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2020

YOUR ULTIMATE GUIDE TO

Summer

FUN

IN EDMONTON & SURROUNDING AREAS

STAY ENTERTAINED WHILE STAYING HOME


STORIES 6 TOP 10 HIDDEN GEMS

Edmonton’s known for a lot of secrets, including these nifty finds

Contents LISTINGS

7 STICKING AROUND

Try these unusual recipes for the ultimate backyard skewering party

10 SUMMER PET ADVICE

28 PARKS AND LIBRARIES 30 ALL SUMMER EVENTS 37 U-PICKS 42 AMUSEMENT CENTRES

How you can get your puss, pooch or other loving animal adjusted for the season

11 DARK SKIES

Look up−way up−at Mother Nature’s time machine

14 URBAN FORAGING

44 SKATEPARKS 44 SUMMER FESTIVALS 45 FARMERS’ MARKETS

A growing movement toward wild-harvested food has no trouble seeing the forest for the trees

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18 SIPPING THE SEASON AWAY

33 NXNE TOP 10

20 WHITE WINE WISDOM

36 THE HIDDEN WORLD OF GEOCACHING

Summer isn’t summer without these fruit suggestions for your favourite cocktails Some grape advice for vin blanc neophytes

21 STRANGE SCOOPS

Five outlets with five of the wildest ice cream flavours in town

22 DON’T LOOK DOWN

Defy gravity and vertigo in the river valley at Alberta’s first aerial park

24 TRUE BLUE HUE

Pantone’s latest shade revisits a colourful classic

26 PANE PORTRAITS

Fun and quirky sites–and sights–for physically distanced day trips

A game (quietly) taking the world by storm

38 20 QUESTIONS

Test your knowledge of the city and surrounding area in this multiple-choice quiz

40 FLOWER POTS WITH FLAIR

Five recommended flowers to brighten your surroundings

46 FAMILY CYCLING

Dust off your saddle and gear up for an active summer with the kids

A viral challenge creates this unique fashion photo essay opportunity

t’s definitely an understatement to declare that the summer of 2020 is a season like no other. We could also say the same thing about spring, but very few of us experienced it, since most of us put ourselves into a state of homebound isolation in response to the worldwide Covid-19 pandemic.

were not only accurate as we went to press, but in accordance with physical distancing and other health advice to minimize the spread of this coronavirus.

Currently, the hinges of the lockdown are starting to loosen a bit so we can at least enjoy some of the summer while getting the economy back in recovery mode. We took great care to ensure the articles and listings

And with some articles that examined topics of interest outside the home, we feel confident that they can all be pursued safely as long as all precautions are met and that everyone has a mask handy and follows the

That’s why quite a few of the stories have a bit of a homespun feel to them, as we focused on more food and drink recipes and advice. We chose other topics related to gardening, stargazing and even ice cream, which we felt were activities not only safe enough to do, but could double as experiences to be shared with the whole family.

two-metre rule. Activities like urban foraging, geocaching and family cycling were chosen to run in Summer In The City with all those medical guidelines in mind. Even our daytrip piece on attractions northeast of Edmonton went with the angle that all of them can be viewed from the safety of your car. And while the listings are smaller this time around, we’re grateful that at least folks in the Capital Region will be able to take advantage of what’s available. And if we all remain careful, here’s hoping we’ll have more to document in the 2021 edition of Summer In The City. In the meantime, enjoy the issue and have fun this summer, but stay safe!

4540-50 Street, Edmonton, Alberta Call (780) 448-1601 millwoodsgolfcourse.com 4

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PUBLISHER, SALES Rob Lightfoot rob@t8nmagazine.com 780 940 6212

EDITOR Gene Kosowan

CREATIVE, DESIGN & PRODUCTION Correna Saunders

STYLING, ART DIRECTION & PHOTOGRAPHY Brenda Lakeman

PROOFREADING Markwell Lyon

LISTINGS, OFFICE MANAGEMENT Janice Lightfoot

CONTRIBUTORS Paula E. Kirman, Markwell Lyon, Robert Michon

FOOD STYLING Shima Zonneveld

PROUDLY PUBLISHED BY T8N Publishing Inc. t8nmagazine.com Copyright of T8N Publishing Inc. Reproduction of copyright material, in whole or in part, is strictly prohibited. We have made every effort to ensure the accuracy of these listings at time of publishing, but we cannot guarantee it. Please look online or call for confirmation. This is a free publication made available on the basis of one copy per person, please.

SUMMERCITY


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n March 12, the World Health Organization officially declared the outbreak of the coronavirus dubbed Covid-19 was a global pandemic. Not long after that, the Alberta government put into motion sweeping changes that essential put the entire province under lockdown.

A MESSAGE ABOUT

Covid-19 By Rob Lightfoot

We have to credit Alberta Health Services for the measures it deployed, resulting in The Capital Region and much of the province remaining a low-risk zone. But we’re not out of the woods yet. That’s why Summer In the City took the safest route possible to ensure the material in this issue was accurate, timely at the date of publishing and−above all−did not contain any information that would compromise the safety and health of our readers.

Clap and Squeak

TOP 10

HIDDEN GEMS Edmonton’s known for a lot of secrets, including these nifty finds

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hen it comes to anything unusual, Edmonton has its fair share fair share of hidden finds, some of them tucked away in popular locations, and others requiring a bit of sleuthing to discover. We’ve taken a bit of legwork and heavy lifting out of the equation to provide you some background on just a few of them.

Alexander Circle Park

From the air, this grassy refuge looks like everything converges to the centre of the world. Actually, you’d find yourself in a park in Old Glenora, with an ornate fountain and lots of bench space on the premises. Located by Stony Plain Road and 102 Avenue, even passers-by are unaware of the spot.

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Who knows how many acoustic engineers it took to create this effect on the Legislature Grounds? Follow the footpaths north of the domed building to a giant brick circle and stand right in the centre. Now clap. Almost instantaneously, you’ll hear an echo of a squeak.

End of the World

Edmontonians can’t stand being told they live in the middle of nowhere, but at least they can claim being on the edge of the planet. That would be the retaining wall blocking remnants of the old Keilor Road from the river. See it from a distance via Saskatchewan Drive in the Belgravia neighbourhood.

Henday Wildlife Underpass

It’s admirable that planners introduced this component as part of the Anthony Henday Freeway to accommodate wild animals who use the river valley to pass through the city undisturbed. For a chance to see nature using the facility, you can access it via the McTaggart neighbourhood.

Leadbeater’s Genesis At first glance, this sculpture in The Citadel’s Lee Pavilion looks like a flying saucer crash. But its creator, Roy Leadbeater —one of the city’s most celebrated artists— said it was inspired by the historic Apollo 11 moon mission and the Big Bang Theory. Either way, it’s an eye-catching display.

Okuda San Miguel Mural

Edmonton’s Old Strathcona neighbourhood has more than its share of eccentricities, namely a six-storey mural by Spanish street artist Okuda San Miguel. Donations

That said, be advised that contents in this publication are subject to change without notice. More activities and events may be accessible over time, perhaps weeks or days after this issue was released. However, if the relaxing of lockdown directives results in more cases of infection, expect that some of the information in Summer In the City may not be recommended by the provincial government. This edition is here to shine a light on as many summer options our readers can enjoy. But while we cannot be responsible for any changes affecting the material in this issue after it was distributed, we regret in advance any inconveniences that might have been caused. n

totaling $120,000 made possible this half-wolf, half-human caricature on the side of the Crawford Block, making it the city’s largest mural.

Purple Haze

Edmonton’s weirdest surreptitious pastime consists of folks heading down to the Legislature Grounds to stare into one of the orange footlights aimed at the dome for 30 seconds. The result? You’ll see everything in a shade of purple for about a minute.

Resonant Progression Sculptures

In Terwillegar Park lie three weird-looking installations meant to be seen and heard. Created by artist Royden Mills, one piece amplifies natural sounds, the other bounces those sounds while the third one is meant for personal reflection, probably to help make sense of those altered sounds.

Roper Pond

Believe it or not, pelicans use this wetland spot that’s totally surrounded by industrial complexes on the south side. Just off Roper Road east of 75 Street, you’d never know you’re in the city, given the lush vegetation and abundance of animal life.

Talus Dome Balls

This sculpture is hardly a hidden find, since locals have complained about this installation at Fox Drive and the Whitemud Freeway for eons. But its real secret is up close where you can catch the reflective splendor of the sculpture, which depending on the sun’s position can get kaleidoscopic at times. n


Fantastic vegetarian option for a skewer party!

STICKING

Around Try these unique recipes for the ultimate backyard skewering party!

Recipes & Styling: Shima Zonneveld; Photography by Brenda Lakeman

Balsamic Portobello Mushrooms These mushrooms are delicious with any cooked grain, but would also be yum on a bun, burger style. 14 portobello mushrooms

½ tsp. kosher salt

½ c. Balsamic vinegar

½ tsp. red pepper flakes

¼ c. soy sauce

½ tsp. black pepper

3 tbsp. honey Remove the stems from the mushrooms and use a spoon to scrape out the gills. In a bowl, combine the vinegar, soy sauce, honey, salt, red pepper flakes and pepper. Whisk all the ingredients together.

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or an outdoor gathering with a difference, there’s nothing like a wonder wand to serve all those delectables. Puzzled? Well, think finger food, beef, chicken, seafood, vegetarian and sweets−all served on a stick. Get your friends and family talking and eventually eating all you can eat on a skewer once the grilling’s done. Also try rice, lettuce cups and other fresh seasonal veggies and your guests are guaranteed to stick around!

In a glass casserole dish, place the mushrooms cup side up. Drizzle the marinade overtop, cover and let the marinade soak in for 30-45 minutes. Heat grill to medium-high. Skewer the mushrooms (any kind of skewer will work, wood, stainless steel) and make sure the skewer goes through the meatier portion of the mushroom. Two mushrooms will fit on a skewer but doing them one at a time works, too. Place the skewers on the grill with the mushroom cup up to hold any extra marinade. Grill for two to five minutes per side until brown grill marks are present. Serve warm and enjoy! summercity.ca

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Sweet and Sour Chicken Skewers with Pineapple and Pepper This is a great sweet, tangy recipe. Perfect for a warm night of grilling. 4 boneless, skinless chicken breasts, cut into 1” chunks

1 ½ tbsp. brown sugar

½ tsp. kosher salt

1 tsp. sesame oil

¼ tsp. pepper 1 tbsp. vegetable oil ⅓ c. tomato purée 3 tbsp. rice vinegar

When grilling meat, the protein will easily pull away from the grill when it is cooked. If the meat is sticking, it is probably not done cooking.

2 tbsp. soy sauce ¼ c. julienned green onions 1 red pepper chopped to 1 ½” chunks ½ pineapple, also chopped into 1 ½” chunks

In a saucepan, warm the vegetable oil over medium heat. Stir in tomato purée, rice vinegar, brown sugar, soy sauce, sesame oil. Bring this mixture to a boil and then reduce to a simmer for eight to 10 minutes until the sauce is visibly thicker. Season the chicken breasts with vegetable oil, salt and pepper. Also season with chopped pepper and pineapple with salt. Skewer all three items in an alternating pattern, chicken, pepper, pineapple. Leave a space in between each chunk. Place skewers on a greased grill over medium heat. Brush half of the sweet and sour sauce over the skewers, grill, turn over once. Brush the other side with the sauce. Serve with rice or inside a yummy pita pocket!

Skewered Shrimp with Lemon and Coconut Grilled shrimp is a great alternative to friends and family who prefer seafood over chicken and beef. The bright, citrus hit of the lemon juice combined with shredded coconut make a great cocktail snack or a meal. Just add rice and some slivered snow peas and the party is on! 1 tsp. red pepper flakes

¼ c. olive oil

1 lemon, zested and juiced

¼ c. soy sauce

1 tbsp. chopped fresh cilantro

1 lb. uncooked medium shrimp, peeled and deveined skewers

1 tbsp. chopped fresh mint ⅓ shredded coconut

Combine the red pepper flakes, lemon zest and juice, cilantro, mint, olive oil and soy sauce in a food processor. Combine until the mixture is smooth. In a large bowl, toss together the shrimp and the marinade. Cover and set aside for two to three hours. Preheat the grill to a medium-high heat. Thread the shrimp onto the individual skewers. Cook the skewers until they are browned on both sides and the meat is cooked. This takes approximately 4-6 minutes per side. Serve hot off the grill or alongside rice and slivered snow peas!

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Beef Bulgogi Skewers This delicious beef dish has its origins deeply rooted in Korean cuisine. Thinly sliced beef paired with a tangy marinade are traditionally served alongside rice or popped into a lettuce leaf for a crispy wrap-like meal. Ribeye, sirloin and brisket all work great in this recipe; just remember the key is very thinly cut strips of beef. Think razor thin! 3 sirloin steaks, thinly sliced, 1/8” thin approximately

3 tbsp. brown sugar

2 tbsp. soy sauce

juice of 1 lemon

1 tbsp. rice vinegar combined with 1 tsp. white sugar or use mirin

2 tbsp. grated, fresh ginger ½ tsp. red pepper flakes 1 tbsp. sesame oil

Pop the steak into the freezer for 30-45 minutes; this will make cutting the steak into thin slices much easier. While the steak is firming up, put together the marinade. Combine the soy sauce, sugars, vinegar, ginger, lemon juice, pepper flakes and sesame oil in a food processor or the container for a hand blender. Whiz up until smooth and pour into a large bowl. Working with one steak at a time, leave the remaining steaks in the freezer, thinly slice the beef and add into the marinade. Marinate the meat in the fridge for up to two hours, but no more than that. The acidity from the lemon will break down the meat protein too much. Heat the grill to a medium-high heat. Skewer the beef and cook. Grill the skewers three to five minutes per side, make sure there are lovely grill marks on each side. Serve with rice, butter lettuce leaf cups and a sweet and salty dipping sauce.

Dipping Sauce 1 tsp. sambal oelek

¼ c. rice vinegar

2 tbsp. lemon juice

2 tbsp. flavourless oil (sunflower, canola, grapeseed)

2 tbsp. lime juice 2 tbsp. soy sauce 2 tbsp. sugar

¼ c. slivered green onions

Whisk to combine. Serve alongside the beef bulgogi or use as a drizzle over top of the rice.

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f the weather forecasts are to be believed, it’s gonna be a hot one this year and we might find occasions when the mercury could rise higher than usual. Taking care of yourself is one thing, but your pets have a different level of maintenance worth considering. Here are a few tips to keep them healthy and happy this summer.

presents

Summer Pet Advice

How you can get your puss, pooch or other loving animal adjusted for the season

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● Pets can get dehydrated quickly, so give them plenty of fresh, clean water when it’s hot or humid outdoors. Make sure your pets have a shady place to get out of the sun, be careful not to over-exercise them, and keep them indoors when it’s extremely hot. ● Know the symptoms of overheating in pets, which include excessive panting or difficulty breathing, increased heart and respiratory rate, drooling, mild weakness, stupor or even collapse. Symptoms can also include seizures, bloody diarrhea and vomit along with an elevated body temperature of over 104 degrees. ● Do not leave pets unsupervised around water. Consider a life vest and rinse your pets off after

swimming to remove chlorine or salt from their fur. Avoid allowing pets from drinking treated or salt water. ● Feel free to trim longer hair on your dog, but never shave your dog: The layers of dogs’ coats protect them from overheating and sunburn. Brushing cats more often than usual can prevent problems caused by excessive heat. And be sure that any sunscreen or insect repellent product you use on your pets is labeled specifically for use on animals. ● Asphalt gets extremely hot, if you can walk on it barefoot, it is not safe for your pets to walk or lie on. Being so close to the ground, your pooch’s body can heat up quickly, and sensitive paw pads can burn. Keep walks during these times to a minimum. ● Commonly used rodenticides and lawn and garden insecticides can be harmful to cats and dogs if ingested, so keep them out of reach. Keep citronella candles, tiki torch products and insect coils of out pets’ reach as well. n Courtesy ASPCA


DARK SKIES Look up—way up—at Mother Nature’s time machine Photography by Brenda Lakeman

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t’s crazy to think that all those stars we see on a clear night could already be gone. That’s why stargazing is like witnessing time travel in its simplest form. This Einsteinian fact has everything to do with the distance that light has to travel to get to us. Witnessing this blast from the past, however, is hindered by the presence of light pollution, which makes all but the brightest stars invisible. Fortunately, areas of land across the world are being set aside where the only light to be seen is from the sky above you. So, getting out of the city to take in the full glory of a cloudless night is easy— all you need is time, a few astronomy basics, plus a blanket to keep you warm. Take a look.

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DARK-SKY PRESERVES

The Royal Astronomical Society of Canada (RASC) describes dark-sky preserves (DSP) as land found in or around parks that have a reduction or elimination of artificial light. Besides being a great place to view the night sky, DSPs also help nocturnal animals, plants and humans keep to their normal Circadian rhythms.

Stargazing and city living may seem an unlikely mix, but being limited to the stars that are visible in urban areas can help you pick out the brighter ones with just a pair of binoculars. You can also invest in one of three basic types of telescopes: a refractor that uses lenses, a reflector that uses mirrors or a catadioptric that uses lenses and mirrors. Remember, however, that moonlight can hinder good sky viewing. Also, the moon rises about 50 minutes later each day because it constantly shifts about 13 degrees towards the east. Keep this in mind to minimize moonlight interference when you set up your telescope or point your binoculars towards the heavens.

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Stargazing really doesn’t require more than a healthy dose of wonder and a few astronomy basics. Books and websites are also great resources to help you locate constellations, planets, galaxies or even the International Space Station. NASA’s website is always a wealth of information, and the RASC’s has a list of Canadian star parties to attend, as well as links to all the DSP sites across Canada. Don’t forget about Edmonton Telus World of Science. Its website lists classes and upcoming events. So whether you are new to stargazing or were born with a telescope in your hands, looking up at a star that twinkles back at you is always awe-inspiring—especially when that star’s light took tens-of-thousands of years to reach Earth. n


BEAVER HILLS DARK-SKY PRESERVE, ALBERTA LOCATION: Elk Island National Park, including Cooking-Lake Blackfoot Provincial Area SIZE: 293 square km RASC DESIGNATION: Received DSP status September 2006, on Elk Island’s 100th Anniversary ASTRONOMY IN THE PARK: The Edmonton RASC has been visiting this preserve for over 20 years. It holds public astronomy programs, but also raises awareness about the damaging effects that light pollution has on the environment.

JASPER NATIONAL PARK DARK-SKY PRESERVE, ALBERTA LOCATIONS: Marmot Meadows, Athabasca Glacier, Jasper House and Pyramid Island SIZE: 11,228 square km RASC DESIGNATION: Received DSP status March 2011 ASTRONOMY IN THE PARK: October is Dark Sky Month in Jasper and is celebrated with a Dark-Sky Festival. This year’s event runs October 16-25.

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URBAN

FORAGING A growing movement toward wild-harvested food has no trouble seeing the forest for the trees By Maxwell Lyon “Production right now is relatively minor, but in two or three years we’re going to start seeing our first flush of fruit,” remarks Kenton Zerbin, permaculture teacher and consultant. Zerbin is referring to the St. Albert Community Food Forest, the first of its kind in town.

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FORAGING ETIQUETTE

Always remember Rule Number One: If you’re not 100 percent sure what it is, don’t eat it. Invest in a guidebook to identify plants so you don’t accidentally gather endangered species or worse—poisonous lookalikes. • Learn when certain produce are in season and forage accordingly. • Only take what you need, and leave some behind for others (including forest critters).

Together with local urban agriculture enthusiasts, Zerbin designed this site using permaculture techniques, an approach to growing food that mimics the design of natural ecosystems for self-sufficiency. He estimates that in five-to-seven years the forest will reach its capacity, offering a safe nutritious source of edibles such as plums, red currants, gooseberries, haskap berries, saskatoons, comfrey, and more. And lots of it—free for whoever wants it.

Ripe for the Picking Food forestry and permaculture might be unfamiliar concepts to many, but they’re part of a growing realization that cities are chock full of potential when it comes

• Ensure that your foraging is on public land, or seek out the landowner’s permission. • Be careful not to collect food that’s been contaminated by pesticide or fertilizer (not to mention dog pee). Wash foods thoroughly before you eat. • Minimize damage to these environments: stay on the trails as much as possible, and leave nature as you found it. • Share your knowledge with others interested in this fun and healthy pastime.

to food. It’s literally all around us—in city parks, in the woods, alongside rivers and roadways. Numerous books detail the variety of edible fruit, plant, and mushroom species available in Central Alberta—much of it on public land, available to anyone with a bucket and a little know-how. The appeal of urban foraging is understandable, as any trip to the grocery store will uncover. Healthy food ain’t cheap. In 2013, the Edmonton Community Foundation reported that food costs had risen by more than double the overall inflation rate over the past 10 years. Food prices are notoriously volatile—in 2018 the Edmonton Food Bank distributed more than $22,000,000 worth of food.

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A World of Foraging Possibilities On paper, it seems there’s little stopping us from getting out there and taking advantage of the cornucopia of produce growing wild all around us, but obstacles exist. The first is knowing where to look. Cue the Internet, where maps have been popping up pinpointing precise locations of fruit trees and other edible plants around the world. The biggest roadblock, however, is probably time and energy. Supermarket produce might be pricer, but it’s easy, and this is the likely cause of why so much backyard fruit goes to waste. Considering that an average apple tree can produce more than 100 kg of apples in a year, for some households even a single tree can be too much. And when you consider how many trees a city may have, both public and private, this adds up to a staggering amount of food that’s, unfortunately, for the birds. Locally, Operation Fruit Rescue Edmonton (OFRE) musters volunteers to harvest backyard trees of homeowners unable to use their fruit. The haul from each pick is divvied up, with roughly a quarter each going to the homeowner, the volunteers, OFRE, and a charity such as the Food Bank or Hope Mission.

Reshaping Cities and Attitudes In Edmonton, a food forest has sprung up in the MacKinnon Ravine, just west of downtown. The MacKinnon Food Forest began in 2014 as part of Root for Trees, an initiative by the City to plant trees, with a minimum target of 16,000 a year in order to increase Edmonton’s canopy cover from 10 to 20 percent.

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Providing

comfortable solutions

for the entire family

The MacKinnon Food Forest bears highbush cranberries, currants, beaked hazelnuts, saskatoons, chokecherries, pin cherries, raspberries, elderberries, and strawberries. All are native plants, as designer Dustin Bajer points out. “That was one of the ways we were able to do something like this,” Bajer says. “I don’t think the City would’ve been onboard had it been non-native species.”

Building a Food Forest 101 Permaculture aims to re-create ecosystems that not only produce food, but are also self-sustaining. Fortunately, Mother Nature gives us a pretty good model to riff on. Forests are made up of layers, from the canopy and understory to the ground cover and roots—and each has a function. Canopies provide shade and protection so lower plants can thrive; meanwhile, perennials in the herbaceous layer die each year, feeding essential nutrients back into the soil. It’s this interplay between layers that makes a forest more than the sum of its parts, and it’s an incredibly efficient and resilient system that sustains many species of plants and animals in a small area. As such, a good food forest design optimizes available sunlight, water, and soil through the careful arrangement of elements. Beyond that, the forest is more or less left to its own devices. n

MAJOR RENOVATIONS HOME OFFICE SPACES PLAY AREAS We’re all spending more time with more people around than usual and will likely continue that way for a while. You may have noticed some areas in your house work well, while other spots could use a few improvements. But…you still love your house and surroundings and just aren’t prepared to move away from them. Let Caruana Interiors and Contracting help you renovate your house so everyone can be comfortable. n

Home office space away from the hustle and bustle

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Play areas to give your kids their own space

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More functional cooking and prep areas

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Sipping

THE SEASON AWAY Summer isn’t summer without these fruit suggestions for your favourite cocktails

Saskatoon & Lime Whisky Lemonade (Pictured left) The berry and spirits are a dead giveaway that this one’s a true Canuck concoction to have during Canada Day! 2 cups fresh or frozen saskatoons

3 oz club soda

1/2 cup white sugar

1 oz freshly squeezed lemon juice

1/3 cup pomegranate juice

1 oz freshly squeezed lime juice

4 oz whisky

Sparkling wine (to taste)

3 oz lemonade

Sprigs of basil and wedges of lime (to garnish)

Add the saskatoons, sugar and pomegranate juice to a medium-sized pot, and bring to a boil over medium-high heat. Reduce the heat to low, and let simmer 10 to 15 minutes, stirring occasionally. Press the softened berries and syrup through a sieve or a food mill. Place the collected syrup in a pitcher, and place in the fridge to chill. To the chilled pitcher with syrup, add the whisky, lemonade, club soda, lemon juice and lime juice. Stir, and pour into 4 or 5 glasses filled with ice. Top with a splash of sparkling wine, and garnish with a sprig of basil and a wedge of lime.

Peach Bourbon Smash Here’s a popular drink from the south, but it’s not necessary to have Georgia on your mind every time you take a sip. 2 oz bourbon 1 oz lemon juice 1 oz ginger-thyme syrup 1 1/2 oz peach nectar Ginger ale (to taste) Slice of peach and sprig of thyme (to garnish) FOR THE GINGER-THYME SYRUP 1/2 cup white sugar 1/2 cup water 1/2 tsp chopped ginger 1 sprig fresh thyme

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ou can’t get much more laid-back than stretching out on your porch, deck or yard under a blazing sun with a glass of cold spirit in your hand. Add a fruit element to your summer drink and you’ve got the ultimate in a season refreshment. To that end, we’ve added a few fruit elements to inject a bit more fun while you imbibe during those lazy, hazy crazy days of summer.

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Combine all the syrup ingredients in a small pot, and bring it to a simmer over medium heat, stirring until the sugar is dissolved. Remove from the heat, and set aside to cool completely. To a cocktail shaker filled with ice, add the bourbon, lemon juice, ginger-lime syrup and peach nectar. Shake vigorously, and strain into a tumbler filled with ice. Top with a splash of ginger ale, and garnish with a slice of peach and a sprig of thyme.


Kiwi & Blueberry Mojito Looking for a new take on a classic rum mojito? It’s kiwis to the rescue. 2 1/2 oz rum 1 oz freshly squeezed lime juice 1 tsp white sugar 12 mint leaves, torn into pieces 2 kiwis, peeled and quartered 1/3 cup blueberries 1 tbsp honey Club soda, to taste 4 kiwi slices (to garnish) 2 tbsp blueberries (to garnish)

Place the quartered kiwis, blueberries, mint and white sugar in a cocktail shaker, and muddle them until pulverized. Then, place two tablespoons of the mixture in the bottom of a tall glass,followed by ice cubes, kiwi slices and blueberries. Next, fill a cocktail shaker half-full of ice, and add the rum, lime juice and honey. Secure the lid, and shake until chilled. Strain the mixture into the prepared glass, and top with club soda to taste. n

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Chardonnay

WHITE WINE

WISDOM Some grape advice for vin blanc neophytes By Rob Lightfoot

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ou can’t be a connoisseur of the finer things in life without first boning up on the basics. A good place to start is with some rudimentary knowledge about white wines, which is where we come in. With some essential tidbits about some of the most popular grapes out there–from characteristics to pairings–you’ll be impressing your family, friends and physical-distancing entourage in no time!

Also known by its French version, Chablis, this wine is typically available either oaked or unoaked. Unoaked is the preferred French product. Body: from dry and crisp to rich and creamy Flavours: citrus to tropical fruit, vanilla and butterscotch Pairing: lobster, oysters, pasta and cheese

Gewurztraminer

A typically aromatic wine with a floral accent, it’s also sweet with a low to medium acidity. Body: made in both dry and sweet, very eclectic Flavours: grapefruit, florals Pairing: curries, Indian food, Asian dishes, pork with fruit, spicy

Pinot Gris

Also well known as Pinot Grigio, this is a light, fresh wine. Body: crisp, simple Flavours: melon, citrus Pairing: poultry, fish, lighter salads

Riesling

While German Rieslings can be very sweet, many new world Rieslings are more often dry. Body: a wonderful balance of acidity and residual sugar. Flavours: apricot, citrus, green apple, peach, honeysuckle. Pairing: shellfish, Asian food, fresh fruit

WINE TIPS

Wine storage: Store your wine in the basement, in a cool corner. Never put a wine rack by a window or on top of a refrigerator. Wine serving: Fill your wine glass to about 40 percent of capacity. This allows you to swirl the wine and allow it to be exposed to oxygen, adding to the overall flavour. Temperature: Remove the bottle from the fridge about a half-hour before serving, to allow it to warm to ideal serving temperature.

Sauvignon Blanc This is an even-bodied, smooth and very enjoyable wine, but with its acidity and fermentation, it often displays pungent aromas that can be off-putting. Body: a body influenced by the soils in which its planted to offer a herbaceous quality Flavours: like grass, herb, citrus, pineapple, peach Pairing: grilled vegetables, salmon, shrimp, heavier salads, sushi

Viognier

Once a scarce French wine, this one is intensely aromatic with apricot and peach scents. Body: a rich wine with a well-rounded body Flavours: floral, citrus and apricot Pairing: ham, roasted vegetable, goat cheese n

WINE TOOLS Waiter corkscrew: It is compact and the most clean and efficient tool to open a bottle of wine. The corkscrew can be inserted cleanly, then using the lever, apply upward pressure to the side of the bottle. The lever can be moved easily to allow for the cork to be removed cleanly and slowly. Aerator with filter: With this tool, you can have your wine exposed to more oxygen as you pour. It allows the flavours and odors to be released. 20

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STRANGE Scoops

Five outlets with five of the wildest ice cream flavours in town

G

one are the days when all you could get to crown your cone was ice cream available only in chocolate, vanilla and strawberry. Today, there are hundreds of flavours out there, and if you want to indulge in something other than the tried and true, a few outlets would love to tempt your palate. We found the wildest options we could think of that exist in town as a challenge. Thankfully, at press time, all the venues in this top five list have pickup or curbside delivery, but check their websites for updates.

Choc ‘n’ Chili (Marble Slab Creamery) Some like it hot, some like it cold. But Marble Slab took both preferences into consideration with this food fusion that’s bound to wake up the taste buds. Lest you think that the scoop will involve a messy blend of chocolate, ground beef and kidney beans, worry not. This spicy and sweet offering includes dark double chocolate, some vanilla and cinnamon and a hit of cayenne. (marbleslab.ca)

Peanut Butter Heat (Revolution Ice Cream) This Old Strathcona spot certainly comes up with some ideas about as irreverent as the neighbourhood surrounding the establishment. This flavour consisting of peanut butter with a healthy kick of chili spices will likely push your senses in overdrive. And as proof of their community spirit, they also have a flavour dedicated to the famed local district called the Scona Fog. (revolutionicecream.com)

Sweet Corn and Blueberry (Kind Ice Cream) We know we live in an age of food pairings, but who would have thought that corn from South America would make for a good match with the local, venerable blueberry? The folks at Kind who created this combo claim that the two items balance each other out for a unique taste. And it was concocted for a good cause as part of proceeds from sales of this flavour go to the Youth Emeregency Shelter Society. (kindicecream.ca)

Toyo with Carmeled Chow Mein (Yelo’d Ice Cream & Bake Shoppe)

Nope, you’re not looking at part of an Asian menu. This is an ice cream flavor that comes from the local mom and pop shop that does everything by hand. In this case, the flavour consist of soya sauce which apparently tastes like brown sugar and salted caramel. And for a crunch you might not expect, sink your teeth into the chow mein noodles added to the mix. (yelod.ca)

Great Golf, we can enjoy the outdoors!

Matcha Green Tea (Scoop n Roll Creamery) For those who like an ice cream that has loads of antioxidants to improve the well-being of your vital organs, you can’t go wrong with this flavor that’s probably the most exotic in this franchise’s lineup. The added benefit to health fanatics is that the flavour’s also totally vegan. (scooproll.com) n

Book Your Tee Time! Call (780) 973-3033 I egmgolf.com summercity.ca

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DON’T LOOK

DOWN

Defy gravity and vertigo in the river valley at Alberta’s first aerial park By Markwell Lyon

I

n a wooded oasis just off the Whitemud, an unusual tower barely pokes through the canopy, no doubt missed by the thousands of commuters who drive by it every day. And in a way, that overlooked protrusion is symptomatic that Snow Valley Aerial Park might still be one of the city’s best kept secrets. The adventure park and ropes course gives the vertically inclined a chance to test their climbing skills — and challenge their fear of heights — in a beautiful river valley setting.

The Name of the Game Surrounding the park’s 50 foot-high tower are some 100 elements, or “games” as staff call them, that taken together sort of resemble a supersized playground. These games lean heavily toward the acrobatic, though. Imagine tire tubes, rope ladders, steps and lines suspended in the air, which participants use to move from one elevated platform to another. Besides dealing with gravity, participants also need to rely on their strength, agility and imagination to complete each game. Like the runs on the nearby ski hill, the games are colour coded: green means easy, blue intermediate and black hard. They’re also arranged at different heights and typically increase in difficulty with elevation. Aerial park manager Ben Evoy describes the games as “challenge by choice,” meaning there’s no set route

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one must follow. “You’re not forced to do anything you don’t want to do,” he says, before joking, “unless you’re with a bunch of friends who peer pressure you.”

First of Its Kind Adding to the fun is the variety of elements, including a few custom-made for the park. As the park is operated by the same not-for-profit organization that manages Snow Valley Ski Club and the Rainbow Valley campground, many of these fit a ski or outdoors theme. One game is made up of a horizontal rope ladder affixed with slalom gates. Another, near the very top, features a canoe that you step in and out of; oars hanging above the canoe provide something to grasp onto with your hands. All while doing your best not to look down, of course. While aerial parks like this one aren’t new — they’re already well established in Europe and Asia — the concept is just starting to take hold in Canada, with most parks based in B.C. and Ontario. “We’re the only one in Alberta,” Evoy says. The park’s centrepiece KT90 Tower is also unique, being the first of its kind in Canada and only the third in North America. The patio topping the tower features great views of the surroundings and is a choice locale for alcohol tastings on summer evenings.


Safety Matters As for the games, naturally it’s all perfectly safe. While taking a wrong step technically means falling off an element, one doesn’t fall far. All participants wear a harness and a specialized lanyard with two connectors, at least one of which is always attached to a cable. Before every adventure, participants attend a short “ground school” showing them how to use the system to navigate the park and its network of safety cables. Additionally, all staff are certified rope course practitioners, at the ready if someone gets unnerved while mid-air. “It’s just as safe as any regular playground,” Evoy says. “There’s just the bumps and scrapes that happen to anybody when they’re having too much fun.” n

SNOW VALLEY AERIAL PARK

13204 Rainbow Valley Road, Edmonton, 780-434-3991, snowvalley.ca

RESTRICTIONS

The minimum height is 100 cm. The ground-level Kids Course is for kids under 140 cm; those between 100 and 125 cm must be accompanied by a harnessed chaperone (no entry charge). Kids between 125 and 140 cm have full Tower Access if accompanied by a chaperone over 140 cm (regular entry charge applies).

RATES

Individuals over 140 cm: $42 (walk-up), $37 (online) Individuals under 140 cm: $29 (walk-up), $24 (online) Family (up to 5 people): $134 (walk-up), $119 (online) Twilight pricing (after 6:30 pm): $25

Visiting one of our advertising partners?

Please tell them you found them in Summer in the City. This publication is funded by our advertisers, and their support is greatly appreciated!

summercity.ca

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HOKA ONE ONE “Speedgoat 4” Women’s Trail Running Shoes, $189.95 with goodr “Falkor’s Fever Dream” Sunglasses $34.95, from Track ’N Trail

COLOUR OF THE YEAR 2020

7 Downie Street “Luxor” Blazer, $350 with BLU Royal Dress Shirt, $116, Eros Bow Ties and Puff Set, $53, J.Grill Pant, $98 and Bench Craft Diamond Buckle Belt, $71 from Knighton Mens Wear

PANTONE® 19-4052

TRUE

BLUE

L’Arianna “Velvet Blue” Pump, $280 from Tiramisu Italian Shoes and Accessories

HUE

Danesco Mini Spatula, Turner and Whisk, $1.99 each, Switchit 2-in-1 Mini Spoon, $9.49 with Homespun Dishcloths, $9.99 and “Home Sweet Home” Diner Mug, $8.99 from Freson Bros. Fresh Market

Pantone’s latest shade revisits a colourful classic By Gene Kosowan

W

ith all the craziness dominating current events, most folks responsible for shaping modern culture are clamoring for more calm. That’s probably why the Pantone Color Institute decided on this year’s shade labeled 19-4052, better known as Classic Blue. It’s a peace and tranquil shade, claim the style gurus, a useful hue reliable enough to blend in with other colours. Classic Blue is also versatile enough to be used on any materials from fabric to metal and really makes a harmonic statement in the items shown here.

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Pixie Mood Bag-in-Bag “Alicia” Tote, $75 with 42 ‘Pops Pocket’ Cardigan $74 from Saltwater Bay Boutique


“Xenia” Statement Necklace, $65 with “Double Blue Agate Beads” Earrings $45 from BUNO Design

Follow

Kuwallatee “Piece” Hoodie, $80 with Denim Jogger, $110, Adidas Ultraboost Shoes $250 from Legit Kicks

SUMMERCITY

for regular updates and contests throughout the summer!

summercity.ca

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Mackage “Mai” Coat $790 David Lerner “Lola” Safari Maxi Shirt Dress $335 Rebecca Minkoff “Edie Flap” Shoulder Bag $400 Jocelyn Kennedy Hoop Fringe Earrings $55

PANE

PORTRAITS A viral challenge creates this unique fashion photo essay opportunity Photography by Brenda Lakeman; Model Chloe Haughian

C

razy times call for crazy solutions. And with the coronavirus outbreak earlier this year playing havoc with social lives, photographers are coming up with creative ways to capture live images, while practising the required physical distance of two metres to curtail the epidemic. After seeing a news story of a photographer taking portraits of subjects through their windows, our equally creative Brenda Lakeman wanted to use that method for a photo shoot. She found the ideal storefront at Who Cares Wear in St. Albert and went right to work. Visit summercity.ca to view the full collection of photos from this wonderful shoot.

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Theory Square Neck Rib Dress $540 Shiraleah “Florentina” Bag $200 Jocelyn Kennedy Lucite Earring $45

Smythe “Pouf Sleeve” Blazer $695 Senso “Quillan” Boots $ 330 GRLFRD “Karolina” Denim Jeans $350 Jocelyn Kennedy Chain Earrings $195

Free People “Angelic” Pullover Sweater $265 AG “Etta” Denim Jeans $330 Vince “Saxon” Sneaker $380 Mackage “Mini Bucket” Bag $450 Jocelyn Kennedy Hoop Fringe Earrings $55 summercity.ca

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LIBRARY HOURS MON–THURS 10AM–9PM, FRI–SAT 10AM–6PM, SUN 1PM–5PM *DIFFERENT HOURS, CONTACT FOR DETAILS

Parks and Libraries EDMONTON AREA LIBRARIES

LEGEND

EDMONTON AREA MAJOR PARKS

01

BORDEN PARK

02

CALLINGWOOD PARK

03

CAPILANO PARK

04

CASTLE DOWNS PARK

05

CORONATION PARK

06

DAWSON/KINNAIRD PARK

07

EMILY MURPHY PARK

08

HIGHLANDS

08

GALLAGHER PARK

09

IDYLWYLDE

09

GOLD BAR PARK

10

JASPER PLACE

10

GOLDSTICK PARK

11

LOIS HOLE (LESSARD)

11

GOVERNMENT HOUSE PARK

12

LONDONDERRY*

12

HERMITAGE PARK

13

MCCONACHIE*

13

JACKIE PARKER PARK

14

MEADOWS

14

KINSMEN PARK

15

MILL WOODS

15

LAURIER/BUENA VISTA PARK

16

PENNY MCKEE (ABBOTSFIELD)

16

LOUISE MCKINNEY RIVERFRONT PARK

17

RIVERBEND

17

MILL CREEK RAVINE

18

SPRUCEWOOD

18

MILL WOODS PARK

19

STRATHCONA

19

QUEEN ELIZABETH PARK

20

WEST HENDAY PROMENADE*

20

RAINBOW VALLEY PARK

21

WHITEMUD CROSSING

21

RIVERDALE PARK

22

WOODCROFT

22

RUNDLE PARK

23

TERWILLEGAR PARK

24

VICTORIA PARK

25

WHITEMUD PARK

26

WILLIAM HAWRELAK PARK

01

CALDER

02

CAPILANO

03

CASTLE DOWNS*

04

CLAREVIEW

05

ENTERPRISE SQUARE*

06

EPLGO, UNIVERSITY OF ALBERTA

07

HERITAGE VALLEY*

12522-132 Avenue x 780 496 7090 201 Capilano Mall, 5004-98 Avenue x 780 496 1802 106 Lakeside Landing, 15379 Castledowns x 780 496 1804

24

10212 Jasper Avenue x 780 496 7062

2755 119 A Street S.W. x 780 496 4834

Climbing Wall

9010-156 Street x 780 496 1810 Off Leash Dog Area

17650-69 Avenue x 780 442 0888

Fishing

110 Londonderry Mall, 137 Avenue & 66 Street x 780 496 1814

16607-50 Street x 780 442 5314

Hiking Trail

Fountain

2702-17 Street x 780 442 7472 601 Mill Woods Town Centre, 2331-66 Street x 780 496 1818

Playground

Picnic Area

3410-118 Avenue x 780 496 7839

460 Riverbend Square, Rabbit Hill Road & Terwillegar Drive x 780 944 5311

Skate Park

Shelter Area

11555-95 Street x 780 496 7099 8331-104 Street x 780 496 1828

Spray Park

818 Webber Greens Drive West x 780 496 8342

Tennis Court

145 Whitemud Crossing Shopping Centre, 4211-106 Street x 780 496 1822

Washroom Water Tap

13420-114 Avenue x 780 496 1830

BEAUMONT LIBRARY 5700-49 Street x 780 929 2665

CAMROSE PUBLIC LIBRARY DEVON PUBLIC LIBRARY

FORT SASKATCHEWAN PUBLIC LIBRARY

LEDUC PUBLIC LIBRARY 2 Alexandra Park x 780 986 2637

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Beach

Canopy

8310-88 Avenue x 780 496 1808

10011-102 Street x 780 998 4275

27

Bowling Green

6516-118 Avenue x 780 496 1806

101-17 Athabasca Avenue x 780 987 3720

26

BBQ Pit

Boat Launch

1-40 Cameron Library, University of Alberta x 780 248 1662

4710-50 Avenue x 780 672 4214

25

Bandshell

3808-139 Avenue x 780 442 4741

OUTLYING AREAS LIBRARIES 23

Ball Diamond

summercity.ca

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MORINVILLE COMMUNITY LIBRARY

Wood Stove

10125-100 Avenue x 780 939 3292

29

SPRUCE GROVE PUBLIC LIBRARY

Melcor Cultural Centre, 35-5th Avenue x 780 962 4423

30

ST. ALBERT PUBLIC LIBRARY

St. Albert Place, 5 St. Anne Street x 780 459 1530

31

STRATHCONA COUNTY PUBLIC LIBRARY 401 Festival Lane, Sherwood Park x 780 410 8600

32

STONY PLAIN PUBLIC LIBRARY 112, 4613-52 Avenue x 780 963 5440

Paddle Boat

PARK HOURS 5AM–11PM, UNLESS OTHERWISE NOTED

7507 Borden Park Road 17740-69 Avenue

50 Street & 109a Avenue 11520-153 Avenue 11425-142 Street 10298-89 Avenue

11904 Emily Murphy Park Road 10943-84 Avenue 4620-105 Avenue 4210-101 Avenue 9938 Groat Road

2115 Hermitage Road 4540-50 Street

9100 Walterdale Hill

13221 Buena Vista Road NW 9529 Grierson Hill

96 Street & 76 Avenue 2730-66 Street

10380 Queen Elizabeth Park Road 142 Street & 50 Avenue 9231-100 Avenue

2909-113 Avenue

10 Rabbit Hill Road

12130 River Valley Road 13204 Fox Drive

9930 Groat Road

OUTLYING AREAS MAJOR PARKS 32

LEGACY PARK, FORT SASKATCHEWAN

28

CENTRAL PARK, SPRUCE GROVE

33

LIONS PARK, ST. ALBERT

29

CENTRAL PARK, STONY PLAIN

34

MORINVILLE SPLASH PARK, MORINVILLE

30

DEVON VOYAGEUR PARK, DEVON

35

STRATHCONA WILDERNESS CENTRE

31

KINSMEN PARK, LEDUC

27

CENTENNIAL PARK, DEVON Athabasca Avenue 450 King Street

5108-55 Avenue

Saskatchewan Avenue West (Riverview Bike Park) Corinthia Drive North

10005-102 Street

Sir Winston Churchill Avenue 99 Avenue & 104 Street

52535 Range Road 212, Strathcona County


MAP LEGEND

Fort Saskatchewan

ill

ur ch Rd

Heb ert

99 12

137 Ave 132 Ave

04

50 St

21

82 Ave

09

Rd

50 St

g Ar

75 St

104 St Gateway Blvd

yll

63 Ave

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Rd Roper

51 Ave 13

ll Rd

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Ave

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Te r

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ny H

66 St

en da y

21

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Wyd Rd Wye Rd

111 St

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Baseline Rd

17

Leduc

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Sherwood Park

101 Ave 10 98 Ave 02

Whitemud Dr

wi

09

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07

23 Ave

22

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17

16

Co 08 nn or sR

119 St

25

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Broadmoor Blvd

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109 St

11

Rd

97 St

82 St

Pa rk Rd

15

02

97 St St 95

Va 24 97 Ave lle yR d

112 St

142 St

06

11

106 Ave

06

16

5

Jasper Ave

87 Ave

Whitemud Dr

rd Lessa

26

87 Ave

178 St

Hwy 39/50th Ave

27

31

Hw

St

30

50

25

23

27

Black Gold Dr Hwy 2

20

Riv er

Em ily Mu 07 rphy

10

87 Ave

109 St

Groat Rd

McLeod Ave

149 St

29

107 Ave

11

01

118 Ave 114 Ave

03

102 Ave

Stony Plain Rd 156 St

28

Century Rd

Brookwood Dr King St

Calahoo Rd

Grove Dr

111 Ave

08

Dr

Spruce Grove

wa y

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05

118 Ave 18

50 St

ng s

y 16

y etzk

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118 Ave

Princess Elizabeth Ave

99 St

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Hw

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127 St

Yellowhead Trail

e Av

An tho

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rea uR

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153 Ave

Castle Downs Rd

ud

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Bo

03

04

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Sherwood Dr

St. Albert

LIBRARIES

82 St

PARKS

y2

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throughout the continent because of this unique streetcar ride over the North Saskatchewan River. It’s one of the highest river crossings by streetcar in the world at 755 m long and 49 m high. The view is both spectacular and exhilarating. edmonton-radial-railway.ab.ca 780 437 7721

EDMONTON RIVERBOAT

All Summer Event Listings

ALBERTA AVIATION MUSEUM

11410 Kingsway Avenue NW I $15 adult, $10.50 youth (13–17yrs), $9.50 kids (6–12yrs), free (5yrs and under) I Explore Alberta’s aviation history including actual airplanes, displays of air force uniforms, maps, and other historical memorabilia Brand new exhibits. albertaaviationmuseum.com 780 451 1175

ALBERTA CRAFT COUNCIL GALLERY

10186–106 Street NW I The only public gallery in the province dedicated to exhibiting craft arts and Edmonton’s second-largest public gallery. albertacraft.ab.ca 780 488 6611

ALBERTA LEGISLATURE BUILDING

9820–107 Street NW I Discover Alberta’s vibrant parliamentary history and culture through our interactive and engaging Visitor Centre located on the main floor of the Edmonton Federal Building. assembly.ab.ca 780 427 7362

ALBERTA RAILWAY MUSEUM 24215–34 Street NW I $10 adult, $8 youth (13–17yrs), $5 kids (3–12yrs), free (2yrs and under) I A rustic outdoor display of railway equipment and buildings. The museum replicates a small terminal

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with a station, water tank, and shops. The main emphasis is on cars and locomotives from the Canadian National Railways, Northern Alberta Railways, and industrial and short-line railways. albertarailwaymuseum.com 780 472 6229

ART GALLERY OF ALBERTA

2 Sir Winston Churchill Square I $14 adult, free (youth) I The Art Gallery of Alberta maintains a collection of over 6,000 objects and is the oldest cultural institution in Alberta, plus it’s the only museum in the province solely dedicated to the exhibition and preservation of art and visual culture. youraga.ca 780 422 6223

EDMONTON GHOST TOURS

10322–83 Avenue NW in front of the Walterdale Theatre I Explore the haunted sites of Old Strathcona and perhaps meet some of the sites’ occupants. edmontonghosttours.com 780 289 2005

EDMONTON RADIAL RAILWAY (HIGH LEVEL BRIDGE STREETCAR)

Depots located at 109 Street & 100 Avenue and Gateway Boulevard & 84 Avenue I $7 adult round-trip, free (5yrs and under) I The Edmonton Radial Railway—as the system was known—became famous

9734 98 Avenue I $29.95 adults, $19.95 for river cruise I The Edmonton Queen riverboat has sailed the mighty North Saskatchewan River since 1995. Enjoy a leisurely sail on a sunny evening or one of their brunch/dinner excursions. edmontonriverboat.ca 780 424 2628

EDMONTON VALLEY ZOO

13315 Buena Vista Road I $15 adult, $12.50 youth (13–17yrs), $10 kids (2–12yrs) I The Edmonton Valley Zoo is home to more than 350 animals. From seals and sea lions, to red pandas and lemurs, to snowy owls and Arctic foxes—these living, breathing animals are the soul of the zoo. Every visit is rich with animal interactions.

edmonton.ca/attractions_events/ edmonton-valley-zoo.aspx

311 (in Edmonton), 780 442 5311 (outside Edmonton)

FATHER LACOMBE CHAPEL 5 St. Vital Avenue, St. Albert I Admission by donation I This simple chapel—Alberta’s oldest building—became the centre of the thriving French-speaking Métis settlement of St. Albert. Today the chapel has been restored to look much as it did in the early 1860s. fatherlacombechapel.org 780 459 7663

FORT EDMONTON PARK CLOSED FOR 2020 SEASON

7000–143 Street NW (Fox Drive & Whitemud Drive) I $26.20 adult, $20.90 kids, $95 family I Fort Edmonton Park is nestled on 64 hectares of wooded parkland along Edmonton’s River Valley. The park now includes the 1846 Hudson’s Bay Fort, as well as

the Streets of 1885, 1905, and 1920. fortedmontonpark.ca 780 496 8787

FUNICULAR

10065–100 Street NW I Free I 850 feet up the side of the river valley. Amazing views, and a lot less work than climbing the steps.

edmonton.ca/activities_parks_recreation/parks_rivervalley/mechanized-river-valley-access.aspx

311 (in Edmonton) 780 442 5311 (outside Edmonton)

JOHN JANZEN NATURE CENTRE

7000–143 Street NW (Fox Drive & Whitemud Drive) next to Fort Edmonton Park I $17 family, $8 general (13yrs +), $8 child (2–12yrs), $3 tots (under 2yrs) Each tot and child admission includes a free adult to supervise I Interactive exhibits, educational programming, and special events have brought visitors towards a greater awareness and engagement with the wonders of nature that surround us. edmonton.ca/attractions_ events/john-janzen-naturecentre.aspx 311 (in Edmonton) 780 442 5311 (outside Edmonton)

JUBILATIONS DINNER THEATRE

West Edmonton Mall Level Two, Phase 1 by Entrance 31 I Wed–Thur & Sun $39.95– $69.95 adult; $36.95 kids I Enjoy live theatre, fantastic dinner and great company. edmonton.jubilations.ca 780 484 2424

MAYFIELD DINNER THEATRE Closed for 2020 Summer Season 16615–109 Avenue NW I This venerable culinary and theatrical venue offers classic dining and live entertainment all season long. mayfieldtheatre.ca 780 483 4051

MUTTART CONSERVATORY

Closed for 2020 Summer Season 9626–96A Street NW I $12.50 adult, $10.50 youth, $6.50 kids I This innovative botanical garden sets the pace for plant science in western Canada and defines Edmonton’s skyline with its striking glass pyramids rising from the river valley. Inside the pyramids, the Conservatory’s year-round displays feature three biomes. A Fourth pyramid houses creative feature displays, which change up to eight times a year. There are educational programs plus great food. muttartconservatory.ca 780 442 5311

RIVER VALLEY ADVENTURES 9735 Grierson Hill I Five 1 hour trips per day I $59.99 I Explore the river valley trails on a Segway and experience the River Valley Cafe. rivervalleyadventure.com 311 (in Edmonton) 780 995 7347 (outside Edmonton)

ROYAL ALBERTA MUSEUM

9810–103a Avenue NW I $21 adult, $10 youth (7–17yrs), free (6yrs and under) I An authentic reflection of where Alberta is today and will be in the decades to come. It represents the new energy of Alberta and the diversity of our culture, telling our story with a new boldness and confidence. It’s a place where you’ll find 2.4 million uniquely Albertan stories just waiting to be told. royalalbertamuseum.ca 825 468 6000

RUTHERFORD HOUSE

11153 Saskatchewan Drive I $7 adult, $5 youth (7–17yrs), free (6yrs and under) I Rutherford House Provincial Historic Site was the home of the first Premier of Alberta, Alexander Cameron Rutherford. In 1911, A.C. Rutherford, his wife Mattie and their family moved into this beautiful brick mansion near the university campus. The family entertained friends, relatives, and influential Edmontonians for more than a generation. Today, this

restored and furnished Edwardian-era home maintains the Rutherford tradition of hospitality and offers visitors a glimpse into the past with costumed interpreters, guided tours, and special events. rutherfordhouse.ca 780 427 3995

TELUS WORLD OF SCIENCE

11211-142 Street I $23.95 adult, $19.95 youth (13–17yrs), $16.95 kids (3–12yrs), rates don’t include IMAX or special exhibits I Explore amazing ongoing exhibits including SPACE garage, science garage, and much more. telusworldofscienceedmonton.ca 780 452 9100

OUT OF TOWN ALBERTA PRAIRIE RAILWAY EXCURSIONS

4611–47 Avenue, Stettler I $85–$165 adult, $65–$145 youth, $35–$145 kids I Alberta Prairie offers an exciting one-day adventure onboard a real steam or dieselpowered train. Different themes are enacted throughout the season including murder mysteries, live stage shows, and teddy bear specials. absteamtrain.com 1 800 282 3994

CAMROSE & DISTRICT CENTENNIAL MUSEUM

4522-53 Street I Admission by donation I Explore the main building and 11 outbuildings to see some of Alberta’s history. https://www.camrose.ca/en/ living-here/camrose-and-district-museum.aspx 780 672 3298

CANADIAN ENERGY MUSEUM

50339 Hwy 60 South, Devon I $12 adult, $8 youth (6–17yrs), free (5yrs and under) I Canadian Energy Museum offers a hands-on education with a climb-aboard working oil rig. Enter the world’s largest drill bit, create alternative energy in the Learning Lab, and learn just how important this resource is in your day-to-day life. canadianenergymuseum.ca 780 987 4323


CASTROL RACEWAY

RR 253 & Hwy 2 Nisku I $10 –$20 I Watch or participate in some amazing drag, motorcycle, and oval racing. castrolraceway.com 780 461 5801

CENTURY MILE RACETRACK AND CASINO

4711 Airport Perimeter Road, Edmonton International Airport I Thoroughbred and standardbred horse racing and so much more. cnty.com/centurymile

CLIFFORD E. LEE NATURE SANCTUARY

51306 RR 264, 5 km north of Devon on Hwy 60 I 348 acres of marshland, open meadow, aspen parkland, and pine forest. The varied habitats of the Sanctuary attract a diversity of animals, including more than one hundred bird species, and provide excellent opportunities for wildlife viewing. cliffordelee.com

EDMONTON INTERNATIONAL RACEWAY 244047A Township Rd 464, 4 km west of Wetaskiwin I NASCAR stock racing and much more. edmontonraceway.com 780 467 9276

ELK ISLAND NATIONAL PARK 1–54401 RR 203 I Less than 35 minutes east of Edmonton I Just east of the city lies a year-round oasis where bison roam freely, sun glistens off lakes and ponds, and stars light up the night sky. Watch for wildlife as you hike or bike over 80 km of trails, rent canoes and paddle around the islands on Astotin Lake, or take in a free program. As night falls, stay warm by a fire and look into a sky filled with stars and the dancing Northern Lights. parkscanada.gc.ca/elkisland 780 992 5790

THE FORT HERITAGE PRECINCT

10006–100 Avenue I $8.15 adult, $5.10 youth, $4.10 kids (2–12yrs) I You can experience history up close at the Fort Heritage Precinct through our three distinct areas. In chronological order we have

the North-West Mounted Police Fort representing 1875 to 1885, the Historic Village representing 1902 to the late 1920s, and the Warden’s Residence representing 1937. historycentre.ca 780 998 1783

JURASSIC FOREST

2-23210 Township Road 564, Gibbons I $15 adult, $12 youth (13–17yrs), $10 kids (3–12yrs) I The days of the dinosaurs roar to life again in Jurassic Forest, a 40-acre prehistoric preserve just minutes from Edmonton and millions of years from the present. It’s set in an old growth forest and has been designed to minimize the impact on the forest and utilize the natural setting to enhance the display of our dinosaurs. It provides an opportunity for you to experience and learn about some of the flora and fauna indigenous to the Edmonton area. jurassicforest.com 780 470 2446

natural environment, and celebrate historic diversity. museeheritage.ca 780 459 1528

Badlands—there’s something for everyone. tyrrellmuseum.com 403 823 7707

REYNOLDS-ALBERTA MUSEUM

SPRUCE GROVE GRAIN ELEVATOR MUSEUM

6426-40 Avenue, Wetaskiwin I $15 adult, $9 youth (7– 17yrs), $0 (under 7 yrs) I The museum interprets the impact of technological change in transportation, aviation, agriculture, and industry

120 Railway Avenue I Visit the last remaining wood grain elevator on the CN Rail Line west of Edmonton. sprucegroveagsociety.com 780 960 4600

MUSÉE HÉRITAGE MUSEUM

5 St. Anne Street, St. Albert I This attraction is the keeper of the history, traditions and heritage of St Albert and district. Together with the community they build knowledge, explore the relationship with the

5120–41 Avenue I By donation I Dedicated to increasing the size of its collection, displays, education opportunities, and relevance to the community. pioneermuseum.ca 780 963 1234

STRATHCONA COUNTY MUSEUM

913 Ash Street, Sherwood Park I $5 adult, $4 kids (5–17yrs) and seniors (65yrs and older) I The majority of our exhibits encompass the Village Square, modelled after a rural community in the 1900s, which is the centre of the museum. Come in and explore our exhibits to find out what a pioneer’s life was like in Strathcona County. strathconacountymuseum.ca 780 467 8189

display gardens, and 160 additional acres of natural areas and ecological preserves. botanicgarden.ualberta.ca 780 492 3050

WETASKIWIN HERITAGE MUSEUM

5007–50 Avenue I This museum celebrates local history and provides visitors with the chance to explore firsthand the lives of early Wetaskiwinites. wetaskiwinmuseum.com 780 352 0227

SUMMERCITY.CA

UKRAINIAN CULTURAL HERITAGE VILLAGE

MULTICULTURAL HERITAGE CENTRE

5411–51 Street, Stony Plain I The Old Brick School was built in 1925 using Scottish architectural design. It has a hip-gable roof and a bell tower. The school was Stony Plain’s first regional high school and was in full operation until 1949. After extensive renovations and landscaping, the school was reborn as the Multicultural Heritage Centre and is now a provincial historic site. multicentre.org 780 963 2777

STONY PLAIN & PARKLAND PIONEER MUSEUM

from the 1890s to the present. Visitors will see a wide variety of vintage automobiles, motorcycles, bicycles, trucks, stationary engines, tractors, agricultural implements, aircraft, and industrial equipment. reynoldsmuseum.ca 780 312 2065

ROYAL TYRRELL MUSEUM

6 km northwest of Drumheller on North Dinosaur Trail I $21 adult, $10 youth (7–17yrs), free (6yrs and under) I Journey through time and come faceto-face with some of Canada’s mightiest dinosaurs. With nine ever-revolving galleries, fun hands-on activities, and the rugged beauty of Alberta’s

ST. ALBERT GRAIN ELEVATOR PARK

4 Meadowview Drive I Interpreters will take you on a guided tour of two of Alberta’s provincially designated grain elevators: the 1906 Brackman Ker Elevator and the 1929 Alberta Wheat Pool Elevator. Complete the experience with a visit to the 1920s replica train station where you can try your hand at Morse code and see how station agents lived. museeheritage.ca/heritage-sites/grain-elevators 780 459 1528

50 km east of Edmonton on Hwy 16 I $15 adult, $10 youth (7–17yrs), free (6yrs and under) I An open-air museum where costumed roleplayers recreate the lives of early Ukrainian pioneers that settled in east-central Alberta from 1892 to 1930. Step back in time to hear real stories of hardships and triumphs in Canada’s oldest and, at one-time, the largest bloc settlement of Ukrainian pioneers. ukrainianvillage.ca 780 662 3640

Summer in the City is available on the go!

U OF A BOTANIC GARDENS

51227 Hwy 60, 5 km north of Devon I $18.75 adult, $9.50 youth, $5 kids (3-12) I With 240 acres to explore, the University of Alberta Botanic Garden has something to appeal to plant enthusiasts, nature-lovers, families, and anyone seeking to spend a few idyllic hours in beautiful, natural surroundings. The garden features 80 acres of

Share your photos enjoying summer in Edmonton for a chance to win amazing prizes throughout the summer!

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W

hile COVID-19 has put a stop to many summer vacations, there is no reason to be totally housebound this summer. There are still things to do and see within a short drive of the area. The areas north, east, and northeast of the city are home to an array of unusual, memorable, and fun roadside attractions. Most of them are viewable from within a family vehicle, but as long as you maintain proper physical distancing, you can get closer–and enjoy some photo ops!

NXNE TOP 10 By Paula E. Kirman

Fun and quirky sites–and sights– for physically distanced day trips

10 excursion options for your summer day-tripping Lac La Biche David Thompson statue The 3.6-metre-tall statue on the lake shore was built to commemorate Lac La Biche’s bicentennial and to recognize David Thompson’s landing on the shores of the lake–a French translation from the Cree moniker of “Lake of the Elk.” Thompson was the first European to reach the shores of Lac La Biche, arriving in 1798 while searching for the elusive Northwest Passage. St. Paul UFO Landing Pad You will see this landmark–the world’s first UFO landing pad–as you enter St. Paul from the west. It was built in 1967 and at its grand opening that June, St. Paul was declared the Centennial Capital of Canada. Located next door is a tourist information centre. The pad’s been a boon for tourism, including a few international UFO conferences.

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Mundare Sausage Monument You can’t miss the world’s largest sausage when driving through Mundare. It sticks out like a...big sausage. The 42-foot-tall statue is a tribute to Stawnichy’s Meat Processing, a family-run sausage factory founded in 1959 that is famous for its kielbasa. However, it’s not likely the family has ever produced a sausage as big as this one: it is over 5,443 kilos (12,000 lbs.) and made of brown fiberglass. Vegreville Pysanka Monument The Vegreville egg makes for an iconic photo backdrop. Located, appropriately enough, at 4500 Pysanka Avenue, the Ukrainian-style Easter egg was designed by artist Paul Maxum Sembaliuk and was unveiled in 1975. An intricate set of two-dimensional aluminum tiles make up the geometric patterns (524 hexagonal stars and 2,208 equilateral triangles, in case anyone wants to keep count) over an aluminum frame. Hey, a snow shaker replica of the Pysanka even made it into an episode of The X-Files.

Vilna Mushroom Monument The sculpture known as World’s Largest Mushrooms is located in the village of Vilna, just a block away from Main Street. The gargantuan fungi may look like something out of Alice in Wonderland, but is actually a giant replica of the tricholoma uspale mushroom which grows wild in the area and is often used as an ingredient in regional dishes. Mushroom hunting has been a tradition in Vilna since Ukrainian settlers arrived in the early 1900s. Glendon Pyrogy Monument If you love the doughy dumpling, you won’t want to miss seeing the World’s Largest Pyrogy in Glendon, on Highway 28. You won’t need a fork–the 8.2 metre sculpture which weighs 2,721 kilograms is already mounted on one, to make it more recognizable. It’s fiberglass with a metal frame and was built in 1991.

www.ElinorLakeResort.com Lot Sales: 1-877-623-3990 42 km SE of Lac La Biche

Own your piece of paradise on spectacular Elinor Lake; on the doorstep to Alberta’s premier northern provincial park, Lakeland Provincial Park. Large annual lease lots available. Lots for sale in the Elinor Lake Condominium.

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Andrew Mallard Monument If it walks like a duck and quacks like a duck, it might be a testament to the sculpture of a mallard with a wingspan of 23 feet (7.2 metres). Weighing in at one tonne, the mallard was built in the village of Andrew to commemorate the wetlands areas in the district. It comes as no surprise that the area is a popular breeding ground for mallards. No actual mallards have ever been reported as being this size, however.

Bonnyville Splash Park giant moose shower Not many kids can claim to shower beneath a giant water-spewing moose, but then not everyone lives by Bonnyville Splash Park, where the antlered behemoth is visible to spectators up to several blocks away. It’s probably the most unique aspect of the splash park, and if you have kids, they will get a kick out of it. The park is also located near some walking and biking trails if you’re up for more recreational activity.

Smoky Lake Pumpkin Park Smoky Lake’s Pumpkin Park features a sculpture of seven large pumpkins. They’re not oversized, but replicas of winning entries from the town’s annual Great White North Pumpkin Fair and Weigh-Off that’s a must-see event for gourd fanatics. They’ve had a number gigantic winners, including one weighing in at 854.5 kilos (1,884 lbs.), a site record since 2017.

Cold Lake 4 Wing Gateway Park If you feel like making the trip up to Cold Lake, a visit to the 4 Wing Gateway Park offers a number of aircraft on mounted display in striking poses near the roadway. You can park and gaze at such legendary fighter jets as the CF-5 Freedom Fighter and the CT-133 Silver Star, located outside Cold Lake Air Force Museum. If the museum’s open, more nifty displays await. n

Summer in the City is available on the go!

SUMMERCITY.CA


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THE HIDDEN WORLD OF

Geocaching A game (quietly) taking the world by storm By Robert Michon

G

eocaches are everywhere. In fact, you’re probably within walking distance of one right now. Alarmed? Don’t be. Geocaching is a fun exploration game that’s gained a strong following in the Edmonton area. In fact, Strathcona County is home to the second-oldest geocache in Canada. But how exactly do you play? Where did it even come from? And how do you get started? Wonder no more. We’ve got all the info you need to become a geocacher extraordinaire.

Just What Is Geocaching? Geocaching is a type of way-finding game that uses GPS technology in order to lead players on a kind of scavenger hunt. Members of the geocaching community hide small waterproof containers in locations all around the world and post coordinates online for other geocachers to find. The containers always contain a logbook and, sometimes, a small trinket as a reward. When you find a geocache, you are meant to sign and date the logbook as proof of your victory, and you can even take a trinket from the cache, as long as you leave one of your own for the next geocacher to find. Anyone at all can play, as long as your cellphone has GPS capability. Geocache coordinates can bring you to almost any location, and they’re a great excuse to get out and explore. You’ll be finding hidden vistas, great trails and viewing your city from a fresh perspective.

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A Brief History Geocaching hasn’t been around long; its roots trace back only 16 years. In May of 2000, the American military made their jealously guarded GPS technology available to the general public, and only two days later, people had already begun to hide caches for their friends to find. The very first geocache was hidden in Portland, Oregon, and it was an instant hit, quickly spreading beyond the group of friends it was initially meant for. Today, geocaching is a worldwide phenomenon, with caches to be found on every continent. One has even left Earth entirely and is hidden aboard the International Space Station.

Rules of the Game While the rules can vary by location, there are some basics for everybody to keep in mind to make the activity safe and fun for everyone. First off, geocaches cannot be placed on private property without the express permission of the owner. High-security areas, such as government buildings and schools, are typically off limits, too. Geocaching employs a “leave no trace” policy, meant to preserve the natural state of the location. That means no garbage, vandalism or destruction of the area in your hunt for the cache, and if players find a disturbed site, they’re encouraged to clean it in order to preserve the reputation of the game.


Game Types

GEOCACHING LINGO FOR BEGINNERS

While there are hundreds of permutations of the game available, there are three main types that can easily be found around the city.

FTF: FIRST TO FIND. A high achievement for cachers.

Traditional caches are the basic cache type that started the whole trend. You get a set of coordinates, maybe a hint if you’re lucky, and you set off looking.

Muggle: a non-geocacher

BYOP: BRING YOUR OWN PEN. Make sure you sign the logbook! DNF: DID NOT FIND. Better luck next time. GZ: GROUND ZERO. You’re in the right spot. Take a look around. POWER TRAIL: Multiple caches in quick succession for easy finds. TRACKABLE: Trinkets that travel from cache to cache.

Puzzle caches (sometimes called mystery caches) make you work for those essential coordinates. They’re hidden within a riddle, cipher or some other puzzle, which must be solved before the hunt can even begin. Multi-caches take you on a bit of a ride. Instead of a notebook to sign, each cache contains yet another set of coordinates, which ultimately brings you to the final location. Whether you love solving mysteries, being taken on tours, visiting scenic vistas or exploring underrated locations, there is probably a geocaching variant to suit your ability level and interest. Now that you know all about it, you’ve got no excuses. Get out there and start caching! n

THE BEVILAQUA

51165 RR 250 Edmonton I 8 am-8 pm 780 955 3051

BIG ROCK BERRY FARM 3-51310 RR 261, Spruce Grove bigrockberryfarm.ca 780 886 3387

U-Picks ATTRACTED 2 APPLES

54264 RR 21, Fort Saskatchewan I Sat & Sun 10 am-4:30 pm Attracted2apples.com

THE BERRY FARM

52002 RR 232 Sherwood Park Berries I $5/lb. (other items available) I Sat & Sun 10:30 am-5 pm theberryfarm.ca 780 918 3221

Follow SUMMERCITY for regular updates and contests throughout the summer!

BRIX ’N BERRIES U-PICK

25157 Township Road 490, Leduc I Tues-Fri 10 am-6 pm, Sat 10 am-5 pm brixnberries.com 780 980 5386

CREEKSIDE HOME AND GARDEN

51530 RR 260, Spruce Grove I Mon-Sat 10 am-6 pm creeksidehomeandgarden.ca 780 470 0527

CREEKSIDE SASKATOON BERRY FARMS

GROVEBERRY PATCH

52430 RR 265, Spruce Grove I 9 am-6 pm groveberrypatch.com 780 962 5824

HAPPY ACRES U-PICK

1-52225 RR 273 Spruce Grove I Wed-Sun 10 am-7 pm happyacresupick.ca 780 968 0099

HORSE HILL BERRY FARM 3203-211 Avenue NE horsehillberryfarm.ca

PRAIRIE GARDEN

56311 Lily Lake Road, Bon Accord prairiegardens.org 780 921 2272

STRAWBERRY FIELDS 140 Grandisle Rd NW sbfields.com 780 695 3146

53418 RR 231, Strathcona County I 9 am-7 pm 780 243 2652

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QUESTIONS Test your knowledge of the city and surrounding area in this multiple-choice quiz By Gene Kosowan

H

ow much do you know about Edmonton and the rest of the Capital Region? Whether you’ve lived in the area all your life or are a relative newcomer, there’s plenty about this spot in on the Canadian prairie that’s still relatively unknown to residents. Try your luck with this local trivia quiz and if you’re stuck, answers are at the bottom.

1. How many episodes of SCTV were taped in Edmonton? a. 12

a. 11 km

b. 13

b. 22 km

c. 24

c. 33 km

d. 26

d. 44 km

2. Only one Alberta Premier was born in Edmonton. Who was it?

a. 30,000

b. Jim Prentice

b. 40.000

c. Arthur Sifton

c. 50,000

d. Ed Stelmach 3. Which of the following is the aboriginal name for Edmonton? a. Ahousat

d. 60,000 10. Which member of the band The Pursuit Of Happiness hails from St. Albert?

b. Amiskwaskihagen

a. Moe Berg

c. Maskekosihk

b. Adam Gregory

d. Shaganappi

c. Corb Lund

4. Which of the following is a sister city to Edmonton? a. Austin, Texas b. Barcelona, Spain c. Harbin, China d. Kiev, Ukraine 5. Which NHL great recently had an arena named after him in his native St. Albert? b. Jarome Iginla c. Mark Messier d. Colton Parayko 6. What song was written in Edmonton by Leonard Cohen? a. Bird On A Wire b. Closing Time c. Sisters of Mercy d. Suzanne 7. Which Edmonton hockey team won Olympic gold for Canada? a. Flyers b. Mercurys c. Oil Kings

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9. How many LED lights illuminate the High Level Bridge at night?

a. Rachel Notley

a. Joe Benoit

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8. How long is Edmonton’s River Valley stretch of parkland?

d. Thistles

d. Alfred Zappacosta 11. How many seasons did the Spruce Grove Mets exist in the Alberta Junior Hockey League? a. one b. two c. three d. four 12. Which Star Trek saga actor was falsely rumoured as a candidate to replace Citadel Theatre Artistic Director Robin Phillips in 1995? a. James Doohan b. Kate Mulgrew c. William Shatner d. Patrick Stewart 13. What Spruce Grove roadway was named after a local Olympic athlete? a. Grant Fuhr b. Jennifer Heil c. Stephanie Labbe d. Carla MacLeod


14. Which city is at a lower latitude than Edmonton? a. Amsterdam b. Glasgow c. Helsinki d. Riga 15. Which ex-Edmonton celeb shares a songwriting credit on a Rolling Stones song?

16. Edmonton’s first native-born mayor occupied that position twice, but only on an interim basis. Who was he? a. Terry Cavanagh b. Ron Hayter c. Ed Leger d. Cec Purves 17. Which magazine referred to Edmonton as a “cultural deprivation tank?”

18. Which star of The Young and the Restless was born in St. Albert?

20. Which star of the drama series Law & Order was born in Edmonton?

a. Steve Burton

a. George Dzundza

b. Sharon Case

b. Dann Florek

c. Jason Thompson

c. Jill Hennessey

d. Jess Walton

d. Michael Moriarty

19. The Edmonton Protocol is a surgical procedure focusing on which human organ?

a. Kerri Anderson

a. Maclean’s

a. heart

b. Tommy Chong

b. Newsweek

b. lungs

c. David Foster

c. Playboy

c. pancreas

d. k.d. lang

d. Rolling Stone

d. stomach

Visit summercity.ca to view answers. Upload a photo of your completed quiz to our Instagram page using the hashtag edmontonsummerinthecity for a chance to win prizes throughout the summer!

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F

lower pots add beauty to any home exterior. They are also easy to maintain. Anita Kuhlmann, one of the owners of Kuhlmann’s Greenhouse Garden Market, recommends using a good quality, all-purpose potting soil mix, along with a water-soluble fertilizer as often as once a week. Kuhlmann also says that it is better to use larger containers rather than ones that are too small. “Especially in the hot sun, smaller containers dry out quickly, plants get root-bound in the summer, and it’s harder to water them well,” she explains. This is especially important for hanging baskets, where there is both wind and sun to consider, as well as placement around the edge of the house so rain is not hitting them.

3) Begonias are better for shade, as they don’t like hot sun from 10 a.m.-4 p.m. They flower all summer long and in bright, vibrant colours like orange, yellow, and red, with dark green leaves.

Finding the right plants to add that super splash of colour is also easy. Kuhlmann recommends the following popular annuals:

4) Coleus is a great choice for people who don’t want flowers, and are making containers of foliage instead. Coleus has brightly coloured leaves, and does well in both sun and shade.

Flower Pots with Flair

1) Geraniums are good for the sun and have big, showy flowers that are visible from far away.

Five recommended flowers to brighten your surroundings By Paula E. Kirman

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2) Trailing Petunias flow over the edge of the pot, so they work well in a combination planter. They are easy to maintain and also good for sunny areas.

5) Pansies, with their cute, happy faces, can be put out early, and still look beautiful in the fall. The flowers don’t mind cooler weather, and can be in the full sun as long as they are away from the house–they don’t like the heat that can collect along the house. n


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#edmontonsummerinthecity

3 Ways to Win!

3 WAYS FOR A CHANCE TO WIN PRIZES THROUGHOUT THE SUMMER!

1. Upload your photos of summer fun, culinary creations or beverage concoctions to our SITC Instagram page 2. Sign up for our e-newsletter 3. Enter our online contests

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Live music, arcade games, axe throwing (southside), climbing wall (WEM) and sports simulator. therecroom.com 780 702 1332 or 780 900 8714

Amusement Centres COMBAT ARCHERY

8128–46 Street I $24.95– $27.95 I Combat archery, nerf wars and blacklight dodgeball. combatarcheryedmonton.com 780 490 8166

FORT EDMONTON PARK Closed for 2020 Season fortedmontonpark.ca 780 496 7381

GATEWAY ENTERTAINMENT CENTRE 3414 Gateway Boulevard I $2–$6.50 I Foosball, arcade, pool, laser tag, bowling and so much more. gatewaybowl.com 780 435 1922

JIM-BOWS ARCHERY

13955–156 Street I $35 I Features 20 metre shooting range, includes rental of equipment. jimbowsarchery.ca 780 488 7705

PHOENIX INDOOR RANGE

4706–76 Avenue I $39.95 I More than 80 guns available in a supervised 10-bay pistol range. phoenixrange.ca 780 466 0307

SNOW VALLEY AERIAL PARK 119th Street off Whitemud Drive I $34 - $42 I Cheaper online, and online bookings highly advised. Climb 40 feet above the ground, through 120 adventures including a ski bridge, a coal car, travel trailer and so many more. Lower level for little ones, features 21 games as they move just feet above the ground. snowvalley.ca/aerial-park 780 434 3991

THE REC ROOM

1725–99 Street OR West Edmonton Mall, 170 Street & 87 Avenue I $4–$35 I

WEST EDMONTON MALL

170 Street & 87 Avenue I Prices Vary I Options galore for summer fun, including: Alien Outbreak Escape Room; Dragon’s Tale Blacklight Mini-golf $14, $10 (3-10yrs); Ed’s Rec Room (billiards, bowling and arcade games); Galaxyland daily rate $49, $39 (under 43 inches tall); Ice Palace $12, $8 (3-10yrs) rental skates available; Sea Lions Rock Show; Sealife Caverns (3-10yrs); Professor WEM’s Adventure Golf $14, $10 (3-10yrs); World Waterpark daily rate $49, $39 (under 48 inches tall); Skyflyer Zipline $14 single flight wem.ca 780 444 5300

WILD WEST SHOOTING CENTRE

Phase 4, West Edmonton Mall I $40 daily rate, no license required I Starter package $59.99 I The thrill of shooting in an 8,000 square-foot safe and controlled environment. shootingcentre.com 780 426 4866

WYLD ARCHERY

14805 Yellowhead Trail I $13 –$21 I Includes archery lanes and pro shop. wyldarchery.ca 587 524 3828

CLIMBING BLOCS

8761–51 Avenue I $18 adult, $15 youth I Tons of boulders blocsclimbing.com 587 754 7470

CLIP N CLIMB

9718–12 Avenue S.W, I $20 I Unique walls, fun obstacles, and more clipnclimbedmonton.ca 780 450 2277

ROCK JUNGLE

10247–184 Street I $19 adult, $16 youth, $9 kids, plus $10 per person gear rental Climb tall walls or upside down, while bouldering, & more climbing.rockjunglefitness.com 780 454 7625

VERTICALLY INCLINED

8523 Argyll Road I $27 adult, $17 kids, includes gear rental Boulders, tall walls, variety of skill levels verticallyinclined.com 780 496 9297

WILSON CLIMBING CENTRE 8707–114 Street, U of A I $14 adult, $8 under 13 I Bouldering lounge and 48 foot tall wall ualberta.ca/kinesiology-sport-recreation/facilities/ north-campus/wilson-climbing-centre 780 492 2767

ESCAPE

Communicate and work together to escape challenging rooms and situations.

BREAKOUT ENTERTAINMENT

Mayfield Plaza, 16604–109 Avenue & Edmonton East 6111-101 Avenue I $25 I Escape from a detention centre, bomb shelter, player vs player and other scenarios breakoutedmonton.com 780 444 4416 (W) 780 705 1550 (E)

CHALLENGE THE ROOM

9603–41 Avenue I $25/ person/room I Escape from Aunt Eunice’s Will, The Tomb and more. challengetheroom.ca 780 468 1208

EXIT EDMONTON

10534–82 Avenue I $25.71 incl. tax/person/room I Escape from a catacombs, medieval, clinic and more e-exit.ca 780 705 0160

GTFO ESCAPE ENTERTAINMENT

2nd Floor, 10018–105 Street I $25/person/room I Escape from the heist, Nightfall, Visiting Hour and more. letsgtfo.ca 780 540 4836

IN TRAP ESCAPE

10355–82 Avenue I $25/ person/room I Escape from a prison cell, a haunted apartment and more. Intrap.ca 780 757 8385

SMARTYPANTZ

10524–110 Street I $25/ person, but minimum people required I Rooms include Morning Never Comes, Thirst for Murder and more. edmonton.smartypantz.ca 780 951 9293

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THE ESCAPE EMPORIUM

1103–95 Street SW I $25/ person/room I Escape from The Swamp, Pirate King and more. theescapeemporium.ca 780 708 6681

LASER TAG LASER CITY

5104–67 Avenue I $8.99/ game, drop-in I Includes laser tag, mini-paintball, VR escape rooms and eSports. lasercity.ca 780 800 4920

LASER QUEST

11271–170 Street I $9.50/ game, drop-in I Games of logic and problem solving in themed rooms. laserquest.com 780 424 2111

INDOOR PLAYGROUND ALL STARS PLAYLAND

951–12 Avenue SW I 1–3yrs $7.95–$9.95, 4–17yrs $10.95–$14.95 I Climbing structures, 115 foot zipline and arcade games allstarsplayland.com 780 757 0055

AMAZONE PLAYZONE

3210–118 Avenue I Kids 4yrs and up $12.95–$16.95 I Skyride, obstacles, video games, rock climbing and more. amazoneplayzone.com 780 760 4190

HIDE ‘N’ SEEK INDOOR PLAYGROUND

10830–170 Street I Kids 4yrs and up $12.95–$14.95 I Play structure, seven slides, spider web, trampoline, two ziplines and more. hidenseekplayground.ca 780 482 7244

MAGIC SPACE

9058–22 Avenue SW I Adults $1, kids 4yrs and up $7–$9 Play gym, inflatables, toddler play area and more. magicspace.ca 780 628 3844


TREEHOUSE PLAY

10184–34 Avenue & 4235139 Avenue I Kids 4yrs and up $11.95–$13.95 Play structure, video games, inflatables and more. treehouseplay.com 780 439 3299 780 475 6330

MAZES EDMONTON CORN MAZE

26171 Garden Valley Road, Spruce Grove I Tentative opening late July I $13, $10 (5-11yrs), free (5yrs and under) I Maze of more than 5 km of twists and turns and 85 decision points. edmontoncornmaze.ca 780 554 4540

PRAIRIE GARDENS

56311 Lily Lake Road I Bon Accord I Kids, $14, inc tax,

Adults $17.85 I Corn maze, U-pick, activities, restaurant, haunted house. prairiegardens.org 780 921 2272

a 44-acre range. younggunspaintball.com 780 963 4006

PAINTBALL

FUN PARK AMUSEMENT CENTRE

EDMONTON PAINTBALL CENTRE 5104–67 Avenue I Mini paintball facility. edmontonpaintball.ca 780 800 2324

PAINTBALL ACTION GAMES

4804-90 Avenue I Starter packages from $35 I Paintball team action for all skill levels. gotopaintballactiongames.com 780 469 0882

YOUNG GUNS PAINTBALL

Range Road 13, south of Yellowhead I Rates start at $35 I Wild West shootouts on

TRAMPOLINE 3001 Buckingham Drive, Sherwood Park I $29.99 Includes trampoline park, dunk zone, jungle gym and more.

JUMP N PLAY

10442–184 Street I 7 & Up, $19.95 I Areas for basic jumping, basketball, dodgeball and toddlers. Jumpnplay.ca 780 758 7000

LAUNCHPAD TRAMPOLINE

780 465 2664

6142–50 Street I $16.50 first hour I Includes trampoline dodgeball, basketball and freestyle. launchpadtrampoline.com 780 468 3161

JUMP 360

U-PLAY

Sherwoodpark.funparkcanada.ca

13535-156 Street I $12/hour (4–7yrs) I Open jumping areas that include virtual reality games. jump360.ca 780 482 5867

13983–156 Street I $13.95– $15.95 (less for children 5yrs and under) I Indoor playground, trampoline park. u-play.ca 780 488 3751

Share your photos enjoying summer in Edmonton for a chance to win amazing prizes throughout the summer!

#edmontonsummerinthecity

summercity.ca

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GROSVENOR

DEVON

MAYLIEWAN

FORT SASKATCHEWAN

MCKERNAN

LEDUC

NORTH GLENORA

MORINVILLE— BOB FOSTER SKATEPARK

14325-104 Avenue 7411-161a Avenue

Skateparks INDOORS

CLAREVIEW

WEST 49

3804-139 Avenue

OUTDOORS CITY-STAFFED

6110-98 Avenue

Phase 1, West Edmonton Mall

Sat–Thu 12:30 pm–8 pm & Fri 2:30 pm–8 pm.

CALLINGWOOD

17740-69 Avenue

CASTLE DOWNS

11520-153 Avenue

FULTON RAVINE SOUTH KASKITAYO

1979-111 Street

MILL WOODS

7207-28 Avenue

OUTDOORS UNSTAFFED

11341-78 Avenue 13535-109a Avenue

RAMSEY SKATEPARK

Riverbend Road & 43 Avenue

RIVERDALE

9306 Cameron Avenue

METRO EDMONTON BEAUMONT

50 Street & 55 Avenue

CAMROSE

4516-54 Street

20 Haven Avenue 101 Street & 94 Avenue 50 Street & 42 Avenue

107 Street & 106 Avenue

SHERWOOD PARK— MILLENNIUM PLACE 2000 Premier Way

SPRUCE GROVE

Kings Street in Central Park

ST. ALBERT

NE corner, Sturgeon Road & Boudreau Road

STONY PLAIN

49 Avenue & Brown Street

Summer Festivals Summer 2020 NEXTFEST

June 4–10 I Online I This sprawling arts festival features dance, visual art, music, theatre, and much more. nextfest.org 780 453 2440

HISTORIC FESTIVAL AND DOORS OPEN EDMONTON

Various locations I July 5–12 I Celebrate the history of many cultures, sites, and traditions of the Edmonton area. Participate in bus or walking tours of gardens, natural areas, cemeteries, and neighbourhoods. Events are held throughout the city. historicedmonton.ca 780 439 2797

WHYTE AVENUE ARTWALK

Whyte Avenue I July I Selected artists will be matched with a business on Whyte Avenue to hang art inside its shop window. The displays will be up for the entire month of July! art-walk.ca

SUMMER SOLSTICE MUSIC FESTIVAL June

BEAUMONT BLUES & ROOTS FESTIVAL June 18–19

FREEWILL SHAKESPEARE FESTIVAL June 15–July 11

EDMONTON INTERNATIONAL JAZZ FESTIVAL June 18–27

THE WORKS ART & DESIGN FESTIVAL June 24–July 6

EDMONTON STREET PERFORMERS FESTIVAL July

TASTE OF EDMONTON July 22–August 1

K-DAYS

July 23–August 1

BIG VALLEY JAMBOREE July 29–August 1

BLUEBERRY BLUEGRASS FESTIVAL August

HERITAGE FESTIVAL July 31–August 2

EDMONTON FOLK MUSIC FESTIVAL August 5–8

CARIWEST CARIBBEAN ARTS FESTIVAL August

Summer 2021 OPERA NUOVA June

SUSTAINIVAL June

IMPROVAGANZA June 16–26

EDMONTON ROCK FESTIVAL August 13–14

EDMONTON INTERNATIONAL FRINGE FESTIVAL August 12–22

EDMONTON BLUES FESTIVAL August 20–22

Follow SUMMERCITY for regular updates and contests throughout the summer!

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summercity.ca


SALISBURY

Township Road 52337

Range Road 232 I 4 pm–7:30 pm.

salisburyfarmersmarket.ca

FRIDAYS

EDMONTON GREATER EDMONTON

MONDAYS THE ORCHARDS

BEAUMONT

5001 Rue Eaglemont, Beaumont I 4 pm–8 pm.

SHERWOOD PARK 401 Festival Lane I 4 pm–8 pm.

4059 Orchards Drive S.W. I 6 pm–8:30 pm. orchards-connect.com/main/ farmers-market/

sherwoodparkfarmersmarket.ca

TUESDAYS

124 GRAND MARKET

THURSDAYS

BEVERLY TOWNE

124 Street & 108 Avenue I 4 pm–8 pm. 124grandmarket.ca

beverlyfarmersmarket.ca

MILLWOODS

4002-117 Avenue I 4 pm–8 pm.

WEDNESDAYS CALLINGWOD

66 Avenue & 178 Street I noon–5 pm. callingwoodmarketplace.com

CASTLE DOWNS

7207-28 Avenue I 5 pm–8 pm.

millwoodsfarmersmarket.com

OTTEWELL

7211 96A Ave I 4–7 pm.

WESTMOUNT

12720-111 Avenue I 10 am–4 pm. westmountmarket.ca

CAPILANO

5004-98 Avenue I 9:30 am–4 pm.

OLD STRATHCONA

10310-83 Avenue I 8 am–3 pm.

osfm.ca

FORT SASKATCHEWAN 102 Ave I 10 am - 2 pm. fortsaskchamber.com/ downtown-market

LEDUC

4821-50 Avenue I 10 am–1:30 pm. leducfarmersmarket.ca

SPRUCE GROVE

120 Railway Avenue I 9:30 pm–1:30 pm. sprucegrovefarmersmarket. weebly.com

WEEKENDS BOUNTIFUL

3696 97 Street I Fri 10 am–4 pm Sat 9 am–5 pm bountifulmarkets.com

CITY MARKET DOWNTOWN 10305 97 Street I Fri, Sat, Sun 9 am–3 pm.

city-market.ca

SOUTH COMMON

151 Karl Clark Road I Sat, Sun 10 am–4 pm. southcommonmarket.ca

stalbertfarmersmarket.com

STONY PLAIN

5008-51 Avenue I 9 am–1 pm.

stonyplainfarmersmarket.ca

10030-99 Avenue I 4 pm–7 pm.

124 GRAND MARKET

BASELINE

fortsaskchamber.com/ farmers-market

124 Street & 102 Avenue I 11 am–3 pm. 124grandmarket.ca

Sherwood Park I 4 pm–8 pm.

LEDUC

CALLINGWOD

4821-50 Avenue I 10 am–1:30 pm I leducfarmersmarket.ca

5202 50 Street I 11 am–3 pm. bcvmarket.com

400 Campbell Road I 10 am–3 pm.

FORT SASKATCHEWAN

baselinefarmersmarket.com

50 Street & 144 Avenue I 11 am–3 pm. mcfarmersmarket.ca

ST. ALBERT

swefm.ca

390 Baseline Road,

lacitefranco.ca

BEAUMONT CENTREVLLE

SUNDAYS

2051 Leger Road I 4 pm–7:30 pm.

8627-91 Street I 11 am–3 pm.

SATURDAYS

20 Haven Avenue I 2 pm–5 pm.

DEVON

FRENCH QUARTER

MILLER CROSSING

SOUTHWEST

11520-153 Avenue I 4 pm–8 pm.

2397-111 Street I 10 am–3 pm. centuryparkmarket.com

MORINVILLE

9908-104 Street I 3–7 pm. morinvillefarmersmarket.com

Farmers’ Markets

CENTURY PARK

66 Avenue & 178 Street I 10 am–3 pm callingwoodmarketplace.com

summercity.ca

45


Family CYCLING Dust off your saddle and gear up for an active summer with the kids

D

rop the kids off at soccer; sit in the bleachers during hockey practice— there are few activities that allow kids and parents to get outdoors and get active together. Biking is one activity that the whole family can participate in, whether getting active is as much a part of the regular routine as brushing your teeth, or a relatively new endeavour. With the help of Andrew Phelps of Cranky’s Bike Shop, we’ve put together eight tips to get your family’s summer of cycling on the right track and make a season of family adventure as easy as riding a bike.

Get a tune-up A lot can happen in the five months your bike hibernates in the shed or garage. So get in the habit of taking your bikes in at the beginning of the season for a basic tune-up. A bike mechanic will give each one a good once-over, checking for any issues with the brakes, gears and frame, as well as tire pressure. Deflated tires have almost no grip and can easily roll off the rim, turning a leisurely ride into a trip to the ER.

Check your head gear It’s required that all cyclists wear helmets, however, a safe noggin isn’t guaranteed

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by simply buckling up. Before you hit the trails this season, check your helmets for signs of wear and tear—like cracks in the shell or worn-out Styrofoam—and replace them accordingly. Elements like sun and rain also have an impact on your helmet’s lifespan. It’s recommended that casual riders replace their helmets every five years, even if there are no signs of wear and tear, while frequent riders should replace them every three.

Get the right fit When it comes to buying bikes for growing kids, the bigger the size, the longer it will last. But how big can you safely go? Keep an eye on both the height of the bike and your child’s reach. Children should be able to touch the ground while seated, and comfortably straddle the frame when they hop off the seat. And keep in mind that as bikes get taller, they get longer too. So make sure your youngster can easily steer without having to reach too much.

Go tandem Tandem bike attachments are increasingly popular with avid cyclists who want to include kids on longer rides. A tandem bike attachment, like those made by Trail-A-Bike, transforms a traditional

mountain bike into a bicycle built for two, allowing little ones to ease up on pedaling without getting left behind. Most tandem bike attachments are sized for kids between 4–7, but regardless of age, children riding must be able to touch the pedals and comfortably hold on for the duration of the ride, even if they decide to give their legs a break.

Plan your route While kicking off and seeing where the wind blows you can be fun for older riders, having a destination in mind will help keep young kids willing to pedal—particularly if that destination promises a frozen treat. You can map out your route using the city’s website, which outlines the multitude of paved trails that connect parks, neighbourhoods and the river valley. Or, for families looking to take their cycling off the beaten path, trailforks.com catalogues mountain bike trails across North America based on factors like difficulty and distance.

Stay hydrated Cycling is hard work—especially for little ones just getting used to pedaling beyond the front sidewalk. Fuel up on water and healthy, energizing snacks throughout

the ride to keep energy levels and spirits high. Equip all bikes with a bottle cage so kids have access to water as needed, and take frequent breaks to let everyone rehydrate.

Adapt Cyclists of all ages are welcome to share the sidewalk with pedestrians, while mature riders can choose the streets if they want. However, all must abide by the laws and etiquette of the space they choose to ride on. Riders pedaling on the road must obey all street signs and rules—think red lights, stop signs, and using hand signals when you turn—while cyclists who take to the sidewalks must dismount at crosswalks, and should be equipped with a bell to warn pedestrians as they approach.

Join a club Local bike shops like Cranky’s offer a variety of clubs for adult cyclists and older kids dedicated to weekly rides. Aside from providing a friendly wheel to follow, clubs can be a wealth of information, with members sharing favourite routes, mechanical tips and techniques. Kid-centered clubs like Sprockids and Pedalheads are great resources for young riders to learn about safety, cycling etiquette and riding skills in an interactive group setting. n


Beaver Hill House Park

TOP 10

OUTDOOR RECREATION SPOTS Pack a blanket, a picnic lunch, and enjoy the great outdoors

T

he city and surrounding area is filled with beautiful parks, gardens and nature reserves, and there’s no better time to explore them than during summer. Hike in the city’s river valley, admire the cultivated gardens or glimpse an elk or bison over lunch. Edmonton and area’s top summer spots are waiting for your next outdoor adventure or tranquil walk in the park.

Alberta Legislature         10800 97 Ave NW Walk through the grounds and explore the site’s many fountains and gardens. Bring a swimsuit for the wading pool, and spread out under one of the historic trees for a picnic. Visit the brand new visitor’s centre on your way in, or take a guided tour of the provincial building, which run every run every hour.

10440 Jasper Ave NW Don’t let the fact that it’s right downtown fool you into thinking that you can’t make a family outing by heading there. Beautifully upgraded, it’s a small spot for hanging out, but the real draw is the array of Aboriginal art that spruces up the surroundings.

Emily Murphy Park 1904 Emily Murphy Park Rd NW Named after the first female judge ever appointed in Canada and what was then the British Empire, this park offers a slew of paths and picnic areas. An added amenity, because of its proximity to the river, is a canoe launch site.

Government House Park 9938 Groat Rd NW Located right by the Groat Road offramp to River Road, there’s plenty of space for picnics with firepits galore for those into more barbecued eats. It’s adjacent to one of the trails that lead walkers and bikers to a wide network of paths in the city’s river valley. The only caveat here is that parking is quite limited.

Jubilee Park 510 Grove Dr, Spruce Grove, AB If you want to get out of the city to seek a grassy getaway, this spot in Spruce Grove is worth the drive west. It’s a local favourite for family picnics with barbecue units that prefer you use charcoal instead of firewood, although you’re still welcome to use the latter. And those with physical distancing in mind will appreciate the abundant green space.

Louise McKinney Riverfront Park 9999 Grierson Hill NW This recreational area doubles as an homage to the Asian community as indicated by the ornate gazebo in the park, right by a colourful Chinese garden. Although its one

of the smaller parks in the city, it’s one of the most eye-catching with an added view of the river.

Rundle Park            2909 113 Ave NW Located on the northeast side of Edmonton, Rundle Park is a beautiful multi-use area with trails, sports fields and a Frisbee golf course. There are six sites available for reservation, and many more sites available on a first come-first served basis, making it a great location for family functions and birthday parties. 

St. Albert Botanic Park      265 Sturgeon Rd, St. Albert, AB This five-acre garden is perfect for locals with an appreciation of Alberta plants. Hosting a variety of themed gardens including the famous Rose Garden, Crabapple Lane, and cozy Cottage Garden, the Botanic Park is a peaceful place to spend an afternoon.

Victoria Park         12030 River Valley Rd NW This park runs alongside the north bank of the North Saskatchewan, and is known for its walking and cycling trails. Play a family game of softball or cricket before enjoying a picnic lunch or barbeque at one of the park’s picnic sites.

William Hawrelak Park       9330 Groat Rd NW Packed with picnic spots, plenty of open green space and a man-made lake, Hawkrelak Park should make every local family’s summer to-do list. Centrally located in Edmonton’s river valley, it is easily accessible by car or public transit. Bring a football, Frisbee, or badminton rackets for a fun-filled afternoon in the park. n


Profile for T8N Magazine

Edmonton Summer in the City  

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