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Momentum

( smart living by bike )

bike this is the

up close with caroline samponaro , NYC visitors guide + fresh fare

inside

+venture: 38

issue #

American Edition

lifestyle + bells&whistles: arts & culture | what’s new | bike curious | 16 + familystyle: Bike Birthday Party | Bicycling with Newborns | 25 + bestcyclingdestinations: 44 | how to plan a bike tour | 52


F E LT B I C Y C L E S . C O M


Momentum

( smart living by bike )

features

bikelifestyle.

Momentum defines what it means to ride a bike as part of your everyday lifestyle.

32 ( smart living by bike )

bike

lifestyle inside

samponaro UP CLOSE WITH caroline , nYc VISITORS GUIDE + FRESH fare

issue #

american edition

+venture: 38

38

12

looking back FIFTY issues of

mag.

top ten places to visit

44

discover the best cycling destinations North America has to offer.

Model LAuren Tinker is photographed by Bridget Fleming as part of Fleming’s Downtown From Behind photo project. The photos featured in this project capture an eclectic mix of New York designers, creatives, architects, artists, environmentalists and entrepreneurs, among others. The subjects are all photographed from behind while they ride their bikes on one of the 200-plus streets, avenues and lanes in downtown New York, below 14th Street. Fleming is currently working with ABRAMS publishing on a Downtown From Behind coffee table book, which is scheduled to be released in March 2012. In the meantime, you can see more of her photos at downtownfrombehind.tumblr.com

this is the

the

cover

Momentum

nyc

explore the Big Apple and find the best places to visit in our detailed guide.

curious | 16 culture | what’s new | bike + bells&whistles: arts & | 25 party | bicycling with Newborns + familystyle: bike birthday to plan a bike tour | 52 destinations: 44 | how + best

cycling

M o m e n t u m p l a n e t. c o m

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on the web

Momentum

jan + feb 2011 Highlights from momentumplanet.com (Jan/ Feb) News

Front Matter contribs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 intandem . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9

takethelane . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . inbox . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

European Cyclists’ Federation:

11 11

A Pro-Choice Voice

momentumplanet.com/articles/european-cyclistsfederation-a-pro-choice-voice/index.html

The Joy of Cycling

momentumplanet.com/articles/the-joy-of-cycling

DepaRtments bells+whistles . . . . .

16

The hottest up-to-date news, gear and arts & culture information – all in one place!

arts & culture . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

16

heels on wheels . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 what’s new . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 street sense . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 bike curious . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22

familystyle . . . . . . . . . . 25

Momentum puts a new spin on family life.

throw your own bike- . . . . . . . . . themed birthday party bicycling with newborns . . . . . . “stay dry” kids clothing . . . . . .

25 26 27

readytoroll: . . . . . . . . 28

Morning to night with a folding bike Follow our dashing folding biker on his journey from morning coffee to date night.

bikeshop . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 +venture: NYC . . . . . 38 Up close and personal with

Caroline Samponaro . . . . . . . . . 38 NYC visitors’ guide . . . . . . . . . . . . 40 fresh fare . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42 top 10 cities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44

goodybasket . . . . . . . . . 46 behindthebrand . . . .

50

MOhow . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

52

Mission Bicycle story

Mikael-Colville Andersen:

Why we shouldn’t wear bike helmets

momentumplanet.com/videos/mikael-colvilleandersen-why-we-shouldnt-wear-bike-helmets

Blogs BikevsBike . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

bikeStyle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Bump in the Road: Pregnant Biking

58 64

Marketplaces mar>apr>11

momentumplanet.com/videos/cycling-sucks

Spring Product Showcase

How to make your bike tour a success!

thebigidea . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54 asktheadvocate . . . . . . . . . . 55 do it yourself . . . . . . . . . . . 56

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Cycling Sucks

Adeline Adeline : Sex appeal your grandmother could love

Columns

smart Finds . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Videos

60

handmade bicycles . . . . . . . .

59

momentumplanet.com/blogs/families-on-bikes/ bump-in-the-road-pregnant-biking M o m e n t u m p l a n e t. c o m


RALEIGH AMERICA MODEL YEAR 2011: STEEL ROAD

FIND YOURSELF PORT TOWNSEND

·Reynolds 520 Butted Chromoly · Canti Brakes · Sora Drivetrain ·Vittoria Randonneur Touring Tires ·Front Rack ·Full Metal Fenders

raleighusa.com


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bryen dunn

Bryen Dunn is a Toronto, ON-based freelance writer whose writing focuses on the outdoors, adventure travel, lifestyle and entertainment. He’s a year-round cyclist, commuter and weekend warrior. From the urban streets to off-road trails, he believes life was meant to be seen on two wheels. You can follow his antics via Facebook, Twitter, and Linked In. Email: info@bryendunn.com. Find his story about New York City on p. 39.

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molly millar

Molly Millar can often be seen racing to work or around the seawall in Vancouver, BC, on her Amsterdam Electra. Her second love is clothing and dreaming about the endless number of potential style combinations that exist in everyone’s closet. See her stylish folding bike story on p. 28. Originally a BC girl, her passion for fashion styling is matched only by her passion for hopping on a plane and heading to unexplored shores.

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ryan mijker

Ryan Mijker is a Kelowna, BC-based consultant that specializes in bicycling with newborns (see story on p. 26) and the analysis of cycling facilities through audits and 3D visualization. A commuter cyclist since he was five, one of his favorite activities is cycling long, steep hills through gorgeous fruit orchards on his Brodie Energy. At present he is looking for flatter ground to travel with his son on their new Bakfiets. pedalforwardconsulting.com

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elizabeth o. hurst

Elizabeth O. Hurst, author of our bike lifestyle feature on p. 32, is a freelance journalist based in Washington, DC, an editorial intern for SNEWS and a frequent Momentum contributor. She started working in the bike industry with a public relations agency that represents clients, such as Interbike and Ritchey Design. Hurst has also contributed to Cycling Utah and Cycle and Style.

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erik neumann

Erik Neumann is a freelance writer living in Seattle, WA. Previously the Seattle regional editor for Momentum, he enjoys bike touring whenever possible and has ridden in Central America, Europe and North America. Neumann shares insights on how to plan your next bike vacation on p. 52.

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kathleen wilker

Kathleen Wilker lives in Ottawa, ON, and can be spotted around town on her Kona Ute, hauling groceries, library books and her two beautiful kids. She’s a writer, an editor and the co-chair of her neighborhood family-friendly advocacy group, The Hintonburg Cycling Champions. Wilker hosts the popular blog, Families on Bikes (see p. 25 for our print story), a forum for sharing the joys and challenges of biking with kids. She’s always eager to hear your family biking stories: familiesonbikes@ momentumplanet.com familiesonbikes@momentum.com.

>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>

Momentum

Momentum

>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>

Momentum Mag

is an independent media company that promotes, encourages and inspires Smart Living by Bike. >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> Publishers Mia Kohout, Tania Lo Marketing and Advertising

Mia Kohout • mia@momentumplanet.com Finance and Operations

Tania Lo • tania@momentumplanet.com Editor

Sarah Ripplinger • sarah@momentumplanet.com Photo Editor

David Niddrie • photo@momentumplanet.com Creative Direction

Jim Nissen SWITCHStudio.com • momentum@switchstudio.com Art Direction

Chaidi Lobato • momentum@switchstudio.com Designers

Kris Olmon, Carla Ragers, Elizabeth Dam, Kat Randall momentum@switchstudio.com Arts Editor

Bryna Hallam • bryna@momentumplanet.com Style Editor

Molly Millar • molly@momentumplanet.com Gear

gear@momentumplanet.com Columnists

Mia Birk, Kristen Steele, Dan Goldwater, Elly Blue, Lolly Walsh Contributing Writers

Mia Birk, Elly Blue, Lynette Chiang, Bryen Dunn, Geoffrey Earl, Dan Goldwater, Bryna Hallam, Trevor Hargreaves, Elizabeth O. Hurst, Ryan Mijker, Molly Millar, Aretha Munro, Erik Neumann, Jonathon Reynolds, Sarah Ripplinger, Kristen Steele, Carrie Swiggum, Carolyn Szczepanski, Ben Van Loon, Lolly Walsh, Kathleen Wilker Contributing Artists & Photographers

Adam Aufdencamp, Rocco Bizzarri, Meli Burgueno, Lynette Chiang, Jonathan Clark, Fatima Colman, Grant Cornett, David Creese, Eric Elsewhere, Tim Engstrom, Patrina Feucht, Bridget Fleming, Gillian Goerz, Ryan Hodgson-Rigsbee, Francois Hogue, Myleen Hollero, Lindsay Holmes, Ben Johnson, Andrew Kreps, Dominique Labrosse, Tania Lo, Sandra Looft, Jonathan Maus, Galen Maynard, David Niddrie, Evalyn Perry, Martin Reis, Doug Scott, Jacob Shea, Tanja Tiziana, Bjorn Wallander, Jonathan Wiles,Kathleen Wilker, Harry Zernike Office Manager

Lindsey Wasserman • lindsey@momentumplanet.com

Aretha Munro, Carrie Swiggum Paloma Vita Proofreaders Sandra Allen, Eva van Emden, Aretha Munro, Carrie Swiggum, Lindsey Wasserman Interns

Copy Editor

Send Correspondence to: Momentum Magazine, Suite#214-425 Carrall Street, Vancouver, BC V6B 6E3 letters@momentumplanet.com

Subscriptions and Customer Service subscriptions@momentumplanet.com Printed six times a year. 19.95 yr US + Canada/ 39.95 International http://www.momentumplanet.com/subscribe To distribute Momentum in your store become a Community Partner http://www.momentumplanet.com/distribute Disclaimer: Opinions expressed in this magazine are those of the authors and do not necessarily represent those of the publishers, sponsors, advertisers or anyone else for that matter. Publication Mail Agreement #40565523G

printed in the

M o m e n t u m p l a n e t. c o m


Party Frank Silicone Overmoulded Flexible Steel Cable Lock Available in 12 colours www.knog.com.au


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Waterproof Briefcase Pannier

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Adjustable fold-over closure Reinforced Bottom Shoulder Strap QL2 pannier mounting system Internal organization


intandem separate note: Sarah, David, Lindsey, Jim and SW!TCH Studio, our wonderful contributors and our forward-thinking advertisers. We are taking the lane! (And enjoying the ease and sensibility of the separated bike path.) The most important question now is: Why are we doing this? The answer, in brief: Because we see a real need for a shift in the transportation culture in North America from car-centricity to a balance of pubic transportation, appropriate car use, walking and bicycling. We need this shift to be adopted by everyone. Riding a bicycle is a choice. It’s smart living by bike.

momentum:

the next generation

W

ith this March/ April issue, we have lots to celebrate. It’s our 50th issue (the two of us have been working on Momentum since Issue 30), we are sharpening our brand and launching our new design, we have expanded distribution in New York City and Montreal and we are working with a newly-formed and strong team. We are excited to take Momentum to the next level,

broadening our focus, growing our web/ digital online presence and providing even more free magazines at coffees shops, grocery stores and retail outlets in urban centers where the bike curious can discover them. Momentum turns a new page this spring. Before we move forward, we would like to recognize and pay tribute to the people that have helped shaped the magazine into what

it is today. To Amy Walker, Terry Lowe, Chris Bentzen, Wendell Challenger, Ulrike Rodrigues, Ron Richings and all of our volunteer contributors, early-adopting advertisers, volunteer distributors and supporters: Thank you! Moving forward, we will focus on families, how tos, style, travel, beginners, bikes, accessories, advocacy and controversial issues that affect how people ride bikes, such as helmet laws, bike parking, outdated laws and more. We are incredibly excited about the path ahead, and we feel lucky to have such a strong team moving forward:

Mia Kohout & Tania Lo Publishers Momentum Magazine mia@momentumplanet.com tania@momentumplanet.com

In our January issue we said goodbye to our Vancouver regional edition in print, but we hope to be back soon with a new Vancouver Bike Blog online. Stay tuned! Are you an illustrator or photographer interested in contributing to Momentum? Please email Photo Editor David Niddrie - photo@momentumplanet.com for more details. Interested in carrying Momentum and giving it out to your customers for free? Join our Community Partner Program. See page 63 for more details.

What do you think about our new look? Fill out our quick survey and be entered to win a new Customizer Skinny Commuter from Rickshaw Bagworks valued at $130 USD. www.momentumplanet. com/newdesign

Contest ends April 1st, 2011 (Thanks to rickshawbags.com)

>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>

This issue is dedicated in loving memory of

Terry Lowe 1957 – 2011 Our beloved friend and colleague Terry Lowe passed away unexpectedly after a brief illness January 24, 2011. Terry’s ideas and contributions helped shape each issue of Momentum for the past five and a half years.

M o m e n t u m p l a n e t. c o m

Terry Lowe

He joined the magazine as a writer in August 2006, became editor by December and later edited the Vancouver/ Victoria and Books sections. Terry loved riding his bicycle and letting people know how easy and fun biking can be. We will miss bumping into him while he explored the streets, wearing his white bike helmet with its distinctive homemade rain visor. Terry, may you ride in peace forevermore!

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Compl Bike C eting o m mu ters’ Outfit s Sinc 1989 e

Find San Some cha dals HeSrweet cou e:

sa.c o

m


takethelane

T

his issue marks a major milestone and turning point for Momentum. We’ve come a long way since our beginnings back in 2001 (see timeline on p. 12). Now, with the publication of the 50th installment of Momentum Magazine, we are debuting a stylish and more mainstream look and feel. It has been amazing, challenging and rewarding to be with Momentum as we reach this turning point. I am excited about our future and look forward to many more years of evolution and change as we continue to listen and react to what you want to see on our pages. By focusing on the bike lifestyle (see feature on p. 32) as a whole, we are in a better position to deliver the information and resources

a fresh start you need to live happier, saner lives on two wheels. Please share your thoughts about our new content: letters@momentumplanet.com. I look forward to reading your comments. In this issue, we give you a peek at some of the hottest gear for spring 2011 (p. 46), share tips on preparing for a vacationby-bike (p. 52), take you to the bike lanes of New York City (p. 39), give you a glimpse into the day of a folding biker (p. 28) and show you how to host your very own bike birthday party (p. 25). Our new lineup of features and columnists will open up the dialogue on hot button issues, such as ticketing cyclists (p. 21), conservatism and cycling (p. 58) and riding with newborns (p. 26), to name a few.

There is so much to discuss. Our cities are growing and maturing in many different ways, which makes establishing better policies and practices around bike infrastructure and laws of imminent importance. Likewise, we should continue to celebrate the joy and functionality of cycling by showing just how fun and easy it is to ride a bike in your city. This is Momentum’s ongoing quest. I hope you will continue to join us for the ride. Happy spring cycling, Sarah Ripplinger Editor Momentum Magazine

on the

web

you are a leader and you have the responsibility of setting a good example. Everyone pictured cycling in your publication should be wearing a helmet. It may be subtle, but by not doing so I think you are sending the wrong message.

web

jan + feb 2011 + POST WITH MOST FEEDBACK

MomentumMag: Bike commuting makes for healthier cities. So when is the majority of people going to actually get this? via GOOD (www.good. is/post/bettertransportationmeans-betterhealth-says-who) 24 Likes, 7 comments

- Michael Wade

Editor's Note: Are mandatory bicycle helmet laws good or bad? Do they save lives or deter people from riding? Should people be forced to wear them? Let us know what you think: letters@momentumplanet.com

top uploaded pic’s:

jan + feb 2011

momentum wants your photos. M o m e n t u m p l a n e t. c o m

It’s easy: shoot. upload. get picked. be printed. flickr.com/groups/momentum_magazine

Momentum wants to know what you think the current issues to cyclists are? #Helmets? #bikeparking? what else? #cyclingissues @4loveofbikes

(FortheLoveofBikes)

@MomentumMag Issues for cyclists here is one. Safety and tolerance among drivers to share the road. @WITTCO

Best of the comments….

(wittco)

@MomentumMag Bike Issue: proportional allocation of funds for (1) current bike structure and (2) future bike structure.

John – “Change is a process, not an event, and more and more people are getting it every day. It just needs to happen faster I suppose.”

@VeloCite

(VeloCite Montreal)

Richard – “Urban sprawl makes it difficult to impossible for many. It is going to take a combination of housing choices, transportation infrastructure, and bike safety education (as in Rules of the Road) to make this happen in most cities in the US.”

Join us on FB to win. facebook.com/ momentummag

Kyle Thomas (middle), Tony Allen-Mills (right).

(Momentum Magazine)

(Dec 1, 2010 – Jan 31, 2011)

Bill-Nicole – “I think many people don’t change unless they have to!”

photos by: Anahi DeCanio (left),

@MomentumMag

sarah@momentumplanet.com

>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> Dear Momentum, I am glad to see a publication that promotes cycling as opposed to driving, finally! Good show! As I was browsing through the latest edition, and looking at the pictures, I noticed some of the cyclists that were obviously on the road were not wearing helmets. I think this leads new cyclists to feel that helmets are optional, which is wrong. Having hit the pavement a few times myself, I know how fast accidents happen and that, literally in a split second, one’s head could be bouncing off a curb. In your role of promoting good, safe cycling,

on the

@MomentumMag - Lack of penalties and responsibilities for drivers in steel cages who commit murders and dangerous collisions w/ human beings @BrianofVan (Brian of Van)

Let reduce bike thefts and let and hst rebates on bikes @MomentumMag @inkandpen (Katie P)

@MomentumMag Drunk & distracted drivers. Lower spd limits, esp in cities. Complete streets and/or sep paths to useful places. #cyclingissues Follow us on Twitter to win: @MomentumMag

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looking back

FIFTy issues of

mag.

June 2002 – Colin Mackenzie joins Momentum as advertising sales representative.

Oct. + Nov. 2003, Issue 16 – the final issue of Momentum as a non profit.

In 2oo1 with a few thousand

dollars donated by founding subscribers– Carmen Mills, Amy Walker and Joelle Paton launch a local non-profit publication: Momentum, the magazine for selfpropelled people. Fifteen thousand copies of the free bimonthly magazine are printed in a tabloid format on newsprint and distributed throughout Vancouver, Victoria and the Sunshine Coast in British Columbia.

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Oct. 2007 – Tania Lo and Mia Kohout join Momentum as associate publisher and director of advertising, respectively. >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> Nov. + Dec. 2007, Issue 30 – The first appearance of the regularly-occurring columns Gleanings, by Ron Richings; Mitey Miss, by Ulrike Rodrigues; and the Shawn Granton comic.

July 2006 – Terry Lowe joins Momentum as a writer, later to become editor and Vancouver editor.

June + July 2005, Issue “16.5” – Amy Walker re-launches the magazine as a sole proprietorship.

Oct. + Nov. 2005 Issue 18 – The sexy rain gear cover. Dec. 2006 – Wendell Challenger starts building up Momentum’s barebones Drupal website .

Oct. + Nov. 2006, Issue 24 – Chris Bentzen becomes Momentum’s graphic designer, significantly boosting the magazine’s aesthetic appeal.

Jan. + Feb. 2008, Issue 31 – Momentum is distributed to 20 cities across North America. The magazine shifts to a North American focus and begins working with independent and group distributors to bring the magazine to a coffee shop and specialty retailer near you. M o m e n t u m p l a n e t. c o m


Sept. 2008 – Momentum styles the first Urban Legend Bike Fashion Show at Interbike.

May 2009 – Momentum nominated for an Utne Reader independent press award.

March + April 2009, Issue 38 – The launch of Kristen Steele’s regularlyoccurring column, The Advocate.

Aug. 2009 – Lindsey Wasserman joins Momentum as its first full-time employee and office manager extraordinaire! Sept. 2009 – Mia Kohout and Tania Lo join Amy Walker as co-publishers.

Sept. + Oct. 2008, Issue 35 – Momentum’s first style issue.

Nov. + Dec. 2008, Issue 36 – David Niddrie begins photo editing for the magazine. M o m e n t u m p l a n e t. c o m

Sept. + Oct. 2009 – Dan Goldwater’s D.I.Y. column makes its first appearance. May + June 2009, Issue 39 - Sarah Ripplinger joins Momentum as the BC editor, later taking on the role of assistant editor as well.

March + April 2011, Issue 50 – The new Momentum team!

March + April 2010, Issue 44 – Sarah Ripplinger takes on the position of editor.

May 2010 – momentumplanet. com is relaunched.

Sept. + Oct. 2010, Issue 47 - First issue designed by SW!TCH studio, Momentum’s new design team.

MAR>APR>11 Jan>feb>11

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FAT TIRE co-founder, Kim Jordan

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It’s the hardest beer for us to make. It’s still a homebrew recipe. The hop/malt balance required makes me pull out what little hair I have left. But, last night as I savored Fat Tire Ale, all was forgiven. The Belgian inspiration, the elegance – it’s worth every ounce of frustration.

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REVEAL OUR JOY RIDE!

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bells+whistles arts & culture

2

1 Bryna Hallam + writer

photo project captures:

New York’s Best Side

B

ridget Fleming isn’t sure where her bike is. She knows it’s locked up somewhere in downtown New York City – “It’s such a good way of getting around” – but it takes the Australian-born photographer a moment to remember where she left it. It’s understandable, given that she’s trying to photograph the approximately 200 streets below 14th Street for her project, Downtown From Behind. The photos – showcased on her website and in a forthcoming book – are one part ode to the city’s streetscapes, one part fashionable portrait series, and come complete with what Fleming

calls a subliminal green message: Ride a bike. The idea, she said, is to snap portraits – yes, from behind – of some of the city’s most creative people riding bikes on downtown streets. The result? “Subtle, humble portraits” that are equally about the street and the person. “It feels like you’re there,” Fleming says of the photos. “New York has a specific feeling.” She found most of her subjects – designers, musicians, artists and more – through word of mouth. There is a wish list, though. Musician, Moby, for instance, has agreed to take part.

downtown behind photo credits

1 Allison Beale, founder of George Public Relations, photographed on Center Street during a winter snowstorm.

3

New York has a specific feeling. – Downtown From Behind photographer Bridget Fleming

The pictures are minimally set up, with Fleming’s photojournalisminfluenced style giving the pieces an almost candid feel. And even though her subjects ride in the middle of the street,

Fleming says it’s not hard to get the shot she wants. “Traffic really doesn’t move that fast.”

See more of the Downtown From Behind project at

downtownfrombehind.tumblr.com

2 Lauren Tinker photographed on West Broadway.

3 Evan Clabots, founder of Nonlinear Studios, photographed on 2nd Avenue.

Photos by Bridget Fleming

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M o m e n t u m p l a n e t. c o m


bells+whistles arts & culture benny benassi’s

Cycling Satisfaction

You’ve been riding for a long time, and nearly went pro. How does cycling fit into your life now? It’s only a hobby, but hobbies can be a pretty big part of your life. Tell me about your involvement with World Bicycle Relief. We got so much positive feedback from the tour when we started talking about it on our social networks that I thought it would be a good idea to use all that attention and energy to do something useful in the world. The credit goes to Joe Rosenberg, the tour manager, for finding out about World Bike Relief. As soon as I discovered this charity and what they do, I knew I wanted them to benefit from the project.

1

Bryna Hallam + writer

D 2

When I’m on tour, if there’s time, I hire a bike wherever I am and pedal for a couple of hours. – Dj Benny benassi

M o m e n t u m p l a n e t. c o m

J Benny Benassi has two loves: bikes and music. In fact, before he fell in love with music, he almost became a pro cyclist. So it was really only a matter of time before he combined the two, as he did for last fall’s Benny Benassi Bike Tour: A Musical Ride Through California… Without Breaks. The Grammywinning musician hopped on his custom fixed-gear "BBike" – specially designed by Qubic New York and constructed by Iridefixedmodena for the tour – and rode from San Francisco to San Diego on a major club tour.

Momentum: What made you decide to do the Bike Tour? Benny Benassi: I’ve always been a keen cyclist, ever since my dad put me on a bicycle almost before I could walk! I try to cycle most days and even when I’m on tour, if there’s time, I hire a bike wherever I am and pedal for a couple of hours. Then I was on a vacation with my girlfriend and we were driving down California slowly, enjoy-

ing the landscapes, as tourists, and it occurred to me that it was a route that could be done on a bike and that I could stop off and play in clubs along the way. It seemed like an interesting challenge and an opportunity to send out a message in favor of healthy sport and ecology that you don’t always get in the world of electronic club music, but is important. Why did you choose to ride the tour on a fixed gear? I know they’re really fashionable right now – kinda what skateboards were in the 1980s and 1990s. But they’re real fun and for a bike enthusiast like me there’s something “pure” about riding without gears. It’s a smooth ride and more challenging. Was it difficult to ride that distance or terrain on the bike? I trained for the tour so most of it was pretty manageable. There were a couple of sections that put me to the test though.

How did you get into music? I started DJing locally when I was still a teenager in my hometown in northern Italy. It was all I ever really wanted to do. I grew up in the same house as my younger cousin, Alle Benassi, who wanted to be a musician and studied classical music. He showed great promise and so when we were kids we would fight because I had the record player on at top volume and he was trying to practice his scales on the clarinet. It was hilarious. Then he developed an interest in the kind of electronic music I was into and we started experimenting together. To cut a long story short, almost 10 years ago now, he had an idea for a riff and out came a track called “Satisfaction.” The rest is history, I guess. What about electronic/ house music and DJing appeals to you? It’s what I do. It’s about connecting with people. What are you working on now? We’re finishing off the new album, which should be out soon and will be full of surprises, I hope! bennybenassi.com

photo credits 1

Benny Benassi on the road in California

2 Benny Benassi using music to rile up an already frenzied crowd. Photos by Rocco Bizzarri

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bells+whistles arts & culture It’s All

in the Hands

2

Cycling Filmmakers or

Filmmaking Cyclists?

1 By Trevor Hargreaves + writer

“F

ixing bikes has absolutely nothing to do with writing or performing music,” Arone Dyer said matter-of-factly. Dyer, one half of folk-duo Büke and Gäss, might see it that way, but the two worlds seem to meet in the bike mechanic/ musician’s dexterous fingers. As she puts it: “I put my fingers on the bike, I put my fingers on the strings and poof, there you have it: Magic!” Dyer’s adept mechanical hands are clearly apparent on her instrument. “It was once a baritone ukulele and now, after adding strings, it’s more like a guitar, but smaller,” she said, explaining the origins of her handmade "buke." In recent years, the two-piece act – bandmate Aron Sanchez plays a self-modified guitar-bass hybrid called a “gass” – has sporadically toured throughout North America, showcasing their music: an unpredictable jangling cacophony of timing changes, contradictory melodies, hazy vocals and obtuse sound effects. A variety of bike projects have also kept the Brooklyn-based Dyer on the move. “Two months after Hurricane Katrina, I went with a small group of mechanics to New Orleans and turned around 100 ten-dollar bikes so the people could get around, get to their jobs and avoid getting ripped apart by packs of abandoned dogs,” she said. The following year Dyer spent time race training in El Salvador, and followed that up with a gig as a race-mechanic in Nicaragua for the seven-day Vuelta. Most recently, she spent time in Ghana, teaching locals to build bamboo bikes in a setting with no electricity and few materials. “That was such an intense and rewarding experience,” she said. “The program – buke and gass co-founder aronE dyer continues to this day and there are similar programs in the States, including one right here in Brooklyn.” Despite this wealth of global experience, as a songwriter, Dyer draws from her everyday surroundings. “There’s lots of inspiration to be had if you’re open to it, no matter where you are.”

“There’s lots of inspiration to be had if you’re open to it, no matter where you are.”

The debut Büke and Gäss full-length album, Riposte, is available for purchase at bukeandgass.com

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F

ilmed by Bike (FBB) is cycling’s version of the Cannes Film Festival (the Golden Helmet is its Palme d’Or). The Clinton Street Theater in Portland, OR, will host the eighth annual bike-centric film festival this April 15 and 16. The 2011 program includes 30 short bicycle-themed pieces selected from a pool of hundreds of documentary, live-action and animated films submitted by amateur auteurs and experienced filmmakers. For the first time, FBB will include “a select few” longer format films (eight to 45 minutes), that festival organizers felt were too good to be ignored. Just like at Cannes, the real action happens outside. On opening night, the street in front of the theater is taken over by DJs, live performers and hundreds of cycling cinephiles for FBB’s kick-off party. “A lot of people intended to go to [see the films],” festival director Ayleen Crotty recalls, “but were having too much fun outside.”

For more information, see filmedbybike.org

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bells+whistles arts & culture

heelson wheels

You’ve Come a

Long Way, Ladies Bryna Hallam + writer

E

Heels are Teal Satin Pumps by Rinaldi. Available on Amazon.com. Photo by Dominique Labrosse Submit your heels on wheels photo to photo@momentumplanet.com

Wanted:

Local Organizers for The Pleasant Revolution Bicycle Music and Film Festival Tour 2011

T

he Ginger Ninjas and the South Yuba River Citizens League, creators of the Wild and Scenic Environmental Film Festival, are teaming up for a series of approximately 16 music/ film festivals and 80 shows at schools and clubs down the West Coast in the summer and fall of 2011. The festivals will both be delivered and powered by bicycles, as the Ginger Ninjas, creators of The Pleasant Revolution Bicycle Music Festival Tour, cycle down the coast toting all their instruments and a human-powered sound and projection system. The series will engage participants, as well as local and national media in the promotion of bicycle culture, watershed health and environmental citizenship. It will also be filmed by a cycling camera crew. This year’s route will become the established annual festival circuit, which will enable bands and fans to easily cycle from event to event. M o m e n t u m p l a n e t. c o m

ven though it only shares the stage with three humans, the bicycle is the real star of Evalyn Parry’s “SPIN” playing the role of liberator, muse and even musical instrument. The piece – theater performance, musical gig, poetry slam and history lesson rolled into one – is the songwriter and poet’s ode to the bike. Through a song cycle played on a vintage bicycle – handled by percussionist Brad Hart and sound artist Anna Friz – Parry takes a look at the role the bike has played in moving 4 women forward. Inspired by the story of Annie Londonderry – who in 1894 became the first woman to cycle around the world – “SPIN” also features Amelia Bloomer (namesake of bloomers) and Frances Willard (who learned to ride a bike at 53).

Parry also gets personal, telling what she calls a coming-of-age story of love, loss and “how to become a woman in the world.” But it’s not all historical references. Parry also gets personal, telling what she calls a coming-ofage story of love, loss and “how to become a woman in the world.” Parry “balances her frustration and outrage with irony and humor.” Earlier works tackled bottled water and maxi-pads – so “SPIN” also serves up some social activism: Even as the bike gave women greater freedom, it also tied them to marketing. Londonderry, for example, funded her trip by selling ad space and changing her last name from Kopchovsky to that of her sponsor’s, the Londonderry Lithia Spring Water Company. The world premiere of “SPIN” takes place in Toronto March 15-27.

For more information, visit Evalynparry.com/spin or buddiesinbadtimes.com

Schedule May to October Bicycle Music and Film Festivals (BMFFs) will be produced on weekends in the following locations: Vancouver, BC; Bellingham, Seattle and Olympia, WA; Portland, Corvallis, Eugene and Ashland, OR; Arcata, Mendocino, Marin County, Berkeley, San Francisco, San Jose, Santa Cruz, San Luis Obispo, Santa Barbara, Ventura, Santa Monica, Los Angeles and San Diego, CA; and Tijuana, Baja California, Mexico. During weekdays, the tour will visit grade schools, high schools and colleges, and will perform pedal-powered shows in several music venues.

The BMFF 2011 needs your help! If you are interested in being involved, please contact

photo credits: buke and gass

1 Büke and Gäss, with friend, take a moment in the tub. Photo by Grant Cornett.

filmed by bike

2 Megan Sinnott, Filmed by Bike's festival assistant, poses in the Nutcase Helmets photo booth at the Opening Night Street Party. Photo courtesy Filmed by Bike.

crowd

3 A street view of the raucous Filmed by Bike Opening Night Street Party. Photo by Andrew Kreps.

spin

4 Evalyn Parry. Photo by Tanja Tiziana.

Kipchoge Spencer + 530-362-8797 + kipchoge@gmail.com

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bells+whistles what's new the latest and greatest people, events and things happening in bike-friendly North America

gear&gadgets Colorful fenders made from recycled skateboards are one of the offerings of Lindsay Jo Holmes’s MapleXO. maplexo.com/blogs/ news/2073582-fenders

Photo by Lindsay Holmes.

event roundup DC Bike Summit March 8 to 10 Grand Hyatt, Metro Centre in Washington, DC. Join bike leaders, youth group organizers, retailers, club leaders, trailbuilders, bicycle suppliers and other leading voices for three powerful days in Washington, DC. New York City Department of Transportation commissioner Janette Sadik-Khan will present the keynote speech at the opening plenary on Wednesday March 9. bikeleague.org/

conferences/summit11/index.php

want more?

hard case. A touch-sensitive membrane on the front allows full use of applications and a soft silicone liner inside provides a secure fit and shock resistance. You can also still take pictures on the fly and plug into your headphones thanks to a lens and ports on the case. MSRP $64.99 USD. thinkbiologic.com

Büke & Gäss singer Arone Dyer, who is also a bike mechanic, uses homemade instruments to make twangy and multilayered music with bandmate Aron Sanchez. Their album, Riposte, was released in September 2010. bukeandgass. bandcamp.com/ album See our coverage on p. 18. East Vancouver, BC, cycling apparel manufacturer, Pilot Rider, makes high quality clothes from regionallysourced materials. pilotrider.com All-in-one – A universal bikemounted gadget holder that can carry your PDA, GPS, phone, iPod and other gadgets. thinkgeek.com/ gadgets/traveloutdoors/e04d BioLogic Bike Mount for iPhone 4 – Protect your iPhone 4 with this fully-enclosed

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This homemade iPad and speaker combo isn’t for sale, but is still very cool. hardwaresphere. com/ 2010/09/24 /ipad-and-speakerbike-mount Share your music with others in the bike lane with this little speaker, the SDI iHome IH85B Bike Mount Speaker System for iPod. tinyurl. com/2bpcno2 Bicycle Radio – Tuesdays from 7 to 8 p.m. MST, tune into this weekly online radio show all about the wild and wonderful world of cycling. bicycleradio.com

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Seattle Bike Expo March 12 to 13 Smith Cove Cruise Terminal in Seattle, WA. This two-day consumer bicycle expo, produced by the Cascade Bicycle Club, brings together consumers, bike shops, events and industry leaders. This is the largest show of its kind on the West Coast.

music&apps The “Bike Doctor” is in. This app, now available for iPhone and Android, gives you step-by-step instructions on how to repair your bike. Now that’s a handy app to have on the road. bikedoctorapp.com

cascade.org/EandR/expo/index.cfm

San Diego Custom Show April 8 to 10 San Diego Community Concourse, Golden Hall in San Diego, CA. Browse the custom bikes on display, plan your next purchase and meet frame builders. Also check out the Swap meet at the show venue on Saturday, April 9 from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., organized by New York Bike Jumble in conjunction with the San Diego Custom Bicycle Show. sandiegocustombicycleshow.com Portland Bicycle Show April 9 to 10 Oregon Convention Center in Portland, OR. See Portland’s largest display of bicycles, gear and apparel at the Pedal Nation Bicycle Show, presented by Drive Less/ Save More. The event promises to have lots of fun activities for everyone, too. pdxbicycleshow.com

New Amsterdam Bike Show April 30 Center 548 in Chelsea, New York, NY. This is the first New York City bicycle show in five years and it promises to be a big one. The event will feature three floors of bikes and accessories. Proceeds benefit Transportation Alternatives, which will be providing valet bike parking and safety tips. newambikeshow.com

Momentum wants to know What’s New.

Send us information about the latest bike-related app, music and news story that’s adding to your commute/ bike-friendly lifestyle. Email WhatsNew@momentumplanet.com

M o m e n t u m p l a n e t. c o m


bells+whistles street sense the mistake of

Ticketing Cyclists By Mia Birk + writer

R

iding home not long ago, I spotted a police officer videotaping bicyclists at a large and lovely traffic circle on one of Portland’s most popular bikeways in Ladd’s Addition, one of its oldest residential neighborhoods. More than 4,000 cyclists a day circumnavigate the roundabout, which features a park in the middle and is the salient feature of this historic neighborhood. A couple times a year, cranky neighbors complain about cyclists rolling the stop signs. The police usually respond by handing out a couple dozen $242 tickets and then go back to ignoring it. Very productive. Once again, someone had complained, and the officer was there to document the situation. Sure cyclists don’t come to a complete stop at this or most stopcontrolled intersections. Most motorists don’t come to a complete stop either. I can explain to the officer until I’m blue in the face that it is desirable, normal and natural to keep up momentum when bicycling. The fact is that stop signs were placed at intersections to keep two-ton vehicles from crashing into

add yield signs and/ or pavement markings to govern cyclist behavior. This infrastructure already appears all over bicycle-friendly cities in Europe. Great idea, but easier said than done. Even in Portland, our progressive, bicycle-friendly traffic engineers are not ready to take that step. Another option is to change state and provincial laws to allow cyclists to yield at stop signs, as the US state of Idaho has done. Again, much easier said than done. Other attempts – three failed efforts in Oregon, for example – to make this shift have been beaten back by law enforcement advocates who feel that cyclists already have too many privileges. One argument they use is that it sends a mixed message: why should cyclists yield if motorists have to stop? How do we explain this to our kids? On the contrary, it sends a clear message: if you’re driving, stop, and if you’re bicycling, yield. The fact is that making bicyclefriendly communities is not just about building a bikeway system and encouraging people to use it. It’s also about the evolution of our attitudes and mores, our models and policies, codes and traffic control devices, laws and enforcement

...to expect bicycle riders to behave exactly like motorists is like expecting kayakers to follow the same rules as motor boaters.

M o m e n t u m p l a n e t. c o m

practices. A bicycle is not a motor vehicle; to expect bicycle riders to behave exactly like motorists is like expecting kayakers to follow the same rules as motor boaters. Ultimately, we need to tailor a set of laws based on cycling as its own form of transportation, rather than hold on to today’s commonly-held belief that “the bicycle is mostly the same as a motor vehicle.”

Photo © Russ Roca

each other. One-to-two-hundredpound bicycle riders do not need to come to a complete stop to avoid serious injury. Stop signs may do a fine job of governing the right-ofway for motorists, but cyclists need a different system. The simplest solution: at the traffic circle in Ladd’s Addition, and at just about every stop signcontrolled location, we should

SUSTAINABLE TRANSPORT WE CREATE ART - ILLUSTRATAION OF COP GIVING TICKET? -(KO)

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bells+whistles bike curious

1 commuter Breezer

By Ben Van Loon + writer

How to Buy a Bike: Five Tips from an Expert 2 folding Dahon Speed P8

4 road Felt F1 SL 2010 Road Bike

3 touring Raleigh Sojourn Touring bike

F

or the budding cyclist, buying a bike can be as exciting as it is overwhelming. You have mountain (6) , commuter (1), city (8), Dutch city (9), cargo (5), folding (2), cyclocross (7), touring (3) and road bikes (4), all with various amounts of carbon fiber, aluminum and/ or steel. How do you know which one is right for you? The best place to start answering that question is your local bike shop. Chances are that the people there are knowledgeable and willing to help. With the advent of Yelp and other customer-generated review websites, finding an honest and friendly retailer has become a little easier. But please keep in mind – as anyone who has worked in retail knows – that not all reviews are created equal. Ultimately, as a conscientious buyer, you will have to go to a shop and find out for yourself. And there is no reason to be scared – bike shops don’t bite. Here is a list of five tips I’ve compiled from my experience to help you with your passage into cycling. You can make your life better by riding a bike and if anything, the purchase of a bike should be as easy as… well… riding a bike, which brings me to point one: (1) Try it before you buy it: Surprisingly, there are shops out there that don’t allow test rides, and people still buy bikes from them. Later, these same customers often end up at different shops and ask employees there why their

bike doesn’t fit right. No surprise there. How do you know if you like it when you can’t even ride it? (2) Know what you want: Simply trying bikes doesn’t tell you everything about what you want. You also need to know what you’ll be using your bike for. Commuting? Training? For fun? Do you need suspension? Fenders are important if you ride in the rain. A basket and/ or rack is useful for carrying things. If you have hills where you ride, you’ll need at least seven gears. There are always questions to be asked, but the more you know about what you want, the easier it will be to find the right bike. (3) Do your research: A lot of people will look up product reviews and online write-ups, but – as with anything on the internet – not everything you read is true. Real research is up to you and is best when based on your experience. Go to a few different shops, ask questions, ride a few different bikes and see for yourself what works best. (4) Be careful about purchasing bikes online: Sometimes, a bike’s warranty is void unless it’s sold by an authorized dealer. That said, your local bike shop might not carry the ride you have your heart set on, so internet purchases are necessary in some cases. (5) Support bike shops: Supporting local businesses is good for the local economy and is the first step towards getting involved in the cycling community, which is what cycling is all about: fun, community and connectedness.

5 cargo Yuba Mundo

6 mountain

7 cyclocross Surly Cross Check

Brodie Fury

8 city Globe

9 dutch city Electra Amsterdam (an American take on a Classic Dutch)

Ben is a writer, reader, cyclist and cinephile, in no particular order. He lives in Chicago, IL, with his wife, their five bikes and Rowsdower the Cat. When he’s not writing, he’s riding, selling, working on and volunteering with bikes, and he has been for years. Follow him on Twitter (@benvanloon) or on the blogosphere (bvanloon.blogspot.com)

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M o m e n t u m p l a n e t. c o m


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M o m e n t u m p l a n e t. c o m

AD FORM


familystyle Kathleen Wilker + writer & photographer

party pastimes

Throw Your Own:

bike-themed birthday party

Make your own handlebar tassels with ribbon and tape. Cut a bunch of ribbon to size. Tape one end of the ribbon bunch to make a firm end you can poke into or tape onto your handlebars.

1

B

irthday parties are fun. Birthday parties with bikes are even more fun! When our daughter, Anna Sierra, turned five years old, we asked her how she wanted to celebrate her special day. Having recently learned how to ride her very own big girl bike with no training wheels, Anna Sierra said she wanted a bike birthday. Hmmm. Her dad, Derek, and I are avid cyclists. We definitely think bikes are a party. But we weren’t quite sure what a bike birthday was. So we invented one. It was so much fun we had another one the next year. You can too!

location

We picked a big, beautiful, shady neighborhood park with a splash pad for the party. Wading pools are fun, but splash pads are better for parties because they don’t require the same level of adult supervision. Splash pads are also great because you can wash off in them if you get covered in icing. We picked a park that we don’t usually go to because we wanted to avoid running into friends from our neighborhood who weren’t invited to the party.

transportation

We informed our guests it was a bike party, so they all rode their bikes to the park. Big kids rode their own bikes. Little kids rode on bike seats or in trailers. Some of the little ones rode their tricycles. Now that I’m looking at the pictures again, I think some of them were so little they needed their parents to push their tricycles.

bike parade

By the time everyone arrived, there were so many bikes all over the park that we decided to have a bike parade. All the kids hopped on their bikes and lined up behind Derek. He said something sweet and fatherly about how proud he was of Anna Sierra’s biking and how he hoped everyone would have a great parade. Then he blew his whistle and the whole gang rode onto a nearby basketball court. It was a wheel-spinning, riding in circles, bell-dinging, hand waving, giggling, some-kind-of-wonderful parade. The kids traded bikes, Derek gave everyone a turn on the trail-a-bike, big kids and little kids tried out the front seat and the parade carried on. M o m e n t u m p l a n e t. c o m

Personalize your bike with a license plate. This can be a homemade plate created from cardboard and zip-tied into place by the handlebars. Or you can try contacting your local bike racing group and ask them to print some personalized license plates for the kids. Somersault Events (somersault.ca), an organization that puts on triathlons, created personalized plates for every kid at a friend’s street party.

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For older kids eager to show off their well-honed bike handling skills, try creating an obstacle course for them to weave in and out of. Bike races are also a possibility. But I find the less competition at parties, the fewer tears.

food

Keep it simple. Pizza seems to taste extra delicious when it’s delivered by bike trailer. Bowls of fresh berries or hummus and pita are also tasty and portable treats. Transporting iced cupcakes in a bike trailer seemed messy. So we brought un-iced cupcakes in one container, icing in another, and the kids decorated their own cupcakes when they were ready to eat them. Now that’s an easy craft!

loot bags

When the kids started getting lots of birthday invites, our group of friends made a pact to not give each other’s kids landfill loot bags. Instead of plastic crap, some parents give one book. Some give seeds for the children to take home and plant. Some give one special toy. A bike bell or a bike light would be a great take-away from a bike party.

Tattoos for the young biker might be in order. Temporary tattoos are cheap, widely available and won’t take up a lot of space in your pannier on the ride to the park.

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Kathleen Wilker is a regular blogger on Momentum's Families on Bikes blog. For more tips and experiences from real families who ride, check out momentumplanet.com/blogs /families-on-bikes

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familystyle

bicycling with newborns ryan mijker + writer

I

n North America, babies are expected to be kept off a bike until they are at least nine months old and are able to wear a helmet. So why do some parents flout convention? Online research produces very little information on bicycling with newborns. Angela Koch, advocacy and events coordinator with Revolution Cycles in Arlington, VA, found what little research there was focused on negative assumption and misinformation. Instead of depending on that information, parents have looked to other parts of the world where cycling with small babies is widespread.

“There is no reason why, if a child is able to be carried in a car, they shouldn’t be able to be carried in a bicycle trailer.”

- Todd Litman, founder and executive director of the Victoria Transportation Policy Institute

newborns photo credits Six-week-old Itziar Castellan takes her first trip to the library. Photo

1

by Tania Lo.

2 Four-month-old Mary Creese is ready for a ride with dad, David Creese. Photo by David Creese.

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When to start bicycling with a baby is a personal judgment. For Carie Weisenbach-Folz, a mother of three from Portland, OR, the time came as soon as she felt physically able. “I was a little nervous with my first child. Our oldest is now six and a half and we started to ride with him when he was about one month old.” Weisenbach-Folz felt more comfortable riding with her third child, starting just weeks after he was born. Jessica Roberts, a program manager with Alta Planning + Design in Portland, OR, started cycling with her child when he was around five months old, approaching it more cautiously. There is a lot of fear around parenting and this extends to cycling with your newborn. There was a “fear drummed into us [bicycling parents] about vibrations that would damage his nervous system,” Roberts said. I asked Diana Leung – a research assistant at BC Children’s Hospital in Vancouver, BC – to

1 contact half a dozen researchers specializing in pediatric injuries to inquire about the safety of cycling with newborns. None knew of any literature or hard evidence to support the claim that vibrations from normal bicycle riding would lead to brain damage in a newborn. Parents are concerned about different risks and threats; many, such as Jasper Lieber in Portland, told me that other road users and collisions with cars were their biggest fears. Others saw no extra risk and no difference between cycling and walking with a stroller. Todd Litman, founder and executive director of the Victoria Transportation Policy Institute, who started cycling with his oldest son when he was just days old, addressed the risk. He said: “There is no reason why, if a child is able to be carried in a car, they shouldn’t be able to be carried in a bicycle trailer. A lot of people overlook the risks and stresses associated with driving, but make a big deal about bicycling.” Bicycling with your newborn can be done safely. Some parents I have spoken to choose to cycle with a car seat secured in a bicycle trailer. Weisenbach-Folz said that: “With our first child we had him buckled into a regular car seat that was strapped into a trailer. I was not super worried about safety. We made him as safe as we could.” For their second child they purchased a Bakfiets and secured the car seat to its base. Living in a city with a decent cycling network helps; so does good route planning. Bicycle

2

M o m e n t u m p l a n e t. c o m


familystyle

‘Stay Dry’

kids clothing W

hen spring showers start to fall, it’s a good idea to get your little one suited up in warm, waterproof rain gear. Here are a couple of options that will keep young riders smiling on drizzly days.

Abeko Anton Jacket and Felix Overalls MSRP $130 CAD Reviewed by Jonathon Reynolds This Swedish-made rain set has a bib overall and a long jacket with high visibility neon cuffs and reflective tape. Made from PVC-free plastic, they're also super safe for your children. Combine the fire fighter-inspired set with the waterproof hats (MSRP $30) – they fit under a helmet – and mitts (MSRP $27), and your little cyclist will be warm and dry in any weather. The set was very durable, showing almost no signs of wear after two months of solid use in the winter rains of Vancouver – five hours per day for over 60 days. puddlegear.com

boulevards, low traffic streets with good connections and safe intersections are often the primary routes for parents cycling with their newborns. Angela Koch, whose first child was born in Jacksonville, FL – “a cycling nightmare” – was relieved to move to Portland where her two other children were introduced to cycling on some of the city’s comparatively safer streets. Parents have strong motivations to start riding with their newborns, such as convenience and pleasure. Brett Hondorp, a father from Portland, told me, “With the bike we could just park outside and never have to go into the parking garage. It was the healthiest thing for me and my child.” All parents interviewed for this article managed the risks they were taking with their children by choosing appropriate carriers and quiet cycling routes.

Tuffo – MuddyBuddy MSRP $29.95 USD Reviewed by Jonathon Reynolds The real joy of this rain suit is the total body coverage, which ensures your child stays warm and dry. The hood works great over a hoody and under a helmet. Elastic cuffs keep out water and the reinforced seat and knees enhance the product’s longevity. It isn’t very breathable, but then it is totally waterproof. The rain suit started to wear a bit along the inside of the ankles, due to the wear and tear of rubbing up against boots and from the action of riding, and so would benefit from another section of heavyweight nylon. tuffo.com

kids gear photo credits Photos are courtesy of Tuffo and Puddlegear

M o m e n t u m p l a n e t. c o m

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readytoroll:

morning to night

with a folding bike

Molly Millar + writer/stylist & David Niddrie + Photographer

am

7 42

am

am

8 36

pm

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8 01

2 38 M o m e n t u m p l a n e t. c o m


pm

2 39

pm

pm

6 26

6 49

7:42 a.m.

And another day begins. After the alarm rings, Andrew heads to the shower, has a quick breakfast and then dresses for a day of riding and working at the office. Today, a pair of Yaz-Gap dark denim jeans, a purple micro check Hotel shirt and a pinstriped Arsenal blazer are perfect for a casual day at the office and the short commute to the subway. And what will Andrew be riding to work? Why a forest green Brompton folding bike, of course.

8:01 a.m.

Twenty minutes later, Andrew is sailing through his neighborhood on his way to the subway. On this clear, mild spring day, a blazer and shirt are all Andrew needs. Depending on how strenuous your cycle to work is, you may want to consider wearing a T-shirt under your shirt to prevent sweat stains from appearing. Also ensure that your blazer is a good fit and allows for freedom of movement while on your bike. Jeans and bikes have always worked well together, as jeans are often flexible, durable and warm. M o m e n t u m p l a n e t. c o m

pm

9 19

8:36 a.m.

6:26 p.m.

2:38 p.m.

6:49 p.m.

2:39 p.m.

9:19 p.m.

After a short ride on the subway, Andrew strides out of the station and on towards work. From cyclist to young urban professional, Andrew’s look translates both on and off the bike. On the way back from a meeting, Andrew decides to stop for a cup of tea and a crossword. The Brompton sits next to him in kickstand mode. Spring weather can often be unpredictable, which is why carrying outerwear, such as this Portland Showers Pass jacket with brown pin stripes, is always a good idea. The waterproof shell and the reflective piping accents are just two of the unique features of Showers Pass jackets.

With the work day behind him, Andrew slips into his evening look, pairing dark denim jeans with a red Gold Case shirt with navy collar and cuffs. Not only easy and comfortable to wear, the navy detailing on the shirt looks sharp. Andrew’s date has arrived and they take a seat at the bar, with the bike folded underneath, of course. There really isn’t anyplace you can’t take this bike. Their conversation has been engrossing, and a second date is planned, but now it’s time to go home. Andrew unfolds his bike on the street and, after slipping on an Arsenal blazer for extra style and warmth, he’s ready for the night ride home.

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A huge thanks to our model, Andrew Curran, Grace Chumfong of Antihero (302 West Cordova St., Vancouver), Rain City Bikes (2518 Manitoba St., Vancouver), Rino's and the Narrow Lounge. mar>apr>11

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bikeshop

Sex Appeal your grandmother could love Carolyn Szczepanski + writer & Adeline Adeline + photos

A

deline Adeline is the product of genuine love and strange coincidence. The welcoming vibe starts with the business sign at the chic little bike shop in New York City’s TriBeCa neighborhood. Owner Julie Hirschfeld named her store after two women close to her heart. “Both my grandmothers’ names are Adeline,” she said with a laugh. “It’s kind of a weird coincidence.” It’s also unexpected that Hirschfeld, a graphic designer by trade, would ever dabble in two-wheeling commerce. But love works in mysterious ways. What Hirschfeld thought would be a simple affair turned into a very serious relationship. A native of Washington, DC, Hirschfeld built a successful graphic design firm in New York City. But, after a decade in the business, her heart wasn’t in it. “I was just starting to burn out,” she said. Her passion was reignited when she started looking for a new bicycle. Her eye for aesthetics drew her to the vintage charm of an old Schwinn. It was love at first sight. “I didn’t need 15 speeds; I liked that it was simple,” she said. But her new bike lacked one crucial element: durability. Luckily, Hirschfeld’s circle of friends included a number of Europeans, including folks from Denmark, the Mecca of cycling. “They pointed me in the direction of a lot of brands they knew and it opened a whole world of bikes I hadn’t seen,” she said. She was introduced to commuter bike brands commonly seen on the streets of Amsterdam and Copenhagen: Pashley, Batavus and Workcycles.

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They were so practical and beautiful that Hirschfeld was shocked when she couldn’t find any of them in the supposedly trend-setting, globe-circling shops of New York City. By January 2010, Hirschfeld found a retail space. Two months later, Adeline Adeline opened its doors. The sleek space, with wood accents and pastel paint, has earned Hirschfeld comparisons to “Sex and the City” protagonist Carrie Bradshaw. She has an eye for both form and function. “Our bikes are simple. Most of them have internally geared hubs, so you don’t have to mess with a chain falling off. They’re as user-friendly and easy as possible.” Of course, simplicity doesn’t overrule style. Sleek accessories – from Basil’s wicker baskets to hand-painted DringDring bells – are a huge part of Adeline Adeline. Like any trend-setter, Hirschfeld wants to be at the forefront of European-style innovation. In 2011, she plans to expand her offerings of BioMega bikes, bring in new models from Linus and introduce PUBLIC bikes for the sportier set.

“I want bikes I feel you can fall in love with.” - Julie Hirschfeld

Hirschfeld won’t carry just any bike in a shop named after her grandmothers. “I want bikes I feel you can fall in love with,” she said. “If people are spending $500, I want the bike to really be something they connect to, an object of lust and desire." adelineadeline.com

M o m e n t u m p l a n e t. c o m


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Mµ Uno

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this is the bike lifestyle

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M o m e n t u m p l a n e t. c o m


this is the bike lifestyle

bike this is the

lifestyle Elizabeth O. Hurst + writer

M o m e n t u m p l a n e t. c o m

m

omentum has tracked the evolution of cycling culture since its very first issue. Now we’re tackling the definition of the “bike lifestyle” head on. Do cyclists across North America have one way to describe how they lead their lives? Or is the experience as unique as each individual cyclist? The beauty of the bike is the diversity of its application. For those who have integrated cycling into their urban situations, the bike has become a natural extension of their lives, not a label. However, they do share many common experiences and values that distinguish their lifestyle choices. Meli Grosa, a San Francisco-based graphic designer and author of the Bikes and The City blog, said: “If you just want to commute to work or if you just want to ride your bike to a party, do it … Why keep yourself to a single description when the city has so much to offer?” Sandra Looft, a lecturer at Iowa State University and author of the Simply Bike blog, commutes daily, even in

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this is the bike lifestyle

3

4

the snow. She said, “You don’t have to bike daily to be a commuter cyclist. If you use a bike every time it makes sense to use a bike, then you’re a commuter cyclist.” Probably the only limitation placed on lifestyle cyclists in North America is the distance they can travel. Commuting six miles (about 10 kilometers) one way is the maximum distance someone can feasibly ride with a low-maintenance bike and ensemble. Eric Kamphof, general manager of Curbside Cycle in Toronto, ON, calls this the “lifestyle radius.” The bike lifestyle is possible in suburban areas with sufficient public transportation, but Kamphof said, “Where it works best is downtown because where you live, everything

5

is within 10 kilometers of home.” Kamphof said it’s much safer to cycle on Toronto’s bike-friendly city streets than it is to navigate wide, high-speed suburban roads. The most obvious “requirement” of living the bike lifestyle is owning a set of wheels that is enjoyable to ride. Urban dwellers that habitually cycle around town choose bikes suited to the lifestyle radius, whether it’s a brand new imported-from-Europe bike or a vintage Raleigh purchased on Craigslist. “Anything you have in New York is going to get abused,” said Lee Palor of Brooklyn, originally from London. He commutes daily to the clothing boutique he works at in SoHo, Manhattan. “I never had a bike in the city that I really cared about

bike lifestyle photo credits ( 1 and 2 from previous spread). 1 Staalstraat in Amsterdam on a rainy afternoon. Photo by ericelsewhere.com (page 32)

2

Photo by Sandra Looft of Simply Bike. (page 33)

7

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3 Eric Kamphof of

Curbside Cycle in Toronto, ON. Photo by Gillian Goerz

4 Yvonne Bambrick leads the 'Mayoral Candidates' Ride' with members of the Toronto Cyclists Union prior to the fall municipal election on Oct 25th, in Toronto. Photo by Martin Reis 5 Dave Feucht, photographed by his wife

Patrina, after arriving home from work on his 4-Speed 1953 Raleigh Sports. Photo by

6 People enjoy a spring afternoon on a Fabre Street terrasse in Montreal, 2009.

7 Clarence Eckerson Jr. covering the first NYC Summer Streets on car-free Park Avenue in 2008. He is wearing a Ciclovia t-shirt from Bogota that he promised he would not wear until NYC got it first "ciclovia-style" road closure. He did not have to wait long.

Photo by François Hogue

Photo by Fatima Colman

Patrina Feucht

M o m e n t u m p l a n e t. c o m


this is the bike lifestyle

gettingstarted If you’re not already leading a bike lifestyle, here are some tips that will get you on track to being a successful everyday cyclist in no time. 1

s tart slow

Don’t try to travel far distances by bike right off the bat. Take a trip to the nearest convenience store or a friend’s place and work your way up from there. 2

b  ike sharing

Many cities have bike share programs – such as Montreal, Denver and Minneapolis – that you can take advantage of for making small trips around your city.

3

get a lift

Integrated cycling and public transit systems allow you to place your bike on buses and light rail systems. If you live far away from transit and your final destination, you might also consider putting your bike in the trunk or on a rack, driving part of the way and cycling the rest. 4

There are many different bikes on the market, each suited to a different purpose and riding style. The best way to enjoy your ride is to invest in a bike that meets your needs. Here are a few bikes and brief descriptions of what they are used for:

6

because it will get destroyed, scratched, knocked over or even stolen.” Urban families that live by bike might need an array of cargo, utility and light bikes to meet their needs. “After a while you know how much each of your different bikes can hold,” said Martina Fahrner, co-owner of Clever Cycles in Portland, OR. “You know, ‘I am going to take our Dutch bike,’ means I can take about five shopping bags.” In Toronto, Curbside Cycle sells high-end, year-round urban European-manufactured bikes. They’re a worthwhile investment, Kamphof said. “People can’t help but think that a bike is a toy,” said Kamphof, “but they have to think of it more like a car.” The weight, body positioning and gears of a city-specific bike distinguish it from bikes built for sport or leisure. There isn’t a “one bike fits all” for the urban bicycle commuter. Bike choice all depends on the cyclist’s financial, family and living situations and, of course, it depends on personal preference. Bike attire isn’t universal either. Concerns about sacrificing fashion for purely functional garb can prevent someone from choosing that lifestyle. “Clothing was one of the reasons I didn’t know

M o m e n t u m p l a n e t. c o m

if I could start biking every day for transportation,” said Looft. “I was hesitant to change how I dressed, but was amazed at how easy it was to hop on a bike wearing what I usually wear.” Outlier Tailored, a Brooklyn-based clothing company, designs clothing for men and women that accommodates the urban bike lifestyle and looks crisp in an urban setting. “Our approach is that you don’t really need to prepare (to ride) as long as you’re wearing clothing that responds to the different elements and social settings you’ll be in,” said Tyler Clemens, Outlier co-founder. “It’s a way of preparing without waking up in the morning and planning out what you need for the day.” It isn’t a requirement that lifestyle cyclists match their ensembles to their bikes, but when they mesh, the city biking experience becomes more natural and fun. Being a lifestyle cyclist has some obvious benefits, including improved wellness, sanity and finances. “It doesn’t take long to save a ton of cash,” said urban cycling consultant Yvonne Bambrick, who bikes year-round in Toronto. Plus, she said: “Bicycles are just so efficient, I couldn’t get to half the stuff I do in a day if I only used transit. For longer distances you can combine

c hoose the right ride

City bikes: a comfortable ride for commuters traveling shorter distances - usually less than six miles (10 kilometers). City bikes are also often easy to mount and dismount and good city bikes come equipped with fenders, chain guard, bell, racks, baskets and a kickstand. Folding bikes: can meet the needs of people who want to travel by car, public transit, plane, etc. Folding bikes are light and easy to step into and off of. They are also easy to transport and store in small apartments. E-bikes: electric-assisted bicycles are ideal for people who travel far distances or who want a bit of help with their commute. Cargo bikes: for cyclists that want to haul groceries, kids and other larger objects. 5

p  roximity

Living a bike lifestyle might also mean looking for a place near to where you work, shop and play. Finding a home within five kilometers of the places you frequent the most is ideal. 6

a ccessories

Enhance your commute by adding the right equipment to your bike, such as panniers, racks, baskets, clothing that is comfortable and stylish to ride in, lights and ergonomic grips.

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this is the bike lifestyle

8

the two, but with a bike you’re on your own reliable schedule and can take whatever route you prefer.” Unreliable public transportation in cities like New York and San Francisco make the bike an incredible time-saving alternative. Grosa of San Francisco started using a bike 10 years ago because, “I was working and going to school, and I couldn’t sit around and wait for the bus.” Palor of New York City finds the predictability of a bike priceless. “You know exactly how long it is going to take you to get from one place to the next.” Nadia Barrera, project coordinator for the Neighborhood Connectivity Division of the City of Austin, TX, attested that “the best part of being a bike commuter is the freedom to pick up and go.” The bike has helped Dave Feucht, an IT specialist in Portland, OR, improve his life.

“A lot of things I like to do now happen in the course of my day, like exercise and photography,” Feucht said. “The bike has helped bring cohesiveness to my life.” Individuals looking for more freedom and outdoor activity are taking life by the handlebars to make it happen. While environmental benefits are more than an afterthought, the bike lifestyle is something people create for themselves first. “We are seeing people be more individualistic in riding their bikes,” said Meghan Cahill, communications director for the League of American Bicyclists. Lifestyle cyclists find strength in the urban bike community that surrounds them while still enjoying the independence the bike offers. Barrera recalled the support she felt in Austin while biking to a city hall meeting. “I came to a stoplight where there were two other women in work attire next

bike lifestyle photo credits 8 Sandra Looft lives in Aimes, IA and blogs about her daily life on a bike at simplybike.wordpress.com. Photo by

Sandra Looft of Simply Bike.

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9 Outlier’s Abe Burmeister (L) and Tyler Clemens. Photo by Bjorn

Wallander/ bjornwallander.com

10 Meli on Valencia Street during one of the super fun Sunday Streets events in San Francisco’s Mission district, June 2009. Photo courtesy Meli bikesandthecity.com

9

to me, she said. “It’s nice to have companionship of people also arriving to work in a different way.” The virtual community has become a vital resource for connecting emerging commuter bike cultures across North America. Feucht, for instance, who lives and blogs in the wellestablished bike community of Portland, finds that most of his readers are out-of-towners. Looft finds much more support for her lifestyle in her national and international blog community than where she lives in Ames, Iowa. “Having that community online that I don’t have in person is huge in inspiring me to keep going,” Looft said. “It’s especially helpful to hear from people that live in places where the weather is like Iowa’s. It makes me want to keep cycling.” Streetfilms, a non-profit that produces films about livable cities worldwide, contributes to the online network of committed and aspiring urban cyclists; they have produced 300 films that have received about three million online visitors. Clarence Eckerson, Jr., who has made 200 of Streetfilms’ short films, said “They [the films] cajole cities into a very beneficial rivalry to become better cities and implement best transportation practices.”

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this is the bike lifestyle

10

Communities that foster shared bike experiences make it easier for others to see the benefits of a bike lifestyle. It is often citizen cyclists who drive the dialogue on community wellness issues with decisionmakers, all while inspiring their neighbors. Though cycling culture mostly emerges from the ground up, city planning and design are essential ingredients. “With improvements in infrastructure in states, businesses and communities, hopefully people will catch on to the bike lifestyle and experience the benefits of riding a bike,” Cahill said. Companies like PayPal use incentive programs and improved facilities to encourage their employees to bike. David Dusatko, a PayPal project manager, said the benefits are clear. “Our commuters have reported feeling more alert upon arrival, making better dietary choices and having a stress outlet on the ride home,” Dusatko said. “Our campus challenge builds camaraderie and provides a healthy, positive and competitive environment.” Benefits such as these are why more and more people are choosing to lead a lifestyle that includes cycling. Whether riding to work, school, with a friend or for a night out on the town, cycling is one element in the daily mix that keeps North America moving. This is the bike lifestyle.

M o m e n t u m p l a n e t. c o m

web links blogs simplybike. wordpress.com bikesandthecity. blogspot.com portlandize.com streetfilms.org

city-friendly bikes clevercycles.com store.curbside.on.ca

bike education

From the League of American Bicyclists: bikeleague. org/programs/ education

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+venture: up close & personal with

caroline samponaro Sarah Ripplinger + writer & HARRY ZERNIKE + PHOTOGRAPHER

O

ne of New York City’s biggest movers and shakers in the grassroots cycling department, Caroline Samponaro first fell in love with bikes as an undergraduate at Columbia College back in 2000 – her thesis was about bicycling in NYC. Now the full-time director of bicycle advocacy with Transportation Alternatives (since 2006), she continues her quest to get more people riding the streets.

what bike do you ride?

My daily bike is a single-speed with a front basket. It’s a no-frills steel frame, with upright handlebars, perfect for my daily commutes and trips to meetings around the five boroughs. A few years ago I built up a geared bike for myself that has a rack so I can attach panniers and carry groceries or do errands more easily. Hands down my favorite bike is the steel, fixed-gear that I designed and brazed last summer (with a ton of help and support from fastboycycles.com). I am 5’5’’, pretty average height, yet even the smallest unisex bike frames are all out of proportion for a woman my size. I designed my frame to accommodate 26’’ wheels – and am experimenting with a more perfect frame size for the growing number of women riding bikes in the US.

what has enabled Transportation Alternatives (TA) to attract 8,000 members?

Our mission is to reclaim NYC streets for the majority of New Yorkers who are walking, taking public transit and, increasingly, riding bikes. Streets and sidewalks make up 80 percent of our public space in the Big Apple. TA’s campaign work helps to connect the dots between the many different voices that want safer, more livable public spaces. The fact that TA has helped to usher in the most unprecedented investment in bicycling in NYC over the past four years has also done a lot to grow our membership.

what is your greatest accomplishment with TA?

Ushering in the community support for the Department of Transportation’s (DOT’s) expansion of more than 250 miles of bike lanes over the past four years has been an amazing learning experience. That investment in quality infrastructure has paralleled a 109 percent increase in biking during the same period. If you build it,

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they will come! When I was riding a bike back in 2000, it was rare to run into another cyclist. Now it’s not uncommon to be in a bicycle traffic jam on some of our most popular bike routes.

what are you working on right now?

We will be working hard to reveal the benefits of increased bicycling for NYC small businesses through our Biking Rules Business campaign: bikingrules.org. We are also super excited that the NYC DOT is officially pursuing a public bike share program! This is something we have advocated for for years, and it will be the biggest game-changer for daily bicycle transportation in NYC.

what changes do you envision for NYC in the next five to 10 years?

We will continue to see the build out of the bike lane network, hopefully, with a core network of protected bike lanes that connect the Five Boroughs (aka NYC) on major arteries for bicycle-commuting. I suspect public bike share, combined with more bike lanes, will help increase our bicycle mode share from one percent to the upper teens in the next five to 10 years. And with that jump, NYC will surely mature into one of the most iconic bicycling capitals in the world. If the the last four years are any indication, we are well on our way there. M o m e n t u m p l a n e t. c o m


2

NYC

3

Bryen Dunn + writer

B

icycling in New York City, NY, first started gaining popularity in the early 19th century, prompting the Parks Department to implement rules and regulations specific to cyclists. Today there are protected bike lanes on 8th and 9th avenues and on 1st and 2nd avenues, along with miles of dedicated lanes throughout Manhattan, Brooklyn and Queens. Also, all the East River bridges have bike paths with directional signage. When asked what it takes to cycle in NYC, Seth Holladay from New York City Maps stated succinctly: “A bicycle and a pair of legs. Anyone can ride a bike in NYC.” According to the Department of Transportation (DOT) website, commuter cycling has more than doubled since 2005. One story in the New York Times also noted that the recent increase in tourism could be attributed to open spaces and alternative transportation methods. The last time I rode in NYC, I was pleasantly surprised at how easy it was to navigate through its busy arteries. As a non-resident, I grabbed a free cycling map, plotted my route and set forth. I managed to ride from the Lower East Side to the Upper West Side in under 30 minutes, largely due to the fact that vehicles, bikes and pedestrians all seemed to flow in synchronized harmony. It was quite easy to ride between the Manhattan Waterfront Greenway, across to Central Park and then over the Brooklyn Bridge without having to battle for road space. In fact, the majority of the infamous bridges that connect the Island have separated bike lanes, making commuting a stress-free task. I took time out to eat lunch in a park, while observing the cycling culture. The couriers weaved in and out of traffic, while office-workers locked up their bikes nearby. It’s not quite Portland, but New York is well on its way to becoming a cycling hub for both residents and visitors. Businesses are also starting to acknowledge the benefits of cycling. Blue Ribbon Restaurants

4

distributed over 200 bikes – one for every staff member – along with a helmet and hands-on safety/ awareness information. DOT also handed out over 20,000 free helmets to any cyclist who requested one. The city is currently considering proposals for a bike sharing network that could see as many as 10,000 bikes on the streets. This is the latest initiative from transportation commissioner Janette Sadik-Khan, who is also responsible for implementing over 250 miles (402 kilometers) of bike lanes and creating the very popular car-free zone along Broadway Avenue in Times Square. The city also recently added 20 sheltered bike parking areas and 3,100 bike racks. Biking is one of the best ways to tour a city, get from one point to another most efficiently and take in the true culture, atmosphere and aroma of the place. As Kenneth J. Podziba, president/ CEO of Bike New York put it: “The best part of riding in New York is getting lost and experiencing the sights, sounds and smells of neighborhoods that I haven’t visited before.”

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6

nyc photo credits 1 Caroline Samponaro. Thanks to Adeline Adeline for providing the Gazelle bike for the shoot. Photo Harry Zernike

2 Graphic designer Michael Brenner in Brooklyn. Photo by Harry Zernike

M o m e n t u m p l a n e t. c o m

3 Participants get ready to ride the Five Boro Bike Tour, May 2010. Photo courtesy of Bike New York

4 NYC street scene at 23rd and Broadway. Photo by Harry Zernike

5 Fast Eddie Williams is a well-known, old-school bike messenger in NYC. Photo by

6 NYC street scene.

Photo Harry Zernike

Harry Zernike

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+venture: experience

NYC

visitors' guide

1

bryen dunn + writer & dougscottillustration.blogspot.com + illustrator

O

ne of the best resources to find good tourist information is to check New York bike blogs, since new places show up all the time (see: momentumplanet.com/articles/nyc-tours-and-websites). Many of the bike-friendlier places can be found along the Hudson River Greenway, Greenwich Village, the East Village/ Lower East Side and Williamsburg/ Park Slope in Brooklyn.

meets

streets (shops)

Escape New York – Escape the crowds and ride out of Manhattan across the George Washington Bridge and into West Hudson Highlands of Bergen, NJ, and Rockland, NY. nycc.org/eny Summer Streets – Seven miles of car-free riding from Brooklyn Bridge to Central Park, Saturday mornings in August. nyc.gov/html/dot/ summerstreets/html/home/home.shtml Suburban Rides – tourdebrooklyn.org, tourdebronx.org, tourdequeens.org

Bicycle Habitat (244 Lafayette St.) One of the oldest, with the original owner Charlie still in place. bicyclehabitat.com Strictly Bicycles (2347 Hudson Terrace, Fort Lee, NJ) Has a nice patio along the trails of Hudson Terrace. strictlybicycles.com Gotham Bikes (112 West Broadway) Located centrally on West Broadway; with two other outlying shops as well. togabikes.com Bespoke Brooklyn (64 Lafayette Ave., Brooklyn) Brooklyn shop with porteur, randonneur and city bikes, for commuters and recreational riders. bespoke-bicycles.com King Kog (453 Graham Ave., Brooklyn) Fixed-gear specific bike and accessories shop in Williamsburg open seven days a week. kingkog.com Adeline Adeline (147 Reade St.) Bicycle boutique that offers funkily-designed and practical bikes with a European flair. adelineadeline.com (see our story on p. 30) Landmark Bicycles (136 East 3rd St.) Unique selection of vintage Schwinns, Raleighs, classic three-speed cruisers and other hard-to-find classics. landmarkbicycles.com Greenpoint Bikes (1078 Manhattan Ave.) Rescued, recycled, renewed. greenpointbikes.com Rolling Orange Bikes (269 Baltic St., Brooklyn) Has a variety Dutch bikes, cargo bikes and accessories. rollingorangebikes.com +A  lso check out Bike New York’s recommendations here: bikenewyork.org/ resources/local/shops_rentals.html

eats

Pier I Café (500 West 70th St.) In Hudson River Park right on the trails. piericafe.com Cafe Gitane (242 Mott St.) Dinner for under $20.00. yelp.com/biz/cafe-gitane-new-york The Smile Cafe (26 Bond St.) Reasonablypriced, healthy, all-day service. thesmilenyc.com Abraco (86 East 7th St.) For java, java, java, and nibbles as well. abraconyc.com HENRY’s (2745 Broadway) A great bike-friendly environment with healthy local food. henrysnyc. com (see our story on p. 42 ).

streets (rentals)

Hudson Urban Bicycles (HUB) (139 Charles St.) Rents, builds and sells bike equipment. Offers city bikes and chid carriers. hudsonurbanbicycles.com Spokesman Cycles Three locations: Union Square, Long Island City and The Shops at Atlas Park. spokesmancycles.com Pedal Pusher Bike Shop (1306 2nd Ave.) Is convenient for Central Park explorers and offers Bike the Big Apple guided tours. pedalpusherbikeshop.com Bicycle Brothers (158 West 56th St.) Delivery and pick up around the city, rates starting at $7 per hour, also offering guided tours. bicyclerenting.com Bike & Roll (several locations) Broad selection of bikes, including tandems. bikeandroll.com/ newyork/newyorklocations.html

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beats

Bike Month – Various events for riders of all levels. bikemonthnyc.org Bicycle Film Festival – The original is now over 10 years old and offers screenings depicting bike culture. bicyclefilmfestival.org Bicycle Show – Find out about the coolest accessories, hottest bikes and newest innovations. nycbicycleshow.com

nyc map bicycle shops 1 Adeline Adeline 2 Rolling Orange 3 Bicycle Habitat 4 Hudson Urban Bicycles (HUB) 5 Pedal Pusher other 13 Central Park Bike tours

cafes 6 Gitane 7 Smile 8 Abraco 9 Pier 1 Cafe hotels 10 Jane Hotel 11 Bowery hotel 12 W New York

sleeps Gem Hotel Midtown West (449 West 36th St.) Very friendly to cyclists and supportive of the more adventurous travelers. ascendcollection.com Jane Hotel (113 Jane St.) Offers complimentary bikes for guests, funky retro decor and reasonable rates. thejanenyc.com Bowery Hotel (335 Bowery) Centrally-located in the boutique district; also offers complimentary guest bikes, a film library and Wi-Fi. Close to most attractions. theboweryhotel.com W Hotel (541 Lexington Ave.) Launched a program in 2008 that allows guests to borrow bikes and explore the city. starwoodhotels.com Ace Hotel (20 West 29th St.) They don’t currently offer guest bikes at this location, however the in-room record players with a selection of vinyl compensates nicely. acehotel.com/newyork +H  ere’s a link to several other hotels chosen by Bike New York: bikenewyork. org/rides/fbbt/lodging.html

tours

Bike the Big Apple – Offers a variety of alternative city tours, such as The Ethnic Apple Tour and Friday Night Lights. bikethebigapple.com Central Park Bike Tour – Established in 1992; offers both group rides and individual rentals to discover NYC’s iconic green oasis. Great for family outings. centralparkbiketour.com

deets

Here are some great websites that will provide all you need to ride the Big Apple: NYC bike map application, ridethecity.com Passenger Transportation Consultancy. transalt.com

2

NYC Bike Maps, nycbikemaps.com Online guide to the road, a1trails.com/ biking/ny/newyorkcity.html Department of Transportation, nyc.gov/bikes Bike New York education and events, bikenewyork.org NYC Department of Parks and Recreation, nycgovparks.org/facilities/ bikeways Community-based bike shop and nonprofit organization, recycleabicycle.org Cycling in NYC, ny.com/health/bike Guide to cycling in NYC, bikingrules.org Not-for-profit direct-action environmental group, times-up.org Bike the Big Apple Tours, bikethebigapple.com + F or even more street level tips, and current updates, check out these awesome blogs. bikeblognyc.com, streetsblog.org, bikestatenisland.wordpress.com, theguardrailblog.blogspot.com, nybikejumble. com, bikingbis.com, downtownfrombehind.com

visitors' guide photo credits 1

Photo by Harry Zernike

2 Bike New York’s CEO Ken Podziba at the

Twin Lights Ride in September 2010. Photo courtesy of Bike New York

M o m e n t u m p l a n e t. c o m


cbc-half-page-horiz_march.pdf

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2/11/2011

12:15:57 PM

seattle bicycle expo march 12 & 13 presented by

smith cove, pier 91 C

www.cascade.org/expo

M

Y

CM

MY

CY

CMY

K

ad Form

April 30, 2011

Client

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+venture: fresh fare

2

You mean wheel them inside the luxurious, carved timber interior modeled on the famous Arts & Crafts Gamble House in Pasadena, CA? “Yes, in our bike corral.” At last! “In spring we’ll offer our award-winning house-made Guavade cocktail to those arriving on a bicycle, plus tune-ups and bike detailing while enjoying our Saturday Jazz Brunch.” One snowy January afternoon, I pedaled the Hudson path to sample HENRY’s signature “Square Meal.” It consists of a soup (butternut squash), a salad (kale, fruit, nut and maple vinaigrette), a sandwich (pulled pork) and dessert (chocolate cake with pistachio ice cream) on a square plate, for $20. Not cheap, but so wellprepared with quality, local ingredients I could feel myself turning into the Curious Case of Benjamin Chiang as I scarfed it like a cyclist would. “I use good fats and flavors: olive oils, nuts, dried fruits, aged vinegars, mustard and chilies,” said Barrett. The restaurant does offer “classics like macaroni and cheese, and hamburgers,” Barrett said, “but I always strive to make the healthy options more desirable. My Shredded Kale Salad initially didn’t sell. People didn’t get that raw kale, sliced correctly by hand, can be tender and delicious. It’s now a best seller!”

1

HENRY’s: the first bike-friendly business in nyc

chef mark barrett’s shredded kale salad (4-6 portions) vinaigrette 1 lemon 1 tbsp. grade “B” amber maple syrup 1/4 cup oil blend (25% extra virgin olive oil/ 75% canola oil) Kosher salt to taste salad 1 bunch green, curly kale 1 head Belgian endive 1/4 cup toasted hazelnuts 1/2 cup red seedless grapes 1/2 cup grated parmesan cheese

Lynette Chiang, galfromdownunder.com + writer & photographer

H

ENRY’s is a rare find for the foodie cyclist: named “the first bikefriendly business in New York City” by Transportation Alternatives (TA) – a local advocacy group. Here, at 2745 Broadway (at 105th Street) in NYC, you’ll find an atmosphere and staff that are 100 percent welcoming to cyclists, along with healthy locavore fare prepared by a gourmet chef who came to work the same way you arrived. “Most days I ride to work,” said chef Mark Barrett. “It’s a great way to wake up and, conversely, riding home helps clear my mind of the day’s events.” HENRY’s bicycle bent extends beyond the kitchen. On the restaurant wall are posters, in both Chinese and Spanish, instructing delivery cyclists how to ride correctly, not like “salmon,” or against traffic. Lifelong cyclists and owners Henry Rinehart and Scott Snyder have big plans for their bistro to become New York’s premier cyclist’s restaurant. “We’re perfectly situated for riders heading up Hudson bike path to the George Washington Bridge,” said Rinehart, a member of TA’s Advisory Council. “Cyclists can sit with their bikes outside or” – and this is virtually unheard of – “bring them inside.”

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method Make vinaigrette by shaking vigorously together lemon, syrup and oil. Season with salt to taste. Prepare kale: wash and dry, then remove tough middle ribs. Stack leaves flat, roll like cigars and julienne across the grain of the veins of the leaf. Remove outer leaves from endive and cut in half, then chop on bias.Mix together all ingredients reserving some Parmesan cheese for garnish. Garnish with grated Parmesan.

bonus movie: great online bonus feature! galfromdownunder.com/henrysnyc

henry's photo credits 1

2

exterior

Owner Henry Rinehart and chef Mark Barrett welcome cyclists to park safely outside - or inside.

go

henrysnyc.com

meal

HENRY's signature Square Meal: Kale Salad, Pulled Pork Sandwich, Butternut Squash Soup, Warm Chocolate Cake. transalt.org

Biking code for NYC cyclists: bikingrules.org

M o m e n t u m p l a n e t. c o m


Schwalbe_Momentum_2011_1-2h.ai 1 2/4/2011 12:47:21 PM

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+venture: top 10 cities

best cycling destinations:

North America Carrie Swiggum & Aretha Munro + writers

T

ravelling to any city on a bike makes it a great place to be, but some cities prove better than others. These urban centers were judged using the following criteria: the percentage of commuters; the presence of online bike resources and advocacy groups; the level of support for cycling at the municipal level, and the quality of their public bike share system, if applicable. The prevalence of bicycle-friendly businesses, including hotels with loaner bike services; a high number of group rides and events; and the amount of things to see and do by bike were also factors in determining our top 10.

Seattle, WA

Portland, OR

Portland has the highest percentage of commuters and kids that ride to school. A 12-mile trail connects the airport to the city. Cyclists can get discounts from businesses, loaner bikes from local hotels and information about everything bicycle-related from BikePortland.org.

Minneapolis, MN

Take the 11-mile (18-km) trail around the lakes and then jump in on a hot day! If you’re new to the city or just there for a visit, join the inclusive cycling community on MplsBikeLove.com.

Find a plethora of coffee shops to park at and explore Seattle-based bike websites to find things to do on two wheels. Stop by this year in June for the second Spoke & Food event, billed as an evening of dining and bikes.

Vancouver, BC

Chicago, IL

San Francisco, CA

Critical Mass started here in the early 1990s and so did (Park)ing Day in 2005 – a project that transforms one metered parking space into a temporary park for a day. Since 2006, the number of commuters has increased by 58 percent, and as of 2008, there were 200 miles (322 kms) of bike networks in the 49-square-mile (127-square-km) city.

Bike-centered events include an overnight ride through Chicago’s neighborhoods. Bike the Drive in May has drawn close to 20,000 cyclists. The McDonald’s Cycle Center is a bike station that offers repair, rentals, showers, lockers and parking for 300 bicycles.

Boulder, CO

There are over 300 miles (483 kilometers) of bike trails in this town of 100,000 people, you can get anywhere on a bike. On Thursdays, cyclists get together and cruise around the city sometimes in costume, shouting “Happy Thursday!” to passersby.

Montreal, QC

Montreal’s BIXI bike share system revolutionized the bicycle sharing experience in North America in the spring of 2009. The Montreal Bike Fest is in its 26th year and includes a ride that takes you through 30 miles (48 kms) of car-free streets.

Davis, CA

In 2005, Davis received the first platinum-level-city designation in the US by the League of American Bicyclists. Last year, Davis residents set a world record for the longest single line of bicycles during the World’s Greatest Bicycle Parade – over 1,000 bicycles in a row!

Photo by Jonathan Maus / bikeportland.org

san francisco

Photo by Adam Aufdencamp

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minneapolis

Photo by Tim Engstrom

boulder

Photo courtesy Boulder CVB

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Austin, TX

Pedal from street food vendor to vendor, tasting the local delicacies. Join one of the group rides taking place every day of the week and visit Lance Armstrong’s very own Mellow Johnny’s bike shop.

notable mentions:

destinations photo credits portland

Vancouver’s seawall is the perfect place to take a leisurely cruise along beaches. Two weeks in June are devoted to Velopalooza, a yearly cycling event featuring group rides, food and movies.

Madison, WI montreal

Photo by Jonathan Clark

seattle

Photo by Galen Maynard

chicago

Photo by Ryan Hodgson-Rigsbee

davis

Photo by Jonathan Wiles

vancouver

Photo by Ben Johnson

austin

Photo by Jacob Shea

New York City, NY Berkeley, CA

emerging cities: Boston, MA Mexico City, Mexico

Washington, DC

Winnipeg, MB

Ottawa, ON

Philadelphia, PA M o m e n t u m p l a n e t. c o m


Cyclecide

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goodybasket

showcase spring product

Modrobes Ladies Riding Jacket

$149 CAD Protect yourself from the elements, protect the planet, and prepare for any challenge (while looking great) in this riding jacket. Made from Modrobes recycled pop bottle technology, the fabric is windproof, water repellent, moisture wicking, and has 360-degree stretch. modrobes.com Maize Sandals by Naya Shoes Abus Bordo Colored Lock

starts at $80 USD The Bordo lock is the smartest and strongest foldable lock we’ve found. It is now available in new colors and has smoother surfaces. Most importantly, its durability and quality is backed by its “Made in Germany” stamp. abus.com

Gazelle Bloom Bike with Yepp Seats

bike $1,299 USD; Yepp seats $170 USD (maxi); $140 USD (mini) This bike is specially designed to carry both a front and rear child bike seat – perfect for moms on the go. The Bloom comes complete with internal gears, internal dynamo hub, double-leg kickstand, step-thru frame and locking system on handlebars to prevent movement while parking – everything you’ d expect from a Dutch bike. gazellebicycles.us

$134 USD A beautiful, comfortable shoe that leaves a softer footprint on our earth. This woven wedge-wrap sandal gives you a “Latin-inspired” look – perfect for pairing with print dresses or a pair of shorts and a patterned T-shirt. nayashoes.com

Montague Boston 8 Folding Bike

$1,099 USD The Boston 8 combines sleek design with the convenience of an eight-speed internal hub. Just like its single-speed counterpart, it is perfect for urban riding and can easily be stowed until your next ride. montaguebikes.com

Ergon PC2 Ergonomic Pedals

$69.95 USD This new pedal is the first non-SPD (non-clip pedal) designed to maximize the performance and comfort of your ride. For those of us who don’t care about performance, these pedals grip high heels, preventing your feet from slipping off your pedals and getting runs in your nylons. ergon-bike.com Available May 15, 2011

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goodybasket Nau Men’s Populus Blazer & Cargo Pants

blazer $200 USD cargo pants $115 USD Designed in Portland, OR, Nau is leading the way for designs that focus on beauty, performance and sustainability, with special attention to urban riding. nau.com

WALD Quick Release Basket

Cycloc - Cycle Storage with a Twist

$95 USD The Cycloc is a practical, smart and stylish way to store your bike – perfect for small apartments or garages. Simple to use, this elegant design has won multiple design awards. cycloc.com

Price: $25 to $30 USD This functional and practical basket easily fits a bag of groceries and can be removed from its holder so you can take it with you into the store! Fits handlebars up to one inch and is available in either a black or white finish. waldsports.com

Rickshaw Customizer SKINNY Commuter Bag

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$589 USD Elegant, simple, easy and affordable, Linus bikes are sure to make heads turn. But you won’t notice, you’ll be too busy enjoying your ride. linusbike.com

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49


behindthebrand

their mission:

build the bike of your dreams Carolyn Szczepanski + writer

B

icycles bestow more than freedom of movement. They offer freedom of expression. Our bikes become our calling cards – an aspect of our identities. In 2007, Zach Rosen and Matt Cheney created Mission Bicycle Company to liberate cyclists everywhere from the artistic confines of mass-produced bikes. Five years ago, the two San Francisco residents began noticing eccentric, one-of-a-kind bikes on the streets of the Bay City. Some of them had frames painted in crazy colors. Others had different wheels on the front and the back. They were as diverse as the city itself, but shared a few key characteristics: Sleek, clean, single-speed - and impossible to find in a traditional bike shop. Rosen and Cheney founded Mission Bicycle Company to give customers complete freedom to design

the bike of their dreams. At Mission Bicycles, your bike is your canvas. You pick each and every component. You choose the hue of your powder-coated frame and the color of your handlebar grips. At the end of the process, customers roll out with a personalized work of art built for urban riding. Lightweight and low-maintenance, these bicycles feature a comfortable, upright riding position with excellent handling and pedal-efficiency. Like a sleek single-speed bombing down a San Francisco hill, Mission Bicycles took off fast. The company grew quickly from a small internetbased outfit run out of an apartment to a full-scale business with a busy Mission-district storefront. To date, they’ve built more than 1,000 bikes for customers across the globe. But, their international scope hasn’t diminished their commitment to quality.

“Every single bike is made on the same repair stand here in San Francisco by mechanics that really care” – Jefferson McCarley

“Every single bike is made on the same repair stand here in San Francisco by mechanics that really care,” said Jefferson McCarley, Mission Bicycle Company’s general manager. But you don’t have to be an aficionado to feel welcome. The staff prides itself on a personal touch. They walk each customer through the entire process – whether that means arranging each

mission photo credits Above: Jefferson McCarley, Mission Bicycle Company’s general manager All photos courtesy of Mission Bicycle Company

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Acting on a Simple Solution

component like a gigantic puzzle on the floor of the retail store or chatting via instant message with a bicycle novice on the other side of the world. For customers in town or willing to travel, Mission Bicycles offers a build-it-yourself option. Prices are accessible, too, starting as low as $600 USD. Mission Bicycles isn’t just selling a product; they’re building a lifestyle. San Francisco has a vibrant advocacy sector and plenty of bicycle-related events, but “there’s definitely a craving for more,” said McCarley. So Mission

Bicycle created its own festival to showcase the local folks making bicycle accessories in San Francisco. The Mission Bicycle Festival brings together diverse groups, from bike polo to unicycle basketball. “We’re trying to fulfill the needs and wants and desires that people have around bicycles,” he said. “They want something that’s lightweight; something that’s supereasy to maintain; something that’s beautiful and personal. But we’re also fulfilling their needs, wants and desires for bike culture.”

MissionBicycle.com

National Bike Summit MARCH 8 - 10, 2011

G R A N D H YAT T | M E T R O C E N T E R | W A S H I N G T O N , D.C .

Register online at www.bikeleague.org P r e s e n t e d b y:

M o m e n t u m p l a n e t. c o m

s P o n s o r e d b y:

MAr>apr>11

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the

bike tour a success! how to make your

mohow

Erik Neumann + writer

B

ike touring is hands-down, one of the greatest ways to travel. On a bicycle you can cover large distances in a single day, but travel slowly enough to take in the breathtaking scenery around you. It’s cheap, healthy and always an adventure. So, how do you prepare? 1

planning & prep

Consult guidebooks and map publishers to help you find a destination. Check out the Adventure Cycling Association and the Railsto-Trails Conservancy for cycling maps and routes in the United States. For a DIY tour, you need look only as far as city and forest service maps for adventurous wayfinding. Regardless of what resources you use, be sure to check their publication date. Old websites or books can be frustratingly out-of-date, and can mean arriving at non-existent campgrounds or re-routed roads.

2

soak in the sunshine

Aim for warm weather. This may seem obvious, but here’s why: Riding within the optimal 60-80 degree Fahrenheit range (15-27 degrees Celsius) means you’ll be carrying less clothing to combat cold weather and less water than you’d need in very hot temperatures or during the height of summer. This temperature window varies between regions, so look up seasonal averages for the areas where you’ll be riding. Traveling in the summertime means more hours of daylight, an important point in order to avoid watching the sun go down at 4 p.m. on a brisk October day when you still have 20 miles (32 kilometers) left to get to camp. 3

shake it down

A shake-down ride is great if you don’t have much time to train. A good shake-down ride should be comparable in distance to your first day on the road, with your full complement of gear, supplies and bike set up. Not only will you have a gauge for how many miles you can

expect to ride at the beginning while fully loaded, you can also test your gear to make sure everything works well and is compatible. Getting your bike fixed pre-trip is easier than when you're on the road or in a foreign place. 4

pack on the layers

Dressing in layers (rather than one allpurpose garment) means having numerous clothing combinations. A set of general riding clothes, a rain shell and long-underwear provide many combinations and can stand up to different weather conditions. 5

ship excess home

No matter how well you plan, there will come a point when you’ll realize you have gear you wish you didn’t bring. Thankfully, post offices can be found in even the smallest towns. So when you can no longer stand trying to repack your coffee cone/ 800-page hardcover novel/ ukulele thingamajig, do yourself a favor and ship it home.

LLACBC ACBC CBC Presents

11th Annual Los Angeles River R Ride BIKE RIDES FOR AL ALL L AGES GREAT T FOOD LIVE MUSIC 100

70

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Kids Ride

Sunday,, June 5th, 2011 20

www ww www.la-bike.org w.la-bike.org 213-629-2142

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whattobring: 6

plan in some buffer days

On any bike tour you should assume that you’ll discover some incredible places that require more exploring. You’ll likely stumble upon cool secluded towns, meet people to do a side trip with or just need some time out of the saddle. Creating a buffer of a few extra days will make a trip much more enjoyable and relaxed. Mechanical breakdowns and inclement weather can also be huge impediments to a too-closely timed schedule. Extra time is without a doubt one of the most important ingredients for a good tour. 7

welcome home

Lastly, planning your riding direction is a fun element of any bike tour. Consider making where you live the final destination of your trip. Riding home creates a motivating goal and eliminates transportation logistics, such as bike boxes, trains, buses and airplanes. Plus, there’s a special triumph that comes with rolling up to your house on your trusty steed after miles on the road.

>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> Visit momentumplanet.com for additional web resources and links to inspirational blogs and books for the touring cyclist.

essentials

+ Sturdy steel bicycle frame with comfortable posture + Minimum 16-gear drivetrain + Long-distance touring saddle + Sturdy, comfortable riding shoes + Riding gloves + Small bag to carry personal items when off your bike

+ Thick-tired wheels – 32-milimeter tire width is capable of handling most touring surfaces + P added riding shorts – can mean the difference between being able to comfortably ride all day and having to quit early

+ Headlight or flashlight (in addition to bicycle lights) + Bandana(s) + Bungee cord or parachute cord (25-feet-long) + Guidebook or maps

+ Stuff sacks to organize gear inside panniers

+ Flip-flop sandals + Insulated mug for hot drinks

luxury items + Handlebar bag + Bicycle computer

whattoknow: resources

+W  arm showers: Web-based lodging for cycle tourists, warmshowers.org +A  dventure Cycling Association: Maps and info galore, adventurecycling.org

inspiring blogs and books +T  ravelling Two: Helpful bike touring advice from a Canadian couple who rode around the world, travellingtwo.com +C  razy Guy on a Bike: Entries from

+ Rails-to-Trails Conservancy: Rail trail routes throughout America, railstotrails.org + Mountaineers Books: North America and international bicycling destinations,

mountaineersbooks.org +B  ed, Breakfast and Biking: North American guide to bed and breakfasts along many established bike routes, bbbiking.com

many cyclists on destinations, gear lists and bicycle types, crazyguyonabike.com + Bike 49: Cycling the 49 continental United States, bike49.org

+ Full Tilt: Ireland to India with a Bicycle by Dervla Murphy + Miles from Nowhere: A Round the World Bicycle Adventure by Barbara Savage

CHECK OUT PACDESIGNS FACEBOOK

M o m e n t u m p l a n e t. c o m

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?`QMY^[XXQ^ 1RGPDCTOOVKTGU(KZGFIGCT

thebigidea mia birk + writer

P

eople often ask me how they should launch into getting bikeway facilities in their cities. They want to know: is it better to start with expensive-but-iconic off-street paths? Should they fight for bike lanes on major roads because these are more visible than bike boulevards? Or should they start with bike boulevards because these are less controversial and expensive? The truth: there isn’t one correct sequence to follow when developing cycling infrastructure, so long as you’re aggressively, progressively making changes in the right direction. Take Copenhagen: their focus for 40 years was creating protected space on major roads, not the bicycle boulevards and off-street paths you find in America. Over the years, they didn’t stop to rest on their laurels. They kept adding bikeway miles and widening and upgrading older bikeways, signals, signs and markings. New York City roared into the bicycle transportation world following the Copenhagen UWTN[DKMGUEQO model. Montreal, QC, has long focused on twoway, separated cycle tracks and off-road paths. For a couple of decades, Seattle, WA, employed an off-road strategy with the lovely Burke-Gilman and Elliott Bay trails, but had almost no on-road connecting bikeways. In the past couple of years, Folding Commuters they have moved to an on-road strategy and now CLIENT PHONE have thousands of shared-lane markings on major CONTACT FAX roads, along with relatively easy-to-implement bike lanes – some of which have been quite controversial. As well, they are planning Authorized Signature: Date: the next round of more challenging, higher quality bikeway facilities – such CHECK EACH BOX AS A GUIDE: as a two-way cycle track on Broadway – and are the addition of bicycle boulevards. Offer correct, if any? â?‘ Name correct? â?‘ Address correct? â?‘ Phone # correct? â?‘ Ad copy correct? â?‘considering So the answer is not so much order as it is pace. AD APPROVAL: • Look over your project and check for errors; spelling, address, telephone #’s, copy or content. Momentum is not responsible for typos or incorrect information. Establish an excellent bikeway master plan based â?‘ Ad approved on the League of American Bicyclists’ Bicycle as is • Please note that due to differences in moniter calibration, colors on this digital proof may not match actual printed colors. Friendly Community program, then develop a with • Sign this page and fax it back to Momentum. â?‘ Ad approved corrections indicated wide variety of bikeway facilities, such as those • Any Changes from this point forward may cost you in time and materials. found in Paris, France; Washington, DC; Long after â?‘ Re-Proof corrections Email Back To: ads@momentumplanet.com Beach, CA; Chicago, IL; Bellingham, WA; are made Cambridge, MA; and many others.

         Make sure to not just focus on the bikeway facilities, but on activities and events that will get more people riding. And go like heck once you’ve committed to the creation of a comprehensive www.origin-8.com bikeway system. Yes, there will likely be backlash. But, honestly, if there’s no reaction in the media, business community or neighborhoods, you probably haven’t done enough.

F Series

AD FORM

Share your big ideas by contacting Mia at: joyride@miabirk.com

54

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asktheadvocate Kristen Steele + writer



   

dear advocate:

My apartment building doesn’t have bicycle parking and I desperately need somewhere to safely park my two bikes. What is a renter to do? Rackless in Seattle

dear rackless,

I’m sure many readers can sympathize with your plight. About 99 percent of all car trips end in a free parking spot. Conversely, bicyclists often have to search for a telephone pole or tree to lock their ride to. First off, determine the person you will need to convince, whether it’s your apartment building’s manager, maintenance director or owner. Know what you want before you approach this person and be specific in your request. Talk to other cyclists in your building and encourage them to sign onto a letter with you. Even if you are currently the only cyclist in your building, you might be able to persuade your building manager with these points: +  Between six and 20 bikes can fit into one car parking space. With real estate at a premium, creating bike parking can save cash. + A basic bike rack is relatively inexpensive – under $200 – and converting an existing storage closet could be even cheaper. +  Bike parking could be the feature that helps fill vacant rentals. +  Would he or she rather have tenants carry bikes inside their homes, potentially scuffing walls and spreading grease? Some cities offer incentives for installing bike parking. Seattle will install bike racks for free in public spaces, if a business owner makes the request. Minneapolis will pay 50 percent of the cost at eligible businesses, including apartment complexes. Seattle’s Cascade Bicycle Club offers assistance in looking at facilities and making them more bike-friendly. Knowing your options and a few supporting facts should help you convince the powers that be to give your bike a safe place to rest.

     

 

  

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Kristen Steele is the benchmarking project manager for the Alliance for Biking and Walking. She has 11 years of experience working with nonprofits and seven years of experience working as a bicycle/ pedestrian advocate. She is also a freelance writer and lives in Northern California. Send your burning advocacy questions to: Kristen@peoplepoweredmovement.org

M o m e n t u m p l a n e t. c o m

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diy wobblebike build your own

1

DAN GOLDWATER + writer & photographer

T

6

what you need

+ 2 steel beater bikes + A small arc or MIG welder + An angle grinder with cutoff wheel and paint-stripping wheel

+ riding tip:

his double-jointed rolling wonder lets you steer from both ends. Also known as a “swing bike,” there was even a commerciallyproduced model that appeared in the 1970s. The wobble bike is one of the many different types of “freak” or “chopper” bikes that you can make. It’s one of the easiest to start with if you have never made something like this before. It’s also great fun to ride and only takes a couple of minutes to get the hang of. After you master the skill of wobble biking, you’ll be able to ride your wobbler nearly anywhere. You can make a wobble bike in just three to four hours. You don’t need to be very good at welding to undertake this task, but consulting someone with experience handling a welder is a good idea if you’ve never used one before.

2

3

chop bike #1

Push the handlebar away from your body when you ride. This will keep the frame straight out in front of you, similar to a normal bike. By following this tip, you’ll be riding confidently in under five minutes. Once you get the hang of it, you can learn to casually swing the front wheel to either side, which is sure to attract attention and garner style points. Have fun!

It takes two beater bikes to make one wobble bike. Using the cutoff wheel, chop the tubes of the first bike at the three locations shown 1 . A good cutoff wheel will cut through the tubes in just a few seconds. You will end up with a separate front half and rear half of the bike. Use the better of the two bikes here since most of this one will end up in the completed wobble bike.

chop bike #2

We mainly need the steering assembly and top tube from the second bike. There are four to five cuts that you will need to make, depending on the bike. Cut the frame and fork as shown 2 . Cut one side of the fork flush with the steering tube; on the other side, leave an inch of tube and cut at the angle shown. On most bikes, the stem (the thing connecting the steering tube to the handlebar) is aluminum, so you can’t easily weld it. The stem can’t be completely removed because it is usually needed to hold the steering assembly together. So, we need to find an exposed area of steel that we can weld to. The end of the steering tube is is a good spot if it’s accessible. If so, just cut off the handlebar and excess stem. If you can’t weld to the steering tube, then you can weld to the steel handlebar. Cut the handlebar very short (maybe three inches long) to provide just enough space to weld to.

4

5

weld it together!

In image 3 I’ve highlighted in green the part that came from bike #2. In pink are two steel bolts I welded on to set the tube angle, shown from below in image 4 . Check the positioning before you weld to ensure the pedals are at a reasonably comfortable height off the ground. You can’t weld to a painted bike tube, so, near the weld area, use the paint-stripping wheel to clean the tubes down to bare metal. In image 5 I’ve highlighted the welds. After it’s all welded together, paint it! More details at INSTRUCTABLES.COM/GROUP/MOMENTUM

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6 M o m e n t u m p l a n e t. c o m


BLUE IS THE NEW BLACK

THE BEST BICYCLE TOOLS NEVER GO OUT OF STYLE. © 2011 Park Tool Co. ® The color BLUE is a registered trademark and trade dress of Park Tool Co.

www.parktool.com


BIRIA

Quality, Comfort, Style, Value 201.461.1980 biria.com

Lolly walsh + writer & Elly Blue + writer

I

n an effort to spark debate about hot topics hitting the bikeosphere, Momentum columnists and bicycle advocates Elly Blue, of Portland, OR, and Lolly Walsh, of Pittsburgh, PA, will duke it out to see which bike steers the truer course.

The question at hand

Is conservatism necessarily harmful to progressive cycling policy?

lolly’s case:

As a recent commenter on Bike Forums asserted, “I find cycling to be a very conservative activity. It saves me money and time.” Conservatism and cycling go hand-inClient handPhone and cycling ContaCt saves Fax money for both the individual and the government. Date: Authorized Signature: Riding a bike is efficient: every meal you CheCk eaCh box as a guide: honesty penelope does double-duty. Offer correct, if any? ❑ Name correct? ❑ Address correct? ❑ Phone # correct? ❑ Ad copy correct? ❑eat First it fuels your body ad approval: and then it fuels your • Look over your project and check for errors; spelling, address, telephone #’s, copy or content. Momentum is not responsible for typos or incorrect information. bicycle to get you to ❑ Ad approved as is • Please note that due to differences in moniter calibration, colors on this digital proof may not match actual printed colors. work or to a friend’s • Sign this page and fax it back to Momentum. ❑ Ad approved with house. Additionally, corrections indicated • Any Changes from this point forward may cost you in time and materials. the health benefits ❑ Re-Proof after of cycling reduce the corrections are made Email Back To: ads@momentumplanet.com amount of public money needed to treat the debilibobbin trucker tating effects of the sedentary lifestyle. While some so-called conservatives pooh-pooh the mainstreaming of cycling, there is a rising tide of people on both sides of the aisle that are eschewing the financial demands of cars in favor of bicycles, and these cyclists are visible in ever-increasing numbers on city streets across North America. In fact, in the midst of his usual anti-bike blubbering, Rob Ford, Toronto’s new mayor admitted, “If I lived downtown, I’d be with the cyclists. You snip maximo wallet don’t need a car to go from point A to point B.” Mr. Ford has got that right. If those who claim to embrace conservative values actually believed and practiced fiscal conservatism, half of the continent would be riding bikes for transportation.

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58

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elly’s rebuttal:

Yes. Today’s social conservatives, particularly the Tea Party movement, are beginning to see the merits of the modern bicycle movement… as a punching bag. When a Colorado gubernatorial candidate claimed that Denver’s bicycle programs were part of a UN plot, the world laughed. Less funny was an Arkansas activist’s public diatribe about Obama’s Muslim pro-bicycle plot “to wean us off cars.” Perhaps this trend is inevitable. The great myth that cars and roads pay for themselves via user fees is still widespread in North America. The corollary is that bicyclists are freeloaders, and both are excellent arguments for continuing to pour public money into automobile infrastructure. Why pick on bikes? Follow the money: You’ll quickly find out that the culture wars of the new right are funded by oil interests. Moreover, the votes that put them in power are largely cast in cardependent suburbia. Until suburbs become bikeable, how will the right-wingers have empathy for cyclists, much less choose to ride? Until the oil economy shifts in a saner direction, bicycles will be seen as an easy target for cheap political shots rather than a viable mode of transportation.

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“NOTSPORT...TRANSPORT” SPORT...TRANSPORT” “NOT ANTspecializes specializes in in fabricating fabricating handbuilt ANT handbuilt bicyclesdesigned designed for for transportation bicycles transportationand and madeto tomeasure measure for for women made women and andmen. men. Wealso also offer offer frame frame building We buildingclasses classes and frame building business training. and frame building business training.

It's time.

visit antbikemike.com for info visit antbikemike.com for info

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Client

Client

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ContaC

Authorized Signature:

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• Look over your project and check for errors; spelling, address, telephone #’s, copy or content. Momentum is not responsible for typos or incorrect information. • Look over your project and check for errors; spelling, address, telephone #’s, copy

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Lolly Walsh is a bicycle advocate living in Pittsburgh, PA. She loves the elegance of the bicycle and rides hers for transportation, convenience and pleasure. She manages the Membership and Outreach programs for Bike Pittsburgh and writes about cities, bikes, possibility and Pittsburgh at Reimagine an Urban Paradise. Elly Blue is a bicycle transportationist living in Portland, OR. She writes for publications, such as Grist, BikePortland and Momentum.

web links Conservative City of Toronto Mayor Rob Ford says he’d ride a bike, too: youtube.com/watch?v=xwxiv2aznB0

How to Talk About Cycling to a Conservative: commutebybike.com/2010/12/11/how-to-talk-about-cycling-to-a-conservative

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( advertising marketplace info: ads@momentumplanet.com ) We don’t do lightning bolts. or skull and crossbones .

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BikeSchool.com BikeSchool.com

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Thesingle single speed speed -- two The two speed! speed! Swiss made by Schlumpf Email Back To: ads momentumplanet.com Email Back To: ads@momentumplanet.com Email Back To: ads@momentumplanet Swiss made by @ Schlumpf 541 488 1121 MonkeyLectric.com pf.ch 541 488 1121 wwwww.sch w.s c h lum lumpf. ch

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BULLITT cargobikes - straight out of Copenhagen

National transportation leader VELO VISION magazine Mia Birk, author of Joyride: Brings you the best workbikes, Pedaling Toward A Healthier folders, recumbents and more Planet, entertains, enlightens from Europe and around the world and dishes the scoop – get your Authorized Signature: Authorized Signature: Authorized Signature: Date: copy today! CheCk eaCh box as a guide: CheCk eaCh box as a guide: CheCk eaCh box as a guide:

Earth’s greatest assortment of bikes... plus our matchmakers who make it happen!

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COMMUNITY

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pick up your free copy of MOMENTUM MAGAZINES here! EVERYBODYBIKE SALVAGETTI BICYCLE WORKS 314 East Champion Street, Bellingham, WA 1234 Speer Blvd, Denver, CO 360-671-BIKE (2453) | everybodybike.com 303-691-5595 | salvagetti.com ARRIVING BY BIKE SATURDAY CYCLES 2705 Willamette St. Eugene, OR 2204 North 640 West, West Bountiful, UT CLIENT 541-484-5410 | arrivingbybike.com 801-298-1740 | saturdaycycles.com ALTA PLANNING + DESIGN MT. AIRY BICYCLES CONTACT 711 SE Grand Ave. Portland, OR 4540 Old National Pike, Mt Airy, MD (877) 347-5417 | AltaPlanning.com 301-831-5151 | bike123.com BANNING BIKES PORTLAND VELOCIPEDE Authorized Signature: 206 North Harbour, Fullerton, CA 45 York Street, Portland, Maine 714-525-2200 | banningsbikes.com 207-899-3133 | portlandvelocipede.com PRACTICAL CYCLE WHEELHOUSE DETROIT Adventure Cycling Association 114 J Street, Sacramento, CA 95814 1340 E. Atwater Street Detroit, MI Adventure Cycling Association Name correct? Address correct? Phone # correct? copy (2453) correct? 916-706-0077 | PracticalCycle.com Ad 313-656-BIKE | wheelhousedetroit.com TALBOT'S CYCLERY Maps 445 South B Street, San Mateo, CA Maps • Look over your project and check for errors; spelling, address, telephone #’s, copy or content. Momentum is not responsible forPEYTON typos orBIKES incorrect information. Routes 650-931-8120 | talbotscyclery.com 4712 Midkiff Rd, Midland, TX • Please note that due to differences in moniterRoutes calibration, colors on this digital proof may not match actual printed colors. 432-699-1718 | peytonsbikes.com Tours • Sign this page and fax it back to Momentum. Tours

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SHAREBIKE.ORG KELOWNA CYCLE 513 S. Jefferson St. Roanoke, VA 103-2949 Pandosy Street, Kelowna, BC 540-982-8289 250-762-2453 | kelownacycle.com RIDEMORE.CA SIMON'S CYCLE 456 McArthur (at St. Laurent), Ottawa, ON 3-1841 Comox Avenue, Comox, BC PHONE 613-747-7433 250-339-6683 | simoncycle.com BIKEBIKE SUNCOAST CYCLES FAX 1501 17 Ave SW, Calgary, AB 9440 Highway 101, Powell River, BC 403-457-BIKE (2453) | bikebike.ca 604-487-1111 | suncoastcycles.com EDMONTON BICYCLE MUSEOVELO Date: COMMUTERS' SOCIETY 463 Rue St. Jean, Quebec, QC 10047 80 Ave NW (Back Alley), 418-523-9194 Edmonton AB NOVA SCOTIA 780-433-2453 | edmontonbikes.ca BIKEWAYS COALITION OfferCYCLE correct, if any?5516 Spring Garden Road, 4th Floor, UNITED 10323-78 Avenue, Edmonton, AB Halifax, NS 780-433-1181 | unitedcycle.com (902) 425-5454 | nsbikeways.ca

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bikeStyle bryan goebel Editor, Streetsblog San Francisco sf.streetsblog.org Photo by Myleen Hollero

what is your bikeStyle? I dress how I feel and I usually feel great when I’m riding my bike. I love the casual feel of shorts on a sunny day, but I also dig my button-down shirts with a dressy vest. My stretchy jeans provide the comfort and agility I need to pedal all over the city and still look nice enough to meet someone at City Hall or pick up my fruits and veggies at the farmers market. what are your favorite clothes to bike in? My Chrome knickers and grey vest.

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where are we most likely to spot your bike? Outside my favorite tea house, Leland Tea Company, on Bush Street in San Francisco.

what do you like most about riding your bike? The bicycle saved my life. I owe so much to the bicycle. Aside from being my best friend, I get to study the tiny details of the everyday landscape; San Francisco is one of the most beautiful cities on the planet. I also love meeting other bicyclists. I pick up some great vibes on the streets.

what is your dream bike for everyday biking? A utilitarian city bicycle that fits all my needs. what did you eat for breakfast? A blueberry scone and a cup of Assam. what song is most played in your iPod? “World, Hold On” by Bob Sinclar basket or panniers? Basket. I love having my things where I can see them. M o m e n t u m p l a n e t. c o m


Bordo 6100

or 36“ Bordo30“ 6100 30“ or Bordo 36“ 6100 30“ or 36“

Love it? Lock it! Love it? Lock it! Love Lock it! Ask your local bicycle retailer.

Bordo Lite 6150 34“ Lite 6150 Bordo Bordo Lite 6150 34“ 34“

Ask bicycleretailer. retailer. Askyour your local local bicycle

Good things improved – the new Bordo family. Good thingsimproved improved – family. Good things – the thenew newBordo Bordo family.

The new generation reaches a new level in comfort due to The new generation reaches new level comfort to to softThe touch surfaces. Abovereaches that theaa new Lite sets adue benchmark new generation newBordo levelinin comfort due soft touch surfaces. Above that the new among Bordo Lite sets a benchmark with less than 650 g (34 inch length) the foldable locks. soft touch surfaces. Above that the new Bordo Lite sets a benchmark with less than 650 g (34 inch length) among the foldable locks.

with less than 650 g (34 inch length) among the foldable locks.

Bordo 6000 Bordo 6000 30“30“ 30 or“ or 3636 “ 30 36“

Bordo 6000 30“ or 36“

www.abus.com www.abus.com ABUS Security Inc. Inc. ABUS Mobile Mobile Security Chicago, IL Chicago, IL www.abus.com sales@ABUS.com sales@ABUS.com

ABUS Mobile Security Inc. Chicago, IL sales@ABUS.com

Bordo Lite 6050 Bordo Lite 6050 34“34 34 “ “

Bordo Lite 6050 34“


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Momentum-Mar/Apr 2011  

Momentum provides urban cyclists with the inspiration, information and resources to fully enjoy their riding experience and connect with loc...

Momentum-Mar/Apr 2011  

Momentum provides urban cyclists with the inspiration, information and resources to fully enjoy their riding experience and connect with loc...

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