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C O N T E N T S

March

LETTER FROM THE EDITOR ...............................................6 CONTRIBUTORS .....................................................................6

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PAST EVENTS..........................................................................7 FASHION Fashion Forward: Vintage Meets Modern.....................8

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FOOD Syracuse Eats: Soleil Café ............................................. 10 WISE WOMAN'S BUSINESS CENTER WISE Woman: Lisa Eklund............................................ 14 SPECIAL FEATURE Life House ....................................................................... 22

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ON THE COVER Joyce Stokes Jones & Michele Jones Galvin ............ 27 FOR A GOOD CAUSE White Ribbon Campaign ................................................. 33

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INSPIRE Linda Lovig ...................................................................... 36 Sheryl Garofano................................................................... 40 Victoria Lightcap ............................................................ 44 DOLLARS AND SENSE Getting to Know Our Fore-sisters ................................. 39 UPCOMING EVENTS ......................................................... 48 MOVERS AND SHAKERS.................................................. 50

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LETTER from the Editor S

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eople sometimes ask me how I get story ideas. There are a variety of answers. Sometimes people suggest someone they admire. Sometimes it’s through a local organization or board. Wherever I am, I try to keep my ear to the ground and eyes peeled. For this cover story of Joyce Stokes Jones and Michele Jones Galvin, the editorial stars aligned and the information came to me in coincidental pieces. I’ll start at the beginning. During college at Syracuse University, I worked as a hostess at a local diner, The All-Night Eggplant, a Central New York staple. I spent about six hours there each Saturday and Sunday morning. After the first few months, I got to know all the regulars. Seeing the same smiling faces each week was my favorite part of the job. Fast-forward to a few months ago: I was asked to join the board of Father Champlin’s Guardian Angel Society, and was contacted by none other than Eggplant regular Michele Jones Galvin. It was nice to put a name to a face. In my mind, I’d usually thought of Michele as “that impeccably dressed and poised woman,” as you can see in the cover story photos. At the beginning of this year, I was looking through my notes for potential story ideas and Central New York women to feature and found the name “Joyce Stokes Jones.” I’d quickly jotted it down over tea with a past cover woman, Sally Roesch Wagner, and forgotten to write any additional details. I vaguely remembered thinking Joyce would be a great fit for when we honored women’s history. So, I began my Googling. I clicked the first result, and was surprised to see Michele’s face smiling back at me. Glancing through the text, I learned that not only is Michele a cornerstone of the Syracuse community, but she is also a descendent of Harriet Tubman — more fondly known as “Aunt Harriet” to the family. Michele’s mother, Joyce Stokes Jones, spent more than 30 years traveling the country to research and document her family’s history. Together, the mother-daughter team wrote the first and only book about Harriet Tubman written by a family member. I had such a great time getting to know Michele and Joyce better, and it’s an honor to share their story with you. I hope you find these women as inspiring as I do!

Lorna On Our Cover: Joyce Stokes Jones and Michele Jones Galvin were photographed by Alice G. Patterson of Alice G. Patterson Photography at the Barnes Hiscock Mansion in Syracuse. Special thanks to Jillain Pastella Salomone, owner of J. Luxe Salon, for Joyce and Michele’s makeup styling.

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OUR TEAM Publisher

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS

David Tyler

Editor Lorna Oppedisano

Design Andrea Reeves

Nichole A. Cavallaro Lorna Oppedisano Colette Powers Carol Radin Megan Stevens

Photography Susan Brown Nichole A. Cavallaro Alexis Emm Steven J. Pallone Alice G. Patterson Tara Polcaro

Advertising sales Linda Jabbour 315.657.0849

Renée Moonan 315.657.7690

ADVERTISE WITH US Unlike any other publication in the Syracuse area, our feature articles address major topics that interest local women. Each issue includes articles on health, fashion, fitness, finance, home matters, dining, lifestyle and personal perspectives, as well as a spotlight on local Syracuse women. Ads are due on the 15th of the month prior to publication. The print magazines will be distributed locally in over 350 locations and will be in your inbox electronically by the middle of every month. The publication is available free of charge.

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The Women's History & Empowerment Edition


PAST SWM Events

Central New York recently celebrated National Wear Red Day to help raise awareness and funds to fight the number one killer of women – cardiovascular disease. Hundreds of Syracuse-area businesses, community groups, hospitals, towns and schools wore red, went red and glowed red on Feb. 2 to help spread the message that heart disease and stroke cause one in three deaths among women each year – more than all cancers combined. In Syracuse, representatives from the American Heart Association/ American Stroke Association joined with the City of Syracuse and Onondaga County to celebrate National Wear Red Day. Go Red For Women Chairwoman Evelyn Carter, of Wegmans, talked about the impact of the Go Red For Women campaign to educate women about their greatest health threat. AHA/ASA advisory board member Dr. Uzma Iqbal, cardiologist with March 2018

SJH Cardiology Associates, shared important risk factors and symptoms of a heart attack. The Onondaga County Executive’s office proclaimed Friday, Feb. 2, as National Wear Red Day in the county. Syracuse Mayor Ben Walsh announced a special event for the Clinton Square Ice Rink. For more information on National Wear Red Day, visit GoRedForWomen. org/WearRedDay. On Saturday, Jan. 20, women around the world gathered for the Women’s March. Locally, thousands of people gathered in both Syracuse and Seneca Falls, the birthplace of women’s rights. For more information on the national movement, visit womensmarch.com. Thanks to Katie MacIntyre for Seneca Falls Women’s March photos. CNY Women’s March photos by Kerry Thurston of New Feminists for Justice. SYRACUSEWOMANMAG.COM

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FASHION FORWARD Vintage Meets Modern

Perfecting Your Vintage Collection By Nichole A. Cavallaro

I believe how we express ourselves with what we wear, how we live and what we own can really define our personality and interests. Whatever you collect and incorporate into your style, it should be something that brings you happiness and makes you proud! SWM 8

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Photography by Nicohle A. Cavallaro

Photography by Susan Brown

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hether it’s beach-combing for polished glass or shells, discovering a collectible online or finding a graphic T-shirt from a thrift store, I love the thrill of curating a collection. It feeds my hobby of collecting vintage clothing, jewelry and kitchenware. It has a pleasant energy to me, a combination of curiosity and nostalgia. I wasn’t born in the decades of what is now considered “vintage,” but my parents were. It’s a fond memory of my mom’s style, combined with my curiosity of something before my time. As a child, I’d play dress up with my best friend. Her attic was filled with trunks and racks of vintage finds her mom had collected. I continued my own search for vintage and antique items. The hobby continued well into college and graduate school, and even through to today. When I’m looking for clothing or accessories, here are some things I consider: 1. Do some research. A simple search on vintage styles gives me an idea of the look I want to achieve. For instance, what kind of vintage am I fan of? ’50s or ’70s? If I can’t locate something specific, I find something easily comparable. 2. Quality and Character. When I’m debating whether or not to purchase a find, I weigh the amount of investment I’m willing to put into it. Whether it’s a true piece from the decade — not a reproduction — is a determining factor for me. Even if it’s a slightly worn T-shirt or Levi’s from the ’70s with some holes, those imperfections can add an authentic feel, unless the holes are under the arms or enormous. That’s a bit much. The good news is vintage is common nowadays, so it’s pretty easy to score something. 3. The stones. No, not the awesome rock group. Materials frequently used in vintage jewelry include glass, shell, wood, lucite, celluloid, enamel, bakelite, imitation pearls and stones, tiger’s eye and opals. 4. Mix and Match. I always mix inexpensive with expensive. I’m all about balance! I certainly wouldn’t wear an outfit comprised of all vintage finds. But, at the very least, one single vintage accessory can elevate the most basic look. A graphic T-shirt under a cardigan is my favorite combo, and I might even layer on vintage necklaces. When I want to wear something different, it’s a pleated, velvet midiskirt paired with a cotton gray top. The skirt reminds me of a crushed velvet couch from the ’70s a college roommate of mine had, thanks to her parents. The pastel pink baubles in the statement necklace make me think of pastel appliances popular in the ’50s — although I think I’d run for the hills if my washer and dryer were pink. For the more casual, weekend feel, I’m a sucker for graphic T-shirts and high-waisted denim — aka mom-jeans — or even just regular skinny or boyfriend-fit jeans, rolled at the ankles.

Top photo: navy cardigan from Madwell; necklace from H&M’s Coachella Collection; gray mixed tape T-shirt from Zara; white high-waisted jeans from JCrew. Bottom photo: gold and pearl earrings from CNY Regional Market; white clam-shaped studs from The Salvation Army; gemstone flowers with screw-on clasps from CNY Regional Market; gemstone earrings, far right, from JCrew. Nichole A. Cavallaro is a Syracuse-based fashion blogger. Read more of her work at eneverythingnice.blogspot.com. The Women's History & Empowerment Edition


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SYRACUSE EATS Soleil Café

Photography by Steven J. Pallone

I think to have a successful business, it comes from you yourself being internally OK and successful inside with your own personal life.” — Taylor Doupé, Soleil Café co-owner

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The Women's History & Empowerment Edition


Serving Sunny Coffee By Lorna Oppedisano

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offee means a lot to Shem and Taylor Doupé, the husband-andwife team behind Soleil Café. They met when Taylor was working at Café Kubal’s Eastwood location. Shem worked nearby and began frequenting the small café after he met Taylor there. The two started dating. On one of their first few dates, Taylor nonchalantly mentioned that she and her sisters dreamed of one day opening a café of their own. Coincidentally, Shem had thought about being a small business owner around that same time. About 10 months later, after the couple was engaged, the conversation came up again. Shem and Taylor didn’t want children yet, so they thought they might as well try it, and see what happens. “We were actually saving for a wedding. We were like, ‘Weddings are cool, but we could spend some of this money and hopefully make it back before the wedding or right after,’” Shem remembered with a laugh.

In mid-January 2016, they decided to go for it. Four months later, on May 2, 2016, Soleil Café opened. In the almost two years since that day, the duo has felt the typical amount of stress new business owners take on when delving into a first endeavor, but they’ve never let that stress consume them or their relationship. “We just put our heads down and kept moving forward,” Shem said. When they began to plan the café, it became clear that Shem would do the initial buildout of the space and manage the numbers, but the day-to-day café management and interaction with clientele would be almost entirely Taylor’s responsibility. After they talked about those potentially grim truths, Taylor took a few days and asked a couple friends and business colleagues for feedback. “Yes. Definitely!” they encouraged her. “Go for that. Why wouldn’t you?”

Photography by Steven J. Pallone

Continued on page 12

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SYRACUSE EATS Soleil Café

Serving Sunny Coffee from page 11 When she first started working at Café Kubal, Taylor never thought she’d manage a shop, let alone run her own. She wanted to make sure it was something she could walk away from at the end of the day. It all comes down to choice, she explained. She makes sure to find other, non-work-related things that mean a lot to her, and devotes time and energy to them. “There are so many other things that are important to me,” Taylor said. “I think to have a successful business, it comes from you yourself being internally OK and successful inside with your own personal life.” Shem and Taylor agreed they were all in, created a business plan and looked for a space. They searched for a community feel in an area not already saturated with coffee shops. The space at 511 E. Genesee St. in the Fayetteville Square plaza was a perfect fit. As winter turned to spring, Shem worked to turn the space into the small, cozy Soleil Café. “When you come in here, it doesn’t feel like you’re in a plaza,” Taylor said, gesturing to the café around her. “That was our goal,” Shem explained. “Keep it bright. Keep it clean. Keep it open. Make it feel different.” On their opening day, most people they knew — or had ever known, they recalled with a smile — stopped by to support them. Soleil Café sources coffee and espresso from Peaks Coffee Company, a small husband-and-wife-owned micro-roaster located in Cazenovia. After Taylor met Peaks co-owner Samuel Bender when they both

worked at Café Kubal, and was inspired by his passion for roasting, it was a no-brainer to partner with the fellow small business. Since opening, Soleil Café has expanded to offer not just coffee and espresso beverages, but also waffles, avocado toast, soups and locally-made pastries. The specials menu changes often, showcasing homemade syrups crafted by Taylor. Last summer, they also added a coffee cart to their offerings, giving Soleil Café the mobility to serve espresso drinks at local events, ranging from weddings to conferences. It’s “Soleil 1.5,” Shem said with a laugh. “It was an exciting thing for us,” he said, “because it was something that was very attainable and achievable, without biting off more than we could chew.” They wouldn’t have been able to add the cart — and live relatively stress-free work lives — without the support of Taylor’s sisters, who were their first employees, and the team they’ve built since opening. It’s the only way she can walk away from the café, Taylor said. When it comes down to it, coffee comes second in their lives. Shem and Taylor are partners in life first, and business partners second, they agreed. “I think understanding that first, our relationship is priority, and then the café, has helped us succeed as a couple,” Taylor said. SWM Soleil Café is located at 511 E. Genesee St. in Fayetteville. For hours, menu, specials and more, visit soleil-café.com or facebook.com/soleilcaféfayetteville, or follow the café on Instagram @soleil_café.

Photography by Steven J. Pallone

Keep it bright. Keep it clean. Keep it open. Make it feel different.” — Shem Doupé, Soleil Café co-owner

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FEATURED ENTREPRENEUR Lisa Eklund

Owner, The Mindful Equestrian

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t the WISE Women’s Business Center, we see our fair share of entrepreneurs seeking to launch coaching businesses. Lisa Eklund, however, arrived with a unique dimension to her Certified Professional Coaching start-up. Lisa adds 1,000-pound animals to the equation at her growing venture, The Mindful Equestrian. Since she was knee-high to a horse, riding was her life as she trained, competed, and led hundreds of lessons nationwide on her own and as an Equine Program Professor at Morrisville College. There she realized while coaching riders from down on the ground, how the horse reacted to what was happening up in the saddle. She knew she had to correct the rider first before she could soften the horse to make a successful team. It was evident to Lisa the fears, blocks, and barriers in the riders were sometimes deep-seated and carried over from long ago. And that’s her passion to unlock those long-time fears through awareness and mindfulness and then shift perspective for a positive, confident ride. Three and a half years ago, Lisa retired from Morrisville College but not without a plan for her next career. As an “Encore Entrepreneur” (one who opens a second career), Lisa knew she needed to create her own path to her future. She began by earning her certification for coaching and growing a professional presence on social media for The

Mindful Equestrian. Her consistent messaging about how mindfulness is helping riders gain power has caught the eyes of not only regional riders but also a few editors… and not just from our area. Lisa has been interviewed by a magazine from the UK and highlighted in the January 2018 issue. She has also been interviewed via Skype by a publication in South Africa wanting to learn more about The Mindful Equestrian. Putting her knowledge to work to benefit clients at the WISE Women’s Business Center has been a dream come true for Lisa. She began by sharing what she has learned about marketing leading the WISE “Women in Social Media Roundtables”. She’s the first to admit she is not an expert – she’s an explorer. Never afraid to say, “I don’t know the answer but let’s discover it together!” Lisa keeps growing the attendance at the roundtables. She also is a WISE Business Counselor helping women one-onone to realize their entrepreneurial dreams by writing business plans for success. Lisa says, “WISE has offered me wonderful opportunities for marketing, training and branding through opportunities such as this article, the radio spot and student interaction at the Whitman School, at Syracuse University. None of that would have been possible without the WISE Women’s Business Center!” And when you think about it, none of it would have been possible without horses! PHOTO BY ALICE PATTERSON PHOTOGRAPHY

wise words of wisdom… “Rather than being your thoughts and emotions, be the awareness behind them.” – Eckhart Tolle

WISE WISE HAPPENINGS: HAPPENINGS: Check out wisecenter.org/events for a complete list of upcoming events!

The Building Blocks for Starting a Business March 6, 12:00-1:30pm

Social Media Roundtable March 7, 12:00-1:30pm March 14, 12:00-1:30pm March 21, 12:00-1:30pm

The Building Blocks for Starting a Business March 28, 5:30-7:00pm

WISE Symposium 2018 APRIL 18, 2018 AT SKY ARMORY

TICKETS ON SALE NOW! http://wise2018.eventbrite.com

A program of the Falcone Center for Entrepreneurship at Syracuse University Funded in part through a Cooperative Agreement with the U.S. Small Business Administration. All opinions, conclusions or recommendations expressed are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the Small Business Administration. Reasonable accommodations for persons with disabilities will be made if requested at least 2 weeks in advance. Call (315) 443-8634.

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Wine, Dine, Women & Song

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Cabaret at the Grande "After Five" with Joey Nigro & John Nilsen 3/24/18 - 7:30 to 9:30 p.m. 1060 Restaurant lounge Also, Wine Wednesdays featuring wine specials from 5:30 to 8:30 p.m. March 2018

Edgar Pagan Brian Alexander Brett Falso Jillian Leigh

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It's a Spring thing...Support Woman-owned &local business

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SPECIAL FEATURE Life House

Building Life House

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arlier this year, In My Father’s Kitchen founders John and Leigh-Ann Tumino announced the creation of Life House, a new project designed to serve as a home of rescue, transition and transformation for women once trapped in a life of sex trafficking. We chatted with John and Leigh-Ann to learn more.

SWM: Sex trafficking in Central New York isn’t typically on the forefront of people’s minds. How did you become aware of the issue? Leigh-Ann: We’ve lived on the Northside for 20-some years. It’s a very highly populated area with a lot of prostitution, so we’ve seen it since we’ve been living over there. And we’ve just always had a heart to help these young women. John: But didn’t know how. Leigh-Ann: Having spoken to some of them, it’s amazing the lives they’ve had to live and the things they’ve gone through. John: They get themselves put into these positions, because of a disfunction or a breakdown in their own mind, their own psychology of feeling like they don’t have self-worth. Or they get caught in drug addiction, and the next thing they know, they’re trapped. Leigh-Ann: But in their own thinking, they’re not trapped. [They think,] “He loves me, he’s taking care of me.” You have to get into their head and turn their thinking around to look back at themselves and say, “Hey, I have value and worth.” So, we have always had a heart to do something with the women. Then, last year in January, we got a phone call from a family who had a family member pass away, and they wanted to give us his house. And we were like, “There’s our answer!” 22

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SWM: How do you break through that barrier with the women and help them begin to build their self-worth? Leigh-Ann: We’re going to be working closely with Judge Limpert, who is the sex trafficking judge here in Syracuse. [When he’s working,] he comes down off the bench and takes his robe off. He sits at a table with them, and basically says, “What do you want to do?” [Life House] is a place for them to go while they’re working through the system.

John: We met with [Judge Limpert] and pitched our idea. We have this house and we’d like to have a maximum of three women — two at a time, and one woman would be like a house mother. It would be to help women come to life and live life again. And our thing is just loving them and pampering them and showing them value and dignity. Leigh-Ann: There is so much that comes off the street with them. A lot of them have PTSD. A lot of them are dealing with trying to get free of the hold that man had The Women's History & Empowerment Edition


Leigh-Ann: Judge Limpert will have a background on the women. So, I feel more confident being able to work with him, rather than just jumping on the trail and being like, “OK, let’s do this!” John: Now, what I want to do in the beginning of this year is go sit in the court a couple times and see how it happens, and how he actually does it — watch it live, and see what goes on. And he said to us one of the hardest things for [the women is] they don’t flip on the guys. They think that these men who are controlling them and using them really care about them. Leigh-Ann: But I think if you give someone support and unconditional love, they see that, “Wow, I can be loved for who I am, not because of what I can bring them or what I can do for them.”

SWM: Do you think you’ll eventually expand to a second house?

Photography by Alexis Emm

John: To me, I’d rather [offer] quality than quantity. I’m sure [Vera House does] something in this realm, and we don’t want to duplicate services that are already out there. To me, if one person’s life is changed forever, it was worth it. It’s not about grinding out numbers.

on them. It’s going to be an opportunity to be in a home and learn how to live again, learn to communicate again with other people, learn responsibility. John: We’re not naive to the fact that the women who come to the house and go through this program have to want it for themselves. We can’t want it more than them. We’re not naive to the fact that there could be relapse. Leigh-Ann: Being out on the street [with In My Father’s Kitchen] has trained March 2018

us a little bit, to prepare us for this. Just like the cardboard sign — there’s a story behind the sign — every woman is going to be different. You’ve got to work with the individual, because everybody’s at different levels. Everybody has different needs. John: We’ve learned relapse is part of recovery. So, sometimes, you might shoot yourself in the foot. One of the great things for us is the court is going to have oversight on this whole thing.

Leigh-Ann: It’s not a program or an institution. It’s a home. John: It might be a three-month stint for one person. It could be six months for another. Maybe they relapse and they go to jail. Who knows what’s going to happen. Leigh-Ann: Ralph Waldo Emerson said, “Do not go where the path may lead. Go instead where there is no path and leave a trail.” So, that’s kind of what we’re doing. This is going to be very different, just like In My Father’s Kitchen was out-of-the-box and different. People were looking at us, going, “What? Why are you doing it that way? Everybody does it this way.” We’re just going to do it differently. John: We’re following our heart. And, for us, following God is part of our life, and letting him make the path. Leigh-Ann: [The women in Life House] won’t be required to read a Bible. They won’t be required to go to church. Continued on page 24 SYRACUSEWOMANMAG.COM

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SPECIAL FEATURE Life House

Building Life House from page 23 John: But if they want it, it’s available. Leigh-Ann: And just like our guys out on the street, once they get housed [in permanent housing after Life House], we stay with them. It’ll be the same with the ladies. We’re here to support you even beyond.

SWM: How can readers connect with you and help?

John: Maybe they could give their time and the talent, in regards to doing [residents’] nails and doing their hair and taking them shopping, being that sister or mother figure. Leigh-Ann: Once we open, we’ll definitely know more. John: Right now, we’re in fundraising mode. We need about $28,000. I think we have about $15,000 raised [as of January interview], so we’re still trying to fund the rest of the project. So, financial [support] is another way people can really help. Leigh-Ann: That will always be a need. We have In My Father’s Kitchen, and now we’re adding another operational cost to it.

John: The women aren’t going to be paying to live there. Maybe they’ll have food stamps, so we’re trying to think of some things that they all chip in for. We want to make sure that they’ve got dignity, quality, value. For us, it’s about building a relationship with people. You’ve got to get to know them. When they trust you, they’ll tell you their story. If you open yourself up to helping people, it’s amazing where you’ll end up. We’re excited about what we’ll be doing next, because who knows what’s going to happen. Leigh-Ann: What if this works and it expands beyond that? Then we’re going to need more volunteers. Right now, we’re just small. We’re a seed. And that’s OK. SWM For more information and to get involved, visit inmyfatherskitchen.org. This interview has been edited for length and clarity.

Photography by Alexis Emm

Leigh-Ann: We have an online volunteer application people can fill out. The difference for Life House is you have to be very careful who goes in there and volunteers, so the screening will be a little bit more than it is for In My Father’s Kitchen. And, just like out on the streets, you can’t have 20 people approach someone. We’ll need women who want to build a relationship, be like a mentor and a helper,

make friends with these women and be willing to support them past when they leave.

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COVER story Joyce Stokes Jones and Michele Jones Galvin

It just came together — like the stars aligned — and we were able to tell [Harriet Tubman's] story from our perspective, from our family perspective.” — Michele Jones Galvin

March 2018

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Photography by Alice G. Patterson

Getting to Know Aunt Harriet

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COVER story Joyce Stokes Jones and Michele Jones Galvin

Getting to Know Aunt Harriet By Lorna Oppedisano

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hen Michele Jones Galvin was in the fourth grade, she was assigned a history project. She was to present a report on an important individual who was greatly admired. The choice of who to feature was up to her. She went home and told her mother, Joyce Stokes Jones, about the assignment. “Well, why don’t you pick Aunt Harriet?” her mother suggested. Michele grabbed an encyclopedia and flipped it open to the page containing a passage about Harriet Tubman, fondly known to the family as Aunt Harriet. Michele and Joyce are great-great grand niece and great grand niece, respectively, of the famous abolitionist. Much to Michele’s dismay, there were only about 10 sentences about Aunt Harriet, accompanied by a small photo. “How am I going to make this very exciting?” she asked herself. In the end, Michele chose to research and present on Sidney Poitier for the project instead, since there was a myriad of information available on him. “Then it hit me,” Michele said. “And, then, I learned that I should never have squandered that opportunity to share with my classmates and my teacher about the relationship with Aunt Harriet.”

Young Joyce went to story hour at Booker T. Washington Community Center, and the storyteller began the session by saying, “We’re going to talk about this wonderful woman named Harriet Tubman,” Joyce recalled. When Joyce returned home later that day, she told her mother about the stories, to which her mother replied, “That was your aunt.” “Of course, at that time, I was a little girl and didn’t realize how famous she was,” Joyce said. Years later, in 1968, Joyce wrote the “Black Heritage,” a weekly column for the Syracuse Herald Journal that highlighted noteworthy African-American figures in American history. She also produced a children’s segment on African-American heritage for Channel 9 the same year. In 1972, Joyce produced and directed shows for WCNY on issues in the African-American community. Around the same time, in the 1970s, Joyce began to research Aunt Harriet, to expand her own knowledge of the famed abolitionist, and bring that knowledge to her family and the general public. She wanted to delve deeper, and expand beyond those 10 sentences Michele found in the encyclopedia. “I wanted to put our history in the public,” Joyce said. While she did frequent the Onondaga Historical Association, a lot of the research was done outside of the Central New York area. Her travels brought her to places like Annapolis, Cambridge and Bucktown, Md., just to name a few. Along the way, she conducted presentations of her discoveries to communities, congregations and student groups. The pieces began to be documented with the 1985 documentary Joyce produced, called “A Conversation with a Living Relative of Harriet Tubman.”

Meeting Aunt Harriet

More than a nurse

Though she realized the importance of being related to Aunt Harriet and her distant relative’s historical significance in her “fourth grade mind,” Michele remembered, to her, it was more “Mom’s project.” Joyce learned she was related to Harriet Tubman when she was about 7 or 8 years old.

Joyce’s research revealed Aunt Harriet to be much more of a courageous and dynamic figure than that 10-sentence encyclopedia entry might have led readers to believe. “Sometimes it comes across as, ‘Oh, she was a nurse and a scout and a spy,’” Michele said. “Well, she was — but scout and spy should come first.” Continued on page 30

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Photography by Alice G. Patterson


COVER story Joyce Stokes Jones and Michele Jones Galvin

Getting to Know Aunt Harriet from page 28 Michele explained her mother’s findings. While Aunt Harriet did, in fact, know a lot about herbs and healing, she was actually asked to join because of her ability to go behind enemy lines in the South and bring slaves North and into service as Union soldiers. “So, that was the amazing part, I think — the Civil War piece,” Michele said. “It wasn’t so much the nursing, which I think can lead you to believe something other than what she was there to do.” Aunt Harriet really had feared nothing, Michele added. “And that’s why we’re here today,” Joyce said, “because she brought our people out, our family out. Can you believe that?”

Putting it all together In late 1999, Joyce decided it was time to compile the years of research, presentations and writings into a book. Michele offered to help edit. “Oh, it’s all done,” Michele recalled thinking, “and I’ll just help her edit it.” But as they began to delve into the writings and place the pieces of creative nonfiction in place, Michele and Joyce realized it would be more of an undertaking than either of them had first imagined.

To achieve the story they’d envisioned, “we had to spend a little more time on putting more meat on the bones,” Michele explained. Each Sunday, and in their spare time, Michele would interview Joyce at their dining room table, in order to make the “creative thread” they needed, she said. “You should see it,” Michele said, in regards to Joyce’s collection on Aunt Harriet. “In her alcove, there are file cabinets just jammed with paper and bookcases just jammed with books, and all the different things that she was able to pull together over the years.” Little by little, the story came together. The process even included a trip to Africa in 2007, to further investigate Aunt 30

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Harriet’s grandmother, Modesty, who was thought to have been of the Ashanti people from Ghana. People told Joyce she had Ashanti features, she recalled. “[To me, they said,] ‘But you look like where the beautiful women come from in the northern tribes,’” Michele recalled with a laugh. “I said, ‘I’ll take that!’” Eventually, in 2013, the duo entered the final steps of publishing. Coincidentally, it was the 100-year anniversary of Aunt Harriet’s death. “It just came together — like the stars aligned — and we were able to tell her story from our perspective, from our family perspective,” Michele said. “And that is the first book that comes from family,” Joyce added. “First and only,” Michele said.

More than just “Mom’s work” Since the book, entitled “Beyond the Underground, Harriet Tubman: A Heroine in My Family,” was published on Nov. 17, 2013, the authors have done nearly 50 present-ations, including book talks and book signings. The Central New York community has been very welcoming of their project, Michele said. The experience of working with her mother on Joyce’s life’s work made quite an impact on her, Michele said. Michele, of course, knew she was related to the historical figure. But while she was growing up, she’d always considered the story of Aunt Harriet to be “Mom’s work.” It wasn’t until 1999 that she really realized, “Wow, this is amazing,” Michele said. “When you actually do the work, you really get to know [Aunt Harriet], and you really get to feel her,” Michele said. “So, it really was much later when I really got it. Since then, it’s just been such an honor to be able to talk about my mom’s work and her research.” SWM

For more information on “Beyond the Underground, Harriet Tubman: A Heroine in My Family” and its authors, visit mosesofherpeople.com.

The Women's History & Empowerment Edition


Photography by Alice G. Patterson

I wanted to put our history in the public.” — Joyce Stokes Jones

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FOR A GOOD CAUSE White Ribbon Campaign

Photography provided by Vera House

Standing with Women

Vera House educators Eric McGriff and Brittany Pryor coordinate a White Ribbon Campaign with Hillside students.

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ach March, Vera House leads the White Ribbon Campaign to raise awareness and funds to stop domestic and sexual violence. This year, Syracuse City School District Superintendent Jaime Alicea will serve as honorary chair of the 24th Annual White Ribbon Campaign. Proceeds from the campaign help fund Vera House education and awareness programs and services. “The funds raised by the White Ribbon Campaign are critical for our programs and services, but even more important is the message of this campaign,” said Vera House Executive Director Randi Bregman. “Ending domestic and sexual violence requires each of us to do our part to help change a community standard that has for too long tolerated violence and abuse. With Superintendent Alicea’s leadership, we hope to bring the important message of the White Ribbon Campaign to the forefront of our community.” Syracuse Woman Magazine talked with Jaime to learn more about his plans for this year’s campaign. March 2018

SWM: How did you get involved with Vera House? Jaime: I have been involved with Vera House for nearly 25 years. When I was the principal at Seymour Elementary School, we had representatives from Vera House come in and speak to our parents.

SWM: Have you been involved with the White Ribbon Campaign in the past? If so, how did it affect you? Jaime: Yes, I have been involved in the campaign since 1997, when I was principal at Fowler High School. It has had a tremendous impact on me, both personally and professionally. I am always amazed at the great work that the staff at Vera House does and the huge role they play in our community regarding domestic violence and its prevention. Continued on page 34 SYRACUSEWOMANMAG.COM

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FOR A GOOD CAUSE White Ribbon Campaign

Standing with Women from page 33 victims of domestic violence? If so, how did you approach it and how did that experience affect you?

Jaime: In the Syracuse City School District, I am actively engaging our students to take a more active role in the campaign this year. I am also reaching out to the other superintendents, to ask for their support and to see if they are interested in getting involved.

Jaime: Of course. I have had both students and staff members confide in me about difficult situations in their personal lives, including domestic violence. On more than one occasion, I have referred them to the Vera House for support.

SWM: Do you plan to get administrators and staff involved in the White Ribbon Campaign? Jaime: Yes, all of our staff will have the opportunity to get involved.

SWM: Talk about the role men can play in changing social norms, and setting positive examples for the next generation.

SWM: You’ve been with the Syracuse City School District since 1983, in a number of different positions. Have you had experience helping children who are

Jaime: It is very important for men to be a part of this campaign and to speak out about domestic violence. This is not a gender issue, but one we all have to be willing to be a part of. I am very proud of the fact that Vera House is working in our high schools

Photography provided by Vera House

SWM: What’s new for the White Ribbon Campaign this year?

Participants gather for the White Ribbon Campaign Walk.

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with our young men and that we have incorporated the Men of Strength Clubs into our school buildings. We also tackle this issue at the middle school level through our Building Men program.

SWM: Between your responsibilities with the SCSD, the community and your personal life, how do you stay healthy and balanced? Jaime: I try to find time for myself that is not work-related on the weekends. My job can be 24/7 a lot of the time, but I know it is important to have some balance. I enjoy day trips to the Finger Lakes and Adirondacks and taking photographs. I also enjoy traveling abroad and going home to Puerto Rico when my schedule allows.

SWM: How can readers get involved in the White Ribbon Campaign? Jaime: They can contact Vera House directly or contact my office and donate that way. SWM For information on how to participate in the White Ribbon Campaign, contact Vera House Director of Communications & Special Events Chris Benton, at (315) 425-0818 x 2248 or cbenton@verahouse.org, or visit verahouse.org.

Making the MOST of the Men of Strength Club Men of Strength (MOST) Club is a leadership program that comes from Men Can Stop Rape, a national Washington, D.C.-based 501(c)3 nonprofit organization. The Men of Strength Club aims to engage men as leaders to stand up against domestic and sexual violence, and to redefine mainstream ideas of manhood. The program follows a 22-week curriculum with a group of male leaders, challenging them the engage in critical, introspective conversations about what it means to be a man in today’s society.

Photography provided by Vera House

Currently, the SCSD has programs at Grant Middle School, Clary Middle School, Danforth Middle School, Nottingham High School and PSLA Fowler High School. For more information, visit mencanstoprape.org/ The-Men-of-Strength-Club.

Vera House Board President Farah Jadran #StandsWithVeraHouse. March 2018

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INspire Linda Lovig

LINDA LOVIG

Photography by Alexis Emm

SYRACUSE MIDWIVES OWNER

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The birth of Syracuse Midwives By Lorna Oppedisano

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hen Syracuse native Linda Lovig moved with her family Everything just exploded, Linda remembered. At that time, to Flagstaff, Ariz., she wanted to do something for her a midwife couldn’t work without a practice agreement with a community, and decided to get certified as an EMT. physician. Dr. Johnson had been that physician. The office and One piece of her coursework was to observe a birth at the local PCAP contract had been in his name, too. hospital. So, one night, she went and observed. Linda didn’t want to lose the momentum they’d developed, She’d always had a calling to help people. Before having two though. So, she got another practice agreement, borrowed money children of her own, she’d been an interpreter for the deaf in junior and kept a skeleton staff employed. high school. But after that experience at the hospital, the future “Basically, we just kept going and kept answering the phones Syracuse Midwives owner knew what the future held for her. and kept seeing whoever wanted to come in, which some days was “I came home that night and said to my husband, ‘I know what like two people,” she said. I want to do for the rest of my life!’” Linda recalled. Little by little, they kept the office running, until life changed She returned home to Central New York and earned a bachelor’s again in 2010, when the Midwifery Modernization Act enabled degree in nursing from Syracuse University. The next step was to midwives in the state to work without the requirement of a practice earn a master’s in midwifery. That’s when she faced her first hurdle; agreement. It secured the office a little more, Linda remembered. none of the schools offering this degree were local. So, she had to She went back to the county and got the PCAP contract make the difficult decision of having her children stay with her reinstated, this time in her own name. sister for a year and a half “[Syracuse Midwives] while she earned the degree kind of took off,” Linda said. at Case Western Reserve “We were seeing all these When you’re pregnant, you just want what’s best University in Cleveland. wonderful women, and for you and your baby and your family. … You’re “My family has always been doing great work.” wonderfully supportive,” In time, as midwifery a little bit more open to changing your lifestyle or Linda said with a smile. evolved and became more listening to advice or making positive changes in In 1990, she and her family widely sought out, your life. And we really love being a part of that.” moved back home, and she Syracuse Midwives grew, began to explore midwifery until eventually many — Linda Lovig, Syracuse Midwives owner options in the Syracuse area. women were making the Not being a common practice choice to visit Linda and at the time, Linda didn’t find her coworkers. many opportunities. Now, Linda’s day-to-day routine starts with rounds at St. Joseph’s Before her schooling in Cleveland, however, she’d been in touch Hospital Health Center — coincidentally, the hospital she was with Dr. Richard Aubry of SUNY Upstate Medical University. born in, too. Then, she sees scheduled patients at her office, When she came home, Linda and Dr. Aubry, along with another where she’s surrounded by “an amazing staff of women who local midwife, discussed the possibility of offering a midwifery understand how important this work is,” she said. And, throughout service at Upstate. the day, she goes to the hospital if any patients are in labor. While that plan didn’t come to fruition, Dr. Aubry did put Linda Being there for her patients during such a special time in their in touch with Dr. Franklin Johnson of the Syracuse Community lives is Linda’s favorite part of what she does. Health Center. They worked together at the health center and then “When you’re pregnant, you just want what’s best for you and in private practice. your baby and your family. It’s just natural for most women,” Once they were in private practice, Dr. Johnson obtained a Linda said. “And, so, you’re a little bit more open to changing your Prenatal Care Assistance Program, or PCAP, contract with the lifestyle or listening to advice or making positive changes in your county, which connected the practice with underprivileged life. And we really love being a part of that.” SWM pregnant women in need of health care. “We did a lot of good work,” Linda said. For more on Syracuse Midwives, visit syracusemidwives.com. Then, in 2004, tragedy struck. Dr. Johnson passed away suddenly from a heart attack.

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The Women's History & Empowerment Edition


dollars and sense

Celebrating Our Fore-Sisters By Colette Powers

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s a woman in finance, I’ve often wondered what it was like to be in the financial sector at a time when women weren’t afforded the same opportunities as men, when social norms assumed women would naturally want to tend to domestic duties. What were the social, cultural, intellectual and emotional beliefs these women had to overcome? How did their accomplishments influence the success and opportunities of 21st century financial pioneers? Historical perspective is so important. It helps us appreciate what our fore-sisters experienced and appreciate the opportunities we have. And don’t forget: we, too, are forging history today. Let’s take a moment to think back, and honor some of these women. Abigail Adams (1744 – 1818) was the wife of John Adams, and the country’s first lady from 1797 to 1801. She was one of the earliest documented female investors in our nation’s history. Her husband’s travel often left Abigail alone to run the farm and finances. John thought it was wise to invest in farmland, but Abigail decided to invest in government bonds instead. This proved to be a more lucrative investment. (1) In 1870, Victoria Woodhull (1838 – 1927) and her sister, Tennessee Clafin (1845 – 1923), opened the first female-owned brokerage firm — Woodhull, Claflin & Company — and became the first female stockbrokers on Wall Street. To fit in with the men, they had custom-made dresses to hide their femininity. However, their gender did not go unnoticed. Victoria was also the first woman to run for president. (1)

Sarah Breedlove (1867 – 1919), founder of Madame C. J. Walker Manufacturing Company, developed her own beauty and hair products for African-American women. She was one of the world’s most successful female entrepreneurs of her time, and one of the most successful African-American business owners ever. (2) Isabel Benham (1909 – 2013) started her career as a railroad bond analyst on Wall Street in the 1930s. She believed people would have greater respect for her research if they thought she was a man, so she signed her name Hamilton Benham. She later became highly respected for her work, despite her true identity being revealed. (1) Muriel “Mickie” Siebert (1932 – 2013), known as the first woman of finance, was the first woman to purchase a seat on the New York Stock Exchange, in December 1967. She had been turned down nine times before she found two sponsors. Her appointment caused quite a stir, as evidenced by the headlines of the time, “Skirt Invades Exchange” and “Powder Puff on Wall Street.” (1) In 2000, Martha Stewart became America’s first self-made female billionaire after taking her company, Martha Stewart Living Omnimedia, public a year earlier. In 2014, Oprah Winfrey became the first African-American female billionaire. The same year, Janet Yellen became the first woman to serve as chair of the Federal Reserve. (3) SWM (1) Kristen Aguilera’s A History of Wall Street’s Women: Echoes. Found at bloomberg.com/view/ articles/2011-12-28/a-history-of-wall-street-s-women-echoes. (2) Edward Glaeser’s Triumph of the City: How Our Best Invention Makes Us Richer, Smarter, Greener, Healthier, and Happier (3) Forbes’ A Timeline Of Women And Wealth: The First Female Millionaires, Billionaires & CEOs and the Policies That Paved the Way for Them. Found at forbes.com/sites/ tanyaklich/2017/03/08/the-first-women-of-wealth-and-the-policies-that-paved-theirway/#59e779917fb8

Colette Powers is a Financial Advisor with UBS Financial Services Inc., 440 S. Warren St., Syracuse, NY 13202. Any information presented is general in nature and not intended to provide individually tailored investment, tax or legal advice. Investing involves risks and there is always the potential of losing money when you invest. The information provided may be deemedreliable; however, the accuracy and completeness is not guaranteed by UBS Financial Services Inc. The views expressed herein are those of the author and may not necessarily reflect the views of UBS Financial Services Inc. As a firm providing wealth management services to clients, we offer both investment advisory and brokerage services. These services are separate and distinct, differ in material ways and are governed by different laws and separate contracts. For more information on the distinctions between our brokerage and investment advisory services, please speak with your Financial Advisor or visit our website at ubs.com/workingwithus.

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INSPIRE Cheryl Garofano

Sheryl garofano COLON CANCER SURVIVOR

Photography by Alice G. Patterson

Realize it’s OK sometimes to just not feel that great. Ask for help.” —Sheryl Garofano, colon cancer survivor

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Putting an Exclamation Point on Life By Carol Radin

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heryl Garofano is on a journey. Diagnosed with stage IV colon cancer 18 months ago, she traverses new challenges every day: chemotherapy treatments, surgeries and side effects; the constant search to educate herself and her family about her treatment options; and, above all, the emotional challenge of sustaining her sense of self. Sheryl was about to retire after 20 years as a career and technical education teacher at Cicero-North Syracuse High School, when she started treatment for what was initially diagnosed as diverticulitis. Then, a colonoscopy and a subsequent CT scan revealed something far more serious. She had colon cancer that had metastasized to her liver and affected several lymph nodes. “It pulls the rug right out from under you,” she said, describing the feeling of fear and powerlessness. It wasn’t long, though, before she began to take control, examine her options and summon her support network. After her own research and discussions with doctors, one of the most important realizations Sheryl has made is that with new treatments and knowledge, later stage cancers are seen “less as cured/not cured, and treated more like chronic illnesses managed over time,” she said. With that in mind, Sheryl is tenaciously committed to her ongoing treatments, surgical procedures and consultations. Shortly after the diagnosis, she began a six-month-long series of chemotherapy treatments. Her follow-up tests were promising: the tumors on her colon and liver had shrunk. Months later, though, the tumors and liver lesions had returned. Sheryl and her husband, Mark, sought opinions at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute in Boston, Johns Hopkins Medical Center in Baltimore and the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center. At Johns Hopkins, Sheryl had liver resection surgery to remove the lesions. In December 2017, she had surgery at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center to implant a hepatic arterial infusion pump in her abdomen. The pump is a hockey puck-sized device that pumps stronger chemotherapy medication to her liver. At that time, she also had her spleen and gallbladder removed.

Traveling from city to city and hospital to hospital for surgery and medication regimens is a way of life for Sheryl now, although it is not her entire life. She’s found that many days, she can enjoy her personal pursuits and quality time with Mark, their four grown children and four grandchildren. “It’s like putting an exclamation point on everything,” Sheryl said. She and Mark have decided to stop talking about things and start doing them. Travel is high on the list: more camping trips on their motorcycle, an upcoming visit to her brother in Florida, and — most ambitious of all — a prospective trip to Kenya, where her daughter and three of her grandchildren live. “I don’t talk myself out of stuff like I used to,” she said. She’s also strengthened her connection to friends. When she can’t see them in person, she shares updates about her condition on her blog on Caring Bridge, a social media platform. It keeps her from having to relay the same information time and time again, and also helps her friends coordinate visits and meal-making on Sheryl’s tiring chemotherapy days. “Realize it’s OK sometimes to just not feel that great,” she advised. “Ask for help.” Supportive family and friends aside, the feeling of being alone is one of the more difficult emotional challenges Sheryl faces. “When you get right down to it, it’s you facing it,” she said. Online resources have helped. She recommends Colontown, a Facebook community of colon cancer survivors, and the Colorectal Cancer Alliance, which offers chatrooms, informative articles, webinars and podcasts. She’s also discovered the Livestrong program at her local YMCA, which has given her new bonds with other cancer survivors. Sheryl’s personal journey continues day by day. Soon, she will begin a systemic chemotherapy series she’s trying for the first time. Combining that with the HAI pump’s more targeted treatment is found to increase overall effectiveness, she said. She’s ready to explore the new possibilities. SWM Want to support cancer research? Visit cancer.org to learn what you can do to help.

The National Coalition for Cancer Survivorship defines a survivor as anyone diagnosed with cancer, “from the time of diagnosis and for the balance of life.” The coalition has expanded this to include family, friends and caregivers.

March 2018

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10% of U.S. Children live with a parent with alCohol problemS Does your drinking affect somone you love?

2018

Half Marathon 5k Run 3k Fun Walk KIDS 1 Mile Fun Run Saturday, Sept. 8th Long Branch Park, Liverpool

NIH, 2015

Registration Opens March 1st

For talking tips 315-471-1359 preventionnetworkcny.org

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Family Fun Zone Race bags, t-shirts and medals for all participants Visit our Runners Fuel Station Register and info at:

www.arcrace.org

The Women's History & Empowerment Edition


March 2018

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Inspire Victoria Lightcap

victoria lightcap

Photography by Steven J. Pallone

ATTORNEY WITH FINKELSTEIN & PARTNERS

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Turning Obstacles into Accomplishments By Megan Stevens

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hat do you do when faced with an obstacle in the road This selection process includes independent research, on the journey of life? You find a way past it. At least peer nominations and peer evaluations,” according to the that’s what trial attorney Victoria Lightcap suggests. group’s website. Victoria serves as an attorney with Finkelstein & Partners in Similar to most accomplishments, Victoria’s have not come without work. Syracuse and travels to the surrounding cities of Albany, Buffalo, For a time, she was the only female attorney in her practice. Binghamton and Oswego to serve her clients. She’s been a trial She was forced to face the challenges and stereotypes posed to attorney for more than 30 years, and attributes her success to the the few women in the male-dominated field of law. Victoria fact that she has never given up, despite any potential roadblocks life has thrown her way. graciously overcame them, with the support of her firm, which she credits in part to her success. “I never let the obstacles stop me,” she said. “I always found a way around them. You should never let challenges and obstacles Balancing motherhood and her career also posed its own set keep you from accomplishing your dreams.” of difficulties. Her daughter was born prematurely at 28 weeks, Victoria faced her most challenging obstacle during college, weighing only two pounds. After Victoria returned to work, she took daily lunch breaks to visit when her mother passed away after a her child. battle with cancer. It was a great test of At the end of the workday, she was her faith. You should never let challenges at her daughter’s side until bedtime. She took a semester off to have and obstacles keep you from This was Victoria’s daily routine time for herself. During that period, until her daughter was able to come she studied the Chinese language accomplishing your dreams.” home from the hospital. After that, at Harvard through an extension - Victoria Lightcap, attorney with she brought her daughter to work program, volunteered to teach Finkelstein & Partners with her as needed. English to Chinese immigrants and Victoria credits her drive and ability volunteered at the local legal aid, to balance family and career in part all while working full time. to her devoted husband, Kerry, also an attorney. The duo put Then, Victoria decided to go back to school at Boston College, their family first and worked together as a team to keep their where she graduated with honors in political science and east Asian studies. Despite her life having been shaken, she was lives balanced. determined to pursue her dream. From as early as elementary “My husband is a saint. He is my rock,” she said. “He has school, she’d always wanted to be a lawyer. She’d “wanted to fight allowed me to be who I am. Without his support, I could not do what I do as a working mom.” the world,” she remembered. Along with career and home life, Victoria also finds time “I did what I had to do to work hard and accomplish my goal,” to give back to her community. She started a chess team in Victoria said. honor of her son, who loves the game. She’s also been involved She headed straight to law school. During that time, she worked with local politics and currently serves as chair of the Pompey three jobs in food service and retail, all while pursing studies at Democratic Party. Syracuse University College of Law. “It feels good being an advocate for someone else, those who During her 30-year tenure as a trial attorney, Victoria has accomplished quite a lot. For the last five years, she’s been do not have a voice,” she said. SWM nominated as a Super Lawyer, “a rating service of outstanding lawyers from more than 70 practice areas who have attained a high-degree of peer recognition and professional achievement.

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NAC/Dirty Dancing Half Page ad

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UPCOMING SWM Events Friday, March 2 First Friday at the Everson

When: 5 to 9 p.m. What: Evening of art, music and culture includes beer tasting from Empire Brewing Company and wine tasting from White Birch Vineyards. Cost: Members, free; nonmembers, $5; Onondaga County employees, free. Where: Everson Museum of Art, 401 Harrison St., Syracuse. Info: everson.org/connect/events.

Saturday, March 3 “We-Are-Family” Feud Game

When: 6 to 9:30 p.m. What: A night of fun, spirited competition and a chance to win the Skaneateles Early Childhood Center’s “We-Are-Family” Feud Trophy. Includes hearty hors d’oeuvres, cash bar and silent auction. Where: Auburn Public Theater, 8 Exchange St., Auburn. Info: skaneatelesearlychildhood.org.

Saturday, March 3 Chip Taylor

When: Doors, 7:30 p.m.; show, 8 p.m. What: Songwriters Hall of Fame 2016 inductee Chip Taylor to perform as part of The Folkus Project of Central New York. Cost: $20. Where: May Memorial Unitarian Universalist Society, 3800 E. Genesee St., Syracuse. Info: folkus.org.

Saturday, March 3 Symphoria Masterworks: Rite of Spring

When: 7:30 p.m. What: Moscow-born pianist Natasha Paremski performs Prokofiev’s Piano Concerto No. 2 on this all-Russian concert. Cost: $53 to $82. Where: Crouse Hinds Concert Theater, 411 Montgomery St., Syracuse. Info: experiencesymphoria.org/concert/rite-of-spring.

Saturday, March 3, & Sunday, March 4 Wizards Weekend

When: 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. What: Includes various activities throughout weekend. Cost: Members, $8; nonmembers, $10, plus zoo admission at door. Where: Rosamond Gifford Zoo, 1 Conservation Place, Syracuse. Info: rosamondgiffordzoo.org/upcoming-events.

Tuesday, March 6 2018 Tax Reform: Understanding the Impact of Key Provisions

When: Registration and continental breakfast, 8 to 8:30 a.m.; seminar, 8:30 to 10 a.m. What: Seminar presented by Dannible & McKee, LLP to address key provisions of the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act for individuals and businesses, how it may impact you and provide planning considerations for the 2018 tax year. Cost: Free. Where: Embassy Suites by Hilton, 3 11-371 Hiawatha Blvd., Syracuse. Info: kdejoseph@centerstateceo.com; centerstateceo.com.

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Wednesday, March 7 WBOC Monthly Meeting

When: 4:30 to 6:30 p.m. What: Part one of two-part Maximize Your Strengths series, Understand Yourself & Others, is a highly interactive workshop that is all about You! Learn how to use your strengths to enhance leadership, communication and persuasion. Cost: Member, $10; guest, $25; all access member, free. Where: Genesee Grande Hotel, 1060 E. Genesee St., Syracuse. Info: wboconnection.org.

Saturday, March 10, & Sunday, March 11 Syracuse City Ballet Presents Aladdin

When: 2 p.m. What: From a classic story line comes an original ballet from artistic director Kathleen Rathbun. Cost: $20 to $75. Where: Crouse-Hinds Theater, 411 Montgomery St., Syracuse. Info: syracusecityballet.com.

Monday, March 12 Rosamond Gifford Lecture Series Presents Lauren Groff

When: 7:30 p.m. What: Talk from author of “The Monsters of Templeton,” shortlisted for the Orange Prize for New Writers; “Delicate Edible Birds,” a collection of stories; and “Arcadia,” a New York Times Notable Book, winner of the Medici Book Club Prize and finalist for the L.A. Times Book Award. Cost: Balcony, $30; mezzanine and orchestra, $35; students with valid ID, $10. Where: Mulroy Civic Center, 421 Montgomery St., Syracuse. Info: foclsyracuse.org.

Thursday, March 15 Docent-led Tour of Jeff Donaldson: Dig When: 5 to 8 p.m. What: Free docent-led tour of “Jeff Donaldson: Dig.” Cost: Free third Thursday admission, 5 to 8 p.m. Where: Everson Museum of Art, 401 Harrison St., Syracuse. Info: everson.org/connect/events.

Friday, March 16 Milkweed

When: Doors, 7:30 p.m.; show, 8 p.m. What: Milkweed, the collaboration of three artists — Joseph Alston (guitar and vocals), Jacqualine Colombo (guitar and vocals) and Peter Lister (upright bass and vocals) — to perform as part of The Folkus Project of Central New York. Cost: Check online. Where: May Memorial Unitarian Universalist Society, 3800 E. Genesee St., Syracuse. Info: folkus.org.

Saturday, March 17 St. Patrick’s Day Parade Party

When: 9:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. What: Watch the parade from Sky Armory’s ballrooms. The second and third floors to feature live music. Second floor to have family-friendly atmosphere. A la carte menu features Irish-inspired fare. Cash bar available. Cost: $10; ages 12 and younger, $5; family pack, $25. Where: Sky Armory, 351 S. Clinton St., Syracuse. Info: info.skyarmory.com/st-patricks-parade-party.

The Women's History & Empowerment Edition


Saturday, March 17 Symphoria Pops: Celtic Celebration: Music of the Emerald Isle When: 7:30 p.m. What: Includes performance by violinist Maria Kaneko Millar, whose credits include 170 performances as solo dancing fiddler in Riverdance On Broadway and the North American and Asian Tours of Riverdance: The Show. Cost: $38 to $81. Where: Mulroy Civic Center, 421 Montgomery St., Syracuse. Info: experiencesymphoria.org/concert/celtic-celebration-music-of-the-emerald-isle.

Saturdays and Sundays, March 17, 18, 24, 25 and 31 Breakfast with the Bunny When: 9 and 11 a.m. What: Includes visit with Easter Bunny, breakfast, activities and more. Cost: Members, $15.95; nonmembers, $19.95, includes zoo admission. Where: Rosamond Gifford Zoo, 1 Conservation Place, Syracuse. Info: rosamondgiffordzoo.org/upcoming-events.

Wednesday, March 21 Speed Networking

When: Registration, 7:30 a.m.; networking, 8 to 10 a.m. What: Small group dialogue while building relationships with other CenterState CEO members. Breakfast provided by Peppino's Restaurant & Catering Company. Cost: CenterState CEO members, $15; nonmembers, $25. Registration recommended. Where: 217 Lawrence Rd. E., North Syracuse. Info: kdejoseph@centerstateceo.com; centerstateceo.com/news-events/speednetworking-3.

Thursday, March 22 2018 Book of Lists Reveal Party

When: 5 to 7 p.m. What: Ticket includes complimentary drink, passed hors d’oeuvres and a copy of the Book of Lists ($51.50 value). Cost: $25. Where: Genesee Grande Hotel, 1060 E. Genesee St., Syracuse. Info: cnybj.com/2018-book-of-lists-reveal-party.

Friday, March 23 White Ribbon Campaign Walk

When: Noon. What: Walk from Clinton Square to Armory Square and tie white ribbons around trees and lampposts to recognize Vera House’s White Ribbon Campaign. Short closing program at Marriott Syracuse Downtown. Cost: Fundraise for Vera House throughout March with the White Ribbon Campaign. Where: Clinton Square, Downtown Syracuse. Info: 2018-white-ribbon-campaign.everydayhero.do.

Saturday, March 24 Pedaling 4 Page: A Spinning Event

When: 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. What: Raises funds and awareness for the fight to end pediatric cancer. Cost: Check online for fundraising details. Where: 8 a.m. to noon at Gazella Training, Fitness & Yoga, 4361 Jordan Road, Skaneateles; noon to 4 p.m. at Elevate Fitness, 5791 Widewaters Parkway, DeWitt. Info: pbrun.org/pedaling4paige.

Saturday, March 24 Maria Gillard Trio

When: Doors, 7:30 p.m.; show, 8 p.m. What: Finger Lakes region singer/songwriter, Maria Gillard, to perform as part of The Folkus Project of Central New York. Cost: $15 Where: All Saints Church, 1340 Lancaster Ave., Syracuse. Info: folkus.org. March 2018

Sunday, March 25 Animal Egg-stravaganza

When: 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. What: Watch animals receive egg-shaped enrichment items throughout the day as part of our animal enrichment program. Cost: Free for members and with zoo admission. Where: Rosamond Gifford Zoo, 1 Conservation Place, Syracuse. Info: rosamondgiffordzoo.org/upcoming-events.

Wednesday, March 28 2018 Nonprofit Awards

When: Registration and networking, 11 to 11:45 a.m.; lunch and awards program,11:45 a.m. to 1:45 p.m.; honoree photos and networking,1:45 to 2 p.m. What: Award categories include board development, board leadership, career achievement, collaboration award, corporate community support, executive of the year, impact award, outstandingbfundraising effort, young professional advisory board and young professional leader. Cost: $45. Where: Holiday Inn Syracuse-Liverpool, 441 Electronics Parkway, Liverpool. Info: cnybj.com/2018-nonprofit-awards.

Thursday, March 29 Pottery & Pour

When: 6 to 8 p.m. What: Learn the basics of hand-building to create yourown work of art, led by ceramic artist Sookie Kayne. Enjoy light refreshments and two complimentary drinks. Cost: Members, $40; nonmembers, $50. Where: Everson Museum of Art, 401 Harrison St., Syracuse. Info: everson.org/connect/events.

Sunday, April 1 Easter Brunch

When: 10 a.m. and 1 p.m. What: Brunch buffet and dessert table includes pastries and a chocolate fountain. Cash bar available with build-your-own Bloody Mary station, mimosas and Irish coffee. Cost: Adults, $29.95; ages 4 to 12, $14.95; ages 3 and younger, free; ticket includes zoo admission. Where: Rosamond Gifford Zoo, 1 Conservation Place, Syracuse. Info: rosamondgiffordzoo.org/upcoming-events.

Saturday, April 7 Afternoon Tea at the Bake Lab

Time: Tea service begins promptly at 4 p.m. What: Elegant afternoon tea experience includes homemade scones, tea sandwiches and pastry delights, served with a selection of fine teas. Cost: $30. Where: The Sweet Praxis, 203 E. Water St., Syracuse. Info: thesweetpraxis.com/events.

Saturday, April 7 Pomeroy College of Nursing Open House

Time: 10 a.m. to noon What: Prospective students who want to learn more about pursuing a degree in nursing. Faculty will be on hand, tour the college, dorms and speak with current students. Registration required. Cost: Free. Free parking in the Marley Education Center garage or the Crouse Hospital garage. Where: Marley Education Center 765 Irving Ave., Syracuse. Info: Visit crouse.org or call 315-470-7481. SYRACUSEWOMANMAG.COM

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movers AND Shakers Student-run dress drive benefits local and international girls Two students at Christian Brothers Academy, Marina Hatem and Alessandra Sommers, recently founded a program at their school to collect used semi and formal dresses (prom dresses). In the past several months, they’ve collected more than 300 dresses. They plan to sell these dresses — $25 for short dresses and $50 for full-length gowns — on Sunday, March 11, from noon to 4 p.m. at Christian Brothers Academy, 6245 Randall Rd, Syracuse. The purpose of the dress drive is two-fold. The organizers aim to provide girls in the area with an opportunity to purchase a beautiful gown for very low cost. The money raised from the sale will support girls’ education and clean water at CBA’s sister school, the Child Discovery Center, in Africa. The drive meant to benefit girls in the Central New York community, as well. The organizers invite girls in the area to come and shop, first come, first served. Please note no girl will be turned away due to lack of funds. Students who are in need of a dress, but cannot afford the nominal fee, are encouraged to come with a confidential letter from the school indicating how much they are able to pay. Contact Marina and Alessandra with any questions, at marinahatem@aol.com.

PAWS of CNY to hold free evaluations PAWS of CNY, Inc., Central New York’s largest non-profit provider of pet-assisted wellness services, plans to hold free therapy pet evaluations at Kehoskie’s K-9 Care, 6743 Swamp Road, Auburn, on Sunday, March 25. Please note that sessions are by appointment only. Residents of Auburn and the surrounding Cayuga County region who are interested in certifying their dog or cat to participate in PAWS of CNY’s pet therapy program are encouraged to submit an application to PAWS of CNY and book an appointment. Qualified applicants will be scheduled for evaluations on March 25. According to Jessica Marabella, president of PAWS of CNY, the organization is looking for loving, well-mannered dogs and cats and generous members of the community who are interested in volunteering their time in one of PAWS of CNY’s pet assisted wellness programs. The PAWS of CNY therapy pet evaluation is the first step for dogs and cats looking to earn their PAWS of CNY therapy pet certification. The evaluation is performed by a PAWS of CNY evaluator who assesses the pet on established criteria of temperament, basic obedience (for canines) and the volunteer’s handler skills. The test is free and takes about fifteen minutes. Pets who pass the initial evaluation are scheduled for a three-month on-site facility evaluation at one of PAWS of CNY’s facility partners to complete the certification process. The PAWS of CNY certification does not certify emotional support dogs, guide dogs, and other service dogs. 50

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Individuals interested in scheduling their dog or cat for a free therapy pet evaluation on March 25 should submit an application to PAWS of CNY. Applications can be found at pawsofcny.org/apply. For more information about PAWS of CNY and the therapy pet evaluation and certification process, visit pawsofcny.org.

The Stand director selected as reporting fellow Ashley Kang, who serves as the director of The Stand newspaper, is one of 33 selected as a 2018 John Jay/H.F. Guggenheim & Quattrone Reporting Fellow. The fellowship is aimed to encourage and promote top-quality journalism on criminal justice. Fellows were selected from a wide pool of applicants based on editors’ recommendations and investigative reporting projects underway or in the planning stage. Following attendance at the 13th Annual Harry Frank Guggenheim Symposium on Crime in America held in New York City, Ashley will pursue an in-depth piece focused on Syracuse’s South Side. The final piece will be published in The Stand and The Crime Report, published by The Center on Media, Crime and Justice. The Stand is a community newspaper run in partnership with the S.I. Newhouse School of Public Communications and South Side residents. Since 2010, The Stand has served as the voice of the South Side, by providing clear and balanced reporting of community news. Ashley has served as the director of the project since 2009, helping to launch both the print and online versions. She contributes regular feature pieces and coordinates all content by contributing Newhouse students and community correspondents. In 2017, she was awarded second place for a news/features series on neighborhood trauma by the Syracuse Press Club. Stories included “Surviving Trauma,” “Street Addiction,” and others. She graduated from the S.I. Newhouse School of Public Communications with a degree in magazine journalism in 2004 and earned her master’s degree in higher education from the SU School of Education in 2011. Prior to working at The Stand, she was the features editor at The Citizen newspaper in Auburn, New York. Visit mysouthsidestand.com to learn more.

St. Joseph’s earns national recognition for efforts to reducing heart disease The American Heart Association and American Medical Association have announced the 310 physician practices and health systems nationwide being recognized for their commitment to reducing heart attacks and strokes resulting from adults with uncontrolled blood pressure and improving health outcomes associated with heart disease. St. Joseph’s Health was among this group of first-time recipients, and is the only organization in Upstate New York to receive the AHA and AMA’s Target: BP™ Recognition Program award. Launched in 2017, the Target: BP Recognition Program is an extension of the national Target: BP initiative between the AHA and AMA aimed at addressing the growing burden of high blood pressure in the U.S. The Women's History & Empowerment Edition


St. Joseph’s Health was honored during the AHA board meeting in Syracuse on Feb. 6, and will also be featured in upcoming Target: BP materials. This includes appearing in print ads, on TargetBP.org and the Target: BP Wall of Recognition that will be displayed at AMA and AHA events throughout the year.

CROUSE HEALTH PRESENTS DAY OF DANCE Crouse Health is planning the fifth annual “Day of Dance,” presented by Crouse Spirit of Women, for Saturday, April 7, from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m., in the Canyon area of Destiny USA. The free event is open to the public, but pre-registration is requested by visiting crouse.org/dayofdance or calling 315-472-2464. Local radio personality Amy Robbins will emcee the threehour-long event. Free refreshments, prizes and educational items will be offered. The first 300 children at Crouse KIDS

March 2018

care will receive a free surgical cap and stuffed animal. They will also have the opportunity to create their own art with staff from the Everson Museum of Art. The Day of Dance, themed “Listen to Your Heart,” will also feature free mini dance classes, with a special visit by Otto and the Syracuse University Dance Team. Crouse Health experts will provide derma scans and screenings for blood pressure, sleep apnea, TMJ, foot issues and more. Integrative Medicine practitioners will provide complimentary chair massage and Reiki treatments. For more information and to register, visit crouse.org/dayofdance. All content has been edited for length and clarity. To submit content for our Movers and Shakers section, please email information to editor Lorna Oppedisano at laoppedi@gmail.com.

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Profile for Lorna Oppedisano

Syracuse Woman Magazine March 2018  

The Women's History & Empowerment Edition

Syracuse Woman Magazine March 2018  

The Women's History & Empowerment Edition

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