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Inside This Report Letter from the President. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .04 Latest on the Crisis in Syria. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 05 Atrocities Committed Against Children. . . . . . . . . . . . 05 About Us. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 06 2013 Distributions and Beneficiaries. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 06 How Donations Are Spent. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 07 2013 Distributions by City. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 07 Programs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 08 Care Packages. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 08 Emergency Response . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10

Hospital Network. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 Medical Aid for Field Hospitals. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Mobile Medical Points. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 Pediatric Primary Healthcare Centers . . . . . . . . . 14 Syrian Refugee Health and Trauma Program (Akilah Hospital) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 Dental Clinic. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 Case Studies. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 Financial Summary. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 2014 Outlook. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19


Letter from the President Dear Friend, 2013 was witness to a large number of atrocities in Syria. An increase in conflict lead to the worst humanitarian situation the world has seen in this generation. In March, on the second anniversary of the civil war, the United Nations Refugee Agency (UNHCR) registered Bushra—a 19 year-old mother of two children—as the one-millionth Syrian refugee. Between March and December, an additional 1.4 million people fleeing from the country were registered by the UN, bringing the total number of Syrian refugees to 2.4 million. And that’s not all—the number of Syrians internally displaced jumped from 2 million at the end of 2012 to 6.5 million by the end of 2013. And while a staggering 4 million Syrians were in need of aid at the end of 2012, by the end of 2013 that number jumped up to 9.3 million people—half of the country’s entire population. These numbers are disheartening. But what you helped us accomplish with your support fills us with hope. Last year, Syria Relief and Development’s donors and partners helped provide more than $6.4 million in aid to Syrians in need through numerous programs. Thanks to your support, our Syrian Refugee Health and Trauma Program treated more than 23,000 patients. Our dental clinic provided dental care for nearly 2,400 patients. Our Mobile Medical Points in Idleb and Aleppo provided more than 9,300 Syrians with urgent first-aid medical care. We

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supplied more than $2 million in aid to field hospitals throughout Syria. Our Pediatric Primary Healthcare Centers treated more than 5,600 children. And with your support we were able to do so much more. Thank you. As you continue to see the devastating effects of the civil war on Syrians and Syrian refugees, know that everything you do for those in need—every dollar you donate, every story or email of hope you share and every prayer you say—makes a difference. Your monetary and non-monetary contributions all make a significant difference toward helping provide Syrians with life’s most basic needs. Together, let’s make 2014 a year of continuing to help better the lives of Syrians in need. With your help, we can reach even more people in need this year. With your support, we can provide relief and plant the seeds of development. But we must do this together. Sincerely,

Dr. Jihad Qaddour President Syria Relief and Development


Latest on the Crisis in Syria

people in need of humanitarian aid

children affected by the crisis

internally displaced persons (IDPs) inside Syria

Syrian refugees displaced to neighboring countries

(USAID Syria Complex Emergency Report, January 30, 2014)

Atrocities Committed Against Children • Children among those killed by chemical weapon use

Child protesters as young as

• Reports of sexual violence committed against wormen and girls during checkpoints, house searches or while in detention

reportedly injured or killed

• Several reports of child abductions in exchange for ransom or the release of prisoners

More than

10,000

CHILDREN

KILLED

11 YEARS OLD

3,000

More than of the country’s 20,000 schools have been damaged or destroyed. (United Nations Security Council’s report of the Secretary-Generalon children and armed conflict in the Syrian Arab Republic, January 27, 2014)

• Children often caught in the middle of crossfire have been injured or killed • Shelling and airstrikes in residential areas caused the deaths of many children 05


About Us Syria Relief and Development (SRD) is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization incorporated in November 2011 to provide humanitarian aid to Syrians and Syrian refugees affected by violence, hunger, poverty, injury and displacement. The volatile situation in Syria has created a dire need for food, shelter and medical supplies. SRD is working to address these needs through its established programs within Syria and in surrounding regions. SRD is based in the US with offices in Amman, Jordan and Gaziantep, Turkey.

Mission

Vision

Our mission is to provide crisis humanitarian relief and plant the seeds of sustainable development for the people of Syria.

Our vision is to maintain humanitarian relief and mobilize resources to develop a comprehensive agenda for sustainable development in Syria.

Distributions and Beneficiaries For the Year 2013 Mobile Medical Points

Beneficiaries

$90,000

9,380

Refugee Health and Trauma Center (Akilah Hospital)

$1,123,681

23,876

Medical Aid for Field Hospitals

$2,031,738

125,000

$49,500

10,000

$1,808,950

63,250

$10,000

2,398

$1,152,377

384

$130,000

5,674

$37,700

3,000

$6,433,946

242,962

Standard Care Packages + Ramadan Winter Care Packages Dental Clinic Hospital Network Pediatric Primary Healthcare Centers Udhiyah/Qurbani Total 06

Distributions


How Donations are Spent 93.72%

Total Programs and Cash

2.92%

Administrative

1.34%

Fundraising

2.02%

Other (Fees, Postage, etc.)

2013 Distributions by City Idleb

Aleppo

$866,487

$465,000 Winter Care Packages

Hama $539,110

Deir Alzor $66,900

Homs

$758,000

Standard Care Packages Pediatric Primary Healthcare Centers Refugee Health and Trauma Center (Akilah Hospital)

Damascus $418,600

Mobile Medical Points Dental Clinic

Daraa

$2,175,968

Amman, Jordan $1,143,881

SRD Hospital Network Medical Aid for Field Hospitals 07


Programs With the support of generous donors and grants from our partners, SRD funds and operates a number of humanitarian aid projects that address the most urgent needs of food and medical care inside Syria and for refugees in neighboring Jordan.

For each program, beneficiaries are determined based upon each family’s needs and individual circumstances. Priority is always given to impoverished families who have lost their main breadwinners, those who have been injured in conflict and require immediate medical attention and other families in need.

Care Packages To address the emergency shortage of basic necessities such as food, clothing, heating fuel, hygiene items and more, Syria Relief and Development has established the Care Package Program. The program is divided into two types—standard and winter care packages—and provide much-needed aid for Syrian families in need.

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Standard Care Packages Standard care packages are distributed at various times during the year as well as during the holy month of Ramadan. The packages contain food items, including rice, sugar, wheat, cooking oil, ghee, lentils, jam, tea, halawa, tomato paste, zatar, mortadella, vermicelli, pasta, dates, cheese, baby formula, milk and eggs, as well as non-food items such as clothing, medicine, candles, heating fuel and more. In 2013, Syria Relief and Development distributed $49,500 in care packages to approximately 10,000 people in cities throughout Syria as well as to refugees in Amman, Jordan.

$ 3,000 | Idleb $ 4,000 | Daraa $ 5,000 | Aleppo $ 7,500 | Amman, Jordan $ 11,000 | Damascus $ 19,000 | Homs Total Distributions:

$49,500

Winter Care Packages Winter care packages are distributed prior to and during the winter months to provide Syrian families with warmth during the colder winter months. The packages generally contain blankets, foam mattresses, winter clothing (thermal pajamas, hats, gloves, thick socks, children’s coats and sweaters), and hygiene items (towels, toothbrushes, toothpaste, shampoo, dishwashing detergent, laundry detergent, feminine pads and soap). In 2013, Syria Relief and Development distributed more than $1.8 million in winter care items to benefit more than 63,000 people in cities throughout Syria.

$ 42,900 | Deir Alzor $ 100,100 | Damascus $ 411,840 | Idleb

$ 539,110 | Hama $715,000 | Homs Total Distributions:

$1,808,950 09


Emergency Response Because the conflict in Syria is ongoing with frequent escalations in violence, Syria Relief and Development often has to mobilize medical teams and volunteers to help the injured when a catastrophe occurs.

Chemical Attack on the Damascus Suburbs

Emergency in Qusayr

On August 21, 2013, at around 3 am in the morning, 29 rockets with chemical heads were fired into the suburbs of Damascus. The attack killed more than 1,300 people, the majority of whom were women and children.

When tens of thousands of people were trapped by harsh fighting in the town of Qusayr in the province of Homs, Syria Relief and Development launched an emergency campaign to provide immediate food and medical care for the people of Qusayr.

Thanks to generous donations from our supporters and in-kind donations from our partners, Syria Relief and Development was able to transport medicine and medical supplies into the affected areas and to doctors in field hospitals throughout East and West Ghouta. SRD was able to provide them with:

ampules of Atropine, a drug commonly used to treat the symptoms of chemical poisoning

Laryngoscopes, instruments often used during tracheal intubation during general anesthesia or cardiopulmonary resuscitation 10

Thanks to the support of generous donors, we were able to send $5,000 to a local field hospital in Qusayr to help care for the injured.

units of Dexamethasone, a corticosteroid used to treat a variety of inflammatory and autoimmune conditions

Endotracheal tubes, essential to help establish breathing airways

Standard Medical Supplies


Hospital Network In December 2013, Syria Relief and Development established a hospital network inside Syria to provide direct medical care tto the sick and injured. The hospitals are located in Aleppo, Daraa and Idleb. Thanks to grants from our partners, Syria Relief and Development distributed more than $1.1 million toward the building of the hospitals and the commencing of treatment for 384 patients.

Aleppo Hospital

Daraa Hospital

Aleppo Hospital provides services in internal medicine, pediatrics, general, orthopedic and vascular surgery, obstetrics/gynecology, urology, psychiatric care and other vital components of critical care within the Aleppo region. The hospital conducts an average of more than 250 surgeries and outpatient care for more than 3,000 patients each month. The hospital currently stands in the spot where a Ministry of Health building was previously destroyed.

Daraa Hospital also provides services in internal medicine, pediatrics, general, orthopedic and vascular surgery, obstetrics/gynecology, urology, psychiatric care and other vital components of critical care within the Daraa region. The hospital allows people living in Damascus and its suburbs to seek treatment through this hospital rather than traveling to Jordan or Lebanon to seek medical care.

Idleb Hospital Idleb Hospital serves the northern region of Idleb where access to proper medical care beyond basic first-aid care is virtually nonexistent. There is currently no other hospital located in the region. The hospital provides emergency orthopedic services for men, women and children. The patients have often suffered catastrophic orthopedic injuries. The hospital includes a blood bank to address the emergency shortage of blood for patients requiring transfusions and a Radiology Department that performs x-rays and Doppler Ultrasound procedures. 11


Medical Aid for Field Hospitals In conflict-affected regions, a staggering amount of civilians have undergone extreme physical trauma. As a result, a dire need for medical care exists for those harmed during this ongoing conflict at field hospitals across Syria. This medical care includes basic acute care along with immediate treatment for traumatic injuries through surgeries, medications, required lab testing and outpatient services. Syria Relief and Development provides essential medical supplies to field hospitals inside Syria. Provisions include general surgery and orthopedics supplies which are in great need as a large number of injured Syrians have suffered from bone and/or muscle-related injuries and deformities. The men, women, and children in need of this medical assistance require advanced medical care to treat broken limbs and injuries of the abdomen, thorax and pelvis. These treatments often prove to be life-saving, or simply improve their quality of life in response to the medical crisis in the region. 12

In 2013, Syria Relief and Development provided approximately 40 field hospitals in Syria with more than $2 million in medical supplies.

$ 24,000 | Deir Alzor $ 302,500 | Damascus

$ 1,705,238 | Daraa

Total Distributions:

$2,031,738


Mobile Medical Points A dire need for rapid first-aid response inside Syria led Syria Relief and Development to establish the Mobile Medical Points program, in collaboration with SRD field partners. Mobile Medical Points provide trained healthcare professionals with Emergency Trauma Kits (ETKs)— equipped with essential medical supplies—so they may in turn provide immediate, onsite treatment to injured Syrians during front-line medical emergencies in or near conflict areas. In 2013, Syria Relief and Development provided $90,000 in emergency trauma kits to healthcare professionals in Aleppo and Idleb.

$ 45,000

| Idleb

$ 45,000

| Aleppo

Total Distributions:

$90,000

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Pediatric Primary Healthcare Centers In 2013, Syria Relief and Development established two Pediatric Primary Healthcare Centers in the southern region of Syria. Given that the children of Syria are at the forefront of pain and suffering during the ongoing crisis, the establishment of facilities dedicated solely to address the needs of children has become absolutely necessary.

One of the greatest features of the healthcare centers are the psychosocial support they provide to children living amid conflict. Activities geared toward getting the children to express themselves and talk about their experiences in a safe environment are just as critical as the physical component of care provided by the centers.

The centers provide children with outpatient primary care services, medications, lab-testing and x-rays. In addition, the centers carry out a child protection program which provides materials regarding child protection and well-being.

In 2013, the centers benefited more than 5,600 people, including more than 4,000 children.

This information is available on-site and distributed to surrounding communities in the form of leaflets, announcements at mosques and other areas of congregation and on a peer-to-peer basis.

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$ 130,000 | Daraa


Syrian Refugee Health and Trauma Program To provide medical care for injured Syrian refugees, Syria Relief and Development established a medical wing inside Akilah Hospital in Amman, Jordan on July 1, 2012. Through the Syrian Refugee Health and Trauma Program, SRD provides essential medical treatments to injured Syrian refugees who are unable to obtain care within Syria or unable to afford treatment. The medical wing consists of physicians, nurses and other medical personnel with specialties including primary care, orthopedics, ENT (Ear, Nose, and Throat), labor and delivery, pediatrics, urology and cardiology. The services patients receive include surgeries, lab testing, x-ray imaging and outpatient care. In 2013, the wing provided more than $1.1 million in medical care to nearly 24,000 Syrian refugees, all free of charge. The medical wing continues to be a source of hope for refugees who are seeking quality care but cannot otherwise afford it.

Surgeries Performed

Patients Served

Total Distribution

Dental Clinic Our dental clinic in Amman, Jordan provides Syrian refugees (men, women and children) with a variety of dental services including the following:

• Oral exams • Dental cleaning • X-rays

Distribution

Beneficiaries

The program started in June 2013 and by December 31, 2013 the dental clinic had treated nearly 2,400 patients, free of charge. 15


Case Studies Maisaa Maisaa, a patient at our Refugee Health and Trauma center in Amman, Jordan, is a real trooper. She has dealt patiently with health issues all of her life and is silently dealing with partial kidney failure.

Mayyar Mayyar is a young patient at our medical wing in Amman, Jordan. His family fled Syria when 2 missiles struck their house. He recounted watching his cousins die and seeing his mom lying on the ground with horrific injuries. It is a scene Mayyar will never forget. But he is happy that he and his family survived and that they are receiving treatment to heal.

Ammoun Ammoun, a 63 year-old woman and mother of 10 children was in Syria when her neighborhood was attacked with gunfire. She fled with her family but a sudden explosion caused her to be struck with fragments in her left shoulder and arm. She arrived at our Refugee Health and Trauma Center at Akilah Hospital in Amman, Jordan where she was treated for her injuries and also diagnosed with osteoporosis. “The treatment here is very good and I appreciate what they have done [for] me,� she said. 16


2013 Financial Summary Income Cash Donations

$ 1,139,778.26

15.49%

Grants

$ 1,536,706.18

20.88%

In-Kind Contributions

$ 4,682,446.00

63.63%

Total Income

$ 7,358,930.44

100.00%

Expenses Overhead Expenses Advertising and Promotion

$

52,530.46

0.71%

Bank Service Charges

$

14,027.09

0.19%

Fundraising, Conferences and Other Expenses

$

182,807.10

2.48%

Payroll and Consultant Expenses

$

215,133.72

2.92%

Total Overhead Expenses

$ 464,498.37

6.31%

17


Relief Program Expenses

18

Mobile Medical Points

$

90,000.00

1.22%

Standard Care Packages + Ramadan

$

49,500.00

0.67%

Udhiyah/Qurbani

$

37,700.00

0.51%

Pediatric Primary Healthcare Centers

$

130,000.00

1.77%

Hospital Network

$ 1,152,377.00

15.66%

Refugee Health and Trauma Center

$ 1,123,681.00

15.27%

Winter Care Packages

$ 1,808,950.00

24.58%

Medical Aid for Field Hospitals

$ 2,031,738.00

27.61%

Dental Clinic

$

10,000.00

0.14%

Total Relief Program Expenses

$ 6,433,946.00

87.43%

Total Expenses

$ 6,898,444.37

93.74%

Net Income in the Bank

$ 460,486.07

6.26%


2014 Outlook During 2014, Syria Relief and Development anticipates continuing our relief work in providing care and assistance to Syrians affected by the conflict. But our focus is going to be on development—long-term rebuilding and reconstruction after a tumultuous three-year ongoing conflict. Our relief efforts will remain in place while we reach our capacity further into helping build Syria’s future. Our hospital network is a major stepping stone toward bridging the gap between current relief projects and long-term development. We have built these hospitals—

currently in Aleppo, Daraa and Idleb—in areas that have seen much destruction over the past three years. The hospitals provide not only a place where families can receive much-needed medical care but also as safe sanctuaries away from the heart of conflict zones where patients and visitors can feel a sense of safety and security amid war. We are working on establishing additional full-fledged hospitals and pediatric centers inside Syria. We also hope to establish a physical therapy rehabilitation center in Idleb.

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Tax ID 45-3737015 PO Box 25446 Overland Park, KS 66225 (913) 438-9990

SyriaReliefandDevelopment.org info@syriareliefanddevelopment.org

Facebook.com/SyriaReliefandDevelopment Twitter.com/SyriaRandD

Syria Relief and Development -- 2013 Annual Report  
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