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FREE s Friday, September 7, 2012

FOOTBALL RECAPS

VOICES UNITED FOR MARRIAGE

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TACOMAWEEKLY 24 YE A R S O F SE R V I C E BE C A U S E CO M M U N I T Y MAT T E R S

FIRST CREEK MIDDLE SCHOOL STARTS OFF SCHOOL WITH PARADE By John Larson jlarson@tacomaweekly.com

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n a warm, sunny afternoon on Aug. 31, First Creek Middle School held its first back-to-school parade in the nearby Salishan neighborhood. Staff members were joined by two Eagle mascots and the Lincoln High School drum line in walking PHOTO BY JOHN LARSON through the public housing development. Police officers on motorcycles were on hand to handle traffic, as a few streets were briefly X See PARADE / page A6

PHOTOS BY STEVE DUNKELBERGER

BACK TO SCHOOL. Children at Whittier Elementary School had new backpacks and school clothes for the first day of school, while parents snapped their fair share of photos to record the day. Herman the turtle in Lori Gallo’s kindergarten class clearly had mixed emotions about the start of a new school year as he did his ritual walk around the carpet one last time before the children arrived.

FIND MORE PHOTOS AT TACOMAWEEKLY.COM

SOUTH SOUND AIDS WALK 2012

Excitement builds for the area’s largest HIV/AIDS fundraising event REGISTRATION NOW OPEN

PHOTOS BY STEVE DUNKELBERGER

ROADWAY. Elected officials, like Tacoma

Mayor Marilyn Strickland (top), and neighbors clapped and sipped coffee at a roadopening ribbon cutting that meant Alaska Street is ready for drivers after months of construction.

Alaska Street reopens with smooth and scenic drive By Steve Dunkelberger stevedunkel@tacomaweekly.com

The end of delayed traffic and periodic road closures is here. City of Tacoma staffers, elected officials and area residents held a ribbon cutting to celebrate the completion of the “green” Alaska Street Roadway Project on Aug. 29. The roadwork included the addition of sidewalks, curb ramps, bike lanes, street lights, landscaping, porous concrete pavement and pedestrian islands to improve driver and walker safety as well as be better for the environment with improved storm mains, sanitary sewer mains and power lines. The roadway is now set to receive a “greenroads” certification for its environmental features. The almost complete reworking of the 5,400 feet of roadway between South 56th and South 72nd streets began in late 2011, which meant months of lane closures and detours. This segment was the last stretch of new roadway that now spans from South 38th to South 72nd streets and was coordinated with the nearby Metro Parks roster of improvements for Wapato Lake Park. “It was really fun to watch the park redevelopment alongside this project,” Deputy Mayor Joe Lonergan said, noting that the new road not only provides a scenic view of the park but the sidewalk intentionally dips into the park property to tie the park more into the neighborhood and make for a more enjoyable walk along the roadway. Money for the roadwork came from the City of X See ROAD / page A7

Card player A5

TRANSIT TAX: Pierce Transit to hold open houses on Proposition 1. PAGE A2

PHOTOS COURTESY OF PCAF

RIBBONS AND WALKERS. The iconic red ribbon – the insignia of AIDS awareness and solidarity – will be

seen everywhere during the South Sound AIDS Walk (left). Many will have names written on them in memory of loved ones lost to the disease (right). By Matt Nagle matt@tacomaweekly.com

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ne of the most meaningful and enjoyable community events in Tacoma takes place Sept. 22 at Cheney Stadium – the South Sound AIDS Walk. It’s meaningful because the walk is a time when the broader community can make a

Spaceworks party A6

Local News ..............A2 City Briefs................A3

real and lasting difference in the lives of people with AIDS – and also their friends and family and those who have lost loved ones to the disease – by showing that a lot of people care. It’s enjoyable because the Walk is family friendly, fun and festive, made so by the many volunteers who see to it that participants are made to feel appreciated and valued for giving of their

time and money. In short – walk in the AIDS Walk and it will leave a lasting impression you won’t soon forget. This year the Walk’s reach embraces not just clients in Thurston County as well, as it has for years, but clients in Lewis County too. This reflects the recent outreach expansion of Pierce County AIDS Foundation (PCAF), X See WALK / page A8

Season preview A9

Sports ......................A9 A&E ....................... ..B1

Glass murals B3

Make A Scene ........ B5 Calendar ................. B6

Look for daily updates online! tacomaweekly.com

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Two Sections | 24 Pages


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Pothole pig’s

POTHOLE OF THE WEEK

82nd and Hosmer Tacoma has a tremendous pothole problem, and the city knows it. During the past couple of years, the city has acknowledged this issue by spending millions of dollars in major arterial repairs with the council’s “pothole initiative,” and in 2010, routine maintenance by Tacoma’s Grounds and Maintenance Division completed street repairs on 229,638 square feet of road. In 2011, the city repaired about 150,000 more square feet of road riddled with holiness, and is continuing those efforts well in to 2012. And while that may sound like a lot of ground, new holes pop up – or return – each and every day, which means a pothole-free road might never exist in Tacoma. With the help of our readers and our dedicated Pothole Pig, we will continue to showcase some of the city’s biggest and best potholes through our weekly homage to one of T-Town’s most unnerving attributes. Help the Pothole Pig by e-mailing your worst pothole suggestions to SaveOurStreets@tacomaweekly.com. Potholes in need of repair can be reported to the City of Tacoma by calling (253) 591-5495.

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Many “classic” cars can be given the title of “ahead of their time,” but only the DeLorean can claim the title on the silver screen. The 1983 DeLorean DMC 12 was made famous by the “Back to the Future” Hollywood movie franchise that featured the rear-engine, gullwinged car as its time machine. The brainchild of John DeLorean, the Pontiac manager responsible for the GTO and the Firebird Trans-Am, DeLorean Motor Co. was ahead of its time in other ways. What made it stand out first was the fact that the car maker was partially financed by the British government as a way to boost the economy of Northern Ireland, which was suffering from high unemployment. The V-6 engine was developed by Peugeot, Renault and Volvo, with the plan being that all four car manufacturers would be able to share the engine development costs. The car itself was designed by the Italian designer Giorgetto Giugiaro and was most known for its flip-up doors that created a bird-like shape and its fiberglass and brushed steel body that was meant to never have to be painted, was corrosion-proof and

PHOTO COURTESY OF MICHAEL CRAFT PHOTOGRAPHY

would be resistant to blemishes. It was ahead of its time when first made in 1980, maybe too far ahead. At a base cost of $25,000, it was a bit expensive for middle-class car buyers and the company’s “creative financing” forced the Brits to pull the plug after just two years of production during the deepest slump in the car market since the Great Depression.

DeLorean Motor Co. went bankrupt in late 1982, after its founder was arrested on drug trafficking charges. He was later found not guilty, but the publicity of the trial had doomed the company. Only 8,742 units were produced, although the DeLorean Motor Co. in Texas owns the rights to the name and manufactures cars on demand from reproduction parts.

)\ZYPKLYZMHJLOHYKYVHKPMWYVWVZP[PVUMHPSZ By Steve Dunkelberger and John Larson stevedunkel@tacomaweekly.com jlarson@tacomaweekly.com

Bus boosters and transit lovers are showing the math of bus services if the sales tax increase package facing voters in November fails. When a similar ballot measure failed to sway voters last year, Pierce Transit was projecting 418,000 service hours without an increase in the sales tax rate. That level of service dropped again in the spring, when several outlying areas opted out of the agency borders altogether. Bonney Lake, Buckley, DuPont, Orting and Sumner, as well as portions of unin-

“People in Pierce County would have fewer buses running on the streets in 2013 than they did in 1980.” – Rob Johnson

Transportation Choices Coalition

corporated Pierce County chose to be removed from Pierce Transit’s boundary, largely because they were located within the taxing district but were not directly served with bus routes. The service level projected in May was 260,000

hours. As the economic forecast for the agency continues to lag, service level predictions have dropped to just 197,000 hours by 2017, Pierce Transit Commissioner and Gig Harbor City Councilmember Derek Young wrote on his blog.

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“That’s 75 percent of 1980 service hours and about a third of the 2010 budget,” he wrote. Pierce Transit had been providing some 623,000 hours of service before the recession. “We are cutting the meat of the core of the system,” Young said. “But that is the reality of the situation we will have if this thing doesn’t pass.” Pierce Transit is largely funded by a .06 percent sales tax, which is one of the lower rates of urbanized areas of the state. The ballot measure would raise that to .09 percent, or about nine cents for every $10 purchase. Young fears that such deep cuts after another failed ballot measure if voters do not support the measure would mean the slow death of the agency as buses become less frequent and riders seek other ways to get to work or to shops, which would lead to a downward spiral. Young called it a “negative feedback loop.” “The service becomes so inefficient and difficult to use, riders start abandoning it,” he said. “That, in turn, reduces fare box revenue as well as federal funds which base part of their formula on ridership X See TRANSIT / page A7

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Police Blotter )<9.3(9@(;:*/663

Five teenagers were arrested on Aug. 30 after allegedly breaking into a school and stealing school supplies. The incident happened at Grant Elementary School, located at 1018 N. Prospect St. Suspects climbed onto the roof and found an unlocked door. Three boys went inside and stole pens, pencils and erasers. Two girls waited on the roof. An alarm went off and officers responded. The boys were taken to Remann Hall and the girls were released to their parents.

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A man was arrested on Aug. 29 on suspicion of robbing a grocery store and convenience store after police recognized him from surveillance camera footage. The first robbery occurred on Aug. 28 at Olympic Grocery, 6601 South Tacoma Way. The suspect entered the store, pulled a gun and demanded cash. He fled on foot. A K-9 unit was unable to track him. The second crime occurred on Aug. 29 at the 7-Eleven at 3005 S. Tyler St. A few hours later an officer spotted the suspect walking into a McDonaldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s on Pacific Avenue. He recognized him from the description from the surveillance video. Money taken during the two robberies was found inside a garbage can in the McDonaldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s.

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Federal agents and local law enforcement personnel arrested more than 20 people on Aug. 28 suspected of trafficking in Oxycodone, a highly addictive prescription painkiller. Several suspects are still on the loose, including Vincent L. Fields of Tacoma. He has been indicted for conspiracy to distribute controlled substances. According to the Federal Bureau of Investigations, members of the ring frequently traveled to Northern California, where they would acquire 2,000 to 5,000 pills per trip. Members sold the pills around the Puget Sound region.

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On Aug. 27 Tacoma Police Department detectives and SWAT teams from TPD and Pierce County Sheriffâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Department served search warrants at four locations. They are part on an investigation into a series of robberies that began in December 2011, along with other crimes involving drugs and weapons. Five alleged gang members have been charged in a string of home-invasion robberies that targeted Asian families. Nolan Chouap, Soy Oeung, Alicia Ngo, Azariah Ross and Azias Ross face multiple counts of robbery, burglary and unlawful imprisonment. They allegedly belong to a Cambodian street gang called Original Loco Boyz. Investigators believe they targeted families of Vietnamese, Filipino and Cambodian descent in Tacoma between January and Aug. 26. In each instance, two to three members broke into a home, threatened occupants, tied them up and stole cash and valuable items. According to TPD, the victims were known to keep money, jewelry and other valuables in their homes.

City Briefs ,?7,*;+,3(@:>/,5 ;9(=,305.:9

Washington State Department of Transportation (WSDOT) reports that the next few weeks will be especially busy at the Interstate 5/State Route 16 Eastbound Nalley Valley project site. Crews will once again be lifting girders into place, this time for a new bridge that will carry southbound I-5 traffic to South 38th Street. Next week the work will take place during the day, and contractor Mowat Construction will continue to need single-lane closures on South Center Street, South Tacoma Way and South Sprague Avenue. During the week of Sept. 10 crews will place new girders over the Eastbound lanes of SR 16. That work will require total closures of eastbound SR 16 at Union Avenue from 11 p.m. to 4 a.m. each night from Sept. 10-13. Eastbound SR 16 will also be closed from 12:30-5:30 a.m. on Sept. 15. Please note that the Union Avenue on-ramp to eastbound SR 16 will also be closed on each of these nights from 9 p.m. to 4:30 a.m. Monday through Thursday, and 11 p.m. Friday to 7 a.m. Saturday. A new project is about to start a little further south on I-5 near DuPont where WSDOT will replace about 4.5 miles of concrete median barrier. Next week crews will have single-lane closures at night to install construction signs, and starting the week of Sept. 10 motorists will see multiple-lane closures during night hours.

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Superintendent Carla Santorno will recommend that the Tacoma School Board approve the hiring of Amanda Thomas as the director of Community Partnership, Academic Equity and Achievement at its Sept. 13 board meeting. Thomas replaces Karyn Osborne, who retired following the last school year. She will report directly to Santorno and oversee an office with a revised title and focus. That office now will focus more on the Achievement Gap Action Plan and developing partnerships with community organizations, Santorno said. Previous duties, such as coordinating the program placement process for new initiatives and program evaluation process for assessing the effectiveness of existing programs, will shift to Toni Pace, assistant superintendent for K-12 Support. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We have a good infrastructure and plan in place to make more progress in eliminating the achievement gap,â&#x20AC;? Santorno said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;But, over the last two years, we have not achieved the outcomes for kids that Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d like

to see. I want us to accomplish more in this area under Amandaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s leadership.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m thrilled to join the team at Tacoma Public Schools and for the opportunity to add my voice to the vision of creating educational equity and improving educational results for Tacoma students,â&#x20AC;? Thomas said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;My goal is to build upon the great foundation that has been set and work with educators, parents, community and young people in supporting the success of every student.â&#x20AC;? Thomas served as public health educator with the Kitsap County Health District from 1995 to 2004. She worked for the Valley of the Sun United Way in Arizona from 2004 to 2007. Thomas served in the Arizona Governorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Office for Children, Youth and Families under Governor Janet Napolitano and was retained under Governor Janice Brewer from 2007 to 2011. From 2011 to the present, Thomas worked in education policy for Schoolâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Out Washington. Thomas earned a Bachelor of Arts degree with an emphasis in public policy and law from The Evergreen State College-Tacoma in 2004.

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Crews have begun a substantial upgrade to the irrigation main at Point Defiance Park. Construction to replace nearly 7,000 lineal feet of main line â&#x20AC;&#x201C; roughly the length of 20 football fields â&#x20AC;&#x201C; is expected to take approximately eight weeks. The work will affect pathways and turf from the Pearl Street entrance through the grassy bowl, pond and garden areas, as well as around the Visitors Center, Pagoda and tennis courts. Parking and the exit road on the backside of the gardens will be closed. It may be necessary to temporarily reroute traffic for a day or two at a time as connecting lines that run under roadways are replaced. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Our contractors will do everything possible to minimize the impact on visitors,â&#x20AC;? said Park Superintendent Vito Iacobazzi. â&#x20AC;&#x153;But, we want to prepare folks that this will be a major undertaking and will create some temporary inconveniences.â&#x20AC;? The replacement is an important longterm solution to address leakage issues that have persisted, despite repairs over the past decade. Millions of gallons flow through the leaking main to irrigate this portion of the park. The upgrade is expected to reduce water usage by roughly 20 percent in this area. Replacing the main will reduce leaks, helping conserve water and eliminating ongoing repairs. The project is part of a comprehensive energy service contract that Metro Parks has entered into with the State

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of Washington, which is designed to provide conservation and operating efficiency benefits.

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Well-known Western Washington newscaster Connie Thompson will headline the 2012 Alzheimerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Caregiver Conference for Pierce County on Sept. 19. Thompson has been a longtime news anchor and currently produces and presents daily consumer segments for KOMO 4 News at 6 p.m. No stranger to the challenges faced by caregivers, for the past several years Thompson and her sisters have been providing the emotional, social and physical support for their mother in her daily struggle with dementia. The free conference will include a presentation by Dr. Doug Wornell on â&#x20AC;&#x153;Challenging Behaviors,â&#x20AC;? a panel of geriatric care managers, and reflections by other family caregivers. Service providers from throughout Pierce County will be on hand to offer information about a wide variety of community resources. The conference will be held at the University Place Presbyterian Church, 8101 27th St. W. in University Place from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Participants must register in advance by calling (253) 798-8787. Complimentary breakfast and lunch will be served. There is no charge to attend. This event is sponsored by the Health Care Providers Council and the Pierce County Aging & Disability Resource Center. For more information about the conference, call the Pierce County Aging & Disability Resource Center at (253) 798-4600 or (800) 562-0332.

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*VTT\UP[`NH[OLYZMVY7\`HSS\W;YPILÂťZHUU\HS7V^^V^ By Kate Burrows kburrows@tacomaweekly.com

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he Puyallup Tribeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 33rd annual Powwow was a celebration of Native American culture, arts and crafts, dancing, drumming and more. Festivities took place Aug. 31 to Sept. 2, with a grand entry celebration on Friday, an annual salmon bake on Saturday and more celebrations on Sunday. A variety of vendors set up shop around the field at Chief Leschi School, and sold handmade jewelry, clothing, crafts and more, along with food and beverages. Arena Director Otto Eaglespeaker said this yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Powwow was bigger and better than ever, with drummers and dancers from near and far attending the celebration. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I was also approached by many non-natives about how wonderful everything was,â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I am so glad they came out to participate in the festivities.â&#x20AC;? Mac Silverhorn served as emcee of the event, ensuring activities moved along as planned. Jim Young has long been involved with the Powwow, and stresses that the significance of this annual event is to celebrate native culture and milestones made by the tribe. â&#x20AC;&#x153;This Powwow is meant to be a celebration of getting our land back,â&#x20AC;? Young said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Many tribes helped Puyallups get their land back, and we want people to know this is about celebration more than anything else.â&#x20AC;?

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OPINION

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Our Views

Rowlands played key role in Tacoma history

Guest Editorial

Washington needs more Lyme disease awareness By Jessica Alonzo I was bitten by a tick in 2008 and just like most on the West Coast was not worried about it. Why should we be? All we ever hear is â&#x20AC;&#x153;there is no Lyme on the West Coast.â&#x20AC;? Even when I got the bullâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s eye rash on my arm I still assumed that is was just a spider bite. I had no idea how my life would change during this camping trip. Lyme disease is a major public health problem and growing crisis. It is the most prevalent bug-borne illness. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, new cases are reported in about 20,000 people yearly and this number represents a 10-fold underestimate. Lyme disease is caused by a complex bacteria carried and spread by ticks. The Lyme bacteria has the ability to evade the immune system and hide themselves deep within tissues and migrate throughout the body, causing a multi-system illness that can be baffling to many physicians. Lyme is called â&#x20AC;&#x153;the great imitator.â&#x20AC;? Many people, especially on the West Coast, do not know what to look for or how to treat it. The result is that one tiny tick the size of the period at the end of a sentence can cause symptoms from muscle and joint pain to heart disease to neurological and

even psychiatric illness. Lyme patients may be misdiagnosed as having other serious diseases such as lupus, multiple sclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis and psychiatric disorders. The message I want to get across is Lyme disease may be hard to diagnose and difficult, if not impossible, to fully get rid of if not caught early. People can go months, even years, before they ever figure out what is wrong. Many doctors will do a blood test for Lyme that is 45 percent accurate! If they have a negative test result they will never look further and rule it out completely. There is only one lab in the United States that accurately tests for Lyme using the western blot. Furthermore, a person with Lyme disease may also have co-infections like babesiosis, ehrlichiosis, bartonella, mycoplasma and tularemia, to name a few. As if having Lyme is not enough! These co-infections often require different antibiotic therapy compared to Lyme. My own story is like many who have Lyme. Visits to countless doctors only to be told I have fibromyalgia, chronic fatigue, depression, multiple sclerosis, lupus and asthma. For me, I knew none of those added up. I was finally told that it was all in my head. â&#x20AC;&#x153;You have a family, you are healthy, you work full

time, are you lacking attention?â&#x20AC;? That is the final question I was asked before leaving that office and firing him as my doctor for good. It has taken a tough few years of pain and symptom flare-ups but I found a great Lyme literate doctor in Seattle. This doctor has saved my life and my daughterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s life. My little girl was born with Lyme and one co-infection and had a rough start and hard first two years of her life. Multiple health issues and seizures. But she turned 3 in July and she is improving daily. I have always heard that treating Lyme is a marathon not a sprint and boy is that the truth. We need continued education of all medical doctors and nurses about the array of Lyme symptoms and its related infections in order to increase the number of health care providers who can recognize and treat these illnesses. When the AIDS epidemic came to light, activists screamed for attention to get testing and medical care. I hope Lyme patients will stand up and fight to get awareness out there. We need better testing, better treatment and more educated health professionals. In my lifetime this will happen. I will make this happen for my daughter. Jessica Alonzo is a Tacoma resident.

Letters to the Editor Dear Editor,

I was born and raised in Oklahoma, and even though I have lived in Tacoma long enough to have moss on the back of my neck, Oklahoma is still dear to me. So it really offended me that your guest editorialist Bill Johnston would stereotype all Oklahomans as backward, â&#x20AC;&#x153;gawd-fearinâ&#x20AC;? Americans (â&#x20AC;&#x153;Oklahoma getting the summer it deserves,â&#x20AC;? TW 8/24). Well, we are Americans, just as much as he is. I am in full agreement that U.S. Senator James Inhofe â&#x20AC;&#x201C; and much of America, including many Oklahomans and some Washingtonians â&#x20AC;&#x201C; is out of touch about climate change. However, is it fair to condemn an entire state based on the comments of one of its citizens? Should I listen to Glen Beck and conclude that all Washingtonians believe President Barack Obama is a Muslim terrorist? I fully understand the distaste with Oklahoma, but why wish misfortune on others? Can Johnston honestly be happy to see farmers lose their crops and livestock just because he does not like what one of their elected representatives said or did? We will all be affected by the increase in prices at the grocery store soon, so he should not be too happy to see others suffer. Finally, Johnston claims that Oklahomaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s economy â&#x20AC;&#x153;which usually sucks anyway is getting worse.â&#x20AC;? Truth is, Oklahoma lags behind Washington only slightly. Oklahoma ranks 13th on the Forbes list of best states to do business. Washington is seventh, but still, Oklahoma is ahead of 37 other states. How bad does that suck? And on www.truecostblog.com Oklahoma ranks number 23, only three places behind Washington. Johnston can feel free to attack Inhofe all he wants â&#x20AC;&#x201C; I would have never voted for Inhofe â&#x20AC;&#x201C; but leave the stereotyping and condemnation of all Oklahomans out of it. His entire argument is based on a hasty generalization that all Oklahomans agree with their elected official, and it appears his thesis is that Oklahomans are being punished by God because they do not like big government. That is just plain crazy and Johnstonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s tiresome whining has got this Okie plum tuckered out.

Randall Martin Tacoma Dear Editor,

I have never met a more kind, caring, generous staff as Puyallup Tribe has at the Elders Center. They are a diverse group, yet they work together to ensure the elders are cared for every day. They make everyone feel welcome, they remember the little details about individuals and they have the utmost respect for everyoneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s privacy. Their professionalism is top of the line. I hope the elders know what a gem they have and remember to tell them how appreciated they are. My husband is a tribal elder and we both know how hard things would be without their help and guidance with his health issues and personal needs. Whenever we feel the need to pick up a phone or pay a visit to the staff at the Elders Center, there is always somebody to help us with whatever we need. We have had many questions answered, help with medical equipment, a friendly piece of advice when needed and much more. We just want to say thanks to each and everyone there. Life is much easier with them in it!

Virginia Young Puyallup Dear Editor,

After 24 years of teaching students on parole and probation for Tacoma Public Schools, I am often asked, â&#x20AC;&#x153;What can we do to prevent a child from being involved in crime and dropping out of school?â&#x20AC;?

Incarcerated youth are disconnected from community. They are unemotionally adrift in their own diluted world of unaccountability. Their negative decision-making processes are self-justified. Disconnected youth do not hold themselves accountable to a society that they are detached from. The student disconnection can be traced to the 1980s, when urban school districts transitioned from the junior high seventh, eighth and ninth grades to the middle school system of sixth, seventh and eighth grades. Sadly, many districts eliminated sports, shop classes and extracurricular activities. As a result, disconnected 14- and 15-year-old ninth-graders are dropping out of school and involved in criminal activities. The increased social disconnection is traced to the adoption of the middle school system and elimination of extracurricular activities. Junior highs provided enrichment extracurricular programs to help students build connections and a strong self-esteem. Teachers and coaches can instill honesty, dedication, camaraderie, morals and values. The middle school system has failed. It is time to admit it and return to the junior high system. The overused excuse that it is the familiesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; fault is correct, but we, as a society, as a neighborhood, as individuals, can use public education to help youth be a reflection of Americaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s norms and values.

Darrell Hamlin Tacoma Dear Editor,

In 2008, the Tacoma School Board voted three to two not to televise or video record its meetings â&#x20AC;&#x201C; citing expense and supposed lack of community interest. My friends and I responded by launching a campaign to make Tacoma Public Schools more transparent and more accessible to working parents. Over the next eight months, we e-mailed and called board members, spoke at citizensâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; forum and stood in the back of the boardroom with a video camera and tripod before uploading every meeting to our website (the cost of this was less than $200). By April 2009, the camera-shy board relented, and by a unanimous vote of five to zero created the free video service that is now available on TPSâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; website. Our experience underscores an important theme that goes to the core idea behind educating children at public expense. School is the foundation of our democracy, and that foundation is undermined by policies that result in exclusion. Initiative 1240 is one such policy. I-1240 would create a partisan school board of five state representatives â&#x20AC;&#x201C; appointed by the governor â&#x20AC;&#x201C; who would single-handedly decide if, where, when and what kind of charter schools will be created in Washington. These schools are not accountable to local elected school boards, but are funded by local levy dollars. In other words, I-1240 would result in taxation without representation â&#x20AC;&#x201C; which our founding fathers rightly identified as tyranny. I can literally think of dozens of reasons why readers should vote no on I-1240, but suffice it to say that if this initiative passes, efforts to promote transparency in government and democracy in education will take a significant blow. As someone who personally spent four years in an alternative school for students with special needs, I know from painful experience how important it is for parents to be able to advocate for their children, and for teachers to be given the support they need to achieve the Herculean tasks before them. Please vote no on I-1240.

Chris Van Vechten Tacoma

A key figure in the history of Tacoma city government passed away on Aug. 29. Dave Rowlands, the second city manager in the City of Destiny, died of natural causes at the age of 97. Few individuals have had the type of lasting impact on Tacoma as Rowlands. He served as city manager from 1956 to 1970. Rowlands was hired shortly after Tacoma switched to a council/manager form of government. He served during a time when many American cities were in decline and the federal government sought to turn that around with large infusions of grants. Rowlands secured federal money to establish a bus system, develop sewage treatment plants and build two downtown parking garages. An indication of the level of respect Rowlands commanded in government circles was his selection in 1996 to serve as president of International City Managers Association. One example of his ongoing impact was his professional relationship and personal friendship with former Tacoma Mayor Bill Baarsma, who as a young man served an internship with Rowlands. Baarsma went on to serve eight years on Tacoma City Council in the 1990s and returned to city hall to serve as mayor from 2002 through 2009. Baarsma and Rowlands formed a strong friendship and stayed in contact with each other. Just a few months ago, Baarsma arranged a meeting between Rowlands and City Manager T.C. Broadnax, who took over the city manager position earlier this year. We imagine Broadnax, who is in his first position as top administrator of a city, picked up a few pointers from Rowlands on the finer points of the job.

Good news on Thea Foss Waterway We are pleased to hear that permits for the Thea Foss Waterway hotel project will be issued soon. The project has been delayed on several fronts, from economic to political to environmental reasons. The idea for a hotel on the waterway has been promoted for years by Foss Waterway Development Association, the city-affiliated agency charged with attracting developers to the revitalized waterfront. The first and second developers who tried to build projects on this parcel experienced financial problems and walked away. This may be a case of the third time is the charm. That would be Hollander Investments of Bellingham, which operates several hotels in Western Washington, including the Courtyard by Marriott downtown. The union that represents workers at unionized hotels, including Hotel Murano, has strongly opposed the Foss project because the existing Marriott is nonunion and they presume the Marriott Residence Inn planned for the waterfront would also employ nonunion workers. The Murano ownership has tried to stop the project, claiming the planned hotels would be aesthetically unsuited for the waterfront. The last legal obstacle to the project was removed earlier this summer when Washington State Supreme Court declined to hear an appeal of the issuing of shoreline permits. Tacomaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s gleaming, modern convention center is an attractive meeting space. But it has struggled to book some larger events because of a lack of nearby hotel rooms. One of its primary competitors is the convention center in Spokane. While that city has essentially the same population as Tacoma, it has about 10 times as many hotel rooms in its downtown. Those hotels range from upscale to lower budget to price ranges in between, offering convention attendees with varying budgets a variety of choices. Plans for the waterway property call for the Marriott facility and a second hotel to be built at some future date. In sunny weather like we have enjoyed recently, the distance from the waterway to the convention center would be a pleasant walk. During the rainy seasons, shuttle vans likely will be needed to transport conventioneers, but that can be easily arranged. The city government wants to send a message that Tacoma is open for business. The obstacles thrown in front of Hollander on this project have sent mixed messages. It is time this project moves forward.

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:WHJL^VYRHPTZ[VYHPZLTVUL`H^HYLULZZ 7YVNYHTOHZYL]P[HSPaLKLTW[`ZWHJLZMVY[OYLL`LHYZ By Kate Burrows kburrows@tacomaweekly.com

When Spaceworks launched in 2009, the joint initiative of the City of Tacoma and Seattle arts group Shunpike had a goal to activate empty storefronts through artistic enterprises. Since then, the program has given some local artists the opportunity to create successful businesses for themselves that they may not have had the resources to start on their own. On Sept. 15, the community will have an opportunity to support the effort by attending the Spaceworks Cakewalk fundraiser to raise money and build support for the program. Cakewalk also includes an artwalk, featuring pieces made by a variety of local artists. Winners of each round of the cakewalk and artwalk will be able to choose their own piece. Bakers and artists have donated items to be used as prizes, and highlights include a hand-made cake stand by Bella Balls owner Diane Hanson â&#x20AC;&#x201C; valued at about $1,700. Tickets for the artwalk are $20, and tickets to the cakewalk are $5. Additional pieces will be available from local artists Sean Alexander, Jessica Spring, Chandler Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Leary, Janet Marcavage and more. Organizers hope to raise at least $5,000 from the fundraiser. â&#x20AC;&#x153;This is not a huge fundraising goal, but weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re also trying to gather community support, as well,â&#x20AC;? said Spaceworks Tacoma Coordinator Rebecca Solverson. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t cost much to run the program, and this kind of money will make a big difference.â&#x20AC;? Solverson recommends arriving early to the event if you are hoping to win your favorite art pieces. So far, there are about 30 pieces to â&#x20AC;&#x153;walkâ&#x20AC;? off, along with about 20 cakes. Drinks and refreshments will also be available throughout the night. The nightâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s festivities will also feature performances by DJ Broam, Mr. Melanin and BareFoot Collective. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We are so excited about the support weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve received so far from the community,â&#x20AC;? she said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m looking forward to celebrating with everyone.â&#x20AC;? The event will take place at 311 S. 7th St., in the home of one of the organizationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s newest creative enterprises, Electric Branch Creative. For more information about Spaceworks, visit www.spaceworkstacoma.wordpress.com.

PHOTOS BY CHRIS SHARP

SWEET TREATS. Spaceworksâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; latest fundraiser takes place

Sept. 15, featuring a cakewalk and artwalk alike. Admission is free, but tickets to participate in the contests are $5-$20.

WParade

From page A1

closed off to allow the marchers to safely walk their route. The parade began in the parking lot of First Creek, which is on Portland Avenue. As they walked along East 44th Street, they briefly stopped in front of Lister Elementary School, where they were greeted by staff of that school. All along the route, marchers tossed candy to children and also handed out school supplies. â&#x20AC;&#x153;This is an effort to bring a sense of community to the school,â&#x20AC;? said Michael Joshua, an instructional facilitator of math and science at First Creek. He said the parade helps children to know they are welcomed and respected at the school. Rachel Smith-Mosul used to be a teacher at the old Gault Middle School, which closed upon First Creekâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s opening. She taught at First Creek for three years before

accepting an administrative position in Tacoma Public Schools. She was pleased to be back in the part of town where she used to teach and happy to see partners such as the YMCA and Metro Parksâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Sparx program involved in the event. â&#x20AC;&#x153;This will grow every year,â&#x20AC;? she predicted. Members of Tacoma Urban League also participated in the parade. After the parade, the marchers gathered in the cafeteria at First Creek. Principal Brad Brown thanked all who participated. He introduced the man he asked to be grand marshal, Josh Garcia. This summer he began his new job as deputy superintendent for the district. â&#x20AC;&#x153;This is a great day to be a First Creek Eagle,â&#x20AC;? Garcia told the audience. He discussed some of his goals for the district, reading aloud a list of priorities. Garcia said he has high expectations for First Creek students and hopes they all take advanced placement classes when they move on to Lincoln High School.

PHOTO BY JOHN LARSON

WELCOME. Staff at Lister Elementary School waved at the marchers as they walked along East 44th Street.

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WTransit From page A2

PHOTO BY SONJA MORGAN PHOTOGRAPHY AND DESIGN

DYNAMIC DUO. Kieran and Sherri Murry are the co-founders of Ignite-U.

Couple seeks to inspire people to think big By John Larson jlarson@tacomaweekly.com

Kieran and Sherri Murry want their fellow Pierce County residents to be inspired to make improvements, be it to their business, family or community. So they created something to provide space for that inspiration to occur. They are the founders of Ignite-U, a series of events that combine motivational speakers and networking opportunities. About 350 attended the last event in Lakewood in August. One speaker was Chris Caillier, who became inspired by a speaker at an Ignite-U event in March. It led him to fly to Africa, where he spent several months meeting with families in need and raising funds to assist them. The Murrys own a marketing company. Sherri said they both closely observed the recession and the

WRoad

impact it had, causing many businesses to shut down. That made them ponder how many were victims of the economy or fizzled out due to other factors, such as a death in the family, a divorce or a dispute with a business partner. The couple has traveled to seminars in the past 10 years, where they have been inspired by a variety of speakers. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We wanted to bring those speakers up here to the Northwest to give people here the same exposure we had,â&#x20AC;? Sherri said. The goal is for attendees to â&#x20AC;&#x153;be ignitedâ&#x20AC;? by what they hear. The next event is the Ignite-U Business Expo on Sept. 13 at Emerald Queen Casino in Tacoma. This is the fifth event in 2012. Sheri said each event has a different nature, so those who attend will all get a different experience each time. This next event will

From page A1

Tacoma and the Washington State Department of Transportation, through the Transportation Improvement Board in the form of a $5 million grant, which the city matched with $1 million of its own. The down economy, however, put the final price tag of the work at only $3 million. The remaining $2 million in grant dollars will now be used for road improvements around the state.

differ in that it will not have speakers. It will be more about mingling and networking, according to Sheri Murry. There will be $6,000 worth of appetizers and Harmon Brewery will bring a special Ignite-U brew. The event is free to the public to attend, as are all in the series, which is funded by sponsors, she noted. This event is meant to showcase the sponsors. Sherri Murry said people who attend the events include business owners and human resources professionals as well as people who may be looking for work who want to interact with such people. â&#x20AC;&#x153;They are open to anyone. We want people to have fun, move forward and think bigger.â&#x20AC;? The expo event will feature music by Johnny Cash tribute band Folsom Prism. For more information contact Sherri Murry at (253) 312-9301 or contact@ignite-u.com.

The Alaska Street improvements were dearly needed as the roadway was beginning to require constant pothole repairs. â&#x20AC;&#x153;You were really taking your life into your hands,â&#x20AC;? Mayor Marilyn Strickland said. The road often serves for a secondary route for drivers stuck in Interstate 5 traffic because it runs parallel to I-5 on Tacomaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s South End, providing an option for people heading to and from downtown who are looking to avoid the gridlock along the interstate during commute times.

Dockside Donuts

and efficiency.â&#x20AC;? Pierce Transit officials have made significant cuts in service since 2008 to stay ahead of the funding lag caused by the recession, with $111 million being cut in recent years. Routes have been closed around the system, including the special shuttles to the upcoming Western Washington Fair from surrounding areas as a way for people to avoid the gridlock of Main Street parking lots. The added congestion created by the lack of bus service to the fair could provide a glimpse of things to come if special event bus service cannot transport the tourists set to flood the area for the 2015 United States Open golf tournament set for Chambers Bay, or the Taste of Tacoma and Freedom Fair each year. â&#x20AC;&#x153;If that happens, it would be the last PGA event in Pierce County,â&#x20AC;? Fife City Councilmember and Pierce Transit Commissioner Glenn Hull said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Our citizens and our communities need transit to grow. We just canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t do without transit.â&#x20AC;? Proposition 1 is opposed by one major business interest, Tacoma/Pierce County Chamber of Commerce. Its Board of Directors recently took this action. President and CEO Tom Pierson cited the impact the tax increase would have on the local economy. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The chamber has long supported transit in Pierce County, even supplying the headquarters for the establishment of Pierce Transit decades ago,â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Unfortunately, the proposed sales tax levels are simply unacceptable. As the chamber continues to welcome businesses and jobs to the area, we need to stay competitive with the communities around us,â&#x20AC;? According to the chamber, the sales tax rate in Tacoma and Pierce County is tied with King County and the cities of Seattle, Kirkland and Redmond as the highest in Washington. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Having the highest sales tax rate in the state is not a distinction Tacoma/Pierce County would want to be known for, â&#x20AC;&#x153; Pierson said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Being a community that preserves a reasonably business-and-economy friendly atmosphere is the sort of favorable distinction we should strive for instead.â&#x20AC;? Rob Johnson, executive director of Transportation Choices Coalition, said his organization has endorsed a yes vote on Proposition 1. The most recent round of cuts means many routes do not run after 7 p.m., Johnson said. Without revenue from the proposed tax increase, Pierce Transit may have to cut service by 50 percent of what it currently offers. â&#x20AC;&#x153;People in Pierce County would have fewer buses running on the streets in 2013 than they did in 1980,â&#x20AC;? he remarked. He points to the social justice angle of the situation, noting that more than half of riders live in households with incomes of less than $20,000 a year. These include veter-

ans, senior citizens and students. Cuts to routes correspond to cuts to shuttle service for the disabled. Johnson added he feels more service cuts would dampen economic development. The ballot measure failing would raise the question of whether Pierce Transit would exist much longer, according to Johnson. Should that occur, Pierce County would be the largest county in the nation without a bus system. Endorsements supporting Proposition 1 have come from several labor and environmental groups, including Amalgamated Transit Union Local 758, Service Employees International Union Local 775, Coalition for Active Transportation, Future Wise, Pierce Conservation Voters and Sierra Club Tatoosh Chapter. The 27th Legislative District Democrats have endorsed it. Kate Whiting is campaign manager for Proposition One Restore Transit Now, which is pushing passage. She said a meeting is scheduled this weekend with Pierce County Republicans seeking their endorsement. Pierce Transit will be hosting a series of informational open houses for the public regarding Proposition 1. Area meetings include: Lakewood, Sept. 18, 6-7:30 p.m., Pierce Transit headquarters, 3720 96th St. S.W.; Gig Harbor, Sept. 19, 6-7:30 p.m. Gig Harbor Civic Center, 3510 Grandview St. Tacoma, Sept. 20, 5-6:30 p.m., city hall council chambers; Tacoma, Oct. 15, 5:30-7 p.m., South Tacoma Library, 3411 S. 56th St.; Parkland, Oct. 16, 6:30-8 p.m., Parkland Library, 13718 Pacific Ave.

PIERCE TRANSIT SERVICE AREA Population: 556,908 Square miles: 292 FIXED ROUTE BUSES 12 million boardings 39,679 average rides per weekday 6.4 million service miles SHUTTLE PARATRANSIT 437,021 trips 6,948 eligible users VANPOOL 859,624 trips 2,533 customers FLEET DATA: 130 buses currently in service 100 shuttle vehicles 326 vanpool vehicles PRIMARY REVENUE SOURCES: 0.6 percent local sales tax Passenger fares Federal Transit Administration Sound Transit for regional service

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WWalk From page A1

which has organized and produced the AIDS Walk since 1991. This past January United Communities AIDS Network (UCAN), headquartered in Olympia, became part of PCAF. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We have assumed all services that have been done by UCAN,â&#x20AC;? said PCAF Executive Director Duane Wilkerson. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We also assumed their prevention program and weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re keeping the office they have in Olympia.â&#x20AC;? He noted that AIDS Walk funds raised by residents in Thurston and Lewis counties will go to services for those living in these counties. What this means for AIDS Walk participants is that by giving up a Saturday morning to get out, walk and raise money, approximately 600 clients in three counties will be helped through the services and support PCAF gives to each of them â&#x20AC;&#x201C; from a ride to the doctor and hot meals

brought to those too sick to provide for themselves, to support groups, help with housing and even with writing a will. A not-for-profit, volunteer supported and community based organization, PCAFâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s overarching mission is to prevent HIV infection, assist persons affected by HIV/AIDS, address related health problems and combat associated stigma and discrimination. This is what AIDS Walk dollars go toward, and in the current fiscal climate of increased financial hardships affecting non-profits across the country. To date, walkers have raised more than $2 million. On PCAFâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Facebook page, walk organizers are gathering inspirational stories from past walkers about why they participate. Jackie (last name withheld) writes in part: â&#x20AC;&#x153;I lost my only brother to AIDS on June 5, 1992. Not a day goes by I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t miss and remember him.â&#x20AC;? Walking in the AIDS Walk led Jackie on to more volunteer work cook-

  

 



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ing dinner for the residents of Three Cedars, a housing facility for people with AIDS, on the first of each month. She writes that she will walk with her son and stepson, who first walked with her when they were little boys in the early 1990s. â&#x20AC;&#x153;They are now 23 and 31!â&#x20AC;? she wrote. Those who may wish to tell their walk story can e-mail events@piercecountyaids.org or share in the comments section on PCAFâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Facebook page. Walkers will also have a new place to gather and a new walk route this year. After more than two decades of holding the Walk in downtown Tacoma, Cheney Stadium is now the new venue for the event, offering ready-made gathering spaces for the more than 1,000 people expected to be there, ample free parking, and an unrestricted two-mile walk on an even surface suitable for walkers of any ability. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We are really excited about our new venue,â&#x20AC;? Wilkerson said. The 2012 Walk route will include a lap around the stadium track and a nice walk on the Scott Pierson Trail. With just two weeks to go before the Walk happens, organizers are anticipating a lot of walkers and sponsors to sign up between now and Sept. 22. Registration for the AIDS Walk is open at www.piercecountyaids.org, where you can also sign up to sponsor a walker or team. You can even register as a â&#x20AC;&#x153;virtual walkerâ&#x20AC;? for those who canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t make it to the Walk itself. Next week, be sure and pick up your copy of Tacoma Weekly (a returning sponsor of the South Sound AIDS Walk) to read all about whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s on the program this year for the opening ceremony, awards, music, entertainment and more.

PHOTO COURTESY OF PCAF

,54(::, More than 1,000 people from all walks of life are expected to gather at Cheney Stadium on Sept. 22 for this yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s South Sound AIDS Walk.

7*(-/6569:(0+:7065,,9 This year marks the 25th anniversary of Pierce County AIDS Founcation, which the organization will acknowledge this coming World AIDS Day, Dec. 1, at Tacoma Art Museum. State Representative Jeannie Darnielle, PCAFâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s first executive director who served from 1989 to 2007, will receive the foundationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s first PCAF Achievement Award for her groundbreaking work on behalf of people with AIDS in Pierce County. Former Tacoma Mayor Bill Baarsma and State Representative Laurie Jinkins will present the award. The evening includes art, music and performance art provided throughout the museum by youth from Oasis Youth Center. Register at www.piercecountyaids.org

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Sports

TACOMAWEEKLY.com VOLLEYBALL

A11 X

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 2012

SECTION A, PAGE 9

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Youth will be counted on to step up

PHOTO BY ROCKY ROSS

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Wilson cruises over Decatur

he Stadium Tigers might lack size, but they know their identity. Behind converted wide receiver Tre Scott at quarterback and small-butquick running back Nick Loftin – who accounted for 193 yards of offense and two touchdowns – the Tigers executed their Wing-T attack almost to perfection in a 34-12 season-opening win over Mount Tahoma on Aug. 31. “We’re a ground-and-pound team, even though we might be small in stature,” said Stadium head coach Jess Nelson. “Those two guys are the features of our offense.” The Tigers started with some trickery, recovering an onside kick on the opening kickoff and scoring on Scott’s one-yard plunge six plays later. After a three-and-out defensively, Loftin found the end zone on a seven-yard run late in the first quarter to make it 12-0. “Our line got off the ball really (well),” said Loftin, who stands at just 5-foot-6 and 155 pounds. “They did their job today, and that’s what made things work for all the running backs.” But the Thunderbirds responded, marching downfield on the legs of running back Zachary Holt, and Parshay Small finished an eight-play drive with a one-yard plunge. Holt led Mount Tahoma with nine carries for 65 yards, and added a 34-yard reception in the third quarter. Loftin scored again on the Tigers’ next drive, taking a counter in from 30 yards out to make it 19-6. The Tigers forced another three-and-out, and Scott connected with Jacob Bills for an 83-yard touchdown on the first play of the next drive to give Stadium a commanding 27-6 lead. The Thunderbirds almost snatched momentum before the half, driving all the way downfield only to have quarterback Michael Rollins come up an inch short of the goal line as time expired. “We talk a lot about momentum, and it has no favorites,” Nelson said. “There’s five or six plays that can determine a game, and going into halftime that was critical – on the goal line getting that stop.” The Thunderbirds twice drove deep into Stadium territory in the third quarter, but the Tigers’ defense held firm to stop Mount Tahoma on fourth down. Stadium then put the game away with a 16-play, 86-yard drive capped by Scott’s five-yard touchdown run to make it 34-6 midway through the fourth. Rollins connected with Jakob Wilson later for a 35-yard touchdown to provide the final margin. Loftin finished with 18 carries for

Danielle Nurmi (right) looks to step up and carry the scoring load for the Lions and help offset the graduation of forward Stephanie Hamilton (left). By Jeremy Helling jeremy@tacomaweekly.com

As local girls soccer teams return to the pitch, several have many questions to answer and holes to fill at key positions. Although a few dazzling stars graduated, there is still some high quality talent returning, and we highlight some of the key players after talking with local coaches.

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The Lions appear poised to make another run to the state playoffs after falling in the state title game last fall, but will have to replace the goal-scoring ability of Narrows 4A MVP Stephanie Hamilton and other key players. Senior first team all-league forward Danielle Nurmi provides a solid offensive threat up front and will be expected to carry the scoring load, and sophomore Kaylee Kebba leads a solid group of younger players. “It’s going to be interesting because we’re going to have to see how our young players adjust and step into leadership roles,” said head coach Joe Waters. “They’re going to have to grow up quickly.” Junior Hope Fleckner will lead the Lions in the midfield, and senior Lauren Fricke will be counted on to head up the defense. Senior goalkeeper Kiley Adams also returns after posting nine shutouts last year.

STADIUM

PHOTOS BY ROCKY ROSS

)0.9<5:. (Top) Stadium running back Tarak Jedidi breaks free on a

big run in the first quarter against Mount Tahoma, as the Thunderbirds’ Sampson Williams (55) and Keshawn Craig (3) give chase. (Bottom) Mount Tahoma’s Zachary Holt finds open field, as he led the Thunderbirds with 65 yards rushing in the loss to Stadium.

148 yards and the two scores – while adding four catches for 45 yards – and junior Tarak Jedidi had 11 carries for 78 yards for the Tigers. “We’re not going to get big-headed, but it gives us a lot of confidence,” said Loftin of the win. “I think we’re going to have a great season. This is Stadium’s year.” By Jeremy Helling

>03:65+6405(;,:+,*(;<9

Questions abounded for the Wilson Rams entering the 2012 season, but after all was said and done, coach Don Clegg had several of them answered on Aug. 31 as Wilson cruised to a 45-14 win over the Decatur Gators at Stadium Bowl. “We were hoping for a decent start and we got one,” said the veteran Ram head man. “I can’t say enough about our

effort.” Clegg’s main concern was the size of the Gator interior lines, which were rendered ineffective in getting penetration in the Wilson backfield and opening holes for the Gators’ backs. After stopping the Gators on fourth down in Wilson territory on the first drive of the game, the Rams dented the scoreboard first when quarterback Moses Lewis scampered 13 yards and pitched to Ben Matz, who covered 22 more to the end zone. Wilson would never look back. “We knew we had talent, but we did not know how they would come out and respond early,” said Clegg. Starting at the Decatur 36-yard line late in the first quarter, Isaiah Simpson would take it in from 11 yards out and X See FOOTBALL / page A11

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Count the Tigers as another team looking to replace some key graduates, and coach Lyndon Harrhy noted that the cast of young talent will have to learn on the fly. “In an ideal world, you’d like the younger players…to ease into it,” Harrhy said. “It is a challenge. Some of the girls will have to be thrown into the deep end and learn from the experience.” Stadium will be strong defensively, as junior goalkeeper Jordan Sallee returns along with senior first team all-league defender Bailey Edwards. Senior Allison Sedlacek is capable of playing in the midfield or as a defender, but Harrhy noted that the biggest challenge will be finding consistent goalscoring threats up front.

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The Vikings will also be getting significant contributions from younger players this year, with six freshmen on the roster, but coach Frank Hankel notes that they have mostly all played at a high level of club soccer. Returning all-league midfielder Lanie Vinson is one of just four seniors on the squad, but will provide a solid presence in the middle. Junior midfielder Maddy Herron and junior midfielder/defender Alyssa Cabral will also be counted on to lead the Vikings. “It’s a real cohesive group,” Hankel said. “They enjoy playing with each other and being around each other. There’s going to be some learning curves with a young team – but there’s a lot of positive things.” Freshman forward Morgan Weaver is one of the talented young players who should step in and provide a scoring threat up front.

>03:65

The Rams should once again challenge for the Narrows 3A crown, as they have a

X See SOCCER / page A10


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PHOTOS BY ROCKY ROSS

KEY RETURNERS. Stadium senior Bailey Edwards (left) will be a key force for the Tigersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; defense this fall, while Curtis will be relying on senior Lanie Vinson

(right) in the midfield.

WSoccer From page A9

solid group of seniors and talented players returning at nearly every position. Star forward Angela Celedon graduated, but the Rams return senior Brittainy Canonica â&#x20AC;&#x201C; a second team, all-league pick â&#x20AC;&#x201C; and senior Alexa Blackman up front to provide a solid

scoring threat. Sophomore Megan Chambers is a rising talent who will add to the group up front. The Rams will be strong in the midfield, as seniors Kailey Norling and Avery Smalls will lead the group, and junior Olivia Pichette is talented and quick. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re really trying to play some basic, fundamental soccer,â&#x20AC;? said head coach Angie Karabaich. â&#x20AC;&#x153;(Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re going to) use our outside

midfielders to get as many opportunities as we can.â&#x20AC;? Smalls will also be key to the defensive effort, while senior goalkeeper Danielle Rhea provides solid experience as the last line of defense.

LINCOLN

The Abes hope that a solid turnout will continue to help the program grow, as first-year head coach Emily Abbott noted there will be a junior varsity team for the first time in several years. Seniors Kaitlyn Downs and Sabrina Stewart look to lead the squad, and they offer the versatility of playing multiple positions on the field. Junior goalkeeper Heidi Leeder should help solidify the defense, something Abbott noted will be the first focus of the team. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The girls are really starting to play well together, and play as one,â&#x20AC;? Abbott said, adding that fitness to play a full 90 minutes

will be a key factor for the group. Sophomore Joelle French is another versatile player who will be expected to contribute as well.

MOUNT TAHOMA

The Thunderbirds will have a solid group of returning players as they begin their first season in the Narrows 3A, headlined by junior second team allleague goalkeeper Nina Thach. Senior midfielder Emily Hoefer and senior forward Chealang Hok will look to capitalize on scoring chances, while fellow senior Karissa Skidmore will be counted on to help lead the defense along with sophomore all-league honorable mention Georgianna Waldron. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re all really excited about this year,â&#x20AC;? said head coach Deirdre Leonard. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve got a lot of good players. They just work really well together.â&#x20AC;?

Freshmen Lezah Rodriguez and Akaiyasia Sumandig are two talented young players who are capable of playing multiple positions, and will be expected to contribute.

FOSS

The Falcons will look to rely on an experienced defense to stay competitive, led by junior Tyfanni Chin, a two-time all-league second team pick. Fellow junior Jessica Orosco also returns to help shore up the defense, but head coach Mark Kramer noted the squad is small in numbers and overall experience, which should present a challenge. Sophomore Emma Rue-Johns returns to lead the midfield, but Kramer expects â&#x20AC;&#x153;significant contributionsâ&#x20AC;? from younger players in the midfield and up front.

LIFE CHRISTIAN

young squad, but feature athleticism as they look to improve against tough competition. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a building program, and itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s going in the right direction,â&#x20AC;? said head coach Keith Beasinger. â&#x20AC;&#x153;They actually play more like a team than weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve ever seen.â&#x20AC;? Junior midfielder Darby Huber returns and brings scoring ability and ball control, and sophomore Maddie Hood adds another experienced midfielder. Sophomore forward Katie Anderson also returns and brings a strong foot, ensuring that the Eagles should have a solid offense. Having struggled in the past against top teams Seattle Christian, Cedar Park Christian and Bellevue Christian, the Eagles will look to surprise in the Nisqually 1A league with a maturing group that will only lose three starters in the next two years.

The Eagles are another

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5L^WSH`LYZZ[LWMVY^HYKMVY>PSZVU:[HKP\T 9HTZ[VW@LSTPUVWLULY;PNLYZMHSS[V7\`HSS\W Looking to replace some key losses from last yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s team, Wilson Rams head coach Jenna Elliott may have found them â&#x20AC;&#x201C; namely Spanaway Lake transfer Sojournah Channel â&#x20AC;&#x201C; as Wilson would come up with a hard fought 3-1 win over the Yelm Lady Tornadoes in their season opener on Sept. 4. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We need to work on finishing games, but give Yelm much credit for hanging tough all afternoon,â&#x20AC;? Elliott said. The long and athletic Rams were looking for separation, but could not find much from the tough and gritty Tornadoes for much of the match in the 25-18, 25-20, 22-25, 25-22 win. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s when Channel took over, controlling much of the match from her setter and outside hitter positions with her athleticism. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I was excited for this match against Yelm,â&#x20AC;? said the junior, who led the Rams with 14 kills and 26 digs on the afternoon. Wilson would coast for much of the first game, but would have trouble the rest of the day. One of the keys to the success for Channelâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s day was the play of Lady Ramsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; setter junior Rachel Russell. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Rachel was great, she was fantastic with her sets all day long,â&#x20AC;? said Channel. Having won the first two sets and leading the third 6-2, the pesky Tornadoes would go on a run to survive and play another set before Wilson would finally put them away. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Once we find that much needed leadership, weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll begin to become more consistent on the court,â&#x20AC;? Elliott said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m gradually beginning to become more familiar with my teammates,â&#x20AC;? said Channel, who also credited the play

PHOTOS BY ROCKY ROSS

0476:05.79,:,5*,. Wilsonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Sojournah Channel (left), a transfer from Spanaway Lake, was key to the Ramsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; opening win over Yelm. (Right) The Ramsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Rachel Russel (left) and Tia Briggs (right) jump together to block a Yelm shot attempt.

of fellow front liners Tia Briggs and Alexis Slater. The thought of this team getting better as the season progresses has Elliott excited for its possibilities. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Once these ladies get to know each other, we could become a real good team.â&#x20AC;? By Steve Mullen

STADIUM FALLS TO 7<@(33<7

Replacing four starters is a tough enough task for any volleyball squad. Having to begin the season against Puyallup â&#x20AC;&#x201C; a

4A state title contender this year â&#x20AC;&#x201C; proved to be too difficult for the Stadium Tigers, as despite a valiant effort, the Tigers fell 25-14, 25-19, 25-11 at home on Sept. 4. â&#x20AC;&#x153;That middle set we competed with them, I thought we did a really good job,â&#x20AC;? said Stadium head coach John Dillard.

â&#x20AC;&#x153;They just have way too many horses for us.â&#x20AC;? The Tigers stayed with Puyallup early in the first set behind the all-out hustle of senior libero Helena Stout, and a couple of impressive kills from junior outside hitter Angela Yun. Yun totaled five kills in the first set alone, and

finished tied for a teamhigh with nine kills and added three digs. â&#x20AC;&#x153;She just came out without much fear and fired it,â&#x20AC;? said Dillard of

Yun. Stadium then battled toe to toe with the Vikings in the second set, forcing Puyallup into several mistakes and riding the play of outside hitter Tabi Webb, who took over. The senior had three early kills as the Tigers clung to an 11-11 tie midway through the set. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Puyallup, they have such a good front line that they knew we were going to set her and they were already set up,â&#x20AC;? Dillard said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Even in that situation she adjusted, made some lined shots and put the ball where they werenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t and got us some kills anyway.â&#x20AC;? The Vikings closed the set on a 14-8 run, and got off to a 17-7 lead on the way to breezing through the third set. But for Dillard and his Tigers, it was a valuable experience. â&#x20AC;&#x153;What we got to do today was play at a higher level, higher speed,â&#x20AC;? Dillard said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The game was much faster today than weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve been able to practice. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll have a couple matches where weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll be able to play a little slower and get a little better rhythm, and then weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll see how we test out against some of the better teams.â&#x20AC;? Webb finished with nine kills and five digs, while Stout led the Tigersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; defensive effort by tallying 11 digs. By Jeremy Helling

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WFootball

From page A9

Lewis would find Devon Phillips for the two pointer and a 16-0 Rams lead. Phillips, who finished with 103 yards and a touchdown on 17 carries, gave a lot of credit to his teammates on both sides of the ball. “Our bigs were faster off the line of scrimmage the whole game long,” Phillips said. “We pretty much had our way with them all night long.” Leading 23-0 early in the second quarter, the Gators’ Kevin Young brought back the ensuing kickoff 82 yards to trim the lead to 23-7. But just when you think that you’d seen it all, Isaiah Simpson answered for Wilson with a 76-yard return to the house for a 30-7 lead. With Wilson negating the Decatur size all game long, linebacker Jake Ferris was excited about his team mates performance on the night. “I personally stared off a little rusty, but we were sharp as a team on both sides of the ball,” he said. “I hope we can carry this kind of performance all season long and get to the playoffs.” With Wilson’s quickness being a factor and the depth they carry on both sides of the ball, Clegg has a pleasant problem to deal with. “If we can stay healthy all season, this team has a real chance to become really special,” Clegg said. A prime example of that aforementioned quickness is Phillips, who echoes his coaches’ sentiments. “We have the ability to get a lot of things done offensively and if our defense performs like it did tonight, we’ll be in pretty good shape,” he said. “I just love defense,” added Ferris. “We’re really looking forward to the rest of the season.” By Steve Mullen

PHOTO BY DAN BESETT

BREAKING OUTSIDE. Wilson senior running back Devon Phillips (21) finds room to the outside during the Rams’

45-14 season-opening win over Decatur on Aug. 31.

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City Life

Lino Tagliapietra at MOG

B4

TACOMAWEEKLY.com

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 2012

SECTION B, PAGE 1

VOICES UNITED FOR MARRIAGE Seattle Men’s Chorus, Seattle Women’s Chorus give free concert in Tacoma to urge approval of Referendum 74 By Matt Nagle matt@tacomaweekly.com

T

aking their show on the road for a five-city tour of Western Washington this month, the Seattle Men’s Chorus and Seattle Women’s Chorus will perform at Pantages Theatre on Sept. 14 for what promises to be an outstanding evening of song, community and support for marriage equality – and admission is free. The music starts at 8 p.m. Through their free concert series “Voices United for Marriage,” the choruses are getting out among the voting public to urge approval of Referendum 74, which will be on the ballot this coming November. Voting yes will help ensure that marriage equality for same-sex couples remains Washington state law as signed by Gov. Christine Gregoire last February. To help rally area voters to be sure and cast their ballots on this critical issue, the choruses are partnering with Washington United for Marriage for events in Tacoma, Olympia, Bellingham, Seattle and Edmonds to bring attention to the Yes on R-74 campaign. “This is about getting people to vote,” said chorus Executive Director Frank Stilwagner. “Since we’re a mail-in (ballot) state, we feel it’s really important to tell people to fill out their ballots and mail them in. “In talking with the folks at Washington United for Marriage, we felt it was the best use of our time and money to go to areas where voters will most likely support the bill. At this point the goal is to concentrate on the I-5 corridor where we know support is there.” The program will include a 90-minute set of music, stories and speakers devoted to building awareness and engaging audiences to take action and vote. Chorus members will share their personal stories describing what marriage means to them, and the choruses will also serve as facilitators for audience member reflections on the importance of marriage in their own lives. Representatives Jamie Pedersen and Laurie Jinkins and Senator Ed Murray are expected to also attend and encourage audience members to get involved in the campaign to approve R-74. “We want to encourage people to get out and tell their stories and engage family, friends and co-workers. If we can get people out in support (of R-74), the chances of it passing are very good,” said Stilwagner. “These concerts align squarely with the mission of the choruses: to use the power of words and music to recognize the value of gay and straight people and their relationships,” said Pedersen, also a longtime singing member of the Seattle Men’s Chorus. “By sharing the importance of Referendum 74 to our lives, we will help Washington become a place that fully accepts and values its gay and lesbian citizens.” Some of the songs the choruses will perform will include “Somewhere Over the Rainbow,” “Dancing Queen,” “Seal Lullaby,” “Come Live With Me and Be My Love” and “Livin’ la Vida Loca.” To learn more about R-74, visit www.WashingtonUnitedForMarriage.org.

PHOTOS COURTESY OF FLYING HOUSE PRODUCTIONS

UNITED. The Pantages Theatre will be filled with song when the Seattle Men’s Chorus (top) and the Seattle

Women’s Chorus (above) take the stage to encourage voters to help keep equal marriage rights in Washington.

THE THINGS WE LIKE ONE JAZZ LIVE AT MARINE VIEW Jazz Live at Marine View begins its fall season on Sept. 9 with a performance by Scott Cossu. The Olympia resident is an internationally-known pianist, composer and recording artist. One of the initial artists signed to the Windham Hill label, Cossu earned critical acclaim with a style that blends jazz, classical and ethnic music influences. The show begins at 5 p.m. at Marine View Church, located at 8469 Eastside Dr. N.E. For more information call (253) 229-9206 or visit www.marineviewpc.org.

TWO

tion students from Central Washington in a professional theater produc tion. The students perform the roles they wrote. Sept. 15, 2 p.m., at Theatre on the Square – admission is free.

MUSIC WITH MAURICE THE FISH Maurice the Fish recording artists Raymond Hayden, Leah Tussing and Rafael Tranquilino, along with special guests, will play a free concert on Sept. 8 at LeMay – America’s Car Museum’s Coffee CruiseIn, 10 a.m.

THREE REMEMBERING 9/11 The public is invited to gather at the Fallen Firefighters Memorial (3301 Ruston Way) on Sept. 11 to help honor those who died on that terrible day in 2001. Prelude at 9:15 a.m., program at 9:30.

FOUR LAS MEMORIAS Presented by Washington State University, “Las Memorias” is a college readiness program that uses theater, performance and writing to help prepare high school students from Warden, Mabton, and Pateros, Wash. “Las Memorias” uses the real life stories of Latino and other first genera-

FIVE DALE CHIHULY VISITS MOG Tacoma native and world-renowned figure in contemporary studio glass Dale Chihuly will return with his team to the Museum of Glass Hot Shop on Sept. 23 for a special one-day appearance in honor of the museum’s 10th anniversary and the 50th anniversary of the studio glass movement. 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. Tickets are $17 general admission and $5 for MOG members (includes museum admission and a timed

ticket for one demonstration). Timed tickets for the Hot Shop demonstrations will be issued; each session will last approximately 50 minutes. Members will be given first priority to Hot Shop access. Advance tickets are available for purchase at museumofglass.org or at the admission desk.


Section B â&#x20AC;˘ Page 2 â&#x20AC;˘ tacomaweekly.com â&#x20AC;˘ Friday, September 7, 2012

Puyallup TRIBAL IMPACT

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

SUPPORTING THE ECONOMIC GROWTH OF OUR COMMUNITY

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â&#x20AC;&#x153;The City of Tacoma is proud of the great relationship we have with the Tribe. They are very generous in their funding to the city. They give us an opportunity to approach projects together that improve the quality of life for everyone.â&#x20AC;? Tacoma Mayor Marilyn Strickland

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- Puyallup Mayor Kathy Turner

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For more information about the Puyallup Tribe of Indians, visit www.puyallup-tribe.com.

â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Puyallup Tribe stands out in Washington state in using its mitigation dollars and revenue to work on community projects. From Stewart Heights to Freedom Fair, from the fire boat to our roads, the Puyallup Tribe has been exemplary in helping Pierce County and Tacoma.â&#x20AC;? - State Senator Steve Conway â&#x20AC;&#x153;We have had a good partnership with Puyallup Tribe. Staff with our Emergency Management Division meets with their staff monthly to update emergency plans. They provide funding to us to provide resources to them. That helps ensure we are on the same page and allows us to be supportive of them. I am proud of the work the Tribe and county have done collaborating on flood hazard mitigation.â&#x20AC;? - Pierce County Executive Pat McCarthy â&#x20AC;&#x153;It is an honor to represent and work with the Puyallup Tribe to address economic, environmental and public safety issues in our community. I value their partnership, as it is critical to the economic health and cultural vitality of our region.â&#x20AC;?

- U.S. Representative Adam Smith â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Puyallup Tribe has been an indispensable asset not only for its members but for communities throughout the entire region. I want to thank the Puyallup Tribe for its continued commitment to improving the lives of our fellow citizens and growing our economy.â&#x20AC;? - U.S. Representative Norm Dicks


ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

Friday, September 7, 2012 â&#x20AC;˘ tacomaweekly.com â&#x20AC;˘ Section B â&#x20AC;˘ Page 3

KNOW YOUR PUBLIC ART

Fused glass murals at Pierce County Courthouse parking garage By Dave R. Davison dave@tacomaweekly.com

The Tacoma Arts Commission is the main agency via which public art flows into our municipal space. The commission mentors, midwifes and maintains the stock of city-owned art treasures. Our beloved arts commission, however, is not the only game in town. Works of public art also come to us through other entities, agencies and combinations of agencies such as the parks department, neighborhood groups, churches, property owners as well as commissions at the state and county level. The Pierce County Arts Commission, for example, oversees the countyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s One Percent for Art Program that directs publicly funded construction projects with costs exceeding $100,000 to allocate one percent of the project for public art. Thus, when the parking garage devoted to those citizens called to serve on jury duty was constructed as part of the county court building complex, the Pierce County Arts Commission saw to it that artwork was incorporated into the building which now stands at the corner of South 9th and Yakima Streets. For this project, the county commissioned a set of colorful murals done in fused glass tiles that feature various wetland species. The work, entitled â&#x20AC;&#x153;As Above, So Below,â&#x20AC;? is the result of a collaboration between two area artists that specialize in fused glass: Richard La Londe and Michael Dupille. The murals, which are mounted on aluminum backings, were set in place upon the brick walls at the southeast corner of the building in May of 2000. â&#x20AC;&#x153;As Above, So Belowâ&#x20AC;? is a suite of three main murals. The â&#x20AC;&#x153;Heron Muralâ&#x20AC;? is 12 feet tall and features a noble heron with a squiggly green tadpole in its beak. The artists allow us a view below the water as well as above. A fish peeks out from the lower left corner and a frog occupies the lower right. Up above there is a cluster of stylized rain clouds emitting cartoonish drops of rain. A big dragonfly hovers in the middle zone. The clouds above and the heronâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s pointed rump stick out beyond the frame, breaking the rectangular composition. Compositions that spill out of the bounds of the frame are a hallmark of Dupilleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s work in particular. The 3-foot by 6-foot â&#x20AC;&#x153;Frog Muralâ&#x20AC;? gives us an underwater view of the wetland environment. We see the head of a duck jutting down from above as it goes for a sub-aquatic worm on a dark log. A fish, meanwhile, moves upward to catch a bug on the surface of the water. A group of

PHOTOS BY DAVE R. DAVISON

FIN AND FEATHER. A suite of wetland-themed, fused glass murals by Michael Dupille and Richard La Londe enlivens the brick facade of the Pierce County Courthouse parking garage at South 9th and Yakima Streets.

green tadpoles is swimming along and a big, green frog with an enigmatic starburst for an eye occupies a lower corner. The most eye-catching mural is the â&#x20AC;&#x153;Duck Mural.â&#x20AC;? At more than 5-feet high and almost 14-feet long, it depicts iconic mallard ducks in flight above a wetland scene. A big kingfisher stands in profile off to one side. The ducks in flight break free of the bonds of the mural. One of the ducks has flown completely out of the mural and is on its own on the side of the building. A fourth mini-mural echoing the â&#x20AC;&#x153;Duck Muralâ&#x20AC;? is high up on one of the buildingâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s brick surfaces. It is a square with more of the stylized clouds with one duck mostly out of the frame and another totally free. The two artists, La Londe and Dupille, are both accomplished practitioners of the art of fused glass. In the fused glass process, designs are laid out almost like a sand painting using variously colored glass that is crushed into a granular form called â&#x20AC;&#x153;frit.â&#x20AC;? The designs are then heated in a kiln. The resulting fused glass composition has

a number of advantages as public art. It will never fade and it is easy to clean. â&#x20AC;&#x153;As Above, So Belowâ&#x20AC;? should be able to last for centuries to come. Mounted on aluminum backings, the glass art can be removed and relocated if necessary. These works of art might well outlive the building upon which they reside. These murals are not beyond reproach however. The whole wetland theme, for example, is somewhat puzzling since the only â&#x20AC;&#x153;wetlandâ&#x20AC;? within miles of the building is the artificial pond in Wright Park. The colors are so brilliant and crisp that they are almost jarring in their contrast to the brick building and drab colors of the city. Neither is there any harmony in the color scheme. The murals are reminiscent of gaudy birthday cakes seen in glass counters of supermarkets. The rendering of some of the creatures can also be off-putting. The tadpoles and the sub-aquatic log, for example, are mere blobs of color. The dragonfly in the â&#x20AC;&#x153;Heron Muralâ&#x20AC;? and the titular frog in the â&#x20AC;&#x153;Frog Muralâ&#x20AC;? are somewhat awkward.

The stylized rainclouds seem out of character with other more naturalistic elements of the murals. That being said, it is good to have something to entertain the eye in this otherwise imposing quadrant of town. The two artists each have impressive records and do fascinating work. Seattlebased Dupille has been involved in glass work since he was part of the glass blowing program at Central Washington University in the early 1970s. He is one of the innovators in the fused glass field and teaches workshops all over the country. La Londe, who lives on Whidbey Island, began fusing glass in 1981. He has taught at the Pilchuck Glass School. Locally his work can be seen at Pierce County Library in Parkland, at Edgemont Junior High School in Edgewood, at Puyallupâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Good Samaritan Hospital and at SeaTac International Airport. For further information on Dupille visit www.michaeldupille.com. La Londeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s website is www.richardlalonde.com.

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ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

Section B â&#x20AC;˘ Page 4 â&#x20AC;˘ tacomaweekly.com â&#x20AC;˘ Friday, September 7, 2012

Exhibit shows a glass master still going strong By John Larson jlarson@tacomaweekly.com

At age 11, Lino Tagliapietra began perfecting his glassblowing skills through observation, repetition and production. The Italian artist was trained by masters in Murano, a major center for glass blowing in his native land. He became internationally recognized as a glass art master. Now 77, the master is still going strong, as evident from viewing â&#x20AC;&#x153;Maestro: Recent Works by Lino Tagliapietraâ&#x20AC;? at Museum of Glass. Organized by Tagliapietra Studios, the exhibit showcases 65 works made within the past 10 years. The exhibit is spread among five rooms. In the first room is â&#x20AC;&#x153;Masai,â&#x20AC;? a group of glass pieces in the shapes of spears. The title refers to a tribal group in Kenya and Tanzania. Nine are blue, two are light green and one is red. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Masai dâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Oroâ&#x20AC;? is a group of 16 pieces, all in gold-colored glass. The markings on all the spears are meant to express

embedded cultural information. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Gabbiana (Ala)â&#x20AC;? is 10 items suspended from the ceiling. In various solid colors, these pieces are meant to represent bird wings and examine the metaphor of glass as both heavy yet light. In the second room is â&#x20AC;&#x153;Medusa,â&#x20AC;? a clear, round piece. It has three circular designs made of black lines. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Chiocciolaâ&#x20AC;? is similar. It is a clear ball with many more small, circular designs. Demanding attention in the third room is â&#x20AC;&#x153;Fenice,â&#x20AC;? which resembles a snake pointing its tail in the air. It has elongated blue and orange patterns. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Borboletaâ&#x20AC;? takes up much of the space in the fourth room. It consists of 12 objects arranged on the floor. While made just last year, the colors and bright patterns suggest an inspiration from late 1960s fashion. The pieces represent butterflies. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Avventuraâ&#x20AC;? is a display case mounted on a wall with many shelves. They con-

PHOTO BY RUSSELL JOHNSON

TROPICAL SUNBURST. The artist created â&#x20AC;&#x153;Mauiâ&#x20AC;? in 2011.

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tain small objects that look like vases made of bronze. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Endeavorâ&#x20AC;? consists of about 15 items suspended from the ceiling in the fifth room. They represent small boats and are in a variety of colors. The title refers to a famous British racing yacht in the 1930s. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Saturnoâ&#x20AC;? is a circular object mounted on a pole. It contains rings, meant to evoke the planet Saturn. Among the more fascinating pieces in the exhibit is â&#x20AC;&#x153;Niomea.â&#x20AC;? It resembles a vase in a teardrop design. The hues of black, brown and blue seem more like a transparent fabric than glass. Two pieces titled â&#x20AC;&#x153;Piccadillyâ&#x20AC;? are here, one made in 2008, the other in 2011. Both resemble a top that a child would spin. This exhibit shows the evolution of Tagliapietraâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s art to larger works and bolder colors over the years. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Maestroâ&#x20AC;? makes a compelling case to declare him the greatest glass artist in the world.

Tagliapietra will display his skills in the Hot Shop at Museum of Glass from Oct. 10-14. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Maestroâ&#x20AC;? runs through Jan. 6.

TAGLIAPIETRA

FILE PHOTO

PHOTO BY FRANCESCO ALLEGRETTO

GLASS ACT. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Borboleta,â&#x20AC;? created in 2011, is a set of pieces assembled on the floor in one gallery.

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Make a Scene Your Local Guide To South Sound Music

Divine Fits rock the Crocodile

Friday, September 7, 2012 • tacomaweekly.com • Section B • Page 5

Live Music TW PICK OF THE WEEK:

RICH WETZEL’S GROOVIN’ HIGHER ORCHESTRA BRINGS ITS LIVELY BIG-BAND JAZZ SHOW TO STONEGATE ON SEPT. 9. THE ALL-AGES SHOW RUNS FROM 5-8 P.M.

PHOTO BY PAMELA LITTKY

ELECTRIC. The Divine Fits released their debut album Aug. 28, and kick off their first full-scale U.S. tour on Oct. 16. By Kate Burrows kburrows@tacomaweekly.com

Seattle’s epic indie music venue The Crocodile was alive Aug. 30 with the energy from a packed house of fans waiting to see supergroup the Divine Fits rock out. The band consists of Britt Daniel (Spoon), Dan Boeckner (Handsome Furs, Wolf Parade) and Sam Brown (New Bomb Turks). The band has only performed a handful of shows as the Divine Fits, but the star power alone from these rockers means it is only a matter of time (and not much, most likely) before they become household names. It will not take much for a band featuring the frontmen of longstanding band Spoon (Daniel), and edgy rockers Handsome Furs (Boeckner) to take over the airwaves. When the players took the stage in Seattle for only the 10th time as a band, their charisma and talent were more than evident. The band released their debut album “A Thing Called Divine Fits” only two days prior on Aug. 28. Before their official debut, the Divine Fits played their first few shows in Austin, which

were well received by critics and fans alike. With two proven frontmen sharing the mic on the album, each track has a unique sound but the energy is consistent throughout. Daniel is best known as the lead singer of Spoon, a band he co-founded in Austin back in 1993. Since then, he has built a career collaborating with a variety of artists ranging from Bright Eyes and White Rabbits to Interpol. He brings his post-punk, innovative pop sound to the stage and, combined with the edgy vocals and captivating stage presence of Boeckner, the band’s live shows keep the audience on their toes. Boeckner’s Handsome Furs – a duo featuring him and wife Alexei Perry – announced their breakup in May, but his energetic vocals bring a darker, quasi-punk vibe to the Divine Fits. Drummer Sam Brown’s experience in New Bomb Turks rounds out the group as he provides a solid backbone for a stellar album. The 11-track album leads off with “My Love

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is Real,” the band’s first single. With Boeckner on vocals and Daniel on synths and percussion, the song features a hook that will stick with you along with the vivid, quotable lyrics. “If I was the king she’s the knife in the water/ there’s so much to lose/ when my love is real/

until it stops.” “Flaggin’ a Ride” features Daniel’s signature sound made famous by Spoon, employing repetitive beats and smooth-butedgy vocals. “Can’t you see me wavin’ I’m flaggin’ a ride/ ‘cause I’m tryin’ to get to Providence I lost my way/ If I don’t make it there there’ll be hell to pay.” With vocals and songwriting split about 50/50 between Daniel and Boeckner, each track offers something different for the listener, and the stage presence of these tried and true rockers make for an incredible live show. For more information about the Divine Fits or to check out their debut album, visit www. divinefits.com. 9/7: 2:00, 4:05, 6:25, 8:35 9/8-9/9: 11:55 am, 2:00, 4:05, 6:25, 8:35 9/10-9/13: 2:00, 4:05, 6:25, 8:35

“Sleepwalk with Me” 90 min., NR

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9/7: 2:10, 4:20, 6:40, 8:50 9/8-9/9: 11:45 am, 2:10, 4:20, 6:40, 8:50 9/10-9/13: 2:10, 4:20, 6:40, 8:50

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“Farewell, My Queen” 100 min., R

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MAXWELL’S: Lance Buller Trio (Jazz) 7 p.m., NC NATIVE QUEST: Open mic night, 5 p.m., NC NEW FRONTIER: Crazy Monk, Graves 33, Man Danno, Josh Rizeberg, Que Vive, Xero Ours, 9 p.m. O’MALLEY’S: Marching Minds, Digital Chemistry, Bone Cave Ballet, Sources in Code, 9 p.m., NC PARADISE BOWL: Just Dirt (Rock covers) 9 p.m., NC STONEGATE: Jerry Miller (Classic rock jam) 9 p.m., NC SWISS: Kry (Rock covers) 9 p.m. UNCLE SAM’S: Off Trak, Fringe Shift, Stript, 8 p.m. UNCLE THURM’S: Linda Myers (Jazz vocalist) 7 p.m. VARSITY GRILL: Rock-Bot live band karaoke, 8 p.m., NC

MONDAY, SEPT. 10 STONEGATE: Rafael Tranquilino Band (Classic rock/blues) 9 p.m., NC

JAZZBONES: Rockaraoke, 9 p.m. OPAL: Tim Hall Band (Blues jam) 8 p.m. RED TUNA: Afrodasia (Jazz) 6:30 p.m., AA STONEGATE: Acoustic couch jam, 8:30 p.m. SWISS: Too Slim (Blues) 7 p.m. UNCLE SAM’S: Billy Pease & Friends (Blues) 8 p.m.

TUESDAY, SEPT. 11 STONEGATE: Leanne Trevalyan (Acoustic open mic) 8 p.m., NC

SATURDAY, SEPT. 8 SWISS: Kry (Rock covers) 9 p.m.

BACKSTAGE: Erotic City (Prince tribute) 9 p.m. C.I. SHENANIGAN’S: Collaborative Works Jazz (Jazz) 8 p.m. EMERALD QUEEN: Idol Eyez (Top 40) 9 p.m., NC GREAT AMERICAN CASINO: Rhythm Nation (Top 40) 9 p.m., NC JAZZBONES: Mighty High, 8:30 p.m. $6-8 NEW FRONTIER: Not From Brooklyn, Sad Little Men, 9 p.m. O’MALLEY’S: Fun Police, North Slope, Mr. Blackwatch, the Plastards, Eddie Gillan’s Red Roosters STONEGATE: Ghost 211 (Top 40) 9 p.m. STONEGATE: Pat Loucas (Hard rock) 9 p.m. SPAR: Dave Roberts Band, 8 p.m. UNCLE SAM’S: Michael Pahamus Band, Smokin’ J’s, 8 p.m. VARSITY GRILL: Rock-Bot live band karaoke, 8 p.m., NC

SUNDAY, SEPT. 9 DAWSONS: Tim Hall Band (Blues jam) 8 p.m., NC O’MALLEY’S: Synrgy (Reggae) 9 p.m.

“Intouchables” 112 min., R

9/7-9/13: 1:15, 6:00, 8:25

“Celeste and Jesse Forever” 92 min., R 9/7-9/9: 6:50, 9:00 9/10-9/13: 9:00

“Beasts of the Southern Wild” 93 min., PG-13

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C.I. SHENANIGAN’S: Collaborative Works Jazz (Jazz) 8 p.m.

9/7-9/13: 3:40

9/7: 2:25, 4:35 9/8-9/9: 12:05, 2:25, 4:35 9/10: 2:25, 4:35 9/11: 4:35 9/12-9/13: 2:25, 4:35

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EMERALD QUEEN: Idol Eyez (Top 40) 9 p.m., NC

SPAR: Billy T. Blues Band, 7 p.m., NC STONEGATE: Rich Wetzel’s Groovin’ Higher Orchestra (Jazz) 5 p.m. STONEGATE: Stonegaters (Classic rock jam), 8 p.m., NC

GREAT AMERICAN CASINO: Rhythm Nation (Top 40) 9 p.m., NC

“Robot and Frank” 89 min., PG-13

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FRIDAY, SEPT. 7

ANTIQUE SANDWICH SHOP: Open mic, 6:30 p.m., $3 DAWSONS: Jho Blenis, Shelly Ely (Blues jam) 8 p.m. LOUIE G’S PIZZA: Acoustic open mic, 6 p.m. NEW FRONTIER: Settlers of Kaletron 7 p.m., NC RED TUNA: Afrodasia (Jazz) 6:30 p.m., AA

WEDNESDAY, SEPT. 12 SWISS: Kareem Kandi (Jazz open mic) 8 p.m.

DAVE’S OF MILTON: Jerry Miller (Blues jam) 8 p.m. DAWSONS: Crazy Texas Gypsies (Jam session) 8 p.m. JAZZBONES: Dubtonic Kru, Rise ‘n Shine, 8 p.m., $5-8 RED TUNA: Afrodasia (Jazz) 6:30 p.m., AA STONEGATE: Tatoosh (Classic rock) 8:30 p.m., NC

THURSDAY, SEPT. 13

UNCLE SAM’S: Jerry Miller (Blues) 7 p.m. DAWSON’S: Billy Shew Band (Jam session) 8 p.m., NC JAZZBONES: Kry (Rock covers) 9 p.m., NC NEW FRONTIER: Headless Lizzy & Her Ice Box Pussy, 8 p.m. PARADISE BOWL: (Rock jam) 9 p.m. ROCK THE DOCK: Dustin Lafferty (Acoustic open mic) 8 p.m., NC STONEGATE: Billy Roy Danger & the Rectifiers, 8 p.m.

Tacoma Weekly’s Music Calendar is always available online at www.TacomaWeekly.com GUIDE: NC = No cover, AA = All ages, 18+ = 18 and older

“Ballplayer: Pelotero” 77 min., NR

Do you have a live show or music event coming up?

9/11 only: 2:20, 6:45

“Heist: Who Stole the American dream?” 90 min., NR 9/12-9/13: 7:00

Email makeascene@tacomaweekly.com for a free listing in the Live Music calendar!

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Section B • Page 6 • tacomaweekly.com • Friday, September 7, 2012

SAT., SEPT. 8 GLBT BOOK CLUB

Join the GLBT Book Club reading both fiction and nonfiction! The book club is open to everyone. September’s selection is “Landing,” by Emma Donoghue. Books are available for purchase at King’s Books. The club meets the second Saturday of every month at Tully’s on Broadway at 2 p.m. Info: www.kingsbookstore.com. ETC –

COMING EVENTS

Promote your community event, class, meeting, concert, art exhibit or theater production by e-mailing calendar@tacomaweekly.com or calling (253) 759-5773.

TW PICK: KIRKLAND CONCOURS D’ELEGANCE

FOR THE FIRST TIME, THE KIRKLAND CONCOURS D’ELEGANCE WILL TAKE PLACE AT ITS NEW HOME, LEMAY – AMERICA’S CAR MUSEUM. IT HAPPENS SEPT. 9, 9 A.M. TO 4 P.M., WITH AN AWARDS CEREMONY AT 3 P.M. IN ATTENDANCE WILL BE DAVID MADEIRA, PRESIDENT AND CEO OF THE MUSEUM; EDWARD HERRMANN, ACTOR (OF TV’S “GILMORE GIRLS” AND FILMS “THE LOST BOYS” AND “THE AVIATOR”) AND CONCOURS EMCEE; KEN GROSS, GUEST CURATOR FOR THE MUSEUM, JOURNALIST AND HONORARY JUDGE; JUNIOR JUDGES: 12 MIDDLE SCHOOL STUDENTS WILL JUDGE THE CARS AND PRESENT A TROPHY TO ONE SELECT VEHICLE; AND CLASSIC CAR OWNERS FROM AROUND THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST AND BEYOND. VINTAGE VEHICLES INCLUDING AMERICAN POST-WAR AUTOMOBILES, BRITISH AUTOMOBILES AND MOTORCYCLES, “CARS OF NICOLA BULGARI,” LAMBORGHINI, UNLIMITED HYDROPLANE RACING BOATS, PREVIOUS KIRKLAND CONCOURS “BEST IN SHOW” WINNERS, CLASSIC CAR CLUB OF AMERICA VEHICLES AND MORE WILL BE THERE AS WELL. TICKET PRICES (INCLUDES ADMISSION TO MUSEUM) ARE ADULTS $30; MILITARY/STUDENTS/SENIORS (65+) $25; YOUTH (AGE 5-12) $15; AGE 4 AND UNDER FREE. PROCEEDS BENEFIT SEATTLE CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL.

poetry e-zine Quill & Parchment. Sharmagne spends time between her home in the Hollywood Hills and her fly fishing lodge on the Stillaguamish River in Arlington, Wash. Following her presentation will be an open mic for all poets. Sign-up is at 6:45 p.m., and admission is free. The event occurs monthly the second Friday of every month at 7 p.m. at King’s Books, located at 218 St. Helens Ave. Info: www.kingsbookstore.com.

SAT., SEPT. 15 CLASS INC. OPEN HOUSE – Class Inc. (Communication Language and Speech Services) is holding an open house at its new Tacoma location, at 535 Dock St., Suite 104, from 10 a.m. to noon. Class, Inc. is a welcoming, upbeat clinic with a nationally recognized track record of success in treating speech, language, learning, motor and social communication delays and disorders for kids, teens and adults. Each room at the clinic will be based around a theme and have fun and engaging activities. The organization will have an augmentative and alternative communication room that will include many communication devices one can try, information from the various vendors and technology toys. Guests will enjoy a water play and bubble room, a pretend play room that will contain many different toys and a sensory room allowing individuals to experience different sensations through touch. There will also be a quiet room for those who need a break from all the excitement. All staff members will be present to answer questions. Info: www.classinc. com. HAPPENINGS

POOCH POOL PARTY

Dog owners can treat their furry friends to a swim in Stewart Heights Pool from 10 am to 1:30 p.m. Fourlegged friends will have the opportunity to paddle around with other dogs, lunge through the Lazy River and splash in the sprayground. In addition to swimming there will be contests for dogs and an agility course. The first session is from 10-11:30 a.m. and the second is from noon to 1:30 p.m. Cost is $10 for first dog, $5 for second. Humans are free. Approximately 125-150 dogs will be allowed during each session. The pool is located at 402 E. 56th St. Remember to bring pet food donations for Dugan Foundation.

for inability to pay. For more information or to register, email tamsugah@aol.com.

BALLPARK PARTY

COMEDY HYPNOSIS SHOW

ETC –

The club meets the second Monday of every month at 1022 South, Hilltop’s bookthemed cocktail lounge. Note: must be 21 to enter 1022 South.

an overall fantastic networking opportunity. The Emerald Queen Casino is located at 2024 E. 29th St. in Tacoma.

3-ON-3 TOURNEY

‘SIMPLY FLORA’

WED., SEPT. 12 CLASSICS BOOK CLUB STAR Center is hosting its first three-onthree basketball tournament at Henry Schatz Boys and Girls Club at 9 a.m. All ages are welcome to join and will be divided up to make things fair. Registration ends Sept. 13. Info: (253) 404-3939. HAPPENINGS –

– Delicious Infield Nosh Extravaganza will take place at Cheney Stadium at 5 p.m. This will be an evening of music, beer and food for those 21 and over, featuring some of your favorite food trucks, terrific local artists and local craft beers. Trucks on the infield dirt, stage at home plate and you living it up on the infield. Tickets include admission and parking. For ticket information visit www.tacomarainiers.com HAPPENINGS

SUN., SEPT. 9 PENS ON FIRE

Tammy Robacker, 2010-11 Tacoma poet laureate, will lead a series of four poetry-writing workshops where participants will learn about and practice a variety of poetic forms and elements. The workshops will take place at write@253, a non-profit community writing center located at 1310 MLK, Jr. Way. The workshop takes place from 2-4 p.m. on four consecutive Sundays starting Sept. 9. Cost is $20 per session or $70 for all four. Scholarships are available for those with financial need. No one will be turned away HAPPENINGS

Jim Kellner has entertained audiences for more than 15 years and has helped countless individuals lose weight, quit smoking and change their lives for good using the power of their own minds with the power of hypnosis. Fascinated with hypnosis since his teens, he once tried to hypnotize his little sister with a library book. Unfortunately his room remained uncleaned. Will you be the star of the show? Your friend? Your family member? And most importantly... will Kellner’s room ever get cleaned? Doors open at 7 p.m. at the Tacoma Comedy Club, and the show starts at 8 p.m. Tacoma Comedy Club is located at 933 Market St. Info: www.tacomacomedyclub.com. HAPPENINGS –

This flower show takes place from 1-4 p.m. at St. Mark’s Lutheran Church, located at 6730 N. 17 St. It is open to the public and has a complimentary tea. It is sponsored by The Tacoma Garden Club, which was founded in 1925. At 2 p.m. there is a demonstration and lecture by Sybil Hunter on divine flower arranging. There is also an exhibition table of arrangements by Ikebana International. Entries by Tacoma Garden Club members, Capital District and Hill and Dale District of Washington State Federated Garden Clubs. HAPPENINGS –

ETC – The

Classics Book Club has been meeting in Tacoma since 1994. Members read a variety of classic works, from the ancient to modern. September’s discussion is on “The Voyage of the Beagle” by Charles Darwin. Books are available at King’s Books. The club meets the second Wednesday of every month at 7 p.m. at King’s Books, located at 218 St. Helens Ave. Info: www.kingsbookstore.com.

THURS., SEPT. 13 IGNITE-U HOOPLA

MON., SEPT. 10

FRI., SEPT. 14 DISTINGUISHED WRITER SERIES

GRAPHIC NOVEL BOOK CLUB

– Ignite-U’s business expo and networking event, Hoopla, is taking place at the Emerald Queen Casino from 3-9:30 p.m. The event will feature live music performed by Folsom Prism, more than $5,000 in appetizers, thousands of dollars in prizes to be given away, more than 100 vendors and HAPPENINGS

Join this book club perfect for people just starting to read graphic novels or confirmed geeks. September’s book is “Like a Sniper Lining Up His Shot” by Jacques Tardi and Jean-Patrick Manchette. Books are available for purchase at King’s Books. ETC –

ETC – This

monthly event features a distinguished writer followed by an open mic. This month features Sharmagne Leland-St. John, a Native American poet, concert performer, lyricist, artist and filmmaker. She is a four-time Pushcart Prize nominee. She is the editor-in-chief of the

NONFICTION WRITERS GROUP

Join this nonfiction writers group coordinated by the Pacific Northwest chapter of the National Writers Union, UAW Local 1981. Both members and non-members are welcome to attend. Writers are invited to bring two pages of double-spaced copy to read, or you can listen and be part of the critique process. Nonfiction writers of history, politics, economics, biography or family history are especially encouraged to attend, but all are welcome. The event takes place at 11 a.m. at King’s Books, located at 218 St. Helens Ave. Info: www.kingsbookstore.com. ETC –

TUES., SEPT. 18 BANNED BOOK CLUB ETC – Join this edgy book club reading books that have been banned or challenged. September’s selection is “Montana 1948” by Larry


Friday, September 7, 2012 • tacomaweekly.com • Section B • Page 7 Watson, with books available for purchase at King’s Books. Come join the discussion! The group meets the third Tuesday of every month at Tempest Lounge at 7 p.m. Note: must be 21 to enter Tempest unless accompanied by an adult. The Tempest is located at 913 Martin Luther King, Jr. Way. Info: www.kingsbookstore. com.

WED., SEPT. 19

1-3 p.m. and again on Sept. 26 from 7-9 p.m. at WayPoint Church, located at 12719 134th Ave KP N. in Gig Harbor. The group will also hold a Fife meeting on Sept. 20 from 1-3 p.m. at Ardena Gale Mobile Park, located at 4821 70th Ave. E. Volunteers are always in need of yarn, knitting needles, crochet hooks and button donations. For more information, e-mail lovingheartsonkp@aol.com.

HEALING HANDS

FALL FREE FOR ALL

Glass. The exhibit showcases works made by Chihuly in his early career, from 1968 through the 1980s. The artwork displayed includes 30 transitional pieces from prominent local collections and the museum’s permanent collection, along with historic exhibit posters from the Mary Hale Cockran Library. Collectively, the works chronicle Chihuly’s influence as an artist, a visionary and a pioneer of the American studio glass movement. Info: www.museumofglass.org.

the exhibition, comprise one of the most complete visual records of the Great Depression. The exhibit runs through Nov. 4. Info: www.washingtonhistory.org.

THURS., SEPT. 20 MEET AND GREET

Join Parents and Friends for Tacoma Public Schools, a group dedicated to strengthening our public education system, in meeting Dr. Joshua Garcia, Tacoma School District’s new deputy superintendent. Dr. Garcia began his new assignment July 1 and is looking forward to learning about the school issues that matter most to the Tacoma community. Also on the agenda is a discussion of Initiative 1240, which seeks to establish charter schools in Washington. The event takes place at 6:30 p.m. at King’s Books, located at 218 St. Helens Ave. Info: www.kingsbookstore.com. HAPPENINGS –

FRI., SEPT. 21 A SPORTING CHANCE

Cheney Stadium is hosting an evening of good old-fashioned detecting at a murder mystery dinner theater. Enjoy an upscale ballpark dinner while sleuthing with friends and family during an interactive show that will keep you guessing. Doors open at 6 p.m. A $40 ticket includes parking, dinner and the show. HAPPENINGS –

The Fall Free for All is a community arts festival that offers more than 75 music, dance, drama, film and children’s events and activities Saturday and Sunday, and all for free. Come enjoy the theaters, support regional artists, dine out and shop in Tacoma’s vibrant Theater District. Note: No events will be held during dinner hours so visitors can enjoy the great restaurants in downtown Tacoma. Fall Free for All takes place at a variety of Broadway Center venues, from noon to 11 p.m. on Sept. 22, and 1 p.m. to 9 p.m. on Sept. 23. The event is free, but requires a wristband. Register for yours at www.broadwaycenter.org, and visitors can pick them up the weekend of the event. HAPPENINGS –

RETAIL THERAPY HAPPENINGS – Grab a group of girlfriends and get on board the party bus for a Tacoma day trip and shopping spree. Your $75 ticket includes continental breakfast, a boxed lunch and a wonderful “swag bag” with sweet deals and surprises. Proceeds will benefit the Broadway Center’s accessibility programs, particularly Fall Free For All. The event takes place Sept. 22 from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Info: www. broadwaycenter.org. WATT’S VISION

“Marie Watt: Lodge” is a mid-career retrospective of this Portland artist at Tacoma Art Museum. The title of the exhibition refers to space of welcome; at its center is a hearth, a place where stories are shared. It is on display through Oct. 7. ART –

NORTHWEST ART ART – “Best of the Northwest: Selected Paintings from the Collection” is on display at Tacoma Art Museum. The works on view are some of the best from its collection of paintings by Northwest artists. It runs until March.

Every Monday through Wednesday, Asia Pacific Cultural Center hosts hot hula fitness classes from 7-8 p.m. Inspired by the dances of the Pacific islands, hot hula fitness incorporates easy to perform dance moves set to the sounds of traditional Polynesian drum beats fused with funky reggae music, resulting in a modern, hip fitness workout. Hot hula fitness is a fun, new and exciting dance workout that isolates your larger muscle groups, quads and arms, providing a total body workout in 60 minutes. All ages and fitness levels will enjoy hot hula fitness. Admission: $6 (discount with APCC membership). APCC is located at 4851 South Tacoma Way.

THE VALLEY CHORALE

The Valley Chorale, a soprano-alto-tenor-bass singing group, meets every Tuesday at 7 p.m. at Aylen Junior High School, located at 101 15th St. S.W. in Puyallup. If you like singing, contact Joy Heidal at (253) 848-1134 or Dixie Byrne at (253) 6775291 for more information and a personal invitation to join the group.

ETC –

MEMORY LOSS SUPPORT

Ted Brown Music Tacoma hosts a free, all-ages drum circle every Thursday from 6:30-8 p.m. You do not need to have a drum to participate. For more info contact Ted Brown Music at (253) 272-3211 or visit www.tedbrownmusic.com. MUSIC –

Venetian artists Laura de Santillana and Alessandro Diaz de Santillana have joined forces to create “Scapes,” a dynamic and entirely new body of work at Museum of Glass. The exhibition comprises four rooms based on the Hindu belief that the universe is divided into separate spheres of existence: Earth, Space, Sun, and Moon and Constellations. The de Santillanas have interpreted elements of the Hindu cosmology in glass, creating spaces in which forms and colors correspond to physical phenomena, or the visible universe, and evoke an atmosphere of cosmic vibration. Each installation is composed of a limited, but strikingly vibrant, color palette. The exhibit runs until January. ART –

‘HOPE IN HARD TIMES’

SUPPORT GROUP

Suffering from fibromyalgia or chronic fatigue? Attend this support group, which meets the second and fourth Wednesdays of each month from 4:15-5:15 p.m. at the Tacoma Area Coalition for Individuals with Disabilities building, located at 6315 S. 19th St. The group’s mission is to improve the morale of people coping with these challenges. Its activities include face-to-face encouragement, networking, sharing of resources as well as individual discoveries. ETC –

Caring for someone with memory loss? Alzheimer’s Association caregiver support groups provide a consistent and caring place for people to learn, share and gain emotional support from others who are also on a unique journey of providing care to a person with dementia. A free information and support group for care partners, family members and friends of individuals with dementia will be held the second Monday of each month from 6:30-8:30 p.m. at St. Andrew’s Episcopal Church, 7410 S. 12th St. Contact group facilitator Chuck Benefiel at (253) 584-3267. ETC –

UKULELE CIRCLE

CHARITY BOOT CAMP Washington State History Museum’s “Hope in Hard Times” exhibit showcases the 1929 Wall Street collapse as it plunged Americans into a period of great uncertainty as unemployment skyrocketed, banks failed and housing foreclosures hit record highs. President Herbert Hoover put it succinctly: “About the time we think we can make ends meet, somebody moves the ends.” “Hope in Hard Times” shares how ordinary people worked for change in their communities, pulling together to find ways to deal with the crisis. A billy club used during the 1934 “Battle of Smith Cove,” Works Progress Administration artifacts and everyday items are among some of the objects showcased in this exhibition. The paintings and sketches of Ronald Debs Ginther, also featured in ART –

KNITTERS, CROCHETERS UNITE! This First Lutheran Church free concert series is in its fourth season, with performances taking place every Wednesday at noon. The church will open its doors to people who want to eat their lunch in the sanctuary and listen to live music, ranging from classical to jazz. First Lutheran Church is located at 524 S. ‘I’ St. Info: www.firstlutherantacoma.com. ETC –

Loving Hearts is a charitable knitting and crocheting group comprised of volunteers. The group makes hats for chemo patients, baby items, blankets, wheelchair/ walker bags, fingerless gloves for veterans and also runs a backpack program for children. Loving Hearts meets in Gig Harbor on Sept. 11 from

DRUM CIRCLE

‘SCAPES’

LISTEN LIVE AT LUNCH

BULLETIN BOARD

ETC –

Museum of Glass is showcasing items created by a glass art master over the past 10 years in “Maestro: Recent Works by Lino Tagliapietra.” The Italian artist has invented numerous techniques and designs that are technically flawless and visually breathtaking, yet filled with complexity and difficulty. He is recognized around the world as the maestro of contemporary glass. The exhibition shows his evolution to larger works, bolder colors and patterns over his nearly 50 years as an artist. It runs through Jan. 6, 2013. ART –

Organizing For America is a grassroots movement with the goal of re-electing President Barack Obama in 2012. It is an organization of volunteers hoping to educate, recruit and build a strong network all across the United States. The group welcomes all interested parties to attend their monthly meetings on the second Wednesday of each month at Native Quest, located at 2354 Jefferson Ave. in Tacoma. ETC –

ETC –

Join Massage Envy as they combine forces with the Arthritis Foundation to host Healing Hands for Arthritis, a one-day national event to build awareness and raise funds to fight arthritis. On Sept. 19, all 22 Puget Sound-area Massage Envy clinics and spas will donate $10 from every one-hour massage or facial to the Arthritis Foundation. Reservations are now being accepted on a firstcome, first-serve basis. All money donated during Healing Hands for Arthritis will support the Arthritis Foundation’s nationwide efforts to prevent, control and cure arthritis. Info: www.massageenvy.com.

ORGANIZING FOR AMERICA

HOT HULA FITNESS

GLASS ART MASTER

HAPPENINGS –

national Museums on Us program. Info: museums.bankofamerica.com.

‘ORIGINS’ ART – “Origins: Early Works by Dale Chihuly” runs through Oct. 21 at the Museum of

Ted Brown Music Tacoma hosts a free, all-ages ukulele circle every Wednesday from 6:30-8 p.m. For more info contact Ted Brown Music at (253) 272-3211 or visit www.tedbrownmusic.com. MUSIC –

Jeff Jowers, owner and founder of Tacoma’s Ultimate Fitness Boot Camps, is hosting charity fitness boot camps every Saturday benefiting Mary Bridge Tree House. People who sign up for Ultimate Fitness Boot Camp can now donate pieces of clothing, which earns them a spot in a fast-paced, interval-style class free of charge. Info: www. tacomabootcamps.com. ETC –

FREE FIRST WEEKENDS ETC – Bank of America bankcard holders and employees receive free admission to the Tacoma Art Museum the first weekend of every month as part of Bank of America’s

To submit calendar items to Tacoma Weekly, please include the name, address and phone number (website optional) of the venue and a description of no more than 60 words. Send your calendar entry to calendar@ tacomaweekly.com. To ensure your listing is published, send it in 10 days prior to publication date.


Section B â&#x20AC;˘ Page 8 â&#x20AC;˘ tacomaweekly.com â&#x20AC;˘ Friday, September 7, 2012

Oktoberfest Northwest set to raise a stein at eighth annual event By Steve Dunkelberger stevedunkel@tacomaweekly.com

Oktoberfest is more than just drinking beer, eating pretzels and pondering creative ways to invade Poland. All things German will be on display at the eighth annual Oktoberfest Northwest, presented by Emerald Queen Casino, set to take over the Puyallup Fair and Events Center Oct. 5-7. Oktoberfest Northwest is known throughout the region for providing authentic German entertainment, and the 2012 event will feature another outstanding line-up of performers crooning everything from Edelweiss to polka versions of popular rock songs. Alongside the beer garden, musical acts, dancing in feathered hats and leather shorts will be the Hammerschlagen Tournament of Champions, where participants compete to hammer a nail into a board as fast as possible; and the crowd-pleasing Weiner Dog Races that pits these short-legged tubes of fury against the clock. A Stein Dash 5K run will have participants run with a souvenir stein that will just happen to get filled in the beer garden at the end of the race if runners or walkers are so inclined. Headlining the event this year is Man-

uela Hornâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Ultimate Oktoberfest Party. Horn has been entertaining audiences around the world for 10 years. She is best known for her performances in Seattleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Teatro Zinzanni variety show, the rockopera movie â&#x20AC;&#x153;Rentâ&#x20AC;? and the TV show â&#x20AC;&#x153;Americaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Got Talent.â&#x20AC;? Known in yodeling circles as â&#x20AC;&#x153;the Austrian Amazon,â&#x20AC;? the 6-foot, 2-inch woman is a dancing, acting, and joke telling force of nature best known for her yodeling dominatrix and host of about a dozen other characters she has crafted. Also returning this year are the Allgauer AlpinCats, direct from Germany and featuring a fun, lively, traditional Oktoberfest performance. Oktoberfest Northwest is a collaborative effort between Festivals Inc. (producers of the Bite of Seattle) and the Western Washington Fair Association. Discount admission coupons are available at participating south King County and Pierce County Safeway stores. Oktoberfest Northwest is an all-ages event until 7 p.m. each evening (and all day Sunday!). After 7 p.m., guests must be 21 years of age or older. Admission is free before 3 p.m. on Friday and $10 for Friday night or all day Saturday. Tickets are half price on Sunday. Children 12 and under are free. For general festival information, go to www.oktoberfestnw.com.

Oktoberfest Northwest, presented by Emerald Queen Casino, set to take over the Puyallup Fair and Events Center Oct. 5-7

PHOTO COURTESY OF CHRISTOPHER NELSON PHOTOGRAPHY

SALUT! Alongside the beer garden, Oktoberfest 2012 will feature music, dancing, weiner dog races and a 5K stein dash.

Forecast prompts extension of sprayground hours Due to forecasts for â&#x20AC;˘ Jefferson Park, continued sunshine, Metro 801 N. Mason St. Parks has extended daily â&#x20AC;˘ McKinley Playfield, operations at six popular 4321 McKinley Ave. spraygrounds. Typically, the â&#x20AC;˘ Norpoint Park, popular attractions operate 4818 Nassau Ave. N.E. weekends only during the â&#x20AC;˘ South Park, months of September and 4851 South Tacoma Way May. â&#x20AC;˘ Wapato Hills Park, â&#x20AC;&#x153;The spraygrounds have 6321 S. Wapato St. been packed this month, so â&#x20AC;˘ Wright Park, weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re happy to be able to 501 S. â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; St. extend this summer experience a bit longer for the comPOOCH POOL PARTY munity,â&#x20AC;? said Park SuperDogs and their owners intendent Marina Becker. have been waiting all year for â&#x20AC;&#x153;And, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a great place for the end of summerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s annual kids to burn off some of that Pooch Pool Party at Stewart extra energy as they transiHeights Pool (402 E. 56th tion from vacation, back to St.). Frolicking fun await the classroom.â&#x20AC;? manâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s best friend as pooches The spraygrounds will be paddle with other dogs. Pups open daily from 10 a.m. until can lunge through the Lazy park closing (1/2 hour after River, make a splash in the sunset), through Sept. 9, at poolâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s beach-like entry and the following locations: participate in AM contests or run IntegraVM_uReachJun2009_print.pdf 6/19/2009 8:06:53 an agility course.

â&#x20AC;&#x153;The pool party provides dog owners and their pets a unique experience after the pool closes for the season. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s great to be able to put this park asset to a different use before itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s drained and cleaned for the winter,â&#x20AC;? remarked Jim Biles, senior recreation aquatics supervisor.

Session 1 runs from 1011:30 a.m. Session 2 runs from 12-1:30 p.m. The price is $10 for the first dog, $5 for the second. Humans are free. Tickets are available at the door (no advance ticket sales). Approximately 125-150 dogs will be allowed during each session. Please bring

well-socialized dogs only to this event. Maximum pool depth: four feet, three inches. People are not allowed in the pool during the party, but will be able to watch from the deck. Stewart Heights Pool closed for the summer on Sept. 3. Pool chemicals are turned off prior to the

Pool Party to minimize any irritation. Scoop bags will be provided. Dogs must be on leashes when they are out of the pool. You can help a pet in need. Donations of pet food will be collected at the Pool Party to benefit the Dugan Foundation. Learn more at www.duganfoundation.org.

     

       



   



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PHOTO COURTESY OF METRO PARKS

ENDLESS SUMMER. Spraygrounds at six area parks will remain open through this weekend so young ones can enjoy these final days of summer.

Saturday September 15th 7 pm Elvis Presley Enterprises Worldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Ultimate

The Washington Center for the Performing Arts 512 Washington St., Olympia WA )RUWLFNHWVFDOO%R[2IĂ°FH 360-753-8586 or online at olytix.org Tickets $28.00 general, $38.00 preferred See Justin online at www.jamieslegends.com

Justin Shandor

Remarkable physical resemblance, the voice, and all the moves. -Las Vegas Review-Journal

Elvis!

No Other Elvis tribute artist ever looked, sounded or moved like this!


Friday, September 7, 2012 â&#x20AC;˘ tacomaweekly.com â&#x20AC;˘ Section B â&#x20AC;˘ Page 9

&ODVVLĂ&#x20AC;HGV REAL ESTATE MANAGEMENT

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Zoned R4. For Sale by Owner. Power, Water & Sewer are at the Lot. Lot is in Fife-Milton School Dist. We are asking $75,000 (253) 951-6329

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Timeless,Classic Beauty APPROVED SHORTSALE 6925 Hillgrove Lane SW $335,000 Timeless, classic beauty w/ upgrades galore, sits on estate like lawn w/ lovely landscaping. W/ 4 bedrooms & 3.5 baths, this gorgeous home beckons you ZFKDUP HDV\Ă RRU plan. Pick your master bedroom- one on the PDLQĂ RRURUWDNH the one upstairs- the choice is yours. Huge 2 car garage w/ additional shop areavery appealing to some; spacious living room, dining room & sweet kitchen appeal to all. Newer windows, heat pump & A/C. Rumored to have once been owned by the Rockefellers... MLS# 224641 Shannon Agent Extraordinaire 253-691-1800 or shannonsells @hotmail.com Better Properties North Proctor

Gated 55+Sheffield Pl. 3BD 2BA Rambler. NO STEPS! A/C. 2 car Garage. JLS#73248 Lorraine Dill JLS 253.831.2944 Completely Remodeled Double Wide In Milton in Desirable Gated Adult Park. New Kitchen and Bathroom, 2 Bedroom, 2 Bathroom. New Heat Pump, A/C, Covered Deck, Garage, Fenced Yard. $109,000 Call Larry 253-835-0642 price or 253-221-6049 reduced

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Affordable 2 BR apartment home in the heart of the 6th Ave District. Walk to UPS, dining and entertainment. Full sized Washer/Dryer. Small property with on site Manager. Call for details: 253-274-8270 253-472-RENT livehere@dmcimail.com

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Barber Shop, 3 Stations. $300 per Station or $800 for Room. Busy Corner, 64th & Portland, Tacoma. Call (253) 948-2214. D Woods.

Lakewood Food & Beverage Businesses 4 Sale with Owner Contract VERY SUCCESSFUL/PROFITABLE SPORTS BAR Business is For Sale for $390,000 Terms are avail. TACOMA LANDMARK TAVERN With Liquor, $225,000. (Bus. & R.E.), Terms Available. LARGE ASIAN RESTAURANT With Cocktails. Price $129,000 POPULAR BAR AND GRILL featuring the largest outdoor, class H amphitheater events in the state. Business is for sale for $180,000. Terms are avail. DOWNTOWN TACOMA COFFEE SHOP CAFE 1,200 SF with excellent lease, $46,000, terms available. RURAL LIVING: ASHFORD, WA- Restr./Lounge, $125,000 with $50K Down, Real E. Avail: 3.4 eCommercial Acres for pric d laundromat. Future Devel., 3 BR Remodeled Home, educe

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Classic Victorian w/the comfort of modern updates. Hardi plank siding, newer roof, plumbing & electrical. Beautiful hardwoods WKURXJKRXWPDLQĂ RRU Great size living room w/original built-ins Ă RZVLQWRVSDFLRXV dining room off of kitchen. 3 bdrms & gorgeous full bath on QGĂ RRU)LQLVKHG family room on 3rd Ă RRUPDNHVVSDFH for everyone! Roomy EXWPDLQWDLQDEOHĂ DW backyard is perfect for outdoor entertaining. Call Today Monica Scott 253-861-0449

Classic Brick home in amazing condition with 3 bedrooms and 1.75 baths. Living rm. with newer pellet stove to keep you warm in the winter months! Retro kitchen w/newer appliances and eating nook, separate dining rm. and beautiful hardwoods! 2 main Ă RRUEHGURRPVDQG a full bath. Basement has 1 bedroom and 3/4 bath with space IRUĂ&#x20AC;QLVKLQJDQ additional rec/family room! Private, fully fenced back yard with mature landscaping and a sprinkler system! Really great house... Come see! MLS# 391728 Call Pam Lindgren 253 691-0461 for more info or for a private showing! Better Properties N. Proctor

FURNITURE Black Iron Canopy Bed w/Orthopedic Mattress Set. New, Still LQ%R[6DFULĂ&#x20AC;FH (253) 539-1600

5 Piece Pub Set Table & 4 Chairs New in Box List $1,000 Sell $350 253-537-3056

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Section B â&#x20AC;˘ Page 10 â&#x20AC;˘ tacomaweekly.com â&#x20AC;˘ Friday, September 7, 2012

NOTICES

NOTICES

IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE OF WASHINGTON IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF PIERCE

PHH MORTGAGE CORP. F/K/A CENDANT MORTGAGE CORP., Plaintiff(s), Vs. Case: NO. 12-2-08332-6 SHERIFFâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S PUBLIC NOTICE OF SALE OF REAL PROPERTY TRICIA J. ROBINS, an individual; GORDON J. ROBINS, an individual, Defendant(s) TO: GORDON J. ROBINS, Judgment Debtor(s). The Superior Court of Pierce County has directed the undersigned Sheriff of Pierce County to sell the property described below to satisfy a judgment in the above-entitled action. If developed, the property address is 2218 205TH AVENUE, LAKEBAY, WA 98349. The sale of the above-described property is to take place: Time: 10:00 A.M. Date: Friday, October 12, 2012 Place: 930 Tacoma Avenue South, Tacoma, WA 98402 2nd Floor Entry Plaza The judgment debtor can avoid the sale by paying the judgment amount of $159,195.68 together with interest, cost, and fees, before the sale date. For the exact amount, contact the Sheriff at the address stated below: Date at Tacoma, Washington, August 20, 2012. PAUL A. PASTOR, JR., SHERIFF OF PIERCE COUNTY. By: Christine A. Eaves, Deputy Civil Section, 930 Tacoma Avenue South, Room, 1B-203, Tacoma, Washington, 98402 (253) 798-7520 See legal description below or reverse: LEGAL DECRIPTION PARCEL NO: 2100050330 LOT 33 OF JOEMMA BEACH, ACCORDING TO PLAT RECORDED MAY 8, 1996 UNDER AUDITORâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S NUMBER 960508357, IN PIERCE COUNTY, WASHINGTON.

IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE OF WASHINGTON IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF PIERCE ORDER OF SALE CASE NO. 12-2-08332-6 PHH MORTGAGE CORP. F/ K/A CENDANT MORTGAGE CORP., Plaintiff(s), Vs. TRICIA J. ROBINS, an individual; GORDON J. ROBINS, an Individual, et al., Defendant(s). TO: GORDON J. ROBINS, Judgment Debtor: An ORDER OF SALE has been issued in the above captioned case, directed to the Sheriff of Pierce County, commanding the sheriff as follows: THE STATE IF WASHINGTON TO: SHERIFF OF PIERCE COUNTY In the above-entitled court, on August 2, 2012, plaintiff recovered a Judgment and Decree of Foreclosure against Gordon J. Robins in the total sum of $159,195.68 itemized as follows: Judgment Creditor: PHH Mortgage Corp. Creditorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Attorney: William O. Kessler, BERESFORD BOOTH PLLC Judgment Debtor: Gordon J. Robins, an individual

SUBJECT TO THE FOLLOWING:

Underlying Judgment Amount: $112,562.22 Pre-Judgment Interest and Penalties: $35,577.77 ($19.14 per diem) (through July 30, 2012) Late Charges & Escrow Advances: $6,172.54 Attorneysâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Fees and cost $4,883.15 Post-Judgment Interest 12.00%

A NON-EXCLUSIVE EASEMENT FOR INGRESS AND EGRESS AS DELINEATED ON JOEMMA BEACH, ACCORDING TO PLAT RECORDED MAY 8, 1996 UNDER AUDITORâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S NUMBER 960508357, IN PIERCE COUNTY, WASHINGTON.

2. The judgment is entered in Execution Docket of the Superior Court for Pierce County as Judgment Number 12-2-08332-6.

RESERVATION OF MINERAL RIGHTS, AND THE TERMS AND PROVISIONS THEREOF, BY INSTRUMENTS RECORED UNDER AUDITORâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S NUMBERS 259657, 380143 AND 8806300535.

3. The judgment is a foreclosure against all of the defendants herein of a Deed of Trust on the real property commonly known as 2218 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 205th Avenue, in Lakebay, Washington, 98349, and legally described as follows: LOT 33 OF JOEMMA BEACH, ACCORDING TO PLAT RECORDED MAY 8, 1996 UNDER AUDITORâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S NUMBER 960508357, IN PIERCE COUNTY, WASHINGTON. ALSO TOGETHER WITH A NON-EXCLUSIVE EASEMENT FOR INGRESS AND EGRESS CREATED BY INSTRUMENT RECORDED UNDER AUDITORâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S NUMBER 9102110351, IN PIERCE COUNTY, WASHINGTON. SUBJECT TO THE FOLLOWING: A NON-EXCLUSIVE EASEMENT FOR INGRESS AND EGRESS AS DELINEATED ON JOEMMA BEACH, ACCORDING TO PLAT RECORDED MAY 8, 1996 UNDER AUDITORâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S NUMBER 960508357, IN PIERCE COUNTY, WASHINGTON. RESERVATION OF MINERAL RIGHTS, AND THE TERMS AND

ALSO TOGETHER WITH A NON-EXCLUSIVE EASEMENT FOR INGRESS AND EGRESS CREATED BY INSTRUMENT RECORDED UNDER AUDITORâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S NUMBER 9102110351, IN PIERCE COUNTY, WASHINGTON.

EASEMENT MAINTENANCE AGREEMENT AND PROTECTIVE COVENANTS RECORDED UNDER AUDITORâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S NUMBER 9102110351. EASEMENT FOR INGRESS AND EGRESS BY INSTRUMENT RECORDED UNDER AUDITORâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S NUMBER 9604190184, WHICH IS A RERECORDED OF INSTRUMENT RECORDED UNDER AUDITORâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S NUMBER 9507120558. RESTRICTIONS, CONDITIONS, DEDICATIONS, NOTES, EASEMENTS AND PROVISIONS CONTAINED AND/OR DELINEATED ON THE FACE OF THE PLAT RECORDED UNDER SUDITORâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S NUMBER 9605080357. COVENTANTS, CONDITIONS, RESTRICTIONS AND/OR EASEMENTS BY INSTRUMENT RECORDED UNDER AUDITORâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S NUMBER 96050990223. PROVISIONS OF ARTICLES OF INCORPORATION AND BY-LAWS OF THE JOEMMA BEACH HOMEOWNERSâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; ASSOCIATION, WHICH INCLUDES RIGHT TO TAX AND ASSESS LAND OWNERS WITHIN THE PLAT OF JOEMMA BEACH. BERESFORD*BOOTH, PLLC WILLIAM O. KESSLER, ATTY. 145 THIRD AV S., STE 200 EDMONDS, WA 98020 (425) 776-4100

SUPERIOR COURT OF WASHINGTON FOR PIERCE COUNTY In re the Adoption of: Ashley Paul Franiszek Kulik, A minor child No. 12-5-00826-1 SUMMONS AND NOTICE OF HEARING RE: TERMINATION OF PARENT-CHILD RELATIONSHIPS TO: ADRIAN FLOYD AND TO: Any and all persons claiming a parental interest in the above-named child A Petition for Step Parent Adoption, which includes a request for termination of the parent-child relationship between you and the child has been filed in the above-entitled court. The Petitioner is asking the court for an order permanently terminating the parent-child relationship between you and the child, permanently terminating all of your rights to the child, and for a Decree of Adoption declaring the Petitioner to be a legal parent of the child. The child was born on September 3, 1996, in Guildford, County of Surrey, England. The name of the childâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s mother is Juliana Marie Paice (neĂŠ Kulik). In order to defend against this Petition, you must respond to the Petition by stating your defense in writing and by serving a copy upon Joyce S. Schwensen (the attorney for the Petitioner) at the address below within thirty days after date this Summons is served upon you, or an order permanently terminating your parent-child relationship with the child by default will be entered. A default order is one where the Petitioner is entitled to what he asks for because you have not responded. If you serve a notice of appearance on Joyce S. Schwensen (the attorney for the Petitioner) at the address below, you are entitled to notice before a default order may be entered. One method of serving a copy of your response on the Petitioner is to send it by certified mail with return receipt requested. If service

is made by mail, the service shall be deemed complete upon the third day following the day upon which the response is placed in the mail, unless the third day falls on a Saturday, Sunday or legal holiday, in which event service shall be deemed complete on the first day other than a Saturday, Sunday or legal holiday, following the third day. You have a right to be represented by an attorney. If you are indigent and request an attorney, an attorney will be appointed for you. You have a right to file a claim of paternity under chapter 26.26 of the Revised Code of Washington. Your failure to file a claim of paternity under chapter 26.26 of the Revised Code of Washington or to respond to the Petition for Step Parent Adoption which has been filed herein within thirty days of the date this Summons is served upon you is grounds to terminate your parent-child relationship with respect to the child. If the child is an Indian child as defined by the Indian Child Welfare Act of 1978, 25 U.S.C. 1901 et sec., and if you acknowledge paternity of the child or if your paternity is established prior to the termination of the parent-child relationship, your parental rights may not be terminated unless you give valid consent to termination, or your parent-child relationship is terminated involuntarily pursuant to chapter 26.33 of 13.34 RCW.

NOTICES

PROVISIONS THEREOF, BY INSTRUMENTS RECORED UNDER AUDITORâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S NUMBERS 259657, 380143 AND 8806300535. EASEMENT MAINTENANCE AGREEMENT AND PROTECTIVE COVENANTS RECORDED UNDER AUDITORâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S NUMBER 9102110351. EASEMENT FOR INGRESS AND EGRESS BY INSTRUMENT RECORDED UNDER AUDITORâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S NUMBER 9604190184, WHICH IS A RE-RECORDED OF INSTRUMENT RECORDED UNDER AUDITORâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S NUMBER 9507120558. RESTRICTIONS, CONDITIONS, DEDICATIONS, NOTES, EASEMENTS AND PROVISIONS CONTAINED AND/OR DELINEATED ON THE FACE OF THE PLAT RECORDED UNDER SUDITORâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S NUMBER 9605080357. COVENTANTS, CONDITIONS, RESTRICTIONS AND/OR EASEMENTS BY INSTRUMENT RECORDED UNDER AUDITORâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S NUMBER 96050990223. PROVISIONS OF ARTICLES OF INCORPORATION AND BY-LAWS OF THE JOEMMA BEACH HOMEOWNERSâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; ASSOCIATION, WHICH INCLUDES RIGHT TO TAX AND ASSESS LAND OWNERS WITHIN THE PLAT OF JOEMMA BEACH. PARCEL ID NO. 2100050330 4. On August 2, 2012 the Court ordered that all of the above-described property be sold and the proceeds applied to the payment of the judgment and interest, attorneysâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; fees and costs, and increased costs and interest, THEREFORE, in the name of the State of Washington, you are hereby commanded to proceed to seize and sell forthwith, and without appraisement, the abovedescribed property, in the manner provided by law, or so much thereof as may be necessary to satisfy the judgment, interest and costs, and setting the redemption period for 8 months. HEREIN FAIL NOT, but make return within 60 days, showing you have executed the same. WITNESS the Honorable Bryan E. Chushcoff Presiding Judge of the Superior Court, and seal thereof This 16th day of August, 2012 BY: Deputy Tawnya Martin This sale date has been set for October 12, 2012. YOU MAY HAVE A RIGHT TO EXEMPT PROPERTY from the sale under statutes of this state, including sections 6.13.010, 6.13.030, 6.13.040, 6.15.010, and 6.15.060 of the Revised Code of Washington, in the manner described in those statutes. BERESFORD*BOOTH, PLLC WILLIAM O. KESSLER, ATTY. 145 THIRD AV S., STE 200 EDMONDS, WA 98020 (425) 776-4100

TO: Ferol Diaz-Bradley

TO: Brittney Nicole Rowland

In the Welfare of: D., J. DOB: 11/26/1995 Case Number: PUY-CW-11/11-049

In the Welfare of: C., M. DOB: 03/31/2009 Case Number: PUY-CW-08/11-042

YOU are hereby summoned to appear for a Review Hearing in the Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Court of the Puyallup Tribe of Indians on the Puyallup Indian Reservation, which is located at 1638 East 29th Street Tacoma, Washington 98404.

YOU are hereby summoned to appear for a Review Hearing in the Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Court of the Puyallup Tribe of Indians on the Puyallup Indian Reservation, which is located at 1638 East 29th Street Tacoma, Washington 98404.

You are summoned to appear for a Review Hearing on September 19, 2012 at 1:30 p.m.

You are summoned to appear for a Show Cause Hearing on Thursday, October 4, 2012 at 9:30 a.m.

If you have any questions, please contact the court clerks at (253) 680-5585. NOTICE, PURSUANT TO TRIBAL CODE SECTION 7.04.720, THE COURT MAY FIND THE PARENT, GUARDIAN OR CUSTODIAN IN DEFAULT FOR FAILURE TO RESPOND OR APPEAR AT A COURT HEARING. THIS MAY RESULT IN YOUR CHILD(REN) BEING PLACED IN ANOTHER HOME AND THE PARENT ORDERED TO CORRECT CERTAIN PROBLEMS.

Dated this 4th day of September, 2012 at Tacoma, Washington. Joyce S. Schwensen Attorney for Petitioner WSBA Number: 14520

If you have any questions, please contact the court clerks at (253) 680-5585. NOTICE, PURSUANT TO TRIBAL CODE SECTION 7.04.720, THE COURT MAY FIND THE PARENT, GUARDIAN OR CUSTODIAN IN DEFAULT FOR FAILURE TO RESPOND OR APPEAR AT A COURT HEARING. THIS MAY RESULT IN YOUR CHILD(REN) BEING PLACED IN ANOTHER HOME AND THE PARENT ORDERED TO CORRECT CERTAIN PROBLEMS.

TO: Brittney Nicole Rowland

TO: Crystal Mae Thomas

In the Welfare of: C., B. DOB: 11/18/2007 Case Number: PUY-CW-08/11-041

In the Welfare of: T.-B. III, G. D. DOB: 12/03/2009 Case Number: PUY-G-02/12-008

YOU are hereby summoned to appear for a Review Hearing in the Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Court of the Puyallup Tribe of Indians on the Puyallup Indian Reservation, which is located at 1638 East 29th Street Tacoma, Washington 98404. You are summoned to appear for a Show Cause Hearing on Thursday, October 4, 2012 at 9:30 a.m. If you have any questions, please contact the court clerks at (253) 680-5585. NOTICE, PURSUANT TO TRIBAL CODE SECTION 7.04.720, THE COURT MAY FIND THE PARENT, GUARDIAN OR CUSTODIAN IN DEFAULT FOR FAILURE TO RESPOND OR APPEAR AT A COURT HEARING. THIS MAY RESULT IN YOUR CHILD(REN) BEING PLACED IN ANOTHER HOME AND THE PARENT ORDERED TO CORRECT CERTAIN PROBLEMS. TO: Tisha N. Moore In the Matter of: Tisha N. Moore vs Lucas Cooley Case Number: PUY-CS-02/12-022 YOU are hereby summoned to appear for an Initial Hearing in the Tribal Court of the Puyallup Tribe of Indians on the Puyallup Indian Reservation, which is located at 1638 East 29th Street Tacoma, Washington 98404. You are summoned to appear for an Initial Hearing on the 3rd day of October, 2012 at 9:30 a.m. If you have any questions, please contact the court clerks at (253) 680-5585. FAILURE TO APPEAR, PLEAD OR OTHERWISE DEFEND MAY RESULT IN A DEFAULT JUDGEMENT. TO: Javier Gonzalez Rosas In the Welfare of: G., J. DOB: 09/21/2006 Case Number: PUY- TPR-11/11-011 YOU are hereby summoned to appear for an Adjudication Hearing in the Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Court of the Puyallup Tribe of Indians on the Puyallup Indian Reservation, which is located at 1638 East 29th Street Tacoma, Washington 98404. You are summoned to appear for an Adjudication Hearing on October 15, 2012 at 9:00 a.m. If you have any questions, please contact the court clerks at (253) 680-5585. FAILURE TO APPEAR, PLEAD OR OTHERWISE DEFEND MAY RESULT IN A DEFAULT JUDGMENT.

Metro Animal Services Pets of the Week 1200 39th Ave SE, Puyallup, WA 98374 253-299-PETS www.metroanimalservices.org Farah is a lovely girl with cute little mittens, she will just melt your heart! She is waiting for her Forever Family to come bring her home!

YOU are hereby summoned to appear for an Initial Hearing in the Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Court of the Puyallup Tribe of Indians on the Puyallup Indian Reservation, which is located at 1638 East 29th Street Tacoma, Washington 98404. You are summoned to appear for an Initial Hearing on October 1, 2012 at 9:00 a.m. If you have any questions, please contact the court clerks at (253) 680-5585. FAILURE TO APPEAR, PLEAD OR OTHERWISE DEFEND MAY RESULT IN A DEFAULT JUDGMENT. TO: Gary Dean Boyd Jr. In the Welfare of: T.-B. III, G. D. DOB: 12/03/2009 Case Number: PUY-G-02/12-008 YOU are hereby summoned to appear for an Initial Hearing in the Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Court of the Puyallup Tribe of Indians on the Puyallup Indian Reservation, which is located at 1638 East 29th Street Tacoma, Washington 98404. You are summoned to appear for an Initial Hearing on October 1, 2012 at 9:00 a.m. If you have any questions, please contact the court clerks at (253) 680-5585. FAILURE TO APPEAR, PLEAD OR OTHERWISE DEFEND MAY RESULT IN A DEFAULT JUDGMENT.

VOLUNTEERS Help a Child Improve Reading One-on-one support makes a huge difference in an elementary studentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ability to overcome reading challenges. As a Read2Me Tutor, you can be that person who makes a difference. The Read2Me program at Tacoma Community House is looking for committed volunteer tutors for grades 1-3. Starting in October, we will have sessions at Roosevelt and McCarver Elementary Schools. Call Karen Thomas at (253) 3833951 or email kthomas@ tacomacommunityhouse.org for more information.

Literacy Tutor

PETS LOST CAT White w Gray Tabby Shorthairwith orange forehead spot. Lost around Dale Lane East, Valley Ave, Holms Rd and 62nd Ave REWARD when FOUND!!! Please call 206.617.2986

Calla Lily is a beautiful girl who loves to play and needs an active Forever Family who enjoys being on the go with their pet! She would do great in a household that will give her the time and attention she needs. Currently available animals are featured on our website www.MetroAnimalServices.org

Pet of the Week Tiny Bird Rescue Sandy 253-770-8552

The court hearing on the termination of your parental rights shall be on Friday, October 19, 2012, at 9:00 a.m. in the Pierce County Juvenile Court, 5501 6th Avenue, Tacoma, WA 98406. YOUR FAILURE TO APPEAR AT THIS HEARING MAY RESULT IN A DEFAULT ORDER PERMANENTLY TERMINATING ALL OF YOUR RIGHTS TO THE ABOVE-NAMED CHILD.

NOTICES

Tacoma Community House is looking for volunteers to help adults improve their reading, writing, and basic math skills. Training is provided. If you are interested in becoming a volunteer tutor, please contact Karen Thomas at (253) 383-3951 or at kthomas@ tacomacommunityhouse.org.

We need a Spanish speaking volunteer Tuesday & Thursdayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 10:3011:30 AM. Volunteer to help translate for our Latino senior population. Call Portland Ave Community Center 253-5915391 Ask for Bonnie. Leave a message if she isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t in she will call you back.

Volunteer needed to teach beginning basic computers skills for seniors. One day a week for 1 hour class Tuesday or 7KXUVGD\Ă H[LEOHIRUFODVV any time between 10-2 pm. Class will start in midSeptember. Volunteers will need to pass background check. Please call Portland Ave Community Center@ 253-591-5391. Ask for Bonnie or leave a message and she will call you back.

Volunteer needed to get seniors up and walking. We need an avid walker that will get seniors walking for a healthier lifestyle. Tuesday or Thursday 1011. Volunteers will need to pass background check. Please call Portland Ave Community Center @ 253591-5391. Ask for Bonnie or leave a message and she will call you back. Join us in changing lives! Changing Rein Equine Assisted Activities and 7KHUDSLHV D QRQSURĂ&#x20AC;W offers equine assisted services to differently-abled individuals. Currently the program offers several volunteer opportunities. Our primary need at present is for program volunteers who work with our horses and support our riders in therapeutic and adaptive lessons. Other volunteer opportunities include: grounds maintenance and administrative/clerical work. Must be at least 14 years old to participate. Horse H[SHULHQFH KHOSIXO EXW not necessary. Training provided. For more information contact: Jacki Berreth at 253-961-7277 or volunteer@changingrein. org. The Tacoma Maritime Institute meets every 4th Monday at the Midland Community Center 1614 99th Street East Tacoma WA Potluck at 6:00, all are welcome. Meeting Starts at 7:00 CONVERSATION PARTNERS NEEDED Help adults learn to speak English! Mornings, no H[SHULHQFH RU IRUHLJQ language skills needed. South Tacoma. Contact Lee Sledd, Madison Family Literacy, 253-571-1887.

REC. VEHICLE

Need safe farms or barns

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Simonâ&#x20AC;? Our Featured Pet this week is Simon, a beautiful, friendly grey and white Domestic Shorthair, about four years old. When he came to the shelter, he was a hungry, exhausted stray with an infected wound. After medical treatment, good food, and lots of lovinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;, he is now a sweet, affectionate and very handsome cat looking to make someoneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s life a little brighter. Come meet Simon and let him convince you that heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the cat for you! Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s in the lobby, and his number is 466287. Best of all, you can name your own price for this gorgeous boy!

Visit us at 2608 Center Street in Tacoma www. thehumanesociety.org

for indoor/outdoor semi-feral cats. 7KH\ DUH Ă&#x20AC;[HG vaccinated and de-wormed. Ages 9 mo. & up. Leave message at (253) 298-0913

Cummins Diesel 360hp, Allison 6speed Trans, 9,100 miles. 4slides, auto Awnings w/wind sensor. Couch fold into Queen air bed, 2 euro recliners, 42in. Flat screen T.V. King size bed, 21in. T.V, in bedroom. 2A/C, stereo surround system. 8Kw Generator. Non-Smoker, super clean, $135,000, call 253-651-5056


GET U GLY : September 7, 2012 • tacomaweekly.com • Section B • Page 11 Friday, LIST F REE W CODE ITH T mAx1 HIS C 79 GE ODE m T U Ax179 G LY : LI WITH GET U ST FR THIS GLY : EE WI CODE LIST F TH TH m A REE W x179 IS CO UGLY ITH T GET U DE m : LIST HIS C Ax179 GLY : FREE ODE m LIST WITH GET U FREE mAx1 Ax179 GLY : L THIS W 79 GE CODE I I GET U S T T H FREE THIS T UGL m GLY : A W x CODE Y : LIS 179 G I LIST F T H THIS THIS ET UG mAx1 T R F R E C CODE E WIT LY : LI 79 GE ODE m ST FR H THI mAx1 T A U x G 1 79 GE LY : LI S COD EE WI 79 GE T UGL ST FR FREE TH TH T UGL E mAx WITH EE W Y : LIS IS CO 179 G ITH T T FRE THIS DE m ET UG HIS C E WIT Ax179 CODE L Y : L ODE m GET U IST FR H THI mAx1 GET U S COD GLY : EE WI 79 GE GLY : L LIST F E mAx TH TH T UGL IST FR REE W I Y 1 S 7 E : 9 C E L IST F ODE m GET U CODE WITH ITH T REE W GLY : L mAx1 TH Ax179 HIS C ITH T IST FR 79 GE ODE m GET U HIS C T E G U A E L G x W Y 1 LY : LI WITH ODE m 79 GE ITH T : LIST S HIS C T UGL FRE T FRE THIS Ax179 ODE m E WIT Y : LIS CODE GET U H THI T FRE Ax179 mAx1 GLY : UGLY S E 7 G C W L 9 E O I S I T G DE m TH TH : LIST T FRE ET UG UGLY Ax179 FREE E WIT IS CO LY : LI WITH GET U DE m H THI ST FR mAx1 Ax179 GLY : L THIS S E E C O W DE m 79 GE CODE IST FR ITH T GET U Ax T UGL HIS C mAx1 EE WI GLY : Y : LIS ODE m 79 GE LIST F TH TH THIS T FRE T R I A S U E x G E C 1 CODE E WIT LY : LI WITH 79 GE ODE m ST FR H THI mAx1 T UGL THI Ax179 S COD EE WI 79 GE Y : LIS GET U FREE TH TH T UGL E mAx T FRE GLY : L WITH Y : LIS IS CO E 1 7 W I 9 S I T G T FRE TH TH THIS DE m FREE ET UG E WIT Ax179 CODE IS CO LY : LI GET U H THI ST FR mAx1 DE m GET U S COD GLY : A EE WI 79 GE G x L 1 Y 7 : LIST 9 GET E mAx TH TH LIST T UGL FREE FREE IS CO Y : LIS 179 G WITH WITH DE m ET UG WITH T FRE THIS A THIS L E x Y T 1 W : H 7 L IS CO 9 GET ITH T CODE IST FR CODE HIS C UGLY DE m EE WI mAx1 mAx1 ODE m : LIST Ax179 TH TH 79 G 79 G FREE Ax179 IS CO GET U ET U ET UG WITH DE m GET U GLY : GLY : LY : L Ax179 GLY : LIST LIST LIST IST F GET U LIST F FREE FREE FREE REE W G R L W Y W E WITH E WIT : LIST ITH T ITH T ITH T H THI HIS C THIS HIS C HIS C CODE S COD CODE ODE ODE ODE mAx1 m E m m m m A A A x A A x179 179 G x179 x179 79 G x179 GET ET UG GET U ET UG GET U UGLY UGLY GLY : LY : L LY : L GLY : : LIST : LIST I I L S S L I S T I T S T FREE T FRE FREE FREE FREE FREE E WI WITH WITH WITH WITH THIS TH T THIS THIS THIS THIS CODE HIS C C C C O O O C DE m DE m mAx1 ODE DE m ODE Ax179 mAx1 Ax179 79 G Ax179 ET UG 79 G GET U GET U GET U ET UG LY : L G G G L Y L L Y : LIWATERFRONTLY : YWATERFRONT HOMESISFOR HOMES : LISTFOR SALE : LIST T FRSALE ST FR FREE EE W FREE EE W WITH TH TPlace 4717 Alameda Ave W,IUniv. WITH ITH HIS C THIS For Sale: WATERFRONT THIS North THIS CODE Fabulous ODE C O m D mAxBeach University E mA Ax179 Salmon Community 1 79 GE x179 Place School GET U 4424 6TH AVE, SUITE 1, T UG District, 5 GLon Narrows, LY : L35-feet GET Y : Tacoma bdrm, 3 ba LIST IST F TACOMA WA 98406 F home. Deck R overwaterEEfrontage leasehold REE W WITH & Yard backs ITH $429,000 THIS & property. Deck, davit to nothing CODE but trees…granite, stainless appl, brazillian cherry parking lot rights. $40,000. mAx1 floors, upgrades galore. Exquisite and barely lived in. 79 No disappointment here!

&ODVVLÀHGV

CALL 253.922.5317

GET UGLY ADVERTISE RENT OR SALE FOR

FREE

LOOK FOR HOMES

(253) 752-1025 Residential • Condo • Vacant Land Foreclosure • Multi-Family

Stephanie Lynch • 253.203.8985 www.stephanielynch.com John L. Scott • Tacoma North

EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY

THIS OFFICE IS INDEPENDENTLY OWNED AND OPERATED.

Contact Salmon Beach North: Sheri@253-879-1201

FEATURED HOME 901 R St NW, Auburn | $339,950 | Something for everyone and plenty of room for it all! With 5 beds, 3 baths plus bonus room, formal living, formal dining, open kitchen with large island, gas cook top, stainless hood, slab granite and tons of storage. WLWKLW·VWRSRI the neighborhood location you have privacy on the large back patio and view of the Valley GRZQEHORZ2ZQHUVKDYHWDNHQJUHDWFDUHRIWKHKRPHVSDULQJQRH[SHQVHZLWKÀUVWFODVV upgrades throughout. Huge Master suite with upstairs laundry room...come see today!

CONDOS & HOMES TACOMA

LAKEWOOD

3228 S UNION AVE #312

8416 PHILLIPS RD SW #47

$575 1 BED, 1 BATH 450 SF. AMAZING 1 BED UNIT HAS ALL UTILITIES IN RENT W/S/G, ELECTRICITY AND CABLE.

4513 87th Ave W, U.P. $229,000

Great location and floor plan of this 4 bdrm, 2.75 bath home! Enjoy 2 FP and all appliances. Sprinkler system in this low maintenance yard. Close to amenities & UP schools!

253-752-1025

NEW ON MARKET

438 Kingsway Wm Bremerton

11812 161st St E, Puyallup

110 207th St E, Spanaway

Remodeled 3 bdrm, 2.75 bath waterfront home! Enjoy views from the deck or fishing, swimming, water skiing and boating in Lake Tahuyeh! A must see!

Updated 3 bdrm, 2 bath home w/ FP, vaulted ceilings, granite counter tops. Enjoy the covered deck and private, fenced, beautifully landscaped yard with pond and fire pit!

253-752-1025 NEW ON MARKET

3 bdrm, 2 bath home located in quiet community. Open floor plan and large kitchen. Enjoy the large deck and huge backyard! You have to see this house!

NEW ON MARKET

$179,900

$179,000

253-752-1025

$199,950

253-752-1025 CURRENT LISTING

4829 S. 7th St, Tacoma $174,900 Extremely clean 3 bdrm, 1.75 bath home with country kitchen, fireplace and large carport! 253-752-1025 CURRENT LISTING

15208 84th Ave Ct NW, Gig Harbor

$195,000 Wonderful rambler on over half acre. Hot tub, in-ground pool. Don’t miss this one! 253-752-1025 CURRENT LISTING

$750 2 BED 1 BATH 800 SQFT 2 BED CONDO HAS GRANITE COUNTERTOPS, SS APPLIANCES, HARDWOODS AND PETS OK

LAKEWOOD

PUYALLUP

10123 88TH AVE CT SW

12214 134TH ST E

$2095

$1995

5 BED, 3 BATH 3394 SF. MASSIVE 5 BED RAMBLER HAS A DAYLIGHT BASEMENT, HUGE KITCHEN, HARDWOODS AND MUCH MORE.

4 BED, 2.5 BATH 2824 SF. IMMACULATE 4 BED HOME HAS LARGE FAMILY ROOM, OPEN KITCHEN, AND PETS WELCOME.

LAKEWOOD

GIG HARBOR

5607 BOSTON AVE SW B-5

1707 31ST ST CT NW #D

$445

$1225

1 BED, 1 BATH 500 SF. PERFECT 1 BED APARTMENT INCLUDES ALL APPLIANCES, EAT IN KITCHEN AND W/S/G IN RENT.

2 BED, 2.5 BATH 1525 SF. FANTASTIC 2 BED CONDO HAS ALL APPLIANCES, OFFICE, FAMILY ROOM, BALCONY, AND 2 CAR GARAGE.

Park52.com · 253-473-5200 View pictures, discounts & more properties online.

Professional Management Services

Doug Arbogast 13201 Lala Cove Lane SE, Olalla

10021 Hipkins Rd SW, Lakewood

5410 S. Junett St, Tacoma

20109 Des Moines Memorial Dr, Des Moines

4317 Nassau Ave NE, Tacoma

Beautiful upgrades in this 3 bdrm, 2 bath home – new custom kitchen cabinets, new countertops, new flooring & totally remodeled bathrooms! 2 car gar and RV parking!

Clean and beautifully maintained 2 bdrm, 2 bath home on nicely landscaped lot. Updated kitchen w/ SS appl & granite counters; Carport and storage shed. Excellent access to shopping, medical facilities and JBLM.

Nice 3 bdrm Craftsman in Historic Old Tacoma! This charming home is close to shopping, freeway and bus line. Entertain in the large backyard and patio!

Charming, updated 3 bdrm, 1.5 bath rambler. Bonus room, FP, vaulted ceilings, hrdwd floors. Covered deck and nicely landscaped yard.

Beautiful home with view of Mt. Rainier!

253-752-1025 CURRENT LISTING

CURRENT LISTING

253-752-1025 PRICE REDUCED

253-752-1025 PRICE REDUCED

$189,500

$163,900

$175,000

253-752-1025

$189,950

$499,950

OPEN HOUSE Sat., Sept 8th from 11 am – 2 pm

178th Place E, Bonney Lake

A Summit Homes community of brand new rambler and 2-story homes! Close to shopping and entertainment with easy access to 410! Come find your new home!

OPEN HOUSE Sat., Sept. 8 & Sun., Sept 9 from 11 am - 5 pm

VIEW ALL LISTINGS AT johnlscott.com/tacomanorthoffice Home Buyers Class – Saturday, Sept. 15th from 10 am – 3 pm. Limited Space Available! Contact Curtis Gibson at (253) 691-2521

www.REISinvest.com www.REIS4rentbyowner.com

REAL ESTATE I N V E S T M E N T

SERVICES

Property Management Receiverships Condo/Home Owners Association Management Bank REO Acquisitions Commercial Sales/Leasing

REIS

For Sale

For Rent

S&S Retail Center & Business Park $1,199,900 14113-14125 Pacific Ave Building SqFt: 22,578 253-752-9742

Discovery Place 6409 6th Ave,Tacoma $2,499,000 28,989 sq ft Mall. Majority Leased 253-752-9742

Chamber Bay Condo $1100 4501 Grand Vie Dr W #107 2br 2 bath 253-752-9742

University Place Stratford Heights Apt with garage. 1, 2 or 3 bd Call 253-565-0343

www.REISinvest.com

www.REISinvest.com

6th Ave Commercial Space

Broadway Center 206 Broadway Ave E,Seattle $1,450,000 Small Center 199,881 NOI On Land lease 253 228 0444

Olalla Farm House

$640,000 4417 6th Ave, Tacoma 253-752-9742

www.REISinvest.com

$1395 14637 Starr Rd SE 3br 3 bath 253-752-9742

www.REISinvest.com

Tacoma (253) 752-9742 Kent

u

www.REISinvest.com

Downtown Tacoma Office 3000 to 16,200 Sq Ft. With Parking 253-752-9742

www.REISinvest.com

6th Ave Office/Retail Space 4412 6th Ave Suite 5 600 sq ft 253-752-9742

www.REISinvest.com

www.REISinvest.com

Steilacoom Lake Front Unit

Lakewood Office Gross Leases. 1290 to 1550 Sq Ft. Good Parking. Prestigious Gravelly Lake Dr. 253-752-9742

Office/Retail Space 3868 Center St 816 sq ft 253-752-9742

www.REISinvest.com

www.REISinvest.com

$1295 9723 Lk Steil. Dr SW #A 2br 1 bath AVAIL. 8/5/12 253-752-9742

www.REISinvest.com

Gig Harbor (253) 514-6539

(253) 981-4098

u

For Lease

u

DuPont (253) 207-5871

Seattle South Lake Union (206) 319-5981

Foreclosure & Investment Specialist

(253) 307-4055 Dougarbogast.com douga@johnlscott.com

Over 20 Years Real Estate Experience

4424 6th Ave Suite 1 Tacoma, WA 98406

Now is the time to invest in Real Estate for your future! Low interest rates + affordable prices = great investment opportunities. Call me today… I am happy to help you with your Real Estate needs. (253) 307-4055 Whether you are a first time home buyer, a distressed homeowner or a veteran investor, I have the tools and systems in place to help you achieve your real estate goals.

For qualifications contact Jenn: Jennifer Pacheco Mortgage Loan Officer

253-926-4131 www.umpquabank.com/jpacheco jenniferpacheco@umpquabank.com


Section B • Page 12 • tacomaweekly.com • Friday, September 7, 2012

Thorogood and CageSport MMA XXI Anthony Hamilton George the Destroyers

September 22, 8:30pm

September 28, 8:30pm

September 29, 7pm

I-5 Showroom, $45, $65, $95, $100

I-5 Showroom, $35, $55, $70, $75

I-5 Showroom, $35, $55, $100

Carlos Mencia

The Commodores

Tim Allen

October 6, 8:30pm

October 13, 8:30pm

October 20, 8:30pm

I-5 Showroom, $30, $55, $80, $85

I-5 Showroom, $30, $45, $65, $70

I-5 Showroom, $40, $70, $95, $100

MORE Winners, MORE Often! 1-888-831-7655 • www.emeraldqueen.com EQC I-5 (I-5 Exit 135): 2024 E. 29th St., Tacoma, WA 98404 EQC Hotel & Casino (I-5 Exit 137): 5700 Pac. Hwy E., Fife, WA 98424

You must be 21 to enter the casino. Management reserves the right to change any event or promotion. Tickets available at the EQC Box Offices.


Tacoma Weekly Community Newspaper