Page 1

Architectural

Culture

2019

New

Perspectives


Architectural Culture: New Perspectives 2019 © ISBN: 978-0-6484458-1-4 Published for ‘unveil’, the Sydney School of Architecture Graduate Exhibition 2019. First published in 2019 by Harvest: Fresh scholarship from the field. A Freerange Press imprint. Sydney School of Architecture, Design and Planning, University of Sydney Wilkinson Building 148 City Road University of Sydney NSW 2006 Australia Editors Adrian Thai Michael Tawa Designer Adrian Thai Printer Oxford Printing © Architectural Culture: New Perspectives 2019 This book, Architectural Culture: New Perspectives, and all works depicted in it are © editors and contributors, 2019. All rights reserved. The Graduate Exhibition elective, MARC6204, was coordinated by Michael Tawa, with the help of Tye McBride and the following students: Jane Chan Natalie Dungey Emma Harrington Nimisha Prashanth Amir Shakya Alice Zhang Exhibition logo Lillian Xiao, David Cadena


CONTENTS

Introduction – Optative Architecture Master of Architecture Bachelor of Design in Architecture Bachelor of Architecture and Environments Honours Index Intensive Studios Tin Sheds Gallery Student Excellence Our Sponsors

4 6 36 68 86 94 112 118 124


4

SYDNEY SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE, DESIGN AND PLANNING

Optative

Architecture 2019


5

Chris Smith

SYDNEY SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE, DESIGN AND PLANNING

In Gilbert Simondon’s text On the Mode of Existence of Technical Objects ([1958], 2017), the philosopher explores just that: the life of objects. Simondon’s key interest is the manner by which technical objects come into being and then continue to evolve or, on the other hand, fall from existence. His examples tend to be transformations of types of engine, electromotors, cooling fins, pistons, electronic tubes, triodes and cathodes, telephones and turbines; but when he speaks of technics and the technical object he speaks broadly and implicates all manner of technical object, including architectural and urban objects that are part of what he identifies as ‘a continuous transition between the technical and the aesthetic’ (196). And this makes the work of Simondon essential reading for students of architecture. Students of architecture are keenly aware that so many ‘solutions’ to pressing needs— and there is likely nothing more pressing that the current climate emergency— come from a complexity of thought and competing ideas, images, schemas, and logics. Indeed, one of the core strengths of an architectural education is the sense of the multiplicitous forces that come to bear upon the architectural and urban object. These competing, jostling forces are at times technical, and at times theoretical, practical and/or aesthetic. Solutions which tend to invoke only one form of force tend to be considered sub-optimal. That is, if a design solution is solely technical or solely theoretical, or solely practical or solely aesthetic, it likely (and thankfully) will never be built. An example may be a case of a technical object that might solve or mitigate a problem but remains deeply unappealing as a moral or ethical proposition…. And thus, unlikely to come into existence. We have all been in crits where we have felt that a particular solution may indeed solve the technical problem set out in an architectural brief, and yet we might still feel regret that it does so in a particularly unappealing manner. Architecture may be a technical object, but Simondon reminds us that a technical object is bound to ethics and aesthetics, which come to make it desirable or not. Another example of a technical object failing to deal with more than a technical problem is the recent government solution to the problem of the devastation of droughts. The solution is to build more dams. Whilst such a solution might operate in a limited technical sense (dams hold water) and might operate in a limited theoretical sense (they’ll work if it rains), the solution remains disturbingly impractical and fails to deal with moral or ethical sensibilities flowing from the current climate emergency.

2019

The outcomes of so many of our studios across the Sydney School of Architecture, Design and Planning across 2019 sought optimal solutions that give the technical object of architecture a particularly rich form of existence. The Design Integration Lab Capstone explores architecture in a complex network of technical, urban and city scales. The third year Architecture Studio 3B explores a small site at the edge of the Domain but does so with a grand vision that encompasses rich precedents, parametrics and provocation. The Master of Architecture Graduation Studio explores the transformation of architectural objects dedicated to transportation modes (that might soon become redundant) into cultural infrastructure. Calling the output of this studio a search for ‘optimal’ solutions, however, seems perverse given the sense of change suggested by such projects and the commitment to architectural material ‘postproduction’. A better descriptor might be found deep in Simondon’s text, deep in a section titled ‘Technical thought, theoretical thought, practical thought’. It is here that Simondon raises the idea of the ‘optative’. The optative might be simply thought of, as Nathalie Simondon defines it, as ‘the hoped for’ (xii) or as her father defined it: ‘the optative is the subjectively possible.’ (214) The optative is not a solution that solves a problem once and for all but is a solution to a breadth of problems that relates to a moment, specific and particular. It transforms that which exists and draws upon different forms of knowledge and complex conceptual operations that might bring an altered technical object into life. Like architecture, the optative technical object starts with a schema. This schema poses solutions which are at once practical and theoretical, technical and aesthetic; and always prompts action. The optative is an art or a science of the possible, the possible as optative; the ensemble of schemas is an incomplete reality; the schemas of action are the beginnings of action, an incitement applied to the world so that an operation is carried out [se réalise] this action is wanted, posited as desirable and already effectively desired insofar as man [sic] tends to carry it out (213)

The 2019 Graduate Architecture Exhibition continues a long and proud tradition of the Sydney School of Architecture, Design and Planning in addressing ecological and socio-cultural issues, in inciting action, and in generating desires to act. The works exhibited have the quality of optative solutions. Complex conceptual, technical, ethico-aesthetic, practical and desirable solutions to some of our most pressing issues. It is a pleasure to see so many technical objects surge into existence.


6

SYDNEY SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE, DESIGN AND PLANNING

MASTER OF

ARCHITECTURE 2019


7

SYDNEY SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE, DESIGN AND PLANNING

2019

‘The Craft Machine’ Gloria Ha


8

SYDNEY SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE, DESIGN AND PLANNING

Cultural Infrastructures:

Graduation Studio MARC5001 Semester 1 2019 Sandra Löschke Tutors Mano Ponnambalam Roger Rajaratnam

Museums in the Age of the

Contemporary architecture is about people. In fact, this is what makes it truly contemporary – its foregrounding of human experiences, encounters, and engagement over objects. Over the past decades, the growing desire for self-representation and heightened life experiences have shaped a contemporary culture, where qualitative distinctions between high and low culture, critical discernment and entertainment, elite and mass audiences are increasingly levelled in favour of alternative cultural understandings. Nowhere is this development more visible than in contemporary museums, where visitor experience and highly aestheticised environments have reversed the relations between displays and architecture, whereby the latter provides the experience and collections and displays have become secondary “extras”.¹ The studio brief is the design of a contemporary art museum that explores the rise of the experience economy and the experience society in a critical and innovative way. The proposed sites are the Domain Car Park (DCP) and the Overseas Passenger Terminal (OPT) at Circular Quay – both represent uses that are no longer desired in inner urban areas and are predestined to become obsolete. Located in close proximity to two of Sydney’s most prominent cultural institutions, the AGNSW and the MCA , these sites offer an opportunity for critiquing existing institutions through the proposal of viable alternatives for the display of contemporary art. ¹ Bourriaud, Nicolas. “The Exhibition in the Age of Formatting.” Critique d’art 47 (30 November 2016): 1-4.

Experience Economy 2019


9

SYDNEY SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE, DESIGN AND PLANNING

2019

‘The Craft Machine’ Gloria Ha


10

SYDNEY SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE, DESIGN AND PLANNING

(L) Sun-Kyoo Kim, ‘Non-Places to Places’. There is a distinction between ‘architecture’ and ‘infastructure’ that becomes relevant when approaching the notion of placemaking. The Domain Carpark and Travelator are by their nature transport infrastructure – transitory spaces, non-places. Where transport infastructure becomes obsolete, its typologies must be adapted and reused. It becomes an opportunity to create architecture from infastructure; to design for people over vehicles. The Domain Gallery is an adaptive-reuse proposal for a Sydney carpark that uses existing site phenomenology and built fabric to celebrate the non-place. It breathes new life into the old structure, creating a gallery of Spatial Experiences and Art. (R) Gloria Ha, ‘The Craft Machine’. In a postproduction era, ‘The Craft Machine’ departs from the status-quo of the ‘white-box’ gallery and proposes a heterogenous space for the

GRADUATION STUDIO

production/deconstruction/interrogation of art. It is a traditional artisan-crafts workshops and art-recycling factory, stitched together with an inventory of rejected art/craft pieces. Workshops are abutted, overlapped and dismantled to generate in-between space, a catalyst for interdisciplinary learning. Woven within are voyeuristic amphitheatres and gantries that delight in the ‘spectacle of the handmade’. Here art becomes not about its production (object), but its ‘theatrical performance’ (experience). The workshops are further entwined with the ‘moving inventory’. It is an overhead conveyorcum-archive of rejected art pieces that serve as tools for artisans, blurring the notion of authenticity/authorship. ‘The Craft Machine’ becomes the pulse of post-production, a space of digestion where ideas/art/experiences are constantly deconstructed, dismantled, and sewn back together. 2019

MANO PONNAMBALAM


11

MANO PONNAMBALAM

SYDNEY SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE, DESIGN AND PLANNING

2019

GRADUATION STUDIO


12

SYDNEY SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE, DESIGN AND PLANNING

(L) Callum Flitcroft, ‘Abstracting the Piazza’. As traditional attitudes towards art gallery typologies evolve from 18th century viewer-object experiences into spaces that facilitate meaningful dialogue and interactions, architecture must develop to foster such encounters. Art theory has progressed to encompass practices of active participation, and as such, society has seen contemporary art move away from the traditional gallery typology of white plasterboard walled spaces. ‘Abstracting the Piazza’ is the product of in-depth analysis of the components that transform a city into a condenser of human interactions. By breaking the ancient typology down into a kit-of-parts and rearranging these components so they suit site conditions, the project progresses artistic theory by enriching humanistic experiences. (R) Johanna Wang, ‘AGNSW: Public Farm!’. ‘AGNSW: Public Farm!’ provides a place of dialogue between artists, scientists, farmers, and visitors. These conversations and stories

GRADUATION STUDIO

are captured within spaces, to mobilise a culture of cultivation and sustenance in light of the environmental challenges we face today. The Domain carpark, a gradually obsolete urban entity, provides a renewed use – the visceral infrastructure that supports adaptive spaces in which art-led collaborations might take place. An urban garden supports small-scale farming with an aim to bring together all communities around the production of food and inspire fresh approaches to sustenance and sustainability. A museum of public farming is imagined as a historic connection between people, the land and the products they consume. This engagement with soil, time and change is a contemporary act in rethinking our connection with the land and embeds a renewed culture of cultivation. “Gardening is an art form inherently engaged with time, change, atmosphere and fragile image...” (Christian Borch).

2019

MANO PONNAMBALAM


13

ROGER RAJARATNAM

SYDNEY SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE, DESIGN AND PLANNING

2019

GRADUATION STUDIO


14

SYDNEY SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE, DESIGN AND PLANNING

GRADUATION STUDIO

INSIDE

1

2 3 4 5 6

7

8

9

OUTSIDE 10

(L) Antoine Portier/David Cadena, ‘Immersion’. This project reconsiders the conventional experience of cultural spaces in Sydney. It offers an immersive experience of the harbour below sea level drawing critical attention to local marine life and the impact of global warming on the ocean in the Anthropocene. The proposal responds to the particular context of Circular Quay, lowering the existing waterfront sea wall at the current site, and removing the existing Overseas Passenger Terminal (OPT) and concrete platform. The concrete and structure of the OPT will be re-purposed to form an underwater artificial reef providing habitat for marine life. This artificial reef will be observable from ‘Immersion’ which takes the shape of a floating island, detached from the shoreline and is partly immersed in water. (R) Lewis Miles, ‘Hard at Work/Hard at

Leisure. The Archive and the Endless Museum’. Contemporary art is an anachronism – an idea that will always be a recent past. In an attempt to elude this tension, ‘Hard at Work/Hard at Leisure’ explores the architectural potential of the contemporary museum through a historical lens. In a gesture of recovery and a provocation of white-cube curating, the AGNSW archives and collection are made accessible to the public – transcending the sacred to the profane. The result is a cultural cross section, an archaeological excavation of civilisation where historical narratives collide and intertwine, free from the authorial control of the curator. Proposed is a transformation of the artefacts rather than the exhibition: – “don’t change the art, change the conditions”.

2019

ROGER RAJARATNAM


15

ROGER RAJARATNAM

SYDNEY SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE, DESIGN AND PLANNING

2019

GRADUATION STUDIO


16

SYDNEY SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE, DESIGN AND PLANNING

Cultural Infrastructure 2025+:

Graduation Studio MARC5001 Semester 2 2019 Sandra Löschke Tutors Stephen Collier Isabel Gabaldon Mano Ponnambalam Roger Rajaratnam Yiwen Yuan

Supporting a culture of creativity is essential for New South Wales to succeed, but for culture to truly flourish it needs a home—places where it can be created, shared and enjoyed. The Honourable Don Harwin MLC, Minister for the Arts

Rethinking the Architecture

The studio brief challenges students to rethink the Architecture Museum for the 21st century and how it can be reconceptualised to make an important and innovative contribution to the NSW Cultural Infrastructure Plan 2025+.¹ It encourages architectural propositions that boost the local cultural economy, encourage community participation and build capacity for a more sustainable future. Not least, it poses the broader question of how the discipline of architecture and the institution of the museum can make a positive impact on human life and the urban environment. The context for the project includes the following theoretical, urban and social themes: entertainment and education, experience economy and experience society, urban obsolescence and postproduction. The proposed sites are the Domain Car Park (DCP) and the Overseas Passenger Terminal (OPT) at Circular Quay – both represent uses that are no longer desired in inner urban areas and are destined to become obsolete. Located in close proximity to two of Sydney’s most prominent cultural institutions, the AGNSW and the MCA, these sites offer an interesting pairing of transport and cultural infrastructures, begging to be explored.

Museum for the 21st Century 2019

¹ https://create.nsw.gov.au/wp-content/ uploads/2019/02/20190206_CIP2025.pdf


17

SYDNEY SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE, DESIGN AND PLANNING

2019

‘Social Movement’ Maurizio Lamanna


18

SYDNEY SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE, DESIGN AND PLANNING

(L) Michael Brewster, ‘Exponential Museum’. By investigating key shifts in museums and galleries, the ‘Exponential Museum’ aims to create a multifaceted typology within the existing urban environment. Focussing on infrastructure about to become obsolete, the carpark, the proposal explores how such spaces could be repurposed to efficiently serve society’s changing needs. Following SANAA’s addition to the Art Gallery of NSW, the project serves as another expansion to this cluster with an architecture museum, library and public park. Connection via a physical ramp highlights the importance of connectivity between cultural institutions and reactivates the site. Importantly, the design does not void the

GRADUATION STUDIO

existing carpark entirely, providing the infrastructure for future expansion. (R) Alexandra Dawson, ‘The People’s Corner’. The Domain has long been a place of political activism, free speech and voice of the people. ‘The People’s Corner’ builds upon the existing fabric of the city to incidentally contribute to the greater network of activist space in Sydney. The four forms of public space, the street, building, park and plaza, are embedded into the existing material of the Domain Carpark to activate the space. Voice, forum, debate and exposure to future developments are fostered through large public thoroughfares which dissect through the site and link in with the city’s existing circulatory pathways.

2019

STEPHEN COLLIER


19

STEPHEN COLLIER

SYDNEY SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE, DESIGN AND PLANNING

2019

GRADUATION STUDIO


20

SYDNEY SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE, DESIGN AND PLANNING

(L) Alex Tran, ‘Archifacts’. ‘Archifacts’ is an architectural museum that examines the relationship between the temporal nature of light and the museum typology, specialised for displaying architectural artefacts. The proposed investment increase into Sydney’s cultural infrastructure necessitates a consideration of how an architectural museum may complement existing cultural institutions of Sydney and engage with the public. ‘Archifacts’ comprises a series of exhibition spaces which celebrate the intersections of adaptive reuse, architectural exhibition and the atmospheric qualities of light. Natural light filters through added incisions in the existing slab and illuminate the spaces beneath, articulating a series of transient experiences animated by time. (R) Brandan Villatora, ‘Demarcation Point’. ‘Demarcation Point’ is an architecture museum of the 21st century which utilises built form to highlight the contrast between

GRADUATION STUDIO

performance and contemplative space. When considering the nonspace infrastructure of the Domain Carpark, the heavily surveyed subterranean form evokes feelings of isolation and observation. Michel Foucault (Discipline and Punish, 1975) presents the circular form of the panopticon as indicative of how power and control can be exercised through architecture. The circular plan which forces inward and outward observation can be likened to the classical amphitheatre in which the stage is the point of not only observation but power. This geometry further leads to intimate spaces of isolation and contemplation. Concerns of public versus private in 21st century society lead us to question how architecture will evolve as the user becomes aware of their role as not only the observer but also the subject.

2019

STEPHEN COLLIER


21

ISABEL GABALDON

SYDNEY SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE, DESIGN AND PLANNING

2019

GRADUATION STUDIO


22

SYDNEY SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE, DESIGN AND PLANNING

(L) Alice Hanqiu Yu, ‘Embrace the Greyness’. Commercial utilities continually replace the pragmatic transportation functions of Sydney’s ports. Similarly, landmarks like the Opera House and the Harbour Bridge will probably be demolished in a century’s time. They are momentary. The aim of this project is to change momentary into eternal. People know Sydney because of these landmarks, but Sydney is not just about its landmarks, there are also abandoned tunnels and railways, which provide historical testimony. There is always a greyness between iconic and abandoned Sydney. In order to embrace this greyness, the design attempts to remove people from landmarks, remove commercial functions and bring more senses into spaces, thus, allowing people to know what Sydney

GRADUATION STUDIO

truly is. (R) Prudence Tang, ‘Nature’. As the concrete structure was an intrusion to the environment, the existing car park is penetrated and exposed with the insertion of a central void and a carved-out shelter. This void encapsulates the vast diversity of flora and fauna, and holds an abundance of greenery and a thriving timber plantation within it. The space serves as a cultural hub, including and educating people about indigenous culture, and unites collective residents of the land which it is built upon. Intimate spaces are curated and designed to reflect the different experiences which can be associated with the land, and are presented as raw spaces for indigenous curators to design.

2019

ISABEL GABALDON


23

ISABEL GABALDON

SYDNEY SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE, DESIGN AND PLANNING

2019

GRADUATION STUDIO


24

SYDNEY SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE, DESIGN AND PLANNING

(L) Khoa Nguyen, ‘Revamp’. ‘Revamp’ reforms the traditional museum and proposes a new set of rules that can be incorporated in the future. As an architectural museum, repurposing architectural features of the old will instigate a pure spatial dialogue of the building’s historic past and a timeless ambience. Blending the boundaries of the observed and the observer, it will add layers of meaning within the space, drawing interest beyond the site to the urban context that will prompt new conversations on a wider scale. The future architectural museum will become self-sufficient, broadening its associations to other fields and publicly showcase

GRADUATION STUDIO

architectural processes. (R) Maurizio Lamanna, ‘Social Movement’. A celebration of the steel portal framed OPT structure and heritage surrounds, this project aims to dissolve the enclosed nature of the existing building to forge a hub for creative and cross societal interaction. Transformed from a vantage point, to a place that engages the public, the program of workshops, markets, pavilions, educational and gathering spaces are grounded by the three tidal pools that are carved from the foreshore. This fluid activation of the public realm allows for inquisitive exploration of existing and reinterpreted portal frame structures. 2019

MANO PONNAMBALAM


25

MANO PONNAMBALAM

SYDNEY SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE, DESIGN AND PLANNING

2019

GRADUATION STUDIO


26

SYDNEY SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE, DESIGN AND PLANNING

(L) Nina McDonald, ‘The Terminal Exhibition’. Challenging the project brief, which declared the OPT and Sydney’s cruise industry obsolete, presented an opportunity to explore rather than condemn the contradictions of architectural, environmental and industrial obsolescence. ‘The Terminal Exhibition’ offers a process-driven space that celebrates salvage as a cultural and industrial spectacle, and re-establishes links to the Quay’s historic and cultural identity as a working foreshore. Existing simultaneously in a state of construction and deconstruction, the museum’s cannibalisation of the ship and its transformation into both exhibition space and artefact re-frames the concept of obsolescence, not as a final condition, but as an expression of architectural process. (R) Karin Ke, ‘A Bricolage of Infrastructural Turned Museum Typologies’. “In our world a museum is not enough” (CCA 2019). The contemporary art

GRADUATION STUDIO

and architectural field is a space of radical uncertainty undergoing constant transformation where the museum merely acts as a frame to make sense of, anticipate and project on the world. In creating architecture that will maintain an institution that is constantly adapting to its needs, how can we design permanent elements of friction? Drawing upon the industrial relic of the Domain Car Park, the key force here is the balance of intensifying a tectonic presence to the fading memories of the parking garage while embracing the inevitability of change and reoccurring architectural obsolescence through a flexible approach to museum infrastructure and design of its display systems. The complex is transformed into an urban ensemble infilled with artistic and architectural activity with adaptable typological characteristics harnessed by a superstructure framework forming their common matrix.

2019

MANO PONNAMBALAM


27

ROGER RAJARATNAM

SYDNEY SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE, DESIGN AND PLANNING

2019

GRADUATION STUDIO


28

SYDNEY SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE, DESIGN AND PLANNING

(L) Yanpei Li, ‘Lyceum’. Social media provides opportunities for ordinary people to express their thoughts and understanding without barriers. However social media limit individuals’ vision and their perspectives. The Lyceum, an ancient Greek temple where philosophers debated, would be the central concept of the Museum of Architecture, Sydney. By adapting the existing portal frame and breaking out the current order of Overseas Passenger Terminal, visitors are welcome to explore the space freely, thus defying any given definition of architecture. The audience can then adopt social media as a creative tool, which enables them to discover their

GRADUATION STUDIO

own interests and to redefine architecture. (R) Douglas Hamersley, ‘Accumulate’. Production is to consume. Post-production is to reclaim. This project uses a reading of post-production theory to reframe the architecture museum as a city-wide network of sites that offer spaces to organise, research, discuss, decide and create. At one level the architecture of each place talks to the physicality of form and place, at another it talks to both memory and the yet to be realised. Considered details, attention to light and acoustics, and a refined material palette break down the inherently monolithic mass of a conventional car park and reconsiders it as ‘new’.

2019

ROGER RAJARATNAM


29

ROGER RAJARATNAM

SYDNEY SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE, DESIGN AND PLANNING

2019

GRADUATION STUDIO


30

SYDNEY SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE, DESIGN AND PLANNING

(L) Yuri Kato, ‘Archistop’. ‘Archistop’ seeks to question the increasing dominance of the spectacle in the contemporary architectural landscape. Oftentimes the public is alienated and the opportunity for structures to be used throughout all stages of its life cycle is not considered. The project is an experimental park where designers have an opportunity to communicate and collaborate with the public to improve their understanding of what the public desires. The proposal will be located in the soon to be obsolete structure of the Domain Carpark, its primary design principle seeking to break apart the large building mass into paths and infrastructure that will improve access to places that cultivate Sydney’s cultural landscape. (R) Wendy Shi, ‘Semblance: The Domain Immersive Art Grounds’. Influenced by the current economic values reflected

GRADUATION STUDIO

in contemporary galleries, the project explores the program as a platform based business model that aims to generate revenue through the aesthetic and programmatic appeal of architecture. The project proposes an expansive and rentable storage/display space for immersive art, installations and large-scale objects, which have always been problematic for galleries and private collectors in terms of storage. Through the means of adaptive re-use, the existing car park becomes the major exhibition space with the twist of habitable programs introduced to the exterior of the building. The design strategy aims for economic efficiency by imposing minimal impact on the existing space and creating a new hybrid façade to activate the envelope of the existing stagnant surroundings.

2019

ROGER RAJARATNAM


31

YIWEN YUAN

SYDNEY SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE, DESIGN AND PLANNING

2019

GRADUATION STUDIO


32

SYDNEY SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE, DESIGN AND PLANNING

(L) Jarrod Harth, ‘A Journey of Innovation’. The design presents a journey through the process of creating innovative architectural products and design techniques produced by an interdisciplinary team of built environment professionals. This process is divided into ‘discovery’, ‘creation’, ‘implementation’ and ‘evaluation’ with each step expressing their own individual characteristics within the architecture. Each step of this journey is exhibited to the public to both entertain and educate in the architectural innovations of the future. The integration of this facility into the context of the adjacent system of park lands draws attention from the building itself and focuses it on the work being created and exhibited inside. (R) Emma

GRADUATION STUDIO

Harrington, ‘The Arbour’. An architectural archive growing from the forest itself, architecture emerging as nature dissipates. With seeds embedded in the walls, shaded by a dappled canopy of repurposed timber, the archive is a physical manifestation of its purpose: to demonstrate the architectural potential of the full lifecycle of the tree, whilst simultaneously cataloguing and curating nature in its nurseries and forests, creating a database of native Australian flora. ‘The Arbour’ is dedicated to the display of timber in construction and the education of its visitors on the importance of retaining and replenishing our rapidly depleting forests — acting as a living, breathing example of the role of the tree, in architecture and in life.

2019

YIWEN YUAN


33

YIWEN YUAN

SYDNEY SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE, DESIGN AND PLANNING

2019

GRADUATION STUDIO


34

SYDNEY SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE, DESIGN AND PLANNING

Master of Architecture Semester 1 Sandra Lรถschke

Semester 2 Sandra Lรถschke

Mano Ponnambalam Hamed Abaeian John Culshaw David Da Costa Enes Ryan Dobbs Callum Flitcroft Samuel Griffith Gloria Ha Sun-Kyoo Kim Jiahui Li Juliette Maurer Hyea Oh Farzana Rahman Tara Sydney Jong-Oh Won Shengyuan Yang Luqiu Zheng Dan Zhu

Stephen Collier Harsh Bavishi Michael Brewster Lynn Dai Alexandra Dawson Carmon Jacqueline Liang Yujing Liu Nathan Souriyavong Alex Tran Damien Wang Bryan Wong

Roger Rajaratnam Haoran Bi Estefano Bonfante David Cadena Ailing Jiang Daniel Joseph Bill Keremelevski Lewis Miles Antoine Portier Ernest Song Johanna Wang Tyler Wang Hong Xiang Yue Xu Connie Yan Jie Zhou Zhou

Isabel Gabaldon Shicheng Bai Mark Bishop Melanie Chow Zhuoran Jia Jingwei Li Shengyang Lu Yuxin Lu Layla Stanley Tammy Tan Prudence Tang Brandan Villatora Di Wu Tiffany Yeung Han Qiu (Alice) Yu

Roger Rajaratnam Chan Chan Joseph Emmi Ziyun Gao Doug Hamersley Katie Hubbard Yuri Kato Karin Ke Geun Mo Kim Kai Kwak Yanpei Li Yvette Ramsay Sam (Ze) Wu Ruoyan Zhao Yiwen Yuan Ivan Dai Yunyi Fan Wendy Gao Emma Harrington Jarrod Harth Jing Lin Chaoran Ni Alexcina Phillips Wendy Shi Ernest Sun Kate Wraight Sherry Yang Jiaze Zhang

Mano Ponnambalam Jwan Al-Saeekh Nazgol Asadi Taya Brooks Yen Dao Amir Fakhrduzduzani Luke Hannaford Maurizio Lamanna Nina McDonald Jordan Murray Khoa Nguyen Byron Sullivan Alex Sun

2019


35

SYDNEY SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE, DESIGN AND PLANNING

External contributors and guest critics Semester 1

External contributors and guest critics Semester 2

Dr Avril Alba, USYD Craig Burns, BVN Mochen Jiang, USYD Byron Kinnaird, NSW Architects Registration Board Kathlyn Loseby, CRONE Russell Lowe, UNSW Dr Sophia Maalsen, USYD Fabricio Siqueira, NSW Architects Registration Board Simm Steel, Steensen Varming Amir Taheri, USYD

Joe Agius, COX Architecture Ross Anderson, USYD Simon Anderson, Anderson Architecture Philip Arnold, PlusMinus Design Anastasia Globa, USYD Ozgur Gocer, USYD Urtzi Grau, UTS Adrian Hohenzolern, Heritage Council of NSW Weijie Hu, USYD Zie Liu, Woods Bagot Mike Lukic, M Lukic Architect Andy McDonald, MI Architects Milly Meares, Woods Bagot Matthew Mindrup, USYD Rizal Muslimin, USYD Peter Nguyen, COX Architecture Nando Nicotra, Jacobs Matt Ravier, National Film & Sound Archive Noel Roche, Koichi Takada Architects Paolo Stracchi, USYD Somwrita Sarkar, USYD Huw Turner, Collins and Turner Stephen Varady, Stephen Varady Associates

Structural John Mai, USYD Alberto Sangiorgio, Grimshaw

Structural Natalie Dumbrell, ARUP John Mai, USYD Tom Urquhart, ARUP Alberto Sangiorgio, Grimshaw Nicholas Scanlan, ARUP

2019


36

SYDNEY SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE, DESIGN AND PLANNING

BACHELOR OF DESIGN

IN ARCHITECTURE 2019


37

SYDNEY SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE, DESIGN AND PLANNING

2019

‘Fold’ Rachel Liang


38

SYDNEY SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE, DESIGN AND PLANNING

Domain

Architecture Studio 3B BDES3027 Semester 2 2019 Catherine Lassen

Tutors Sean Akahane-Bryen Justine Anderson Jason Dibbs Nicholas Elias Maren Koehler Zoya Kuptsova Tiffany Liew Mahroo Moosavi Mano Ponnambalam Kieran Richards Lachlan Seegers Thomas Stromberg Mitchell Thompson

Between the urban environment of Macquarie Street and the landscape of the Sydney Domain, students in this studio proposed a public space for performance, display and discussion. Located behind the Mint on Hospital Road, their speculative designs sought to negotiate the historic built setting together with the politically charged urban void. Selected for its legibility, Jørn Utzon’s methodological work afforded an additional disciplinary, proto computational context from which to imagine new possibilities. Framed as rule governed, his design thinking spans scales ranging from urban ambitions to assembly details. Retroactively imagined as parametric, thoughts that inform geometry can be seen as connected to attitudes towards structure and material components, extending to performance requirements such as acoustics. Attention was paid to techniques of architectural representation to conceptually clarify design direction as well as generate potential projections. Through the iterative re-drawing and re-making of what one ‘sees’ and ‘reads’ students were asked to isolate architectural aspects or strategies, leading to a precise yet abstracted, open-ended depiction of the studied architectural work or urban context. Clarification through parametric schemas offered extended tools for establishing an internally coherent new framework; explicit representation helped promote intuitively driven designs toward realised intentions. Architectural agendas were framed in relation to larger urban attitudes. Structural and material thinking was encouraged in alignment with broader design priorities; part and whole were seen as continuously interconnected. Multiple modes of making helped to manifest intelligible, inventive, digital, as well as material, propositions. Focussed by close readings of projects or buildings via measured drawings in the online Utzon Aalborg Archives, students posed their own designs in critical counterpoint.

Threshold 2019


39

SYDNEY SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE, DESIGN AND PLANNING

2019

‘The Immersive Space’ Jinrui Zhang


40

SYDNEY SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE, DESIGN AND PLANNING

(L) Kyle Wilson, ‘The Mint Performance Precinct’. In an effort to grow this historical site instead of producing a stagnant artefact, this vertical precinct connects the cityscape to the Domain through the existing building on the site, the Mint. Once returned to its former state, the original Mint serves as the heart of the design and provides the foundation of the overall principle of designing a humanitarian based environment that contributes to society through providing social infrastructure rather than just a private theatre. Throughout this complex collection of special experiences, society can integrate and facilitate the future of this design through its habitation. (R) Rachel Liang, ‘Fold’. ‘Fold’ is a proposition that

ARCHITECTURE STUDIO 3B

investigates the formation of malleable public spaces that emerge from the natural ground plane. The project is characterised by a language of brick walls that each rupture from the earth and weave through the site like ribbons. They define intimate relationships between everyday life, art and performance and introduce a permeability within its architectural envelope that is achieved by folding, puncturing and burying the ribbons into the landscape. A performative journey emerges from within and wraps around a central courtyard, sculpted by a gentle ascension of programmed ground planes that depart from the public domain to reach the main theatre. 2019

SEAN AKAHANE-BRYEN


41

SEAN AKAHANE-BRYEN

SYDNEY SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE, DESIGN AND PLANNING

2019

ARCHITECTURE STUDIO 3B


42

SYDNEY SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE, DESIGN AND PLANNING

(L) Gabriella Lindsay, ‘Fold/Unfold’. A performance theatre and dance school; ‘Fold/Unfold’ is inspired by Utzon’s Fredensborg Kunstmuseum. The work mediates the relationship between space, periphery and circulation. The sloping planes, functioning as a gallery for the Domain, are derived from a set of site lines intersecting the city grid. Slicing and folding these lines from a single sheet forms a constructed landscape. While the primary spaces are expressed in the exterior, the interior spaces encourage circulation through intersecting thresholds, glimpsing separate programs of the design. The observer traverses a continuum of sensory experiences and the building becomes a key part of the

ARCHITECTURE STUDIO 3B

performance itself. (R) Michelle Lee, ‘Collect. Focus. Diffuse’. ‘Collect. Focus. Diffuse’ is a collection of alternating roof archetypes defined and organised categorically across the interface of the city grid and the Domain. The three archetypes, Collect gives shelter to the passing visitor, Focus draws attention to the performer below, and Diffuse radiates light. Spaces can be defined and divided according to their programmatic needs through the use of curtains that extend from the roofs. The gentle curves and translucent qualities of the skins create a delicate layering of light, shadows, and silhouettes reflective of the interpretive and experimental experiences of dance. 2019

JUSTINE ANDERSON


43

JUSTINE ANDERSON

SYDNEY SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE, DESIGN AND PLANNING

2019

ARCHITECTURE STUDIO 3B


44

SYDNEY SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE, DESIGN AND PLANNING

(L) Carmelo Nastasi, ‘Procession’. ‘Procession’ is a series of choreographed moments and apertures of the city of Sydney. The building is the stage, its users, the protagonists and its context, the backdrop. ‘Procession’ seeks to frame and celebrate three distinct landscapes datums in Sydney, the honesty of the subterranean, the refined nature of the ground plane and the imagined skyline. Via the program of theatre and exhibition, these three terrains become the backdrop for a Greater Chain of Theatre. As you ascend the levels of the structure, each addresses a hierarchical theatrical experience, from informal busking and underground performance in the Subterranean links to Formal Theatre and Art Exhibition on the rooftop. In its form, these landscapes become the lenses through which the performances are experienced and interact with a theatre machine insertion allowing the levels to interact and operate separately. (R) Leanne (Letong) Meng, ‘Episode D’. By examining the meaning of theatre, where the roles of audiences

ARCHITECTURE STUDIO 3B

and performers are tied closely through the acts of viewing and moving, the conception of two particular architectural elements has been reframed: apertures and thresholds. Establishing a conceptual framework based on the semantic themes generated from the etymological roots of the terms ‘aperture’ and ‘threshold,’ the proposal reimagines spatial experience by recompositing selected architectural components, such as apertures and thresholds, from the precedent of Jørn Utzon’s house at Can Lis, as well as a broad analysis of the existing architectonic elements surrounding the site. By doing so, this proposal argues for the narrative potential of architecture. The resulting design has an internal coherency that resonates with the performing arts, circulating scene by scene, subtly combining different theatrical experiences, and threshold and aperture typologies to create the dialogue between audiences and performers, the site and the city.

2019

JASON DIBBS


45

JASON DIBBS

SYDNEY SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE, DESIGN AND PLANNING

2019

ARCHITECTURE STUDIO 3B


46

SYDNEY SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE, DESIGN AND PLANNING

(L) Brigid White, ‘Beneath The Bedrock’. Inspired by the relationship between gothic elements of European architecture and striking Australian artists such as Charles Blackman and Arthur Boyd, my design is based on the idea of using the Australian landscape as a means to evoke drama. Through a series of mappings of the broader context of the Domain, the harshness of the Sydney landscape and the struggles faced by early settlers in an unforgiving topography is explored. These mappings characterise elements of the site. A study of Jorn Utzon’s Silkeborg Museum showed the potential for light barrels to permeate the architecture and allow light to flood spaces below the surface. In my design, large excavated walls of sandstone are lit by vessels of glowing light from above, subverting the idea of the traditional gothic space. The building relies on the

ARCHITECTURE STUDIO 3B

piercing Australian sun and offers a means of escape below the surface to a space that contrasts light and materiality whilst offering a relationship with the sandstone that has existed for thousands of years. (R) Nicole Wen, ‘Anti Culture Culture Theatre’. With projected population growth and demand for cultural capital in Sydney, an estimated 22,500 patrons will require space for cultural activities by the year 2100. This is a proposal for a multi-functional theatre that incorporates art galleries, flexible event spaces, small live music venues to concert halls in order to return space to the public realm. If large swathes of prime city real estate can be given to a casino, why can’t 20% of that space be invested into a cultural venue that will in turn grow our soft power and promote the arts?

2019

NICHOLAS ELIAS


47

NICHOLAS ELIAS

SYDNEY SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE, DESIGN AND PLANNING

2019

ARCHITECTURE STUDIO 3B


48

SYDNEY SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE, DESIGN AND PLANNING

(L) Amanda Yeo, ‘Hinge’. A continuous circulation path informed by arcs and tangents brings the spectator, performer and public around hinges and into programs offering unique experiences of space. Moving through the spaces, the distinction between wall, balustrade and ground is removed as the hinge and tangent create sculptural modulating forms. An open-air theatre featuring a gentle undulating landscape of poured rubber generates a playful experience of performance, while an enclosed theatre with a continuous wall offers an immersive digital experience. The public landscape formed on a rooftop ramps down into the Domain connecting to an existing footpath and a new path as part of the urban intervention. (R) Marion Edye, ‘Immersion’. The Broadway show ‘Sleep no More’, based on Shakespeare’s Macbeth, is one of the most intriguing

ARCHITECTURE STUDIO 3B

and exciting performances of modern theatre. Pairing film noir and immersive theatre, ‘Sleep no More’ is an indoor promenade that takes its audience up, down, and around rooms where the play is staged in separate rooms. Inspired by the vitality of immersive theatre, ‘Immersion’ is composed of a series of spaces ordered around a grid on the urban front and a sympathetic intervention into the Domain. A loop takes the audience from vast gallery spaces down to staggered theatres where the audience is free to roam around sequences of rooms connected by underground tunnels. The audience is immersed in a theatrical landscape where actors play along with changes in vertical thresholds: smaller intimate spaces contrast other larger open rooms, ultimately rendering architecture a backdrop to the art of immersive theatre.

2019

MAREN KOEHLER


49

SYDNEY SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE, DESIGN AND PLANNING

ARCHITECTURE STUDIO 3B

S-04

S-04

S-03

S-03

S-02

S-02

S-01

S-01

MAREN KOEHLER

2019


50

SYDNEY SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE, DESIGN AND PLANNING

(L) Jack Fountain, ‘Confluence’. ‘Confluence’ emerges from the intersection between Macquarie Street and the Domain, seeking to simultaneously enhance and juxtapose Macquarie Street’s privacy and the Domain’s public vibrancy; metropolis and nature; linear and organic. This scheme seeks to build upon the site’s latent potentiality. The Domain threshold currently sits in purgatory, neither truly part of the urban sprawl of the CBD or a part of the intricate rhizome of the Domain precinct. The application of these conceptual motivations filters throughout the scheme from macro gestural moves (footbridge and tunnel) to the intricacies of roof detailing, ultimately seeking to enhance and unify the contrasting characteristics of the site. The simultaneous juxtaposition of these characteristics against each other also creates a series of complex

ARCHITECTURE STUDIO 3B

architectural moments and boosts the public experience. (R) Lisa Shao, ‘Ebb and Flow’. A quality and character of a space is largely affected by the physical scale of a space, both horizontally and vertically, in relation to the human scale. Such is the main concept of ‘Ebb and Flow’. With the parameters of hierarchy, privacy/publicity, density and function in mind, a multitude of spaces with varying physical qualities and character are created. Constants established against this undulating landscape separate the form into three major spaces: one moving against the constant housing the art gallery, one in constant motion forming a direct extension to the Domain, and one constant against the motion with a large chamber enveloping theatre spaces hidden underground.

2019

ZOYA KUPTSOVA


51

ZOYA KUPTSOVA

SYDNEY SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE, DESIGN AND PLANNING

2019

ARCHITECTURE STUDIO 3B


52

SYDNEY SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE, DESIGN AND PLANNING

(L) Nicky Law, ‘Possibilities’. Inspired by the sectional geometry of Utzon’s Bayview House, the premise of this design is an exploration of the inherent polyvalency within the language of interlocking beams. The building is presented as a modular framework inviting interpretation through the gap. Seen as an extension of the streetscape, the observer is led through spaces of gradually increasing scales. Upon seeing the ambiguous undulating curves and the regulated expression of the gap, the observer is invited to define these forms and envision a plethora of potential uses. The interplay between subjective interpretations of form and function within the punctuated modular framework empowers the observer to become a performer in their own right. Similarly, the archetypal settings for performance are defined through the same ambiguous forms. Performance is thus inspired within the subjective definitions

ARCHITECTURE STUDIO 3B

of intersection and transition between the walkway, stage, stairs and auditorium. (R) Jinrui Zhang, ‘The Immersive Space’. The project is a public space for immersive performance as well as art exhibitions. The idea is to encourage participation in performances and exhibitions to create an art culture precinct. In this project, space becomes the narrator of scenarios happening inside. Derived from the idea of remapping the existing urban pattern around the site, spaces are defined as scenes. The architectural components consisting of each space creates unique experiences, curved ground, light tunnels and materiality compose an unceasing variation of spatial narrations changing through time. The boundary between performers and viewers is eliminated, and eventually, everyone in the space becomes part of the performance.

2019

TIFFANY LIEW


53

TIFFANY LIEW

SYDNEY SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE, DESIGN AND PLANNING

2019

ARCHITECTURE STUDIO 3B


54

SYDNEY SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE, DESIGN AND PLANNING

(L) Marco Pecora, ‘Productive Assemblages – Opportunistic Performances’. This project recognises that a genuinely porous city can only occur naturally through time and layering, it cannot be designed. Sydney, due to its youth as a built city, lacks porous, pocketing spaces. It defines zones through programmatic use and as such, limits spaces to certain groups. This is prejudice. The proposed design facilitates opportunistic, playful and incidental performances driven and defined by the communities that choose to occupy and manually transform these modular spaces, inherently involving them in the performative gesture of place making. As to avoid a stereotypical sponge, the design embraces a quintessentially Australian porosity, a gentle fold and open plane. It is a truly public space for absolutely all of Sydney’s citizens; a

ARCHITECTURE STUDIO 3B

democratic space for an architecturally democratic Sydney. (R) Poppy Brown, ‘Traverse’. This topographical intervention into the site is shaped by circuitous sandstone forms which carve out choreographic spaces, generating the potential for movement and performance through exploration. This proposal is a response to the historical, formal and programmatic contradictions between the Domain’s inclusive and accessible civic space and Macquarie Street’s authoritative sandstone institutions. As a constructed landscape informed by Sydney’s coastal geography, ‘Traverse’ seeks to reclaim the site as a flexible and dynamic public space, which not only supports organised and spontaneous performance, but also casts its users as both actors and audience as they investigate and negotiate the constructed topography. 2019

MAHROO MOOSAVI


55

MAHROO MOOSAVI

SYDNEY SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE, DESIGN AND PLANNING

2019

ARCHITECTURE STUDIO 3B


56

SYDNEY SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE, DESIGN AND PLANNING

(L) Darrelyn Nguyen, ‘Cube’. ‘Cube’ draws upon a sense of wonder within the vertical experience, reflecting and manipulating its contextual surroundings. The vertical journey begins upon viewing the harsh, monolithic exterior, piquing senses of curiosity as one ascends the dramatic staircase. The strong rectilinear exterior is juxtaposed within the interior, utilising concrete and frosted glass to create an ethereal experience reflecting its environmental surroundings. The experience is everchanging and in a constant flux; light absorbs from exterior walls and trickles from above. Circulating higher, drama accumulates, weaving through each level and eventually reaching the finale, the theatres which frame the sky, skyscrapers, and the Domain. ‘Cube’ encapsulates experiences of

ARCHITECTURE STUDIO 3B

the unexpected, the journey, and sensation of wonder. (R) Alex Bang Yih Ting, ‘The Quaint Theatre’. In response to the unique background and urban scale, the project seeks to activate the quiet streetscape in a humble way. By featuring the uniqueness of theatre spaces around the historical site, ‘The Quaint Theatre’ intends to create a progressive spatial experience, gradually leading the audience towards the auditorium. Layers of timber decks expand towards the east, forming a subtle curve that slightly reveals the hidden backstage in the urban context. The elegant design is an extension of the Domain parkland yet a response to the modern skyscrapers; it filters the natural light, creating charming and welcoming theatre spaces.

2019

MANO PONNAMBALAM


57

MANO PONNAMBALAM

SYDNEY SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE, DESIGN AND PLANNING

2019

ARCHITECTURE STUDIO 3B


58

SYDNEY SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE, DESIGN AND PLANNING

(L) Xavier Logan, ‘The Cave’. We once lived in caves. The acoustic environment of the cave wall once reverberated music and language into existence. We are indebted to the porosity of our landscapes, the infinity of strata, which magnified architectural refuge and storytelling. In the treatment of the site’s boundary condition as a kind of cave wall, a theatre was traced out through an exploratory method of echolocation. A catacomb of negative and positive strata undulates between the surface and subterranean levels. The staggering in this stratification reveals otherwise hidden geometric and performative characteristics of the surroundings. (R) Yushi Yang, ‘Circle Wave’. The design has a three-level programmatic arrangement with an open-view public space, a subterranean

ARCHITECTURE STUDIO 3B

auditorium and an underground gallery. In order to introduce a functional performance venue while keeping the existing character of the site as a transition point between the robust CBD and the tranquil Domain, minimal landscape alteration on the ground surface is fundamental to the overall design. On the ground level, scattered sculptural building elements are designed to allow spacious visual continuity and to attract people into forced circulation from one side to the other. A combination of circles and curves are employed saliently in the design to enhance fluidity and variation, which aims to bring non-stop novel experiences to visitors while they are exploring the spaces.

2019

KIERAN RICHARDS


59

KIERAN RICHARDS

SYDNEY SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE, DESIGN AND PLANNING

2019

ARCHITECTURE STUDIO 3B


60

SYDNEY SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE, DESIGN AND PLANNING

(L) Madeleine Gallagher, ‘Inhabited Topography’. A woven tapestry of stairs, platforms and stages amplifies the experience of procession and movement through space within an ‘Inhabited Topography’. A new performance landscape is carved from the liminal zone that exists between the city and the Domain, responding to a rich topographic history, scarred by colonisation and urban reform. As a site of Indigenous heritage once marked by dense bushland and sandstone gullies, the proposed design pays homage to historical landscapes of Sydney Harbour to construct a renewed understanding of the way we interact with terrain. Notions of prospect and refuge become embedded within the schema, with Jorn Utzon’s choreography of platform and plateau informing a series of investigative mappings recording the tensions and

ARCHITECTURE STUDIO 3B

thresholds within the site. Public life, art and performance interact in a landscape that encourages inquisition and creativity. (R) Lauren Maley, ‘The Dancing Theatre’. ‘The Dancing Theatre’ explores an essence of movement through architecture. A constant thread of motion and a sense of rhythm is created as the ramps take individuals on a journey up into the theatre, leading them in and out of the space. The main theatre space is nestled within the building’s walls which are extruded to hold its vital program. The ramps penetrate the walls, allowing individuals to circulate as it spins through, pulls out, and revolves around the static core, creating a contrasted form that emulates a dancer’s core and the energy around it.

2019

LACHLAN SEEGERS


61

LACHLAN SEEGERS

SYDNEY SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE, DESIGN AND PLANNING

2019

ARCHITECTURE STUDIO 3B


62

SYDNEY SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE, DESIGN AND PLANNING

(L) Rebekah Chew, ‘Memorial to Lived Experience’. This memorial commemorates lived experience through the performative past of the city. With reference to post-war reactionary artist Jackson Pollock, the ritual events of the city are considered more important than the formal spaces in which they occur. These events materialise as detritus, as simple throw away objects from each event, to be archived as artefacts at the chasms fault line. It is in the display of these mundane objects over time, that the bores of our past are exposed. In the layering our own detritus, a new way forward or progress is suggested. It articulates our difficulty with reconciling the chaos of our past wreckage whilst creating a form

ARCHITECTURE STUDIO 3B

that builds up skyward. (R) Jun Hyung (Kevin) Hwang, ‘Uncovering Bangarra’. When asked to imagine a traditional theatre space, it is perhaps an image of the monumental amphitheatres of Ancient Greece that first come to mind. Yet in the context of Sydney, these theatres are foreign and do not represent the true tradition of Australian theatre. A ‘Corroboree’ is an event celebrating Aboriginal Dreamtime, a night of music and dance performed within the landscape, around the fire and under the stars. It is a theatre where the stage of the performers and the seats of the audience become one within the landscape. This is the traditional theatre of Australia we must uncover. 2019

THOMAS STROMBERG


63

THOMAS STROMBERG

SYDNEY SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE, DESIGN AND PLANNING

2019

ARCHITECTURE STUDIO 3B


64

SYDNEY SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE, DESIGN AND PLANNING

(L) Ingrid Yingru Zhu, ‘Open-end’. As a collective of three blocks cascading along the landscape looking out towards the Domain, the buildings share the same construction language, with 4-column scaffolding that continues in a grid of 2.1m squares. This invites appreciation of the north morning sun and leave pockets on the site for public activities, thus enabling circulation through space. Spaces remain completely porous and open to the framed courtyards. The rotation of the grid creates pivotal threshold moments, dragging the strips of building into rotation. Courtyard spaces are protected by their adjacent buildings, creating meeting places for the public. Filtering views and lights, it is a space in-between enclosure and openness, public and private – open to interpretation by the public.

ARCHITECTURE STUDIO 3B

(R) Vivienne Kendall, ‘Patchwork’. Balancing on the threshold of the city and the Domain, this multipurpose theatre space illustrates the value of an intimate, human scaled experience within grand architectural gestures. Designed on a 3x3m ‘human scaled’ grid, each performance space is defined by walls of varying materiality which dictate the style of exhibition within. Beyond the performance, the interstitial spaces are guided by undulations between the roof and ground planes. As the ground adopts the surrounding pavements, the roof reaches into the streets of the city and around trees in the Domain, patching the building beyond the physical threshold it sits on.

2019

MITCHELL THOMPSON


65

MITCHELL THOMPSON

SYDNEY SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE, DESIGN AND PLANNING

2019

ARCHITECTURE STUDIO 3B


66

SYDNEY SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE, DESIGN AND PLANNING

Bachelor of Design in Architecture Catherine Lassen

Sean Akahane-Bryen Vania Alverina Xinyao Chen Lingjie Gan William Michael Goodwin Shubing Hou Matthew Hourigan Yuhan Li Rachel Liang Tsung Pei Andrew Lin Jun Seong Park Amir Ratna Shakya Rupert Trengove Kyle Stephens Wilson Samantha Yau Amin Abdul-Hakeem Yazici Justine Anderson Jamika Ashley Bell Shiyu Cao Meihan Gao Zhe Ji Manjeera Kancharla Michelle See-Yuen Lee Alexander Lee Aidan Ting Wai Li Gabriella Mersija Lindsay Emma Lydia O’brien Yilin Qiu Berinder Singh Jacob Christopher Smyth Celeste Stein Lu Wang Jason Dibbs Omar Ahmed Catherine Kai-Min Chen Lin Chin Leong Beverley Lim Jiayi Julia Lin Jinkun Liu Letong Meng Carmelo Arturo Nastasi Evan Poole-De Roma Hui Yuan Christina Sun Catherine Taylor Imogen April Thomas Daniel Tonnet Hongyuan Wu Andrew Xu Ruixin Zhang

Tiffany Liew Akmal Hannani Ahmad Kamal Dominic Bicego Stephanie Lee Dodd Eric Yu Huang Faith Kennerley Nicky Fong Law Thomas Le Ned Atticus Love Dominic Metcalf Harry Murdoch Mohammad Muzaffer Jeremy Pacionista Nadia Mila Vidor Huilin Yan Wenjing Yang Yi Qi Yu Jinrui Zhang

Nicholas Elias Tommy Chen Claire Hui-Hsin Chuang Elsa Feng Angus Stevenson Gregg Flora Hedayati Edwin Huang Lily Zonghui Huang Victor Bech Moritz Huyen Shayla Nguyen Ghounwa Tawk Nicole Wen Brigid White Maryam Wilson Maren Koehler Shannon Angela Dias Marion Edye Justin Howard Friemann Yunxi Stacey Gu Aishwarya Trilok Joshi Min Kang Mouhamed Kbar Massimo Reginato Yuhe Tian Rachael Amelia Wright Xuejun Wu Amanda Yeo Long Ting Yu Lucy Zhao Yizhou Eva Zhu

Mahroo Moosavi Wessam Bakkour Liam Henry Brandwood Poppy Lucinda Brown Desmond Chiang Jiarui Hu Sin Pui Lai Baoying Li Siyong Liao Ruoxu Liu Nimisha Prashanth Bronte Parker Marco Pecora Ka Hey Szeto Dixin Wei Benjamin James Wong Yizhe Ye

Zoya Kuptsova Byung Yoon Choi Jack Micheal Fountain Shiqi Han Yifei Li Qinyang Li Qiyang Lin Tianyun Liu Cheng Ma Lisa Xiao-Lei Shao Sally Suryeon Shin Ami Jeetendra Surti Sophie Thorley Bijie Wang Yifang Xia Jinming Xu

Mano Ponnambalam Yih Ting Bang Fotina Bouranta Daryl Chang Alexandra Devenish Courtney Adelle Louise Currie Alen Eessa Kerrin Fernanda Yulin Hao Lingjie Jiao Zhenyu Lin Qianyu Liu Katherine Elizabeth Marsh Darrelyn Phuong Nguyen Gracia Arleen Setiono Cho Yan Joan Wong Peiyan Wu Xing Fu Zheng

2019


67

Kieran Richards Jessica Ming Yen Chan Junyi Du Chloe Ruoyao Huang Selina Irwan Zuoting Li Xavier Logan Abbey Margaret Anne O’Regan Junhong Pan Cheng Peng Jack Rogers Noah Soderlund Chiting Suo Ben Meldrich Toralba Tan Rain Tone Wu Yushi Yang

SYDNEY SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE, DESIGN AND PLANNING

Mitchell Thompson Yin Chun John Chan Kexin He Skye Hengpoonthana Vivienne Kendall Hyuk Seung Kwon Ximeng Li Yixin Lu Isabella Mrljak Jun Heok Suh Yidi Tian Haochen Xu Kailin Zeng Xichun Zhang Yingru Zhu

External contributors and guest critics Paolo Apostolides, Place Studio Matthew Bennett, Bennett + Trimble Architects Paul Berkemeier, Paul Berkemeier Architects Ben Berwick, Prevalent Studio Andrew Burges, Andrew Burges Architects Harry Catterns, SAHA Studio Alice Chirculescu, BVN Architects Stephanie Chiu, Carter Williamson Architects Chris Cole, Chris Cole Architect Andrew Daly, SuperContext Studio Francisco Espinosa, Architectus Guillermo Fernandez-Abascal, UTS/GFA2 Architects Anna Field, City of Sydney Will Fung, CO-AP Architects Laura Harding, Hill Thalis Arch + Urban Isaac Harrisson, Sessional UTS Olivia Hyde, NSW Dep. Govt. Architect Richard Johnson, Johnson Pilton Walker Architects Mija Keane, Stewart Hollenstein Architects Sarah Lawlor, FJMT Architects Eoghan Lewis, Eoghan Lewis Architects Jesse Lockhart-Krause, Lockhart-Krause Architects Tye McBride, Allen Jack + Cottier Architects Jennifer McMaster, Trias Studio Phil Moore, Melocco & Moore Architects Anita Morandini, City of Sydney Kasia Podrygajlio, JDH Architects Matthew Pullinger, Matthew Pullinger Architect Bruce Roberton, Great North Design Services Shaowen Wang, Sessional UNSW Xinyi Wang, MAD Architects Brian Zulaikha, Tonkin Zulaikha Greer Architects

Lachlan Seegers Cong Chen Madeleine Gallagher Tess Patricia Hewitt Eunju Jung Michelle Lee Shiya Liang Thaw Tar Lin Lauren Maree Maley Abdul Munir Mohamad Lokman Georgia O’Sullivan Cong Pham Spiros Spyrou Joanne Tran Anthony Po Yin Tsang Marcellinus Agie Wiriahadi Daniel Zhang

Ross Anderson, USYD Matthew Asimakis, BDES graduate USYD Eduardo De Oliveira Barata, USYD Liat Busqila, BDES graduate USYD Jennifer Ferng, USYD Luke Hannaford, BDES graduate USYD Ivana Kuzmanovska, PhD candidate USYD Neena Mand, Sessional USYD Arielle Marshall, PhD candidate USYD Matthew Mindrup, USYD Michael Mossman, USYD Michael Muir, USYD Rizal Muslimin, USYD Chris Smith, USYD Lee Stickells, USYD Amir Taheri, PhD candidate USYD Michael Tawa, USYD Daiming Zhu, BDES graduate USYD

Thomas Stromberg Mihali Adamou Zeinab Allam Andrew Ivan Henry Carfax-Foster Rebekah Mei-En Chew Amanda Pei-Fen Chiam Natalie Dungey Jiaxi Fu Isaac Grant Heslop Junhyung Hwang Chloe Faith Mcarthur Rhea Kaur Nagi Angela Peng Kiran Roche Yarene Song Camille Donna Symonds Grace Tayler Owen Zhang Sally Zhu

2019


68

SYDNEY SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE, DESIGN AND PLANNING

BACHELOR OF ARCHITECTURE

AND ENVIRONMENTS 2019


69

SYDNEY SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE, DESIGN AND PLANNING

2019

‘Vertical Village’ Sabrina Pasic


70

SYDNEY SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE, DESIGN AND PLANNING

School as Community,

Design Integration Lab: Capstone BAEN3002 Semester 2 2019 Somwrita Sarkar

Tutors Eduardo Barata Tomas Delaney William McKee Karunya Subramaniam

This is the urban age, the age of cities. The United Nations predicts that by 2050, 68% of the projected 9 billion people on the planet will be living in cities. Our cities are evolving to accommodate increasing physical, functional, and socio-economic diversities. A school is not simply a school, an office is not simply an office, a house is not simply a house. Instead, buildings, spaces, and precincts become multifaceted spaces supporting a range of complex, compounded urban spatial and locational activities and processes. The studio focussed on the design of a primary school for the suburb of Westmead, situated next to the Central River City of Parramatta, proposed by the Greater Sydney Commission as the second Central Business District for growing metropolitan Sydney. The students successfully responded to a unique set of challenges in their design responses, arising from the local context, but universally relevant for the Sydney metropolitan region, exploring the hierarchical relationships between architecture, urban design, and urban planning. Challenge I: Design a large school. With Western Sydney recording one of the highest rates of growth in population and density, Westmead Public School is currently the largest primary school in Australia, with a current enrolment strength of 1653 students. Challenge II: Design for diversity and equity. Westmead is highly diverse and multi-cultural, home to an education, health care and ICT focussed worker base, and a thriving, diverse community formed by new immigrants, with 98% of the school students hailing from a language background other than English. Challenge III: Design more than a school. The primary school serves a number of community functions, including English language classes for new immigrants, fitness and mental health programs for parents, students, and guardians, and providing space for nurturing social connections, in order to address social isolation conditions faced by the new community. The students developed both building and urban precinct level responses responding to the challenges, focussing on three themes of design, health, and sustainability, their design responses informed through the core lens of social equity and justice.

Community as School 2019


71

SYDNEY SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE, DESIGN AND PLANNING

2019

‘Jannnawi Nura’ Lana Laureles


72

SYDNEY SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE, DESIGN AND PLANNING

(L) Mai Alarilla, ‘The Village’. In a population that is becoming increasingly dense, how can children continue to be raised socially and physically aware, without restriction? ‘The Village’ is a precinct that is formed around the interconnection between the community and its children. Building arrangement and opacity manipulation provide a domain that directs activity away from busy roads, while open-plan classrooms make for an agile, social learning environment. The bridges double as playspace and thoroughfare. Layers are scattered with diverse explorative play areas and ramps that lead into green spaces, imparting a sensory experience for students, staff, and visitors alike. Openings and railings allow one to peer into the landscape from different perspectives, creating boundaries that don’t feel like boundaries – safety borders

CAPSTONE (BUILDING)

without exclusion or restraint where children can safely coexist with common hazards while cultivating mental awareness of their surroundings to apply this knowledge to the outer world as they grow. (R) Katie Tsui, ‘Fly’. Inspired by the origami workshops held in Westmead Hospital, paper folding is the key idea of the design. By incorporating folding into the design of roof, façade and layout, the design creates spatial differences in terms of height and depth for kids to explore. The roof form is both exposed and closed, thus enhancing spatial hierarchy. It is hoped that kids can ‘learn outside the book’ through studying in different spaces. The school is a platform for children to grow up with the spirit of exploration.

2019

EDUARDO BARATA


73

EDUARDO BARATA

SYDNEY SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE, DESIGN AND PLANNING

2019

CAPSTONE (BUILDING)


74

SYDNEY SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE, DESIGN AND PLANNING

(L) Ian Chow, ‘Live Green’. To create a healthy and vibrant community in Westmead, the ‘Live Green’ project seeks to establish a network of community gardens and achieve self-sustainability. Two defining features of the project are the integration of the new Westmead Primary School with the landscape and the development of an urban food forest. The food forest acts as a green hub that connects people via community garden and individual gardening spaces. By having different sizes of community garden space that are easily accessible, the local community has the opportunity to interact with nature and become active in connecting with other people. (R) Natasha Zhong, ‘Westmead Primary School’. The vision

CAPSTONE (PRECINCT)

of the ‘Westmead Primary School’ is to provide opportunities of health and environment facilities to the community. As children start to develop their sensory systems and learn decision-making skills based on their physical experience, it is important to enhance sensory experience throughout the school. Also, the school will be designed to provide a safe community platform to embrace cultural diversity which draws stability and vibrancy to the neighbourhood. As a result, the community would be strongly bonded and the nature-friendly design can reconnect society with nature once again.

2019

EDUARDO BARATA


75

TOMAS DELANEY

SYDNEY SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE, DESIGN AND PLANNING

2019

CAPSTONE (BUILDING)


76

SYDNEY SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE, DESIGN AND PLANNING

(L) Rebecca Jones, ‘Seamless’. Amid a rapidly growing population and increasing demand on schools, it is essential to implement a wiser use of space. Maximising the outdoor expanse is critical to a school design that seeks to address increasing obesity rates and overcrowding. Utilising the sloping terrain of the site allows for level playgrounds and public parks to seamlessly enhance the community, whilst the layering of buildings into the contours creates public and private zones distanced by height and vegetation. Improved bicycle infrastructure in the form of lanes, shelter and storage encourages physical activity whilst reducing vehicular congestion at an urban scale. The school deeply considers the health of the community and simultaneously solves modern constraints. (R) Ashleigh Vissel, ‘Pixel’. Westmead Public School is the largest school in Australia,

CAPSTONE (PRECINCT)

with over 1,600 students. Westmead reflects the current climate of the built environment – the population grows, but the land does not grow with it. Increased high-density living means intake will continue to rise, further diminishing outdoor space to accommodate more classrooms. ‘Pixel’ responds with a modular system allowing for a theoretically infinite number of classrooms, without compromising outdoor space. The system creates terrace spaces, where students can learn en plein air, with modular interiors to suit the broad scope of the curriculum. The structure reflects a built pedagogy, with the concept derived from toys, a theme reflected throughout the design, where children learn through exposure to their surrounding environments

2019

TOMAS DELANEY


77

TOMAS DELANEY

SYDNEY SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE, DESIGN AND PLANNING

2019

CAPSTONE (BUILDING)


78

SYDNEY SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE, DESIGN AND PLANNING

(L) Sabrina Pasic, ‘Vertical Village’. ‘Vertical Village’ is a modern high-rise primary school that overcomes obstacles of high density population by an adventurous architectural solution. Differing from existing monolithic high-rise schooling developments, ‘Vertical Village’ focuses on reflecting the contextual community within its design by appropriating typologies and morphologies of its local surroundings, creating and promoting interaction and play in a “lifeless community”. It further encompasses design elements shaping and challenging stereotypical classroom layout, while subconsciously improving the mental health and mental growth of school children. (R) Sarah Carr, ‘The Last Village in the City’. In a

CAPSTONE (BUILDING)

gentle unfolding, two buildings form an embrace. One classroom becomes two, two become four, and an intimate courtyard reveals itself. The structure, mirrored, forms a significant place of connection. Here one will find a path of play and curiosity, where a child explores both towards and away from their surrounds. An interplay is encouraged through movement and expressed through form. Inspired by the conceptual drivers of a traditional village formation, the site is divided into year groups nestling alongside this flowing path. Each village has its own central communal space, yet differs in its structural expression, an embrace from the smallest to the largest of settings. 2019

WILLIAM MCKEE


79

WILLIAM MCKEE

SYDNEY SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE, DESIGN AND PLANNING

2019

CAPSTONE (BUILDING)


80

(L) Calvin Yeung, ‘Modulus Foldaway Campus’. On Earth we are experiencing unprecedented and transformative change in the way we design and build our cities. Architects are increasingly being called upon to design and create new multi-story urban residential buildings using modular techniques. Designing a modular concept requires a logical thinking process at a conceptual level. The building seeks to create a sustainable modular school building prototype at MJ Bennett Reserve, Westmead, Paramatta to tackle the problem of overcrowding at Westmead Primary School with the continuous increase of students. Likewise, questions that should be asked include the following: Can modularity really be a tool for urban revitalisation? Can this concept be adaptable to a range of

0002:1 elacS

CAPSTONE (BUILDING)

0002:1 elacS

0002:1 elacS

0002:1 elacS

0002:1 elacS

0002:1 elacS

0002:1 elacS

0002:1 elacS

0002:1 elacS

0002:1 elacS 0002:1 elacS

0002:1 elacS

0002:1 elacS

00000022:1:1eelalaccSS

0002:1 elacS

0002:1 elacS

0002:1 elacS

SYDNEY SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE, DESIGN AND PLANNING

climates? Will the widespread adoption of modular architecture eventually lead to homogenisation and dull uniformity? (R) Lana Laureles, ‘Jannnawi Nura’. The phrase ‘Jannnawi Nura’ is a mixture of Dharug and Dharawal dialects from the Eora and Tharawal people of Australia. It translates to “for me, for you” (jannnawi) and “place” or “country” (nura), signifying a long history of connection between people and the land on which they reside. This connection has evolved, with a variety of cultures making up Australia’s multicultural society and co-existence. Jannnawi Nura resonates especially with Westmead’s urban renewal, with a variety of cultures, people and activities coming together to use the space as one community, a melting pot of diversity. Jannnawi, it’s for me, for you. 2019

KARUNYA SUBRAMANIAM


81

KARUNYA SUBRAMANIAM

SYDNEY SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE, DESIGN AND PLANNING

2019

CAPSTONE (PRECINCT)


82

SYDNEY SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE, DESIGN AND PLANNING

(L) Bernadette Balatbat, ‘Rekindle’. Set in the suburb of Westmead, this project looks to utilise the proposed school grounds and its surroundings as a catalyst for stronger community connection. The vision towards a more prominent town centre is achieved by rejuvenating and enhancing existing areas along the main artery running through Westmead – Hawkesbury Road. Here, a vibrant journey is established between the public realm and immediate school grounds that contains shared areas for the local community. While creating a vibrant and well-connected suburb, the school prioritises family-friendly and child engaging design as a means to ultimately rekindle community spirit. (R) Marwan Mohamed, ‘Neo-Populous’. The whole isn’t greater than the sum of its parts.

CAPSTONE (PRECINCT)

The sum of the parts in nexus invents the whole. ‘Neo-Populous’ is a conceptual framework envisioned for the Westmead area. The concept presents the school site as the focal point of a bustling, newly urbanised region which constitutes a variety of interventions extending as far as distant corners of the Westmead area and further into the Parramatta area. This builds a functional bond with the Parramatta central region through presently activated paths of access that ensure added urban value, equity and inclusivity for the diverse users. ‘Neo-Populous’ is the evolved spirit of Westmead: nurtured, retained and fortified under the threat of a rapidly urbanising Sydney that is in a ‘No-Quarter’ combat with gentrification and identity. 2019

KARUNYA SUBRAMANIAM


83

KARUNYA SUBRAMANIAM

SYDNEY SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE, DESIGN AND PLANNING

2019

CAPSTONE (PRECINCT)


84

SYDNEY SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE, DESIGN AND PLANNING

Bachelor of Architecture and Environments Somwrita Sarkar Tutors Eduardo Barata Tomas Delaney William McKee Karunya Subramaniam Sarah Abu Dareb Kai Adair Jerika Mai Alarilla Nadine Alirani Luke Cotsford John Austin Bernadette Lorraine Balatbat Ruksaar Begum Anthony Paul Bucciarelli Auguste Juliana Campbell Harrison James Campbell Sarah Ellen Carr Max Mintae Cha Nonthaporn Chaipatamanont Zhenming Chen Yee Lai Ian Chow Matthew Pak Ho Chung Liam Nelson Coe David Danyal Harrison Colin Dumesich Eleni Emvalomas David Finneran Mathew Fortunato Vincent Dominic Ondus Gabut Portia Evangelia Georgouras Shen Wern Guan Cigdem Guven

Jacinta Habib Jasmine Jahani Yuanyuan Jiang Rebecca Ellen Jones Lana Alethea Laureles Jiaxin Li Ava Li Raphael Li Aiwen Liang Esther Nathania Liem Ziyan Liu Chunlei Liu Yishan Lu Zihang Luo Aaina Malik Juthamas Edith Marsh Hollie Mathew Vibhavari Tripta Meghnad Marwan Ibrahim Hussein Mohamed Nur Harita Binte Mohd Tahir Rachel Murray Neha Charnelle Narayan Kae Ozawa Aksh Palan Sabrina Pasic Esha Tushar Patkar

2019

Gabrielle Maria Pavicic Ying Yi Peng Georgie Pulham Shristi Sainani Shababa Salim Elvaretta Sentana Thomas Barry Simmons Rachelle Succar Thisana Sutanujinda Ebony Temira Kennedy Syron Stephanie Tanevski Sin Yu Tsui Anastasia Uricher Ashleigh Rika Vissel Francois Visser Xinyu Wang Xiao Wei Yilan Xiong Peter George Yates Ka Shing Yeh Chi Hung Calvin Yeung Ruihan Yu Matthew Zanon Shilin Zheng Natasha Jessica Zhong


85

SYDNEY SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE, DESIGN AND PLANNING

External contributors and guest critics Chris Kuehl, FJMT Zie Liu, Woods Baggot Lynn Masuda, USYD Ben Muir, USYD and Big Kahuna Imagineering Marini Samaratunga, UNSW

2019


86

SYDNEY SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE, DESIGN AND PLANNING

HONOURS

INDEX 2019


87

SYDNEY SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE, DESIGN AND PLANNING

2019

‘Waterloo Retained’ Katie Hubbard


88

SYDNEY SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE, DESIGN AND PLANNING

Waterloo

A study of built form preservation and its effect on neighbourhood

Retained

Katie Hubbard Supervisor: Sandra Löschke What value do existing built form have within cities? And what is “...the role of the physical environment in shaping social processes over time”?1 Through analysis of contemporary scholarship on the preservation of modern architecture, a critique of townscape visual planning will establish the Waterloo Retained hypothesis: built form preservation (as opposed to total demolition and new development) has an important positive social aesthetic effect on neighbourhood and community.

[which] is essential to maintaining a dynamic flexibility necessary to keep an urban neighbourhood thriving.”2

Establishing a position of antiurban-obsolescence this thesis will investigate these instances through analysis of Waterloo Public Housing, Sydney, and its proposed demolition as part of the New South Wales Government’s Waterloo Estate urban renewal redevelopment (2018). This case study will be used to critique the “diversity of physical form, especially the gradual repurposing, reconstruction, and infilling of existing properties,

1

2019

Waterloo Retained has intent to provide a contemporary framework through an established understanding of townscape visual planning to better understand the short and long-term implications of blank-slate, mixed-use development on existing and future residing communities in Waterloo, Sydney. Sampson, R. .J. and Morenoff, J.D., “Ecological perspectives on the neighbourhood context of poverty and social organisation: past and present”, in: G.J. Duncan, J. Brooks-Gunn and J.L. Aber (Eds) Neighbourhood Poverty: Context and Consequences for Children: Volume 2: Policy Implication in Studying Neighbourhoods, (New York: Russel Sage Foundation Press, 1997), 3 2 King, Katherine, “Jane Jacobs and ‘The Need for Aged Buildings’: Neighbourhood Historical Development Pace and Community Social Relations,” Urban Studies 50, (Urban Studies Journal Limited, 2013), 2414


89

SYDNEY SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE, DESIGN AND PLANNING

Rethinking

Xiaoxi Tammy Tan Supervisor: Dr Paolo Stracchi

Architectural Potential

of Relief Perspective

The research investigates the history and theory of relief perspective illusions, with the aim of provoking thought about contemporary architectural applications. Although powerful and inspiring, relief perspective ceased to be an architectural design tool after the Renaissance. The thesis aims to fill the gap between contemporary architectural practice and the centuried theory. By examining the design intents and resultant geometrical formulation of built relief perspectives in ancient architectural applications, archetypes

emerge. Here the examples are: Teatro Olimpico in Vicenza (15801585); colonnade in Palazzo Spada (1652-1653); Scala Regia in Vatican City (1663- 1666) From that, new spatial prototypes are derived and experimented with, both digitally and physically for enriched architectural realisation and experience. Finally, the graduation design will be demonstrated as an application of the derived prototypes with their potential, limitation and adjustment discussed when being confronted with the contemporary situation of an actual design project.

V3

V4

I4

I3

V2 V1

V2

V3

V4

I4

I3

I2

V1

2019

I2

I1


90

SYDNEY SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE, DESIGN AND PLANNING

A Return

Marion Mahony Griffin’s interpretation of the Australian landscape

to Nature

Layla Stanley Supervisor: Simon Weir This thesis will examine the distinct architectural drawing practice of Marion Mahony Griffin through an exploration of her attachment to the Japanese Ukiyo-e Print. After becoming the second woman to graduate from Massachusetts Institute of Technology she famously worked under Frank Lloyd Wright at his Oak Park studio, where she developed a distinguished architectural drawing style, which was influenced by the spread of Japonism and more specifically the Japanese Ukiyo-e Prints Frank Lloyd Wright collected.1 Historically it has been difficult to consider Marion’s work on its own due to her professional ties to Frank Lloyd Wright and marriage to Walter Burley Griffin. However, her work is being seen in a new light with the release of literature such as Marion Mahony Griffin: Drawing the Form of Nature which acknowledges the influence of the Japanese art form over her work.2 A deeper critical analysis of the drawing techniques Marion borrowed or appropriated from the Japanese artists will be undertaken in this thesis, through a consideration of 2019

Marion Griffin’s Forest Portrait Series in adjacency to Hiroshige’s One Hundred Famous Views of Edo. The technical analysis will inform how Marion Griffin’s unique interpretation of the exotic Australian bush landscape was developed along with the binary approach to architecture and nature established in her architectural design ethos. Consequently the paired exploration offers a fresh appreciation of her brilliant images and persuasive and meaningful aesthetic style. 1

Deborah Wood, Marion Mahony Griffin Drawing the Form of Nature, (Evanston,Illnois : the Mary and Leigh Block Museum of Art and North Western Universtiy Press, 2005) 6 2 Ibid (L) Utagawa Hiroshige I , 1856, The Armorhanging Pine at Hakkeizaka (Hakkeizaka Yoroikakematsu), from the series One Hundred Famous Views of Edo (Meisho Edo hyakkei), Woodblock print (nishiki-e); ink and color on paper, 35.7 x 24.5 cm, Museum of Fine Arts Boston (R) Marion Mahoney Griffin, mid 1920’s, No.6 Angophora Lanceolata/ A Castlecrag Home in a Castlecrag Gully, Pen and Black Ink on Drafting Linen, 36 x 18 inches, Magic of America, NewYork Historical Society images


91

SYDNEY SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE, DESIGN AND PLANNING

The House

An architectural exposition of homeless femininity

and Her Hauntings

Anastasia Pitt Supervisor: Ross Anderson Architecture and, more specifically, manifestations of the ‘home’ may be understood as the ultimate spatialisation of the collective human condition. This dissertation examines the work of Virginia Woolf, a feminist author and academic who interrogated the idea of gendered domesticity within the domain of literature. Through a reading of Sigmund Freud’s Das Unheimlich (1919) and Lars Lerup’s Planned Assaults on the single-family house of Postmodern America, this dissertation will seek to identify

2019

the ghost of deconstructive theory obscured within the pages of Woolf’s literary body, in order to present an architectural exposition of feminine “homelessness” within the modern era. Through the vehicles of psychoanalysis, architecture and literature, this investigation will locate woman within the precarious infrastructure of the modern unhomely and its associated spatial linguistics, to further examine the contextual dislocation and tentative reclamation of a ‘homeless’ Western femininity.


92

SYDNEY SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE, DESIGN AND PLANNING

Revitalisation of The case of

urban villages in the Nantou village

the urban milieu

Guangen Li Supervisor: Arianna Brambilla Nantou village is located in the Nanshan District, one of four Special Economic Zones (SEZ) in Shenzhen, and is surrounded by important business districts, i.e., Shenzhen High-tech Industrial Campus and Qianhai Shenzhen-Hong Kong Modern Service Industry Cooperation Zone. In such a situation, Nantou Village, surrounded by two important economic development zones, is bound to garner more interest from people in the near future. The study looks to provide a solution to revitalising Nantou village, by 2019

maintaining the existing character and feel, instead of demolishing the village and replacing it with new buildings. Three community centers are proposed in the inner residential blocks for the benefit of inner city areas located in the Chunjing Park, northeast and southeast of the village. As per the observations from these residential areas, three representative activities and elements are concluded, i.e., street living room, step platform, and three-wheel motorcycles. The proposal will be driven by dwellers’ daily life and respect for their living habits.


93

SYDNEY SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE, DESIGN AND PLANNING

Reading

An exploration of pedestrian circulation in Sydney through space, movement, event and history

Public Space

Jack Storch Supervisor: Catherine Lassen The way that architects and urban designers read the city is important. Modes of drawing can serve as lenses for describing public space. Given the recent interest in urban consolidation and pedestrianisation within the City of Sydney, this study explores a reading of public pedestrian circulation, one informed by two major architectural theorists: Bernard Tschumi and Aldo Rossi. Four key public spaces within the Sydney Central Business District will be investigated. An initial exploration of Tschumi’s Parc de la Villette is used to contextualise discussions regarding deconstruction within architectural discourse on diagramming. A series of maps at

2019

the same urban scale, locates the discussion by tracing the historical evolution of Sydney with reference to significant networks such as rail, water, vehicular and pedestrian movement. Rossi’s theory of urban artefacts provides further historical background. This reading of public pedestrian experience within the Sydney CBD seeks a mode of documentation that combines historical study with analysis through drawing. Exploratory modes of description that trace ‘space’, ‘movement’, ‘event’ and ‘history’ are used to suggest aspects of public pedestrian circulation, searching for an enriched perception and understanding of the nominated precincts.


94

SYDNEY SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE, DESIGN AND PLANNING

INTENSIVE

STUDIOS 2019


95

SYDNEY SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE, DESIGN AND PLANNING

The Freswind School Project 2019


96

SYDNEY SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE, DESIGN AND PLANNING

The Freswind

Travelling Workshop – Vanuatu Winter Intensive Michael Muir

Students Mai Alarilla Wessam Bakkour Poppy Brown Stephanie Dodd Elsa Feng Maddie Gallagher Angus Gregg John Heok Suh Kevin Hwang Mouhamed Kbar Faith Kennerley Rachel Liang Gabriella Lindsay Ned Love Lauren Maley Juthamas Marsh Chloe McArthur Leanne Meng Harry Murdoch Emma O’brien Lisa Xiao-lei Shao Noah Soderlund Camille Symonds Rain Tone Wu Kimberly Ye Jinrui Zhang

Severe Tropical Cyclone Pam hit the South Pacific in March of 2015, and is regarded as one of the worst natural disasters in the history of Vanuatu. In 2016, the University of Sydney was contacted to help with the relocation of around ninety families squatting on land within the water catchment area of the capital of Vanuatu, Port Vila.

Builders Keith March Denis Ruest Craig Scow Freswind Community

The students arrived in Vanuatu in two groups, each spending two weeks on site building and spending time with the community. With the help of local community members and their machetes, the first group cleared the site and dug trenches. They cut, bent, tied and assembled steel reinforcement cages and poured concrete into trenches forming the step footings of the cyclone proof classroom.

Vanuatu Government Joseph Lagoiala Hon. Ralph Regenvanu

In early 2017, a keen group of students and staff visited the Freswind community where a school was set as the most important priority – a community building that they could all be proud of. The project progressed in 2018 with the Tin Sheds Gallery Exhibition, The Freswind School Project Book along with many cake stalls. This year, 26 students were involved in the preparation and construction of the first stage of the school. The students spent the semester learning about Vanuatu culture and language as well as continuing to fundraise and promote the project within the school and beyond. The crowd funding goal of $30,000 was reached and the students raised a further $10,000.

The second group arrived a few days later to build a low concrete block wall which involved mixing mortar and carrying, cutting and laying blocks. As a parting gift, the students painted the side of the site shed with the project name. This attracted a lot of kids in the community, which reinforced the purpose of the project as a place of diversity and unity. This project was supported by the Australian Government New Colombo Plan. A special thank you to Michael Muir, Christina Rita, Keith March and Denis Ruest.

School Project 2019


97

SYDNEY SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE, DESIGN AND PLANNING

2019


98

SYDNEY SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE, DESIGN AND PLANNING

2019


99

SYDNEY SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE, DESIGN AND PLANNING

2019


100

SYDNEY SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE, DESIGN AND PLANNING

Critical

Travelling Workshop – Paris Winter Intensive Catherine Lassen

Students Matthew Asimakis Timothy Bauer Liat Busqila James Feng Emily Flanagan Gracie Grew Max Jefferys Nina McDonald Mackenzie Nix Caitlin Roseby Janelle Woo Nick Woolley

This week-long workshop, Critical Distance, invited students to consider both conceptual and actual distance in identifying strategies employed within significant modern architectural works in Paris. Conducted in collaboration with Ecole nationale supérieure d’architecture de Paris-Belleville, time was divided between field studies and work in the studio. Students critically researched and precisely documented one aspect of a selected work from a series of four key visited buildings: - Maison du Peuple (1935-39) Prouvé w/ Beaudouin & Lods; - Centre Pompidou, Beaubourg (1974-77) Piano & Rogers; - Fondation Cartier pour l’art contemporain (1994) Jean Nouvel; and - Palais de Tokyo (2001-2012) Lacaton & Vassal re-designed (originally 1937) structure. Selected for their architectural and urban ambitions as well as for their technological, programmatic and spatial interest in the glass skin enclosure, the examples traced ideas of modernity from the 1930s to the present day. All four works dealt with an intersection between architecture and art. Using measured architectural drawings and collage techniques, student studies identified fragments through which they developed individual approaches toward the theme critical distance. Each student constructed a lens through architectural attributes such as patina, lightness, historical and political reflections etc. Located within close readings that situated the selected building in conceptual, cultural and urban contexts, studies were extended to test such strategies for speculative reappropriation in contemporary Sydney. The program was possible due to generous support from the Hezlet Bequest. Special thanks are due to ADP Dean Robyn Dowling and at ENSA de Paris-Belleville, Françoise Fromonot, Paul Gresham and Odile Canale.

Distance 2019


101

SYDNEY SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE, DESIGN AND PLANNING

Caitlin Roseby

Mackenzie Nix 2019


102

SYDNEY SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE, DESIGN AND PLANNING

2019


103

SYDNEY SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE, DESIGN AND PLANNING

Liat Busqila

2019


104

SYDNEY SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE, DESIGN AND PLANNING

Let Every Voice

Studio 2B Semester 2 2019 Michael Muir We have been trying something new in the second year studio in the Bachelor of Design (Architecture) over the last two years. The students choose between six different projects related closely through theme and scale, but each with a different client group and site. Each studio is firmly founded on cultural understanding and principles of ethical design. Each also seeks to place the lives of people at the centre of architectural design. Tutors Michael Mossman Anna Ewald Rice

Burri Gummin: One Fire The aim of this design studio was to develop appropriate and sustainable housing solutions for members of the Yarrabah community. This project is a reaction to the ongoing housing crisis in Yarrabah Aboriginal Shire, and the current unsatisfactory ‘one size fits all’ approach to housing for Indigenous people. Students reflecting upon their own stories, before engaging in an immersive cultural experience, were able to explore a process of reciprocal cultural exchange and a heightening of cultural difference.

Tutors Richard Briggs Sue Harper

Housing for Health in Regional NSW The Housing for Health studio was based in regional NSW. The task was to design a multi generational house for three local Aboriginal families living together. We had a real site in Guyra and a client, Pauline Ale and her family. Pauline is the property manager of the local Land Council and we were able to meet with her and visit one of the council’s properties. The visit to Guyra provided a great opportunity to present and test the initial design ideas in a real life setting. The visit also helped the students to get to know each other and to therefore provide better support for each other throughout the semester.

Tutors Nathan Etherington Georgia Forbes-Smith

Be Heard 2019

Evolve Community Housing Our studio collaborated with Evolve Community Housing whose focus is the provision of public housing in western Sydney. The students visited Evolve’s offices in Parramatta and were introduced to the challenges and realities of providing public housing in New South Wales. The projects that emerged from the studio were extremely varied in medium density housing type and tenant demographic, providing a rich collection of work. The student’s work demonstrated the potential for architecture to provide a platform for community development amongst some of Sydney’s most vulnerable citizens.


105

SYDNEY SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE, DESIGN AND PLANNING

2019

Tutors Lisa King Tara Sydney

Empowering Design: Studio Housing in the Inner West The fastest growing demographic of homeless people in Australia today is older women and with a rapidly ageing population, housing for this vulnerable group is an essential focus. This studio offered our students an opportunity to understand and interpret the needs of those at risk and to design an environment which could not only house but empower one of these communities. Working on an actual site with input from current housing providers and industry experts, students have developed insights into the housing needs of those who have experienced discrimination and disadvantage and have developed built environments which encourage connection, dignity and respect.

Tutors Emma Leckie Ellie Gutman

Social Design Responsibility: Working with Vulnerable Communities Our studio was centred on developing housing for five families living in a community affected by Leprosy and flooding in Ahmedabad, India. The design brief was based on a real project by local architecture firm, Sealab, in conjunction with an NGO, Manav Sadhna. While volunteering as architects with The Anganwadi Project in Ahmedabad, we were inspired by Sealab’s community driven approach to this project, and the practical, beautiful houses that resulted, and got to know the principal Architect, Anand Sonecha. During the studio, the students had the opportunity to interact directly with Anand and local architects by video, and to ask questions of the local community, forming and interrogating design decisions based on genuine need.

Tutors John Roberts Owen Kelly

Affordable Student Housing: Newcastle Our Affordable Student Housing studio was tasked with housing 36 university students in a sustainable urban dwelling prototype in Wickham, inner Newcastle. On our site visit we met beside the Hunter before surveying the project site, a wrecker’s yard surrounded by older houses and new apartment towers. Two young Newcastle architects showed us their renovated apartments, a rare glimpse of living and fine work that focussed the project for many. The encounter with Newcastle cemented the project in our senses and minds, provoked a new awareness of the responsibilities of architecture, and helped transform an array of nervous individuals into an intent group of positive, curious, designers alert to fresh concerns of society, environment and place.


106

SYDNEY SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE, DESIGN AND PLANNING

Social Design Responsibility Sealab, Manav Sadhna and De Montfort University

Housing for Health in Regional NSW

2019


107

SYDNEY SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE, DESIGN AND PLANNING

Burri Gummin: One Fire

Housing for Health in Regional NSW

2019


108

SYDNEY SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE, DESIGN AND PLANNING

Hexbox

Code to Production Elective Eduardo De Oliveira Barata Christopher Robeller Valentino Tagliaboschi Felix-Schmidt Kleespies

DMaF Staff Lynn Masuda Rodney Watt Students Muneeb Ahmed Carla Alkhouri Nazgol Asadi Minh Au Philip Becker Benedikt Blumenröder Michael Calarco Michael Connolly Guobin Dai Dominik Diehl Joseph Emmi Ziyun Gao Satoshi Hoshino Alvin Hui Geun Mo Kim Florian Lapport Jian Howe Lee Jingwei Li Sarah Lutgen Albert Marhoffer Jan Neklapil Khoa Nguyen Chaoran Ni Liezl Pajarin Manuel Scheib Wenxi Shi Anna Specchio William Stephenson Haochen Sun Ernest Sun Prudence Tang Christian Tsitsos Victoria Vuong Iridia Xanthou Industry Sponsorship Lamello SA PMI Engineers (Thomas Williams) Carter Holt Harvey Plywood

Canopy 2019

The Hexbox Canopy was undertaken as an intensive workshop collaboration between University of Sydney School of Architecture, Design and Planning and TU Kaiserslautern. The canopy is based on a funicular shell geometry which essentially achieves an equilibrium state of form through corresponding loads constrained by a given boundary. Typically, these types of structures might use a triangle to form the surface subdivision but, in this case, the design used a hexagon shape which changed its boundary depending on whether the structure was convex or concave. The timber shell is made exclusively of plywood components without the addition of any kind of metal fasteners for the main loadbearing structure and consists of 204 boxes and 508 connectors. All the hollow polygonal segments that form the boxes are mitred and glued. Once all of the boxes are assembled it is extremely quick to construct without formwork or prior expert knowledge. For its size (64sqm) the structure is exceptionally lightweight and can easily be disassembled when required. Each timber box consists of 8 plates – a top and bottom face and 6 sides glued together. Totaling 1531 plates, these were nested over 125 19mm plywood sheets. As each box contains a varying offset edge and all side plates containing mitred joints with individual dihedral angles the fabrication required more than the average 3 axis milling machine. Fabrication was therefore carried out on the school’s Kuka KR120 6 axis robot, which has been fitted with a spindle and cutting tool. All the mitred joints were connected with the Lamello Tenso P14 system, for quick and easy assembly. The project neatly demonstrated the power of collaboration between two universities using cutting edge parametric software and fabrication techniques with the support of industry to produce ultra-precise timber elements forming a large-scale canopy. The lightweight plywood structure further demonstrates a new ‘plug & play’ system for rapid on-site assembly and disassembly of complex timber plate shells with no mechanical fixing.


109

SYDNEY SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE, DESIGN AND PLANNING

2019

Photo credit Katherine Lu


110

SYDNEY SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE, DESIGN AND PLANNING

Photo credit Katherine Lu

2019


111

SYDNEY SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE, DESIGN AND PLANNING

Photo credit Katherine Lu

2019


112

SYDNEY SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE, DESIGN AND PLANNING

TIN SHEDS

GALLERY 2019


113

SYDNEY SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE, DESIGN AND PLANNING

2019

Designed in Italy, Made in Australia exhibition


114

SYDNEY SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE, DESIGN AND PLANNING

Designed in Italy,

Discovering the Australian work of Pier Luigi Nervi

Made in Australia

11 July – 7 September 2019 Curated by Dr Paolo Stracchi Pier Luigi Nervi (1891–1979) was a structural engineer but also a revolutionary Italian master builder, architect and artist, who forged, through the invention of the Sistema Nervi – Nervi System, a new structural aesthetic for modern architecture. His pioneering system was adopted all around the world to build some of his most famous buildings: the Rome Olympic Palasports, the Cathedral of Saint Mary of the Assumption in San Francisco, the Field House at Dartmouth College in the USA, and many others. In Australia, the Sistema Nervi was for the first time adopted with the construction of the Australia Square Tower, designed by Harry Seidler. The 2019

success of the famous circular tower led to a fruitful collaboration that lasted for more than 15 years. The exhibition will shed light on unexpected affinities between the Italian and Australian construction industries, Roman and Milanese precedents used in modern Sydney, and an unlikely connection between an Italian factory and a revered Australian skyscraper. This exhibition will pay tribute to the two men and their shared Australian legacy, casting light on its unexpected Italian affinities and celebrating it into the future.


115

SYDNEY SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE, DESIGN AND PLANNING

Fusions of

Australian Architects in Asia, 1950s-80s

Horizons

11 July – 7 September 2019 Curated by Dr. Amit Srivastava and Associate Professor Cole Roskam Fusion of Horizons is the story of five pioneering architects from Australia who travelled throughout Asia in the post-war years and fundamentally contributed to the architecture and design of the continent. These figures existed at the centre of an array of intellectual, professional, and business networks, and their architectural work collectively defined an aesthetic now readily identified with Asia. The exhibition incorporates a range of objects and images from private archives located across three continents to present a narrative tapestry of intersecting encounters and professional pursuits. Private letters, diary entries, ethnographic research 2019

and documentation contribute to the story of this fusion of horizons, culminating in an array of spectacular architectural drawings and models that convey shared approaches to materiality and tectonics decades in the making. Framed by the unique sociopolitical context of post-colonial Asia, the exhibit will map for the viewer the various pilgrimage, recreational travel, ethnographic, and migratory routes of these individuals in an effort to show how travel inspired the evolution of an array of architectural styles commonly identified with Asia, and found in tourist hotels and infrastructure from Bali to Beijing.


116

SYDNEY SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE, DESIGN AND PLANNING

New Agency:

How old will you grow?

Owning Your Future

1 March – 4 May 2019 Curated by Sibling Architecture How will you grow old? Can you live forever? What kind of ancestor do you want to be? Will your house outlive you? The twenty-first century has ushered in a longevity revolution with the life expectancy of human beings almost doubling in the last hundred years made possible by healthier lifestyles and improved medical care. This is echoed in Australia, which has one of the highest life expectancies in the world. The ageing of the population has seen the demographics of Australian society changing: one-fifth of its population will be over 65 by 2053. The extension of life has also seen a new age category of over-85s emerging. This puts pressure on the wider community to address the varying experiences of our elders 2019

around issues of civic participation, medical care, pensions, public space, entertainment, accessibility, employment and housing. New Agency: Owning Your Future is a design research project that poses these questions. Taking the form of a public investigation, the audience is a participant in Sibling Architecture’s research within the gallery to examine and discuss the futures of dwelling through the lens of an ageing population. Visitors engage with a series of activities within Tin Sheds Gallery: exploring precedents on a spinning lazy Susan, a guided meditation, and sketching out their desires via a survey. This exhibition was a part of the Sydney Design Festival.


117

SYDNEY SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE, DESIGN AND PLANNING

Departures

10 October – 27 November 2019 Curated by Christina Rita With over 60 students exhibiting works from 31 different countries, the selection presents pieces captured by students whilst travelling as part of international studios, study abroad and exchange, and overseas research projects. Every image evokes the unique student experience of being immersed in the architecture, design and urban cultures that exist abroad.

2019

2019


118

SYDNEY SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE, DESIGN AND PLANNING

STUDENT

EXCELLENCE 2019


119

SYDNEY SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE, DESIGN AND PLANNING

2019

2019 Architects Medallion Sarah Mae-Siew Yap


120

SYDNEY SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE, DESIGN AND PLANNING

Awards, Prizes

Undergraduate Prizes and Scholarships

Postgraduate Prizes and Scholarships

NSW Architects Registration Board

Henry J Cowan Prize in Architectural Science (Undergraduate Architecture) Junhyung Hwang Connor Samuel Chieh-Han Tan

Bates Smart Prize for Architectural Design Katie Hubbard

2019 Architects Medallion Sarah Mae-Siew Yap

Conrad Gargett Scholarship Katherine Huang

NSW Student Architecture Awards

Leslie Wilkinson Prize in Architectural History and Theory Chris Koustoubardis Cox Architecture Scholarship Junhyung Hwang Noel Chettle Memorial Prize 2D Processes - Shiqi Han, Emily Malek, William Stephenson 3D Processes - Shayla Nguyen, Si Lang Ryan Cai, Ophelia Paroissien Centenary Anti-Realism Student Competition Junhyung Hwang Kangyun Kim John Stephen Mansfield Prize in Urban Design and Planning Matthew Giles Burnham Prize in Urban Planning and Architecture Tahnia Zara Allauddin Elizabeth Munro Prize in Architecture Chris Koustoubardis Arthur Baldwinson Memorial Prize in Architectural History and Theory Nicholas James Woolley

James Hartley Bibby Memorial Scholarship in Architectural Design Mackenzie Robert Nix Ruskin Rowe Prize for Architecture Sarah Mae-Siew Yap Sir John Sulman Prize in Architectural Design Lewis Evans Bluescope Lysaght Prize in Architectural Design Lewis Evans C H L Turner Memorial Prize in Architectural Design Kevin Heng George McRae Prize in Architectural Construction Sarah Mae-Siew Yap Ethel M Chettle Prize in Architecture Sarah Mae-Siew Yap Matthew Geoffrey Bolton Anna Erica Ewald-Rice Cassandra Amrita Lal-Teerman Sunlord Perpetual Prize in Architectural Design Gloria Ngoc Tran Ha Henry J Cowan Prize in Architectural Science (Graduate Architecture) Nicholas Bucci Douglas Arthur Shane Hamersley

and Scholarships 2019

NSW Undergraduate Medal – Commendation Domain Arts Sasha Tatham Graduate of the Year – Master’s Program Sarah Mae-Siew Yap Graduate of the Year – Bachelor’s Program Chris Koustoubardis History and Theory Prize Mitchell Tran Construction and Practice Prize Nicholas Bucci and Jong-Oh Won MADE by the Opera House 2019 Recipients Billie-Grace Dunk Nicholas Bucci Josephine Nicholas


121

SYDNEY SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE, DESIGN AND PLANNING

unveil 2019 Architecture Graduate Exhibition Logo Lillian Xiao

2019


122

SYDNEY SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE, DESIGN AND PLANNING

The Sounding Waves’

Sculpture by the Sea 2019 24 October - 10 November Gabriella Boyd and Chloe Henry-Jones

A site-specific work made in consultation with the University of Sydney, The Sounding Waves’ Translucent Light hid a light, from which a beam of light emanated, in an existing channel within Bondi’s rocks. Referencing the colour of light emitted from neighbouring houses and following the edge of an intermittently revealed rock shelf aligned to the breaking waves, the work was sensitive towards the landscape, beginning to make itself known only at dusk and slowly growing in presence as the sun set. The beam of light, which changed appearance according to the sun, tides and qualities of the ocean and weather, as well as the recipient’s position in public space, was set just above the high tide mark and acted as a datum from which the tides could be read. During low tide, the distance between the beam and the ocean’s surface was at its greatest and only the lightest mists were caught by the light. During high tide, the beam appeared to hover just above the water’s surface, revealing the more powerful movements of the ocean. In this way, the sound of the ocean, which seemingly grew as the sun disappeared, was combined with a luminous visual score that grew louder and softer in response to the shifting tides. After the success of Sculpture by the Sea Bondi, a development of the artwork was selected for Sculpture by the Sea Cottesloe. Rearticulated as Sea Window, the project responds to the calmer waters and vivid sunsets of Cottesloe, Western Australia. A further investigation of the dynamic relationship between light, colour, air and water, the new work shines a palette of colours taken from the evening’s sunset onto the surface of the ocean, each night creating a new luminous painting of Cottesloe’s changing atmospheric conditions.

Translucent Light 2019


123

SYDNEY SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE, DESIGN AND PLANNING

Photo credit Henrique Fanti

2019

Photo credit Henrique Fanti


124

SYDNEY SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE, DESIGN AND PLANNING

OUR

The Sydney School of Architecture, Design and Planning would like to thank the following sponsors for their generosity in making the 2019 Architecture Graduate Exhibition and publication possible. Platinum NSW Architects Registration Board BLP Grimshaw Gold Allen Jack+Cottier Bates Smart Silver Architectus CHROFI i2C NBRS Architecture PTW Stockland Tonkin Zulaikha Greer Bronze Fox Johnston GCCV Make Architects TKD Architects Trotec Utz Sanby Architects Young Henrys

SPONSORS 2019


125

SYDNEY SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE, DESIGN AND PLANNING

CONGRATULATIONS to the graduates of the University of Sydney! We look forward to seeing you in the near future as you continue your journey toward registration.

Image: Boaz Nothman for the Sydney Architecture Festival 2019 2019


Austin Health Short Stay Observation Unit & Psychiatric Assessment and Planning Unit Austin Hospital, Victoria

At BLP, we design environments to inspire, engage + connect We’re Hiring - Students and Grads www.blp.com.au/opportunities E: opportunities@blp.com.au


Bates Smart would like to congratulate this year’s graduates. We are proud to support The University of Sydney Architecture Graduate Exhibition 2019.

batessmart.com batessmart.com/journal

Newmarket Green, Randwick

Pitt Street, Sydney

Workshop, Pyrmont

At AJ+C we believe in design that is

CREATIVE SUSTAINABLE INNOVATIVE in artistic, conceptual, technical and economic terms.

#architectsajc architectsajc.com

One30 Hyde Park, Sydney

Ace Hotel, Sydney


Silver Sponsors


Bronze Sponsors


Architectural Culture: New Perspectives 2019