Work 4 (6, 8, 10, 12) rows even, WS rows as doubles, RS rows as trebles, starting with a WS row. HEM Row 1: (WS) 1ch, 3 (3, 3, 4, 3)dc, [3dc, change to yarn B, 3dc in next, change to yarn A, 3dc] 9 (10, 11, 13, 14) times, 3 (4, 4, 4, 4) dc, break yarn B – 87 (97, 106, 125, 133) sts. Row 2: (RS) 3ch, 3 (3, 3, 4, 3)tr, [1tr, 2tr in next, change to yarn C, tr5tog, change to yarn A, 2tr in next, 1tr] 9 (10, 11, 13, 14) times, 3 (4, 4, 4, 4)tr, break yarn C – 69 (77, 84, 99, 105) sts. Row 3: 1ch, dc across. Row 4: 3ch, tr across. Row 5: 1ch, dc across. Fasten off. SLEEVES Rnd 1: (WS) With WS facing, reattach yarn A at the underarm in first ch from opposite side of 2 (2, 3, 3, 3)ch of body, 1ch, work 1dc in each st around, sl st to

join, turn – 27 (30, 32, 34, 38) sts. Work 8 (12, 16, 20, 22) rnds even, WS rows as doubles, RS rows as trebles, starting with a RS row. Next Rnd: 3ch, tr around, inc (dec, dec, inc, dec) 1 (2, 4, 1, 3) st(s) evenly around – 28 (28, 28, 35, 35) sts. CUFF Row 1: (WS) 1ch, *3dc, change to yarn B, 3dc in next, change to yarn A, 3dc; rep from * around, sl st to join, turn, break yarn B – 36 (36, 36, 45, 45) sts. Row 2: (RS) 3ch, *1tr, 2tr in next, change to yarn C, tr5tog, change to yarn A, 2tr in next, 1tr; rep from * around, sl st to join, turn, break yarn C. Row 3: 1ch, dc around, join with sl st. Row 4: 3ch, tr around, join with sl st. Row 5: 1ch, dc around, join with sl st. Fasten off. FINISHING Weave in all ends. Block lightly. Position and sew on button firmly.

END

Sizes 3–4yr and 5–6yr only Row 17: Rep row 11. Row 18: 3ch, 1tr, [5tr, 2tr in next, 4tr] 14 times – 155 sts. For size 5–6yr only Row 19: Rep row 11. Row 20: 3ch, 1tr, [5tr, 2tr in next, 5tr] 14 times – 169 sts. For all sizes Divide for body and sleeves. Next Row (WS): With yarn A still attached, 1ch, 16 (18, 20, 23, 25)dc, 2 (2, 3, 3, 3)ch, miss 25 (28, 29, 31, 35), 33 (37, 38, 47, 49)dc, 2 (2, 3, 3, 3)ch, miss 25 (28, 29, 31, 35), 16 (18, 20, 23, 25)dc – 65 (73, 78, 93, 99) dc. AGE

0–6m

6–12m

2–3yr

3–4yr

5–6yr

TO FIT CHEST

42

46

53

58

64

cm

16½

18

21

23

25

in

43

48

53

64

66

cm

17

19

21

25

26

in

15

18

23

25

28

cm

6

7

9

10

11

in

20

23

25

30

33

cm

8

9

10

12

13

in

FINISHED CHEST

SLEEVE SEAM

LENGTH

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MAKE IT

Pattern instructions

Pleated Cardigan BY KAT GOLDIN

Crocheted with the softest silk and alpaca, this cardigan wraps you in a light cloud. With its airy stitches and simple gathers, it makes an elegant addition to your wardrobe.

ADVANCED SKILLS USED Pleating

3 layers of fabric, ltr into each tr in the ptr – 4ltr.

MATERIALS ● Jeanette Sloan Baby Alpaca/Silk 4ply, 70% alpaca/30% silk, 50g/200m/218yds Shade: Olive x 9 (10, 10, 11, 11, 12, 12, 12) balls ● 4mm hook ● Yarn needle ● Safety pins ● 2 stitch markers (sm)

S Pleat Decrease (S Pleat dec): Fold the next 8 sts tog, 4tr on 4tr, RS tog. Bring the newly folded edge at the back of your work to the left to align the folded sts it behind the following 2 sts. Working through all 3 layers of fabric, ltr into each tr in each ptr – 4ltr.

YARN ALTERNATIVES For a similar effect, try Artesano 4ply, a delightfully soft pure alpaca yarn.

Z Pleat Increase (Z Pleat inc): [Miss 1ltr, (place sm and 1ptr) in flo of next ltr] twice, turn leaving rem sts unworked, [1ptr in flo of next missed st] twice, turn, [1ptr in blo of marked ltr] twice – 6ptr.

TENSION Work 9ptr and 10½ rows to measure 10 x 10cm/4 x 4in using 4mm hook, or size required to obtain tension.

S Pleat Increase (S Pleat inc): [Miss 1ltr, 1ptr in blo] twice, turn leaving rem sts unworked, [1ptr in flo of ltr just worked] twice, turn, [1ptr in missed st] twice – 6ptr.

DESIGNER BIOGRAPHY Kat Goldin spends her days with hooks in her hands and yarn in her pockets, peering through the lens of a camera. She blogs at www. slugsontherefrigerator.com.

PATTERN NOTES The 3ch and 1tr at either end of each row form the selvedge for sewing on the sleeves and working the collar. Pattern is written to fit with 5–8cm/2–3¼in of positive ease. Piece is worked from top down.

SPECIAL STITCH PATTERNS Paired Treble Crochet (ptr): Worked into odd number of foundation chains. Set-up row: 2tr in 3rd ch from hk, *miss 1ch, 2tr in next chain; rep from * to last 2ch, miss 1 st, 1tr, turn. Next and all subsequent rows: 3ch (counts as 1tr), *2tr in gap btwn 2nd and 3rd tr from hk; rep from * across, 1tr in the t-ch. Linked Treble Crochet (ltr): Insert hook into middle diagonal bar of st just worked, yoh, pull through, insert hook into next st, yoh, pull through, [yoh, pull through 2 lps on hk] twice. Ltr after 3ch: Insert hook into middle ch, yoh, pull through, insert hook into next st, yoh, pull through, [yoh, pull through 2 lps on hk] twice. Z Pleat Decrease (Z Pleat dec): Miss 4tr. Fold the next 8 sts tog, 4tr on 4tr, RS tog. Bring the newly folded edge at the back of your work to the right to align the folded sts behind the four missed sts. Working through all

BACK Make 69 (71, 73,75, 87, 87, 89, 89)ch. Row 1: Work set-up row of ptr stitch pattern (see Special Stitch Patterns), turn – 33 (34, 35, 36, 42, 42, 43, 43)ptr. Row 2: 3tr, 33 (34, 35,36, 42, 42, 43, 43)ptr, 1tr in t-ch, turn – 33 (34, 35, 36, 42, 42, 43, 43)ptr. Row 3: 3ch, 11 (11, 11, 12, 14, 14, 14, 14)ptr, PM, 11 (12, 13, 12, 14, 14, 15, 16)ptr, PM, 2ptr, turn leaving rem sts unworked – 24 (25, 26, 26, 30, 30, 31, 32)ptr. Row 4: 3ch and 1tr into the first ptr (counts as 1ptr), ptr until 2ptr past the second marker, turn leaving rem sts unworked – 26 (27, 28, 28, 32, 32, 33, 34)ptr. Row 5: 3ch and 1tr into the first ptr (counts as 1 ptr), ptr across, 1 ptr in next unworked ptr from row 2, turn leaving rem sts unworked – 28 (29, 30, 30, 34, 34, 35, 36)ptr. Rows 6–22 (22, 22, 24, 28, 28, 28, 28): Repeat row 5 until all the ptr in row 2 have been worked, working the selvedge stitch and the last tr in the last 2 rows. START

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70 (7 2 , 7 2 , 7 4 , 7 4 , 7 4 , 7 4 , 7 5 ) c m 27½ (28½, 28½, 29, 29, 29, 29, 29½)in

33, (33, 33, 35, 35, 35, 36, 37)cm 13 (13, 13, 13, 13½, 13½, 13½, 14, 14½)in

BODY Row 1: (RS) Join with sl st at left Front corner, 3ch, 13 (14, 13, 14, 16, 16, 16, 18)ptr, (miss 1ch, 2tr in next ch) 3 (3, 6, 6, 4, 6, 8, 7) times, 37 (38, 39, 40, 46, 46, 47, 51)ptr, (miss 1ch, 2tr in next ch) 3 (3, 6, 6, 4, 6, 8, 7) times, 13 (14, 13, 14, 16, 16, 16, 18)ptr, 1tr in t-ch, turn – 71 (74, 79, 82, 88, 92, 97, 103)ptr. Work even in ptr st patt until Back measures 40 (41, 43, 43, 44, 44, 44, 44)cm/ 15¾ (16¼, 16¾, 17, 17¼, 17¼, 17¼, 17½)in, measured from the starting ch down the back, ending with a WS row.

88 (91, 97, 102, 107, 112, 117, 124)cm 34½ (36, 38, 40, 42, 44, 46, 49)in

Work even in pattern until piece measures 16 (17, 17, 18, 18, 19, 19, 15)cm/6¼ (6¾, 6¾,7¼, 7¼, 7½, 7½, 6)in at the selvedge. SHAPE ARMHOLES Row 1: 3ch, 2ptr in next ptr, ptr across to last ptr, 2ptr in last ptr, 1tr in t-ch, turn – 35 (36, 37, 38, 44, 44, 45, 45)ptr. Row 2: 3ch, ptr across, 1tr in t-ch, turn. Rep last 2 rows 1 (1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 3) more time(s) – 37 (38, 39, 40, 46, 46, 47, 51)ptr. Fasten off.

FRONT Make 2 Turn piece to work in opposite side of starting chain. Sl st to join in first ch. Row 1: 3ch, [miss 1ch, 2tr in the next] 11 (12, 11, 12, 14, 14, 14, 14) times, miss 1ch, 1tr in next ch, turn – 11 (12, 11, 12, 14, 14, 14, 14)ptr. Row 2: 3ch, work ptr in each ptr across, 1tr in t-ch, turn. Repeat row 2 until the front measures 16 (17, 17, 18, 18, 19, 19, 15)cm/6¼ (6¾, 6¾,7¼, 7¼, 7½, 7½, 6)in, turn.

SHAPE ARMHOLE Row 1: 3ch, ptr to last ptr, 2 ptr in last ptr, 1tr in t-ch, turn – (12 (13, 12, 13, 15, 15, 15, 15) ptr. Row 2: 3ch, ptr in each ptr stitch across, turn. Rep last 2 rows 1 (1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 3) time(s), turn – (13, 14, 13, 14, 16, 16, 16, 18) ptr. JOIN FRONT AND BACK Make 6 (6, 12, 12, 8, 12, 16, 14) ch, join at the adjacent selvedge stitch on the Back panel, fasten off. Repeat with 2nd Front panel at other underarm.

WAISTBAND Row 1: (RS) 3ch, 19 (20, 22, 23, 23, 25, 27, 28)ptr, work Z Pleat dec, work S Pleat dec (see Special Stitch Patterns), (1ltr (see Special Stitch Patterns) into each tr of the ptr) 9 (10, 11, 12, 18, 18, 19, 23) times, work Z Pleat dec, work S Pleat dec, 19 (20, 22, 23, 23, 25, 27, 28)ptr, 1tr in t-ch, turn – 38 (40, 44, 46, 46, 50, 54, 56)ptr and 26 (28, 30, 32, 44, 44, 46, 54)ltr. Rows 2–5: 3ch, ptr in ptr, ltr in ltr across, tr in t-ch, turn. Row 6: 3ch, 19 (20, 22, 23, 23, 25, 27, 28)ptr, work Z Pleat inc, work S Pleat inc (see Special Stitch Patterns), (miss 1, 1ptr in next) 9 (10, 11, 12, 18, 18, 19, 23) times, work Z Pleat inc, work S Pleat inc, 19 (20, 22, 23, 23, 25,

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MAKE IT

Pattern instructions

diagram 1

Work even until the piece measures 12 (13, 13, 14, 14, 15, 15, 12)cm/4¾ (5¼, 5¼, 5¾, 5¾, 6, 6, 4½)in.

27, 28)ptr, 1tr in t-ch, turn – 71 (74, 79, 82, 88, 92, 97, 103)ptr. Work in established pattern until bottom waistband edge to hem measures 25cm/10in, ending on a RS row. Do not fasten off. COLLAR Turn to work up the next Front edge. This row is worked into the 3ch and 1tr that make up the selvedge on the Neck edge of the rows. Row 1: 3ch (counts as 1ltr), 1ltr after 3ch (see Special Stitch Patterns) into the same selvedge stitch, 2ltr into each selvedge stitch to neck, work 1ltr into each unworked chain around the back of the Neck and 2ltr into each selvedge stitch down the other side of the Front. Turn. Work even in ltr for 5 rows. Break yarn. SLEEVES Make 2 Work 59 (63, 63, 63, 71, 71, 75, 75)ch. Row 1: (RS) Work set-up row of ptr stitch, turn – 28 (30, 30, 32, 34, 34, 36, 36)ptr.

SHAPING Row 1: 3ch, 2ptr in next ptr, ptr across to last ptr, 2ptr in last ptr, 1tr in t-ch, turn. Row 2: 3ch, ptr across, 1tr in t-ch, turn. Rep last 2 rows 1 (1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 3) time(s) – 32 (34, 34, 36, 38, 38, 40, 44)ptr. Work even until the sleeve measures 47 (48, 48, 51, 51, 51, 53, 55)cm/18½ (19, 19, 20, 20, 20, 21, 21½)in. Fasten off.

securely in place (right sides should be together). Working around the armhole, evenly distribute the body’s armhole around the edge of the sleeve cap, lining up the selvedges on each. Pin as you go. Sl st or sew around the armhole, using the selvedge sts to anchor your seams. Ensure you work through all 4 layers at the sleeve cap. Rep for other sleeve.

FINISHING With WS facing, line up selvedge sts along sleeve length. Sl st or sew from cuff to final row of the shaping increases at the sleeve cap. Mimicking the Z and S pleats of the waistband, fold the sleeve cap as shown, with 2ptr “hanging off” each side of the pleats. Using your safety pins, securely pin the pleats in place, approximately 2cm/¾in away from the top edge. TO FIT BUST

ACTUAL BUST

SLEEVE

ACTUAL LENGTH

YARN

Line up the sleeve seam with the middle of the sts added at the underarm, right sides together. Pin them together through the WS of the body. Pull the sleeve cap through the armhole to the WS of the body, line up the edge of the beg chain, with the central point of the pleated sleeve cap. Pin

CUFF Rejoin yarn at bottom of Sleeve seam. Rnds 1–3: 3ch, 1ltr in each tr around, join with a sl st – 32 (34, 34, 36, 38, 38, 40, 44)ltr. Fasten off. Rep for other sleeve. Weave in ends. Remove all pins. Lightly block.

END

81

84

89

97

102

107

112

117

cm

32

33

35

38

40

42

44

46

in

88

91

97

102

107

112

117

124

cm

34½

36

38

40

42

44

46

49

in

33

33

33

35

35

35

36

37

cm

13

13

13

13½

13½

13½

14

14½

in

70

72

72

74

74

74

74

75

cm

27½

28½

28½

29

29

29

29

29½

in

9

10

10

11

11

12

12

12

balls

62 Inside Crochet OCTOBER 2013

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Digital subscriptions start from as little as ÂŁ15.99 for 6 months

IC#46_63[DigitalAd]SPCM.indd 3

11/09/2013 11:14


MAKE IT

Pattern instructions YARN ALTERNATIVES Try Sirdar Supersoft Aran

A Zombie Named Skip BY BRENDA KB ANDERSON

Bring your very own zombie to life with this puppet pattern.

This pattern is taken from Beastly Crochet by Brenda KB Anderson (Interweave, £15.99). Turn to page 15 for our full review.

MATERIALS ● Red Heart Soft, 100% acrylic, 140g/234m/256yds Yarn A: Seafoam #9520 x 1 skein Yarn B: White #4600 x 1 skein Yarn C: Mid Blue #9820 x 1 skein Yarn D: Wine #4608 x 1 skein ● 3.75mm hook ● Yarn needle ● Quilter’s pin ● Toy stuffing ● Two sheets round plastic canvas, 7.5cm/3in diameter or larger ● Small piece of light pink craft felt (for eyes) ● Small piece of dusty blue craft felt (for eyes) ● Two black 15mm/½in buttons ● La Mode #2044 (for eyes) ● 20 round white seed beads, size 6 (for teeth) ● Sewing needle and white thread ● Embroidery needle and size 3 white crochet thread ● Craft glue that can adhere to plastic and fabric ● 4 buttons 9–12mm/¼–½in in diameter to anchor the puppet strings ● 6 jumbo wood craft sticks ● Wood glue

● One spool of black bead thread ● Drill with 2mm drill bit ● Primer and spray paint for control stick (optional) YARN ALTERNATIVES You can use any worsted/aran weight acrylic yarn to make your zombie. TENSION Working rnds 1–6 of head should give you a circle 6.5cm/2½in in diameter using 3.75mm hook, or size required to obtain tension. Getting exact tension isn’t as important as getting a firm, stiff fabric. You do not want to see holes between sts when Skip is stuffed with the toy stuffing. MEASUREMENTS The finished zombie stands about 38cm/15in tall. DESIGNER BIOGRAPHY Brenda works at “Creatures and Costumes” and designs for children’s programmes such as Sesame Street. She’s also a prolific crochet designer, and has just written her first book, Beastly Crochet. Browse her designs at www.ravelry.com/designers/ brenda-k-b-anderson.

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SPECIAL STITCHES Make bobble (MB): [Yoh, insert hook into the indicated stitch, yoh and pull loop through to front of work, yoh and pull through only two loops] six times. There are now seven loops on the hook. Yoh and pull through all seven loops. Use your finger to poke the roundness of the bobble toward the RS of work. PATTERN NOTES Work in a spiral. Do not join rnds. The strings that work the puppet come from his knees, wrists, and head. Each knee and wrist string is anchored with a button inside the puppet. The head string is anchored by stitching through a circular piece of plastic canvas in the head. The buttons and plastic canvas will keep the strings from pulling too hard on a single st in the crocheted fabric. If you would rather make Skip into a plain ol’ softie, give him a stronger, thicker neck so that he can hold up his head. To do this, work to rnd 22 as written in pattern, and then work a couple rnds of 1dc in each st, change to yarn B and work 1 rnd of sl sts, and then follow the pattern starting with rnd 29. Make sure you stuff his neck very firmly. This pattern uses the term “rotate work.” This is not the same as “turn work.” While keeping the same side (the RS) facing you at all times, rotate work 180 degrees, like turning a steering wheel. BUTTON ANCHORS Cut 4 pieces of the beading thread to about 1.83m/72in in length. Fold each piece in half. Push the folded loop down through one hole on the button, and up through another hole so that it sticks through the button about an inch or two. Open the folded loop and thread the cut ends of the thread through this loop. Pull the cut ends all the way through this loop until the button is anchored at the folded end of thread loop. Set aside. START

HEAD With yarn A, make an adjustable loop.

Rnd 1: 6dc into loop, pull yarn tail to close ring – 6 sts. Rnd 2: 2dc into each st around, place st marker in first st of rnd to keep track of beginning of rnds – 12 sts. Rnd 3: [1dc into next st, 2dc into following st] 6 times – 18 sts. Rnd 4: [1dc into each of the next 2 sts, 2dc into the following st] 6 times – 24 sts. Rnd 5: [1dc into the next st, 2dc into the following st, 1dc into each of the next 2 sts] 6 times – 30 sts. Rnd 6: [1dc into each of the next 4 sts, 2dc into the following st] 6 times – 36 sts. Rnd 7: [1dc into each of the next 2 sts, 2dc into the next st, dc into each of the next 3 sts] 6 times – 42 sts. Rnd 8: [1dc into each of the next 13 sts, 2dc into the next st] 3 times – 45 sts. At this point you should attach the plastic canvas reinforcement circle to the WS of the top of Head. Cut the plastic canvas down so that it will fit in the first 6 rnds of the head. Using a piece of yarn A and yarn needle, whip stitch around the edge of plastic canvas, sewing it to the WS of head. Make sure that these sts do not show on the RS of the head (just stitch through a part of each stitch). Rnd 9: [1dc into each of the next 4 sts, 2dc into the next st, dc into each of the next 10 sts] 3 times – 48 sts. Rnds 10–15: 1dc into each st – 48 sts. Rnd 16: [1dc into each of the next 10 sts, dc2tog, 1dc into each of the next 4 sts] 3 times – 45 sts. Rnd 17: [Dc2tog, 1dc into each of the next 13 sts] 3 times – 42 sts. Rnd 18: (mouth opening) 21ch, miss next 21 sts, [1dc into each of the next 5 sts, dc2tog] 3 times – 39 sts (21ch and 18 sts). Rnd 19: [1dc into each of the next 5 sts, dc2tog, 1dc into each of the next 6 sts] 3 times – 36 sts. Rnd 20: [1dc into each of the next 3 sts, dc2tog, 1dc into the next st] 6 times – 30 sts. Rnd 21: [1dc into the next st, dc2tog, 1dc into each of the next 2 sts] 6 times – 24 sts. Rnd 22: [1dc into each of the next 2 sts, dc2tog] 6 times – 18 sts. Rnd 23: [Dc2tog, 1dc into the

next st] 6 times – 12 sts. Rnds 24–26: 1dc into each st – 12 sts. Do not fasten off. TORSO Rnd 27: Insert hook into next st, yoh with yarn B (to change colour) and pull through to front of work, 1 sl st into each remaining st – 12 sts. Rnd 28: Working into the dc sts from rnd 26 (work behind the sl sts made in previous rnd), make 2dc into each st around – 24 sts. Rnd 29: 1dc into each st – 24 sts. Rnd 30: [1dc into each of the next 3 sts, 2dc into the next st] 6 times – 30 sts. Rnds 31–39: 1dc into each st – 30 sts. Rnd 40: 1sl st into each st – 30 sts. Remove hook from loop. Insert hook from WS to RS under first sl st of rnd, replace loop back on hook and pull loop through to WS of work, yoh with yarn C (to change colour) and pull through loop on hook. Rnds 41–45: 1dc into each st – 30 sts. Rnd 46: [1dc into each of the next 2 sts, dc2tog, 1dc into the next st] 6 times – 24 sts. Rnd 47: [Dc2tog, 1dc into each of

the next 2 sts] 6 times – 18 sts. Stuff body firmly with toy stuffing (head should not be stuffed yet). Rnd 48: [1dc into the next st, dc2tog] 6 times – 12 sts. Rnd 49: Dc2tog 6 times – 6 sts. Fasten off, leaving a long tail. Using yarn needle, thread the yarn tail through the front loop of each of the remaining 6 sts and pull tight. Weave in ends securely. INNER MOUTH With yarn D, follow directions for rnds 1–9 of the head, omitting canvas attachment. SI st to fasten off. Work the following rnd into the back loops of rnd 9: Pull up a loop of yarn A in any st from rnd 9. 1ch, starting with same st, 1dc into each st around. Do not fasten off. Cut down plastic canvas so that it will fit within rnds 1–9 of Mouth. Cut this circle in half as evenly as possible. Pin each half of the circle to the WS of the Mouth. Orient the crack between semi-circles so that it is lined up with the last st you made. In other words, your hook and live loop is even with the crack between canvas pieces. It is okay

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MAKE IT

Pattern instructions

to have a gap of about 6mm/¼in wide between pieces. Using yarn D and yarn needle, whip stitch all the way around the edges of each semicircle. Top of Head Thread Thread yarn needle with a 1.8m/2yd piece of beading thread. Push needle down through centre top of Head and out through plastic canvas to the inside of head. Turn needle around and push through a different hole in plastic canvas (it should be one or two holes away from the hole the needle already passed through) and out the centre top of Head (this should be the same place as where the thread entered the head). Pull on the length of thread so that the ends are even. Tie thread together near top of Head so that it stays in place. Attaching Mouth Pin edges of Mouth to Mouth opening with WS together. Your hook should be at the right side of Skip’s Mouth (if you were Skip, it would be the left corner of your mouth). With RS of Mouth facing you, slip stitch the top of Skip’s Mouth together with the top of the Mouth opening. Stop at the opposite corner of the Mouth but do not fasten off. Stuff Head firmly. Do not stuff head/ chin very much below the Mouth (unless you are not making him into a marionette). Stuffing the lower back of the head is okay. Continue attaching the Mouth to the head by slip stitching across the bottom of the Mouth together with the bottom of the Mouth opening. Fasten off. Weave in ends. Sleeve Make 2 Using yarn B and leaving a long beginning tail, 6ch. Work in a spiral, in unjoined rnds. Rnds 1–4: 1dc into each st – 6 sts. Use a st marker to keep track of the beginning of each rnd. Rnd 5: 2dc into the first st of rnd, 1dc into each of the next 5 sts – 7 sts. Rnd 6: 1dc into each st – 7 sts. Rnd 7: 1dc into each of the next 3 sts, 2dc into the next st, 1dc into each of the next 3 sts – 8 sts.

Rnd 8: Work this rnd into the front loops only. [1htr into the next st, 2ch, sl st into the bottom of the 2nd ch from hook, 1sl st into the following st] twice, [1sl st into the next st, 2ch, sl st into the bottom of the 2nd ch from hook] twice, 1sl st into each of the next 2 sts. Fasten off, leaving a long tail. Arm and Hand Make 2 Rnd 1: Insert hook into any unused back loop from rnd 7 of sleeve, yoh with yarn A and pull through, 1ch; starting with the same st, 1dc into each unused back loop from rnd 7 – 8 sts. Rnds 2–6: 1dc into each st – 8 sts. Rnd 7: 2dc into the next st, 1dc into each of the next 7 sts – 9 sts. Rnds 8–11: 1dc into each st. Rnd 12: 2dc into each st – 18 sts. Rnd 13: 1dc into each of the next 5 sts, 2dc into the next st, 1dc into each of the next 12 sts – 19 sts. Rnd 14: 1dc into each of the next 12 sts, 2dc into the next st, 1dc into each of the next 6 sts – 20 sts. Rnd 15: 1dc into each of the next 2 sts, 2dc into the next st, 1dc into each of the next 17 sts – 21 sts. Rnd 16: 1dc into each of the next 17 sts, 2dc into the next st, 1dc into each of the next 3 sts – 22 sts. Rnd 17: (thumb rnd) [Dc2tog] twice, 1dc into each of the next 9 sts, MB (see Special Stitches), 1dc into each of the next 8 sts – 20 sts. Rnd 18: 1dc into each of the next 3 sts, 1htr into the next st, 1tr into each of the next 3 sts, 1htr into the next st, 1dc into the next st, [dc2tog] twice, 1dc into the next st, 1htr into the next st, 1tr into each of the next 3 sts, 1htr into the next st, 1dc into the next st – 18 sts. Thread yarn needle with both pieces of thread from one of the button anchors that you had set aside. Push needle from the WS to the RS between rnds 17 and 18, just below thumb bobble. The thread should come out of the arm at wrist, and the button should be on the inside of the arm near thumb bobble. Rnd 19: 1dc into each of the next 3 sts, 1htr into the next st, 1tr into each of the next 3 sts, 1htr into the

next st, 1dc into each of the next 4 sts, 1htr into the next st, 1tr into each of the next 3 sts, 1htr into the next st, 1dc into the next st – 18 sts. Stuff the hand firmly with toy stuffing. Do not stuff arm. Row 20: (finger bobbles) 1dc into each of the next 2 sts, fold hand flat with hook at right. Work through both thicknesses together at one time, leaving the one st at each end unworked. The unworked st at this end is the current working loop. In other words, the next st that you make in this row will be made into the st to the left and the st directly behind it, which is also the very first dc st that you made in this row. Work across hand as follows: [MB in next set of sts, sl st through following set of sts] 4 times, leaving the very last st unworked. Fasten off. Legs Make 2 Using yarn C, 6ch. Work in a spiral, in unjoined rnds. Use a stitch marker to keep track of the beginning of each rnd. Rnds 1–12: 1dc into each st – 6 sts. Thread yarn needle with both pieces of thread from one of the button anchors that you had set aside. Push needle from the WS to the RS between rnds 10 and 11. The thread should come out of the Leg, and the button should be on the inside of the Leg. The point at which the string exits the Leg can be changed later; don’t worry if it ends up on the underside. Rnd 13: 2dc into the next st, 1dc into each of the next 5 sts – 7 sts. Rnd 14: 1dc into each st – 7 sts. Rnds 15–28: 1dc into each st around. On odd rnds, increase one time per rnd by making 2dc into one st. The st that you make the increase into should be in a different place each rnd – 14 sts at the end of rnd 28. Rnd 29: Work this rnd into the front loops only. [1sl st and 1htr] into the first st, 2ch, sl st into the bottom of the 2nd ch from hook, [1htr and 1sl st into the next st, 1sl st into each of the next 2 sts, *[1sl st and 1htr] into the next st, 2ch, sl st into the bottom of the second ch from hook, [1htr and 1sl st] into the next st, 1 sl st into each of the next 2 sts**, repeat

from * to **, 2ch, sl st in bottom of 2nd ch from hook, 1sl st into the next st, [1htr, 2ch, sl st in bottom of second ch from hook, 1htr] in last st. SI st to fasten off, leaving a long tail. Foot Rnd 1: Insert hook into any unused back loop from rnd 28, yoh with yarn A and pull through, 1ch; starting with the same st, 1dc into each unused back loop from rnd 28 – 14 sts. Rnd 2: [1dc into each of the next 6 sts, 2dc into the next st] twice – 16 sts. Rnd 3: [1dc into each of the next 3 sts, 2dc into the next st, 1dc into each of the next 4 sts] twice – 18 sts. Rnd 4: [1dc into the next st, 2dc into the next st, 1dc into each of the next 7 sts] twice – 20 sts. Rnd 5: 1dc into each of the next 14 sts [1ch, turn, 1dc into each of the next 9 sts] 6 times, 1ch, turn, [MB, 1sl st into the following st] 4 times, MB. Rotate work to crochet down the side edge of the foot. Make 4 dc along edge of foot, 1dc into each of the next 6 sts ending near the back of the foot. Rnd 6: 1dc into each of the next 5 sts, make 4dc up the other side edge of the foot, 1dc into each of the next 19 sts – 28 sts. Rnd 7: 1dc into the next st, dc2tog, 1dc into each of the next 5 sts, dc2tog, 1dc into each of the next 7 sts, dc2tog, 1dc into each of the next 6 sts, dc2tog, 1dc into the last st – 24 sts. Rnd 8: 1dc into each of the next 2 sts, dc2tog] 6 times – 18 sts. Rnd 9: [Dc2tog, 1dc into the next st] 6 times – 12 sts. Stuff the foot and ankle firmly with toy stuffing. Do not stuff leg. Rnd 10: [Dc2tog] 6 times – 6 sts. Fasten off. Using yarn needle, thread yarn tail through the front loop of each of the remaining sts and pull tight to close hole. Ears Make 2 With yarn A, make an adjustable loop. Row 1: 6dc into loop. Do not join. Do not work in the rnd, but work in turned rows. Row 2: 1ch, turn, 1dc into each of the next 6 sts. Fasten off with long tail.

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Cut out two each of large and small eye patches using templates as guides. Using embroidery needle and crochet thread (or regular needle and thread), stitch each eye button onto the smaller felt patch for eyes. Superglue each small felt patch on top of each large eye patch. Glue each large eye patch to the face about 3 sts apart, with the bottom of the large felt patch resting just above the top of the Mouth. Consider marking the eye placement with pins so that they end up in the right spot when you glue them to the face. MAKING THE CONTROL STICK (see diagram) Using wood glue, adhere 2 craft sticks together to make them stronger. Do this three times so that you have a total of three double-thick craft sticks. Allow the glue to dry. Glue two of these strengthened sticks to the top of the remaining stick, so that they are perpendicular to it. (We will call these two sticks the “horizontal sticks” and the other stick the “vertical stick” to avoid confusion.) One horizontal stick should be glued on top of the vertical stick so that it is about 1.5cm/½in away from the end of the vertical stick. This is the front of the stick. The next horizontal

CONTROL STICK DIAGRAM (TOP VIEW)

TO LEG 28" (71 cm)

TO LEG 28" (71 cm)

FRONT ½" (1.3 cm)

¾"(2 cm)

¾"(2 cm)

HORIZONTAL ¾"(2 cm)

HORIZONTAL HORIZONTAL

¾"(2 cm)

VERTICAL

FINISHING Check the location of the strings that come from the Legs. They should come out of the tops of the Legs (the knees). If they do not, thread the yarn needle and push needle back through the space where the thread exited the Leg and out through the desired location. Remember that you want the thread to come out of the Leg between rnds 10 and 11. Use yarn tails to stitch down the corners of the jagged edges of sleeves and pant hem. Using the yarn tails, stitch the Arms to the sides of the body, and the Legs to the bottom of body. Pin, and then stitch, the Ears to each side of the face, about one row above the corners of the Mouth. Weave in all yarn ends. Using needle and thread, stitch beads into Mouth. (Our model has 12 beads at the top and 8 beads at the bottom of the Mouth.)

TO ARM 26 "(66 cm)

¾"(2 cm)

TO ARM 26 "(66 cm) 1” (2.5cm)

1” (2.5cm) BACK

stick should be glued on top of the vertical stick, leaving a space of about 2cm/¾in between horizontal sticks. Allow to dry. Using a small drill bit (approx. 2mm), make 1 hole in each horizontal stick about 2cm/¾in away from each end. Drill a hole in the vertical stick about 2.5cm/1in away from the back end of the control stick. Spray paint the control stick if desired and allow it to dry.

TO HEAD 22" (56 cm)

front-most horizontal bar. Tie these ends together in a sturdy knot so that each thread measures 71cm/28in from control stick to knee. Use a dab of superglue to keep all knots from fraying. When superglue is dry, trim END thread ends down to about 2.5cm/1in.

EYE PATCH TEMPLATES

LARGE EYE PATCH (DUSTY BLUE FELT)

SMALL EYE PATCH (LIGHT PINK FELT)

STRINGING MARIONETTE (see diagram) Thread the embroidery needle with both threads from the top of Skip’s Head. Use embroidery needle to wrap threads around stick and through the hole in the vertical stick a few times. The string should measure about 56cm/22in long from Top of Head to control stick. Tie these thread ends to the piece of thread that hangs down from the control stick. Repeat this process for the Arms, attaching the arm strings to each end of the horizontal stick closer to the head attachment point. The length of the string attached to the Arms should be about 66cm/26in. Using embroidery needle thread, thread each Leg string up (from bottom to top) through each of the holes in the www.insidecrochet.co.uk 67

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MAKE IT

Pattern instructions

“BOO!” Bunting BY LYNNE ROWE

Crochet up our bunting for some spooky Halloween fun.

MATERIALS ● King Cole Smooth DK, 100% Microfibre, 100g/216m/236yds Yarn A: Emerald Green 807 x 1 ball Yarn B: White 801 x 1 ball Yarn C: Black 848 x 1 ball (Unfortunately Emerald Green has been discontinued – we recommend Spearmint 931 as a substitute) ● 3mm hook ● 2–3m/79–118in of 6mm ribbon ● 2 x white seed beads ● 5 x star-shaped buttons ● Large square of black felt ● Sewing needle ● Black and white sewing thread YARN ALTERNATIVES You can use any DK yarn in Halloween colours with a 3mm hook to achieve a similar effect. If you wish to make your bunting larger, you can use a larger hook (3.5mm or 4mm). TENSION Tension is not essential to this project. MEASUREMENTS Letters and Pendants measure 14cm/5½in high. DESIGNER BIOGRAPHY Lynne Rowe is a freelance knit and crochet designer, writer and tutor from Congleton, Cheshire. To find out more about Lynne and her work, visit her website at www.lynnesknits.weebly.com. SPECIAL STITCH PATTERNS Make picot (mp): Make 3ch, miss last chain just made, sl st into each of next 2 ch.

PATTERN NOTES The crocheted letters are backed with felt to make them more rigid. The 1ch at the start of each row is the turning chain and is not counted as a stitch. LETTER “B” With 3mm hook and yarn A, make 18ch. Row 1: Miss 1ch, 1dc in every ch, turn – 17 sts. Row 2: 1ch, dc across to last st, 2dc in last st, turn – 18 sts. Row 3: 1ch, 2dc in first st, dc to end, turn – 19 sts. Row 4: As row 2 – 20 sts. Rows 5–7: 1ch, dc to end, turn. Row 8: 1ch, 7dc, turn. Work on these 7 sts only as folls: Rows 9–12: 1ch, 7dc, turn. After row 12, do not turn. Instead, make 6ch, cut yarn and pull through last st on hook. START

With WS facing, count 7 sts in from left side of the horizontal bar. Make a slip knot onto hook and join into 7th st with a dc (this counts as first dc), then dc into rem 6 sts, turn – 7 sts. Work on these 7 sts only continuing as folls: Rep rows 9–12. Row 13: 1ch, 7dc, 1dc in each of 6ch made at end of first row 12, 7dc, turn – 20 sts. Row 14: 1ch, dc to last 2 sts, dc2tog, turn – 19 sts. Row 15: 1ch, dc2tog, dc to end, turn – 18 sts. Row 16: As row 14 – 17 sts. Row 17: 1ch, 2dc in first st, dc to end, turn – 18 sts.

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Row 18: 1ch, 17dc, 2dc in last st, turn – 19 sts. Row 19: As row 17 – 20 sts. Rows 20–25: Rep from row 8 to end of row 13 (making 6ch at end of row 24). Rows 26–28: 1ch, dc to end, turn. Row 29: As row 15 – 19 sts. Row 30: 1ch, 17dc, dc2tog, turn – 18 sts. Row 31: As row 15 – 17 sts. Cut yarn and pull through loop on hook. Weave all loose ends of yarn into work and trim. LETTER “O” With 3mm hook and yarn A, make 15ch. Row 1: Miss 1ch, dc in every ch, turn – 14 sts. Row 2: 1ch, 2dc in first st, dc to last st, 2dc in last st, turn – 16 sts. Rows 3 & 4: As row 2, turn – 20 sts. Rows 5–7: 1ch, dc to end, turn. Row 8: 1ch, 7dc, turn and work on these 7 sts only for the side bar. Rows 9–24: 1ch, dc to end, turn. At end of row 24 do not turn, make 6ch, cut yarn and pull through last st on hook. With WS facing, count 7 sts in from the left side of the lower horizontal bar. Make a slip knot onto hook and join into 7th st with a dc (this counts as first dc), then dc into rem 6 sts, turn – 7 sts. Working on these 7 sts only cont as folls: Rep rows 9–24. Row 25: 1ch, 7dc, dc in each of 6ch made at end of first row 24, 7dc, turn – 20 sts.

Rows 26 & 27: 1ch, dc to end, turn. Row 28: 1ch, dc2tog, dc to last 2 sts, dc2tog, turn – 18 sts. Rows 29–31: As row 28. After row 31 cut yarn and pull through last st on hook. Weave all loose ends of yarn into work and trim. PENDANT With 3mm hook and yarn B, make 18ch. Row 1: Miss 3ch, work 1tr in 4th ch from hook, 1tr in ea of next 13ch, (2tr, 2ch, 2tr) in last ch, rotate work, and work 1tr in ea ch along opposite side of foundation ch (working last tr in bottom of first 3ch) – 17tr in total on each side of foundation ch, turn. Row 2: 3ch (counts as 1tr), 12tr, 2tr in next st, 3tr, (2tr, 2ch, 2tr) in 2ch-sp, 3tr, 2tr in next st, 13tr (working last tr in top of 3ch), turn. Row 3: 3ch (counts as 1tr), 13tr, 2tr in next st, 5tr, (3tr, 2ch, 3tr) into 2ch-sp, 5tr, 2tr in next st, 14tr (working last tr in top of 3ch), turn. Row 4: 3ch (counts as 1tr), 14tr, 2tr in next st, 8tr, (3tr, 2ch, 3tr) in space, 8tr, 2tr in next st, 15tr, turn. Row 5: 3ch (counts as 1tr), 15tr, 2tr in next st, 11tr, (2tr, 2ch, 2tr) in space, 11tr, 3tr in next st, 16tr. Cut yarn and pull through loop on hook. PICOT EDGE Join in yarn C with a sl st to top left corner, (mp (see Special Stitch Patterns), 4dc) 7 times, mp, 2dc, 2dc in 2ch-sp, mp, 2dc in same 2ch-space, 2dc, (mp, 4dc) 7 times,

mp, sl st in rem st, work a line of dc across top of pendant, work 2dc in each row end (20 dc in total). Sl st to next st. Cut yarn and pull through loop on hook. Weave all yarns ends into WS of work and trim. Make 1 more pendant in yarn B. Make 2 striped pendants, working in alternating stripes of yarn A and yarn C and working the picot edge in yarn C. SPIDER With 3mm hook and yarn C, make a magic loop and work in a spiral. Rnd 1: 6dc in magic loop – 6 sts. Rnd 2: 2dc in every st – 12 sts. Rnd 3: (1dc, 2dc in next st) 6 times – 18 sts. Rnd 4: (2dc, 2dc in next st) 6 times – 24 sts. Rnd 5: (1htr, 1tr, 2dtr) in next st, 1tr, 1htr, sl st into next st, make 12ch, miss last ch just made, sl st in each of the next 11ch, sl st in next 2 sts, *make 10ch, miss last ch just made, sl st in each of the next 9ch, sl st in next st, rep from * once, sl st in next st, make 9ch, miss last ch just made, sl st in each of the next 8ch, sl st in next 7 sts, make 9ch, miss last ch just made, sl st in each of the next 8ch, sl st in next 2 sts, **make 10ch, miss last ch just made, sl st in each of the next 9ch, sl st in next st, rep from ** once, sl st in next st, make 12ch, miss last ch just made, sl st in each of the next 11ch, sl st in next st.

MAKING UP Block all crochet pieces using a steam iron. Pin the pieces out onto an ironing board. Pin the spider’s legs so that they are facing forward. Hold a steam iron over the pieces but do not let it touch the yarn. Steam all pieces. Leave to dry completely before removing pins. You may need to block the spider a second time to make sure the legs stay in position. Stitch 5 small star buttons to the White (yarn B) pendants. Use the BOO letters as a template to cut out felt letters. Slip stitch the felt letters to the back of the crocheted letters to make them more rigid. Arrange the pendants and BOO letters along the ribbon and slip stitch in place. Stitch 2 white seed beads to the head of the spider then stitch the spider to the top right END corner of the second letter “O”.

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MAKE IT

Pattern instructions

Photos © Harrison Stone

Ribbed Socks BY ROHN STRONG

Designed for men of all shapes and sizes, these socks are great for everyday warm weather wear, while ribbing at each side of the foot allows for a snug fit.

MATERIALS ● Rowan Fine Art, 45% wool/25% polyamide/ 20% mohair/10% silk, 100g/400m/437yds Shade: Lapwing x 2 skeins ● 3.25mm hook ● Split ring stitch markers (sm) YARN ALTERNATIVES Any sock yarn will be perfect! TENSION Work 24 exdc and 14 rows to measure 10 x 10cm/4 x 4 in using 3.25mm hook, or size required to obtain tension. MEASUREMENTS The finished socks fit a calf measurement of 24(26.5, 29)cm/ 9.5(10½, 11½)in. DESIGNER BIOGRAPHY Rohn Strong is an internationally recognised crochet and knitwear designer. He is the author of The

Heritage Collection as well as numerous ebooks. Visit his blog at www.rohnstrongdesigns. wordpress.com. SPECIAL STITCHES Extended Double Crochet (exdc): Insert hook in indicated st/sp, yoh, pull up loop, yoh, draw through first loop on hk, yoh, draw through 2 rem loops on hk. Foundation Treble Stitch (ftr): 3ch, yoh, insert hk in first ch, yoh, pull up loop, place sm on loop, yoh, draw through marked loop, [yoh, draw through 2 loops on hk] twice (counts as 2 ftr); *yoh, insert in marked loop, pull up loop, move marker to this loop, yoh, draw through marked loop [yoh, draw through 2 loops on hk] twice; rep from * until desired stitch count. PATTERN NOTES Sock is worked cuff down. 3ch counts as tr throughout.

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CUFF Work 56 (64, 72)ftr and join to work in the round in top of initial 3ch, taking care not to twist sts. Small gap can be sewn closed when weaving in ends. Row 1: 1rtrf, *2rtrb, 2rtrf, rep from * around, 1rtrf. Rep row 1 until cuff measures 5cm/2in. START

LEG Rnd 1: 1rtrf, 2rtrb, 2rtrf, 2rtrb, 14 (18, 22)exdc, (2rtrb, 2rtrf) three

times, 2rtrb, 14 (18, 22)exdc, 2rtrb, 2rtrf, 2rtrb, 1rtrf. Rep rnd 1 until piece measures 18cm/7in from beginning of cuff. HEEL FLAP Begin working in rows. Row 1: Dc in first 28 (32, 36) sts, leave rem sts unworked. Row 2: 1ch, turn; dc in each dc across. Rep row 2 until Heel Flap measures 6.5cm/2½in, ending after working a WS row.

HEEL TURN Row 1: Dc in first 17 (19, 21) sts, dc2tog, dc in next st, 1ch, turn. Row 2: Dc in first 8 sts, dc2tog, dc, 1ch, turn. Row 3: Dc to 1 st before gap, dc2tog, dc, 1ch, turn. Rep row 3 until all sts have been worked. You will have 18 (20, 22) sts remaining. GUSSET Set-up Row: Dc across heel sts, dc 10 sts across the end of heel

flap, pm (this will be the new beginning of round and will also mark the left side of the foot). Work pattern across foot sts as follows: [1rtrf, 2rtrb, 2rtrf, 2rtrb, 14 (18, 22)exdc, 2rtrb, 2rtrf, 2rtrb, 1rtrf], pm, dc 10 sts across the end of heel flap, exdc to end of round. Rnd 1: Work est patt across to marker, dc2tog, patt to 2 sts before beg of next round, dc2tog. Repeat rnd 1 until you have 56 (64, 72) sts remaining. Remove markers. FOOT Work even in est patt until foot from heel measures 21 (24, 26) cm/8¼ (9½, 10¼)in, or 5cm/2in less than desired finished length. TOE Set-up row: Dc in first 28 (32, 36) sts, place marker, work to end of round. Rnd 1: *Dc, dc2tog, dc around to 3 sts before marker, dc2tog, dc repeat from * around. Rnd 2: Dc in each st around. Repeat these 2 rnds until you have 28 (32, 36) sts remaining. Repeat rnd 1 until you have 12 (16, 16) sts remaining. FINISHING Seam top and bottom of toe together. Weave in ends and sew gap at cuff END together. Wash and lay flat to block. www.insidecrochet.co.uk 71

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MAKE IT

Pattern instructions

Up and Away Mobile BY SALLY SHEPHERD

A bright and cheerful mobile to keep summer lasting long after the weather has cooled.

MATERIALS ● DMC Natura Just Cotton, 100% cotton, 50g/155m/170yds Yarn A: Aguamarina N25 x 1 ball Yarn B: Lima N76 x 1 ball Yarn C: Crimson N61 x 1 ball Yarn D: Ivory N02 x 1 ball Yarn E: Ombre N39 x 1 ball Yarn F: Parme N50 x 1 ball Yarn G: Topaze N19 x 1 ball Yarn H: Tournesol N16 x 1 ball ● 3mm hook ● 2 bright beads ● Yarn needle ● 2 pieces 6mm/¼in wooden dowel YARN ALTERNATIVES You can use any DK weight cotton to achieve a similar effect.

MEASUREMENTS Balloon approx 11cm/4½in long. Mobile total drop is 21cm/8½in. DESIGNER BIOGRAPHY Sally loves designing and making small crochet shapes and amigurumi creatures. You can see more of her work on her blog www.ditzyanddotty.blogspot.co.uk. PATTERN NOTES The balloons are made by carrying the unused colours across the back of the balloon until they are needed again. This helps the balloons keep their shape. They are made in spirals so there is no need to join at the end of each round. BALLOON Each balloon requires 4 colours. Choose any 4 for each balloon, and label your choices A–D (ignore the yarn START

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letters given above, for the balloons only). With yarn A make an adjustable ring, 1ch, 8dc in ring – 8 sts. Rnd 1: 2dc in each st to end – 16 sts. For rnd 2 and all subsequent rounds, work one repeat of stitch pattern, given in brackets, in each colour following the sequence B, C, D, A, B, C, D, A to end, carrying completed colours around behind sts. Rnd 2: (Dc, 2dc in next st) around – 24 sts. Rnd 3: (2dc, 2dc in next st) around – 32 sts. Rnd 4: (3dc, 2dc in next st) around – 40 sts. Rnd 5: (4dc, 2dc in next st) around – 48 sts. Rnds 6–10: (6dc) around – 48 sts. Rnd 11: (Dc2tog, 4dc) around – 40 sts. Rnd 12: Dc around – 40 sts. Rnd 13: (Dc2tog, 3dc) around – 32 sts. Rnd 14: Rep rnd 12 – 32 sts. Rnd 15: (Dc2tog, 2dc) around – 24 sts. Rnd 16: Rep rnd 12 – 24 sts. Rnd 17: (Dc2tog, dc) around – 16 sts.

Rnd 18: Rep rnd 12 – 16 sts. Stuff firmly. Rnd 19: Using yarn A only, dc2tog blo to end. Fasten off yarn and weave in ends. For rest of pattern, use the yarn letters as given in Materials list. BASKET With Yarn E, make an adjustable ring, 2ch, 6dc in ring, sl st into 2nd ch to join rnd – 6dc. Rnd 1: 2ch, 2dc into each st around, sl st to join – 12dc. Rnd 2: 2ch, dcblo around, sl st to join. Rnd 3: 2ch, dc around, sl st to join. Rnd 4: Rep rnd 3. Rnd 5: 8ch, join with sl st to 2nd row from bottom of balloon, between the colour changes. Fasten off and weave in end. Rnd 6: Rejoin yarn to top of basket, exactly half way from your first line of chains. 8ch and join to balloon, half way around from your first join. Fasten off and weave in ends. BIRD With yarn A make an adjustable ring, 3ch, 8tr in ring, change to

yarn D, 4tr in ring, change back to yarn A, tr in ring, sl st into 3rd ch to join – 13tr. Rnd 1: 5ch, dc into 2nd ch from hook, htr, tr, dtr, miss 2 sts on foundation rnd, tr into next st, tr, (2tr into next st) twice, tr, 2tr into next st, sl st into same st, change to yarn H, 3ch, dc into 2nd ch from hook, dc into same st as previous 2tr, change to yarn A, dc, change to yarn D, dc, 2dc into next st, dc, 2dc into next st, with yarn A, dc, 2dc into next st, sl st to first ch to join. Fasten off and weave in ends. CLOUD With yarn D, 14ch. Row 1: Dc into 3rd ch from hook, dc to end, turn. Row 2: 2ch, 11dc, turn. Row 3: 2ch, 9dc, turn. Row 4: 2ch, 7dc, turn. Row 5: 2ch, 5dc, turn. Row 6: 2ch, 3dc, turn. Row 7: 2ch, 2tr, sl st into same st. Fasten off and weave in ends. RAINBOW Row 1: With yarn A, 7ch, dc into 3rd ch from hook, 2dc into each st to final st, dc into final st of row – 9 sts.

Row 2: Change to yarn B, 2ch, [2dc into next st, dc] 4 times, dc – 13 sts. Row 3: Change to yarn H, 2ch, [2dc into next st, 2dc] 4 times, dc – 17 sts. Row 4: Change to yarn F, 2ch, [2dc into next st, 3dc] 4 times, dc – 21 sts. Row 5: Change to yarn C, 2ch, [2dc into next st, 4dc] 4 times, dc – 25 sts. Fasten off and weave in ends. FINISHING Drill holes in the centre of each piece of dowel. Join yarn at the top of each balloon, 25ch, sl st into 5th ch from hook to make a ring, 6dc into ring. Fasten off and weave in ends. Slip each ring over one end of dowel, and adjust position until the balloons hang level. Join cloud, rainbow and bird together with chain stitches, leave a long thread at the top and fasten off. Thread the yarn through the centre hole of one piece of dowel, through a bead, through the 2nd piece of dowel and the END 2nd bead. Tie a large loop in the yarn for hanging.

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MAKE IT

Pattern instructions

Genevieve Gloves BY NICKY HALE

Inspired by old Saturday afternoon films, these fingerless gloves are lightweight and pretty, perfect for cycling or driving.

MATERIALS ● Rowan Wool Cotton 4 Ply, 50% Merino wool/50% cotton, 50g/180m/197yds Yarn A: Sea 492 x 1 ball Yarn B: Celanden 482 x 1 ball ● 3mm hook ● 6 x 10–15mm/½–¾in buttons ● Stitch markers ● Bent ended yarn needle ● Needle and thread YARN ALTERNATIVES These gloves would also look great in Garnstudio Drops Alpaca or Regia Cotton. TENSION Work 24htr and 18 rows to measure 10 x 10cm/4 x 4in using 3mm hook, or size required to obtain tension. MEASUREMENTS Finished gloves measure 19.5cm/7½in around the knuckles, and 17.5cm/7in around the wrist. DESIGNER BIOGRAPHY Nicky has worked in the craft marketing industry for 12 years.

She’s been an avid crafter from the age of 10, inspired by her creative grandmother, and can be found on Etsy, Ravelry and Blogger as alifelikevera. LEFT HAND GLOVE With yarn A work 40ch. Row 1: 1dc in 2nd ch from hook, dc to end, turn – 39 sts. Row 2: 2ch (doesn’t count as a st ), 6htr, 2htr in next st, htr to last 11 sts, 2htr in next st, htr to end, turn – 41 sts. Row 3: 2ch (doesn’t count as a st), 10htr, 2htr in next st, htr to last 8 sts, 2htr in next st, htr to end, turn – 43 sts. Row 4: 2ch (doesn’t count as a st), htr to last 12 sts, 2htr in next st, htr to end, turn – 44 sts. Row 5: 2ch (doesn’t count as a st), 11htr, 2htr in next st, htr to end, turn – 45 sts. Row 6: 2ch (doesn’t count as a st), htr to last 13 sts, 2htr in next st, htr to end, turn – 46 sts. Row 7: 2ch (doesn’t count as a st), htr to end, turn. Row 8: 2ch (doesn’t count as a st), START

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htr to end, 5ch, sl st to join piece into top of beginning 2ch on opposite side, fasten off. Sew in yarn ends. Lay the piece flat with the 5ch at the top of the work. With RS facing and counting from left to right, count across 5ch, then count 17htr, rejoin yarn into the top of this st from the wrong side then with WS facing and working back across these 17 sts cont as folls: Row 9: (WS) 2ch (counts as 1htr), 1htr in each st to 5ch, 1htr in each of the 5ch, htr to end, sl st to join, turn – 51 sts. Working backwards and forwards in rows cont as folls: Rows 10–12: 2ch (counts as 1htr), htr to end, sl st to join, turn. Row 13: (WS) 2ch (counts as 1htr), htr to last 8 sts, 6ch, miss 5 sts, htr to end, sl st to join, turn. Row 14: (RS) 2ch (counts as 1htr), htr in each st to 6ch, htr in each ch, htr to end, sl st to join, turn. Rows 15–18: 2ch, (counts as 1htr), htr to end, sl st to join, turn. Fasten off. Put glove onto left hand and use two stitch markers to mark a comfortable gap between little finger and ring finger on palm side and back of hand. LITTLE FINGER With RS facing join yarn into palm side of glove at marker, work 3ch across and sl st to join at marker on back of hand, this will form the finger hole. Row 1: (RS) 2ch (counts as 1htr), htr in each st to 3ch, work 1htr in each ch, sl st to join, turn. Row 2: 2ch (counts as 1htr) htr to end, turn. Row 3: 2ch (counts as 1htr) htr to last st, join in yarn B on last st, do not turn. Row 4: (RS) 1ch (doesn’t count as a st), dc to end, fasten off. Return to main part of glove with RS facing. Next Row: (RS) Join yarn into palm side of work, 2ch (counts as 1htr), htr in each st to little finger, work 1htr in base of 3ch, so that fingers are joined, htr to end, sl st to join, fasten off. Put glove onto left hand and use two stitch markers to mark a comfortable gap between ring

finger and middle finger on palm side and back of hand. RING AND MIDDLE FINGER With RS facing join yarn into palm side of glove at marker, work 3ch across, as before, join at marker point to form finger hole. Row 1: 2ch (counts as 1htr), htr in each st to 3ch, work 1htr in each ch, sl st to join, turn. Row 2: 2ch (counts as 1htr) htr to end, turn. Row 3: 2ch (counts as 1htr) htr to last st, join in yarn B on last st, do not turn. Row 4: (RS) 1ch, (doesn’t count as a st), dc to end, fasten off. Rep again for middle finger. INDEX FINGER With RS facing join yarn into palm side of glove. Row 1: 2ch (counts as 1htr), htr in each st to 3ch, work 1htr in each ch, sl st to join, turn. Row 2: 2ch (counts as 1htr) htr in each st to end, turn. Row 3: 2ch, (counts as 1htr) htr to last st, join in yarn B on last st, do not turn. Row 4: (RS) 1ch, (doesn’t count as a st), dc to end, fasten off.

Row 5: 2ch (doesn’t count as a st), 10htr, 2htr in next st, htr to end, turn – 45 sts. Row 6: 2ch (doesn’t count as a st), htr to last 12 sts, 2htr in next st, htr to end, turn – 46 sts. Row 7: 2ch (doesn’t count as a st), htr to end, turn. Row 8: 2ch (doesn’t count as a st), htr to end, 5ch, sl st to join piece in top of beg 2ch on opposite side, fasten off. Sew in yarn ends. Lay the piece flat with the 5ch at the top of the work. With RS facing and counting from right to left, count across 5ch, then count 17htr, rejoin yarn into the top of this st from the wrong side then with WS facing and working back across these 17 sts cont as folls: Row 9: (WS) 2ch, (counts as 1htr), htr in each st to 5ch, htr in each of 5ch, htr to end, sl st to join, turn – 46 sts. Working in the following sequence, (RS), (WS) and (RS). Rows 10–12: 2ch (counts as 1htr), htr to end, sl st to join, turn. Row 13: (WS) 8ch (counts as 1htr) 6ch, miss 5 sts, htr to end, sl st in

2nd ch of beg 8ch to join, turn. Row 14: (RS) 2ch (counts as 1htr), htr in each st to 6ch, htr in each ch, sl st to join, turn. Rows 15–18: 2ch (counts as 1htr), htr to end, sl st to join, turn. Fasten off. Put glove onto right hand and use two stitch markers to mark a comfortable gap between little finger and ring finger on palm side and back of hand. LITTLE FINGER With RS facing join yarn into back of glove at marker, work 3ch across and sl st to join at other marker point, this will form the finger hole. Row 1: 2ch (counts as 1htr), htr in each st to 3ch, 1htr in each ch, sl st to join, turn. Row 2: 2ch (counts as 1htr), htr to end, turn. Row 3: 2ch (counts as 1htr), htr to last st, join in yarn B on last st, do not turn. Row 4: (RS) 1ch (doesn’t count as a st), dc to end, fasten off. Next row: (RS) Join yarn into back of glove, 2ch (counts as 1htr), htr in each st to little finger, work in base of 3ch, so that fingers are

THUMB With RS facing join yarn in any st at bottom of thumb space, near the side edge palm side. Row 1: 2ch (counts as a 1htr), htr around, when you reach the sides work 1htr in the side of the st, then in bottom of 6ch, work into side of st again and cont to the beg 2ch, sl st to join. Rows 2–4: 2ch (counts as 1htr) htr to end, join in yarn B on last st, turn. Row 5: (RS) 1ch,(doesn’t count as a st), dc to end. Fasten off. RIGHT HAND GLOVE Using yarn A work 40ch. Row 1: 1dc in 2nd ch from hook, dc to end, turn – 39 sts. Row 2: 2ch (doesn’t count as a st), 9htr, 2htr in next st, htr to last 11 sts, 2htr in next st, htr to end, turn – 41 sts. Row 3: 2ch (doesn’t count as a st), 10htr, 2htr in next st, htr to last 11 sts, 2htr in next st, htr to end, turn – 43 sts. Row 4: 2ch (doesn’t count as a st), htr to last 11 sts, 2htr in next st, htr to end, turn – 44 sts.

END

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MAKE IT

Pattern instructions

joined, htr to end, sl st to join, fasten off. RING AND MIDDLE FINGER With RS facing join yarn into back of glove at marker, work 3ch across, as before, join at marker point to form finger hole. Row 1: (RS) 2ch (counts as 1htr), htr in each st to 3ch, work 1htr in each ch, sl st to join, turn. Row 2: 2ch (counts as 1htr) htr to end, turn. Row 3: 2ch (counts as 1htr) htr to last st, join in yarn B on last st, do not turn. Row 4: (RS) 1ch (doesn’t count as a st), dc to end, fasten off. Repeat again for Middle finger. INDEX FINGER With RS facing join yarn into outer side of glove. Row 1: (RS) 2ch (counts as 1htr), htr in each st to 3ch, work 1htr in each ch, sl st to join, turn. Row 2: 2ch (counts as 1htr) htr to end, turn. Row 3: 2ch (counts as 1htr) htr to last st, join in yarn B on last st, do not turn. Row 4: (RS) 1ch, (doesn’t count as a st), dc to end, fasten off. THUMB With RS facing, join yarn into any

st at bottom of thumb space, near the side edge palm side. Row 1: (RS) 2ch (counts as a 1htr), htr around, when you reach the sides work 1htr in side of st then in bottom of 6ch, work into side of st again and cont to beg 2ch, sl st to join. Rows 2–4: 2ch (counts as 1htr), htr to end, join in yarn B on last st, turn. Row 5: (RS) 1ch (doesn’t count as a st), dc to end, fasten off. CUFF Work the same for both gloves (pattern worked over 8 + 3 sts). Working into bottom of foundation ch, with RS facing work 1ch to join in yarn. Row 1: 4ch (counts as 1tr, 1ch), 1tr in base of 4ch, 1ch, miss next 2 base ch, *(1dc, 3ch, 1dc) in next st, miss 3 base ch, (1ch, 1tr, 1ch, 1tr, 1ch, 1tr, 1ch) in next base ch, miss 3ch; rep from * to last 4ch, (1dc, 3ch, 1dc) in next base ch, miss next 2 base ch, (1ch, 1tr, 1ch, 1tr) in last base ch, turn. Row 2: 1ch (doesn’t count as a st), 1dc, *miss next (1ch, 1tr, 1ch, 1dc), work (1ch, 1tr, 1ch, 1tr, 1ch, 1tr, 1ch) in next 3ch-sp, miss next 1dc, 1ch, ** 1tr, 1ch, work (1dc, 3ch, 1dc) in next st; rep from * 3 times, rep from * to ** once, dc into 3rd ch of beg 4ch, turn.

Row 3: 4ch (counts as 1tr, 1ch), 1tr in base of 4ch, 1ch, miss next (1ch, 1tr, 1ch), *(1dc, 3ch, 1dc) in next st, miss 1ch, 1tr, 1ch, **1dc, work (1ch, 1tr, 1ch, 1tr, 1ch, 1tr, 1ch) in next 3ch-sp, miss (1dc, 1ch, 1tr, 1ch); rep from * 3 times, rep from * to ** once, (1tr, 1ch, 1tr) in last st, turn. Rows 4–7: As rows 2 & 3, join in yarn B at 2nd part of last tr. Row 8: As row 2. Fasten off. BACK OF HAND OPENING LEFT HAND Join in yarn B to left side of opening into last dc worked in yarn B of cuff. Work 1dc in top and bottom of side of next tr, 1dc in side of dc, work 1dc, 5ch to form button loop and finish by working 1dc in next side st, cont working 1dc into cuff until you reach last side st before cuff meets main glove, work 1dc, 5ch to form button loop and finish by working 1dc in first st of main glove, work a further 6dc then 5ch, 1dc in next st, cont until you reach the corner, dc2tog over last

side st and first base ch of 5ch, 3dc, work dc2tog over last base ch of 5ch and first side st, dc to end. Fasten off. RIGHT HAND Join in yarn B to the left side of opening into last dc worked in yarn B of cuff. Work 1dc in each side st until you reach first corner, dc2tog over last side st and first base ch of 5ch, 3dc, work dc2tog over last base ch of 5ch and first side st, work 3dc, work 1dc, 5ch to form button loop and finish by working 1dc into next side st, cont working 1dc a further 6 times, work 5ch to form button loop, work a further 6dc, work 5ch to form button loop, dc to end, fasten off. Sew in yarn ends. MAKING UP Secure button on opposite side to button fastening loop, using needle and thread. Wet block or steam END gently hovering an iron over the gloves.

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STOCKISTS Look no further than these stockists for your favourite Debbie Bliss yarns and patterns. CAMBRIDGESHIRE

COUNTY LONDONDERRY

CUMBRIA

DEVON

Yarn on the Square

The Wool Shop

Superior Sewing Centre

The Wool Merchant

22 Market Place, Ely CB7 4NT

19 The Craft Village, off Shipquay Street, Londonderry BT48 6AR

14 Rosemary Lane, Treasury Court, Carlisle CA3 8PW

3 Fore Street, Tiverton EX16 6LN

Email: thewoolshop@btinternet.com

www.sewingknitting.co.uk

www.thewoolmerchant.co.uk

Email: sales@sewingknitting.co.uk

Email: info@thewoolmerchant.co.uk

www.yarn-on-the-square.co.uk

Tel: 01353 661024

ESSEX

Tel: 028 7126 0959

FIFE

Tel: 01884 243569

GLOUCESTERSHIRE

HERTFORDSHIRE

Craft Arena

The Woolly Brew

The Wool Stop

Wool-n-Things

Studios 48 - 50, Barleylands Craft Village, Barleylands Road, Billericay CM11 2UD

39 High Street, Pittenweem, KY10 2PG

34 High Street, Thornbury BS35 2AJ

3-5 Hitchin Street, Baldock SG7 6AL

www.craftarena.co.uk E: denise.gannon@craftarena.co.uk

Tel: 01268 523780

LANCASHIRE

www.thewoollybrew.co.uk

www.thewoolstop.co.uk

www.wool-n-things.co.uk

Email: thewoollybrew@gmail.com

Email: info@thewoolstop.co.uk

Email: info@wool-n-things.co.uk

Tel: 01333 312042

Tel: 01454 419912

Tel: 01462 612889

MORAY

NORFOLK

NOTTINGHAMSHIRE

Knitting Heaven

Buckie Yarns

Norfolk Yarn

Baa Yarn

332 Golden Hill Lane, Leyland PR25 2YJ

33 West Church Street, Buckie AB56 1BP

288 Aylsham Road, Hellesdon, Norwich, Norfolk NR3 2RG

35 Gordon Road, West Bridgford, Nottingham NG2 5LL

www.knitting-heaven.co.uk

Email: scbuckieyarns@btconnect.com

www.norfolkyarn.co.uk

www.baayarn.co.uk

Email: info@norfolkyarn.co.uk

Email: nickcazza@hotmail.co.uk

Tel: 01603 417001

Tel: 0115 998 9671

PEMBROKESHIRE

WARWICKSHIRE

YORKSHIRE (WEST)

Black Hills Yarn

The Wool Shop

Knit One Purl One

Unravel Crafts

6a Hart Street, Henley on Thames RG9 2AU

Unit 2, St Govan’s Centre, Dimond Street, Pembroke Dock SA72 6JE

10 Ribbonbrook, Nuneaton CV11 4LN

355 Wakefield Road, Denby Dale, Huddersfield HD8 8RP

Email: linda@knittingheaven.co.uk

Tel: 01542 835598

Tel: 01772 378797

OXFORDSHIRE

www.blackhillsyarn.co.uk Email: info@blackhillsyarn.co.uk

Tel: 07760 851120

IC46_77.indd 1

Tel: 01228 599880

Tel: 07776 025065

www.knitone-purlone.co.uk

www.unravelcrafts.co.uk

Email: knitonepurlone@ymail.com

Email: mary@unravelcrafts.co.uk

Tel: 07429 032673

Tel: 01484 767502

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MAKE IT

Pattern instructions

Log Cabin Quilt BY TRACEY TODHUNTER

Translated into crochet, this simple technique works up quickly for a beginner, while changing colours every five rows adds interest for the more experienced.

MATERIALS ● Debbie Bliss Blue Faced Leicester Aran, 100% wool, 50g/75m/82yds Yarn A: Burnt Orange 07 x 4 (7) balls Yarn B: Duck Egg 14 x 4 (7) balls Yarn C: Chocolate 04 x 4 (7) balls ● 6mm hook YARN ALTERNATIVES You can use any aran-weight wool blend yarn to achieve a similar effect. TENSION Work 12dc and 16 rows to measure 10 x 10cm/4 x 4in using 6mm hook, or size required to obtain tension. MEASUREMENTS Pram blanket measures 90 x 90cm/35½ x 35½in. Lap blanket measures 110 x 110cm/43¼ x 43¼in. DESIGNER BIOGRAPHY Tracey is a knitting and crochet designer. Her website

www.bakingandmaking.com gives details of classes and workshops, together with free patterns and her design inspirations. PATTERN NOTES Colour sequence A, B, C is worked throughout.

START

BLANKET With 6mm hook and yarn A make 17ch.

FOUNDATION SQUARE Row 1: Dc into second ch from hook, dc to end, turn – 16dc. Rows 2–18: 1ch, dc into second ch from hook, dc to end, turn – 16dc. Change to yarn B on last yoh of row 18, 1ch, do not turn. STRIP 1 Row 1: With yarn B, rotate work 90º clockwise to work 16dc across ends of rows 1–18, turn. Rows 2–5: 1ch, dc to end, turn. Change to yarn C on last yoh of row 5, do not turn. STRIP 2 Row 1: With yarn C, 1ch, rotate

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work 90º clockwise to work across ends of rows of strip 1, work 4dc evenly across row edges of strip 1, then 16dc along opposite edge of foundation ch, turn – 20dc. Rows 2–5: 1ch, dc to end, turn. Change to yarn A on last yoh of row 5, do not turn.

MATERIALS ● Katia Merino 100%, 100% Merino wool, 50g/102m/111yds Yarn A: Colour 3 x 5 balls Yarn B: Colour 37 x 3 balls Yarn C: Colour 46 x 5 balls (Unfortunately Colour 46 has been discontinued; we recommend using Colour 55 as an alternative) ● 3.5mm hook ● Wool pins ● 3 x 3cm/1¼ wooden buttons ● Cushion insert, 50 x 50cm/ 19¾ x 19¾in

STRIP 3 Row 1: With yarn A, 1ch, rotate work 90º clockwise to work across ends of rows of second strip, 4dc evenly across rows of second strip, 16dc evenly across row ends of foundation square, turn. Rows 2–5: 1ch, dc to end, turn. Change to yarn B on last yoh of row 5, do not turn. NEXT STRIP Using yarn B, 1ch, rotate work 90º clockwise to work across ends of rows of previous strip, 1dc in each dc, 4dc evenly across row ends of previous strip. Rows 2–5: 1ch, dc to end, turn. Change to yarn C on last yoh of row 5, do not turn. NEXT AND ALL FOLLOWING STRIPS Rep instructions for “next strip”, always changing to next colour in sequence on last yoh of row 5, 1ch, work 4dc along row ends of previous strip, 1dc in each dc along centre strip and 4dc evenly across row ends of previous strip. Work in colour sequence A, B, C until 44 (58) strips have been worked. Fasten off yarn and weave in all ends. END Lightly block, following ball band instructions.

YARN ALTERNATIVES You can use any DK wool for a similar effect. TENSION Exact tension is not essential for this project. MEASUREMENTS Finished cover will fit a 50 x 50cm/19¾ x 19¾in cushion.

Log Cabin Cushion BY SARAH COAD

A beautiful log cabin style cushion that will make a welcome addition to any home.

DESIGNER BIOGRAPHY Sarah Coad is a designer based in Warwickshire. You can keep up to date with her crochet and knitting journeys at www.facebook.com/ KnitsNotPerfect and on Twitter @knitsnotperfect. PATTERN NOTES This piece is made with a series of panels which are joined together to achieve a log cabin effect. It may be easier to add each panel as you go to ensure that the chart is followed and using wool pins to help line up the pieces. The pieces can be joined using a double crochet seam. CUSHION FRONT PANEL 1 With yarn A, 16ch. Row 1: 1dc in 2nd ch from hook, 14dc, turn – 15dc. Rows 2–16: 1ch, 15dc, turn – 15dc. Fasten off. START

PANEL 2 With yarn B, rep Panel 1. PANELS 3 & 4 With yarn B, 29ch. Row 1: 1dc in 2nd ch from hook, 27dc, turn – 28dc. Rows 2–16: 1ch, 28dc, turn – 28dc. Fasten off. www.insidecrochet.co.uk 79

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MAKE IT

Pattern instructions Upper Half of Cushion UPPER HALF OF CUSHION 10 6 2 11

3

1

7

5

9

13

4 8 12

LOWER Half HALFof OFCushion CUSHION Lower

PANEL 5 With yarn B, 45ch. Row 1: 1dc in 2nd ch from hook, 43dc, turn – 44dc. Rows 2–16: 1ch, 44dc, turn – 44dc. Fasten off. PANEL 6 With yarn A, rep Panel 5. PANELS 7 & 8 With yarn A, 60ch. Row 1: 1dc in 2nd ch from hook, 58dc, turn – 59dc. Rows 2–16: 1ch, 59dc, turn – 59dc. Fasten off. PANEL 9 With yarn A, 76ch. Row 1: 1dc in 2nd ch from hook, 74dc, turn – 75dc. Rows 2–16: 1ch, 75dc, turn – 75dc. Fasten off. PANEL 10 With yarn C, rep Panel 9. PANEL 11 & 12 With yarn C, 92ch. Row 1: 1dc in 2nd ch from hook, 90dc, turn – 91dc. Rows 2–16: 1ch, 91dc, turn – 91dc. Fasten off. PANEL 13 With yarn C, 108ch. Row 1: 1dc in 2nd ch from hook, 106dc, turn – 107dc. Rows 2–16: 1ch, 107dc, turn – 107dc. Fasten off.

Attach panels for front of cushion together using the diagram above as a guide. Join the panels by placing the right sides together and using a double crochet seam – this way the seams are concealed. BACK OF CUSHION Make 2 With yarn C, 108ch. Row 1: 1dc in 2nd ch from hook, 106dc, turn – 107dc. Rows 2–22: 1ch, 107dc, turn – 107dc. Change to yarn A. Rows 23–43: 1ch, 107dc, turn – 107dc. Change to yarn B. Rows 44–65: 1ch, 107dc, turn – 107dc. Fasten off.

edge of the front cover. Line up the sides and be aware that there will be a slight overlap with the lower half back panel. You may again like to use wool pins to hold the pieces together. Attach the three sides of the back panel to the upper half of the cushion using a double crochet seam, remembering to put three dc in the corners. This means the pink (yarn B) parts of the two back panels meet in the middle. Turn cushion the right way round to conceal the seams.

Attach the three buttons evenly across the lower back panel. Weave in any loose ends. BUTTON LOOPS With yarn B, 11ch. Attach in a loop shape to the upper back panel in line with the first button. 20dc into the loop to add strength, fasten off. Repeat Button Loop instructions for the other two buttons. END Insert cushion and button up the cover.

FINISHING LOWER HALF Place the right sides of all pieces together. Line up the beg ch edge of one of the back panels with the lower half edge of the cushion’s front cover. Line up the sides of the back panel against the front cover. You may wish to use wool pins to ensure the work is distributed evenly. Attach the three edges of the back panel to the front cover using a double crochet seam, remembering to put three dc in the corners. UPPER HALF Line the beg ch edge of the other back panel against the upper

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ISSUE 47

ON SALE 25 th Oc tober

NEXT MONTH Season’s Greetings

Countdown to Christmas

TUNISIAN CROCHET

Advanced techniques

HOW TO CROCHET GUIDE All you need to know

Essential patterns

FESTIVE DECOR WINTER WARMERS MUST-MAKE GIFTS COSY CABLES

DON’T MISS OUT For subscription details, please turn to page 52

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Contact Helen Jordan helen@threadoflife.co.uk tel: 07702 392935 34 Shann Avenue, Keighley, West Yorkshire, BD21 2TL

WIDE RANGE OF:

Helen Jordan

• Crochet hooks - Knit Pro Symfonie, Clover Soft Touch, Crystalites • Broomsticks (knitting needles from 9mm to 25mm)

Crochet specialist

• Tunisian crochet hooks; single ended, double ended, flexible, interchangeable Knit Pro Symfonie • Hairpin tools including a special 20cm wide frame • Cottons from 10s to 100s weight • Loads of patterns and booklets, including my stitch dictionary ‘Textured Crochet’ • Workshops and talk on all aspects of crochet • Technical Editing • Knit Pro Symfonie interchangeable knitting needle tips and cables from 40cm to 200cm

www.threadoflife.co.uk

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MAKE IT

Pattern instructions

Gabrielle BY JANE CROWFOOT

This beautiful crocheted pillowcase slip pays homage to Gabrielle “Coco” Chanel’s fine sewing skills, and is made of a simple mesh-stitch pattern with a lacy edging.

MATERIALS ● Rowan Siena 4 Ply, 100% cotton, 50g/140m/153yds Shade: Cream 652 x 6 balls ● 2.5mm hook ● 14 x 12mm/½in vintage shirt buttons ● 16 x 10mm/3 ⁄8in vintage shirt buttons ● 3m/118in x 7mm/¼in black ribbon ● Yarn needle

MEASUREMENTS Finished pillowcase measures approximately 43 x 55cm/ 17 x 21¾in. Will stretch to fit a pillow of 50 x 75cm/20 x 29½in.

BACK AND FRONT Both alike Foundation row: 94ch, miss 3ch (counts as 1tr), work 1tr into fourth ch from hook, *1ch, miss 1ch, 1tr into next ch; rep from * to last ch, 1tr into the same ch as the last tr, turn. Row 1: (WS) 4ch (counts as 1tr, 1ch), miss 2tr of previous row, 1tr into 1ch-sp, *1ch, 1tr into next 1ch-sp; rep from * to last 1ch-sp, 1ch, 1tr into last 1ch-sp, 1ch, miss 1tr, 1tr into top of t-ch, turn. Row 2: (RS) 3ch (counts as 1tr), 1tr into 1ch-sp, *1ch, 1tr into next 1ch-sp; rep from * to last 1ch-sp, 1ch, 1tr into last 1ch-sp, 1tr into third ch of t-ch, turn. Repeat rows 1 & 2 until 46 rows have been completed. Fasten off.

DESIGNER BIOGRAPHY Jane Crowfoot specialises in designs for the home and is known for her amazing use of colour. She has written many books including Homespun Vintage and the Ultimate Crochet Bible. Visit her website at www.janiecrow.co.uk

LACE EDGING With right sides together, sew together the top edge of the last row of the Front and Back pieces. With right side facing, work 92dc along side edge of first crochet panel, 1dc into seam area, 92dc along side edge of remaining

TENSION 14 pattern repeats (1tr, 1ch) and 11 rows to 10 x 10cm/4 x 4in using a 2.5mm hook, or size required to obtain tension.

This pretty pattern is taken from Homespun Vintage by Jane Crowfoot (Collins & Brown, £14.99)

and read her blog at www. janeknits.blogspot.co.uk.

START

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crochet panel, turn – 185 sts. Row 1: 1ch, 1dc into each stitch to end of row, turn. Rows 2–4: Repeat row 1. Row 5: 3ch (counts as 1tr), miss st at base of beg-3ch, 1tr into each st to end of row, turn. Row 6: 1ch, 1dc into each st to end of row, work final dc into top of t-ch, turn – 185 sts. Rows 7–9: Repeat row 1. Row 10: 4ch (counts as 1tr, 1ch), miss st at base of beg-4ch, 1tr into next st, *1ch, miss 1 st, 1tr into next st; repeat from * to last st, 1tr, turn. Row 11: 3ch (counts as 1tr), miss 2tr, 1tr into next 1ch-sp, *1ch, miss 1tr, 1tr into next 1ch-sp; repeat from * to end of round, miss 1tr, 1tr into top of t-ch, turn. Row 12: 4ch (counts as 1tr, 1ch), miss 2tr, 1tr into next 1ch-sp, *6ch, miss next 1ch-sp, 1tr into foll 1ch-sp, [1ch, 1tr into next 1ch-sp] twice; repeat from * 21 times more, 6ch, miss next 1ch-sp, 1tr into foll 1ch-sp, 1ch, 1tr into third ch of t-ch, turn. Row 13: 1ch, sl st into next 1ch-sp, sl st into top of tr, *[2dc, 2htr, 5tr, 2htr, 2dc] into next 6ch-sp, [sl st into top of tr, miss 1ch-sp] twice, sl st into top of tr; repeat from * 21 times more, [2dc, 2htr, 5tr, 2htr, 2dc] into next 6ch-sp, sl st into top

of tr, miss 1ch-sp, sl st into top of t-ch, turn. Row 14: 4ch, miss [2sl st, 2dc and 2htr], *1tr into next tr, 3ch, miss 1tr, dtr into next tr, 3ch, 1dtr into same sp as last tr, 3ch, miss 1tr, 1tr into next tr, 3ch, miss [2htr, 2dc and 1sl st], 1tr into next sl st, 3ch, miss [1sl st, 2dc and 2htr]; repeat from * 21 times, 1tr into next tr, 3ch, miss 1tr, dtr into next tr, 3ch, 1dtr into same sp as last tr, 3ch, miss 1tr, 1tr into next tr, 4ch, miss [2htr, 2dc and 1sl st], 1dc into next sl st, turn. Row 15: 1ch, [3dc into next sp] twice, into the next space *[3dc, 3ch, 1sl st into st at base of 3ch to make picot, 3dc], [3dc into next sp] twice; repeat from * to end of row, 1dc into base of t-ch at end of row. Fasten off. Repeat along the opposite side edge.

Errata CHAMOMILE SOCKS ISSUE 44 page 64 INSTEP Row 1: 3ch, tr in ea dc and ch-sp to end, join rnd with sl st to top of t-ch – 54 (60)tr. Some finishing has been omitted: FINISHING Sew up heel seam, trying to only catch the back bars of each stitch for a smaller seam if possible. Alternatively work a slip stitch crochet join, again just through back loops only for a less bulky seam. Fasten off all ends and weave in ends. Block lightly to shape.

FINISHING Pin out and lightly block, join remaining side seam and weave in loose ends. Using the photographs as reference, sew buttons into place evenly below row 5 of the edging, alternating in size, then weave the ribbon through the treble stitches on row 5 END of the lace edgings and tie the ends into a bow.

COMPETITION WINNERS, ISSUE 44 The winner of the complete set of Clover Amour hooks is Esther Hill from Carlton, Nottingham. The winner of the set of Zoomigurumi books 1 and 2 is Diana Lake from Porthtowan, Cornwall. Congratulations to both lucky winners! We have all our patterns checked professionally and try our hardest to ensure all pattern text is correct at time of going to press. Unfortunately mistakes do occasionally occur and any errata that we are aware of can be found on our errata pages and Ravelry pages. Please do let us know if you find any mistakes by emailing claire@tailormadepublishing.co.uk. The result of the finished project will vary depending on the yarn used. We always recommend swatching before beginning a new crochet project and using the yarn suggested for best results. However, if you decide to use an alternative, ensure you swatch thoroughly to achieve the correct tension provided in the pattern. All patterns are for personal use only, no pattern or part of this magazine may be reproduced and redistributed without prior consent from TMP.

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MAKE IT

Pattern instructions MATERIALS ● DMC Natura Just Cotton, 100% cotton, 50g/155m/170yds Yarn A: Tournesol N16 x 2 balls (flannel) ● Hoooked Zpagetti, 92% recycled cotton/8% other recycled fibres, 800g/120m/131yds Yarn B: Green x 2 cones (bathmat) ● 4.5mm (flannel) and 12mm (bathmat) hooks YARN ALTERNATIVES Try an aran-weight cotton yarn instead for the flannel, as the 4ply cotton is used held double. TENSION Flannel Work 14dc and 17 rows to measure 10 x 10cm/4 x 4in using 4.5mm hook, or size required to obtain tension. Bathmat Work 7dc and 9 rows to measure 10 x 10cm/4 x 4in using 12mm hook, or size required to obtain tension. MEASUREMENTS The flannel measures 28 x 33cm/11 x 13in, and the bathmat measures 61 x 68cm/24 x 26¾in. PATTERN NOTES The pattern is exactly the same for both flannel and bathmat but the flannel is made using two strands of DMC Natura worked together, while the bathmat is made with one strand of Hoooked Zpagetti.

Duck Flannel and Bathmat Set BY HELEN FREE

Cotton is the perfect fibre for bathroom accessories, and using different weights gives you matching pieces.

DESIGNER BIOGRAPHY Helen has been crocheting as long as she can remember, and loves designing with bright colours. Check out her colourful website at www.enfys.me.uk. BEAK Row 1: 5ch, dc in 2nd ch from hook, 2ch, 2dc in next ch, turn – 5dc. Row 2: 1ch, 2dc in next dc, 4dc, turn – 6dc. Row 3: 1ch, 1dc, miss 1dc, 4dc, turn – 5dc. Row 4: 1ch, 1dc, 2dc in next dc, 3dc, turn – 6dc. Rows 5 & 6: 1ch, dc in each dc, turn. Row 7: 1ch, 1dc, 2dc in next START

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dc, 2dc, 2dc in next dc, 1dc, turn – 8dc. Row 8: 1ch, 6dc, 2dc in next dc, 1dc, turn – 9dc. Row 9: 1ch, 1dc, 2dc in next dc, 5dc, 2dc in next dc, 1dc, fasten off – 11dc.

Row 12: 1ch, 36dc, 2dc in next dc, 1dc, turn – 39dc. Row 13: 1ch, dc in each dc, turn. Row 14: 1ch, 1dc, 2dc in next dc, 37dc, turn – 40dc. Rows 15–22: 1ch, dc in each dc, turn.

BODY Row 1: 8ch, 2dc in 2nd ch from hook, 5ch, 2dc in next ch, turn – 9dc. Row 2: 1ch, 1dc, 2dc in next dc, 5dc, 2dc in next dc, 1dc, turn – 11dc. Row 3: 1ch, 1dc, 2dc in next dc, 7dc, 2dc in next dc, 1dc, turn – 13dc. Row 4: 1ch, 1dc, 2dc in next dc, 9dc, 2dc in next dc, 1dc, turn – 15dc. Row 5: 1ch, 1dc, 2dc in next dc, 11dc, 2dc in next dc, 1dc, turn – 17dc. Row 6: 1ch, 1dc, 2dc in next dc, 13dc, 2dc in next dc, 1dc, turn – 19dc. Row 7: 1ch, 17dc, 2dc in next dc, 1dc, turn – 20dc. Row 8: 1ch, 1dc, 2dc in next dc, 16dc, 2dc in next dc, 1dc, turn – 22dc. Row 9: 1ch, 1dc, 2dc in next dc, 18dc, 2dc in next dc, 1dc, turn – 24dc. Row 10: 1ch, 24dc, working in row 9 of Beak, 2dc in next dc, 8dc, 2dc in next dc, 1dc, turn – 37dc. Row 11: 1ch, 35dc, 2dc in next dc, 1dc, turn – 38dc.

HEAD Row 23: 1ch, 14dc, turn, leaving rem sts unworked – 14dc. Row 24: 1ch, dc in each dc, turn. Row 25: 1ch, 1dc, miss 1dc, 10dc, miss 1dc, 1dc, turn – 12dc. Row 26: 1ch, 1dc, miss 1dc, 8dc, miss 1dc, 1dc, turn – 10dc. Row 27: 1ch, 1dc, miss 1dc, 5dc, miss 1dc, 1dc, turn – 7dc. Row 28: 1ch, 1dc, miss 1dc, 2dc, miss 1dc, 1dc – 4dc. Fasten off. BODY Row 23: Attach yarn to next dc on row 22 with sl st, 1ch, dc in same dc, miss 1dc, 24dc, turn – 25dc. Row 24: 1ch, 23dc, miss 1dc, 1dc, turn – 24dc. Row 25 & 26: 1ch, dc in each dc, turn. Row 27: 1ch, 1dc, 2dc in next dc, 22dc, turn – 25dc. Row 28: 1ch, dc in each dc, turn. Row 29: 1ch, 1dc, 2dc in next dc, 23dc, turn – 26dc. Row 30–38: 1ch, dc in each dc, turn. Row 39: 1ch, 1dc, miss 1dc, 24dc, turn – 25dc.

Row 40: 1ch, dc in each dc, turn. Row 41: 1ch, 1dc, miss 1dc, 23dc, turn – 24dc. Row 42: 1ch, 22dc, 2dc in next dc, 1dc, turn – 25dc.

Row 43: 1ch, 1dc, 2dc in next dc, 23dc, turn – 26dc. Row 44: 1ch, 1dc, miss 1dc, 22dc, 2dc in next dc, 1dc, turn – 26dc. Row 45: 1ch, 1dc, 2dc in next dc, 24dc, turn – 27dc. Row 46: 1ch, 25dc, 2dc in next dc, 1dc, turn – 28dc. Row 47: 2ch, dc in 2nd ch from hook, 2dc in next dc, 25dc, miss 1dc, 1dc, turn – 29dc. Row 48: 1ch, dc in each dc, turn. Row 49: 1ch, 1dc, miss 1dc, 25dc, miss 1dc, 1dc, turn – 27dc. Row 50: 1ch, 1dc, miss 1dc, 23dc, miss 1dc, 1dc, turn – 25dc. Row 51: 1ch, 1dc, miss 1dc, 21dc, miss 1dc, 1dc, turn – 23dc. Row 52: 1ch, 1dc, miss 1dc, 18dc, miss 1dc, 1dc, turn – 20 dc. Row 53: 1ch, 1dc, miss 1dc, 15dc, miss 1dc, 1dc, turn – 17dc. Row 54: 1ch, 1dc, miss 1dc, 12dc, miss 1dc, 1dc, turn – 14dc. FINISHING With RS facing, 1ch, work 1 row of dc around the edge, increasing as necessary at outside curves and decreasing at inside END curves. Fasten off. Weave in ends. www.insidecrochet.co.uk 87

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SK_49_160887_WOOL CABIN JMC

ESSEX

10:06

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13/08/2013 16:33 Helen Jordan

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HOW TO CROCHET

How to

Crochet I have always believed that anyone can learn to crochet, so long as you follow one simple rule: don’t try to run before you can chain! The chain is the most simple of stitches and therefore ideal for practising the all-important hold, which helps create the perfect tension for forming all the following stitches. When my mother taught me to crochet, she followed her grandmother’s lead and helped me to hook metre upon metre of chain before I was shown any further stitches. It was a fantastic foundation for learning the more difficult techniques. Once your chains are looking even and feel comfortable to create, then progressing on to the next stitches becomes much easier. If at any point you feel as if you have lost your hold, go back to those comforting lengths of chain until your confidence returns. My biggest tip is to remember that this wonderful craft is well known for being relaxing and fun, which is why crochet is completely addictive, so enjoy it!

TEACH YOURSELF How to hold the work, chains, double & treble crochet, slip stitch

TURN THE PAGE FOR ALL YOU NEED TO GET STARTED

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GETTING STARTED

THE BASICS To crochet smoothly and efficiently, you must hold the hook and yarn in a relaxed, comfortable and consistent fashion. This will also ensure that your tension is even and accurate. There are two main ways of holding the hook and two main ways to tension the yarn. You can choose whichever combination feels more natural for you, or a variation on these.

SLIPKNOT

CHAIN

A slipknot creates the first loop on the hook.

Most crochet projects begin with a length of chain. This is the perfect stitch to practise your hold and tension with.

HOLDING THE HOOK

KNIFE GRIP

PENCIL GRIP

Hold the hook in your dominant hand as you would a knife.

Hold the hook in your dominant hand as you would a pencil.

1 Make a loop in the yarn around 10–20cm/4–8in from the end. Insert hook through loop, catch the back strand of yarn and pull it through to the front.

HOLDING THE YARN

FOREFINGER METHOD

MIDDLE-FINGER METHOD

Wrap the ball end of the yarn around the little finger of your opposite hand, under the next two fingers and over the forefinger. Hold the work steady with your middle finger and thumb, then raise your forefinger when working to create tension.

Wrap the ball end of the yarn around the little finger of your opposite hand and over the other fingers. Hold the work steady with your forefinger and thumb, then raise your middle finger while you are crocheting to create tension.

Working left-handed To croch e t le ft-h and ed, simply do the opp osit e to . the righ t-h and ed hol ds Hold a mirror up to any to p ic ture in this gu ide

see how to wor k.

TOPTiPabcdgg It doesn’t ma t te r if your sti tch es te nd tow ar ds be in g sli gh tly tig ht or ev en a lit tle loose; you ar e ai mi ng for an ev en te nsion th roughout to ac hi ev e a pr of ession al fin ish .

1 Holding just the hook with point up in your dominant hand, and the yarn in the other, grip the slipknot with the yarn holding hand. Work a yarn round hook (yrh or yoh) by passing the hook in front of the yarn, under and around it.

2 Pull the ends of the yarn to secure the knot around hook, but not too tightly or it will be hard to pull the first loop of chain through.

TOPTiPabcdgg The action of working stitches causes a constan t rolling of the hook in your fingers; hold the hook pointin g up when performing the yrh, then roll it round towards you to point down when pulling through the loops so that you don’t catch the hook in the stitches.

2 Roll the hook round in your fingers towards you to catch the yarn and pull through loop on hook. One chain made.

3 Ensuring the stitches are even – not too loose or tight – repeat to make a length of chain.

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HOW TO CROCHET

THE MAIN STITCHES SLIP STITCH (sl st) A slip stitch is usually used to join one stitch to another, or to join a stitch to another point. It is usually made by picking up two strands of a stitch but when used all over, you usually only pick up the back loop.

Double crochet stitches are perfect for making amigurumi, while treble crochets are used to create the classic granny square design

DOUBLE CROCHET (dc) The smallest stitch, creating a dense fabric perfect for amigurumi. 1 Insert hook into st or chain required. Yarn over hook, as when you make a chain. Pull a loop through all stitches/ loops/work on hook to finish slip stitch.

1 Insert hook into chain or stitch, front to back. Yarn over hook and draw through stitch to front, leaving you with two loops on the hook. Yarn round hook. 2 Draw through both loops to finish the stitch. Double crochet completed.

COUNTING A CHAIN The right side of your chain is the one that looks like a little plait of “v” shapes. Each “v” is a stitch and must be counted. When you are working the chain, you do not count the slipknot, but begin to count your chain when you pull through the first loop. To count the chain afterwards you count the slipknot as the first stitch, but not the loop on the hook, or “working” loop.

HALF TREBLE CROCHET (htr) Slightly taller than a double crochet stitch, with a softer drape to the resulting fabric. 1 Yarn over hook, insert hook into st from front to back and draw loop through stitch only. This gives you three loops on the hook. Yarn round hook.

2 Draw yarn through three remaining loops on the hook together to complete half treble.

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Top crochet websites

TREBLE CROCHET (TR) The tallest of the basic stitches, great for using within more complex patterns.

FASTEN OFF Pull up final loop of last stitch to make it bigger and cut the yarn, leaving enough of an end to weave in. Pull end through loop, and pull up tightly to secure.

We Love

1 Yarn round hook, insert hook into stitch from front to back and draw loop through stitch only. This gives you three loops on the hook. Yarn round hook.

COUNTING STITCHES Count the post or “stem” of each stitch from the side of your work. Each post counts as one stitch. Double crochet

➻ Vita Apala shares crochet tutorials, free patterns and inspirational pictures from her home in Italy – what a fabulous mix! monpetitviolon.blogspot.co.uk

2 Pull loop through two loops. Two loops on hook. Yarn round hook.

➻ Emma Lamb’s pretty blog provides an oasis of crochet calm in a busy world. Go here to relax and soak up the aspirational imagery. emmallamb.blogspot.co.uk

TOPTiPabcdgg

➻ The UK Hand Knitting Association website is packed with helpful information on shops, workshops and craft teachers near you. www.ukhandknitting.com ➻ Purplelinda Crafts’ crochet-centric store is a treasure trove of crochet-related haberdashery, patterns and threads. www.purplelindacrafts.co.uk

Treble crochet

3 Pull loop through the remaining two loops to complete treble, repeat to end of row.

Try t o coun t your st it ches a t regu lar int erva ls, usua lly a t the end of ever y, or ever y othe r, row and esp ecia lly a f t er an incr ea se or decr ea se row. It is b est t o try t o ca t ch any mist ake s a s q uick ly a s p ossib le, a s this will mak e them muc h ea sier t o rect i fy!

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HOW TO CROCHET

USING THE STITCHES WORKING INTO A CHAIN

WORKING STRAIGHT

When working into a chain, you need to miss out the appropriate number of chain stitches called for with your particular stitch (see the information on turning chains, to the right). Now insert the hook from front to back into the next chain, under the top loop of the chain. Yarn over and draw a loop through to the front of the chain.

When working straight, you need to turn your work at the end of a row and then work a turning chain (t-ch) to the height of your intended stitch so that you can continue working along the next row. This chain often counts as the first stitch of the row and each type of stitch uses a different number of chain stitches for the turning chain.

WORKING INTO WHICH LOOP? Crochet stitches are always worked through both loops of the next stitch (this looks like a “v” on top of the stitch), unless the pattern tells you otherwise.

With htr and taller stitches, you now miss out the first stitch of the row, then work into every following stitch. This is because the turning chain is tall enough to count as the first stitch itself, so is counted as the first stitch of the row. This also means that you must remember to work the last stitch of a row into the top of the previous row’s turning chain.

Knowing which stitch to work into when working straight can be a problem for beginners, because the turning chain has such a role to play

KEEPING STRAIGHT EDGES Sometimes a pattern will ask you to work only through one loop of the stitch. To work through the front loop only (flo), insert your hook under the front loop of the next stitch, then bring it out at the centre of the stitch, then complete. To work through the back loop only (blo), insert your hook through the centre of the stitch, then under the back loop to the back, then complete the stitch. Sometimes you are even asked to work in between the stitches. In this case, ignore the top loops of the stitch and insert your hook between the posts of adjoining stitches.

WORKING INTO A SPACE Sometimes you are asked to work into a space or a chain space. To do this simply insert your hook into the hole underneath the chain, then complete your stitch normally. This is similar to working into a ring, as shown on page 94.

Knowing which stitch to work into when working straight can be a problem for beginners, because the turning chain has such a role to play. If you don’t know which stitch to work into after making your turning chain, simply unravel back to the last stitch from previous row and insert a thread or stitch marker into that stitch. Make your desired turning chain then miss out the stitch with the thread in (except with dc stitches), as your turning chain now counts as the first stitch of the row. Once you have worked across all stitches in the row, you must remember to put a stitch into the top of the previous row’s turning chain, as this also counts as a stitch. www.insidecrochet.co.uk 93

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Beginner books we recommend

WORKING IN THE ROUND When working in the round, instead of working backwards and forwards along the work, turning at the end of each round, you simply work with the right side facing you at all times and you do not turn. When working in the round, you generally begin one of three ways:

WORKING AROUND A RING

WORKING INTO A SHORT CHAIN

ADJUSTABLE RING

This method of working in the round creates a large hole at the centre of your work. Its size is dependent on the length of chain used.

You can create a smaller hole in the centre of your work by working into a chain as short as 2ch long.

This method is also referred to as the magic loop or ring, as it creates a round with no hole at the centre. Here it is demonstrated with double crochet.

CROCHET WORKSHOP Erika Knight (Quadrille, £16.99)

One of the most stylish crochet books on the market, this has easy-tofollow instructions and modern, desirable patterns to practise your skills on.

Make a length of chain as required, then insert your hook into the first chain stitch you made. Yarn round hook.

For double crochets, as in this example, work 2ch. For htr you would work 3ch and for trebles, 4ch. Make a loop in your yarn, at least 15cm/6in from the tail end. Insert hook through the loop from front to back

Insert hook into the top loop of the first chain as shown. Yarn round hook.

CUTE AND EASY CROCHETED BABY CLOTHES Nicki Trench (Cico Books, £12.99)

Baby patterns are a perfect place to begin when making garments. This pretty book has plenty of simple projects and step-by-step diagrams.

Work a slip stitch to join, creating a ring, and then work your turning chain dependent on which stitch you will be working into the ring. Insert hook into the centre of the ring and work the first stitch into this ring.

Complete the first stitch in the chain as shown (illustrations show dc, but can be any stitch).

Work required number of stitches into the centre of the ring and join round with a slip stitch. Do not turn, but continue the next row around the last.

Now work the required amount of stitches into the same chain. The sheer amount of stitches worked into one place will cause them to fan out into a round. Now join this round with a slip stitch and continue with the pattern.

Pull yarn though to front of loop and complete the stitch around the loop and the tail end of yarn held double.

CROCHET STEP BY STEP Sally Harding (Dorling Kindersley, £12.99)

A clear, comprehensive book using UK terms, this has essential techniques as well as simple, pretty patterns to try them out on.

Work all the following stitches into the ring in the same way, over the two strands of yarn in the loop. Once all stitches have been worked, pull the loose tail end of the yarn to close the ring and join the round with a slip stitch.

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HOW TO CROCHET

SHAPING, COLOURWORK & TENSION Once you’ve learned simple shaping stitches, you can create almost any garment – and add in different colours as you go with our simple technique. Make sure to check your tension first though, or your finished piece could be completely the wrong size!

INCREASING

JOINING IN A NEW COLOUR

TENSION/GAUGE

To join in a new colour (or a new ball of the same colour), you can simply fasten off the old yarn and then attach the new colour with a slip stitch into the top of the last stitch made. However, for a neater join, you can also work the colour change as follows: To work an extra stitch, you simply need to work into the same stitch more than once. Work one stitch as normal. Insert hook into same stitch you’ve just worked and complete another stitch. One stitch increased.

DECREASING To decrease a stitch, you need to work into two stitches without finishing them, then work them together.

For a double crochet (above), insert hook into next st, yarn over hook and draw a loop through the stitch, but do not finish the double crochet stitch as usual. Insert hook into following st, yarn over hook and draw a loop through the next st, so there are three loops on the hook in total. Yarn over hook and draw the loop through all loops on hook, drawing two stitches together. One stitch decreased.

For a treble crochet, work a treble into the next stitch until the last step of the stitch, two loops on hook. Do the same into the following stitch, three loops on hook. Draw through all three loops on hook to draw the two trebles together. One stitch decreased.

Work the last stitch in the colour you are using first, up to the final step, so that the stitch is unfinished. Pull the new colour through the loops on your hook, completing the stitch and joining the new colour at the same time. Working a new colour over double crochet

Working a new colour over treble crochet

Once you have joined in the new yarn, you can weave in the ends of both yarns as you go, by holding them on top of your stitches and working round them as you work into the following stitches. Do this for at least 5cm/2in then cut the remaining ends.

A tension swatch is used to ensure that you are working at the tension called for in the pattern. It is essential to check this, otherwise your finished garment is likely to be the wrong size! Crochet a small square of just over 10 x 10cm/4 x 4in in the main yarn and stitch used in the pattern, then count and calculate the average amount of stitches per cm. Chain a few more stitches and work more rows than the tension in the pattern suggests you’ll need for this size. Once you have completed the swatch, use a measuring tape or ruler, place some pins at 0 and 10 and take some average measurements – count how many stitches and rows to 10cm at different points over the swatch. If you find you have more stitches per cm than indicated in the pattern, then your tension is too tight and you need to work more loosely. The best way to do this is to increase the size of hook you’re using by a quarter or half millimetre until the tension is as close as you can get it. If there are fewer stitches than required, then you are crocheting too loosely, and you need to decrease the size of hook used in the same way.

TURN THE PAGE FOR CLUSTER STITCHES, TIPS AND A FULL GLOSSARY OF CROCHET ABBREVIATIONS, UK VS US TERMS, AND HOOK SIZES

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CLUSTERS Clusters are groups of stitches worked into the same stitch, but rather than an increase, they still only equate to one stitch overall. Clusters can be confusing to work, so here are the details of some of the main cluster stitches.

BOBBLE

PUFFS

A bobble is a number of stitches (generally trebles), half finished and all worked into the same stitch. Work each stitch until the last step, omitting this final step. Once the desired number of half finished trebles have been completed, you will have one more loop on your hook than you have half finished trebles. Yarn round hook, then pull through all loops on hook to complete the bobble.

A puff is a number of elongated half trebles worked into the same stitch and then finished together, as follows:

POPCORNS Popcorns are a number of complete stitches worked into one stitch.

1 Yarn round hook, insert into next stitch, pull a loop through the stitch and then pull it up to the height of all other stitches in the row.

TIPS ANDTRICKS abcdgg

Working from a pattern ➻ Once you have “cracked the code” and understand the stitches’ abbreviations, a pattern becomes much easier to read. Don’t read a pattern fully before starting it as it may make it seem more complex, but do take a brief look through to check if there any abbreviations you are unfamiliar with. Consult the abbreviations tables opposite before beginning. ➻ Purchase yarn with the same dye lot number on the balls to avoid unwanted colour changes and choose light coloured yarn for your first projects to make sure that you can see your stitches easily – this helps prevent mistakes occurring.

1 Once the sts are completed, remove your hook and insert back into the first stitch worked, then through the final loop.

2 Yarn round hook, insert into same stitch, pull a loop through stitch and pull it up to the height of all other stitches in the row. Repeat this step the desired number of times.

➻ If you are attempting a project with multiple size options, circle or highlight the instructions for the size you are making throughout the pattern to avoid confusion. The smallest size is listed first, then all following ones inside brackets, increasing in size and separated by commas. ➻ Where a pattern has an accompanying chart, use this for reference, as it shows the formation of the stitches as they will be worked and can help with tricky instructions.

2 Yarn round hook and pull through everything on the hook. Popcorn complete.

3 Yarn round hook and pull through all loops on hook. Puff made.

Choose light-coloured yarn for your first few projects to make sure that you can see all of your stitches easily – this helps prevent mistakes occurring

➻ Finally, and most importantly, for projects that need to have a good fit, always check your tension by swatching before you begin.

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HOW TO CROCHET

A note on... Hook sizes

ABBREVIATIONS Abbreviations note: Inside Crochet uses UK terms throughout alt · alternate bef · before beg · begin(s); beginning bet · between blo · back loop only ch(s) · chain(s) ch-sp(s) · chain space(s) cl(s) · cluster(s) cm · centimetre(s) cont · continue(s); continuing dc · double crochet dc2tog · work two dc together dec(s) · decrease(s); decreasing; decreased dtr · double treble crochet dtr2tog · work two dtr together ea · each ech · extended chain edc · extended double crochet

prev · previous rem · remain(s); remaining rep(s) · repeat(s) rev dc · reverse double crochet rnd(s) · round(s) RS · right side rtrf · raised treble front rtrb · raised treble back sl · slip sl st · slip stitch sp(s) · space(es) st(s) · stitch(es) t-ch(s) · turning chain(s) tog · together tr · treble crochet trtr · triple treble tr2tog · work two trebles together WS · wrong side yd(s) · yard(s) yoh · yarn over hook yrh · yarn round hook

etr · extended treble est · established fdc · foundation double crochet flo · front loop only foll · follows; following ftr · foundation treble crochet g · gram(s) gp(s) · group(s) hk · hook htr · half treble crochet htr2tog · work two htr together inc(s) · increase(s); increasing; increased in · inch(es) lp(s) · loop(s) m · stitch marker mm · millimetre(s) nc · not closed patt · pattern pm · place marker

adjustable ring

BREAKING THE LANGUAGE BARRIERsl st UK and US terms have differing meanings which can create difficulty for thech crocheter. Here’s a handy reference guide to overcome any misunderstandings.

bl only

UK TERMS Chain Miss Slip stitch Double crochet Half treble crochet Treble crochet Double treble crochet Triple treble crochet Raised treble back/front

US TERMS Chain adjustable ring Skip Slip stitch sl st Single crochet ch Half double crochet Double crochet bl only Treble crochet Double treble crochet fl only adjustable ring Back/front post dc dc sl st

14

0.75

12

1 1.25

11adjustable ring 7

1.50

6

sl st

5ch

1.75 2

14

bl only

2.25

B/1

2.75 sl st

C/2

adjustable ring 2.5 12 adjustable ring 3sl st

10

3.5 bl only

9

ch 3.25 ch

bl only 3.75 fl 4fl only only 4.5 dc 5dc fdc 5.5 fdc 6 htr htr 6.5 7tr

8tr 9

dtr dtr 10 11.5

trtr 12

trtr

fl only dc

D/3 fdc E/4

htr

F/5 8

G/6

7

7

6

H/8

tr

5

dtr I/9

4

J/10

3

K-/101/2 trtr

2 0

L/11

00

rtrf M /13

000

N/15 O rtrb P

15

Q dc2tog

20

S

rtrf rtrf

tr2tog

tr2tog tr2tog

3-tr cl

dtr

rtrb

tr3tog tr3tog

popcorn

trtr

dc2tog

puff puff

linked tr

tr2tog

3-tr cl 3-tr cl

tr3tog

popcorn www.insidecrochet.co.uk popcorn

puff

linked tr linked tr

fl only

tr

sl st

dc

ch

fdc

bl only

htr

htr

dtr

0.60

rtrf

adjustable ring

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tr

US

puff

htr

fdc

htr

UK

dc2tog dc2tog

bl only

tr

dc

fdc

Metric (mm)

tr3tog

fdc

fl only

dc

CROCHET HOOK SIZES

rtrb rtrb

ch

CHARTS KEY

fl only

➻ Hook sizes and their designations vary from country to country. When following the recommendations in a pattern or on a ball band, make sure to check which size convention is being used.

trtr

rtrf dtr rtrb

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FINAL THOUGHT

Joanne Scrace

“I cannot believe I've been crocheting such a short time. Since I learned it has completely changed my life in the most wonderful way”

A PORTFOLIO CAREER Lindsey Harrad meets Joanne Scrace, who’s been designing everything from crocheted lichen to autumnal fashion pieces.

Above: Joanne wearing her Galactica scarf, designed in stunning Malabrigo yarns. Below: Hard at work crocheting nature-inspired designs for Cambridge Botanic Gardens Bottom: Joanne's Silene Shawl design, available from The Crochet Project © Lightbook Photography; Louise Stubbings; Kat Goldin

Tell us about yourself… I live with my husband and three small children on the edge of Suffolk and Cambridge, just where the land turns from little hills to flat, flat fens. We live in a village and we love that we can walk and cycle everywhere. How long have you been crocheting? I taught myself to crochet from library books and YouTube videos back in 2009. I cannot believe I have been crocheting such a short time! Since I learned it has completely changed my life in the most wonderful and positive way. Is crochet design your main career? No, it is just one of the strands in the portfolio business that I am building up. I design knitting and crochet patterns, tech edit and teach knitting and crochet and co-produce The Crochet Project. Each strand exercises different parts of my brain and gives me plenty of variety – essential for me! But my day job is being a full-time mum to my three kids. What was your career before you discovered crochet? Before I had children I worked in software design and development. I couldn’t do the job part time and I wanted to be home with the children as much as possible. I’d always heavily modified my knitting patterns but it wasn’t until I discovered crochet (and its wonderful ease of ripping back!) that I began to design my own patterns from scratch. Can you tell us how The Crochet Project came about? I worked with co-founder Kat Goldin as the technical editor for her first book, Crochet At Play. It was quite an intense process that involved us speaking almost every day and when it was finished we wanted to continue working together. The Crochet Project is the embodiment of our shared passion for modern crochet, and is an online source of patterns for the intermediate to advanced crocheter who is ready to move beyond granny squares and ripple blankets. What can we expect from your autumn/winter 2013 collection? Issue 2 is titled Woodland Whimsy and is due to be released this month. You can expect rich saturated tones and absolutely loads

of texture, all with our trademark great fit, stunning yarns and fantastic detail. Do you have any new developments to share? Yes! We plan to create ebooks of our collections so you can buy all the patterns together (at a discount, naturally.) And we will soon have a shiny new website because we are launching The Knit Project! It is built on the same guiding principles as The Crochet Project – beautiful patterns, stunning yarn, awesome styling and great pattern writing. Where do you get your inspiration? I am very inspired by nature and the natural landscape, I think I produce my best work when I design from mood boards around a theme. Tell us about the Cambridge Botanic Gardens project The team at the Cambridge University Botanic Gardens approached me about leading a group of WI members to create a crochet display for the Festival of Ideas in October. After talking to plant experts, we decided to create two displays: Lichen of the Tundra, which involved the whole of the CamCity WI, and Trailing Plants from Arid Environments, created by the members of the group that have met once a month in the gardens throughout the year. The group comprises about 20 women, many of whom had never crocheted before, and it has been wonderful to see their skills blossom, to the point where they are now able to make free-form crochet designs and teach others. Any other plans in the pipeline? I am teaching lots of fun new classes at The Sheep Shop (www. sheepshopcambridge.co.uk) over the next few months, as well as working with Kat on her next book (it’s going to be amazing) and getting to grips with launching my own website. I am also having fun on my blog trying to work through my “40by40” list of fun things to try before I turn 40 in 2016. Head to www.theyarnproject.com to find both The Knit Project and The Crochet Project under one virtual roof. Find out more about the Festival of Ideas at www.cam.ac.uk/festival-of-ideas.

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Inside Crochet 46