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LETTER FROM THE PRESIDENT Dear Friends, This March marked the start of the 5th year of the conflict in Syria. In the last 4 years, Syrians across the country—and those who have sought refuge in other countries—have felt the strong reverberations of each barrel bomb, each life lost and each physical and emotional scar carved into Syria’s land and its people. But there has also been another reverberation across the country: one of hope and resilience, and that is what we at SRD cling to, what our staff clings on to and what we hope we communicate to you every day—that in spite of the hurt there is so much hope yet remaining in the hearts of the Syrian people. In this Annual Report, you’ll see what we were able to accomplish in 2014 and how many people we were able to help thanks to your support. But what we hope you take away is the resilience and strength of the people we helped. Because, while we can connect with you through our words, we want the words and actions of the beneficiaries to reach you foremost. We want to be the facilitator for your shared world view with people who are no different than you and I, except that they struggle with much more difficult circumstances. I would like to take this opportunity to thank all of you. The achievements and positive stories presented herein are all because of your support. Without it, many children may not have received psychosocial

©UNHCR / A. McConnell

support, many pregnant women may not have had a local clinic to receive prenatal care, many wounded or injured Syrians may not have received timely medical care, and many other things may not have happened. But they did, and it’s not through our own doing but through the mercy of God and through your support. Thank you. We wish you a wonderful year full of hope and joy in your own life. We hope you will remember the smiling faces of those whom you’ve helped. And we also hope you will keep them in your thoughts as you focus on the good that can come from the human spirit amid times of extreme strife. And lastly, we ask for your continued support so that we may pass on the hope to many other Syrians who need it. Sincerely Yours,

Dr. Jihad Qaddour President, Syria Relief & Development


“ I n s p it e o f t h e h ur t , t h e re is s o mu c h hope y e t r e m ain i n g i n t h e h e a rts of the Sy rian p e op l e .�


INSIDE THIS REPORT 03 Letter from the President Our thanks

04 Uplifting Women

How our programs bring strength to Syrian women

08 Helping Children in Need

Providing physical and psychological care to the most innocent victims of the conflict in Syria

13 Physical Therapy & Rehabilitation Our role in this long-term need

14 Providing Comprehensive Health Care How we are working to address the need for basic and advanced health care in Syria

19 Rebuilding Aleppo Hospital

Perseverance amid unforeseen destruction

20 Giving Joy and Comfort

Bringing food, warmth, and celebrations of hope and resilience to Syria

25 Looking Forward

Our outlook for 2015

26 Financial Statement of Activities An overview of 2014 finances

A Year of Hope and Resilience


LETTER FROM THE PRESIDENT Dear Friends, This March marked the start of the 5th year of the conflict in Syria. In the last 4 years, Syrians across the country—and those who have sought refuge in other countries—have felt the strong reverberations of each barrel bomb, each life lost and each physical and emotional scar carved into Syria’s land and its people. But there has also been another reverberation across the country: one of hope and resilience, and that is what we at SRD cling to, what our staff clings on to and what we hope we communicate to you every day—that in spite of the hurt there is so much hope yet remaining in the hearts of the Syrian people. In this Annual Report, you’ll see what we were able to accomplish in 2014 and how many people we were able to help thanks to your support. But what we hope you take away is the resilience and strength of the people we helped. Because, while we can connect with you through our words, we want the words and actions of the beneficiaries to reach you foremost. We want to be the facilitator for your shared world view with people who are no different than you and I, except that they struggle with much more difficult circumstances. I would like to take this opportunity to thank all of you. The achievements and positive stories presented herein are all because of your support. Without it, many children may not have received psychosocial

support, many pregnant women may not have had a local clinic to receive prenatal care, many wounded or injured Syrians may not have received timely medical care, and many other things may not have happened. But they did, and it’s not through our own doing but through the mercy of God and through your support. Thank you. We wish you a wonderful year full of hope and joy in your own life. We hope you will remember the smiling faces of those whom you’ve helped. And we also hope you will keep them in your thoughts as you focus on the good that can come from the human spirit amid times of extreme strife. And lastly, we ask for your continued support so that we may pass on the hope to many other Syrians who need it. Sincerely Yours,

Dr. Jihad Qaddour President, Syria Relief & Development

2014: A Year of Hope and Resilience | 3


As a vulnerable population amid war, women are often among the innocent victims of bombardment, arrest, harassment, sexual abuse and torture. And women who have lost their husbands or fathers may find themselves in previously unknown roles— that of primary breadwinners coupled with care providers. This is the case for countless female refugees who are facing obstacles finding gainful employment to provide food and shelter for themselves and their children.

4 | SyriaReliefandDevelopment.org


t SRD, we have identified Syrian women as one of the greatest populations in need amid the crisis. Strengthening their resolve, providing them with relief and uplifting them is a necessity. That’s why our food programs target families of widows and orphans before reaching other families in need. And because Syrian women often have difficulty accessing adequate gynecological and maternity care due to a limited number of hospitals, clinics and qualified health care professionals around the country, our Primary and Reproductive Health Polyclinics and Regional Hospitals provide comprehensive reproductive health care for women. Each of our programs aims to strengthen the resilience of Syrian women and encourage and foster their growth within their families, communities and for Syria’s future.

14,479

women received help from SRD in 2014

189,544

women have received help from SRD to date

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ADVANCED REPRODUCTIVE HEALTH CARE FOR WOMEN The United Nations estimates the number of women and girls of reproductive age affected by the conflict in Syria to be around 3 million. To address the lack of access to adequate health care for Syrian women of reproductive age, SRD has implemented reproductive health as a critical component of our Primary and Reproductive Health Polyclinics in Aleppo and Idleb. Launched in September 2014, the clinics provide women with a variety of basic and advanced services that include routine check-ups, access to family planning services, and prenatal, natal and postnatal care for mother and child. The reproductive health care component ensures pregnant Syrian women experience healthy pregnancies, safe deliveries, and the prevention and treatment of potential complications, including malnutrition, neurological birth defects, preeclampsia and others. And with access to a team of trained doctors, nurses and midwives, the rates of newborn and maternal mortality as well as cesarean sections (C-sections) decrease. The clinics provide care for women of reproductive age and focus on healthy pregnancies, safe deliveries, reductions in C-sections and also track cases of sexual violence against women.


©UNHCR / S. Baldwin

181 qualified SRD health care professionals provided OB/GYN services to girls and women of reproductive age:

105 76 doctors

nurses and assistants

743 188

pregnant women were provided with free maternity care pregnant women safely delivered babies at SRD’s polyclinics

*Because the clinics were implemented in late 2014, many of the women provided with free maternity care are still anticipating delivery and receiving care. Additionally, some may have relocated or chosen to deliver at home or another medical facility.

CASE STUDY: UMM FAYSAL Umm Faysal is a 32 year-old mother of three children who regularly visits one of SRD’s health care clinics to obtain OB/GYN services. Umm Faysal was having complications around the sixth month of her most recent pregnancy. When she began to bleed and vomit repeatedly, doctors at SRD’s clinic provided her with the treatment she needed to get better and keep both her and her baby safe. Thanks to the care she received and Umm Faysal’s own resilience, a premature delivery was avoided and Umm Faysal gave birth in her ninth month of pregnancy to a precious baby girl whom she named Marwa.

2014: A Year of Hope and Resilience | 7


The situation for Syria’s children is bleak: 5.6 million Syrian children are living in dire situations; nearly 2 million Syrian children are living as refugees in neighboring countries; and more than 3 million Syrian children have had to drop out of school, many of whom have not attended school since the conflict began more than 4 years ago. Countless children have been injured amid violence and many more have witnessed or been directly affected by violence. But Syrian children are resilient and have learned to deal and cope with so much in their short lives.

2014: A Year of Hope and Resilience | 9


asnim (pictured, right) is a young girl who was injured by a bomb fragment during an air strike that targeted her neighborhood in Daraa. She was treated at SRD’s regional hospital to have the fragment removed and has since visited SRD’s local Pediatric Primary Health and Psychosocial Support Center for follow-up care. SRD’s programs provide life-saving treatment for children, the most vulnerable population amid the conflict. Our Regional Hospitals and Pediatric Primary Health and Psychosocial Support Centers provide a variety of treatments to tackle the physical and mental health of Syrian children. From birth through infancy and into childhood, SRD doctors have provided pediatric primary health care services as well as life-saving surgeries. We have witnessed children suffering from health issues as a result of inaccessibility to clean, sanitary water and nutritious food, and have provided them with much-needed treatment. We have witnessed children like Tasnim who arrived to us after an attack and whose lives depended upon our doctors and treated them as well.

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SRD’s health care programs tailored for children ensure healthy growth and development for children by facilitating access to primary health care services as well as more advanced services when needed. SRD’s health programs also focus on preventing and treating communicable diseases (CDs) such as skin diseases (leishmaniasis), respiratory infections, measles and diarrhea. But the care we provide for children doesn’t end at their physical well being. Our psychosocial support centers address the great need for the psychological and social wellbeing of children living amid war. Helping Syrian children deal with their emotions and better cope with their fears and worries while giving them a safe place to be themselves is invaluable. In addition to providing physical and mental health care for the well-being of Syrian children, SRD has programs that provide seasonal food, meat and winter care packages to families to ensure that vulnerable children have their basic needs met.


HEALING THE EMOTIONAL WOUNDS OF WAR FOR CHILDREN: PSYCHOSOCIAL SUPPORT The physical effects of war are often evident because they can be seen and are frequently portrayed across news media worldwide. Death and injury are among the terrible consequences of armed conflict; but what aren’t so visible are the emotional and mental health wounds being dealt with by those affected by it, particularly children who are old enough to retain images, but too young to know how to process them. Dr. Faheem Arain, a Child and Adolescent Psychiatrist at Pathways Community Behavioral Health Care in Raymore, Missouri, has traveled as a volunteer to disaster zones in the United States and abroad, providing mental health support to affected children. According to Dr. Arain, “disaster or war can really influence children and cause devastating effects on their personalities. Each child is different and will have his or her own coping strategies—some may come out stronger and others may be devastated.”

145,656

children received help from SRD (across all programs) in 2014

366,105

children received help from SRD (across all programs) to date

Dr. Arain notes that children attempting to process a traumatic event may become emotionally numb and unable to respond, going through symptoms categorized as Acute Stress Disorder. If the symptoms continue, the child may experience Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD), depression, anxiety disorders and substance abuse disorders. And the effects of trauma are even worse for children who have lost loved ones. “If a child has lost a loved one, he or she may be seeking comfort and if the loved one is not there, the child’s world is turned upside down.” 2014: A Year of Hope and Resilience | 11


The benefits of providing psychosocial support to Syrian children are immeasurable, according to Dr. Arain. “There is no health without mental health—a healthy body needs a healthy mind and vice versa. We can treat superficial wounds but the traumatic wounds need to be explored, addressed and ultimately healed. Mental scars are equally as important.” SRD has long-recognized the importance of mental health support to growing children who are still

6102

formulating their important coping skills and must deal with the traumas of armed conflict. Our Pediatric Primary Health and Psychosocial Support Centers provide mental health and social support for children through a variety of ways. Children participate in peer groups where they interact with one another. Children are also taught to develop coping mechanisms through activities that promote psychological well-being and support. At the centers, children are also invited to holiday parties full of skits and fun activities as well as toy distributions.

children were provided with psychosocial support from SRD in 2014

CASE STUDY: HEALING NOUR 12 year-old Nour Alhayek’s family was shaken one day during a barrel bomb attack in their neighborhood that struck their home. The women and children of Nour’s family moved into a neighbor’s basement while her father, uncle and grandfather stayed in their damaged home. After the attack, Nour was traumatized by her memories of the bombing and the loss of her childhood home. She experienced nightmares about bombings, war planes and the deaths of close family members. She would wake terrified and screaming. Her sudden change in behavior affected other aspects of her life, including her studies as she became terrified of even leaving her home to attend school. Nour’s family heard about SRD’s local Pediatric Primary Health and Psychosocial Support Center and, concerned for Nour’s well being, brought her to the center in the hopes that the support would benefit her. At the center, Nour received sessions

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of the Child SelfProtection Techniques program, designed to help children better cope with the painful experiences they have had, teach them how to protect themselves during an emergency situation, provide them with communication and cooperation skills and also engage in entertaining activities. Since joining the program, SRD staff and Nour’s family have noticed a remarkable difference in her behavior. Nour has started to cope with the painful feelings she was experiencing. She shared her feelings and listened to other children express their feelings as well. She slowly learned how to solve and face problems she encounters and regained confidence in her abilities. Nour has stopped having nightmares and has returned to school where she is excelling.


PHYSICAL THERAPY AND REHABILITATION Addressing a Long-Term Need

earning how to navigate a wheelchair after a devastating bullet injury, how to walk with a prosthetic limb after a neighborhood bombardment caused severe injuries or how to increase mobility after diabetes-induced neuropathy—these are some of the health concerns faced by a growing number of Syrians due to the conflict as well as inaccessibility to adequate health care for acute and chronic conditions. As a result, one of the most critical needs in Syria is that of physical therapy and rehabilitation. With more than 750,000 Syrians injured (a number that has increased dramatically since the World Health Organization reported it in June 2014) and fighting continuing in the country, the need to provide long-term rehabilitative care for the injured is critical. Currently, there are not many programs inside Syria for this type of care and a lack of access to even regular primary health care and, consequently, poor management of chronic conditions has contributed to an increase in limb amputations. Conflict-related attacks have also led to long-term disabilities from

severe injuries that have resulted in limb amputations and immobility. Since April 2014, SRD’s Health Care Network in Syria has included an outpatient Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation Clinic in Idleb. Idleb was chosen as the site for the clinic as the city currently serves as a temporary home to a large number of internally displaced persons (IDPs) and has been a major area of migration and resettlement. The clinic addresses the need for care with the rise in handicapped individuals and the program provides them with the adequate support they need to survive and thrive. The program provides care for both chronic and conflict-related disabilities, including services in rehabilitation, prosthetic limb fitting, assistance with mobility, gaining functionality following injury or disability, dialysis and extensive treatment for burns and wounds.

12,596

disabled persons have received help from SRD’s clinic

CASE STUDY: THERAPY FOR MOHAMMAD 8 year-old Mohammad Hashash came to SRD’s Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation Clinic after being treated for a bullet wound in his thigh. His leg mobility was limited and he was unable to participate in normal activities. For 3 months, Mohammad received intensive physiotherapy through infrared rays and therapeutic exercises. As he grew stronger through his resilience to struggle to heal, Mohammad was able to begin bending his knee completely and move while he played sports with his friends.

2014: A Year of Hope and Resilience | 13


Four years of armed conflict have destroyed numerous health care facilities across Syria and either killed or caused a large number of health care workers to leave the country. As a result, Syria is in a health care crisis. Through its comprehensive Health Care Network, Syria Relief and Development strives to provide treatment for men, women and children in Syria who might otherwise go without proper care.

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he 7.6 million IDPs and the 12.2 million people in the country who are in need of humanitarian assistance struggle to obtain access to basic health care services. Addressing the urgent needs sustained by injuries amid armed conflict aside, many children and adults are being attacked by a host of health issues arising from a lack of basic health check-ups. To address the need for basic and advanced health care in Syria, SRD instituted a Health Care Network in Syria that consists of Regional Hospitals, Primary and Reproductive Health Polyclinics, Pediatric Primary Health and Psychosocial Support Centers and Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation Clinics.

99,306

total patients were seen by SRD Regional Hospitals in 2014

REGIONAL HOSPITALS At the highest and most advanced level of SRD’s health care network stand our regional hospitals in Aleppo, Daraa and Idleb. Another regional hospital is under construction in Homs and anticipated to begin treating patients in 2015. SRD’s regional hospitals provide a variety of advanced health care services in internal medicine, pediatrics, general, orthopedic and vascular surgery, obstetrics/ gynecology, urology, ENT (ear, nose and throat), psychiatric care and other vital components of critical care. The hospitals also contain radiology departments with access to perform x-rays, CT scans and Doppler Ultrasound procedures. The hospitals together treat thousands of patients each month and have performed numerous life-saving surgeries.

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ALEPPO HOSPITAL

14,898

TOTAL PATIENTS

7491 2206 3099 2102 men

women

boys

girls

DARAA HOSPITAL

56,208

TOTAL PATIENTS

10,505 10,774 17,768 17,161 men

women

boys

girls

IDLEB HOSPITAL

28,200

TOTAL PATIENTS

8874 6019 7930 5377 men

women

boys

girls


PRIMARY AND REPRODUCTIVE HEALTH POLYCLINICS SRD’s polyclinics in Aleppo and Idleb offer primary health care services to men, women and children, complementing the more advanced care provided by our regional hospitals with preventive and follow-up care for acute and chronic total conditions. Repropatients ductive health care were treated at Primary for women is one and Reproductive Health of the polyclinics’ Polyclinics (Idleb, Aleppo) most critical components, providing labor and delivery, men women prenatal, natal and postnatal care in addition to family boys girls planning services.

10,453 1282

2086

3541

3544

PEDIATRIC PRIMARY HEALTH AND PSYCHOSOCIAL SUPPORT CENTERS The centers in Daraa provide outpatient pediatric primary health care services, medicine, diagnostic testing, child protection and advocacy education and psychosocial support for children. Children participate in activities that encourage selfexpression and dialogue in a safe environment, a critical component to helping vulnerable children cope with the traumas of war.

52,267

total children were treated at SRD’s Pediatric Primary Health and Psychosocial Support Centers (Daraa)

27,324 boys 29,943 girls

CASE STUDY: HAJAR ALKHATEEB Hajar is a 24 year-old woman who visited SRD’s polyclinic in Idleb to receive maternal care. Hajar was in her ninth month of pregnancy and suffering from pain and abdominal spasms. She visited the clinic and delivered her son naturally the same day. Hajar was given post-labor and delivery support as well as postnatal care for both her and her baby.

2014: A Year of Hope and Resilience | 17


PHYSICAL THERAPY AND REHABILITATION CLINIC

MEDICAL AID FOR FIELD HOSPITALS

The Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation Clinic in Idleb provides physical therapy and rehabilitation services for Syrians who need such services as a result of either conflict-related injury or from chronic conditions. The clinic provides services in rehabilitation, prosthetic limb fitting, assistance with mobility, gaining functionality following injury or disability, dialysis and extensive treatment for burns and wounds.

SRD’s Medical Aid for Field Hospitals program administers essential medical supplies to field hospitals in areas of need within Syria. The medical provisions include general surgery and orthopedic supplies which are in great need as injuries sustained during the conflict often require advanced medical care to treat broken limbs and injuries of the abdomen, thorax and pelvic regions.

12,596

disabled persons have received help from SRD’s clinic field hospitals have received medical aid from SRD to date

9551 3077 REFUGEE HEALTH AND TRAUMA CENTER (AMMAN, JORDAN) Located in Amman, Jordan, SRD’s Refugee Health and Trauma Center provides advanced medical care for impoverished Syrian refugees. The center’s physicians, nurses and other medical professionals provide free services in primary and outpatient care, pediatrics, orthopedics, labor and delivery, urology, cardiology, diagnostic testing and much more.

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refugees received care through SRD’s Refugee Health and Trauma Center in 2014 total refugees received dental care through SRD’s Dental Clinic

1237 men 1563 women 277 children

DENTAL CLINIC (AMMAN, JORDAN) Launched in June 2013, SRD’s Dental Clinic in Amman, Jordan provides Syrian refugees (men, women and children) with a variety of dental services, including oral exams, dental cleanings and x-rays.


The SRD staff showed immense resilience after a devastating attack.

n the morning of April 21, 2014, SRD’s Aleppo Hospital was destroyed by two barrel bombs. While hospital staff and patients sustained no severe injuries or casualties, civilians in the area immediately surrounding the hospital were severely injured. “I was just finishing my cup of coffee when I heard the explosion of the barrel bomb. I lost consciousness for a few moments because of the operation room window that fell over my head. I awoke a few minutes later stunned and looked for my colleagues in the hospital. After another 5 minutes, the second barrel bomb fell into the building,” said Ahmed*, a staff member. Following the attack, SRD staff worked to recover equipment and supplies, salvaging most of the hospital’s equipment. The destruction of the hospital had a tremendous impact on the morale of hospital staff members, many of whom had been part of the hospital’s initial building phase. The hospital represented a symbol of rebuilding amid war. “We were very troubled and did not know where we would go,” said Ahmed. “The hospital was our home and where all of our memories were.” Yet the staff persevered through the circumstances and focused on caring for the injured at a new location in Aleppo. The new facility was up and running within 23 days after the attack, demonstrating the staff’s resourcefulness

and ability to adapt and move quickly in the face of difficult and unforeseen circumstances. Not long thereafter, the new location became the permanent facility for Aleppo Hospital. In the months following the attack, the new Aleppo Hospital continued operations in full force, seeing more than 3,400 patients in August 2014. Armed conflict around Aleppo continues to keep the staff and people of Aleppo weary but their resilience is strong. “It’s the duty of the humanitarian [to stay and treat the sick and injured],” said Mazen*, another staff member. “It’s our duty to serve children, women, the elderly and ensure not only their protection and safety but for reducing their pain.” “I’m a believer in the importance of practicing humanitarianism,” said Ahmed. “Our fellow Syrians deserve for us to stay for them.” Today, Aleppo Hospital continues to serve civilians in the region. With only 33 doctors left in the entire Aleppo region, the 8 doctors at Aleppo Hospital have become more valuable than ever, making the hospital a true necessity for the region. The hospital continues to operate at full capacity and sees an average of 1,500 patients every month. *Staff members’ names have been changed to protect their privacy.

2014: A Year of Hope and Resilience | 19


SRD strives to provide joy and comfort to Syrians in need. War is one of the most difficult circumstances for any person to live through. And a war that has caused a humanitarian disaster unlike any witnessed in decades is even more difficult. So for the past few years, our programs have sought out families who need a bit of joy and comfort in their lives—through the provision of food and other basic necessities to holiday food and toy distributions and holiday celebrations.

2014: A Year of Hope and Resilience | 21


13,951 PEOPLE (1200 FAMILIES)

received SRD Standard Care Packages and Food Baskets in 2014

950 FAMILIES received Ramadan Food Baskets in 2014

2810 FAMILIES received Udhiyah Qurbani meat distributions in 2014

22 | SyriaReliefandDevelopment.org

FEEDING THE NEEDY For the 12.2 million people in need across Syria and the 7.6 million who are internally displaced, obtaining a steady supply of food does not come easy. Four years of conflict have seen increased food prices throughout the country. Air and ground attacks have destroyed farmland, crops and livestock. Many people have become destitute and rely on humanitarian aid for their survival. Yet they continue to seek support and search for ways to feed themselves and their families. And through the hardships, their resilience continues to shine through. In an effort to continue providing food relief, SRD has instituted a Standard Care Package program that includes the distribution of food baskets filled with staple items such as rice, pasta, dates, baby formula, mortadella, sugar, flour, cooking oil and much more. SRD distributes the care packages and food baskets during the spring, summer and early fall months, as well as the Islamic holy month of Ramadan. In addition to care packages and food baskets, SRD also provides meat packages to families during the holy month of Dhul Hijjah when Muslims practice the age-old Islamic tradition of sacrificing an animal and distributing a third of it to the poor. The packages are given to families in Syria and Jordan for whom eating meat is a rarity.


GIVING WARMTH IN THE COLD WINTER MONTHS Winter in Syria and its surrounding region can often be brutal. The region is not unknown to experience cold winter storms that can blanket its landscapes with snow and ice. While many adults may have warm winter clothing from years past, Syrian children are still growing and will often very quickly outgrow the previous year’s winter clothing. In addition, millions of displaced Syrians fled their homes with very little possessions and do not have access to warm clothing, blankets or heating fuel. To address the seasonal needs of Syrian families during the cold winter months, SRD developed the Winter Care Package program. Distributed during the colder winter months, the winter care packages include items that provide warmth to families. An average winter care package includes blankets, warm clothing (particularly for children), foam mattresses, rugs and heating fuel, along with a hygiene kit that consists of soap, shampoo, detergent and more.

13,498

people received winter care package items in 2014

2014: A Year of Hope and Resilience | 23


RAMADAN Syrians worldwide who grew up in the country’s historical landscapes and brightly lit centuries -old cities can recall with fondness memories of childhood Ramadans spent in Syria. The bustling bedecked souks, aromas of freshlycooked bread and sweets and the excitement of family get-togethers. But since the start of the crisis, Muslims in Syria as well as in neighboring countries have experienced a different kind of Ramadan–one in which food is less readily available, marketplaces have shut down or been destroyed and, for many, family members may be missing, killed or far away. Yet they continue to celebrate and do what they can for themselves and their families, to create some fond moments and memories in the darkness. To help bring joy to Syrian families during Ramadan and ensure families have food with which to break their fasts each day, SRD distributes Ramadan food baskets to families in need.

EID CELEBRATIONS Many Syrian families have memories of holidays past full of family, friends, food and laughter. Many Syrians who once celebrated Eid al-Fitr and Eid al-Adha with joy and festivity find themselves internally displaced, without access to proper food, or even missing members of their families. Once a joyful, light-filled occasion, Eid is celebrated differently in Syria today and only through the resilience of its people who make an effort for themselves and their children to create joy and love where there may be little. In recent Eid holidays, SRD has held Eid celebrations full of food, activities and presents for Syrian children. The children receive a true celebration in the spirit of Eid and their parents rejoice in seeing laughter in their eyes. SRD staff and volunteers recalled the atmosphere of pure joy for the children who attended the celebrations, full of face painting, games, mascots, prizes and more.

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UDHIYAH QURBANI The Islamic tradition of performing a sacrifice each year in the month of Dhul Hijjah dates back to Prophet Abraham’s sacrifice of his son who God replaced at the last moment with a ram. Muslims honor Abraham’s sacrifice each year by sacrificing an animal of their own and donating a third of the sacrifice to the poor and needy. With millions of Syrians living in food insecurity and dealing with the daily threat of hunger, SRD’s Udhiyah Qurbani program provides much-needed food aid to Syrian families. Just one Udhiyah Qurbani can provide enough meat to feed 15 families.

1300

children participated in SRD hosted Eid celebrations in 2014


LOOKING FORWARD SRD is already under way with 2015 and hopes to make it a year of strengthening our current programs with even greater support and reach and to also implement additional programs, particularly in the area of education, that meet the needs of Syria’s future.

ur focus in the past year has shifted from shortterm emergency aid to programs that provide key long-term sustainable benefits. Programs such as our Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation Clinic and our Pediatric Primary and Psychosocial Support Centers seek to help those with disabilities and children overcome obstacles and be contributing

members of Syria’s future. Our life-saving health care programs continue to ensure that health issues are not sidelined but that Syrians can receive access to quality health care that also gives them a chance at rebuilding and re-creating a new future for Syria. And with the resilience Syrians have shown over the past year, and the last four years of conflict, there is great hope.

2014: A Year of Hope and Resilience | 25


FINANCIAL STATEMENT OF ACTIVITIES Fiscal Year 2014

SUPPORT & REVENUE Gift in Kind Contributions

Pharmaceuticals, Medical Supplies, and Equipment

11,402,159

Food

34,305

Non-Food Items (NFI)

91,682

Services

Individual Contributions Grants

TOTAL SUPPORT & REVENUE

255,247 637,231 3,337,610

$ 15,758,234

EXPENSES Program Services Health Care Network 1,463,199

Regional Hospitals (Aleppo, Daraa, Homs, Idleb)

Pediatric Primary Health Care & Psychosocial Centers

Primary and Reproductive Health Care Polyclinics

Medical Aid for Field Hospitals

Medical Aid for Regional Hospitals

10,339,638

Refugee Health and Trauma Center

688,070

Dental Clinic

475,326 83,657 1,062,521

28,385

Standard Care Packages

344,015

Winter Care Packages

68,695

Udhiyah/Qurbani

20,500

Ramadan & Eid

32,023

Total Program Services

14,606,029

Supporting Services Administrative

379,392

Fundraising 280,966 Other Expenses Total Supporting Services

TOTAL EXPENSES

NET ASSETS 26 | SyriaReliefandDevelopment.org

82,211 742,569

$ 15,348,598

$ 409,636


FISCAL RESPONSIBILITY 95.16% 1.83% Programs

Fundraising

2.47% 0.54% Administrative

Other Expenses

OUR MISSION To provide crisis humanitarian relief and plant the seeds of sustainable development for the people of Syria.

OUR VISION To maintain humanitarian relief and mobilize resources to develop a comprehensive agenda for sustainable development in Syria.

2014: A Year of Hope and Resilience | 27


SyriaReliefandDevelopment.org info@SyriaReliefandDevelopment.org SyriaReliefandDevelopment |

SyriaRandD

PO Box 25446 Overland Park, KS 66225 | (913) 438-9990 Tax ID 45-3737015 Cover photo: ŠUNHCR / A. McConnell

Syria Relief & Development 2014 Annual Report  

Our 2014 Annual Report and what your donations helped achieve!

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