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Volume 12 Issue 2 September 2013 What’s Inside

Darryl Sutter

Darryl Sutter Behind the Bench and On the Ranch

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Gate Post Simmental On The Move!

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Simmental Innovations

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Breed Improvement Scrotal Circumference: Fact or Fiction

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Vet’s Advice

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What’s Happening

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Publication Mail Agreement # 40012794

Commercial Country

Behind the Bench and On the Ranch

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ad used to tell us when we were home from hockey: ‘They aren’t making any more of that’,” recounts Darryl Sutter, pointing at the rolling hills around his farm east of the small town of Viking, Alberta (approximately 120 km east of Edmonton). Over the years, this advice stuck with Darryl and his brothers as they travelled around the world playing and coaching hockey at the highest levels. Even after his first Stanley Cup victory as coach of the LA Kings in 2012, ranching is still every bit as important to Darryl Sutter as his sports career. Simmental breeders will be happy to know that their breed is an important part of Darryl’s playbook off-the ice. Arguably the most famous family in hockey history, six of Louis and Grace Sutter’s seven sons played in the NHL: Brent, Brian, Darryl, Duane, Rich and Ron (the oldest brother, Gary, pursued opportunities outside of the hockey arena, but was reputed to be the best player of all). In addition to their sports fame, the Sutter family also has deep roots in agriculture. The Sutter homestead near Viking was established in 1905. Louis took over the family farm but decided he needed a bigger land base to raise seven sons. In 1966, they moved from the original homestead, consisting of 320 acres, to a section of land (640 acres). Darryl’s family and Grace Sutter still call this property home today. In 1980 Darryl married Wanda, also a native of the Viking area. Around the same time, even though spending most of his time in Chicago playing for the Blackhawks, Darryl chose to invest in agriculture. In the eighties hockey players didn’t make the multi-million dollar salaries they do today, so just like any other young farmers Darryl and Wanda borrowed money to buy their first farmland. More interested in cattle than grain farming, Darryl also purchased cows. Initially his father fed and managed the cowherd while hockey kept Darryl away during the fall, winter and spring months. When Louis Sutter’s health failed, the cows were wintered and calved out at a neighboring farm. After Louis passed away in 2005, Darryl bought out his brothers’ and mother’s share of the farm estate. Even before this time, Darryl and Wanda had decided the farm at Viking would be their home away from hockey. The fact that this was where family roots were for both husband and wife was important, and Darryl states: “All my best friends live here.” But perhaps the key factor in this choice was their children. When their youngest son, Chris, was born in 1993 he was immediately diagnosed with Down’s syndrome. Between 1995 and 1997, Darryl took two seasons off from coaching hockey to focus on Chris’ development while farming full-time with Wanda and their older children, Jessie and Brett. Over the years, Darryl and Wanda continued to expand their land base. Their operation now consists of over 3,300 acres and about 260 cows. Darryl had

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#13, 4101 19th St. N.E., Calgary, Alberta T2E 7C4

Phone: 403-250-7979 Fax: 403-250-5121

Website: www.simmental.com Email: cansim@simmental.com

CSA Executive

President Fraser Redpath Mather, MB P/F: (204) 529-2560 C: (204) 825-7401 redsim@xplornet.com First Vice-President Kelly Ashworth Oungre, SK P: (306) 456-2749 C: (306) 861-2013 jashworth@sasktel.net Second Vice-President Randy Mader Carstairs, AB P/F: (403) 337-2928 C: (403) 660-1123 rrmader@xplornet.com

CSA Directors

John Sullivan Kazabazua, PQ P/F: (819) 467-2713 Sullivan.simmentals@bell.net Wes Mack Estevan, SK P: (306) 634-4410 C:) 306) 421-1853 wkmack@signaldirect.ca Lacey Fisher Amherst, NS P: (902) 661-0766 C: (506) 536-8454 timberwoodfarms@seasidehighspeed.com Maureen Mappin-Smith Byemoor, AB P: (403) 579-2175 silversmithcattle@yahoo.com Deanne Young Breton, AB P/F: (780) 696-3643 C: (780) 542-0855 bfcss@telus.net David Milliner Dundalk, ON P: (519) 923-9188 dgmilliner@everus.ca

Provincial Associations British Columbia President Lorne Webster Abbotsford, BC P/F: (604) 823-6797 Secretary: Jan Wisse P: (604) 794-3684

Alberta President Ashley Anderson Minburn, AB P: (780) 259-0093 ashleyandblair@gmail.com Office Contact Heather Saucier Airdrie, AB P: (403) 861-6352 F: (403) 948-2059 saucierh@telus.net Promotion / Fieldperson Chuck Groeneveld High River, AB P: (403) 938-7843 barnboss@telus.net Saskatchewan President Dave Erixon Clavet, SK P: (306) 270-2893 Secretary: Carolyn McCormack P: (306) 697-2945 sasksimmental@yourlink.ca

Manitoba President Darryl Perkin Elgin, MB P/Fax: (204) 769-2159 dperkin@westman.wave.ca Secretary: Donalee Jones P: (204) 529-2444 Email: donalee@midcan.com Ontario President Dan O’Brien Winchester, ON P: (613) 761-2403 dan.obrien@sympatico.ca Quebec Président Philippe Bellavance Ferme Sibelle Fleck SENC St-Sophie-de-Levard, QC P: (819) 288-5005 Secretaire: Sandra Berthiaume Saint-Garmain, QC P/F (819) 395-4453 info@simmentalquebec.ca Maritimes President Don Godfrey Meadow Bank, PEI P: (902) 566-3613 Secretary: Ralph Taylor P/F: (902) 895-2117

Users of any information contained in Commercial Country are encouraged to validate that information by independent means.

A Division of:

Phone: 403-250-5255 www.simmentalcountry.com Layouts & Proofs - Requests for special layouts should be in the Commercial Country office by the first of the second month preceding publication. Although every effort will be made to provide proofs on all ads, proofs are guaranteed only if all ad material arrives in the Country office prior to deadline. Simmental Country Western Representative Darryl Snider Cell: 403-803-6532 Eastern Sales Consultant Jane Crawford Cell: 519-317-5263 Editorial Policy - Articles and information in this magazine represent the opinions of the writers and the information that, to the best of our knowledge, was accurate at the time of writing.

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CSA Staff

General Manager Bruce Holmquist C: (403) 988-8676 bholmquist@simmental.com Office Manager Barb Judd P: (403) 250-7979 bjudd@simmental.com Breed Improvement Jeff Hyatt P: (780) 492-6165 jhyatt@simmental.com Marketing Co-ordinator Margo Cartwright Tel: (403) 250-5255 mcartwright@simmental.com YCSA Coordinator Emily Grey P: (819) 835-0284 egrey@simmental.com Processing Department Perry Welygan pwelygan@simmental.com Beth Rankin brankin@simmental.com

Published by:

Mailing Dates - Each issue will be mailed on or about the first of the month. Commercial Country, mailed as second class, assumes no responsibility for actual receipt date. Advertising Content - The Commercial Country assumes no responsibility for the accuracy and truthfulness of submitted advertising copy or electronically supplied pictures and has the right to refuse any ad copy or photos. Advertisers shall indemnify and hold harmless the Country containing pedigrees or statements regarding performance must conform to records kept by the Canadian Simmental Association. Copy deviating from official records may be changed as necessary without advertiser consent.

4-3342 Millar Avenue Saskatoon, Saskatchewan S7K 7G9 Office: 306-934-9696 Fax: 306-934-0744 www.todayspublishing.com

© 2012 Simmental Country (1997) Ltd. All rights reserved. The contents of this publication may not be reproduced by any means, in whole or in part, without the prior written consent of the Canadian Simmental Association. Published September 2013 For: Canadian Simmental Association #13 , 4101 - 19th Street N.E., Calgary, Alberta T2E 7C4 Phone: 403-250-7979 Fax: 403-250-5121

Accounting: Mina Serhienko & Treena Ballantyne

With Editorial Contributor

Phone: 306-867-8126 Email: office@springcreekconsulting.ca

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Circulation: Debbie Thiessen Production: Tiffany Peters, Jamie Van Cleemput & Lindsay MacGregor Please Return Undeliverable Copies To: Canadian Simmental Association #13 , 4101 - 19th Street N.E. Calgary, Alberta T2E 7C4 Phone: 403-250-7979 Fax: 403-250-5121 Publication Mail Agreement #40012794


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started out with a purebred Horned Hereford herd, but in the early eighties tried a Simmental bull. The increased weaning weights of his first Simmental-cross calves convinced him of the value of Simmental genetics, and he has used Simmental herd sires ever since. “We sell calves by the pound, so weaning weight is number one. That’s why the Simmental breed has been popular around here,” according to Darryl. Today, the cowherd is entirely Simmental, comprised of about 180 reds and 80 blacks. Darryl’s ideal cow is deep bodied, easy fleshing, solid in color, and weighs in around 1,700 lbs. Simmental females fit this bill well. The only non-Simmental females on the place are the handful of purebred Angus cows belonging to Chris, sourced from his Uncle Brian Sutter’s Atlasta Angus herd. Darryl has also succeeded in convincing his brother Brent to use Simmental bulls in his 600-head cow herd. Bulls are turned out in early May, and calves are sold at the Viking Auction Market by the September long weekend in order to accommodate Darryl’s busy schedule. Sutter calves are always the first to hit the local market, and local cattle feeders have been repeat buyers of their steers. “There aren’t many February calves in this area, and 700-pound Simmental calves are appealing to feedlots to get a good start,” Darryl says. Replacement heifers are all home-raised with the strongest heifer calves being retained in the fall, then only the best of those heifers are selected for breeding in the spring. The farm remains a family affair. Son-in-law Troy Hettinger manages day-to-day operations and keeps about 80 of his own cows. Jessie and Troy’s daughter Mackenzie (age four) is also being raised on the farm. Brett spends as much time on the farm as his NHL career allows, and a building site has already been chosen south of the main yard should he and his wife decide to return to Viking. Chris is responsible for checking fences with his John Deere Gator, and Darryl states: “I’d be happy if Chris spent the rest of his life here.” Although the 900 acres of cultivated land is either rented out or custom farmed, all feed is home-raised. Even with Darryl home in the summer to help Troy put up hay, haul bales, and wean calves, neighbors often lend a hand. The assistance goes both ways though. During the NHL lockout last fall Darryl helped a neighbor combine, and Troy also works for other farmers in the area during seeding and harvest time. When asked about balancing an NHL coaching career in California and a ranch in east central Alberta, Darryl is quick to recognize the important roles played by his family, neighbors, and technology. “I’m just the summer student here,” he laughs. “And without cell phones and computers, this would just be a small hobby operation.” Although there’s abundant pasture and excellent crops on the Sutter farm this year, this area is prone to drought. “You never know how much moisture you’ll get next year,” Darryl says. His management strategies to cope with dry years include forage and

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pasture insurance, rotating hay land, carrying over as much hay and straw as possible, and having dugouts on every quarter. Darryl is optimistic about the cattle industry today, but recognizes that it was a tough business for most of the previous 15 years with widespread drought followed by BSE. Darryl knows the advantage that off-farm income has afforded his operation, but still takes agriculture seriously, stating: “Hockey enabled us to farm, but the farm has to be a business – it has to sustain itself.” He listens closely to the advice he received from previous generations of ranchers: “‘Stick it out…it’ll be all right. It’s about the quality of your herd, how you take care of your grass, how you feed your cattle.’” When asked what kept him enthusiastic about the industry, even during the tough times, Darryl responds: “I guess ‘cause I like cows.” Whether it be hockey or farming, the key to success is hard work in Darryl’s opinion.“You’ve got to be ready to work every day and work long days. It’s still your own choice how much you want to put into it,” he says matter-of-factly. Although one could never question Darryl’s work ethic, you have to suspect that he may possess other noteworthy characteristics that have added to his personal successes. It’s plausible that his strong respect for the generation before him also helped him out, both in sport and in business. For example, when asked to talk about bringing the Stanley Cup home to Viking last summer, Darryl immediately and enthusiastically declares: “Taking it to the lodge and the extended care was the highlight. Older folks who’d listened to hockey on the radio before TV were looking at all the names on it and remembering all the old players.” Perhaps another key to his achievements is deep commitment to the next generation, as evidenced by his clear objectives for the future: “The farm is where we live, and the long-term goal is to make sure we maintain it….I want my kids to have this and do this. It’s not about how much money you make farming, it’s about sustaining it and passing it on.” Or maybe it’s his value of teamwork and community. Darryl has a passion for what he does – hockey and farming – that can’t hurt either. “I couldn’t live here without a big herd,” Darryl reflects.“Every day the first thing I do when I get up in the morning is grab a coffee, drive around and look at the cows, see what needs to be done…. That’s what we do.” Whatever the reasons for Darryl Sutter’s successes as an athlete, coach, father and farmer, one thing is certain: he is the true essence of both Canadian hockey and Canadian agriculture. Simmental genetics have been an important component in the Sutter’s cattle program. With an eye on the bottom line at the end of each year, the pounds gained by utilizing Simmental has helped the Sutter herd remain sustainable for future generations. By Trish Henderson


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From the Gate Post

By Bruce Holmquist General Manager, Canadian Simmental Association

Simmental on the Move!

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algary was the place to be in mid-July as the Canadian Simmental Association hosted several events that focused on education, fund raising, business, youth and networking. For those who arrived early the activities began on Saturday to watch the Calgary Stampede youth and steer shows and the next day the group grew in size with many attending “Super Sunday” and the finals of the rodeo and chuck wagon races. All reported having a great time and appreciated the exceptional Stampede hospitality while viewing a part of our western heritage. Monday was the beginning of the Beef Innovations Symposium which brought researchers, industry partners and producers to a common venue in order to educate and also share information and experiences in the ever evolving science of beef cattle genetic improvement. The impressive line-up of world renowned researchers offered an opportunity to hear experts in several fields of livestock research with the focus on the science of genomics. This was an opportunity that is not presented often and the one hundred and fifty plus attendees were able to interact with each of the speakers and to participate in a question and answer process and also engage in a producer panel at the conclusion Tuesday afternoon. A complete video of the event is available at www.simmentalinnovations.com and a more detailed report can be found within this magazine. Many positive comments were made regarding the organization of the event and the leadership that the CSA provided in hosting Beef Innovations 2013. Thank you to all who made it a success and especially our sponsors. Following the conclusion of Beef Innovations the CSA Annual General Meeting banquet was held and a highlight of the evening was Garth Sweet Simmental Foundation auction. Without a doubt this was the most successful GSSF fundraiser ever raising over $53000.00. While all donations were very much appreciated and contributed to the overall amount there were two that deserve special mention; Marlin and Lucille LeBlanc (R Plus Simmentals), Estevan, Saskatchewan donated the selection of a bred heifer from their great breeding program and New Holland Agriculture provided the use of a Tractor-baler Combo which was also very much appreciated. The support from all the donators, buyers and bidders of this very worthwhile event was outstanding!

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Wednesday was another busy day with a group touring out to Mader Ranches at Carstairs to view the cattle on display there. Unfortunately the CSA board of directors and staff were busy in a board meeting and unable to attend however from all reports the cattle and hospitality were outstanding. The focus of the afternoon was the CSA Annual General Meeting which was attended by a group of interested members who received reporting on the 2012 activities of the Association and then approved the actions of the board and staff. A by-law amendment to change the up-grading table was approved and once this change receives approval from Agriculture and Agrifood Canada will allow upgrading from the Simmental female in a similar fashion to what has historically been recognized through the Simmental male. This AGM saw the completion of the terms for two CSA directors, Ron Nolan and Kara Enright both from Ontario. As President, Ron led the CSA for almost two years and did a tremendous job; his leadership and business acumen greatly assisted in the decisions that were made. Kara’s input at the board table was always well thought out and presented in a positive and professional fashion. New directors to the CSA board are Maureen Mappin-Smith, Byemoor Alberta and David Milliner, Dundalk Ontario who will join Lacey Fisher, Amherst New Brunswick who was successful in her re-election.The time dedicated to the CSA by all directors is of tremendous value and much appreciated. While the CSA events were being held in Calgary our Junior program was being showcased at the National YCSA classic in Okotoks. A group of keen and energetic youth were busy focusing on marketing, sales, herdsman quizzes and other events designed to expand their knowledge of the breed and industry as a whole as well as developing tools necessary to become leaders of the future. The confirmation classes were held Thursday and culminated the three days of very successful activities. One disappointment was that there was only a small crowd in the stands to show support and to appreciate the work that all involved contribute to the YCSA. All in all the flurry of Simmental activities in Calgary were a great success. Thank you to all who worked so hard to make them a success as well to our sponsors and those who took time out of their busy schedules to attend. You are the ones who make the Simmental breed the success it is!


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Selling these great bred heifers at Bar 5 ...

PHS Polled Zest

DOB January 10, 2012 SIRE BLI Warlord 915W DS BHR Sir Ro-Leo K680 Bred to Sibelle Dirty Harry 25Z

PHS Polled Zowie

DOB January 22, 2012 SIRE BLI Warlord 915W DS Dora Lee Keswick Bred to Sibelle Dirty Harry 25Z

PHS Belle’s Polled Zenith

DOB January 28, 2012 SIRE Bar 5 SA Evan 440L DS Bar 5 P SA Expert 826M Bred to Sibelle Dirty Harry 25Z

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Bar 5 Extravaganza S I M M E N TAL SAL E

Saturday, October 5, 2013 • Markdale, Ontario

PHS Zinfandel

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Sibelle Dirty Harry 25Z SIRE Virginia Walker 97W DS PRL Houston 005H

Sibelle Dirty Harry is the service sire for all of the sale heifers. He is well balanced, wide topped, very deep ribbed and has tons of natural muscle.”

SERVICE SIRE

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION AND CATALOGUES CONTACT: Transcon Livestock Jay Good (403) 556-5563 • Office (403) 638-9377 • Website: www.transconlivestock.com 13


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Appuye sur le poteau de cloture

Par Bruce Holmquist General Manager, Canadian Simmental Association

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La race Simmental en action!

l fallait être à Calgary vers la mi-juillet, alors que l’Association Simmental Canadienne était l’hôte de plusieurs évènements d’importance touchant l’éducation, la levée de fonds, les affaires, les jeunes éleveurs et le réseautage. Les activités ont débuté le samedi pour ceux qui étaient arrivés plus tôt, par la compétition des jeunes éleveurs et le concours de bouvillons au Stampede de Calgary. Le lendemain, le groupe s’est accru et plusieurs invités ont participé au « Super Dimanche », en regardant les finales du rodéo et de la course de “chuck wagon”. Tout le monde a affirmé avoir passé du bon temps et apprécié la célèbre hospitalité du Stampede, tout en prenant contact avec nos traditions de l’ouest. Le symposium des “Innovations bovines’ a débuté le lundi matin, lequel a rassemblé autour d’un même thème des chercheurs, des producteurs et des partenaires de l’industrie, ce qui leur a permis de s’informer et de partager leurs expériences et leurs connaissances dans le domaine constamment en évolution de l’amélioration génétique des bovins de boucherie. Une brochette impressionnante de chercheurs de renommée mondiale nous a offert la chance d’écouter ces experts touchant plusieurs domaines liés à l’élevage, et plus spécifiquement concernant la génomique. Voici un évènement qui ne présente pas souvent, et les quelques cent cinquante participants ont eu la chance d’échanger avec chacun des conférenciers, de leur poser des questions et également d’assister à un panel de discussion destiné aux producteurs lors de la journée du mardi en fin de programme. Un reportage vidéo de l’évènement est accessible en ligne au : www.simmentalinnovations.com, alors que vous trouverez un rapport détaillé plus loin dans cette revue. On a entendu plusieurs commentaires positifs en regard de l’organisation de cet évènement et du leadership démontré par l’ASC en étant l’hôte des « Innovations bovines 2013 ». Nous remercions tous ceux qui ont contribué à ce succès, en particulier nos généreux commanditaires. Le banquet de l’assemblée annuelle de l’ASC s’est tenu immédiatement après le Symposium des « Innovations bovines 2013 », avec comme clou de la soirée l’encan de la Fondation Garth Sweet Simmental (FGSF). Cette édition de la levée de fonds de la FGSF fut sans contredit la plus réussie, avec une cueillette totale de plus de 53 000. $. Alors que tous les dons ont été grandement appréciés et nous ont permis d’amasser cette importante somme, on doit en signaler deux en particulier soit; Marlin et Lucille LeBlanc (R Plus Simmentals) d’Estevan en Saskatchewan qui ont donné la sélection d’une taure gestante parmi toutes leurs femelles d’élevage et la compagnie « New Holland Agriculture » qui nous a offert l’utilisation du Combo « Tractor-Baler ». Tous les donateurs, les acheteurs et les enchérisseurs ont témoigné un formidable support envers cet évènement très méritoire.

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La matinée du mercredi fut tout aussi occupée, alors qu’un groupe s’est rendu chez Mader Ranches de Carstairs afin d’y voir l’exhibit d’animaux sur place. Les directeurs ainsi que le personnel n’ont malheureusement pas été en mesure d’y participer, étant alors en réunion du conseil d’administration. Les échos entendus nous permettent de préciser que les animaux exposés et l’hospitalité ont été très appréciés. L’Assemblée générale annuelle (AGA) de l’ASC a pris l’affiche en après-midi, avec la présence d’un groupe d’éleveurs qui ont pris connaissance des divers rapports d’activités de l’association en 2012, puis ils ont pu donner leur approbation envers les actions du personnel et des directeurs. Un amendement aux statuts et règlements concernant les pourcentages de sang obtenus par croisement d’absorption a été approuvé par les membres et, lorsque celui-ci aura reçu l’aval d’Agriculture et Agroalimentaire Canada, cela fera en sorte que les femelles Simmental pourront être reconnues de la même manière que les mâles Simmental dans les cas de croisement d’absorption. La tenue de cette AGA correspondait avec la fin du mandat de deux directeurs de l’ASC, soit Ron Nolan et Kara Enright, tous les deux de l’Ontario. À titre de Président de l’ASC pour près de deux ans, Ron a accompli un travail remarquable ; son leadership et ses aptitudes du monde des affaires ont été très utiles par rapport à nos décisions et orientations. La contribution de Kara autour de la table du conseil fut toujours bien réfléchie, positive et présentée de manière très professionnelle. Deux nouveaux directeurs ont été élus au conseil d’administration, soit Maureen Mappin-Smith de Byemoor en Alberta et David Milliner de Dundalk en Ontario, auxquels s’ajoute également Lacey Fisher d’Amherst au NouveauBrunswick, qui a été réélue pour un autre mandat. Tout le temps consacré par les directeurs envers l’ASC représente une valeur inestimable et cela est très apprécié. Notre programme des éleveurs juniors était le point de mire à la Classique des JESC tenue à Okotoks, en même temps que les activités entourant l’AGA de l’ASC avaient lieu à Calgary. Un groupe de brillants et énergiques jeunes éleveurs ont participé à diverses compétitions touchant la commercialisation, les ventes et les connaissances en conduite de troupeau, le tout ayant pour objectif de parfaire leurs connaissances de la race et de l’industrie, et de se doter d’outils qui leur permettront de devenir nos leaders de demain. Les classes finales eurent lieu le jeudi et ont mis un terme à trois jours d’activités bien réussies. Les jeunes ont été toutefois déçus par la faible présence de spectateurs dans les estrades pour les encourager et apprécier leurs efforts de tous ceux ayant contribué au succès des JESC. Cette rafale d’activités Simmental tenues à Calgary a malgré tout connu un vif succès. Merci à tous ceux qui ont travaillé si fort envers l’atteinte de cette réussite, de même qu’à tous nos commanditaires ainsi qu’à tous ceuxlà qui ont pris le temps d’y assister en dépit de leur horaire déjà chargé. Vous êtes ceux qui font que la race Simmental connaît le succès actuel!


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By Trish Henderson

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roducers from all major Canadian beef breeds took advantage of a unique opportunity to learn more about advances in the world of beef cattle genetics on July 15th and 16th when the Canadian Simmental Association (CSA) hosted Beef Innovations 2013 in Calgary. This first-of-its-kind symposium provided an opportunity forcattle producers – both purebred and commercial – to meet worldrenowned scientists in the field of beef animal genomic research. The event was a culmination of two years of research supported by the CSA though its $3.5 million Simmental Innovations genetic improvement initiative; which focuses on helping cattle breeders identify, select and breed cattle that are more fertile, more feed efficient, and produce higher quality beef. “The process of beef improvement is taking shape as a three-legged stool,” CSA General Manager Bruce Holmquist says. The first leg of the stool is the pedigree and visual assessment, telling us who the animal is. The second leg of the stool is the performance of that animal, or phenotype, telling us what he or she did. Genomics, which can be thought of as gene mapping, is the third leg of the stool—making it stable by providing the means to accurately predict what traits an animal is genetically capable of passing on to its offspring. Dr. Mike Goddard from the University of Melbourne, Australia was the lead-off presenter amongst the nineteen world-class guest speakers at Beef Innovations 2013. According to Dr. Goddard, traditional selection based on performance and pedigree works – it’s just a slow for process for some traits such as fertility and meat quality. Genomics can speed up the pace of selection for such important characteristics, which can have a big impact on the bottom line for all beef producers: from cow calf operations to packers. Facts from Beef Innovations 2013 Ten years ago, about $1 billion was spent to sequence the human genome. Today the cost of a complete genomic sequence of one bovine animal costs approximately $5,000. Decreased costs, improved technology, and better statistical methodology have greatly enhanced the accuracy of genomic predictions. “DNA tests are now a viable means of improving accuracy of selection.” - Dr. Wade Shafer Genomic testing can help identify animals that are more feed efficient. Breeding more efficient cattle reduces costs of production for producers, shrinks the environmental foot print of beef production, and produces more food for the world. “A 10% improvement in feed efficiency across the feedlot sector is worth $1.2 billion in reduced feed costs.” – Dr. Bob Weaber Further genomic advances will help scientists and breeders better understand complex relationships between important traits, such as meat quality, fertility, and feed efficiency. “Tenderness is the most important beef desirability trait, but many genes and many factors affect tenderness.” – Dr. Mike Dikeman One way Canadian Simmental breeders will soon be able to utilize genomic information in their breeding decisions is through the use of genomic-enhanced expected progeny differences, or GE-EPDs. Dr. Goddard outlined how this process works: 1) Purebred breeder takes hair root sample (DNA) from animal and sends it to lab; 2) Lab analyzes animal’s genotype and makes genomic predictions; 3) Breed associations incorporate genomic predictions with traditional EPDs to create GE-EPDs that are more accurate tools for bull buyers.

The CSA will soon be offering GE-EPDs and a few other breed associations, including American Simmental, have already added this new tool to their arsenal. Dr. Goddard estimates that the value of GEEPDs is $100 to $600 per bull. Despite this potential value, Dr. Bob Weaber of Kansas State University had a warning for purebred breeders at Beef Innovations 2013: GE-EPDs can be a marketing tool, but they are best used as a selection tool. Although there has recently been great technological advancement in genomic information for beef cattle, there is still room to make ita better tool for producers. For example, Dr. John Crowley of Livestock Gentec told Beef Innovations participants that genomics currently allow for prediction of feed efficiency with 35% accuracy within beef breeds and 15% accuracy in crossbred cattle. Compare this to 75% accuracy for some genomic predictions used in the dairy sector, and scientists agree that more work needs to be done on genomic predictions for beef cattle. The need for worldwide collaboration was a resounding theme at Beef Innovations 2013. According to presenters, the most effective method for improving genomic prediction tools is global data sharing amongst those who collect genotypic and phenotypic information. By doing so, individual breeders, breed associations, private companies, and academia can contribute to the growth of genomic databanks that are more statistically accurate. The ultimate goal – a common one across all breeds and all countries – is to produce tools such as GE-EPDs that can accurately predict an animal’s potential today, and will continue to be just as accurate when used in future generations of cattle. Facts from Beef Innovations 2013 Next steps for research include increasing the accuracy of genomic predictions within groups of similar cattle (such as a single breed) and creating methods to predict the performance of crossbred cattle. “The seed stock industry has always accepted new technologies, and genomic information is a great new tool to embrace.” - Dr. John Pollak With genomics, the potential of an individual animal can be predicted at birth; when combined with artificial insemination and embryo transplant technologies, genomic data can greatly speed up the rate of genetic improvement. Breeders must understand the traits they’re selecting, and what direction these decisions will take their herd. “The faster one goes, the harder it hurts if one crashes! It is more important than ever to ensure one goes in the right direction.” - Dr. Jacques Chesnais Collaboration across the beef industry is required in order to improve the accuracy of genomic predictions, and to learn more about economically important traits such as feed efficiency, carcass quality and fertility. “Through its Simmental Innovations projects, the CSA will collect 15,000 genotypes. This will help increase accuracy of all genomic predictions.” - Dr. Steve Miller Those doubting the relevance of genomic technology in the beef sector need look no further than the dairy and hog industries. The Holstein breed was an early adopter of genomics. According to Dr. Jacques Chesnais, another Beef Innovations 2013 presenter, genomic technology is the single biggest event for the dairy sector since the introduction of frozen semen. “Genomics have allowed the dairy sector to double its rate of genetic progress. Today, all elite dairy breeders genotype their females,” Dr. Chesnais says. Recounting the story of purebred swine producers in North American losing their market when corporate breeders began

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By Trish Henderson

es producteurs représentant toutes les principales races de bovins de boucherie du Canada ont participé les 15 et 16 juillet dernier à Calgary au symposium Innovations Bovines 2013, un évènement organisé par l’Association Simmental Canadienne (ASC), lequel a constitué une opportunité unique de s’enquérir des plus récents progrès dans le monde de la génétique bovine. Grâce à ce symposium, qui était une première initiative du genre, les producteurs de bovins de race pure ou commerciaux ont eu l’opportunité de rencontrer des scientifiques de renommée mondiale dans le secteur des recherches en génomique chez les bovins de boucherie. Cet évènement constituait le point culminant des efforts de recherche supportés depuis deux ans par l’ASC, grâce à son projet de recherche de 3,5 millions $ touchant les innovations en amélioration génétique de la race Simmental; lequel vise à appuyer les éleveurs dans leur travail d’identification, de sélection et d’élevage de bovins plus fertiles, ayant une meilleure conversion alimentaire et produisant une viande de bœuf de plus haute qualité. Entendus lors des Innovations bovines 2013

Les prochaines phases de la recherche concernent une augmentation de la précision des prédictions génomiques à l’intérieur des groupes de bovins du même type (une race par exemple) et le développement de méthodes de prédiction des performances des bovins croisés. “Les nouvelles technologies ont toujours été bien acceptées par l’industrie pur-sang, et l’information génomique représente un nouvel outil à apprivoiser.” – Dr John Pollak Le potentiel d’un sujet donné peut être prédit à la naissance avec la génomique; si on combine les données génomiques avec l’insémination artificielle et la transplantation embryonnaire, celles-là viennent accroître le taux de progrès génétique. Les éleveurs doivent bien connaître les caractères qu’ils sélectionnent et l’orientation que prendra leur troupeau suite à leurs décisions. “Plus vous allez vite et plus vous vous frapperez fort en cas d’accident ! Il est encore plus important de s’assurer qu’on va dans la bonne direction.” - Dr Jacques Chesnais Une collaboration de toute l’industrie bovine est requise si on améliorer la précision des prédictions génomiques, et accroître nos connaissances relativement aux caractères d’importance économique tels que la conversion alimentaire, les qualités de la carcasse et la fertilité. “L’ASC recueillera 15 000 génotypes grâce à son projet d’innovations en génomique. Cela contribuera à accroître la précision de toutes les prédictions génomiques. ” – Dr Steve Miller

2) Le laboratoire analyse le génotype de l’animal et produit des prédictions génomiques ; 3) Les associations de race incorporent ces prédictions génomiques au niveau de leurs EPD traditionnels afin de publier des GE-EPD, lesquels constituent des outils beaucoup plus fiables pour les acheteurs de taureaux. L’ASC offrira bientôt des EPD-GE, alors que quelques autres associations de race, dont l’Association Simmental américaine, ont déjà ajouté ce nouvel outil à leur arsenal. Le Dr Goddard a estimé que les GE-EPD peuvent correspondre à une valeur de 100 $ à 600 $ par taureau. Bien que cette valeur potentielle puisse exister, le Dr Bob Weaber de l’Université de l’état du Kansas a exprimé la réserve suivante aux éleveurs pur-sang lors des Innovations Bovines 2013 : les GE-EPD peuvent être un outil de marketing, toutefois ils devraient être davantage utilisés comme un outil de sélection. Entendus lors des Innovations bovines 2013

La partie la plus facile est d’obtenir la cartographie des gènes. Le défi est de comprendre, d’utiliser et de poursuivre les avancées sur les données génomiques. “La nouvelle génération en génomique aura un effet sur plusieurs secteurs, en particulier en agriculture.” – Dr Graham Plastow La précision de la sélection peut être augmentée si on combine les données génétiques avec les données phénotypiques, les objectifs d’élevage, une bonne gestion et les programmes des associations de race. “En tant qu’éleveur de bovins de race pure, si vous n’avez pas encore commence à utiliser l’information génomique, vous auriez dû le faire depuis l’an passé !” – Dr Donagh Berry Les profils génomiques deviendront encore plus importants lorsque les parcs d’engraissement et les abattoirs offriront des primes reliées à certains caractères tels que la conversion alimentaire et la qualité de la carcasse. Notre système de traçabilité au Canada sera utile afin de pouvoir tirer profit de ces caractères. “Un jour, on pourrait effectuer un test d’ADN sur chaque veau.” – Dr Steve Miller

Bien qu’il y ait eu d’importantes avancées technologiques dernièrement au niveau de l’information génomique pour les bovins de boucherie, on estime qu’il y a encore moyen d’en faire un meilleur outil pour les producteurs. Par exemple, le Dr John Crowley du groupe “Livestock Gentec” a mentionné aux participants des Innovations Bovines que la génomique permet présentement d’estimer une prédiction pour “Le processus d’amélioration génétique bovine ressemble à une la conversion alimentaire avec une précision de 35 % à l’intérieur des structure comparable à un banc à trois pattes,” disait le Directeur Général races pures et de 15 % chez les bovins croisés. En comparant ces valeurs de l’ASC, M. Bruce Holmquist. La première patte du banc est en fait la au niveau de précision de 75 % de certaines prédictions génomiques généalogie et l’apparence visuelle du sujet, lesquels nous indiquent ce que présentement considérées dans le secteur laitier, les scientifiques présents l’animal est. La deuxième patte du banc représente la performance de cet étaient d’accord pour dire que davantage de travail doit être réalisé animal, et elle nous précise ce qu’il ou elle a fait. Le profil génomique, qui concernant les prédictions génomiques chez les bovins de boucherie. peut être obtenu par la cartographie des gènes, est en fait la troisième patte Lors des Innovations Bovines 2013, on a clairement reconnu la du banc — celle qui le rend plus stable, en nous fournissant les moyens de nécessité d’obtenir une meilleure collaboration partout dans le monde. prédire avec précision les caractères pouvant être transmis par un animal Selon les conférenciers, on pourrait améliorer plus efficacement les à sa progéniture. outils de prédictions génomiques en favorisant un partage plus global Le Dr Mike Goddard de l’Université de Melbourne en Australie a été des données parmi tous ceux qui effectuent la cueillette d’informations le premier conférencier, parmi une brochette de dix-neuf conférenciers de génotypiques et phénotypiques. Ce faisant, les éleveurs particuliers, renommée mondiale invités au Symposium Innovations Bovines 2013. les associations de race, les compagnies privées et la communauté Selon le Dr Goddard, la sélection effectuée traditionnellement à partir des scientifique pourraient contribuer à l’augmentation des bases de données performances et de la généalogie donne des résultats – il s’agit en fait génomiques statistiquement plus précises. L’objectif ultime, et cela d’un processus plus lent par rapport à des caractères tels que la fertilité est partagé conjointement par toutes les races et tous les pays, est de et la qualité de la viande. La génomique peut contribuer à accélérer le développer des outils tels que les EPD-GE qui vont aujourd’hui prédire rythme de la sélection pour de tels caractères d’importance, ce qui peut avec précision le potentiel d’un animal, et qui continueront d’être tout grandement influencer la rentabilité chez tous les producteurs de bœuf : aussi précis lorsqu’on les utilisera chez les prochaines générations de des producteurs vache-veau jusqu’aux abattoirs. bovins. Les éleveurs Simmental du Canada pourront prochainement incorporer Tous ceux qui ont des doutes quant à la pertinence des technologies l’information génomique dans leurs décisions d’élevage, en utilisant des génomiques dans le secteur des bovins de boucherie devraient regarder du écarts prévus chez la descendance améliorés par la génomique, ou si vous côté des industries laitières et porcines. La génomique a été rapidement voulez des EPD-GE. Le Dr Goddard a expliqué le déroulement de ce adoptée par la race Holstein. D’après le Dr Jacques Chesnais, un autre processus: conférencier des Innovations Bovines 2013, la technologique de la 1) Les éleveurs de race pure recueillent des échantillons de poils génomique représente l’évènement spécifique le plus marquant dans (ADN) sur leurs animaux et les envoient au laboratoire; le secteur laitier depuis l’introduction de la semence congelée. “La

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offering commercial hog producers superior composite genetics, Dr. Wade Shafer of the American Simmental Association told Beef Innovations 2013 attendees that leveraging science, such as genomics, could be the key to ensuring survival of the family seed-stock operation. Nonetheless, experts speaking at Beef Innovations 2013 also stressed the need for well-balanced breeding decisions. Focusing too much on complex traits that are influenced by many genes and environmental factors, such as feed efficiency or carcass quality, can adversely impact other important characteristics. For example, Dr. Yuri Montanholi of he University of Guelph shared preliminary research findings that demonstrate a possible negative correlation between feed efficiency and semen quality. More research is needed in order to confirm unintentional consequences of intense selection for specific beef cattle characteristics. Facts from Beef Innovations 2013 Mapping genes is now the easy part. Understanding, utilizing and leveraging genomic data is the challenge. “Next generation genomics will impact nearly every industry, especially agriculture.” – Dr. Graham Plastow Combined with phenotypes, breeding objectives, sound management, and breed programs, genomic data can improve accuracy of selection. “If you haven’t started using genomics as a purebred cattle producer, you should have started last year!” – Dr. Donagh Berry Genomic profiles will become even more important once packers and feedlots begin paying premiums for certain traits, such as feed efficiency or carcass quality. Our traceability system in Canada will provide an advantage for tracking these traits. “Someday we may DNA test every calf.” – Dr. Steve Miller For maximum economic benefit, commercial cattle producers should be selecting the best possible herd sires. It is the responsibility of cattle breeders to make well-informed seed-stock selections in order to market only bulls that can offer genetic improvement to commercial herds. It is in every cattleman’s best interest to produce more fertile and feed efficient animals that also yield high quality beef. The CSA is proud to be spearheading initiatives like Beef Innovations 2013. Scientific research like that funded through CSA’s own Simmental Innovations arm will help further the industry by improving the bottom line for beef producers from cow-calf to packer, reducing the environmental footprint of our industry, and providing a better beef-eating experience for the consumer. Interested in learning more? Watch future issues of Simmental Country for columns on individual Beef Innovations 2013 guest speaker presentations and research, and check out video coverage of Beef Innovations 2013 online at www.simmentalinnovations.com.

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génomique a permis au secteur laitier de doubler son taux de progrès génétique. Aujourd’hui, tous les éleveurs laitiers d’élite font analyser le génotype de leurs femelles,” affirme le Dr Chesnais. En racontant l’histoire des éleveurs porcins de race pure en Amérique du nord qui perdaient leur marché alors que les élevages des grandes compagnies offraient aux producteurs commerciaux des porcs supérieurs de type “composite”, le Dr Wade Shafer de l’Association Simmental américaine a indiqué aux participants des Innovations Bovines 2013 que les avancées de la science, telles que la génomique, pourraient être un facteur clé permettant d’assurer la survie des entreprises familiales d’élevage de bovins de race pure. Néanmoins, les experts ayant présenté une conférence aux Innovations Bovines 2013 ont rappelé l’importance de conserver un bon équilibre au niveau des décisions d’élevage. En mettant trop d’emphase sur des caractères plus complexes tels que l’efficacité alimentaire et les qualités de la carcasse, lesquels sont influencés par plusieurs gènes et par divers facteurs environnementaux, cela pourrait avoir un impact défavorable sur d’autres caractéristiques importantes. Par exemple, le Dr Yuri Montanholi de l’Université de Guelph nous a présenté les résultats préliminaires de ses recherches, lesquelles semblent démontrer une corrélation possiblement négative entre l’efficacité alimentaire et la qualité du sperme de taureau. On devra donc effectuer plus de recherche afin de confirmer des effets imprévus liés à une sélection plus intensive envers certaines caractéristiques spécifiques inhérentes à l’élevage des bovins de boucherie. Entendus lors des Innovations bovines 2013 Il y a dix ans, le séquençage complet du génome humain a coûté un milliard $. Aujourd’hui, le coût approximatif pour obtenir la séquence complète du génome d’un bovin est d’environ 5000 $. La précision des prédictions génomiques a été améliorée beaucoup en raison des coûts plus faibles, d’une meilleure technologie et de meilleures méthodes statistiques. “Les analyses d’ADN représentent maintenant des moyens réels d’améliorer la précision de la sélection. ” – Dr Wade Shafer L’analyse génomique peut nous aider à identifier des animaux avec une meilleure conversion alimentaire. L’élevage de bovins plus efficaces réduit les coûts de production pour les producteurs, vient diminuer les effets de l’environnement affectant la production bovine et permettre de produire plus d’aliments pour la planète. “Une amélioration de 10 % de la conversion alimentaire au niveau des parcs d’engraissement correspond à une réduction de 1,2 milliard $ des coûts d’alimentation.” – Dr Bob Weaber Les progrès futurs en génomique aideront les scientifiques et les éleveurs à mieux comprendre les relations complexes entre des caractères d’importance tels que la qualité de la viande, la fertilité et la conversion alimentaire. “La tendreté de la viande est un caractère démontrant une grande importance, mais elle est influencée par plusieurs gènes et plusieurs facteurs. ” – Dr Mike Dikeman

S’ils veulent obtenir les bénéfices économiques maximaux, les producteurs de bovins commerciaux devraient sélectionner les meilleurs taureaux disponibles. Les éleveurs de race pure ont toujours la responsabilité de prendre des décisions d’élevage basées sur des informations fiables, afin de ne vendre que les taureaux pouvant améliorer la génétique des troupeaux de bovins commerciaux. En fait, tous les éleveurs de bovins ont intérêt à produire des animaux plus fertiles et possédant une bonne efficacité alimentaire, tout en produisant une viande de bœuf de qualité. L’ASC est fière d’avoir fait montre de leadership en organisant une activité comme les Innovations Bovines 2013. Des recherches scientifiques telles que celles présentement financées par l’intermédiaire des Innovations Simmental initiées par l’ASC devraient aider encore davantage toute l’industrie bovine, en favorisant une amélioration de la rentabilité des producteurs bovins, des producteurs vache-veau jusqu’aux abattoirs, tout en diminuant également les empreintes environnementales sur notre industrie et en permettant aux consommateurs de déguster une viande de bœuf de grande qualité. Intéressé à en apprendre davantage ? Surveillez les prochaines parutions de la revue Simmental Country, dans lesquelles seront publiées des articles concernant les recherches et les présentations effectuées lors des Innovations Bovines 2013. Des vidéos tournés lors des Innovations Bovines 2013 sont aussi disponibles en ligne au : www.simmentalinnovations.com.


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Breed Improvement

Scrotal Circumference Fact or Fiction

Jeff Hyatt – CSA Research Coordinator

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here are many documented reports out there about correlations between scrotal circumference and traits such as heifer age at puberty, pregnancy rates, semen production, etc. If you’ve been around the cattle industry long enough (which doesn’t have to be long), I’m sure you’ve heard at least one of them, if not all. At a young age, bulls can all develop at a different pace. So when trying to decide whether or not to cull a bull at 6 months of age because of small scrotal circumference, consider that approximately 50% of bulls that have scrotal circumference of 23 cm will meet minimum size at a year old. That being said, what are considered to be the minimum scrotal sizes for Simmental bulls? There has been some confusion out there as a result of the Western Canadian Association of Bovine Practitioners (WCABP) decision to change their minimum requirements, that the CSA had also changed our standards. That information is false; the CSA’s guidelines have stayed the same and we were not consulted when the WCABP decided to make changes to their requirements.

What does increased scrotal circumference mean? Larger scrotal circumference reflects more sperm producing tissue. Up to approximately 38 cm, there is an increased probability of superior seminal quality, which means less defective sperm in a study done on 1944 bulls at Colorado State University. There have been several research trials, with some producing conflicting articles, over the years on the correlation between scrotal circumference and maternal traits. There have been suggested correlations as high as 81% and as low as 15% between increased scrotal size and younger age at puberty. However, one research trial done at USDA-MARC in Clay Center, Nebraska took place over the course of 14 years on over 8,000 animals (7,500 females, 700 bulls). This extensive research trial suggested that the correlation may be as low as 15%; many other trials have suggested the correlation between the two is somewhere between 20-30%. With such varying results, it is very tough to decide which information is correct; however it is reasonable to suggest that the correlation is closer to 20% then 80%. Even with 24

a relatively low correlation, it is still advisable to take into account scrotal circumference EPD when selecting a herd bull. Some breeders lean more towards actual measurements of traits in the sire as opposed to EPDs, but you also have to consider that actual measurements include the environmental effect on top of the genetic effect (which the EPD only takes into account). Remember:

So let’s put this in context, for example, there are two bull calves that have the exact same genetic potential from the same sire, in two different herds; Bull 1 (Stumpy) born into Herd A, and Bull 2 (Pudgy) born into Herd B. Now Stumpy was born to a great milking cow, was creep-fed after weaning, went into a bull development program that got him ready for sale day, he ends up as a yearling with a 38 cm scrotal circumference and is in the top 10% of his herd mates. On the other hand Pudgy was born, and his dam died for some unforeseen circumstance soon thereafter. He was put on an old cull cow that lost her calf, and she was only milking in two quarters. At weaning, Pudgy was turned out into a pasture with the rest of the bull calves who were born a month earlier on average. He grazed very hard grasses until his yearling measurement, and he measures 34 cm and is in the top 10% of his herd mates for scrotal circumference. So these two bulls, Stumpy and Pudgy both have the same genetic potential and therefore the same breeding potential; however they have drastically different actual measured scrotal circumferences due to their environments. It is likely that if a breeder were to buy both Pudgy and Stumpy and put them in the same pasture, that eventually Pudgy would get enough compensatory gain that he would catch up to Stumpy. This is why submitting scrotal circumference to the CSA is very important; to address the genetic potential of an animal, we have to be able to compare all animals within a herd against each other in a contemporary group setting as it is impossible to compare between herds. By reporting all the information from all of your bulls including scrotal measurements we are provided more data that enhances genetic prediction potential through our EPDs.


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COMPLETE COWHERD DISPERSAL On The Farm Monday, October 28th, 2013

Our farm has been sold, so with some apprehension and many reservations, we will be having a

COMPLETE HERD DISPERSAL,

including the herd bulls, at the farm on MONDAY, OCTOBER 28, 2013 this will be an opportunity to buy into an established, successful and unique breeding program.

Bull calves and open heifers will sell at our annual bull and female sale on MONDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 2014 Check our website for pictures and videos as they become available! WWW.KOPPFARMS.COM

In order for a cow to remain in our herd, she MUST produce a quality calf that meets our criteria. This cow herd has been built by buying the best herd bulls and the best females in the country over the last 25 years, and is now capable of producing the most powerful and consistent bulls and heifers in the Simmental industry.

Will consider selling the herd private treaty until September 15th Will not split into smaller packages 4 options 1. Entire herd 2. All the Reds 162 Bred Cows, 61 Bred Heifers

3. All the Blacks 50 Bred Cows, 15 Bred Heifers

4. All the Fullbloods 75 Bred Cows, 9 Bred Heifers.

Enquiries welcome

For more information or viewing of the cow herd, contact us any time.

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Edmund, Pauline & Laura Steven, Amanda, Madison & Kailey Kopp Box 41, Amaranth, MB R0H 0B0 Ph:204.843.2769 · Fax: 204.843.4558 Edmund’s Cell: 204.856.3064 Steven’s Cell: 204.843.0090 Email: steven@koppfarms.com


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Keith 780-968-0002 780-915-3969

R.R. #1 Site 2, Box17 Stony Plain, AB T7Z 1X1 kmporter@canadasurfs.ca

Kevin 780-968-6772 780-915-9823

Call or email us for your 2014 Bull Sale Brochure.

Homestead in 1903... Relocated in 2008... Fourth Generation Family Farm 41


O

ver the course of the summer grazing period one of the most common conditions encountered in our beef cattle is lameness. Whether on calves, cows, yearlings or bulls none are immune from developing some types of lameness. Surprisingly enough many really don’t require much for treatment yet many are treated! Producers often use the allencompassing term of foot rot yet most lameness at pasture is not caused by foot rot. This year (summer of 2013) could see a higher than normal incidence of foot rot with all the extra rainfall most areas have experienced. This article will try and differentiate the many forms of lameness we see at pasture and the steps necessary to correct them. Just as an example I supervised 90 dry cows at pasture last summer and out of 12 lameness’s I encountered (all on different cows) only one case was treated. All the rest cleared up uneventfully. After lame livestock are spotted get up close to them which should not be difficult. Visually or with some binoculars spend some time observing them. First determine which leg they are lame on. Look for signs of swelling, the degree of weight bearing on the affected leg and how they ambulate. With regards to the hoof evidence of cracks, the toes spread apart, corns, long hooves or curled toes may all cause pain in the foot. Of course as with any condition or illness record the description of the animal including color, ear tag and any other distinguishing features as this makes them easier to find on the recheck. Once the location and condition causing the lameness has been determined the course of action is determined. My main point here is if you have a true foot rot with swelling of the foot and in advanced cases the dead rotting flesh between the toes treatment should be very effective with antibiotics. Many different antibiotics are effective so you and your veterinarian will determine which is best suited to your situation. A number of the longacting products are very effective against foot rot and often one shot if caught early can be curative. Some newer products need a veterinary prescription if used against foot rot so together with your veterinarian find a course of action that works. Many of the other lameness’s fall into two broad categories. Those that need more involved procedures done and those which need to simply convalesce on their own with no further treatment. By more involved procedures the examples are broken legs which may need anything from emergency slaughter in larger animals to either casting or splint applications in younger ones. In young calves casts and splints depending on the location of the break have a very high success rate if found early before the bone has broken out through

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the skin. A couple other conditions which need further care are sole abscesses and septic arthritis. With sole abscesses there is almost no weight bearing yet often no swelling is evident. These need to be brought home and a therapeutic foot trim performed by your veterinarian. The abscess is open up and drained. We often see this in association with bad feet or a crack in the wall which allows the infection to enter. Because the infection is enclosed and just under the sole it is very painful when weight is placed on the affected foot. As with other very painful conditions it will be up to you and your veterinarian whether painkillers are given. Sometimes limping with convalescence allows the condition to heal quicker rather than removing the pain and having a false sense of improvement. Then when the painkillers wear off the condition has worsened. A septic arthritis is when infection has been introduced into the last joint just beneath the hoof. The history of these is they often have been treated many times with antibiotics with no improvement. The infection often breaks out just above the hoof. Often times the curative procedure is either amputating the toe or drilling out the joint. Either procedure requires restraint, local anesthetic and is best done at a clinic. There is also follow up care so removing from pasture is the obvious thing to do and fly control is a good adjunct treatment as well. Most of the multitude of other lameness problems are transient and my suggestion is to not stress the cattle out by catching them initially. Just like people cattle can sprain or strain themselves in a multitude of ways? Stepping in gopher holes, slipping on wet terrain or rock bruises can all lead to transient lameness problems. Cattle with poor feet long hooves or abnormal gaits are definitely more predisposed to these as well. Hoof abnormalities such as cracks (horizontal or vertical), corns or long hooves ripping off too short will also lead to lameness. In the spring a good hoof trimming will prevent a lot of these problems the following summer. Stifle (knee) injuries can result from various insults to the hind legs including breeding injuries and they may result in permanent lameness or may heal with convalescence. By maintaining your herds hoof care and selecting breeding stock especially the herd bulls for good feet and legs will go a long ways to preventing a large number of pasture lameness’s. For those that do occur don’t rush for the antibiotic syringe without first closely assessing the actual cause. Remember for those lameness’s which can’t be treated emergency slaughter is always an option as long as drugs have not already been given.


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BARRY & BRENDA LABATTE Box 72 Gladmar, Sask. S0C 1A0 www.labattesimmentals.com Ph: (306)969-4820 labatte.simm@sasktel.net Cell: (306) 815-7900

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Auctioneer/Ringman

Trucking

Industry Events

Photographers

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Insurance

Semen/Embryos

Semen/Embryos

Marketing

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ADVERTISER’S INDEX

3D Simmentals..........................55 ABC Cattle Co...........................55 Adair Ranch...............................49 Afri-Can Simmentals..................52 Alameda Agencies Ltd...............59 Alberta Simmental Association......... ..................................................44 Alliance Simmental Farms.........53 Allied Genetic Resources..........30 Alta Genetics.............................59 Anchor D Ranch..................36, 49 Applecross.................................49 Ashworth Farm & Ranch Ltd.....55 Aumack Simmentals..................55 Bar 5 Farms Ltd................... 11, 53 Bar L7 Simmentals..................6, 7 Beagle Simmentals....................49 Beechinor Bros. Simmentals............ .............................................39, 49 Big Rock Simmentals................52 Black Diamond Simmentals.......43 Black River Farms.....................53 Black Sand Cattle Company......52 Blushrose Simmental Farm.......55 Bohrson Marketing Services............ ..................................9, 29, 31, 59 Boisvert Simmental....................14 Bonchuk Farms...................34, 52 Bouchard Livestock International..... ......................................5, 6, 7, 59 Bova-Tech Ltd............................59 Bow Valley Genetics Ltd............59 Boynecrest Stock Farm.............52 BS Ranch..................................49 C C Simmental Ranch...............49 Canadian Bull Congress............58 Canadian Cattlemen..................58 Canadian Farm Insurance Corp..59 Carey, Brent...............................58 Car-Laur Simmentals.................53 Circle G Simmentals & Angus...49 City View Simmentals................55 Crimson Tide Fleckvieh.............53 Crossroad Farms.................34, 55 Davis-Rairdan Embryo Transplants Ltd..........................59 Deeg Simmental........................49 Delta Rho Farms.......................53 Destiny Simmentals...................54 Diamond M Ranch.....................37 Diamond T Simmentals.............49 Diana’s Monograming................57 DJ Henderson & Associates......33 Dodge........................................62

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Don Heggie Simmentals............49 Donovandale Simmentals..........54 Dora Lee Genetics...............15, 54 Dorran Marketing Inc.................58 Dorran, Steve............................58 Double Bar D Farms..........IFC, 55 Double G Simmentals................55 Downey Farms..........................52 Dunc’s Cattle Co........................54 Dwayann Simmentals................54 Eagle-Ridge Simmentals...........49 East Poplar Simmentals............56 Edge, Dean................................58 EDN Simmental.........................56 Elm Tree Farms.........................54 Erixon Simmentals.....................56 Fallen Timber Farms.................52 Ferme BMS...............................14 Ferme Gagnon..........................55 Ferme Saro................................55 Ferme Sibelle Fleck...................14 Flying N Cattle and Feed...........58 Genex Cooperative, Inc.............59 Get-A-long Stock Farm..............58 GJR Simmentals........................56 Grant Rolston Photography Ltd........ ..................................................58 Gravandale Simmentals............54 Grinalta Farms...........................49 H.S. Knill Company Limited.......58 Hairy Hill Cattle Co....................49 Hallridge Simmentals.................54 Hannah Simmentals..................49 Harvie Ranching........................49 High Bluff Stock Farm................52 High Country Cattle Services....49 Highway 5 Simmentals..............56 Hi-Tech Farms...........................54 Hoegl Farms..............................56 Indian River Cattle Co...............54 Janzen Brogan Embryo Services Ltd...............................59 Janzen Ranches........................50 Jetstream Livestock...................54 JNR Farms................................50 Jo-Dreen Farm..........................53 Keato Meadow Simmentals.......50 Kelara Farms.............................56 Kin Kin Cattle Co.......................50 Kopp Farms Simmentals.....26, 52 Kuntz Simmental Farm..............56 LaBatte Simmentals..................56 Lazy Bar-B Simmentals.............56 Lazy H Farm..............................27

Lazy S Ranch Inc......................50 Lewis Farms Ltd..............50, OBC Little Willow Creek Ranch..........56 Lobster Point Farms..................53 Lone Stone Farms.....................50 M & J Farms..............................53 MacKenzie Cattle Company......50 Madar Ranches...................48, 50 Majestic Cattle Company...........33 Maple Key Farm........................54 Mappin Simmentals...................50 Mar Mac Farms.........................52 Masterfeeds.........................18, 57 Maxwell Simmentals............40, 50 McCormack Family Ranch............... ............................................32, 56 McIntosh Livestock....................56 McMillen Ranching Ltd........35, 56 Meadow Acres Farms................56 MI Simmentals...........................50 Mitchell Cattle Co......................52 Muellers Nossa Terra.................55 Muirhead Cattle Co....................56 New Holland................................3 North Hill Simmentals................50 O Double E Simmentals............50 O’Grady Steel............................57 Okotoks Fleckvieh Embryo Group.........................................50 Oslanski Simmental Farms........50 Parke Livestock.........................59 Parkhill Ranches........................50 Parview Stock Farms.................50 Pearson Simmentals.................51 Pheasantdale Simmentals.........56 Phillips Farms............................57 Poley, Chris...............................58 Porter Ranches....................41, 51 Prospect Hill Simmentals................. .......................................12,13, 54 Rainalta.....................................51 Rancier Farms...........................51 Rattray Livestock.......................51 Redpath Simmentals.................53 Rendezvous Farms...................53 Rimac Simmental......................55 River Point Cattle Co...........17, 54 Riverbank Farm.........................53 Robb Farms...............................57 Robson Acres............................54 Rock Ridge Cattle Company.....28 Rust Mountain View Ranch.......30 SAJ Simmentals........................57

Saskatchewan Simmental Association................................45 Saugeen Acres..........................51 Schatz Simmentals....................51 Simmeron Fleckvieh Simmentals..... ..................................................51 Skeels, Dan...............................58 Skor Simmentals.......................51 Southpaw Cattle Company........51 Spring Creek Simmentals....29, 57 Spring Lake Simmentals............51 Spruce Grove Cattle Co............57 Starwest Farms.........................52 Steen Agencies..........................59 Stewart Simmentals...................54 Stock, Mark................................58 Stockmens Insurance................59 Stone Simmentals.....................51 Stoughton Farms.......................57 Sullivan Simmentals..................55 Sun Rise Simmentals..........31, 57 Sun Star Simmentals.................51 Sunny Valley Simmentals..........57 Swan Lake Farms Ltd..........38, 57 Swantewitt Simmentals.............51 Tessier Simmentals...................57 The Register..............................57 Timberlind Auctions...................58 Todd Simmentals.......................55 Transcon Livestock Corp............... ......11, 13, 27, 28, 31, 43, 59, IBC Trevor’s Cowpix.........................58 Tryon Simmentals......................53 TSN Livestock...........................53 Twin Brae Simmentals...............53 Twin Butte Simmentals..............51 Tymarc Livestock.......................51 Virginia Ranch...........................51 W2 Farms..................................57 Weldehaven Farms...................55 Wells’ Crossing Cattle Company... ...................................................51 Westway Farms Ltd...................52 Wild Oak Farms.........................54 Windy Knoll Farm......................53 WJ Simmentals..........................52 WLB Livestock...........................25 Wolfe Farms........................46, 52 Wolfe’s Fleckvieh.......................52 Xcel Livestock............................54 Yankee Creek Ranch.................57


September Sept. 7 - M&L Cattle Co. & Guests Red, Black & White Production Sale, Indian River, ON Sept. 14 - Ontario Autumn Simmental Classic Sale, 11th Anniversary, Hanover, ON Sept. 28 - Ferme Gagnon & Guests Production Sale XVII, Cheneville, PQ Sept. 28 - Pacific Invitational All Breeds Female Sale, Williams Lake, BC Sept. 29 - Carp Fair Simmental Show, Carp, ON

October Oct. 1 - Dr. Allan A. Dixon & Trevor Vance Memorial Scholarship Application Deadline Oct. 3-6 - River Point Cattle Co. Internet Sale, Glencoe, ON www.riverpointcattlecompany.com Oct. 4 - Bar L 7 Simmentals Dispersal Sale, Innisfail, AB Oct. 5 - Bar 5 Extravaganza Production Sale, Markdale, ON Oct. 5 - Ontario Fleckvieh Forum Sale, Markdale, ON Oct. 17-21 - WLB Livestock’s 1st Online Simmental Female Sale, www.wlblivestock.com Oct. 19 - Partner’s for Progress Sale Vol III, Waterloo, PQ Oct. 19 - Lazy H Farm, Complete & Total Dispersal, Fleming, OH Oct. 22-23 - Livestock Gentec: Turning Information into Application, Edmonton, AB Oct. 28 - Kopp Farms Complete Cowherd Dispersal, Amaranth, MB

November

Nov. 1 - Royal Elite All Breeds Sale, Toronto, ON Nov. 1 - YCSA Ontario Trillium Classic, Toronto, ON Nov. 1 - Royal Agricultural Winter Fair Simmental Show, Toronto, ON Nov. 2 - Transcon’s National Trust Simmental Sale, Brandon, MB Nov. 3-10 - FarmFair International 40th Anniversary, Edmonton, AB Nov. 7 - Farmfair International National Simmental Show & Simmental Draft, Edmonton, AB Nov. 8 - Farmfair’s Headliner All Breeds Show & Sale, Edmonton, AB Nov. 9 - Pembina Triangle Simmental Association 33rd Annual Sale, Cypress River, MB Nov. 11-16 - Canadian Western Agribition, Regina, SK Nov. 13 - Canadian Western Agribition Simmental Show & Simmental Select, Regina, SK Nov. 17 - Hudson Pines Living Legacy Sale, Campbellsburg, KY Nov. 17 - Central Invitational Simmental Sale, Woodville, ON Nov. 18 - North American Select Sale, Louisville, KY Nov. 18 - Rock Ridge Cattle Co. Complete Simmental Herd Dispersal, Vermilion, AB Nov. 23 - Spring Creek 40th Anniversary Simmental Female Sale, Virden, MB Nov. 23 - Transcon’s Simmental Cow-A-Rama Sale, Innisfail, AB Nov. 25 - Rust Mountain View Ranch’s “Queens of the Pasture” Female Sale, Turtle Lake, ND Nov. 28 - McCormack Family Ranch Genetic Expressions Vol. 2 Production Sale, Grenfell, SK Nov. 30 - Sun Rise Simmentals Bred Female Dispersal & Bull Sale, Virden, MB

December

Dec. 2 - The Source of Elite Simmental Genetics, Lloydminster, SK Dec. 2 - Midwestern Simmental Sale, Lloydminster, SK Dec. 2 - Harvest Hoedown Simmmental Heifer Sale, Neepawa, MB Dec. 3 - 35th Annual Keystone Konnection Simmental Sale, Brandon, MB Dec. 5 - Transcon’s 36th Annual Simmsational Simmental Sale, Moose Jaw, SK

What’s Happening Dec. 7 - Wolfe Farms Bull and Female Production Sale, Valleyview, AB Dec. 7 - Stewart Simmentals Open House & Private Treaty Sale, Newbury, ON Dec. 9 - Shades of the Prairies Sale, Brandon, MB Dec. 11 - Camrose Country Classic, Camrose, AB Dec. 12 - Southern Alberta Round Up Group 20th Annual Production Sale, High River, AB Dec. 13 - 2nd Annual Friday Night Lights Simmental Sale, Olds, AB Dec. 14 - Checkers & Fullblood Perfection, Red Deer, AB Dec. 15 - Transcon’s Fleckvieh Equation Fullblood Simmental Sale, Red Deer, AB Dec. 15 - Transcon’s Ultimate Red & Black XVI Simmental Bull & Female Sale, Red Deer, AB Dec. 17 - Bonchuk Female Production Sale, Virden, MB Dec. 18 - GJR Simmental Complete Dispersal, Saskatoon, SK Dec. 20 - Muirhead Female Sale: Every Bred Heifer Sells with Select Open Females, Saskatoon, SK Dec. 21 - Majestic Cattle Company Dispersal Sale, Innisfail, AB Dec. 21 - RK Cattle Calf Factory Sale, Moorefield, ON Dec. 21 - Black Diamond Simmentals Complete Herd Dispersal, Virden, MB Dec. 31 - New Years Resolution Frozen Genetic Sale: Volume II, Saskatoon, SK

February

Feb. 7 - Genetic Edge Bull Sale, Anchor D Ranch, Rimbey, AB Feb. 9 - Diamond M Ranch 3rd Annual Bull Sale, Estevan, SK Feb. 14 - 40th Annual Mader Ranches Bull Power Sale, Carstairs, AB Feb. 15 - Double Bar D Farms Annual Bull & Female Sale, Grenfell, SK Feb. 17 - Kopp Farms Annual Bull and Female Sale, Amaranth, MB Feb. 19 - Crossroad Farms 8th Annual Bull Sale, Shell Lake, SK Feb. 20 - 9th Annual Rpbb/Hoegl Bull Sale, Lloydminster, SK Feb. 22 - Lewis Farms 29th Annual Bull Sale, Spruce Grove, AB Feb. 24 - Simmental Summit Bull & Female Sale, Bently, AB Feb. 26 - 12th Annual Muirhead Cattle Co. Bull Sale, Shellbrook, SK Feb. 26 - 19th Annual Herd Master Bull Sale, Camrose, AB Feb. 26 - Erixon Simmentals Annual Bull & Female Sale, Saskatoon, SK Feb. 27 - Pheasantdale Annual Bull & Female Sale, Balcarres, SK Feb. 28 - LaBatte Simmentals 34th Annual Bull & Female Sale, Moose Jaw, SK

March

Mar. 1 - Cutting Edge Bull Sale, Rimbey, AB Mar. 1 - 20th Annual McMillen Ranching Production Sale, Carievale, SK Mar. 1 - 6th Annual Westgold Farms & Guests, Simmental Bull Sale, Vermilion, AB Mar. 2 - R+ Simmental 14th Annual Bull Sale, Estevan, SK Mar. 3 - Ashworth Farm & Ranch & Guests Bull Sale, Unger, SK Mar. 4 - 34th Doll Ranch Bull & Female Sale, Mandan, ND Mar. 5 - Mar Mac Farms & Guests Annual Bull Sale, Brandon, MB Mar. 5 - Sunny Valley 24th Annual Bull & Female Sale, Saskatoon, SK Mar. 6 - Westway & Deeg Annual Bull Sale, Olds, AB Mar. 6 - Spring Creek Ranch Pursuit Of Perfection Annual Bull Sale, Moosomin, SK Mar. 7 - Ranchlands 7th Annual Bull Sale, Stavely, AB Mar. 7 - Genetic Destination Annual Bull Sale, Grenfell, SK Mar. 8 - Next Generation Bull Sale, Lloydminster, SK Mar. 8 - Synergie Bull Sale, Ste. Sophie de Levrard, PQ Mar. 8 - Swantewitt Simmentals Annual Bull Sale, Mayerthorpe, AB Mar. 11 - Kuntz-Stoughton-McIntosh- SAJ Annual Bull Sale, Llodminster, SK Mar. 12 - South Saskatchewan Simmental Bull & Female Sale, Moose Jaw, SK Mar. 13 - Rocky Mountain Simmental Bull Sale, Olds, AB Mar. 20 - Get-A-Grip Angus & Simmental Bull Sale, Forestburg, AB Mar. 21 - Porter Ranches Bull Sale, Stony Plain, AB

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It’s time

to map out your fall travel plans

Saturday, September 28 Saturday October 5

Ferme Gagnon & Guests 17th Annual Simmental Production Sale, Cheneville, PQ Bar 5 & Guests Fall Extravaganza, Markdale, ON

Monday, October 28 Kopp Farms Simmentals Complete Cowherd Dispersal, Amaranth, MB Saturday, November 2 Transcon’s National Trust Simmental Sale, Chapter VI, Brandon, MB Saturday, November 9 Pembina Triangle Simmental Association, 33rd Annual Sale, Cypress River, MB Monday, November 18 Rock Ridge Cattle Co. Complete Simmental Herd Dispersal, Vermilion, AB Saturday, November 23 Transcon’s Simmental Cow-A-Rama XIV, Innisfail, AB Saturday, November 30 Sun Rise Simmentals Bred Female Dispersal & Bull Sale, Virden, MB Monday, December 2 Harvest Hoedown Simmental Heifer Sale, Neepawa, MB Thursday, December 5 Transcon’s 36th Annual Simmsational Simmental Sale, Moose Jaw, SK Saturday, December 7 Gerrard Cattle Co. & Guests Charolais Bull & Female Sale, Innisfail, AB Thursday, December 12 Southern Alberta Simmental Round Up Group 20th Annual Production Sale, High River, AB Sunday, December 15 Sunday, December 15

Transcon’s Fleckvieh Equation, Fullblood Simmental Sale, Red Deer, AB

Saturday, December 21

Black Diamond Simmentals Complete Herd Dispersal, Virden, MB

Transcon’s Ultimate Red & Black XVI, Simmental Bull & Female Sale, Red Deer, AB

www.transconlivestock.com

Jay Good (403) 556-5563

Bob Wilson (403) 540-3084

Glenn Norton (780) 542-0634

Darren Paget (403) 323-3985

Kelly Richardson

(403) 638-9377

Sandra Smith (403) 638-9377

Craig Mills (306) 365-8432

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September 2013 Commercial Country  

September 2013 Simmental Commercial Country

September 2013 Commercial Country  

September 2013 Simmental Commercial Country