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Celebrating Avnet’s 50th year on the New York Stock Exchange.

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flanked by les Avnet (middle) Founder/CEO Char th served bo o wh t, ne Av bert sons Lester and Ro their father. as Avnet CEO after

Roy Vallee

Chairman and CEO, Avnet

A Legacy of Industry Leadership Since the Avnet family started selling surplus radio parts in New York City in 1921, Avnet’s leaders and talented employees have defined what makes a world-class company. On December 15, 2010, Avnet will commemorate a milestone that only 350 other companies have ever achieved in the history of the New York Stock Exchange – we will celebrate our 50th anniversary on the NYSE. This milestone distinguishes Avnet as a premier company – one with global scale and scope, five decades of demonstrated adaptability, a strong global culture, and leading financial strength. It is these capabilities that

have allowed Avnet to grow consistently and profitably over time, and become the leader in technology distribution. Avnet would like to thank our 16,000 plus employees who have made our company so great, our trading partners who have placed their trust in us to deliver the highest service and value, our shareholders who invest in us as well as our business and community partners who work with us to help make the world a better place to live and work. We are proud of our legacy and look forward to achieving far more in the next 50 years than we can only imagine today!

View Avnet’s history on www.avnetondemand.com


What’s Inside

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Contact us :: editor@techconnectmag.com

In Every Issue 006 President’s Letter 008 Editor’s Letter 024 Science Foundation Arizona 026 The University of Arizona 028 Arizona State University 029 Northern Arizona University


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Shining Star t seems fitting in the Renewable Energy Issue of TechConnect I pay tribute to a shining star. No, I’m not talking about the source of solar energy. Rather, I’m talking about a “star” who actually is one of Arizona’s biggest supporters of the solar industry evolving in Arizona. She is U.S. Rep. Gabrielle Giffords. I was one of her many friends who rode a roller coaster of emotions on the day the horrific shootings claimed six lives and wounded Giffords among others in Tucson. And I’m one of the many across the country— both friends and people who have never even met her—who every day celebrate the strength and courage she demonstrates as she defies the odds to make it through her rigorous therapy toward recovery. Getting to know Gabby as I have, I’ve seen firsthand the effort and enthusiasm she has put into championing solar and other facets of the growing technology community. At a Councilsponsored forum several years ago, she shared her passion for solar as well as her vision of Arizona becoming the “Solarcon Valley.”

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It was more than just a day of grandstanding as more than a few politicians are known to do. Gabby’s a person of action. She launched a Community Solar Energy Initiative to garner support for widespread use of solar. She brought together an advisory council ranging from researchers to citizens so they can suggest ways solar can take hold in Arizona. Back in Washington, she has served on the House Science and Technology Committee, allowing her to push for America’s energy independence. Gabby has supported continuation of the solar investment tax credit while introducing the Solar Technology Roadmap Act that proposed dedicating more than $2 billion for solar research. She also has been vice chair of the sustainable energy and environment coalition. Gabby chaired the Space and Aeronautics Subcommittee, reflecting her commitment to the value of such exploration as the successful Phoenix Mars Mission, which established its mission control at The University of Arizona. Of course, it almost goes without saying that Gabby—wife of astronaut Mark Kelly—is one

of NASA’s biggest supporter. In this role, she also backs expansion of aviation research. She was a sponsor for reauthorization of the Competes Act, which was signed by President Barack Obama. This measure funds basic research funding as well the STEM initiative. As she said after the law was signed, “Preparing students in Arizona and across the nation for the 21st century means providing them with the best education possible in science, technology, engineering and mathematics.” Can you tell Gabby doesn’t let anything stand in her way? If a subject catches her interest, she studies it and asks questions until she is a near expert. I couldn’t ask for better ally. In the months ahead, Gabby undoubtedly will deal with challenges most of us can’t even imagine. But I know she will persevere. For now, I look forward to the day we see each other again.

Steven G. Zylstra

President & CEO, Arizona Technology Council


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Editor’s Letter

Publisher Steven G. Zylstra Editor Don Rodriguez Art Director Jim Nissen, Switch Studio Designers Chaidi Lobato Carla Rogers

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Contributing Writers William Bell Don Cardon Karen Dickinson Donna Haught Pati Urias Bruce A. Wright

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live in a subdivision at the far northern end of the Phoenix metro area. Like a lot of areas developed on the outskirts, my and my neighbors’ front yards are filled with rock and low-water use plants. After all, we live in the desert. But it’s the backyard that makes the difference for me. Step out the back door and you’re looking through an open-grate fence at a raw desert landscape with hills in the western horizon. On the nights that I make it home from work before dark, a beautiful sunset offers my own light show. The combination of sun and wind create variations of blues, purples, oranges and so on. In the summer, an intense sun beats down and desert winds blow strong—the blast furnace effect, as I like to call it. And still, I like it. These two natural forces constantly shape my life here. It’s no surprise to me that others in Arizona also recognize the power of the sun and wind. Only this time the creation of power, not colorful sunsets is the reason.

In this issue of TechConnect, we take a look at some of the individuals and organizations involved in the study, research and development of renewable energy. It’s probably no surprise that solar often came up in story development. And right behind it was wind.

From All Fronts Utility giants Arizona Public Service and Salt River project are using both to meet the needs of customers. Recession or no, they still need to prepare for the energy needs of a user base that will only grow. We offer a look at projects that already are online and some of the bigger ones yet to come. The state’s universities are busy looking at ways to harness the sun and the wind in new ways. But you’ll see they’re not stopping there. One is planting the seeds for a new generation to learn about the power of the wind. Another institution has created an umbrella arm to champion exploration of other forms, such as biofuels. All of this activity has resulted in attention from beyond our

borders. Learn why a Chinese group has reached out to partner with innovators from our state. Speaking of international interest, we are premiering a new column from attorney Karen Dickinson, who will offer insight into technology and other entrepreneurs can market to foreign customers. Also, the Arizona Science Teachers Association will share how K-12 teachers and their students are progressing in the science, technology, engineering and mathematics initiatives. This time you’ll see how they already understand the power of solar. This issue is by no means a catch-all of everyone’s efforts in renewable energy. There is only so much time and space to tell their stories. But it will give you a sense of what’s happening now and to come.

Don Rodriguez

Editor, TechConnect Magazine

Trademark // General Counsel Quinn Williams

E-mail editor@techconnectmag.com For queries or customer service, call 480-620-3759. TechConnect is published by the Arizona Technology Council, One Renaissance Square, 2 N. Central Ave., Suite 750, Phoenix, AZ 85004.

Entire contents copyright 2010, Arizona Technology Council. Reproduction in whole or in part without permission is prohibited. Products named in these pages are trade names or trademarks of their respective companies. TechConnect is a trademark of the Arizona Technology Council. All rights reserved. Publication of TechConnect is supported by private-sector businesses, and is not financed by state-appropriated funds.


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safety innovators

Honeywell is advancing flight safety through enhanced situational awareness. On the ground or in the air, getting more information to pilots is critical for the safe operation of aircraft. That’s why we strive to create safety systems that not only surround pilots with the key information they need – weather, traffic and terrain – but also integrate these innovations into lightweight, cost-effective platforms. From intuitive displays and predictive sensors to integrated avionics, Honeywell reduces pilot workload while enhancing situational awareness with proven automated advanced avionics solutions.

www.honeywell.com ©2010 Honeywell International Inc.

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As one of the most promising solar markets, Arizona is abundant with trade opportunities for both China and U.S.

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–Secretary General Sun Guangbin

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Writing by :: Don Rodriguez

“A journey of a thousand miles began with a single step.” his proverb attributed to the Chinese philosopher Lao Tzu couldn’t have been truer for a new relationship taking shape. Only this modern journey was more than 6,000 miles. Thanks to a delegation from Arizona traveling last year to Beijing, a Chinabased organization is interested in “green” technology developed here—especially when it comes to solar. “As one of the most promising solar markets, Arizona is abundant with trade opportunities for both China and U.S.,” says Sun Guangbin, secretary general of the China Council for the Promotion of Green Industry The U.S. last year joined the group of nations that have installed more than 1 gigawatts of solar energy capacity, notes Sun, and is expected to be one of the leading global markets by 2015. Last year also was when a group from the then-Arizona Department of

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Commerce traveled to Beijing to visit the solar photovoltaic products branch of the China Chamber of Commerce for Import and Export of Machinery and Electronic Products (CCCME). That signaled the start of a “healthy and stable relationship” with Commerce, which has become the Arizona Commerce Authority, Sun says.

Importance of Arizona The CCCME established the China Council for the Promotion of Green Industry (CCPGI) as that country’s longterm platform for domestic and foreign enterprises of green industry to exchange and share relevant information. CCPGI officials view a relationship with Arizona as helping enhance the development of domestic and foreign green industry. The connection to the state also helps promote exchanges within a Sino-U.S. green industry and green economic circle, Sun says.

One way is the establishment of a U.S. branch of CCPGI. Steven G. Zylstra, president and CEO of the Arizona Technology Council, is one of its founders. He said he became involved to help further bridge connections between our countries with the hope it would lead to new opportunities for our members in the green space.” The group is looking for additional members in Arizona. Best suited for involvement are any enterprises active in green industries or are open to developing products for green energy or green industry. “Companies working in solar energy, wind energy, nuclear energy and so on are especially welcome,” Sun says. Meanwhile, a delegation representing what is now called the Arizona Commerce Authority was scheduled to return to China in late February. This time the destination was Shanghai to meet with CEOs from top photovoltaic companies in that country to explore mutual benefits in solar and green industry fields, Sun says. Call it another step in the right direction. + how to join Any enterprises in green industry interested in joining are asked to complete an application form for the China Council for the Promotion of Green Industry can send an e-mail to zhangsen@cccme. org.cn or chenhuiqing@cccme.org.cn.


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The Council strongly believes this is the most comprehensive improvement to Arizona’s business climate ever envisioned and is a bold way to create jobs and improve the state’s economy.

–Steven G. Zylstra, president and CEO of the Arizona Technology Council

Gaining an Edge

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Corporate Income Tax – Trim the corporate income tax rate from 6.97 percent to below 4.9 percent between Fiscal 2014 and Fiscal 2017. The reduction is to occur in equal increments over a four-year period. 100 Percent Sales Factor – Increase the electable sales factor for multistate corporations from 80 percent to 100 percent in equal increments between Fiscal 2014 and Fiscal 2017. A corporation that conducts business both in-state and out-of-state must apportion its income from business activity based on the ratio of property, payroll, and sales in Arizona compared to the corporation’s property, payroll, and sales everywhere. R&D Tax Credit Enhancement – Increase the credit by 10 percent if qualified expenditures are made through a public or private Arizona university. Angel Tax Credit/Capital Gains – Increase the eligibility criteria for a qualified small business from $2 million to $10 million in total assets. Eliminates the capital gains tax on income derived from investments in qualified small businesses that have been certified by the Commerce Authority. Quality Job Tax Credit – Replaces Arizona’s expiring Enterprise Zone program with a new Quality Job Income Tax Credit. Each eligible

job qualifies for a $3,000 annual credit for three years, with a cap of 400 jobs per employer each year. The total annual program cap is $30 million and $90 million for three years. Arizona Competes Fund – To qualify for what also has been called the Deal Closing Fund, a company must achieve certain performance measures, average employees’ wages above the county’s average wage, and other requirements similar to the existing Job Training program. The Fund is expected to generate dollars for investment in business projects that stimulate and promote industries that provide stable, high-wage jobs. The program will be funded through increases in corporate income tax withholding, and capped at $20 million.  Job Training Program – Reauthorize the existing job training program, a job-specific reimbursable grant program that provides training plans for employers creating new jobs or increasing the skill and wage levels of current employees. Other proposals include personal property tax reform, reduction in the commercial property assessment ratio, and a decrease in capital gains for individuals. For more information on the package, contact Zylstra at szylstra@aztechcouncil. org or (602) 343-8324 ext. 101.

TECHCONNECTmag.COM

or anyone to make it in the new economy, they have to be given the tools to compete. With that in mind, Gov. Jan Brewer has unveiled a plan that does just that for Arizona’s technology community as well as the rest of the state. The Arizona Competitive Package is a mix of tax cuts, training, investment, recruitment—a different way of doing business to attract business. The Arizona Technology Council was a key resource to the governor, her staff and the legislative leadership in defining the components of the package. “The Council strongly believes this is the most comprehensive improvement to Arizona’s business climate ever envisioned and is a bold way to create jobs and improve the state’s economy,” says Steven G. Zylstra, president and CEO of the Council. At press time, the package was making its way through the Arizona Legislature. The highlights of the complete package are: Arizona Commerce Authority – The Department of Commerce was reinvented as the Arizona Commerce Authority. This has the effect of eliminating waste in government and creating a private sector entity made up of 17 top CEOs in the state.

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Governor rolls out Arizona Competitive Package


A guard uses a vascular scanner.

Close+up scanner helps ensure only those with proper authorization are allowed in. Additionally, the cross-connect room is basically encased inside the meet-me room, and separated by an 8-inch thick wall and reinforced door. This separation of the rooms is somewhat unusual and it helps keep network carrier equipment away from connection panels and fiber conduits, creating a cleaner, and more secure environment.

Authentication Perhaps the most noticeable security measure is the three-factor authentication used throughout Phoenix NAP. A lot of data centers use multi-factor authentication, but having three such security checks is a bit atypical. It’s not completely unprecedented to have three, but many facilities will employ a couple of factors. Additionally, in reality there are several more than three validation

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Writing by :: William Bell

Every data center places emphasis on security. It’s one of the primary goals any facility must achieve to be successful. With Phoenix NAP, it’s no different. However, in developing the protocols and implementing systems, some of what was done ended up being firsts for the state and multi-tenant colocation facilities. It’s not that Phoenix NAP specifically set out to be a security pioneer. Rather, the points of validation and access control measures are all designed to offer clients peace of mind while safeguarding their data. The fact that some of them are new is interesting, but secondary to the overall vision and thought process.

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Door Detective A first for Arizona is the Fastlane Door Detective. This piece of security equipment

from is positioned just before the entry to the data center’s mantrap. Essentially, the Door Detective prevents anyone from gaining entry while tailgating authorized users by using an infrared beam. It also prevents any authorized user from going through then coming back out. Doing so triggers an alarm and a security guard response. Having this system in front of the mantrap enables accurate visitor counts to be maintained and lets security staff members know how many people are heading into the datacenter and where they are.

Vascular Scanner First for the Valley is the hand vascular scanner at the door to the meet-me room. This piece of equipment reads the veins in a person’s hand as a means of validation. There is also a PIN entry pad on the device. Access to the meet-me room is highly restricted and this

points people must pass through to get to the Phoenix NAP data center floor, but the “factors” utilized are these: a keycard reader, a PIN entry pad, and an iris scanner. The iris scanner is actually within the mantrap, which also includes measures to prevent unauthorized access into it.

The Result Of course the ultimate goal of all these measures is a facility that is highly secure, yet accessible to authorized users. The checkpoints in place at Phoenix NAP are built on the premise of least privilege logical access control, and the data center employs a mixture of technology and onsite personnel to maintain a highly visible and effective system. In fact, due in part to the security in place, Phoenix NAP is one of the few data centers in the world to be recognized as a PCI DSS Validated Services Provider. William Bell is director of information systems for Phoenix NAP. .


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Payson chose Phoenix-based Kennedy Partners, LLC to manage the $12 million project funded by investors NRG Energy. Federal tax credits can pay for 30 percent of the project cost and Arizona Public Service rebates cover up to 50 percent of the cost. The school district will repay its portion over the next 15 years in the form of utility bills and in essence will not have any extra cost with this project.

Students see what happens when green combines with solar Writing by :: Donna haught

he question could be asked: How can one collect the energy of the sun, create sustainability, and lower the electricity bill? Payson Unified School District answered this question recently when it went green and off the grid. Although Payson, a small town of approximately 15,000 people, lies

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in the mountain belt of central Arizona, the district realized there was plenty of sun available and had the forethought to take advantage of the potential solar energy. This along with federal and local rebates helped the district make the decision to go solar. At four different schools in the district, the largest solar panel system at a school site in Arizona has attracted national attention.

Donna Haught is Region IX director of the Arizona Science Teachers Association.

TECHCONNECTmag.COM

Lessons Learned

Payson and Julia Randall elementary schools have solar panel structures that cover the playground areas. Julia Randall also hosts the first of its kind: a canopy of solar panels that cover the basketball courts. Rim Country Middle and Payson High schools have 63,000 square feet of solar panels that cover three parking lots and a solar array section that moves with the sun. Students will be able to monitor the electricity generated by the solar panels at a Web site that monitors the output of energy created by the solar panels. This has the potential to create an interest in green technologies and lead the way to other technologies that can generate sustainability for the future. There is more to come. The Payson High School vocational department was awarded a $40,000 grant through the Career and Technological Department of the state Department of Education. Vocational students will create the project that will teach them about solar thermal energy through a simulator system. After learning the theory and physics of the system, the students will build it on a trailer so they can take it to different sites and demonstrate how it works. They will be able to see firsthand the positive effects of using green technology to power the schools and homes. Green technology, solar energy, and sustainability—the future is looking bright for STEM education at Payson Unified School District.

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local lender to increase your lending limits. Foreign receivables guaranteed under an Ex-Im Bank program are treated more like your day-in, day-out domestic receivables in your bank’s lending decisions. Additionally, a new Ex-Im Bank program provides supply chain financing guarantees that make it easier for U.S. parts and materials suppliers to get financing when selling to U.S. exporters. When suppliers in the U.S. sell to other companies that use the goods to produce exported products, payment terms can be 60 days or longer because of the longer customer payment terms common in international sales. This is often difficult for the exporter’s supply chain, especially for small- and medium-size businesses. With this program, lenders can purchase these suppliers’ receivables at a discount and the suppliers get paid much more quickly. Everyone wins: the exporter and the companies that make up the exporter’s supply chain.

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re you ready to go global? The National Export Initiative (NEI) plans to double U.S. exports by 2014. Today 95% of the world’s customers are outside the country. Doubling exports would create 2 million new jobs for Americans. Doubling U.S. exports is therefore a crucial part of continuing the current U.S. economic recovery. With or without you, it’s going to happen. If you want to be part of the action, there are resources in Arizona to help your company become “global ready.” As chair of the Arizona District Export Council (ADEC), let me share just a few of the resources available as you plan your global strategy. There is ADEC itself, which is part of a family of District Export Councils set up across the country to help the U.S. Commercial Service help you. ADEC members are appointees of the U.S. Secretary of Commerce and are international business experts who volunteer to help businesses here expand globally. We try to keep our finger on the pulse of new ways to help the Arizona economy globalize. At the moment, the NEI is the place to be, especially for Arizona technology

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companies. Let’s look at a couple of its first programs that have been rolled out to help U.S. businesses expand globally.

Small Business Administration You may already know the U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA) as a provider of many services—from counseling to online tools and training to grant and loan programs. But from a global business perspective, the SBA provides counseling, training and financing to support small business export opportunities. Under the NEI, the SBA is expanding the availability of term loans and revolving lines of credit loans for small businesses through Export Express. For example, loan proceeds can be used to fund participation in a foreign trade show, finance standby letters of credit, translate product literature, or finance specific export orders.

U. S. Export-Import Bank U. S. Export-Import Bank (Ex-Im Bank) provides working capital guarantees and receivables insurance to U.S. companies. For their foreign buyers, it offers loan guarantees and credit terms to help them get credit to purchase American offerings. These programs also make it easier for your

Are You Global Ready? Many businesses express interest in exporting, but just don’t know how to get started. The U.S. Commercial Service and the SBA have teamed up to offer online help with “Six Steps to Begin Exporting,” which includes a self-assessment for businesses that helps them gauge their export-readiness. The website helps companies understand available training and counseling programs, provides resources to develop an export business plan, gives information conducting market research, provides assistance for finding foreign buyers, and offers financing assistance to fund the exporting venture. The new SBA and Ex-Im Bank programs are just the beginning. This column will continue to offer updates on new NEI programs, along with other ideas for Arizona businesses considering global expansion. Until next time. Karen Dickinson is an international business and intellectual property attorney at Quarles & Brady in Phoenix. + Get Connected Bob Blaney, Arizona SBA representative: Robert.Blaney@SBA.GOV. Sandra Donzella, Senior Business Development Officer for Ex-Im Bank: ‘Sandra.Donzella@exim.govs West Regional Office Eric Nielsen, director of the Arizona U.S. Export Assistance Center: Eric.Nielsen@mail.doc.gov. Arizona District Export Council: www.districtexportcouncil.com U.S. Small Business Administration: www.sba.gov Arizona U.S. Export Assistance Center: www.buyusa.gov/arizona


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Christopher Smith Arizona public policy loses one of its leaders Writing by :: Don Rodriguez

or those who didn’t know Christopher Smith, all they need to do is look at what he wrote under “Basic Information” on his Facebook page to get a sense of the man: “I aspire to be a leader, a man of honor, a man of vision, a man of passion, a man of faith demonstrated by action, a true and loyal friend, and a defender and promoter of liberty. Ah, so much hard work to do.” For the 390 friends who remain linked to him through Facebook, this turned out to be was far more than wishful thinking or a list of things to do. He actually wrote his legacy. Smith was manager of government and regulatory affairs at Cox Communications when he died recently at 51. “Christopher’s death was a tragedy, but his life was a gift to many,” says longtime friend and colleague Susan Anable, director of public affairs at Cox. Both had worked together earlier when she was director of the research staff for the Arizona Senate and he was chief of staff for the Arizona Senate Republican majority. Smith worked in the Senate from 1989 to 2000. “He believed in true servant leadership and understood what it meant to be a

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transformational leader,” Anable says. “He had a gift for seeing the ‘big picture’ in important policy issues and could gently and effectively lead others to the best solutions—even if they were not the solutions he personally favored. “ Adds John Kaites, who saw Smith in action while a member of the Legislature, “He was one of the top architects of every major piece of legislation that had gone through the Senate.” Kaites is a partner in the government relations firms of Public Policy Partners. “He showed insight and integrity to create policy programs beneficial to people of the state of Arizona,” Kaites recalls. “His influence on Arizona and its policies will be felt and seen for many years” says Anable. “(They are) a true memorial to his life.”

More to Do Even after he left the Senate, Smith continued his efforts in public policy issues. He was executive director of the Goldwater Institute. He also served as CEO of the Internet Education Exchange, a Web-based education policy organization. Smith also became involved in public policy affecting technology in Arizona. He served on the Arizona Technology Council’s

Board of Directors as well as its Executive Committee. Later he became chairman of the Council’s Public Policy Committee. “The committee had many public policy successes under his tutelage and guidance,” says Steven G. Zylstra, the Council’s president and CEO. “Christopher led with his inherent charisma and incredible intellect.” Smith had even more to offer. “Christopher embraced everything in his life with the same selfless passion and commitment—whether it was his family, his friends, his community, his job or his state,” Anable says. “When anyone needed something, Christopher was the first to step up and step in.” Kaites agrees. “He was the kind guy that was there when you needed him.” Giving back was part of who Smith was. He served in five different ministry and community service roles through his church. A graduate of Arizona State University and Northern Arizona University, he enjoyed participating in endurance sports and traveling the world. Above all, Smith was a family man. He is survived by his wife of 22 years, Vanessa, and three daughters, Roxanne, Sophia and Isabella. In her eulogy, his wife best summed up the type of person her husband was: “So hard working, fastidious, electrically creative, you were. A natural leader. Your work and energy, your ideas and perseverance have left their imprint. You expected much of yourself, perhaps to a fault, but you achieved so much. You set out, armored with a passionate spirit, a noble heart, and brilliant mind, the foundations your parents laid for you of values, a thirst for learning, a sense of responsibility to the bigger picture, and a love for mankind.” Smith’s wishes for himself indeed came true.

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–John Kaites, Public Policy Partners

the renewable energy issue

[Smith] showed insight and integrity to create policy programs beneficial to people of the state of Arizona. His influence on Arizona and its policies will be felt and seen for many years.


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NATURE’S way

APS and SRP turn to new technologies to capture solar and wind as power sources

any schoolchildren—past and present—can recall a particular Aesop fable. In short, it was about how the sun and wind challenged each other to see who was stronger. Although there was a winner in the ancient tale, two of the state’s major utility companies will tell you it might be a toss-up if the sun and wind took on the same bet now. Arizona Public Service Co. (APS) and Salt River Project (SRP) have invested heavily in solar and wind projects to serve the needs of their growing customer bases. All the projects use a variety of technologies—one uses the sun’s heat, not its rays!—to generate electricity. Here is an update of the some of APS and SRP’s major projects that are online or just about to be:

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solar a r i z o n a pu bl ic serv ic e Solar Test and Research (STAR) Center (Tempe) and smaller sites across Arizona

Luke Air Force Base Solar Photovoltaic

5 megawatts STAR opened in 1985; other facilities built between 1997 and 2006

15 megawatts Commercial operation expected during summer 2011

location for TÜV Rheinland PTL, the internationally recognized solar equipment testing and certification organization. APS also owns and operates more than 30 on- and off-grid small solar systems around the state. For example, at the Scottsdale Water Campus, APS has photovoltaic single-axis trackers sitting on concrete covered water reservoirs. The Solar Garden, which consists of 24 photovoltaic horizontal tracking systems, sits in the city of Yuma’s West Wetlands Park. STAR Center

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hen completed, the yet to be named plant will be the largest solar installation on U.S. government property. The plant will be on more than 100 acres of underutilized land on the base. It will use 52,000 high-efficiency SunPower solar panels. A single-axis tracking system will allow the panels to follow the sun across the sky, capturing 25 percent more energy than if the panels were stationary. The plant’s capacity is equivalent to the energy needs of 3,750 Arizona homes or 50 percent of the base’s energy needs. APS has hired SunPower to design and construct the plant.

APS Saguaro Solar Trough Power Plant near Red Rock

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PS STAR Center is a laboratory and power plant. The utility works with manufacturers, universities and government labs to find technological advancements for converting solar energy into electricity. The 33-acre park is one of the most advanced solar testing sites in the world. The many solar technologies at the site include single-axis tracking photovoltaic systems, high concentration photovoltaic solar systems and tilted tracker photovoltaic systems. In 2009, STAR became the outdoor testing

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a r i z o n a pu bl ic serv ic e Prescott Municipal Airport Solar Power Plant 3.5 megawatts Built in phases, the first section went online in 2002 and the final installation occurred in December 2006

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t one time the power plant was the second largest photovoltaic solar project in the nation. It contains three different photovoltaic technologies: dual-axis high concentration (five, each

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with 33.60 kilowatt capacity); horizontal single-axis tracking (20, with capacity ranging from 102 to 162 kilowatts) and tilted single-axis tracking (16, each with 24 kilowatts of capacity).

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Solar Plant near Hyder 17 megawatts Construction to begin in June Commercial operation expected in the fourth quarter

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lanned on 240 acres, the solar plant will use polycrystalline photovoltaic solar panels attached to a single-axis tracking system. The energy will connect to the grid at the County Line Substation. SunEdison is developing the project, which will be owned by APS as part of the AZ Sun program to invest in the development of 100 megawatts of solar photovoltaic power plants across the state.

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Solar Plant in Chino Valley

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APS Saguaro Solar Trough Power Plant near Red Rock

20 megawatts Construction to begin in the first quarter 2012. Commercial operation expected in the fourth quarter 2012.

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he solar plant use polycrystalline photovoltaic solar panels attached to a single-axis tracking system. The energy will connect to the grid at the 69 kilovolts line south of the APS Old Home Manor substation. SunEdison is developing the project, which will be owned by APS as part of the AZ Sun program.

Gila Bend Solar Photovoltaic 18 megawatts Commercial operation expected in November

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he solar plant will sit on 145 acres of former agricultural land in Gila Bend’s Solar Overlay Zone, a designated area that allows the permitting process for photovoltaic projects to be fast-tracked. The plant’s 75,168 photovoltaic panels will be placed in 522 rows and follow the sun across the sky using a singleaxis tracking system. The energy produced will connect to the electric grid through a 12 kilovolts line at the Cotton Center Substation north of project. APS has hired Solon Corp. in Tucson as the project developer.

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Solana Generating Station

Solana Generating Station

250 megawatts Scheduled to provide renewable energy beginning in 2013

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he station will be a concentrating solar power (CSP) plant built near Gila Bend. Unlike a photovoltaic solar plant, which uses sunlight to produce electricity, CSP uses the sun’s heat. The plant will produce enough energy to serve 70,000 APS customers when operating at full capacity. Spanish for “sunny place,” Solana will not emit greenhouse gases and will provide APS with more solar electricity per customer than any utility in the U.S. The facility also would be the largest solar power plant in the world if in operation today.

sa lt r i v er proj ect Agua Fria Solar 200 kilowatts Built 2001

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his single-axis tracking PV system was installed to provide renewable energy support to SRP’s EarthWise Energy™ program. The system is at the Agua Fria Generating Station and is operated and maintained by the station’s operations staff.

400 kilowatts Built 2003 to 2005

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n 2003 SRP moved two 100 kW PV systems from the Santan Generating Station in Gilbert. In 2005 the Rogers PV system was expanded with an additional 200 kW of PV at Rogers 3. This system incorporates a horizontal single axis tracking system. The tracker moves the modules in an east-west motion to follow the sun.

Coronado Generating Station Solar 20 kilowatts Built 2005

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ontinuing an effort to install and demonstrate photovoltaic power systems at its facilities, SRP installed a system on the canopy structure at the south end of the PERA Building at the Coronado Generating Station. The solar energy produced by the system offsets the auxiliary power requirements of the plant.

SRP Tempe Service Center Warehouse 75 kilowatts Built 2005

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RP’s largest rooftop system to date was installed at the warehouse. The freestanding mounting structure requires no roof penetrations or system ballast, and can withstand winds up to 100 mph.

Phoenix Pecos Park and Ride 101.6 kilowatts Built 2004

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n cooperation with the city of Phoenix, two photovoltaic systems were installed at the Phoenix Pecos Park and Ride Facility. The primary system uses the tops of two parking structure canopies for mounting the solar modules. In addition, modules are installed on the roof of the Park and Ride Security Building.

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Rogers 1, 2 & 3

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APS Solar Field in Prescott


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a r i z o n a pu bl ic serv ic e Aragonne Mesa Wind Farm Guadalupe County (40 miles southwest of Santa Rosa, New Mexico) 90 megawatts (APS receives all the energy output through a power purchase agreement) December 2006

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sa lt r i v er proj ec t Dry Lake Wind Power Project Near Heber 63 megawatts (SRP will receive all the energy output through a power purchase agreement) October 2009

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hen the Aragonne Wind’s Mesa Wind Farm came online in 2006, it marked the largest single source of energy from a renewable project in APS history. The plant increased the company’s renewable energy portfolio from 16 megawatts to 106 megawatts. The 15-square-mile wind farm took 18 months to build and contains 90 1-megawatt Mitsubishi New Wind Turbines. Each turbine has three blades and a 1-acre footprint, the majority of which are aligned along a northeast to southwest axis

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High Lonesome Mesa Wind Energy Project Torrance County, New Mexico (55 miles southwest of Albuquerque) 100 megawatts (APS receives all the energy through a power purchase agreement) July 2009

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hen completed in 2009, the $190 million project contained the largest turbines in the world. The 40 turbines manufactured by Clipper Windpower have a hub height of 259 feet (from the center of the wind turbine to the ground). Each turbine contains four generators.

Perrin Ranch Wind Energy Center North of Williams in Coconino County 99.2 megawatts (APS will receive all the energy output through a power purchase agreement) Construction to begin in the second half of 2011. Commercial operation expected in 2012.

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hen completed, the Center will be the largest wind project in Arizona. When running at full capacity, it will provide enough energy for 25,000 homes. The Center will contain 62 wind turbine generators scattered across acres of rural grazing land just west of State Route 64. A 3.5-mile, 230-kilovolt transmission line will be constructed from the project site to a new 500/230-kilovolt switchyard located along an existing 500-kilovolt transmission line.

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he project is the state’s first commercialscale wind farm. The project is on a combination of private, state and Bureau of Land Management public lands. The 30 Suzlon S88-2.1 MW turbines can generate power for more than 15,000 average homes. An expansion of the site is now 75 percent complete. Eventually 31 new turbines will be added in Phase 2. When completed, SRP will receive 100 percent of 127 megawatts generated from the wind farm, or enough to power more than 30,000 homes in the metropolitan Phoenix area.


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[sen-suh-ree • dih-zahyn] -noun


bright ideas Arizona is the place to be for the solar industry

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n this state of almost endless sunshine, Arizona’s solar energy industry continues to grow steadily. We reached new heights with recent announcements of the world’s largest solar plant to be built in central Arizona, the U.S. military’s largest solar plant to be built on Luke Air Force Base and the world’s premier photovoltaic testing laboratory. These success stories demonstrate Arizona is on the move. They are just part of a number of projects helping the state become the nation’s solar energy capital.

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Abengoa Solar is building Solana, a 280-megawatt solar concentrating solar plant in Gila Bend. The plant will provide enough energy to power 70,000 homes. The Solana plant will also be the first large-scale solar plant in the nation to store the energy it generates for later use. The Don Cardon molten salt storage “battery” will enable Solana to provide power during cloudy weather and through the night.

Sempra Generation will build its Mesquite Solar Complex in Arlington on former agricultural land near existing transmission lines. At full build-out, the site could grow to 600 megawatts, becoming one of North America’s largest photovoltaic solar generation plants. Phase One of the project will generate 150 megawatts with a capital investment estimated at $500 million. Arizona Public Service announced in August 2010 that it is building a 15 megawatts solar plant at Luke Air Force Base west of Phoenix. The project represents the largest photovoltaic installation for the electric utility and the largest solar plant on a U.S. military base.

SunEdison, a subsidiary of MEMC Electronic Materials and SOLON Corp., activated a 1-megawatt photovoltaic solar power plant near the Roger Road Wastewater Reclamation Facility— the largest solar photovoltaic deployment for Pima County. Germany’s TÜV Rheinland selected Arizona for its Photovoltaic Testing Laboratory based on the state’s attractive combination of business infrastructure, workforce availability, and the business climate. TÜV Rheinland PTL, LLC is the world’s most comprehensive and sophisticated facility for testing and certification of solar energy equipment. This significantly upgrades the technology and know-how of the former ASU Photovoltaic Laboratory. With a new facility and additional human resources, the lab more than doubles its previous capacity and provides a unique one-stop source for clients to get full testing and certification for all safety and performance standards in use by the industry anywhere in the world. Power-One Inc., a California-based solar and wind inverter manufacturer,


Suntech Power Holdings Co., Ltd., the world’s largest producer of solar panels, opened its first U.S. manufacturing plant in Goodyear. The module production facility has an initial 30 megawatts of annual capacity and employs more than 75 operators, engineers and professionals. BrightSource Energy, a provider of

export power to southern California. Schletter Inc. is a global company based in Tucson that manufactures solar mounting systems for small- to utility-scale generating stations. Tucson-based Global Solar Inc. is the leading manufacturer of highly efficient thin-film solar cells on a flexible substrate. Gestamp Solar Steel will build steel structures for utility scale concentrated solar generation stations at its new manufacturing facility in Surprise. First Solar , the world’s leading photovoltaic module manufacturer, is headquartered in Tempe. It is evident Arizona’s focus is to create quality jobs in high growth industries. By Gov. Jan Brewer’s signing one of the most significant pieces of economic legislation in state history, the Arizona Competitiveness Package, this state will continue to see many more solar companies setting up camp here. Don Cardon is president & CEO of the Arizona Commerce Authority.

the renewable energy issue

Science and Technology Park introduced the Solar Zone to serve as an interdisciplinary and collaborative hub for researchers and industry to develop and promote renewable energy.

utility-scale solar power plants, opened an office in Phoenix in 2008. SolFocus, a leading developer of concentrator photovoltaic systems, operates a solar glass reflector manufacturing factory in Mesa. American Solar Electric , headquartered in Scottsdale, and SolarCity, with a regional office in Phoenix, are full-service integrators of residential and commercial photovoltaic solar systems. Rioglass Solar , a Spanish company, is building a glass reflector manufacturing plant in Surprise. Faist GreenTek , a U.K.-based metal fabricator, opened a manufacturing plant in Phoenix to support the Power-One manufacturing efforts. Fluidic Energy is commercializing a revolutionary energy storage technology developed at Arizona State University and will build a manufacturing facility in Maricopa County. EnviroMission Inc. is planning a 200 megawatts, 2,400-foot solar tower generating station in La Paz County to

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opened a 120,000-square-foot manufacturing facility in Phoenix. PowerOne cited the state’s strong workforce and the intellectual resources of ASU as reasons for choosing Arizona for its US manufacturing base. Germany’s SOLON Corp. has a 105,000-square-foot photovoltaic solar panel manufacturing facility in Tucson. The plant develops highly efficient solar panels using crystalline-based cell technology. The University of Arizona


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reation of a method to make large-scale solar electricity generation more costeffective. Call it a bright idea that has paid off. Science Foundation Arizona (SFAz) earmarked a $1 million grant for the “energy telescope” project pioneered by Roger Angel, an internationally recognized researcher based at The University of Arizona. The project uses principals of optics and large telescope design in an innovative way to produce electricity from the sun. The technology is especially effective in deserts and other regions of the world with much direct sunshine, such as Arizona. The energy telescope system of solar energy generation concentrates sunlight by 1,000 times onto small but highly efficient photovoltaic cells. It uses no water, has a low environmental impact and produces a high volume of electricity in terms of land acreage used for equipment. The modular, sun-

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tracking systems are large, lightweight open structures that require on-site assembly. The jobs created to build, deploy and maintain them remain local. The university’s partner in the project is Tucson Electric Power. Besides SFAz, the project is supported by the Governor’s Office of Economic Recovery.

The “energy telescope” project uses principals of optics and large telescope design in an innovative way to produce electricity from the sun.

The grant funds will be used to complete research into maximizing the efficiency of the energy telescope. Matching funds for the project will come from REhnu, a company Angel founded with an exclusive license from UA to bring the technology to market. “We thank state leaders for their support of innovative technologies, such as the energy telescope, to bolster our state’s economy and job creation through promising research and development of viable products,” says William C. Harris, president and CEO of SFAz. “Like many other projects supported through SFAz, this has potential to make this state a hub of science and innovation.” This clean, solar energy innovation has the potential to elevate Arizona’s standing as a major player in sustainable industries, eventually contributing to the creation of thousands of high-quality jobs in the state. “We are grateful to Science Foundation Arizona for this grant, which will move us one step closer to the point of making solar energy cost competitive with fossil fuels,” says Angel. “I am delighted that SFAz will fund Roger Angel to continue the development of his novel method for capturing sunlight and converting it to electricity more efficiently —and more inexpensively—than has so far been possible using more conventional technologies,” says Leslie Tolbert, vice president of Research, Graduate Studies and Economic Development at UA. “Roger has a very impressive history of innovation and creativity that suggests that he can make the sorts of breakthroughs that are needed to make solar energy economical.”


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Nestled among the landmark red rocks of Papago Park, the Desert Botanical Garden allows you to experience the beauty that is the Sonoran Desert.


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Tucson Electric Power’s solar generation project

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he sun is shining brightly on The University of Arizona Science and Technology Park. The park is poised to become one of the major research and development centers for solar energy in the United States. Located on 1,345 acres of land 13 miles southeast of the university’s main campus, the Tech Park is home to 47 high technology companies, including industry giants Canon, Citigroup, IBM and Raytheon. More than 7,000 high tech employees work on site. The park also hosts three educational institutions: the Vail Academy and High School, Pima Community College, and UA South. A year ago the park’s management team set aside 250 acres of land to establish the Solar Zone @the UATechPark. The concept was to create an integrated,

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multi-dimensional research center that could foster all elements of solar energy development: generation and distribution, research and development, assembly and manufacturing, workforce training, and public education and demonstration. The goal of the Solar Zone is to allow developers and utilities to evaluate various solar technologies side by side under identical operating conditions to determine the most efficient and economical systems. The creation of the Solar Zone received a big boost when it was embraced by Tucson Electric Power. Last year TEP issued a request for proposals to solar companies asking them to demonstrate their technologies at the uttility or grid (megawatt) level. TEP designated the Tech Park Solar Zone as a preferred site for these projects. Subsequently, the company awarded contracts to five companies:

Amonix, CTC Electric, Foresight Renewable, Emcore and Solon Corp. When completed in early 2012, these five projects will generate more than 13.5 megawatts of power. A sixth project is being developed on an additional 65 acres of land at the Tech Park by Bell Independent Power. It is a concentrated solar power field that will generate 5 megawatts of power and use a proprietary thermal storage system. When all six projects are online, the Solar Zone will be the largest multi-technology solar demonstration site in the United States.

Taking Shape In August the Tech Park began preparing 165 acres for the TEP projects at a cost of $2.7 million. In December, after moving 400,000 cubic yards of dirt, building a mile of roadway and installing 18,000 linear feet of fencing, the Solar Zone was ready to accept


air is heated slightly using solar energy then released to drive turbines that generate electricity. This type of storage addresses the problem of providing an efficient and reliable alternative source of energy when solar energy arrays are not producing electricity. CAES holds the potential to transform and store large quantities of energy for widespread transmission and usage.

Recruiting Others Land has been set aside in the Solar Zone to accommodate the manufacturing and assembly of solar products including solar panels, arrays, and controllers. The Tech Park team has launched a campaign to recruit solar energy companies from around the world into the Solar Zone. The team recently returned from a recruiting trip to Israel, one of the hot spots for solar energy development. Several Israeli companies have expressed an interest in locating in the Solar Zone. Similar recruitment trips are planned to Germany and Spain. As the solar industry begins to grow and expand in southern Arizona, it will create the demand for a skilled workforce— installers, technicians, information technologists, and systems engineers. With the assistance of the UA South, Pima Community College, and the Pima County One Stop Program, the Tech Park is facilitating an effort to develop a comprehensive and integrated curriculum for solar energy workers. This curriculum would include classroom instruction, internships with solar companies and field work in the Solar Zone demonstration site. Equally exciting, the park

staff is working with the Vail School District to develop a solar energy go-cart competition for middle and high schools students. Students would build their go-carts and race them against teams from other area schools. The program is designed to build student interest in careers in the solar industry. The Solar Zone @the UATechPark is a work in progress. However, it already is a unique and compelling location for solar energy development. Building on the research strengths of the university, following the innovative lead of a Tucson Electric Power and using the land and research facilities at the UA Tech Park, the Solar Zone can position Tucson to be at the leading edge of solar energy innovation and development in the world.

Bruce A. Wright is associate vice president for University Research Parks at the University of Arizona.

+ Get Connected BORDERS: www.borders.arizona.edu UA Office of University Research Parks: www.ourparks.arizona.edu

the renewable energy issue

its first project: a 1.6 megawatts single axis photovoltaic array jointly developed by TEP and Solon. It began generating power in January. A second project is currently under construction by Amonix. It is a 2 megawatts solar generating station on 12 acres in the Solar Zone. It is comprised of 36 large concentrating photovoltaic arrays. This project is expected to be operational in late spring. Power generation and distribution are only one component of the Solar Zone. Equally important is research and development. To successfully compete with coal and oilbased energy and become a larger part of the overall energy mix, solar energy must become efficient and less costly. They key is new research and development. The Solar Zone is designed to provide university and industry researchers with state-of-the art laboratory and testing facilities. Areas of research will include discovering new optical and solar materials, developing methods for storing solar energy, finding ways to improve solar arrays and tracking systems, exploring techniques to better integrate solar energy into existing electrical grid and distribution systems, measuring the impact of weather conditions on solar generation, and evaluating the performance of solar energy systems. Later this spring Joe Simmons, director of the UA’s Arizona Research Institute for Solar Energy (AzRISE), will lead the first university-based research project in the Solar Zone. He and his colleagues will demonstrate the use of compressed air energy storage (CAES), which involves compressing air and storing it in vessels above or below ground. The compressed

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The goal of the Solar Zone is to allow developers and utilities to evaluate various solar technologies side by side under identical operating conditions to determine the most efficient and economical systems.


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Shine a light

on this potential asulightworks.com

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using light to solve societal challenges

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conversion efficiencies nearly double today’s solar cells. Researchers also hope to begin using flexible organic and inorganic thin film solar cells that use nanocrystalline materials. This could make solar a cost-efficient source of power for industry, homes, devices and cars. LightWorks already has spinoff companies to report. For example, the Arizona Center for Algae Technologies and Innovations already has gained international notice with work that promises to greatly impact the growing biofuels industry. And there’s more to come. Test bed systems for photosynthetic microorganisms being created “will be best in the world,” Dirks says. “There will be nothing comparable.” Still, there remain some challenges. While the potential for energy is deep, its impact is expected to be on a massive scale, Dirks says, even bigger than health care. But the lingering question will be, “How do you get it to market?” he says. “At the end of the day, business has to make money.”

hen Gary Dirks was deciding what to do after retiring as president of BP Asia Pacific and BP China, Arizona State University President Michael Crow suggested he follow the light. No, Crow wasn’t giving Dirks some cosmic advice. Instead, ASU’s leader was brainstorming a role that would draw university alumnus Dirks to a new yet exciting challenge. “Think of light in an integrated way,” Crow offered. “That was enough for me,” recalls Dirks, and a new initiative was born. He took on the role of director of LightWorks, a multidisciplinary approach to researching and developing reliable, affordable, and renewable energy sources and storage suitable for commercialization. Specfically, this mission will be achieved by pursuing: • Energy research strengths – solar thermal, photovoltaics, bioenergy, fuel cell/energy storage, and energy system testing • Prototype and systems analysis for renewable energy sources

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• Curricula and training in renewable energy including social, economic, and policy advancement To accomplish this, LightWorks brings under one umbrella 17 ASU research centers created to pursue light-inspired research. Most are based at the university’s Tempe main campus while some are at its Polytechnic campus in Mesa and Research Park in Tempe. Despite pulling together some of the world’s best minds with the brightest ideas, LightWorks is not a competition of one center against another. And it’s not just a cooperative effort. Dirks said it is best described as a collaboration within a transdisciplinary environment whose researchers all deal with issues ranging from the social aspect of energy transition to economics. As with light itself, “you have to think of the full sprectrum,” he says.

Research is Key When it comes to solar, research is extensive. For example, mirrors that concentrate sunlight on photovoltaic panels could result in

The 17 research centers that are part of LightWorks are: • Center for Bio-Inspired Solar Fuel Production • Center for Bioenergy & Photosynthesis • Center for Computational Nanoscience • Center for Photonics Innovation • Center for Renewable Energy Electrochemistry • Consortium for Science, Policy & Outcomes • Decision Theater • Energy Innovation Network • Global Institute of Sustainability • Laboratory for Algae Research and Biotechnology • Power Systems Engineering Research Center • Solar Power Laboratory • Sustainability and Energy in the Built Environment • The Biodesign Institute • TUV Rheinland Photovoltaics Test Lab

+ Get Connected www.asulightworks.com


Teachers at a workshop build a wind generator.

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Written on the Wind

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that serve a home and, during especially windy periods, produce extra electricity that some utilities will allow as credits for the customer later. After about a year, there are a number of developments to report among partners. At Flagstaff Unified School District, the Career and Technical Education program is developing Wind Energy Technician courses. The district also is host to a series of

There are a number of developments to report among partners. teacher workshops for the region in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics, and Career Technical Education programs.

College Students, Too Students in the Alternative Energy Technician program at Coconino Community College will work on generator installations at the schools for their laboratory or service learning credits. Arizona Public Service (APS) will collaborate on a series of wind energy teacher workshops through its Mission: Sustainability curriculum program.

NextEra Energy Resources contributed $30,000 to program to cover costs of one Skystream installation, program support, and one teacher workshop in addition to facilitating internships within NAU students. NextEra is building a wind farm in Williams that will help serve the needs of APS customers. K-12 schools also have progress to report. For example, the freshman class at Desert Marigold School in Phoenix has committed to four years of research on wind energy topics as well as fundraising for an offgrid hybrid renewable energy lab for a greenhouse. NAU secured $100,000 in funding for renewable energy and energy efficiency infrastructure improvements St. Michael Indian School in Window Rock. Besides installing a SkyStream generator, the school will have ongoing wind and climate education for teachers and students. Cromer Elementary School in Flagstaff will install an anemometer and Skystream as part of a research partnership between NAU and APS. The Williams Unified School District will install a Skystream on one of its campus and host a teacher workshop that also will include Grand Canyon teachers.

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Northern Arizona University is leading the charge as it develops educational programs to improve the understanding of wind technology through the installation of small wind turbines at K-12 schools across the state. Through the collaborative efforts of NAU’s Landsward Institute, the Sustainable Energy Solutions Group and the Institute for Tribal Environmental Professionals, a three-year grant valued at nearly $200,000 from U.S. Department of Energy’s Wind Powering America program is helping get the job done. Housed at the Institute is the Arizona Wind for Schools program, which also includes assistance from the university’s electrical, mechanical, and civil and environmental engineering departments. Some additional program support has been secured, including nearly $50,000 from the Arizona Technology and Research Initiative Fund governed by the Arizona Board of Regents. One of the outside partners has been Flagstaff-based Southwest Windpower, which created the Skystream Grid Tie Wind Generator being used by some of the K-12 schools to demonstrate the value of the wind. It can use wind power to create electricity

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Sponsors: We Proudly Present

Arizona Technology Council’s Sponsors Thanks to them, we can serve our members better. PremierSponsors ::

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NEW MEMBERS: right people at the right time to providing innovative tools that help incorporate the latest new media, manage your workflow, and even track your effectiveness. A complete range of services allows direct access throughout the world as well as comprehensive media databases, up-to-the-minute video and web options, and more. www.marketwire.com

Copper State Communications has provided many businesses a “one stop shop” for all their telecommunications and IT requirements. It sells and service telephone equipment from Avaya, ShoreTel, Mitel and Toshiba. Its business partnerships with more than 60 telecommunications providers allows it to assist businesses with selecting the most appropriate, cost-effective services for their phone and Internet needs. www.copper-state.com

Identity Studios is a mix of business strategists who believe in the power of good marketing and a group of talented marketing specialists passionate about their craft. It was founded by Scott Salkin, a creative but practical marketer who honed his craft from his years spent in both enterprise field sales and product marketing in the technology industry. Account and project managers have strong business backgrounds and understand sales, so they know how to build marketing programs that will boost your top line. www.identitystudios.biz

The Musical Instrument Museum is the most extraordinary museum you’ll ever hear. MIM collects and displays musical instruments from every country in the world. Guests enjoy a close encounter with the instruments, enhanced by state-ofthe art audio and video that bring to life their sounds and sights. Performances in the intimate MIM Music Theater celebrate global musical diversity through live presentations. www.themim.org

DMc Strategic IT Consulting specializes in ensuring technology is an asset, not a problem for its business partners. It realizes its success depends on customers’ success and commits to its mission of dramatically affecting the metrics of growth, profit, and competitive advantage by delivering solutions that have the “Right Balance” of business process improvements and technology through advisory, translation, and project leadership services. www.dmcstrategicit.com The East Valley Partnership is a regional coalition of community, business, educational, and government leaders whose goal is to provide leadership and support in specific areas of focus, thereby improving business and quality of life in the region. www.evp-az.org

LuthCommunications positions clients for growth by creating communications platforms and strategies that reach the right audiences with the right messages. It specializes in high technology and renewable energy. Services include strategic market development; corporate messaging, positioning and outreach; stakeholder engagement programs; executive/employee/ external communication; media relations and PR program management. www.luthcommunications.com Marketwire is in the business of making clients’ lives easier— from providing peace of mind that press releases reach the

PwC is one of the world’s largest providers of assurance, tax, and business consulting services. It believes the best outcomes are achieved through close collaboration with clients and the many stakeholder communities it serves. Its technology practice specializes in providing services to a range of companies from the start-up phase through their initial public offering and beyond. www.us.pwc.com Regenesis Biomedical is a privately held medical technology company focused on developing and marketing noninvasive regenerative medicine products. Regenesis developed, patented, and now markets the Provant® Therapy System. Customers include health care

facilities and providers that serve patients treated in acute care hospitals, long-term acute care hospitals, skilled nursing facilities, rehabilitation centers, home healthcare agencies, and wound care clinics as well as patients in their homes under physician orders. www.regenesisbio.com RISC is a global due diligence and investigative consulting firm based in Phoenix. It specializes in enhanced Reputational Due Diligence with a focus on sophisticated background checks of fund managers, investment advisors and acquiree management teams. Working with quality research information specialists and consultants who provide exceptional due diligence reports and business investigations is a vital part of conducting business responsibly. www.risc-llc.com Shared Performance is a direct result of experiencing and overcoming the challenges found in international businesses and world-class organizations large and small. The company’s products enable businesses of all sizes to create and maintain a higher level of performance and achieve the critical objectives that are essential to success in today’s highly competitive business environment. www.sharedperformance.com Since 1969, Unique Machine & Tool Co. has designed and built thousands of machines running worldwide. Complete manufacturing services include design, weld, assemble, electrical, automate, and software design. Automation is the theme Unique has built its foundation on. www.uniquemachine.com

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Future Business Solutions consults with its clients to implement and manage customized document management strategies. It leverages the latest industry technologies to efficiently control and lower the expense of customers’ print and document management. The company’s team has more than 40 years of industry experience. www.fbsinc.biz

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Altima Business Solutions helps small to mid-size companies meet growth and expansion goals by developing and implementing customized business development, capital acquisition, e-media, and marketing/ PR strategies. It has helped hundreds of entrepreneurs accelerate their growth while minimizing their learning curve. www.altimabusinesssolutions.com


The Network

The technology ... can be adapted to virtually all of our clients’ specific needs.

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032 n any action movie, you know someone means business when they reach for the “red phone.” Help arrives to promise a happy ending. In this digital world, law firm Fennemore Craig gives clients a new way to resolve a crisis. At the heart of the firm’s “red phone” is an iPod touch filled with a host of apps. But there’s no copy of Angry Birds on the touch. After clearing the clutter of the standard apps shipped with the touch, “We then load on several different app-like buttons that serve various functions, including direct email accounts, legal document storage, links to case-relevant webpages, a Skype account, etc.,” says James Goodnow, an associate with Fennemore Craig.

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What is loaded on the phone depends on the need. “The technology is very flexible; it can be adapted to virtually all of our clients’ specific needs,” Goodnow says. At the touch of a button, the client gets fast access to a member of the legal team assigned to his or her case. “Our team prides itself on accessibility, so we are generally responding to red phone communications very quickly,” he says. Need to talk? Word goes out to the team’s desktops, laptops, iPhones, and touches via Skype. Quickly a video conference is in full swing. Each red phone has a camera that enables clients to shoot case-relevant photographs and to send the information to attorneys over the dedicated email program immediately.

Clients are not charged for use of the red phone as long as the case is active. “In our business, immediate accessibility is king,” Goodnow says. “The cost we incur for the red phones is far outweighed by the significant benefits to our clients.” This is not Fennemore Craig’s only nontraditional way to use technology. It already has replaced use of written legal documents with video productions ala NBC’s “Dateline” that present the case and the arguments. It then is loaded on an iPad and sent to the opposing lawyers to show “how we plan on dismantling his or her case at trial,” Goodnow says. “The video sends a very powerful message: We mean business and we’re willing to work this case up in a way that will be unlike any attorney or firm you’ve ever been up against.” The firm is already experimenting with “augmented reality” technology that creates a 3-D rendering of any scene, person, or event, Goodnow explains.  The scene is then transposed onto a live shot of the user of the technology and be can moved or manipulated so the jury can get the sense of what happened before the case came to trial. “It’s like a Star Wars communication device, only better,” Goodnow says. “There’s no reason that it can’t over time be integrated into our red phone.”

+ Get Connected www.fclaw.com


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Lucky Number 13. OneNeck completes 13 years of business, 13 years of profitability and 13 years with 98% Contract Renewal Rate Since 1997, OneNeck has become a global leader for hosted application management and managed services to companies whose complex IT systems are vital to their success. Other numbers we are proud of: • We serve over 130 customers and 66,000 users in 45 countries on six continents • We support over 950 customer sites worldwide • We manage hundreds of different applications and platforms • We’ve been ranked No. 1 ERP Outsourcer by the Black Book of Outsourcing three times and one of the Top 50 Outsourcing Providers in 2010 We achieved these results by providing a comprehensive portfolio of global solutions that include: Infrastructure Services – Take advantage of a scalable environment with guaranteed system availability among the highest levels in the industry. Managed Hosting – Leverage our data centers and technical experts to proactively manage and maintain your IT systems. Cloud Services – Move from working within your own IT bubble and use the OneNeck cloud to access technologies when you need them. Application Management – Let OneNeck manage your top tier applications such as Oracle, JD Edwards, Baan, Microsoft Dynamics AX and numerous others. Other Services – Need help in areas such as functional or development support, EDI Administration or desktop support? We provide a total IT solution and a single point of contact to address all your IT needs. This ample experience allows us to tailor outsourcing services to each customer. In fact, our service philosophy revolves around customization. Each customer solution is personalized to optimize their unique business requirements and operating environment. And that equals improved system performance and greater return on your IT investments. Contact us today to learn how OneNeck can make a difference in your IT operations.

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