SYUKRI MATSUNI ARCHITECTURE PORTFOLIO

Page 1

B (ARCH) NATIONAL UNIVERSITY OF SINGAPORE M (ARCH) NATIONAL UNIVERSITY OF SINGAPORE SELECTED WORKS

MSBM


MUHAMMAD SYUKRI BIN MATSUNI DIPLOMA IN LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE ( SINGAPORE POLYTECHNIC ) B (ARCH) NATIONAL UNIVERSITY OF SINGAPORE M (ARCH) NATIONAL UNIVERSITY OF SINGAPORE HTTPS://WWW.LINKEDIN.COM/IN/SYUKRIMATSUNI/ SYUKRIMATSUNI@OUTLOOK.COM





REST STATION REFUGE FOR WILDLIFE, THE AFTERLIFE AND THE EVERYDAY LIFE By 2030, Singapore aims to move towards a projected 6.9 million population. Hence, additional housing and infrastructure are required to support the rising population. As Singapore’s limited land space struggles to keep up with the needs of the growing population, the conflict between Singapore’s urban development and its environmental preservation is called into question. To date, Singapore has lost nearly 99% of its natural forest cover with substantial environmental consequences such as biodiversity loss, increased flood risk, and rising temperatures. Yet, more of Singapore’s forested areas such as Tengah Forest will be cleared to make way for urban infrastructures such as housing developments and transport infrastructures. With the impact of urbanisation as a threat, how do we gain and become better from this situation? How do we strike a balance between Singapore’s urban development and its nature preservation with land space being a big challenge? Can the “City in Nature” vision be pushed further to allow for both man and nature to coexist? As a prototypical study, this thesis looks at the coexistence of an integrated train and bus depot and existing greenery of the Tengah Forest within the upcoming Tengah Town Development. It serves as a steppingstone between the Central nature reserves and the western Catchment Area to preserve the existing biodiversity that is and will be affected by the upcoming development. At the same time, it looks at the possible integration of a columbarium space with existing depots in Singapore as a study to free up existing columbarium for other developments which are often contested in land scarce Singapore. The thesis aims to look beyond monofunctional infrastructure and its current tokenistic nature of greening solution, as a network of systems to encourage a symbiotic relationship between man and nature.







[COLUMBARIUM]

JOSS PAPER BURNING

RITUAL ROOMS


RITUAL ROOM CLUSTER

ASH SCATTERING AREA



[TRAIN STATION]


BUS OFFICE AND MAINTENANCE


[BUS PARKING]

BUS CHARGING AREA






LODGING [ADVENTURE+NATURE] Located within the vicinity of the Old SIA Sports Club, Nomadscape: Trek Trek at Changi is an Outdoor Adventure Learning Centre that is driven by the concept of Nomadism. The approach begins with the conceptualising of a pushcart as a learning tool which campers assemble together. This enriches the education experience of the outdoor classroom where campers then engage with natural elements such as the open sea as well as wild vegetation and its biodiversity. All in all, the campsite aims to create a new form of school with ecoliteracy at the centre of its curricular, to nurture a future of students that are concerned on the wellbeing of the world around them.



NOMADSCAPE: TREK TREK AT CHANGI CAMP SCHEDULE


NOMADSCAPE: TREK TREK AT CHANGI CAMP MASTERPLAN


Split into 3 clusters, the lodging area is designed as an adventure playground that evokes a sense of adventure for the campers while exploiting on the varying surrounding site context to enhance their interaction with the wide range of flora and fauna that can be found within the site. Hence, the idea of eco literacy is not forced into the curriculum but more of the subtle interaction with nature as a tool to plant the seed of eco literacy in the camper’s mind. Seaside lodge exploits on the sea that comes into the site, which at the same time serve as habitat for wild animals such as monitor lizards and otters. The forest lodge exploits on the existing wild vegetation that can be found within the site which includes tree species such as Simpoh Air which are biodiversity attracting plant and at the same time known to provide ethnobotanical function for people The grassland lodge exploits on the current mostly barren land of the site which will be incrementally planted with more trees over time as more camps are held at the campsite. Here the campers interact with the changing landscape of the site.



Serving as a temporary holding point for the campers in case of wet weather program, the drop off point comprises of a collection of mementoes that are littered throughout the entire façade which paints an experience that the campers could expect for their 3D2N camp at the campsite. These mementoes could be anything that the campers made throughout the camp and leave behind on their last day of the camp as 1) A means of the campers’ incremental contribution to the campsite 2) Memory for the next time they come to the campsite Attached to the drop point is a watch tower that provide campers access to the top part of the drop off point to leave their memento behind. At the same time, it also provides campers with a panoramic view of the entire campsite - a glimpse of Nomad Scape.


After assembling their pushcart over at the workshop, the campers will push their pushcart following a path that brings them to the lodging area. Here, the campers will first gather at the outdoor amphitheatre area before being divided into their different lodgings. The outdoor amphitheatre is also where the campers engage in school level activities throughout the day.


The standalone structure is divided into multiple floors which depending on the camps, can be used to separate the male and female campers. Otherwise, it evokes a sense of adventure for the campers as they unlock different spaces within the structure with the pushcart. Throughout the structure, items from the push cart such as the bamboo poles and wooden crates are uses as both a façade treatment and the main structures for the lodging area. This is cleverly done so to expand on the use of the items and a form of affordance for the campers as they transform their push cart throughout the entire camp to achieve a task.


In the seaside cluster, the deck acts a viewing deck for the campers to spot the white bellied eagle that flies across the open sea. For the forest lodge, a chance for them to be close to the wild vegetation, plucking the leaves of the simpoh air plants as a plate. For the grassland lodge, a platform for the campers to pluck the produce from the planted trees to facilitate in their meal preparation.


[layout plan of 1 accommodation area] Climbing down the bamboo ladder from the 2nd floor give the camper access to the activity room which the campers get to see a live feed of the different animals that roams around the campsite. To enhance this further, the façade is designed to allow for biodiversity such as the bees and butterflies to seek refuge within the small bamboo poles that are repurposed as a bug condo. The roof is designed as a hanging rain garden to collect rainwater but also a haven for birds to seek refuge. Held on by a series of steel rods, the hanging garden is made up of varying sizes of steel planter which is in response to the different soil depth for different plant species. When it rains, the perforations located at the end of the planter allows for the water to drip down which acts as another teachable moment for the campers. It highlights the importance of animal’s conservation in Singapore and what it takes to protect them.


The showering facility that is designed to allow for interaction with the lush landscape, giving the campers the experience of showering in the outdoors. The fingerlike configuration of the showering facility allows for trees to grow in between the spaces to allow for maximum interaction with the plants and the biodiversity that can be found within.




BRIDGING BIODIVERSITY

TANGLIN SECONDARY SCHOOL Five Systems i. Energy (nodes of production + pathways of distribution + points of consumption) ii. Water (nodes of treatment + surface flows/detention + pathways of distribution + points of consumption) iii. Greenery (biodiversity + habitats + types of green cover) iv. Food (nodes of production + pathways of distribution + points of consumption) v. Public Spa ce (social space, pedestrian and cycling connectivity, permeability, access, semi-public, indoor)

What if buildings are designed with the 5 systems in mind? This inquiry began with an insight investigation of a 5x5 km site located on the Southwest of Singapore. Identified were 3 prominent systems - Greenery, Water, and Public space – which forms the armature of the site. These armatures are however, fragmented thus causing a disparity within the site. To strengthen these armatures, the project focuses on the Japanese schools which comprises of The Japanese Secondary School and Japanese Kindergarten, and Tanglin Secondary School. Situated in the intersection of an industrial and 2 disparate residential areas, the schools serve as a driver to boost interaction between these communities, and consequently promote synergy between human and nature. All in all, the project proves that buildings do not have to be just self-serving but also contributes to the larger natural and man-made ecology.





N

3.

2.

18.

1.

4. 5.

6.

17.

7. 19.

16.

20.

8. 15. 9.

14.

10.

13.

LEGEND 1. DROP OFF POINT 2. CARPARK 3. LOADING/ UNLOADING BAY 4. SCHOOL CANTEEN 5. STAFF ROOM 6. GENERAL OFFICE 7. THE RAINFOREST 8. LIBRARY 9. THE WETLAND 10. OUTDOOR CLASSROOM 11. COMMUNITY GARDEN 12. PLAZA 13. BASKETBALL COURT 14. RESTING AREA 15. THE STREAM 16. PARADE SQUARE/ MARKET PLACE 17. FOOD STORAGE AREA 18. FOOD LOADING AND UNLOADING AREA 19. SOCCER FIELD 20. PARK CONNECTOR

12.

11.

GROUND FLOOR PLAN



SOLAR PANEL ROOF TOTAL ENERGY PRODUCTION: 125.68 MWH 100 % ENERGY PRODUCTION FOR GO GRO TOWERS 103% ENERGY PRODUCTION FOR TANGLIN SECONDARY SCHOOL

VEGETATED FACADE AS BIRD HIDE 13838 SQM OF VERTICAL SURFACE AREA FOR VERTICAL GREENERY

FOOD PRODUCTION ( GO GRO TOWER) 200 TOWERS ACCOMMODATING TO 103% OF TOTAL POPULATION ( 30000 KG / MONTH)

CIRCULATION CORRIDOR

OUTDOOR CLASSROOM ROOF GARDEN

CLASSROOM BLOCK

THE STREAM

GRANDSTAND NON TEACHING BLOCK

WORKSHOP

LINEAR PARK

THE RAINFOREST

THE WETLAND

COMMUNITY @ TANGLIN

PARK CONNECTOR

EXPLODED AXONOMETRIC







PROJEK PINTAR THE ENVIRONMENT AND THE THIRD TEACHER Projek Pintar is an integration of 2 pedagogies – the Green School in Bali and the Reggio Emilia. It aims to develop its students into green leaders with its curriculum based on green education and sustainability, coupled with project-based learning. The three core principles of Projek Pintar’s philosophy are the child, the environment, and the teacher. Projek Pintar believes that: • Every child has the capacity to learn; rich with wonder and knowledge • Children are central to their own learning with curriculum created around their interests • Children learn better through investigation and discovering in a supportive, rich and wall-less environment with an emphasis on the Green Education and ecology Projek Pintar operates on a distinctive daily timetable structure - The Three-Frame Day (3FD) - designed to sustain a studentcentric structure which operates in three discreet ways, namely through the Integral, Instructional and Experiential frames. The teacher’s role is to learn alongside children, becoming involved in group learning experiences as a guide and resource. As part of its curriculum, children are allocated time to do gardening and be involved in food preparation for both lunch and dinner. This is to inculcate a sense of involvement and educate them about the real world. The children decide what they want to learn, and the teachers plan alongside them through the 3FD structure. Projek Pintar emphasises on the importance of the environment being the third teacher, thus the classrooms are designed such that children are exposed to the environment around them. A dedicated gardening space for each classroom provides a sense of responsibility for the children as they grow their own produce for their daily consumption. The School consist of 2 small villages which segregates the playschool and the preschool. The heart of school splits these small villages and acts as the core of Projek Pintar. This is where children from the two villages come together as they enter and leave the school and congregate as a school at the sunken auditorium. Projek Pintar boast its green initiative with its distinctive butterfly roof which channels rainwater into a bioswale and subsequently a bio pond that recycles this water. Native plants are planted generously throughout the school as part of its green education at the same time promoting biodiversity and stewardship of our natural heritage. Projek Pintar is not only a school, but a project for the environment and for the future.



PHILOSOPHY // TIMETABLE // FURNITURES

SCHOOL PHILOSOPHY

TIMETABLE

SCHOOL UNIFORM

UTENSILS

CUBBY HOLE/ BAG

SHELF / READING NOOK / DISPLAY CASE

Projek Pintar operates on a set of philosophy imbued in its curriculum, augmented by a series of furniture designed specifically for the functionality of the school. Children are allocated time to do gardening and be involved in food preparation to inculcate a sense of involvement and educate them about the real world. The children decide what they want to learn, and the teachers plan alongside them


PULL OUT BED

BUILDING FORT / SITTING CUSHION

CRAFT TABLE

PLAYHOUSE

TYRE FURNITURE

PLANTING SHELF / TABLE

The furniture of Projek Pintar emphasizes on green education and sustainability. They are designed to be multifunctional and encourage self-expression of the children. They are meant to inspire and promote independence.


BUILDING ELEMENTS OF PROJEK PINTAR

E/ ON SPACE 150 MM THK TIMBER BEAM X3 150 MM THK TIMBER BEAM X3

APPING SPACE / 150 MM THK PRECAST CONCRETE OLLABORATION SPACE 150 MM THK PRECAST CONCRETE

150 MM THK TIMBER BEAM X3

150 MM THK PRECAST CONCRETE

CE 150 MM THK TIMBER BEAM X3

150 MM THK PRECAST CONCRETE

AIRCASE EEL MESH

E SPACE

RFORMANCE SPACE

150 MM THK TIMBER COLUMN X3 150 MM THK TIMBER COLUMN X3 150 MM THK TIMBER COLUMN X3

150 MM THK TIMBER BEAM 150 MM THK TIMBER BEAM

E

150 MM THK TIMBER BEAM METAL PLATE

ANTER I BEAM

I BEAM

METAL PLATE 150 MM THK TIMBER COLUMN X3 METAL PLATE

150 MM THK TIMBER BEAM I BEAM METAL PLATE

I BEAM

SUNKEN GARDEN SPACE

SLANTED COLUMN CONNECTION

100 x 100 MM TIMBER STRIP 100 x 100 MM TIMBER STRIP 100 x 100 MM TIMBER STRIP FROSTED CORRUGATED SHEET FROSTED CORRUGATED SHEET

100 x 100 MM TIMBER STRIP CORRUGATED SHEE FROSTED

TOILET

METAL PLATE

TOILET

METAL PLATE FROSTED CORRUGATED SHEET METAL PLATE

TOILET 150 x 600 MM TIMBER BEAM 150 x 600 MM TIMBER BEAM METAL PLATE

MBER

150 x 600 MM TIMBER BEAM

TOILET

150 x 600 MM TIMBER BEAM 150 MM THK TIMBER BEAM 150 MM THK TIMBER BEAM 150 MM THK TIMBER BEAM

PULL OUT BED

PULL OUT BED

150 MM THK TIMBER BEAM

PULL OUT BED

PULL OUT BED

PULL OUT BED / TOILET

ROOF


NAPPING SPACE / COLLABORATION SPACE 150 MM THK PRECAST CONCRETE NAPPING SPACE / COLLABORATION SPACE 150 MM THK PRECAST CONCRETE

5.

5b.

5a.

STAIRCASE STEEL MESH

STAIRCASE STEEL MESH

LEGEND 5c.

PERFORMANCE SPACE

PERFORMANCE SPACE

1) FROSTED CORRUGATED SHEET 2) 100 X 100 MM TIMBER STRIPS 3) 150 X 600 MM TIMBER BEAM WITH 150 MM SPACING 150 MM THK TIMBER BEAM 4) METAL PLATE 5) SUNSHADE 150 MM THK TIMBER BEAM

PLANTER

I BEAM

PLANTER

1.

I BEAM

7.

3. 6. 4.

2. 3.

SPLIT CLASSROOM

8. 9.

14.

13.

16. 17.

a) 100 X 100 MM TIMBER WITH 100MM SPACING b) 35 MM THK STEEL ROD c) 100 X 100 MM SHS 6) ELECTRICAL WIRING 7) LIGHT FIXTURE 8) 150 MM THK PRECAST CONCRETE PLANTER 9) FLITCH PLATE 10) I BEAM 11) 25MM THK TIMBER FLOORING 12) 100 X 100 MM TIMBER JOIST 500MM C/C 13) CONCRETE COLUMN 14) 150 X 300 MM TIMBER COLUMN 15) STEEL FENCE WITH METAL MESH 16) STEEL MESH STAIRCASE 17) STEEL BRACKET 18) M&E SPACE 19) DRAINAGE 20) FOUNDATION 15.

10. TOILET

19. TOILET

100 MM THK TIMBER 3 MM THK SQUARE HOLLOW SECTION

11. 100 MM THK TIMBER 3 MM THK SQUARE HOLLOW SECTION

20. 13. PULL OUT BED

PULL OUT BED

12. 18. CLIMBING PLANT SUPPORT MESH

CLIMBING PLANT SUPPORT MESH

SUNSHADE

STRUCTURAL MODEL OF PROJEK PINTAR


3. 1. 5. 2.

4.

LEGEND

5.

1. TOILET 2. PULL OUT BED 3. NAPPING / COLLABORATION/ PLAYING SPACE 4. PERFORMANCE / SELF EXPRESSION SPACE 5. GARDEN

TYPICAL CLASSROOM LAYOUT


5.

A typical classroom configuration consists of two spaces – a napping/ collaboration/ playing space (this is where a bulk of the activities in the classroom happens), and a performance/ self-expression space. Dividing these two spaces is a mesh staircase that doubles up as a sitting space looking down to the performance/ self-expression space.

6000 MM

Each of the classrooms are equipped with at least one sunken planter which acts as a garden space for the children. Projek pintar emphasises on the importance of the environment being the third teacher, thus the classrooms are designed such that children are exposed to the environment around them.

2500 MM

3.

4.

A dedicated gardening space for each classroom provides a sense of responsibility for the children as they grow their own produce for their daily consumption.

2.

LEGEND 1. TOILET 2. PULL OUT BED 3. NAPPING / COLLABORATION/ PLAYING SPACE 4. PERFORMANCE / SELF EXPRESSION SPACE 5. GARDEN

1.

5.

5.


AY ST W

G WE

KAN SENG

The school consist of 2 small villages which segregates the playschool and the preschool. The playschool houses the toddler ( the sunbird), 2 years old (magpies) and the 3 years old (the bluebirds).

A)

13.

The preschool on the other hand houses children aged 4 to 6 years old named as the kingfishers, woodpeckers and hornbills respectively.

10.

LIN FERNVALE

The name of the classes are named after native birds in singapore. 11.

K

The heart of school splits these small villages and acts as the core of projek pintar. This is where children from the two villages come together as they enter and leave the school and congregate as a school at the sunken auditorium.

6. 9.

7.

A bioswale cuts in between each of the villages which eventually leads to a bio pond in the heart of school. LEGEND

This water is to be recycled for other uses in the school. Native plants are also planted generously throughout the school as part of its green education at the same time promoting biodiversity and stewardship of our natural heritage.

12.

B)

1.

3.

2.

1. RECEPTION 2. WELCOME ROOM 3. SUNKEN AUDITORIUM 4. BIOPOND 5. DROP OFF POINT 6. CARPARK 7. KITCHEN / EATING SPACE 8. INFANT CARE 9. CLASSTROOM 10. INTERNAL COURTYARD 11. BIOSWALE 12. ENTRANCE 13. EXIT

4.

5.

10. 7. 8. 11.

A) PRESCHOOL VILLAGE : NURSERY - KINGFISHER KINDERGARTEN 1 - WOODPECKER KINDERGARTEN 2 - HORNBILL B) HEART OF SCHOOL C) PLAYSCHOOL VILLAGE: TODDLER - SUNBIRD 2 YEARS OLD - MAGPIE 3 YEARS OLD - BLUEBIRD

C)

9. 12.

GROUND FLOOR PLAN


1.

1.

5.

2.

2.

3.

4. 4.

1.

1.

SECOND FLOOR PLAN

THIRD FLOOR PLAN


1.

A typical section of projek pintar consist of a split in the middle of 2 classroom spaces that accommodates an internal courtyard coupled with a butterfly roof that channels rainwater into the bioswale.

9.

3.

The school is split into 3 levels. For the pre-schoolers, this dictate the elementary level that they are in. As they progress, they will go up one level. Each of the levels come equipped with a dedicated kitchen/ eating space.

9.

5. 7.

9.

10.

LEGEND 1. CLASSROOM 01 2. CLASSROOM 02 3. CLASSROOM 03 4. CLASSROOM 04 5. CLASSROOM 05

6. KITCHEN / EATING SPACE 7. INTERNAL COURTYARD 8. BIOSWALE 9. PRIVATE GARDEN 10.M&E SPACE


The school emphasises on the importance of the environment as a third teacher. As such the classroom spaces are designed such that they are exposed to the environment around them. To further accentuate this ideology, the classrooms are designed to be wall-less thus exposing them to the spaces outside their classroom boundary. This enhances their learning and creativity while facilitating communication with the children. With no walls, the light, sounds, weather and motion in the surrounding outdoors are always present thus creating intimacy with the natural world. On top of that, this allows for natural ventilation.

2.

4.

9.

6.

9.

8.

TYPICAL SECTION OF PROJEK PINTAR


3.

9.

5. 7.

9.

10.

7. 8.

1.

LEGEND 1. RECEPTION COUNTER 2. SICK BAY 3. WELCOME ROOM 4. SUNKEN AUDITORIUM

5. BIOPOND 6. DROP OFF POINT 7. TEACHER’S ROOM 8. ROOF GREEN

2.

3.


4.

9.

The heart of school consist of a welcome room for children when they first arrive to school, a sunken auditorium space for them to gather, and an office core for the teachers that opens up to a roof garden accessible from the 2nd floor of the 2 villages.

6.

9.

It provides an alternative space for the children to run around.

8.

4.

5.

6.

SECTION OF HEART OF SCHOOL






TREE, WATER, WILDLIFE, PASIR PANJANG Based on the prototype of natural infrastructure, “tree, water, wildlife, pasir panjang” explores natural infrastructure as a form of healing. The district lacks recreational spaces to serve the multiple residential and high-rise office developments situated adjacent to the district. The project envisions the transformation of the former power district into a powerhouse that helps in the recuperation and recharging of the human mind, placing an emphasis on our well-being. In addition, it seeks to return the district back to pasir panjang. This is done by extending Labrador park into the district and bringing in the water from the sea, forming an ecosystem within itself which is vital in the development of the district. The district will be revitalized through the repurposing of several existing buildings onsite such as PowerStation a and b in addition to some newer structures. Infrastructure for activities such as parks for skating, rope obstacle courses, and locations for fishing & prawning aid in healing the human body whereas amenities such as forest showers and meditation pods enable the healing of the human mind.


Low Rise Commercial

Visitor Centre High Element Park Plaza

Biotope

Resort

Basement Carpark

Recreational Hub

Birdwatch tower

Ranger Station

Bird Sanctuary Fishing/ Prawning Area

Labrador Nature Reserve

Villa Samadhi


The prototype natural infrastructure explores the different forms and purposes of nature as a close loop infrastructural system in greater southern waterfront. It seeks to create a symbiotic ecosystem where there is a continuous inter-dependency between urban life and nature


The masterplanning of tree, water, wildlife, pasir panjang was curated based on the basis of the prototype of natural infrastructure. It seeks to create an interdependency between the activities introduced in the greater soutern waterfront and the activities generated from the landscape extended from labrador park.



Ranger Station

SECTION OF BIRD WATCH TOWER


Water Storage Tank

Biotope

SECTION OF ABC WATER SYSTEM

Fishing/ Prawning Pods

Fishing Pond Sea

SECTION OF FISHING/ PRAWNING AREA







Can I hide from the birds? Gazetted as a nature reserve in 2002, labrador park has been home to over 70 species of birds. It is a perfect spot for small passerine birds such as sunbirds and kingfisher to seek shelter and find food for their survival. A natural indicator of an environment, birds are often caught and ringed to monitor their movement and their conservation. Bird ringing is the practice of catching birds, marking them with an identifying band around the leg, and then releasing them back to the wild. This is done by setting up a series of mist nets around a vegetation and waiting for unsuspecting birds to get caught on it. Measurements such as the birds’ length, culmen, head, tarsus, foot, tail, wing, wingspan and weight are measured and kept as a data for future references. These data provide information on migration, longevity, mortality, population, territoriality, feeding behaviour, and others. The architecture seeks to preserve the natural environment that the birds call home by amalgamating itself into the forest layers. The main objective of the architecture is to hide away from the birds while to allowing one to experience the different forest layers, educate the public on birds, to house an in-house research facility for the study of birds, and lastly provide a structure to span mist nets to allow for bird ringing. For these to work, the architecture should cause minimal damage to the natural environment and remain covert so as not to disrupt the natural environment. As such, the use of scaffolding structure was adopted to avoid piling and avoid unnecessary clearing of the forest. A hexagonal configuration was also adopted as it provides a rigid structure and provide opportunity for the structure to be expanded when the research facility requires it to. In addition, it provides a maze- like pattern to facilitate in the capture of the birds. One of the benefits of building in the forest layers is that it acts as a buffer to reduce air temperature, humidity, vapour pressure and precipitation. On a macro level, it acts as a form of envelope for the architecture. However, on a micro level, factors such as privacy and mosquitos must be addressed. As such, nettings of different porosity are used throughout the architecture as a form of envelope. It acts as a buffer between the forest and the spaces within the architecture. With these in mind, can I hide from the birds?

Emergent Layer ( 42 m )

Canopy Layer ( 30 m )

Understorey Layer ( 18 m )

Undergrowth Layer ( 6 m )

FIGURE B

FIGURE C

FIGURE A


MICRO ANALYSIS OF ARCHITECTURAL ENVELOPE Bamboo Pole

The persona of a bird ringer was conscripted for a personal enclosure. Due to the nature of the profession, a bird ringer has to ensure that his movement are kept at minimal and his presence to be covert.

9 x 2 m 36mm Mist Net

1mm Mosquito Net

The personal enclosure was designed to be portable for easy fixing and dismantle. It was designed to provide optimal comfort away from mosquitoes and provide a space for respite. Different layers of netting was adopted to accomodate to different level of comfort and function.

Nylon Fabric 3 mm

NYLON FABRIC

140

1.2 mm

mm

PERSONAL ENCLOSURE OF A BIRD RINGER

MOSQUITO NET @ 1.2 MM SPACING

MIST NET @ 30 MM SPACING

1.2 mm

Mosquito Net @ 1.2mm spacing


BUNKER TOILET

A OFFICE VISITOR CENTRE/ BIRD GALLERY/ LIBRARY

A

GATHERING SPACE

C

C

CLASSROOM/ OFFICE/ OBERVATION TOWER

B

B LABRADOR PARK


LIBRARY

BIRD GALLERY

BIRD RINGING STATION

PANTRY

CLASSROOM OBSERVATION TOWER

OBSERVATION TOWER

RESEARCHER'S BREAK ROOM

RESEARCH LAB CLASSROOM

SECOND FLOOR PLAN

OFFICE/ AVIARY

FIRST FLOOR PLAN


SECTION A-A SECTION OF BIRD GALLERY/ LIBRARY/ GATHERING SPACE


SECTION B-B SECTION OF BIRD RINGING STATION / OFFICE/AVIARY / RESEARCHER'S BREAK ROOM


SECTION A1 SECTION OF BIRD GALLERY / LIBRARY

SECTION B1 SECTION OF AVIARY


SECTION C-C SECTION OF BIRD OBSERVATION TOWER




THE CROSSOVER A response to rising stress levels, crossover re-evaluates the importance of work and play in today’s fast paced society where work is often prioritized. Through inverting the traditional hierarchy of spaces, the architect challenges the conventional form and function of the house, crafting a unique and thought-provoking spatial experience. In crossover, leisure spaces form the spine of the house, deeming the work spaces secondary as they depend on the spine for support. As the leisure spaces connect the different work spaces together, the importance of play is magnified as what holds us together and provokes users to re-examine the value of work and play in our lives.


PLAY

Crossover between work and play space creates an opportunity for an intermediate space that shares the quality of the joining spaces

Play (Active) Entertainment Gathering Play space as a corridor connecting the different passive space

Work (Passive) Dine Recuperate Work Slumber

Structure Columns and Party Wall

Play space as the main focus of house with passive space butting in as a parasite clinging onto the play space


INTERSECTION OF PASSIVE SPACE INTO ACTIVE SPACE, BOUNDING THE WALL OF PLAY SPACE


SECOND FLOOR PLAN

FIRST FLOOR PLAN


RECUPERATE

SLUMBER

BEDROOM DINE

WARDROBE

WORK

PANTRY

GARDEN

PATIO

STUDIO

LIBRARY

KITCHEN

DINE- PLAY

WORK/ SLUMBER - PLAY


RECUPERATE - PLAY




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