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SEPTEMBER / OCTOBER 2016 | $4.95 September/October 2016

CLOCK WORK PREP FOR THE OVERTIME RULE IN FIVE STEPS

FIND YOUR NETWORK WHICH GROUP YOU SHOULD JOIN NOW

SPRINGFIELD’S TECH SCENE | 20 UNDER 30 | PERFECT ELEVATOR PITCHES

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UNDER

MEET THE UNSTOPPABLE CLASS OF 2016

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20 Under 30 They haven’t quite hit 30, and these 20 young leaders are already scaling the corporate ladder. Find out what makes them tick and what’s on the horizon for the class of 2016.

PHOTO BY BRANDON ALMS

BY MATT LEMMON

At just 28 years old, John Chastain is boss of the budget at CoxHealth. Read about John and the whole class of movers and shakers on p. 32. BIZ417.COM

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September/October 2016

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SPARKS OF INSPIRATION

14 PUBLISHER’S NOTE

Get ahead with hard work and passion

15 TAKEAWAY

A skimmer’s guide to what’s inside

16 FEEDBACK

Reader reactions and celebrations

BREAKTHROUGH STRATEGIES

20 FOUR TO FOLLOW

22 BACKGROUND NOISE

20 TIPS

24 MEET THE MAKER

21 THE REPORT

BREAKTHROUGHS

Philip Baird’s internet inspiration Improve your customer service now Tech employees at local companies

21 Q&A

Why Audrey Garard loves local business

Mood-boosting hits from Jeremy Mhire Tether Tug’s dog-gone good marketing

20 StepNpull 22 Computer Recycling Center

22 NIGHTSTAND

21

The fundamentals of great leadership

TOOLS TO HELP YOU DOMINATE

56 CULTURE CLUB

61 HOW-TO

56 DO IT NOW

62 WORKSPACE

57 WHAT IF?

64 CHART IT

57 JUMPSTART

68 THE BIG QUESTION

58 ADVICE & WHISKEY

69 VANTAGE POINT

60 GIVING BACK

70 NEXT GEN

What to do when you get a bad review Protect your business from theft Get prepped for the new overtime rule Linda Ramey-Greiwe follows her passions T-shirts that make a difference

Kill it with your Kickstarter campaign CAST is full of quirky decor and collaboration Which networking group should you join? Ending a partnership without a fuss Employee solutions for the win Steering the way to success

62 PHOTOS BY BRAD ZWEERINK

People come first at Classy Llama

EVERYWHERE YOU NEED TO BE

74 CALENDAR

Where to go and what to do

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80 SCENE

Relive moments from the best events

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PHOTOS BY BRAD ZWEERINK

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@biz417

linkedin.com/company/biz-417

BIZ417.COM STELLAR SERVICE

With 25 years of experience, Commerce Bank Springfield Region CEO Doug Neff is an expert on customer service. Step up your service game with his tips on p. 20, and find out how to add value to client relationships at biz417.com.

A NEW TAKE ON PLAYTIME

Tether Tug dog toys look simple, but there’s much more than meets the eye. Learn about the company’s unconventional marketing approach on p. 24. Then, go to biz417.com to read all about the local manufacturing process for each toy.

LOCAL BY DESIGN

Grooms Office Environments Co-owner Audrey Garard talks up the local business scene on p. 21. Visit biz417.com to learn how she and her husband overcame the challenges of keeping a locally owned business invested in the community.

PRESS PLAY

Ramp up your afternoon with this fun collection of old and new tunes from Jeremy Mhire, co-owner and head coach at CrossFit Springfield. Turn to p. 22 to see the playlist, and plug in online at biz417.com to listen to the full, extended Spotify playlist and get your endorphins flowing.

20 UNDER 30 Nab your tickets to Biz 417 ’s 20 Under 30 exclusive party online at biz417. com/20Under30. Be there to celebrate with us as we recognize these young movers and shakers at Missouri Spirits on September 23, and read about the 2016 winners starting on p. 32.

WOMEN WHO MEAN BUSINESS It’s time to call out the powerful women working to make a change in 417-land. Help us honor the women who run the show by nominating deserving candidates for our second annual Women Who Mean Business feature at biz417.com.

SEE THIS MARK? LOOK ONLINE FOR EXTENDED CONTENT AT BIZ417.COM

September/October • Volume 1, Issue 6 • 2016 ADVISORY BOARD

Jim Anderson Vice President, Marketing and Public Affairs CoxHealth Rayanna Anderson Entrepreneurship Coordinator and Community Liaison Missouri State University College of Business Philip Baird Managing Partner | Spirit Factory Business Development Manager Stingray Overseas Manufacturing Organizer | 1 Million Cups Sherry Coker Director, Business Development OTC Center for Workforce Development Co-founder, Executive Director Mid-America Technology Alliance Trevor Crist CEO | Nixon & Lindstrom Insurance Don Harkey Partner and Chief Innovation Officer People Centric Consulting Group Sterling Huff Senior Vice President Simmons Bank

Winter Kinne Assistant Vice President of Donor Development and Operations Community Foundation of the Ozarks Samuel Knox Managing Editor Unite.Publication

Gary Metzger Regional Chairman Simmons Bank

Ryan O’Reilly CEO and Managing Partner Westward Alliance Ken Schwab Commercial Real Estate Agent, Manager of Commercial Real Estate Department Wilhoit Properties Inc. Jack Stack Founder, President, CEO SRC Holdings Corporation

SUBSCRIPTION RATES: 6 issues, $15. Please call Dylan Whitaker at 417-883-7417. Allow 4–6 weeks for processing orders, payment and changes of address. SINGLE ISSUE: $4.95, back issues, $6 plus $6 shipping and handling, if available. No back issue orders or subscriptions outside the United States. ADDRESS CHANGES: Include both new address and mailing label with old address. Biz 417 (ISSN 23763604) is published bimonthly by Whitaker Publishing, LLC, 2111 S. Eastgate Ave., Springfield, MO 65809–2146. © Whitaker Publishing, LLC. All rights reserved. Reproduction or use in any manner, in whole or in part, without written permission of the publisher is strictly prohibited. Postage paid in Springfield, Missouri and additional mailing offices. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Biz 417, 2111 S. Eastgate Ave., Springfield, MO 65809–2146. The magazine accepts no responsibility for unsolicited manuscripts, artwork or cartoons. Printed in the United States of America.

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PHOTOS BY COLBY MOORE, COURTESY TETHER TUG

facebook.com/biz417

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FULL PAGE AD p. 11

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September/October • Volume 1, Issue 6 • 2016 EDITORIAL EDITOR

Adrienne Donica EDITORIAL DIRECTOR

CREATIVE DIRECTOR

Heather Kane DESIGNED BY

Katie Pollock Estes

Jim Nissen | SWITCH Studio

SENIOR EDITOR

ART DIRECTOR

ANCILLARIES EDITOR

SENIOR PHOTOGRAPHER & DESIGNER

Savannah Waszczuk Rose Marthis

PRODUCTION EDITOR

Claire Porter

Abby Gust

Brandon Alms

EDITORIAL DESIGNER

Ryan Saunders

STAFF WRITER

Stephanie Towne Benoit

EDITORIAL ART COORDINATOR

EDITORIAL INTERN

Karlee Renkoski

DIGITAL DIRECTOR

Vivian Wheeler

STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

Kevin O’Riley

Dayle Duggins

DESIGN INTERN

DIGITAL PRODUCER

Elisabeth Behnke

DIGITAL ASSISTANT

Jennifer Adamson, Juliana Goodwin, Sony Hocklander, Jeff Houghton, Matt Lemmon, Peyson Shields, Brad Zweerink

JuliRose Sullivan Lillian Stone

CONTRIBUTORS

BUSINESS PRESIDENT/PUBLISHER

VICE PRESIDENT/FINANCE

VICE PRESIDENT/ ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER

VICE PRESIDENT/ GENERAL MANAGER

Gary Whitaker gary@417mag.com

Logan Aguirre logan@417mag.com

Joan Whitaker joan@417mag.com

Dylan Whitaker dylan@417mag.com

SALES & MARKETING MARKETING DIRECTOR

SALES MANAGER

MARKETING & EVENT COORDINATOR

ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE

Megan Johnson Janelle Haik

COMMUNICATIONS COORDINATOR

Lauren Stalder

BRAND DESIGNER

Khaley Watts

EVENT COORDINATOR

Logan Swope

MARKETING COORDINATOR

Trevor Collins

MARKETING ASSISTANT

Danielle Leonarduzzi

MARKETING INTERNS

Abby Greene, Jessica Houke, Melissa Koerber FINANCE MANAGER

Carley Inskeep

ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT

Ammie Scott

Kinsey Batson Rogers ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE

Emily Christopher

ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE

Debbie Ophoven

ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE

Drew Owen

ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE

Chelsea Warren

ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE

Jami Wightman

SALES ASSISTANT

Katherine Newman PRODUCTION MANAGER

Brittni Bynum

CREATIVE COORDINATOR

Callie Henry

CREATIVE COORDINATOR

Kaedy Hess

Bernadette Pry

CREATIVE COORDINATOR

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PERMISSIONS & REPRINTS

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Hard Work Fuels Success Our annual list of the 20 Under 30 has evolved as much as the careers of the young people we’ve highlighted throughout the past decade. We announced the first class in 2006 as part of our late, great biweekly entertainment tabloid called GO Magazine. When GO morphed into the digital division of our publishing company, we moved the annual feature to 417 Magazine. And now that we have launched Biz 417, this year’s list and future lists of young high-achievers is in the perfect place for the business community to see who is up and coming. Watch your back. Our track record for spotting talent is pretty good, too. As I looked back over honorees from the first decade of recognition, I saw people who were rising stars in accounting firms, real estate offices and insurance companies who are now full partners, marquee names and even CEOs. One who started a restaurant now owns a chain. Several who started in the nonprofit space have grown into job-creating entrepreneurs. So what trends can you look for in the 20 Under 30 class of 2016? Many of them are in nontraditional industries. Since the financial meltdown of 2008–09, many young people found jobs scarce. So they created their own. While they can be high-earners along with being high-achievers, that is seldom their focus. Instead, their energies are going into being their best or making their companies and organizations better. They’re still growing, not standing still. You can tell from their profiles that though they have had some early success, they know taking too much time to celebrate will leave them on the sidelines. Lean in and you’ll hear the sound of sharpening saws. They’ve made good choices. Yes, everyone wants that perfect work-life balance, but you can see evidence that these 20 have figured out their priorities by producing superior products or offering world-class service first. Finally, it is clear that this class of 20-somethings has cracked the code of how to do well by doing good. They love what they do, and it shows. Passion trumps knowledge every time. This sixth edition of Biz 417 marks the end of our first year, and we are humbled and grateful for the success: nearly 2,000 paid subscribers. Soldout ad space. An award for Best New Magazine in America by Niche Media. Enhanced website and e-newsletters. So as newbies in the biz of biz magazine publishing, we feel a kinship with all the fresh faces honored as this year’s class of 20 Under 30, enjoying early success with a promising future. It will be fun to grow up together.

GARY’S FAVORITE LESSON

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Gary Whitaker Publisher, Biz 417

PHOTO BY KEVIN O’RILEY

I love that employees at Classy Llama share news from their personal lives at the company’s daily roundups. It’s a reminder that people are more than their jobs and that you have to have a balance between work and life. Read story on p. 56.

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PHOTO BY KEVIN O’RILEY

The most useful lessons of this issue to help you get ahead faster Opening Doors to a New Business

Growing any kind of company takes more than a little elbow grease, especially for a relatively unknown product like StepNpull. That’s why inventors Ron Ely, Mike Sewell and Kelly Coddington have adopted an atypical marketing strategy in the hopes of getting their product off the ground. PAGE 20

Three Tips to Improve Customer Service

As CEO for Commerce Bank’s Springfield region, Doug Neff knows a thing or two about customer service. He knows it’s important to offer multiple methods of communication, but at the end of the day, it goes back to treating people with respect and being upfront. PAGE 20

Tech Talk

No matter what industry, businesses in 417-land are starting to rely on technology specialists more. As the number of tech employees rises, so does the demand for programs at local colleges and universities. PAGE 21

Community-Minded Business

Dog’s Best Friend

When brick-and-mortar sales for Tether Tug dog toys lagged, the company switched its focus to online sales and marketing. Matt Price, the director of Marketing and E-Commerce, says staying on top of social media and other online forums is critical to attracting your target demographic. PAGE 24

20 Under 30

The 20 eager young leaders in the class of 2016 are already making waves in 417-land. Sure, they might have great mentors by their sides, but it’s their relentless work ethics and selfless dedication that have set them apart from other millennials in the local workforce. PAGE 32

Classy Culture

Kurt Theobald knows what if feels like to be another cog in the business machine. That’s why the CEO of Classy Llama has cultivated a workplace where constant communication and monthly events engage each employee, and fitting into the culture starts from the very first interview question. PAGE 56

Preventing a Takeover

Passion Projects & Punch with Linda Ramey-Greiwe

Before becoming executive director of Care to Learn, Linda Ramey-Greiwe had been helping kids in 417-land through the Springfield News-Leader’s Every Child poverty series. She says finding your passion is about taking risks and relying on what comes naturally. PAGE 58

Thoughtful Threads

After a T-shirt fundraiser went viral, Bigfish Screenprinting owner Vicki Simpson created a charitable foundation to continue helping the community. She says a nonprofit foundation allows more money to go to the cause, but applicants should be sure to apply for the appropriate status to meet their needs. PAGE 60

Working the Crowd

Launching your company or even your next product might mean resorting to crowdfunding. Caleb Stokes, owner of Hebanon Games and Kickstarter veteran, says the key to a successful campaign is engaging your audience and earning their trust by offering freebies. PAGE 61

When a Kansas City company looked into purchasing Grooms Office Environments, Audrey and Jonathan Garard jumped in to keep the business locally owned. Audrey shares how investing in the community has helped Grooms stand out.

When it comes to corporate account takeover, you can never be too careful. A risk advisor for Ollis/Akers/Arney, Jeff Eiserman, recommends a proactive approach that includes reviewing your insurance coverage, seeking legal assistance for cyber liability and talking with your leadership.  

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Growth Thanks to Data Destruction

Racing the Clock

What Networking Group Should You Join?

After buying Computer Recycling Center in 2011, Luke Westerman and his former business partner soon learned the center’s success was tied closely to the price of gas. By listening to customers and diversifying its services through data disposal, the business continues to thrive.

As December creeps closer, so does the change in the overtime rule. This five-step strategy from Carolyn O’Kelley, who is president of the Springfield Area Human Resources Association, emphasizes communication with your employees and training your human resources team for long-term management and time tracking.

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Working Together

Cooperative workspaces are all about flexibility. Located at Farmer’s Park, CAST currently has 10 tenants who love the campus feel and variety of open and closed spaces that spark collaboration and can be converted depending on occupants’ needs.

With so many professional organizations in 417-land, it can be hard to determine which is the right fit. Our quiz makes it easy. The time is always right to get involved. PAGE 64

Parting Company

Just like any other relationship, business partnerships can end. Predetermined legal agreements will help, but Bob Helm of Elliott, Robinson & Company, LLP says that’s not the only way to ensure a smooth split. He recommends communicating with employees, checking your emotions at the door and staying focused on how to create the best circumstances for all parties involved—including the clients. PAGE 68

Sealing the Deal on Success

For decades, Springfield has been home to 3M, and the local plant is now recognized for developing innovative solutions. Plant manager Frederick James says this has been in large part thanks to the workforce in 417-land. James recommends relying on the expertise of employees who often know how to solve problems better than leadership teams and trusting those employees to form teams dedicated to fulfilling the company’s vision. PAGE 69

Perfect Pitch

Nailing your elevator pitch can be the difference between scoring your next client and leaving the conversation empty-handed. Angela Smith, owner and president of ADsmith Marketing & Advertising, says preparing yourself, paying close attention to your body language and delivering your pitch with confidence and authenticity is just as important as the message itself. PAGE 69

A Family Drive

Generations of Thompson family members have owned and worked for Thompson Sales Company since it opened in 1919. Company President Lynn Thompson says the car business really comes down to people. Valuing its employees and making them feel like part of the family has helped the dealership stay successful through moves, expansions and growth. PAGE 70

September/October 2016

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Feedback

T

he July/August issue of Biz 417 discussed the workplace culture of six 417-land companies in our cover story, “Winning Workplace Cultures.” Our readers were inspired, and here’s what they had to say.

“We’re SO excited to be one of the spotlights in @Biz417’s Winning Workplace Cultures feature. Check it out!” —The Twitter page of Mostly Serious

“Some first-class reading for my #ChaseGoesToTuscon flight. @Biz417” —The Twitter page of Chase Snider

“We had such a fun time at the Biz 417 Review Party! We love connecting with everyone in the 417 area. Congrats on one year, Biz 417!” —The Facebook page of PaperWise

CORRECTIONS: In the “Winning Workplace Cultures” feature from the July/August issue, we incorrectly stated the co-founders of Mostly Serious. Joe Donohue and Jarad Johnson are the co-founders. In the “Keep on Truckin” story, we incorrectly state Trailiner’s fleet size. The company has 200 trucks and 300 trailers. In the “Selling Homes and Happiness” article also in that issue, the photo caption incorrectly identified the year and beneficiary of Keller Williams’s Red Day. The photo shows the 2016 day of service, which benefitted The Victim Center. Later in that article, the name of The Victim Center was incorrect. We regret the errors.

HOW TO CONTACT BIZ 417 Social Media

“Have you checked out the July/August issue of @Biz417 yet? You should! Great articles and even a few quotes from our John Mack.” —The Twitter page of Brandigm We spoke with Brandigm Co-owner John Mack in our “Winning Workplace Cultures” feature. The company works out of CAST Workspace Cooperative, but that doesn’t stop the team from creating a good company culture. Read the story at biz417.com.—Editors

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facebook.com/biz417 @biz417 linkedin.com/company/biz-417

Snail Mail Adrienne Donica/Letters to the Editor Biz 417 2111 S. Eastgate Ave., Springfield, MO 65809

Email Send your notes, feedback and story ideas to

PHOTO COURTESY CHASE SNIDER

“As always, impressed with what Biz 417 does as a company. Very grateful to have them do what they do for a community I call home.” —Tyson Johns, President/CEO at Corporate Business Systems Johns joined us for our Biz Review party, which celebrated Biz 417’s (almost) one full year in print.—Editors

biz@417mag.com www.

Biz417.com

Visit biz417.com, scroll to the bottom of the homepage and submit your questions and email address in the suggestion box.

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BREAKTHROUGH STRATEGIES

“At the end of the day, going local creates more jobs and local wealth.” –Audrey Garard, co-owner of Grooms Office Environments

PHOTO BY BRAD ZWEERINK, COURTESY STEPNPULL

SEE STORY PAGE 21

21 STEP UP How KRM Innovations made its product stand out from the crowd. PAGE 20 BIZ417.COM

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Breakthrough Four to Follow Tips The Report

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Q&A Nightstand Background Noise Watercooler

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Breakthrough Meet the Maker Nailed It Failed It Founding Subscribers

September/October 2016

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FOUR TO FOLLOW WITH PHILIP BAIRD BY: ROSE MARTHIS

Philip Baird, managing partner for Spirit Factory, business development manager for Stingray Overseas Manufacturing and organizer for 1 Million Cups, shares his inspiration.

JON GORDON’S NEWSLETTER

“I really appreciate his ability to balance religion and business.”

jongordon.com/ newsletter.html

OPENING DOORS TO A NEW BUSINESS The Opportunity

Getting your foot in the door of a new industry or massive company can be hard to do. For co-workers Ron Ely, Mike Sewell and Kelly Coddington, it was inspiration for their business. “We just all noticed how people use paper towels to grab a door handle,” Sewell says. “Why not figure out a way to pull the door open with your foot?” They weren’t the only ones with this idea but formed KRM Innovations anyway because they thought they could create an even better design.

The Big Idea

During the engineering phase, they worked hard to create an easy-to-use product with a lower price point to discourage competition. After several prototypes, they settled on a design and named their product StepNpull. The design allows a person to use the bottom of his or her shoe to pull open a door, eliminating the need for a paper towel when people don’t want to touch a dirty bathroom door handle.

The Learning Curve

The entrepreneurs soon realized the patented product was a hard sell to potential customers. “It’s such a simple idea, but it’s simply complicated,” Ely says. So they started giving them away to local restaurants to generate buzz. They sold to big-name clients, including Google, Anheuser-Busch, Facebook and Ford, but they wanted to convince clients to use StepNpulls at all their locations. Because it’s a business-to-business product, Sewell says they needed to take a nontraditional approach.

JACK WELCH ON LINKEDIN

“His posts off er insights regarding team leadership that go unmatched.”

linkedin.com/in/ johnfwelch

“THE TOP” PODCAST

“He’s pretty ruthless about uncovering the ‘secret sauce’ that his interviewees attribute their success to.”

nathanlatka.com/ podcast-thetop

“BRAINCHILD NINJA” PODCAST

“[Craig Jamison is] a fellow 1 Million Cups organizer and a great mentor. I love that he tends to interview CEOs who are local to southwest Missouri.”

brainchildninja.com/ category/podcast

The Strategy

Now, the 9-year-old company focuses on a three-pronged approach: awareness, acceptance and demand. They’ve started using Facebook and pay to boost their content so employees and customers understand their product. Previous sales prove this is a key demographic because frequently it’s these people who ask for StepNpulls to be installed. Although the product has yet to be installed throughout an entire chain, Ely says they’re close to reaching that goal and hitting that stage of demand. Until then, they’ll continue as they always have—taking business one step at a time.—Adrienne Donica

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FIVE ON FIRE CALEB ARTHUR DAVID FOSS ASHLEY FRENCH RANDY JOHNSON ZIM SCHWARTZE

[TIPS]

THREE TIPS TO IMPROVE CUSTOMER SERVICE

As CEO for Commerce Bank’s $2 billion Springfield region, Doug Neff understands the unique challenges of serving a varied customer base. World-class customer service is just around the corner thanks to his tips. BY: SONY HOCKLANDER

Tip 1: Balance communication

options for everyone.

Older generations still prefer face-toface or phone communication, and it’s a mistake to eliminate that. “You have to let them be comfortable and contact you the way they want to,” Neff says. But embrace new communication delivery mechanisms. “Cutting-edge technology, great websites, the ability to chat online—things that the younger generation wants out of their customer service are different than the traditional customer service, and I think your business has to evolve with that,” Neff says.

Tip 2: Treat all customers with

respect and kindness.

When customers vary in educational, generational, socio-economic and cultural backgrounds, Neff stresses that employees must have a positive attitude and treat people respectfully and fairly. If you help somebody who has a particular challenge and support them through the process, “a lot of times you’ll have a customer for life,” Neff says.

Tip 3: Be transparent. “I always say a slow no kills everybody,” Neff says. Be honest with a prospect or customer about what you can and cannot do for them. “If you try to be all things to all people, you’ll fail because you won’t be able to set realistic expectations for folks,” Neff says. Empathy is also important. “They know at least you care,” he says. “That to me is a critical component.” FIND MORE ADVICE FROM COMMERCE BANK EXECUTIVE DOUG NEFF ON HOW TO IMPROVE YOUR CUSTOMER SERVICE AT BIZ417.COM

PHOTO COURTESY STEPNPULL

[BREAKTHROUGH]

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[THE REPORT]

FULL-TIME TECH-RELATED EMPLOYEES AT 417-LAND COMPANIES

[Q&A]

COMMUNITY-MINDED BUSINESS Beginning as a sales representative at Grooms Office Environments more than 10 years ago, Audrey Garard worked her way to the head of the conference room table. When the current owner wanted to retire, a Kansas City company looked to buy the business. However, Garard, who was sales manager then, and her husband, Jonathan, decided to make the leap and keep Grooms how it started—local.

WEHRENBERG DESIGN COMPANY: 2 EMPLOYEES

MOSTLY SERIOUS: 9 EMPLOYEES

BY: PEYSON SHIELDS

CAMPAIGNIUM: 12 EMPLOYEES

Grooms Office Environments has worked with clients such as Prime Inc.

BIZ 417: WHY WAS KEEPING GROOMS LOCAL IMPORTANT TO YOU? Audrey Garard: Locally owned companies are the heartbeat of communities. We are more invested in local politics, we support the causes we believe in, and we pride ourselves with contributing to the economy of the place where we live, learn and play.

HEALTHMEDX: 76 EMPLOYEES

PHOTOS COURTESY GROOMS OFFICE ENVIRONMENTS, SHUTTERSTOCK

TECH TALK

= 1 EMPLOYEE

It’s official: 417-land’s technology scene is booming. Tech-related jobs have made their way into a slew of local companies, and demand for tech prowess is growing. Curious how local businesses compare? We checked in with a random assortment of 417-land businesses to see how many techies they employ. Take, for example, HealthMEDX, a medical company with 76 tech-related employees at its Ozark branch in jobs such as information technology and web development. As demand for tech-related expertise grows, area colleges and universities are working to tailor degrees and programs to student interest. Undergraduates can study computer information systems at Missouri State University or complete Drury University’s new animation program. A computer information science program is also popular at Ozarks Technical Community College. These skills come in handy at local web operations. Wehrenberg Design Company, for example, has only two full-time employees—but they rely on a number of freelancers and contributors to get the work done. Mostly Serious in downtown Springfield, has nine. Although the size of the tech workforce ranges depending on the employer, one thing is for sure: 417-land is becoming more tech-friendly, and demand will grow as the industry develops.—Lillian Stone BIZ417.COM

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BIZ: SINCE TAKING OVER, WHAT STEPS ARE YOU TAKING TO STAND OUT IN YOUR INDUSTRY? AG: We focused on a new marketing strategy and on increasing brand awareness. At the time we bought Grooms, the marketing budget was very low, and there was a lack of name recognition. We were really committed to a grass-roots campaign and sharing the Grooms story, and we are really starting to see that pay off. In addition, we invest in education for our employees and continue to be regarded in our industry as knowledgeable experts in our field. You have to continue to learn and strive to educate your clients. If you are not moving forward, you are falling behind in this industry. BIZ: WHAT IS YOUR ADVICE TO THOSE WANTING TO KEEP THEIR BUSINESS LOCAL? AG: Sometimes it’s not easy. There are times it might cost more, but you have to be committed to doing what is right. At the end of the day, going local creates more jobs and local wealth. We are so blessed to be in a community that really understands that.

READ MORE ABOUT THE CHALLENGES GROOMS HAS FACED AND HOW GARARD AND HER TEAM ARE OVERCOMING THEM AT BIZ417.COM. September/October 2016

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NIGHTSTAND

WATERCOOLER ACCELERATING

—Jon Baker, board member and former COO of WieseUsa Inc.

BACKGROUND NOISE “In my business, music drives the mood and creates atmosphere,” says Jeremy Mhire, coowner and head coach at CrossFit Springfield. With current hits, throwbacks and mashups, this playlist will kill any weekday slump.

Intro 2 | NF All The Way Up (Remix) | FAT JOE, REMY, JAY Z Missile | DOROTHY Brother (feat. Gavin DeGraw) | NEEDTOBREATHE Divine Sorrow (feat. Avicii) | WYCLEF JEAN Can’t Stop the Feeling | JUSTIN TIMBERLAKE I Believe | KB, MATTIE OF FOR TODAY Hype | DRAKE Going Back to Cali (Viceroy “Jet Life” Remix) | NOTORIOUS B.I.G Hold On Be Strong vs Big Poppa (Matoma Remix) | 2PAC, NOTORIOUS B.I.G READY FOR A WORKOUT? HEAD TO BIZ417.COM TO LISTEN TO JEREMY’S PLAYLIST.

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The inaugural cohort of The eFactory Accelerator, the first accelerator in the southwest Missouri, is completing the 12-week program. The four companies are preparing to debut their work at a demo day on October 24.

ARRIVING

The site of Campbell 16 Cine won’t sit empty long. Alamo Drafthouse Cinema, a movie cinema offering a full restaurant and bar service, plans to open in the space early next year. The company expects the Springfield location to be the largest of the chain’s two dozen locations. COMBINING

Effective October, Heart of America Beverage Co. and Premium Beverage Sales, two regional beverage wholesale companies, are merging under the Heart of America name. The newly combined company plans to operate out of Republic after construction is complete. WINNING

The Inc. 5,000, a ranking of the fastest-growing companies in the country, recognized 11 companies in 417-land. Missouri Sun Solar ranked in the top 10 of the energy industry nationwide.

GROWTH THANKS TO DATA DESTRUCTION The Problem

In 2011, Luke Westerman and a partner purchased Computer Recycling Center, a business that recycled electronics. The recovered materials—including plastic, which is a petroleum product in demand when oil prices are high—were a profitable commodity. As oil prices dropped, however, so did the value of plastic. Meanwhile electronics were getting smaller and made with fewer precious metals. Soon the existing business model was no longer sustainable, says Westerman, now sole owner of CRC.

The Big Idea

Westerman says from the start the company tightened security and established new procedures, committing itself to creating what he calls an organization people could trust. It wasn’t long before the company realized data disposal was the right direction for diversification and growth.

The Learning Curve

To diversify services, CRC added more data disposal equipment, including mobile equipment for on-site service. His business set itself apart through best practices recognized by rigorous certifications, including the RT, which is a responsible recycling practices standard. Westerman learned in June the company also passed an audit for a coveted certification from the National Association for Information Destruction.

The Strategy

By listening to customers about a need for responsible data disposal and by paying attention to a changing industry, CRC has overcome limitations of its original business model. Building trust through responsible protocols has been the key to growth. “We do so much more than recycle computers,” Westerman says. Sensitive data must be managed properly, he adds. “I expect us to add more services as our customers see a need,” Westerman says.—Sony Hocklander

PHOTO COURTESY JAMES M. KOUZES AND BARRY Z. POSNER

“[This book] had a big impact on the way I chose to lead people. [It’s] the most important book to get a good, strong, fundamental understanding of what leadership is and what it takes to be a good leader.”

[BREAKTHROUGH]

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[MEET THE MAKER]

“INITIALLY WE THOUGHT WE WOULD GO STRAIGHT TO RETAIL BUT QUICKLY REALIZED THAT A 5-FOOT POLE WITH A ROPE ON THE END DOESN’T LOOK THAT GREAT ON A SHELF.” —Matt Price, director of marketing and e-commerce for Tether Tug

The creators of Tether Tug knew they had made a toy that would keep any high-energy dog occupied, but getting it into owners’ hands was another story. BY: KARLEE RENKOSKI

F

our years ago as an inventor of medical products, Dr. Roger Huckfeldt never dreamed he and David Hayford would be co-owning a dog toy company trending toward the million-dollar mark. Huckfeldt’s son Adam came to him with the idea of a tug-of-war toy that a dog could use even without the owner present. During the process of developing the toy, Tether Tug created strong relationships with its customers and now has six available sizes manufactured at its warehouse in Nixa and by Stingray International in Dallas.

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But despite its local production, you probably won’t see Tether Tug on shelves in 417-land; more than 95 percent of Tether Tug products are sold online. “Initially we thought we would go straight to retail but quickly realized that a 5-foot pole with a rope on the end doesn’t look that great on a shelf,” says Matt Price, the director of marketing and e-commerce. Due to its initial failure, Tether Tug began selling its hand-assembled toys online and marketing itself on Facebook, where most of its customers are. Price has learned to target specific dog breed owners, to promote video ads and to use affiliate marketing to increase product sales. He encourages online companies to find out where their customers are and to continuously learn about using those platforms. Aside from its own marketing and sales, Tether Tug products are sold online by Amazon and Matt Price quickly realized the marketing focus for Tether Tug had to shift from traditional box stores to online platforms.

Bed, Bath & Beyond. The company scored both connections while at an industry trade show. So what’s next for this online retail giant? Aside from continuous improvements to their existing models, Huckfeldt says Tether Tug now faces the challenge of creating an interactive counterpart for another furry friend—cats. IT MIGHT LOOK SIMPLE, BUT A LOT GOES INTO MAKING TETHER TUG TOYS. ROGER HUCKFELDT EXPLAINS HOW IT’S DONE ON BIZ417.COM.

BEHIND THE BUSINESS

Date Opened: January 2014 Number of Employees: 5 From Mind to Market: About 2 years Most Popular Items: XL and Uber Tether Tug Dog toys. “Bigger dogs have more energy and are more likely to be destructive, so owners are more desperate to get rid of that energy,” Price says. Maker’s Choice: “The most fun one is the [original] because you get it out there and see if it’s really going to sell,” Huckfeldt says.

PHOTOS COURTESY TETHER TUG, BY BRANDON ALMS

DOG’S BEST FRIEND

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[STYLE]

#NAILED IT FAILED IT

WORK WEAR

Don’t forget this effortless shirt and versatile phone case on your next business trip.

CASE CLOSED

This leatherwrapped phone wallet has two slots for cards and a built-in camera hole.

Share your triumphs and stumbles with us on Twitter with the hashtag #naileditfailedit #Nailed It Failed It DOUG NEFF, see his story on p. 20

Years ago, he #Failed It when he led his bosses on a day trip to several markets, and they landed at the wrong airport. The 7-minute flight to get to the right place probably cost $1,000 of jet fuel, he says. “After 25 years of successes, failures and following my dream, I now get to represent Commerce Bank in one of our most important regions.” #Nailed It

FUSS-FREE

The moisturewicking fabric will keep you cool, and cleanup is a breeze—just machine wash in cold water.

#Nailed It Failed It JEFF EISERMAN, see his story on p. 57

“Before we engaged with them, (a client) was having some real struggles in their program. Our work together has saved them over $300,000 in workers’ compensation costs, not to mention the positive impact on their employees.” #Nailed It “Walking in to meet with a potential new client and calling them by the wrong name. Totally #Failed It!”

#Nailed It Failed It MILES THOMPSON, see his story on p. 70

PACK IT UP

Go ahead and wad it up in your suitcase, because this little number doesn’t wrinkle.

Get the look: Mizzen+Main, Hampton check blue dress shirt, $125; HEX iPhone 6/6s wallet, $49; both available at Modern Society Men’s Shop

SUBSCRIBERS PHOTO BY BRANDON ALMS

PHOTOS COURTESY TETHER TUG, BY BRANDON ALMS

FOUNDING

When we launched this project almost one year ago, we took a gamble that there would be an audience for a new business magazine in 417-land. You rallied around us, and our bet paid off. In this issue, you’ll see the names of the 56 newest subscribers joining our 1,877 total subscribers for Biz 417’s inaugural year. Didn’t make the list? We’ve got something special planned to mark our one-year that you won’t want to miss. Get your subscription today at biz417.com. BIZ417.COM

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Windy Amberg Stacey Bacorn Terry Baum Valerie Box | Freeman East Hospital Cheyne Brokate | Brokate Janitorial Ken Brooks Richard Browne Robin Byler | Blue Iguana Car Wash Hoover Case | Case Real Estate Durlene Castor Anita Chamblee Marlene Chism Tim Cluny Kent Cochran

“I really believe all of the 120 team members at the dealership are my biggest #Nailed It moment. Without them, we wouldn’t be celebrating 97 years in business.” As the GMC truck manager, he accidentally ordered 33 GMC Safari vans instead of the three he wanted. “They weren’t the biggest sellers then, and it took many months to sell all 33. I still get reminded about that!!,” he says. #Failed It

Dennis Cox | Live Events Missouri Gina Cripps Bill Darr Sharyn Dawson | March of Dimes Duckett Ladd, LLP Nancy Ann Dunn Kayce DuVall Wendy Featherston Carl Fichtenbaum Doug Fiester Maureen Gray Jeramie Grosenbacher Vance Hall | Druff’s Dixie Hardy Jennifer Henry Sharon Hunt

Highway H Highland Cattle Ranch Jennifer Jester Carolyn Kierstead Carol Kiser Adam Kyle | Kyle Insurance Services April Mann Ewa Michalska Mart & Jeremy Miner Mark Moore | G.L. Moore Tire Pros & Automotive Ruth Mushynski Nancy Patrick Angie Pirac Quiznos Jesse Rafferty Shannon Ranson

Jay Reynolds | Motorhead Events Ellen Richardson Cynthia Rogers Kristina Rosewell Chris Rozier | Towneplace Suites Joey Sands Stephanie Sumners Kurt Theobald | Classy Llama Robbin Vigil Audra Vincent | Springfield First Community Bank Gary Wood

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Congratulations,

20 UNDER 30 WINNERS!

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Congratulations,

20 UNDER 30 WINNERS!

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PROMOTION

INSIGHT

STRATEGIC PLANS ARE

USELESS.

Imagine a highly motivated and capable executive team. They decide to lock themselves in an offsite conference room for a day of discussion. They talk about the Vision and Mission of the company. They talk about their organizations' strengths and weaknesses. They talk about opportunities and threats. They develop an action plan that will take their company to a new level. The executive team is very excited and has come up with an excellent plan. The next day the executives go back to work. They get consumed by the day to day operations, and the plan sits on the shelf. A year later when it is time to think about the next strategic plan, the previous plan that has sat on the shelf for a year is pulled off the shelf and read. We hear different versions of this story from company leaders who failed to launch strategic planning initiatives, but get little traction and few results. Strategic planning is a powerful way to build focus and alignment with both the management team and employees. This alignment of strategic initiatives within all levels of a company, aside from accomplishing strategic goals, has a dramatic impact on employee engagement, satisfaction, and a reduction in turnover.

Ultimately, alignment affects the productivity and profitability of a company. People Centric works with our clients to create good Strategic Plans, and we don’t stop there. We help our clients get everyone involved in executing the plan, regularly tracking progress, and updating the plan as new insights become available. We can look at your business before the planning starts to assess the health of your business and your culture and identify opportunities for improvement. We aren’t passionate about strategic planning. We are passionate about getting results.

Contact us today to meet with one of our Engagement Specialists

and disucss how People Centric can get your organization the results it needs. Learn more at PeopleCCG.com.

417.887.6760 PEOPLECCG.COM


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U N D E R BY: MATT LEMMON

For years, 417 Magazine has honored a score of 417-land’s brightest up-and-comers by sharing their efforts with readers in its 20 Under 30 feature. Now, Biz 417 has taken over the annual list and is highlighting 20 new faces. This year’s class includes finance whizzes, advertising and computer programming standouts and, of course, a healthy number of the entrepreneurs that help put Springfield and the Ozarks on the map. Let’s meet them. STYLING BY THE UPTOWN BOUTIQUE AND DAPPER, A FINE GENTLEMEN’S BARBER CLUB & THE HABERDASHER AT DAPPER PHOTOS BY BRANDON ALMS

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DR. DEREK MAGERS 28 | Dentist and Partner, Ascend Dental Design

N

ot a lot of professionals—particularly in a field as crowded as dentistry— can walk in as a third-year graduate student and basically ask for (and get) a job at their employer of choice. But that’s what Dr. Derek Magers did when he introduced himself to Dr. Jeffrey Dorman at Ascend Dental Design. The two hit it off, and today Magers is a partner in the practice that not only aspires to be the best in Springfield but also a national leader in the industry. To that end, Magers currently is going through the rigorous three- to five-year process to become certified in cosmetic dentistry. Once finished, he will be the only dentist in 417-land to be an accredited member of the American Academy of Cosmetic Dentistry. “If you can put this certification behind it, it allows you to separate yourself as a business,” Magers says. A flawless customer experience and the satisfaction of Ascend’s dozen or so employees are also important to Magers. He has donated his free time to help those who might not be able to pay for dental care, previously at The Kitchen’s now-closed dental clinic and now by trying to help get a replacement for that service off the ground at Missouri State University. He and his wife, Emily, are currently expecting their first child. STYLED BY THE HABERDASHER AT DAPPER

EMILY COULTER

Account Executive, The Marlin Company | 27 @EMILYRCOULTER

“P

itching a media idea is sort of like throwing a dart at a dartboard,” says Emily Coulter, a member of the Marlin team who, among other assignments, works with French’s Foodservice to market a wide variety of their condiments. Coulter recently scored a bull’s-eye when she helped the company market its Cattlemen’s BBQ sauce and prepare sponsorship materials for the Memphis in May barbecue competition, which the brand sponsors. Resulting press was a boon for the brand. “I was excited they got a little bit of the spotlight,” Coulter says. Previously, Coulter worked on Marlin’s Starbucks account, helping the chain with seasonal item promotions (think Pumpkin Spice Latte). Her favorite part of her job is the atmosphere at Marlin. “Everyone is smart and funny, and there is never a dull moment,” she says. “When you’re in such high-pressure situations, having the balance of understanding people and a relaxed atmosphere is so necessary.” Coulter is a member of Junior League of Springfield where she currently chairs the project review and development committee, which helps decide which organizations JLS supports with its time and donations. She also spends every minute she can outdoors and loves to travel.

MARANDA REYNOLDS

Head of Development, Mostly Serious | 27 @__RANDOMJO__

@__RANDOM_JO__

S

ometimes a college major leads to a job, and sometimes a job leads to a major, which is what happened for Maranda Reynolds when she went to work as a programmer for Springfield’s Innovative Web Solutions at the age of 18. “It was a win-win,” Reynolds says with a laugh. “I would learn on the job, and for them I was supercheap, because I had no experience.” Fast forward a decade, and Reynolds leads development for Mostly Serious, one of the hottest tech shops in Springfield. Under her guidance, the company recently undertook a new website for CoxHealth, overhauled Noble Communications’ CultureWaves trendspotting software and rebranded and is expanding Cause Momentum (the nonprofit crowdfunding platform behind the $1 million Give Ozarks Day), a project Reynolds is particularly passionate about. “It’s amazing to see so many people using a site that was a technical feat in and of itself,” she says. “There’s nothing better than building something that helps people.” In that spirit, Reynolds is co-founder, with Krista Peryer, of The Geek Foundation, a new nonprofit that seeks to teach people, particularly young women, how to code. Even in 417-land, Reynolds says, the gender and ethnic gaps in programming are very real, and by removing price as an obstacle she hopes the foundation encourages people to enter the field who might not have considered it before. A bit of a Renaissance woman, Reynolds also is a singer (she performed earlier this year with Shaun Munday) and an accomplished yogi (she teaches a Sunday night class at Live Pure Yoga).

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Maranda Reynolds found her passion for programming while working at Innovative Web Solutions. Now she leads development at Mostly Serious and recently started The Geek Foundation with Krista Peryer to teach other 417-landers how to code.

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Architect Benjamin Hall takes a break from his day in the lobby of the Holland Building in downtown Springfield. The offices of Casey Architecture, where Hall works, are located upstairs.

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A’DJA JONES

27 | Student Athlete Advisor, Missouri State University @ADJAADARICE07

M

uch ink has been used maligning the term “student-athlete” thanks to eligibility scandals that occasionally emerge at large universities. Fortunately, those cases are a vast exception, and advisors like A’dja Jones are the reason why. Jones works with the Missouri State University track, cross country and swimming and diving teams, in addition to primarily freshmen and sophomore players on the football team. She helps with every aspect of their academic and athletic careers, including selecting classes, studying, managing practice schedules and acclimating to college life. “We try to empower students more than anything else,” Jones says. She serves as a staff senator at MSU and is a coordinator for SAFE (Student Athletes for Excellence), a program that brings athletes from different sports together to build leadership and career skills and work in the community. Jones, herself, volunteers for Isabel’s House in her free time. The Doniphan, Missouri, native credits her family as well as past and present supervisors at MSU for her success. And though she says she never originally saw herself working in athletics, she loves the opportunity it has provided her to grow at the university. “I think surrounding yourself with people who provide the right amount of challenge and support is the key to being successful,” Jones says.

BENJAMIN HALL 29 | Associate Architect, Casey Architecture Co-founder and Director of Business Initiatives, Formm

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@BHALL1380

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rom the Casey Architecture offices in downtown Springfield’s Holland Building, Benjamin Hall can see the Springfield History Museum, a high-profile project he has helped Casey spearhead along with a number of other large-scale projects such as schools, hospitals and museums. But he has to look a little farther to see his projects that are making a major difference halfway across the world. As a co-founder of Formm (previously For Burkina), a nonprofit humanitarian organization, Hall and others work to educate underprivileged communities worldwide through innovative design and construction. Hall and his team raised $32,000 and traveled to Burkina Faso to build the group’s first school, the completion of which he calls his proudest moment. Formm has plans to expand its efforts in Africa as well as begin projects in Latin America and the United States. While in Burkina Faso, Hall and other Formm team members were caught in the crosshairs of a terrorist attack, a harrowing experience that he says—unfortunately—got Formm a lot of unintended publicity and highlighted the extremes of humanity that exist in many places in the world. In addition to his nonprofit work, Hall is a Staff Sergeant in the U.S. Air Force. His biggest advice is to act on your dreams. “If you want to do something it’s a matter of just doing it,” he says. BIZ417.COM

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ZACH TERHARK

Founder and operator, Eagle Armory | 27

N

ecessity is the mother of invention, the saying goes. As a sophomore at Evangel University, Zach Terhark noticed one day that he couldn’t buy firearms on Craigslist. One weekend later, he and his brother Jeremiah had built a site that offered just that, the aptly named gunlistings.org. That site, and an accompanying online ammunition sales site, took off. When he sold gunlistings.org in 2012, he was able to open Eagle Armory, a firearms retailer in Springfield. A second location in O’Fallon opened in 2015. Growth since then has been explosive, so to speak. “I didn’t realize just what the economy for firearms in Springfield was,” Terhark says. Terhark’s success has been through watching competitors like Amazon to see what they do right or wrong. To keep overhead low, he waits for a customer to ask for a specific product before he’ll carry it. The firearms industry is also one with a lot of important legal procedures. “If you make a mistake, you can have a pretty bad impact on the ability of the [Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives] or police departments to do their jobs,” he says. Terhark is active in the Springfield community, personally in Rotaract and the Springfield Area Chamber of Commerce and through Eagle Armory, which has sponsored the Southwest Missouri Cattle Baron’s Ball and a benefit for officer Aaron Pearson, as well as the Missouri chapter of Ducks Unlimited. STYLED BY THE HABERDASHER AT DAPPER September/October 2016

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ABBY GLENN

BRIAN KINCAID

27 | Development Associate, Habitat for Humanity of Springfield, MO @ABBY01GLENN

F

or every nonprofit gala you attend, there’s a hardworking employee who puts in countless hours to make it happen. For Habitat for Humanity of Springfield, MO’s annual Tool Belts & Bow Ties gala, that person is Abby Glenn. Last year the fundraiser grossed nearly $90,000, enough to build an entire habitat home from the ground up. Additionally, Abby coordinates Habitat’s efforts on Give Ozarks Day, as well as an annual fun run, poker tournament and Hearts & Hammers event. “Having a house and a safe place to call home is something I’ve never had to think about before,” Glenn says. “But once you get here, you realize it’s very much a need, and it’s one of the things that really keeps me going.” This summer Glenn began a year as professional development director in Springfield Rotaract’s officer rotation. She’s also in her third year as a member of Junior League of Springfield where she has spent time working with families at the Robberson Community School. Glenn’s secret to success? Staying busy. She’ll tackle three different projects on a given day and relishes the chance to multitask. “I like having to constantly juggle things,” Glenn says. “That’s what keeps me motivated.” STYLED BY THE UPTOWN BOUTIQUE

WHITLEY LANE

Vice President - Human Resources Manager, Bear State Bank | 27 @WHITLEYMAE

W

hen opportunity knocks, Whitley Lane answers. At the age of 19, while she was working at O&S Trucking to help pay for college, she was promoted to manage payroll and employee benefits for the company. It started a love affair with HR, which she now runs for two regions of Bear State Bank (formerly Metropolitan National Bank) and 200 or so of its employees at 19 branches in Missouri and Arkansas. Lane’s biggest mission and passion is finding the best employees. “It’s a talent-driven world, and it’s a competitive market,” she says. “My goal is to make us that employer of choice and get that word out.” For example, Lane recently helped introduce perks like 12 weeks of paid parental leave for both new moms and dads. Lane also credits Bear State Bank President Mark McFatridge as a mentor. “I can’t imagine working for a better leader,” she says. “I always say, when you let him know your goal, be ready to achieve it, as he will drag you kicking and screaming across your finish line, personally and professionally.” As her job would indicate, Lane likes meeting new people and helping them grow and flourish while also achieving Bear State Bank’s goals. Outside of work, she’s a member of the Springfield Area Human Resources Association and volunteers for Big Brothers Big Sisters. She and her husband, Garrett, are expecting their first child this fall.

Director, The eFactory | 28 @BRIANCKINCAID

M

issouri State University’s The eFactory is arguably the most important program the school has developed in recent years. And Brian Kincaid is a driving force behind the program’s success. Tasked with getting the project in motion as a graduate student in 2009, Kincaid, who has a finance background, admits that managing the renovation of an old turkey processing plant into a state-of-the-art building—and then running it—seemed professionally daunting at first. But with the help of strong mentors and the Springfield business community at large, his career has flourished along with The eFactory. “I’m a big fan of not turning down a good opportunity,” Kincaid says. “What I’m proudest of is client success stories and how our programs have evolved,” he says. He points to economic impact data and the new business accelerator program as evidence that The eFactory is nimble and responsive to the needs of the entrepreneurial community and is making a difference. He currently serves on the Idea Commons Planning Committee, the body tasked with developing the larger 88-acre tech and entrepreneurial campus on which The eFactory sits. He also serves on the Missouri Economic Development council and the International Business Innovation Association, coordinates the Missouri Public Affairs Academy and is an advisor for the entrepreneurial strand of GO CAPS, which he calls a point of pride for The eFactory.

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In 2009 when Brian Kincaid was a graduate student, he led the project to get The eFactory up and running. Today the entrepreneurial center is home to several startup businesses and a new accelerator program.

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The many sculptures that decorate BKD’s national office, including this abacus, don’t compare to Travis Liles’s favorite part of his job as a financial advisor: his clients.

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JODY GLAZNER 28 | Give Back Director, North Point Church @JODY_LYNN

T

he influence of the faith community in 417-land cannot be overstated. So in her position as give back director for North Point Church, one of the area’s largest congregations, Jody Glazner has a unique ability to influence how faith is perceived by the community. “My job is to make sure the church isn’t a liar,” Glazner says bluntly. “When we say we have this God who loves us and cares, we need to show that we’re active in that role toward other people.” The most exciting thing Glazner has had a chance to participate in lately has been the Convoy of Hope Community Event, held in conjunction with the City of Springfield, in early May. “Together we can help more people than we can on our own,” she says. “It was so great to be a part of.” Glazner’s goal: to help establish a dream center, what she calls a “hub of hope,” where community members can have access to programs including social services, counseling and rehab and other needs currently scattered across town. Despite her hyper-local focus, Glazner also has spent time both coordinating and participating in North Point mission trips, which have included ventures to the Dominican Republic, Haiti, Ethiopia and more. “I will keep going wherever I can to help the most people,” she says.

TRAVIS LILES

28 | Financial Advisor, BKD Wealth Advisors @TRAVIS_LILES

T

hanks to the Great Recession, widespread suspicion of Wall Street and the “Summer of Brexit,” you might wonder why anyone would want to work in the financial services industry. Travis Liles has a two-word answer: the clients. He works with BKD clients, both individuals and businesses with employee plans, to help them invest in the right funds, plan retirement and more. The Missouri State University MBA program, as well as a stint at the Community Foundation of the Ozarks, helped Liles cultivate a message he finds himself repeating often: “The most difficult thing is to remember that investments are a long-term strategy,” he says. “Patience really is a virtue.” Another passion of Liles’s is connecting with the community. He recently completed a year as president of the Springfield Little Theatre’s Associate Board, which seeks to promote the theater to young professionals and families. He spearheaded a high-profile roast event and the annual Curtains & Corks fundraiser, which saw record results in 2015 and 2016. Like any engaged young professional, he spends a lot of time reading. Anything about the 2016 presidential election (particularly its rumored effect on the markets) or Springfield city news is sure to catch his attention. “I’m really fortunate to have a supportive network of folks who have helped me grow in the community,” he says.

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ANDREA HARP

Senior Communications Manager, Ozarks Community Hospital Health System | 28 @THEMIGHTYMICROS

A

s a “safety net provider,” Ozarks Community Hospital Health System benefits those who might not have access to other medical care. As its main communicator, Andrea Harp makes sure the hospital’s message gets out and that its 700 or so employees, who cover much of southern Missouri and northern Arkansas, remain connected not only to the hospital but also to the communities they serve. A current major priority is integrated care that focuses on a patient’s symptoms and the underlying causes for their ailments and pairs patients with case managers to find the best course of treatment. Harp also strives to convey a message of trust and accessibility among the health system’s 16 clinics and their communities, a vital step to making sure rural patients seek the care they need. “I’m honored to get to tell the story of a health system I believe in so much,” Harp says. And it’s a story she has told well since joining the hospital in 2010. In 2011 she received the SWMO Public Relations Society of America’s Rising Star award for outstanding young professionals. Harp—who recently returned from extended leave caring for extremely premature twins, Ainsley and Alexandria, born last fall—still finds time to work with HOPE Connection, a service for Springfield’s homeless population, and GO:61, which combats human trafficking. STYLED BY THE UPTOWN BOUTIQUE

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SHAILEY MURPHY

29 | Co-owner and Creative Consultant, Harp Creative LLC @SHAILEYMURPHY

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hen you graduate with a degree in interior design at the height of the worst recession in decades, you quickly learn to ad lib. Fortunately for Shailey Murphy, that skill paid off in the form of an entrepreneurial streak that today takes her and her husband, Jonathan, around the world to shoot videos for clients that include the Assemblies of God, Convoy of Hope and others. In her role as creative consultant, Murphy is essentially the face of the agency, working with clients to conceptualize the ad or video that Jonathan and the company’s stable of videographers and editors produce. The couple also worked in 2011 on Man Up and Go, a feature-length documentary produced with Randy and Shannon Bacon about a group of local men who went to Africa to help address the orphan crisis. “Sometimes it’s strange for people to think of a husband and wife that work together all the time, but it works for us,” Murphy says. “It’s neat that we’re able to do something as random as video production full-time, make a living and have the freedom to travel.” In her free time, Murphy has volunteered for North Point Church, I Pour Life and Great Circle. She is also co-host, along with Katie Day, of Shailey & Katie: The Podcast, a DIY, design and creative entrepreneur podcast that you can download on iTunes.

GARRETT LOWDER

Assistant Principal, Nixa Public Schools | 28 @GARRETTLOWDER

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or six years, Garrett Lowder has helped Nixa fourth graders learn and embrace the STEAM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Arts and Mathematics) curriculum employed at Nixa’s John Thomas School of Discovery. Starting this fall, he is helping all students in two of the growing district’s buildings do the same thing in his role as assistant principal. STEAM is project- and inquiry-based learning, which challenges students to engage in real problems and, through technology, prepare for the kinds of situations and problems they’ll be asked to face in the real world. For example, Lowder’s students a couple of years ago solved an erosion problem on the Thomas campus, complete with an action-plan presentation to administration and negotiations with local businesses for supplies. “Employers are looking for collaborators, problem-solvers and critical thinkers,” Lowder says. “These changes are bold and progressive, but Nixa always focuses on what the kids need to be successful.” While still a teacher, Lowder presented on STEAM practices at national conferences. Although he’s sad to be leaving the classroom, Lowder is excited to impact more students as assistant principal at both Thomas School of Discovery and Inman Elementary. He’s also working on his doctorate at Southwest Baptist University with hopes of moving up in administration at Nixa, where he says he works with the best teachers and administrators in the world.

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After six years in the classroom teaching fourth grade, Garrett Lowder started this fall as an assistant principal at two Nixa elementary schools to help inspire even more students.

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TABITHA EUTSLER 29 | Third-grade Teacher, Springfield Public Schools @MSEUTSLER117

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alk about things coming full circle. Tabitha Eutsler attended grade school at Jeffries Elementary in southwest Springfield. Two decades later she’s now a teacher at the school, making the lives of students better each and every day. Named the 2015–16 Teacher of the Year for Springfield Public Schools, Eutsler took the position in 2010 straight out of Evangel University and right away gravitated to the third graders. “They love their teacher and hugs and notes, but they’re also very independent,” Eutsler says. “My goal is to teach them through that transition.” But as any teacher will tell you, it’s not all hugs and notes. Education is changing, and Eutsler says navigating the current educational landscape—changing technology and methods that require finding what’s right for each student—is a big challenge. Outside of the classroom, Eutsler is a sponsor for the Jeffries Student Council, where she has helped kids in kindergarten through fifth grade execute fundraisers for CASA and the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society. She also helped students develop live-action PSAs for the school’s safety night, which they presented for parents and neighborhood firefighters. Eutsler can often be found at her students’ basketball games or gymnastics competitions. It’s a time investment she says she’s happy to make. “Hopefully I’m building lifelong relationships,” she says. “I want students to know I love them and care about them.”

Whether Tabitha Eutsler is helping students in the classroom or cheering them on at athletic events, her dedication to students helped her earn 2015–16 Teacher of the Year.

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RACHEL ROBINSON Owner and Co-Founder, DotCom Therapy | 29 @SLPRACHEL

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ere’s a stat: currently there are 20 million people in the United States alone in need of speech therapy, but fewer than 150,000 licensed therapists. Enter DotCom Therapy. Rachel Robinson and her partner, Emily Purdom, started the business in early 2015 when they decided online therapy could be just as—if not more—effective than in-person sessions. Today DotCom Therapy employs 20-plus therapists across the country who work with schools and individuals around the globe. Many of their clients, from ages 3 to 84, are in rural places, where the urban concentration of therapy professionals simply isn’t accessible. DotCom Therapy is adding occupational and behavioral therapy services as well. Robinson’s background is working with adult speech patients, including those affected by Parkinson’s Disease, stroke and other brain injuries. “Being able to work with patients and hear them say ‘I love you’ to a husband or wife for the first time is huge,” she says. In August, Robinson and Purdom spoke at the 30th World Congress of the International Association of Logopedics and Phoniatrics in Dublin, which Robinson calls incredibly exciting. She and her husband, Tim, spend a lot of time exploring downtown (where DotCom Therapy recently opened its first office) and supporting the Springfield Rugby Club. STYLED BY THE UPTOWN BOUTIQUE

JOSHUA SULLIVAN

28 | Senior Art Director, The Alchemedia Project @JSULLY

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or Joshua Sullivan, advertising is all about making connections. The senior art director for The Alchemedia Project, a Springfield-based ad firm specializing in business-to-business food service work, got his start designing CD covers and T-shirts for bands in college. A planned MBA turned into an associate degree in graphic design, and the rest is history. Stints in Florida and Texas led Sullivan to Missouri where he worked for O’Reilly and then design shop The Team before landing at Alchemedia several years ago. Now Sullivan manages multiple designers and works on accounts including Unilever and McCain Foods. “Advertising is often the best place for people to make an emotional connection with graphic design,” he says. And though the job of an art director is often more conceptual than actually creating a look, he says he enjoys the problem-solving nature of the business. In addition to his day job, Sullivan recently started Deep Fried Design Studios. He says opening his own business is a chance to scratch an entrepreneurial itch he’s always had. “It’s a good time in my career to do it,” Sullivan says. “It’s just me and my wife, so we can easily aim for the stars and try to make it happen.” Sullivan serves on the marketing committee for the Foundation for Springfield Public Schools and on the board of Springfield Creatives, where as special events chair he helped bring Portland, Oregon–based designer Aaron Draplin to Missouri State University to speak, a huge draw for local creatives. He’s also done branding work for downtown businesses such as Scotch & Soda and Druff’s. STYLED BY THE HABERDASHER AT DAPPER

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FELICIA ROSE 29 | Volunteer Coordinator, Harmony House

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s a survivor of domestic abuse herself, Felicia Rose didn’t arrive at her job at Harmony House on the easiest of paths. But her personal journey is the reason she’s so passionate about the nonprofit’s mission and is driven to help the women and families who seek shelter there. After starting at Harmony House as a volunteer and then a case worker, Rose now supervises the 100 or so weekly volunteers it takes to operate the 110-bed shelter, which is in the process of moving to a new larger location that will increase programming and capacity, and thus the need for volunteers. Rose also assists with donor development and events for Harmony House. Previously active with community groups including Stand Against Trafficking and the Ozarks Fighting Back Committee, Rose is currently completing a master’s degree in Nonprofit and Civic Leadership at Drury University. With that under her belt, and drawing on her own experience and the strength of the clients she has helped at Harmony House, Rose has grand designs for her role in combating abuse and violence at the community level and beyond. “In order for abuse to end, the community at large needs to understand and acknowledge it,” Rose says. “It’s all interconnected.” STYLED BY THE UPTOWN BOUTIQUE

NICOLE CARR

Chief Executive Officer, Little Sunshine’s Enterprises | 29

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arly childhood care is simultaneously a very personal decision and big business. As CEO of Little Sunshine’s, it’s Nicole Carr’s job to help her company walk the line between the two. With a business degree from Missouri State University, Carr succeeded founder Rochette Dahler as CEO earlier this year after working her way up in the organization. It’s a busy time at the company; with 14 current locations stretching from the Midwest to Arizona and sights set on nearly doubling that number in the next year, Little Sunshine’s is a growing national name in childcare. The biggest challenge, Carr says, is putting the right people in the right places by balancing experience in early-childhood education with passion for the job. She says the close-knit, family atmosphere is Little Sunshine’s biggest strength. “I feel adamant that our people are number one,” Carr says. And special features like kiddie cams and the “Love Notes” system of daily electronic updates make the tie between parents and school even closer. “We serve on every scale like a family, from each location right up through the corporate office.” Carr and her husband, Andy, also are involved with the Pediatric Brain Foundation, for which Little Sunshine’s is the national corporate sponsor. The organization works to help find cures for neurological disorders in small children.

JOHN CHASTAIN

System Director of Budget Management, CoxHealth | 28 @JOHN_CHASTAIN

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hink about your checkbook. Sometimes it’s difficult to balance, right? Now think about setting and sticking to a budget for a $1.3 billion healthcare provider. John Chastain has been doing this job since he was 26. “[Our department is] like your financial planner, but instead of trying to maximize the growth of assets in your retirement account, we use financial models to determine what investments provide the maximum return for our patients and community,” Chastain says. This can include deciding where to build CoxHealth’s next clinic or, as has been the case in 2016, dealing with the skyrocketing costs of drugs and pharmaceuticals, which are increasing significantly year-over-year. Familiarity with programming and tough decision-making are also a big part of the job. “You can’t feasibly invest in every project, especially in an era of declining reimbursement,” he says. “But you do hope the decisions we make strengthen the position of the health system to continue to improve the health of the communities that we serve.” Chastain says he enjoys the chance to bring a fresh perspective to CoxHealth and feels fortunate to work at an institution that values its legacy and provides excellent guidance to its young leaders. In his free time, the Marshfield native coaches girls’ soccer for an area traveling team that practices up to three nights a week and travels every weekend in the fall.

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John Chastain, who is system director of budget management for CoxHealth, stands in the west wing of Cox Medical Center South. His job responsibilities include helping decide where to build new facilities.

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PROMOTION

EACH ISSUE WE INTRODUCE YOU TO 417-LAND’S TOP PROFESSIONALS

MEET THE MASTERS There are many experts in 417-land who set the bar high for others in the industry. From masters in floral distribution and financial planning to construction management, find out what makes those businesses, and those who are behind them, so exceptional.

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PROMOTION

MEET THE MASTERS IN FLORAL PRODUCTS

Lane Waggoner, Chris Owens, Kim King, Andre Due, Ben Ratteree, CJ Romo, Robb Wilcox, Warren Carlson, Judy Mears, Scott Ables

It’s all about the Pretty!

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ears Floral is a well-known supplier of fresh flowers in the four- state area. In addition, Mears Floral’s best-kept secret is one of the largest showrooms in the wholesale floral industry. It showcases a wide variety of permanent arrangements, silk flowers, dried flowers, ribbon, balloons, containers along with novelty, home decor, and new trending products for every season. If you haven’t experienced their showroom you are missing a shopping adventure. Mears Floral customers purchase fresh, silk and dried flowers to create custom arrangements. The home decor department is limitless. Mear’s carries fall decor, pumpkins, fall foliage, fall flowers and fall ribbon. Pre-

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What sets this wholesale business apart is the loyalty built after nearly seven decades of treating customers like family. MEARS FLORAL PRODUCTS 1222 S. SCENIC AVE. SPRINGFIELD, MO 417.862.4394 MEARSFLORAL.COM

lit Christmas trees, wreaths, tabletop decor, and a wide variety of ornaments have just arrived. Mears has everything you’ve ever wanted in fall and Christmas decor styles from Ozark rustic to high-end contemporary. Mears Floral provides products that will enhance your seasonal needs. What sets this wholesale business apart is the loyalty built after nearly seven decades of treating customers like family. Well-known and well-respected, Mears Floral has a long reputation of trust and true customer service among florists, designers, event planners, wedding coordinators and business owners. Mears Floral will help you create a backdrop for your greatest memories.

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PROMOTION

MEET THE MASTERS IN COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION

EXPANDING SPRINGFIELD’S INDUSTRIAL POWERHOUSE

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pringfield’s Partnership Industrial Park is experiencing rapid growth and expansion! Larry Snyder & Company has partnered with Digital Monitoring Products, Inc. (DMP) in expanding it’s headquarters, which is a key centerpiece in the Partnership Industrial Park. With the exponential company growth, DMP’s President, Rick Britton continues to expand the company’s state-of-the-art headquarters facility. DMP as a company takes pride in it’s quality of work and attention to detail, which is evident in the quality and appearance of its facilities and products. This set the table for a perfect partnership fit with Larry Snyder & Company that would result in construction of

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Larry Snyder & Company has partnered with Digital Monitoring Products, Inc. in expanding it’s headquarters, which is a key centerpiece in the Partnership Industrial Park. LARRY SNYDER & CO.

4820 N. TOWNE CENTRE DR. OZARK, MO 417.887.6897 LSCINC.COM

the additional, expanded area to meet the comapny’s operational needs, and implementation of the quality of work and craftsmanship the DMP and Larry Snyder & Company teams are both known, recognized, and respected for producing. The current expansion provides DMP with an additional 35,500 square feet of office and conference space included within two separate areas of expansion, as well as 38,600 square feet of expansion of themanufacturing and warehouse facility. This project is nearing completion, and Larry Snyder & Company looks forward to further continuing it’s partnership with Digital Monitoring Products, Inc.

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PROMOTION

MEET THE MASTERS IN FINANCIAL PLANNING

Jeff Bilberry, Holly Gray, Lance O’Neill, Dennis Heim, Dean Young and Brent Singleton

ACHIEVING Your Financial Independence

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eim, Young & Associates offers financial, retirement and estate planning services. Dennis Heim, Dean Young and Brent Singleton have more than 80 years of combined experience in the industry. Whether you need a strategy to meet short- or long-term goals, are starting a family or are nearing retirement, they are the professionals to count on. The team utilizes and values a holistic personalized approach. Their client-first mentality is evident. They offer free consultations that are designed to discover your goals and financial risk tolerance. Options are then explored with those goals and best interests as the focus, and a comprehensive financial plan is developed based on specific needs. “We

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We ultimately answer the client’s big question, ‘If I keep doing what I’m doing, will I be able to get where I want to go?’ -Brent Singleton HEIM, YOUNG & ASSOCIATES

ultimately answer the client’s big question, ‘If I keep doing what I’m doing, will I be able to get where I want to go?’” says Singleton. Most people think all financial planners are certified, but anyone can call himself a financial planner. Heim, Young & Associates suggests researching the planner’s commitment to ethical behavior and adherence to high professional standards. Be sure to look for a Certified Financial Planning Practitioner who puts clients’ needs and goals at the center of every financial planning engagement. Get on the right path, and plan your financial future with Heim, Young & Associates.

1256 E. KINGSLEY ST. SPRINGFIELD, MO 65804 417-882-7283 HEIMYOUNG.COM

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PHOTOS BY BRAD ZWEERINK

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TOOLS TO HELP YOU DOMINATE

“The ultimate objective is the improvement and progress of the individuals on the team.” – Kurt Theobald, CEO, Classy Llama

PHOTOS BY BRAD ZWEERINK

SEE STORY PAGE 56

FOUR WHEELS, FOUR GENERATIONS

The Thompson family gets a lot of mileage out of close relationships at Thompson Sales. PAGE 70 BIZ417.COM

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Culture Club Do It Now What If Jumpstart

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Advice & Whiskey Giving Back How-To Workspace

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Chart It The Big Question Viewpoints Next Gen

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Marketing Strategist Ashlee Colliver, FrontEnd Developer Brendan Tull and Llama Desk Technical Manager Jordan Phillips are fully engaged at Classy Llama thanks in part to an unconventional office environment, including work sessions on the porch.

[CULTURE CLUB]

Classy Culture As an e-commerce agency, Classy Llama is people-centric by nature. Ultimately, though, the Springfield company’s culture comes down to its tight-knit staff and the relationships therein. Kurt Theobald, Classy Llama’s CEO, shares the ins and outs of “Classy Culture.” BY: LILLIAN STONE

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hen CEO Kurt Theobald began Classy Llama in 2007, he knew his business model would be unorthodox. “In the past, I worked as a payroll employee for many different companies,” Theobald says. “And I felt very marginalized, very part of the machine, not really like a human with a soul.” Today, the full-service e-commerce agency has more than 40 employees. But the heart of the organization lies beyond the daily grind. Theobald feels strongly that his role is not to dictate company culture, but to cultivate it like a garden, he says. The value of relationships is apparent in Classy Llama’s day-to-day operations. Each day, the team conducts a roundup, during which one staffer updates the others on their life outside of work. Theobald feels these daily roundups help establish meaningful relationships beyond desk chatter. The team also participates in monthly community events, which allow employees and their families to meet up outside of the office. Theobald’s favorite recent event? “We played

laser tag on the property,” he says. “We used all three buildings on campus. Someone got hurt. It was awesome.” The Classy Llama team also shares its culture with others. Theobald shares words of wisdom on “how to do life” in the form of short videos. These snippets are released online four days a week and cover topics essential to a relationshipfirst organization, including managing risk, releasing anger and using time effectively. Theobald is adamant that Classy Llama’s culture is not about financial gain or driving traditional business productivity. However, engagement is a huge plus. “Only about 30 percent of the workforce on an average team is fully engaged,” he says. “At Classy Llama, I think we can honestly say we have 100 percent engagement.” Theobald is also proud of the agency’s low employee turnover rate. “People find that there’s something worth staying for,” he says. It’s important to note that a relationshipbased culture is not without its challenges—for Classy Llama, those challenges included rapid company growth. “In 2015, we added 20 people to our team,” Theobald says. “When you add that many people, there’s a lot of risk to the culture.” For Classy Llama, vetting new employees on cultural grounds is the secret to creating the perfect mesh. “We really want to understand who they are, how they operate, how they think about other people and their own life and their own value,” Theobald says. He recommends going deeper than standard interview queries to get to know the heart of each potential new hire. For those looking to improve a company’s culture, Theobald offers an essential first step: self-reflection. “Look inside yourself and ask yourself, ‘Why am I doing this?’” he suggests. In his eyes, a flashy culture with the goal of driving productivity will fail. “The culture is not the means to the end,” he says. “The ultimate objective is the improvement and progress of the individuals on the team.” Theobald feels that a company’s focus should lie in the soul of the company’s mission. “The highest priority is not staying in business,” he says. “The business is not worth compromising who we are.”

ADDRESS CRITICISM WITH EASE 56

CERTIFIED LEADERSHIP DEVELOPMENT COACH JAMES BONDS, OWNER OF WELL DRIVEN LIFE (WELLDRIVENLIFE.COM), SHARES HOW TO BOUNCE BACK AFTER RECEIVING NEGATIVE FEEDBACK.

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DON’T TAKE IT PERSONALLY

“The main thing people need to realize when they receive a performance review is that it’s not about you as a person; it’s about your performance,” Bonds says. “You have to separate the two.”

GET IT IN WRITING

“A supervisor may tend to give you more factual information when they provide written feedback compared to verbal conversations,” Bonds says. Plus, written feedback is easier to digest and act on.

REFLECT AND MOVE FORWARD

Use tough feedback as a selfevaluation tool. “Ask yourself, ‘Are you doing the best you can do?’” Bonds says. “Only you can answer that question for yourself.”

PHOTO BY BRAD ZWEERINK

[DO IT NOW]

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[WHAT IF]

[JUMPSTART]

RACING THE CLOCK

PREVENTING A TAKEOVER The threat of corporate account takeover looms for organizations of all sizes. Two local experts weigh in on how businesses can stay secure and what to do if they become victims. BY: STEPHANIE TOWNE BENOIT

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yber criminals accessing credentials and infiltrating corporate bank accounts are a business owner’s nightmare. Some assume only huge corporations are threatened, but that’s not the case. “Frankly more and more small businesses are being targeted because they don’t have all the resources to put the controls in place,” says Jeff Eiserman, an Ollis/Akers/Arney Risk Advisor. One control includes reviewing your insurance because standard policies might not fully cover corporate account takeover. Eiserman says a commercial crime policy generally insures monetary losses. Or consider a cyber liability plan to cover you in case criminals gain access to key data, such as customer contact or payment information. After a breach, seek legal assistance and address requirements regarding notifying law enforcement, consumer reporting agencies and clients. An expert in cyber liability mitigation can help minimize liabilities from data loss, says Thomas H. Douglas, president and CEO of JMARK Business Solutions, Inc. Once the dust settles, Eiserman recommends a post-accident investigation. “Sit down with your trusted advisors and internal leadership and determine exactly what happened and put proactive steps in place to prevent it from happening again,” he says. Then relay those findings to the rest of your organization so you’re all on the same page.

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If you haven’t started planning for the upcoming changes in overtime pay, the clock is ticking. On December 1, the salary threshold will more than double to $47,476 per year. According to the U.S. Department of Labor, the change will impact an estimated 4.2 million workers nationwide, including 85,000 in Missouri. Carolyn O’Kelley, president of the Springfield Area Human Resources Association, shares a five-step strategy to help you prepare now. BY: ADRIENNE DONICA

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ASSESS THE SITUATION

“If [HR professionals and employers] haven’t already, they need to begin that process of identifying the employees that are impacted,” O’Kelley says. This means figuring out who is exempt from overtime (Editor’s Note: Refer to the U.S. Labor Department’s Fact Sheet No. 17A for more information) and how much time currently exempt employees below the new salary threshold spend working. This includes checking email from home and traveling. O’Kelley reminds employers that both salaried and hourly employees can qualify for overtime. The real distinction is determined by job responsibilities, meaning executives, some IT and sales employees and other professionals might be exempt.

CONSIDER YOUR OPTIONS

Restructuring your workforce could help minimize the financial impact on your business. O’Kelley says increasing salaries to meet the new threshold, updating job responsibilities to meet exemption status and reducing hourly wages of employees who will be non-exempt come December and who work more than 40 hours per week are all possible solutions.

COMMUNICATE WITH EMPLOYEES

O’Kelley advises transparency throughout the transition. “Once you make your decisions about how you’re going to work with those impacted employees, you’ve got to communicate your expectations to them,” O’Kelley says. Be as specific as possible so everyone knows what is happening. If you’re still working on a plan, it’s OK to tell employees you don’t know what your solution will be, she says.

IMPLEMENT A TRACKING SYSTEM

Come December 1, a timekeeping system will be required for all non-exempt employees. What kind of system is entirely up to you, though. “You don’t have to go out and buy a fancy system,” O’Kelley says. “There’s no required way to do that, just that you are tracking them.” Excel spreadsheets or plain old paper timecards will do just fine, but she says Kronos Incorporated offers a popular electronic system.

DEVELOP A LONG-TERM SOLUTION The changing rule also stipulates that the salary threshold will increase again in 2020, possibly to around $50,000, O’Kelley says. “I think long-term, you really have to rely on your human resources department, making sure that they are given the resources they need to evaluate all your positions [and] do the training that they need to keep on top of this,” O’Kelley says. “It’s going to be an ongoing process.” September/October 2016

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[ADVICE & WHISKEY]

Passion Projects & Punch with Linda Ramey-Greiwe Last year Linda Ramey-Greiwe retired as publisher of the Springfield News-Leader after 29 years with Gannett. A few months later she followed her passion into an entirely different field as executive director for Care to Learn. Over drinks at Golden Girl Rum Club, she shared the wisdom she has learned in following her passion. BY: JEFF HOUGHTON

Lifelong Mizzou fan Linda Ramey-Greiwe knows a thing or two about finding your passion in your job.

“Find something that you’re passionate about that makes you want to get up and go to work every day. That to me is one of those gut checks, when you wake up and ask yourself, ‘Am I happy about Monday?’” “I think every job has parts that you like more and parts that you like less, but you just need to be sure that at the end of the day there are more parts that you like than you don’t like.” “Make yourself a plan with a timeline so you can see how you can get from where you are currently—in a job you’re not as passionate about—to knowing what you want to do and how to get there.” “It’s easier to enjoy a job that uses your natural skills than one that relies too heavily on a skill set you don’t have.” “Eighty percent of the time you should be doing things that you’re really good at and then get better at the other 20 percent. Don’t spend 80 percent of your time in a detail-oriented job if you hate detail.” “If it’s something you care about, you don’t work hard to find it. It’s there; you just have to learn more about it.” “You have to be responsible, but you also have to know that there is no perfect time to leave your job.”

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ILLUSTRATION BY HEATHER KANE

“Push yourself; it’s very easy to get comfortable. Taking a risk and doing something you’re passionate about may mean you give up that steady income, and you’re probably going to have fewer Friday night dates, and that’s okay.”

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Benefits that are better for you.

You get a lot more with a UBA Partner. Employee Benefit Design is committed to bringing you the most resources available in order to find you the best benefits package. That’s why we’re proud to be a United Benefits Advisors Partner. Being a partner gives us access to the experiences of more than 2,000 benefit professionals and allows us to gain knowledge and resources from across the country and find cost-effective solutions. Our goal is to find the benefits package that fits you and your business best.

Your benefits team.

National Scope. Local Expertise.

Ken Stephens

Chance Potts

employee benefit

LLC

d e s i g n •

417.889.6345 | ebdllc.com Benefit Advisors on: Health | Life | Dental | Disability | Accident | Critical Illness | Vacation

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PHILANTHROPIC PROFILE NUMBER OF CHARITABLE GIVING PROGRAMS:

2

AMOUNT DONATED AFTER THE HOPE FOR JOPLIN FUNDRAISER:

$167,000

VOLUNTEERS WHO HELPED DURING HOPE FOR JOPLIN:

132

NUMBER OF FUNDRAISERS COMPLETED THROUGH YOUR IDENTI-TEES:

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Thoughtful Threads Days after the 2011 Joplin tornado, Bigfish Screenprinting started a fundraiser that changed the company for good. BY: ADRIENNE DONICA

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fter a catastrophic tornado ripped through Joplin on a Sunday night in May 2011, 417-landers, including the small team at Bigfish Screenprinting LLC, rushed in to help pick up the pieces. The team knew they wanted to help but initially didn’t know how. “People always say, ‘I’m one person, what can I do?’ Well, we were thinking that same thing,” says owner Vicki Simpson. “We’re a small company. I mean seriously, what can we do?” On Tuesday, they decided to make a T-shirt that read “Hope for Joplin,” thinking they would possibly sell 500 and

donate the money to a church or a disaster relief fund. But thanks in part to Facebook, requests for shirts were pouring into Bigfish’s inbox, and lines of customers were out the shop’s door. “Springfield always steps up to the plate, but the nation really rallied behind some little town in Missouri,” Simpson says. By the end of the campaign, they had sold approximately 30,000 shirts to customers in 48 states and six countries. “It really shaped more of who we are as a company,” she says. “Yeah, it’s just T-shirts, but we can help people.” The fundraiser’s surprise success meant the entire process was a learning experience. Other businesspeople warned Simpson against bankruptcy. Now she advises others to donate the profits, not the proceeds. By taking out the costs you incur, you’ll eliminate the risk of debt. Another concern was taxes that would have cut into the overall donation amount. Determined to find a way around that, Simpson looked into creating a nonprofit foundation. Even with the help of a lawyer, she says the application process is overwhelming but does suggest paying someone to help. Bigfish also had to navigate the tricky waters of nonprofit classifications. “Know what you’re going after and what the ramifications will be,” Simpson says. “Are you really going to be able to do what you want to do?” For example, Bigfish Foundation can only give to other organizations, causes or events that affect the broader community because of its classification, she says. In February 2015, the company created Your IDENTI-tees, an online fundraising platform. This model allows customers to market their efforts and determine their profit margins by setting an item’s price. Some customers have raised close to $13,000 through Your IDENTI-tees, and Bigfish is able to help even more people. But with so many requests, it can be difficult for business owners to choose a cause. “You can’t say yes to everything,” Simpson reminds others. “So I’d say if it touches your heart, go for it.” Vicki Simpson, owner of Bigfish Screenprinting, took the small action of creating T-shirts after the Joplin tornado and turned it into a fundraising model that helps efforts across 417-land.

PHOTOS COURTESY BIGFISH SCREENPRINTING, BY KEVIN O’RILEY

[GIVING BACK]

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[HOW-TO]

Working the Crowd

Crowdfunding success requires more than enthusiasm and a good idea. We talked to a Kickstarter whiz to learn how to maximize your efforts and avoid a crowdfunding flop. BY: STEPHANIE TOWNE BENOIT

K

ickstarter helps build excitement for an idea and get ventures off the ground, but the platform does not guarantee success. A great campaign takes preparation and planning, a reality Caleb Stokes, owner of Hebanon Games, has learned over the years. Stokes has successfully used the platform three times to fund tabletop roleplaying games such as Red Markets, which is the fourth most-funded Kickstarter in Springfield to date. He shares his tips on how to avoid possible pitfalls. DO YOUR HOMEWORK

Familiarize yourself with other campaigns first. “If you are going to be a writer, you should read a lot of books; if you are going to start a Kickstarter, you should at least look at a lot of Kickstarters,” Stokes says. GET SOCIAL

Start marketing long before your launch by building a following outside of Kickstarter through blogging and social media. “When [people] back it and they retweet it, those are the people who are going to get you the biggest number of [additional] backers,” he says. “But if you don’t have that pool before you start, you are in big trouble.” TIME IT RIGHT

The timing of your launch is important. For example, with tabletop games, Stokes says backers have less disposable income during the holidays and around major gaming conferences. Consider trends to avoid launching at an inopportune time. “You need to kind of know those statistical truths and the ins and outs of your industry,” he says. SWEETEN THE DEAL

People are more inclined to support a project if it offers worthwhile rewards. “You are asking people to give you money for a product that may not exist yet,” Stokes says. “You are going to have to give something away for free. That gets your name out there and shows that you can produce professional work without asking people to gamble a whole bunch of money on you.” Plan to build rewards into your budget. DEVELOP RAPPORT

Take advantage of the connection Kickstarter creates with backers. Keep them up-to-date on your progress and detail your budget, which builds trust and indicates that you will deliver on the project. “I know some people aren’t comfortable with that,” he says. “But that engenders such goodwill among the Kickstarter community, and that goodwill is a powerful tool for marketing.” BIZ417.COM

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[WORKSPACE]

2

CAST’s meeting areas are perfect for tenants with larger groups or for cross-company collaboration.

Farmers Park is always full of activity, and CAST, a workspace cooperative run by Green Circle Projects, is no exception. The current 10 tenants— companies specializing in a wide range of industries, such as design and sustainable development—enjoy the laid-back atmosphere full of natural lighting and adjustable music in every area. Jessica Pearson, the marketing director for the Green Circle Projects development team, loves the campus feel and collaborative environment that CAST provides.

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BY: KARLEE RENKOSKI

If you’re wondering where to find the headquarters for the Springfield Batman, CAST is the first place to look. On his desk is one of his many collection pieces, a Batman piggy bank that serves as a reminder and symbol of his goal to give back to the community.

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CAST recently added rolling partitions around their semi-private conference area. “The space is very popular with our coworkers,” Pearson says. “They love the natural light combined with the ability to arrange the partitions.” In addition to serving as space separators, the partitions are made out of whiteboards, a useful quality during meetings.

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Business employees can check out books from the CAST library at any time and return them when they’re finished. The books sit on a pipe shelf that hangs on the wall, which was inspired by Pinterest and made in-house.

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The glass enclosed conference room makes it easy to hold private meetings and includes an Apple TV for presentations, bulletin boards and a large glass garage door on one of the short walls. “Open the garage door, move chairs around and you have a very flexible space to accommodate large groups,” Pearson says. Employees often pull the blinds down and use the glass as a dry erase board as well.

PHOTOS BY BRAD ZWEERINK

WORKING TOGETHER

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The subtle details, such as the packing material on this column, fill CAST with personality.

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Two insulated rooms—dubbed “Padded Rooms for Disturbed Individuals”—are perfect when workers have a private phone call. The small rooms include a chair and desk, an outlet and padded walls for sound absorption, making it easy to take care of business.

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If the coffee, creamers and sugar covering the kitchen cabinets at CAST don’t give you an idea about what the employees like, the chemical formula of caffeine on the wall is sure to make a statement. “Coffee is king,” Pearson says. “We all have an appreciation for brews of all varieties.” CAST has a wholesale account with Brick & Mortar Coffee, and to add to their love of drinks, there is also a kegerator in the kitchen with cold beer.

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Paintings by local artists brighten the walls with bursts of design and color. “I love the fact that we support local artists, and our white walls are perfect backdrops for highlighting the art,” Pearson says. One of the most popular paintings in the office is Brahma

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With 10 current tenants, there’s always a lot of activity in the co-op.

by Brad Noble, which glares at passers-by and reminds tenants to grab the bull by the horns.

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An antique Hammond No. 12 typewriter from Ellecor Design & Gifts floated to different areas in CAST until Community Coordinator Danielle Hartzler started working there two years ago. Now it fits perfectly in the space on her desk at the front of the room as a conversation piece. “It’s just one of those pieces that you walk in a store and know you really want it as soon as you see it,” Hartzler says.

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A cardboard cutout of Chewbacca that has made appearances on CAST’s social media is often moved around the office. Chewbacca was a gift from an employee’s family member, and everyone in the office has a lot of fun with it. Although the placement of Chewbacca can give everyone a good laugh, Pearson says the Wookie has also given her a good scare after being placed right in front of the door. September/October 2016

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[CHART IT]

Let’s start with your age.

What networking group should you join? There are countless Springfield organizations that offer you an opportunity to get involved with other professionals and the community, but how do you know which one is the right fit for you? Follow this chart to figure it out, then watch the connections start coming your way.

How old are you, then?

30 OR YOUNGER?

NO

BY: SAVANNAH WASZCZUK

YES but I’m NOT 40 YET, either

Rotaract Club of Springfield, Missouri Many members in Rotaract (springfieldrotaract.org), who are all ages 30 and younger, are experiencing similar first milestones in both their personal and professional lives. Whether you’re buying your first house or trying to deal with a new leadership role at work, chances are someone else in Rotaract is, too, and they’ll be happy to offer advice. The club has monthly socials and service projects, along with two meetings each month for networking and personal and professional development. As a service club, its primary goal is to serve those in need—specifically, Great Circle’s youth.

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ARE YOU 40 OR OLDER?

The Network for Springfield’s Young Professionals Described as the largest young professional group in the area, The Network (springfieldchamber.com) has close to 500 members who are all between 21 and 39 years old. Individuals get to know people from various industries, and associates of small and large companies are welcome to join. Although there’s a focus on peer-to-peer networking, The Network’s twice-per-month programs raises funds for a new charity each year. The Network is a program managed by the Springfield Chamber of Commerce.

NO

YES

What’s your MAIN REASON for joining a networking group?

Come on, does my age really matter? Just tell me HOW TO CONNECT! I need to BUILD THAT BUSINESS, baby

I want to IMPROVE OUR COMMUNITY, but helping my business won’t hurt, either

My No. 1 reason is to DO GOOD AND GIVE BACK

BNI Groups

Rotary Groups

Sertoma Groups

Business Network International has multiple 417-land chapters for business owners and entrepreneurs of all ages. Local chapters, including the Business Power Network (businesspowernetwork. com), aim to pass business referrals and leads from one member to another. “BNI is a networking organization that teaches you how to network and promote your own business,” says Business Power Network Mentor Andy Flint. In Flint’s group, there’s only one professional from each industry, such as banking and real estate. So if someone has a need for your business, you’ll get the referral.

There are five Rotary clubs in Springfield, and all of their members have one goal in mind: learning the needs of the community, then figuring out how to meet them either as individuals or with the help of their companies. The majority of Rotary members are 30 or older, and most of them are business owners, managers or other key players. As far as networking and meeting other professionals who might one day work with them, this happens, too—but more as a byproduct. Find more information and contact local clubs by using the Club Finder at rotary.org.

Networking for Sertoma Groups (springfieldsertoma.com) is a bit different from most organizations. Members don’t join to pitch their business to the entire club. Instead, they join as a way of volunteering for the community. Becoming friends and meeting other business owners—and then learning what they do—happens at things like a weekly lunch, fundraising events and even occasional dinner dates with other members. The organization, which offers both menand women-only clubs in Springfield, hosts many major fundraisers throughout the year to support local children’s charities. BIZ417.COM

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PROMOTION

EVENTS AND MEETINGS

GUIDE

1. Your go-to event center Whether you’re planning a small meeting or a large corporate party, The Diamond Room is the perfect location for your next event. With room for more than 380 guests and catering available from Simply Delicious Catering with Chef Patty, you can rest easy knowing that your next corporate event will be memorable and fun.

Are you looking to take your corporate events, meetings, or holiday parties to the next level? These lively local businesses will not disappoint. With a fun, entertaining environment and amazing catering options, you can rest easy knowing that your next event or meeting will be be a hit.

1.

2. The Holiday Party Hot Spot Business Luncheons? Check. Holiday Parties? Check. Catering for your next corporate event or directly to your office? Check and check. If you are looking for the perfect downtown location for your next business meeting, networking event or holiday party, 425 Downtown has what you need! Give them a call at 417-5364470 and book your event today. 3. Andy B’s Event Suites The Event Suites located on the lower level of Andy B’s offers flexible meeting space that can accommodate up to 125 people. It has a private entrance, elevator, and four flat screen TVs with full audio/visual capabilities. Our catering menu and quality service will make your event stand apart from the rest. 4. Ramada Plaza & Oasis Convention Center For everything from meetings and retreats to celebrations of all types, the Ramada Plaza Hotel & Oasis Convention Center is a fullservice conference and banquet facility. Our convention center features a built in stage, state of the art audio visual, theatrical lighting and complimentary high speed internet.

2.

3.

425 DOWNTOWN | 425downtown.com 425 W. Walnut St. | 417.536.4470

4.

ANDY B’S EVENT SUITES

ANDY B’S | andybspringfield.com 1127 E. Battlefield Rd. | 417.883.123

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THE HOLIDAY PARTY HOT SPOT

YOUR GO-TO EVENT CENTER THE DIAMOND ROOM | diamondroom.org 2340 W. Grand St. | 417.501.9661

RAMADA PLAZA & OASIS CONVENTION CENTER ramadaoasis.com

2546 N Glenstone Ave. | 417.866.5253

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PROMOTION

SPOTLIGHTS

BUSINESS

SPOTLIGHT ARTISAN FABRICATION Commercial and Residential Fabrication In business since 2011 Artisan Fabrication are 417-land’s go-to metal fabrication specialists. Owner, Quentin Pendergrass, and his team love a complex challenge. They can produce just about anything a customer can envision. With a strong work ethic and a commitment to excellence, this is the business that makes it right the first time and exceeds expectations every time. Boasting the largest waterjet cutters in the midwest, Artisan Fabrication can cut multiple sheets of metal at once, measuring up to 10' x 20', which reduces time and saves you money. Beginning with raw, flat materials, everything is processed inhouse to the smallest detail. Whatever your business needs to stand out, this nationally recognized company can make it happen. From full blueprints to solid model rendering, Artisan Fabrication’s expert design team brings customer’s ideas to life. They think outside of the box and the end result shows their creativity. Artisan fabrication makes it all: Industrial equipment and structures, ornamental and architectural elements, whiskey stills, caged ladders, platform assemblies and more. Whether it’s a custom single part or a large volume order, Artisan Fabrication can turn your vision into a reality.

Artisan Fabrication 735 Evergreen Rd. 417.736.9266 | artisanfabrication.com

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PROMOTION

SPOTLIGHTS

EMPLOYEE

SPOTLIGHT MAXON’S DIAMOND MERCHANTS Diamond Merchants and Jewelers In business for over 42 years Some things a person only buys once. Shopping for those “forever” items demands a place with only the best products and staff. Rick and Jane McElvaine have created a store tailored for those most important purchases. Maxon’s Diamond Merchants is the exclusive Official Rolex Jeweler in the Springfield area. They also carry the world’s most perfectly cut diamond, Hearts on Fire. In addition to these remarkable stones, Maxon’s carries fine jewelry and several other watch brands like, Tudor, Tag Heuer, Jude Frances, Sylvie, Frederick Sage and many more. Estate jewelry is also available for customers desiring unique, vintage pieces. Once-in-a-lifetime pieces should be sold by skilled professionals. The McElvaines are certified graduate gemologists. Their staff includes a registered jeweler, graduate of diamonds and pearls and an accredited jewelry professional. They offer CAD design services, on-hand appraisals and repair. Together, Maxon’s brings their customers decades of experience and expertise. The McElvaines don’t just live a life of diamonds. Rick and Jane are local people with a heart for their customers and community. They’ve owned Maxon’s Diamond Merchants for 22 years. There are many reasons people trust Maxon’s for the things they’ll only buy once. Maxon’s Diamond Merchants 2622 South Glenstone Ave. 417.887.1800 | maxonsdiamonds.com

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[THE BIG QUESTION]

Parting Company When an important partner decides to leave a company, managing the transition is no easy task. Find insights about bouncing back and moving on after the departure of essential staff. BY: STEPHANIE TOWNE BENOIT

W

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allow that to take control and think ‘Oh my gosh, how will we ever recover from this?’” he says. “Well, I chose a different approach. I chose ‘OK, let’s figure out what we need to do, how we can do it better than we did and how we can move forward.’ Take the optimistic viewpoint on it and say we will be better as a firm for it and so will they.”

LEGAL LOWDOWN Mary Clapp, Managing Member of Clapp Business Law, LLC, discusses the basics of noncompete agreements.

CONSIDER THE EMPLOYEE.

Noncompete agreements are suitable if the employee will have access to proprietary information or be significantly involved with customer relationships.

STATE THE PURPOSES.

Clearly stating what you’re seeking to protect in the agreement helps prevent disputes should you seek to enforce the provisions.

SET REASONABLE LIMITS.

“Missouri will only enforce non-competition agreements when they are no more restrictive than necessary to protect the legitimate interests of the employer,” Clapp says. Excessively long or geographically broad restrictions won’t fly.

ILLUSTRATION COURTESY SHUTTERSTOCK; PHOTO COURTESY BOB HELM

hen business partnerships form, the natural intent is that they last for years to come. “It’s like getting married when you become a partner,” says Bob Helm says the firm’s partnership agreement Helm, managing partner of Elliott, Robinson served as that blueprint, though it wasn’t & Company, LLP. But whether for reasons necessary to refer to it often. philosophical, personal or otherwise, those Another priority is communicating the working relationships might come to an end. situation to the rest of the staff. Helm did so When that happens, an organization faces a by calling a company-wide meeting right away challenging transition and a future without a to address the departure. “This is where you staffer once considered vital. have to overcommunicate,” he says. “I spent a At several points throughout its history, very large part of time over the [following] four Elliott, Robinson & Company, LLP has been or five months overcommunicating.” Helm in this position, including when a founding also had one-on-one meetings for employees partner left to start new venture. Although the who had greater situation is not concerns. easy to come “TAKE THE OPTIMISTIC VIEWPOINT ON Many of to terms with, these conHelm advises IT AND SAY WE WILL BE BETTER AS A versations approaching it FIRM FOR IT AND SO WILL THEY.” focused logically and —Bob Helm, managing partner of Elliott, on deterobjectively. “It’s Robinson & Company, LLP mining how really easy, if to fill the void you allow it, left by the exiting partner. This can mean for you to get your feelings hurt,” Helm says. recruiting personnel with the right skills or “You can make it so personal and too emonurturing in-house talent so they can assume tional that you make poor decisions.” new responsibilities. “When somebody leaves, Knowing this possibility, Helm sought to there’s somebody who is saying ‘I think I can maintain a measured outlook. “It’s not a fun do that. I believe I can do that,’” he says. process to go through, but you sit down as Looking back, Helm found that a positive adults, as business people, and from there perspective was a key factor throughout the you try to figure out what are the best circumtransition. Rather than allowing departures stances,” he says. To help guide those converto dampen enthusiasm and confidence, the sations and prevent disputes, it’s important to firm focused on new possibilities. “You can have predetermined legal agreements in place.

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[SIMPLIFY]

PERFECT PITCH When a potential client’s attention is at stake, these tips from marketing expert Angela Smith will help you streamline and sell what your business has to offer. BY: LILLIAN STONE

TIMING IS EVERYTHING According to Smith, timing can make WORDS or break an elevator pitch. “Ideally, an elevator pitch should be timed to about 30 or 35 words,” says Smith. “That’s about the amount of time you’re likely to have in an elevator with someone who might ask about the business.”

30-35

[VANTAGE POINT]

SEALING THE DEAL ON SUCCESS Springfield was an attractive pick for a 3M plant because of its location and economy, but its workforce is what has kept the local plant thriving. BY: JULIANA GOODWIN

ILLUSTRATIONS COURTESY SHUTTERSTOCK; PHOTO BY VIVIAN WHEELER

T

he next time you take your boat out for a spin on Table Rock Lake, use a Post-it note, or even board an airplane, there’s a good chance the adhesive or sealants used in those products were produced right here in Springfield. Since 1967, Springfield has been home to a 3M plant that manufactures adhesives, adhesive-coated films and sealants. At the time, the company was experiencing rapid growth and decided the city would be home to another plant. Now, the 350,000-squarefoot Springfield factory employs more than 300 people and ranks in the top 28 of 3M’s 86 U.S. factories. The plant supplies 18 divisions within 3M, and its products are used worldwide, plant manager Frederick James says. “The people we have at the plant make Springfield successful,” he says. “We have good technology, but that is only as good as the people you have working here. We have smart, hard-working people who continue to drive improvements year after year.” Today’s 3M is responsible for 60,000 products and holds more than 105,000 patents. Aside from being dedicated to research and development, the company has a culture of teamwork, which is one of

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the keys to Springfield’s success. At the plant, members of the numerous teams within each department know they have to work together to support each other. However, they also understand and execute the company’s vision and strategies. As plant manager, James believes it is one important part of his job is to be visible, to circulate throughout the plant and to get to know employees and listen to their ideas. Employees are encouraged to generate suggestions for process improvements. Those ideas are weeded through, and best ones are implemented. “[Employees] see it and live it every day, so they are going to come up with better ways of doing things,” James says. In the 1970s a company-wide 3P program was created called Pollution Prevention Pays, which encourages and recognizes employees who come up with ideas to reduce waste. At the factory here, a record 21 3P programs were recognized in 2015. Those employee suggestions included ideas such as using recycled materials for packaging and improving cleaning methods that allow for improved yields. Together these efforts prevented thousands of pounds of waste. Another aspect of team building comes in the form of philanthropy. 3M offers financial support to agencies like United Way of the Ozarks, but employees also volunteer with various nonprofits. Those efforts have been employee-driven, not leadership-driven. Springfield’s attraction has been and continues to be its geographical location, strong local economy and industrious workforce. “It is a testament to the people that the Springfield factory has been here this long,” James says.

START SMART Smith recommends that each elevator pitch start with examples of how the professional can benefit the consumer, not about any potential transactions. “I think you first have to intrigue the person by clarifying what you have to offer to them,” she says. ADJUST YOUR BODY LANGUAGE Open, engaged body language can help you nail a first impression. “It’s eye contact,” Smith says. “I use my hands a lot; for some people that comes really naturally, and for others, not so much.” She recommends building on your natural communication style so interactions are perceived as authentic and appealing. GO FORTH WITH CONFIDENCE Once, Smith saw a future client in a parking lot and started a casual conversation about the business world. “Then I went into my pitch, and it turned into a 15-minute conversation that turned into a meeting, and it turned into a client,” she says. She chalks that success up to her casual, confident approach while making the pitch about the potential client’s needs.

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Angela Smith, owner and president of ADsmith Marketing & Advertising, knows the power of the elevator pitch. She shares how to streamline your pitch and land your next client.

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A Family Drive

[NEXT GEN]

Sales Consultant Alex Thompson, Vice President Miles Thompson, General Manager Tyler Thompson and Pre-owned Sales Manager Troy Thompson are just a few of the Thompson family members working at Thompson Sales.

The Thompson Sales Company has long been a household name for Springfieldians shopping for a new car. The fourth generation of Thompsons is now leading the company and keeping a reputation for success. BY: ROSE MARTHIS

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In the early 1950s, the Thompson Sales Company was located at 727 Saint Louis St. in downtown Springfield before moving to the south side decades later.

‘‘

George Thompson Sr. stands in front of the first dealership location in 1919 at 300 S. Kimbrough Ave. in Springfield.

There’s a fine line between enjoying your family and enjoying your family business.”

PHOTO BY BRAD ZWEERINK, COURTESY THOMPSON SALES COMPANY

“W

—Lynn Thompson, President of Thompson Sales Company

hen you think about Thompson Sales, you think about cars. That’s the way it’s been for 97 years,” says Miles Thompson, the vice president of Thompson Sales Company and a fourth-generation employee. Miles is one of eight family members who are currently working for the company, but there have been many more since 1919, when the auto sales company first opened its doors in Springfield. The auto industry has made huge strides since then, and the company has kept up with every one of them. Throughout the years, the Thompsons have learned one thing above all else: The car business is really just a people business. George Thompson Sr. founded the company in downtown Springfield as a franchise for Racine Tires. The company continued to grow for decades, and a second location was built in south Springfield in 1987. With George Jr.’s passing in 1991, siblings Lynn Thompson and George Thompson became third-generation owners and presidents, positions they hold to this day. Miles started working with his father, George, when he was in high school. He worked in all five departments—new cars, used cars, body shop service, parts and financing—for at least six months until he became assistant truck manager when the company added the GMC franchise in 1996. Miles worked alongside his cousin Tyler, Lynn’s son. They both made the move in 2000 to the new building, Thompson’s current location at 1555 E. Independence St. Tyler worked his way through every department as well, and now he manages the sales staff with Miles but specializes in the digital and social media side of the business, along with finance and insurance and staff relations in his role as General Manager. Miles handles dealership operations, including inventory and the buying and pricing of new and used cars. He also focuses a lot of his time on improving customers’ online experiences. “How you’re found on the internet is really a BIZ417.COM

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big key to how many cars you sell now,” Miles says. Throughout all the change, one constant in the company is the longevity of employees. Some managers have worked there for 50 years. “It kind of runs itself if you have a good staff of people who enjoy what they do,” Miles says. “We want everyone to feel like part of the family.” Lynn says he’s been very happy watching his son and nephew learn what it takes to make the family business successful. “The biggest asset you have in a dealership is the people you have working for you,” Lynn says. “We have the best staff right now that we’ve ever had.” The 120-person staff all work in the 75,000-square-foot building that houses the sales, finance and accounting offices, a business development center, the body shop and parts center and five showrooms. Keeping the business in the family for nearly a century has taught the Thompsons some hard life lessons. Miles says a challenge for him has been learning how to keep work and family separate. “When you get together, it’s important to have something else to talk about and share,” he says. “There’s a fine line between enjoying your family and enjoying your family business.” Tyler also has learned how to separate family members and employees while on the job, as three of his brothers also work there. “It’s hard to treat your brother one way and then turn around and have to talk to another guy with a complete smile,” he says. “It takes lots of patience. I imagine it’s just as hard for a manager to work here and sit in a board room with seven family members.” Both Miles and Tyler knew they would be joining the family business, but they have plenty of family members who haven’t. They learned to love it by watching their dads. “If you’re going to model yourself off of someone, follow someone that’s been doing a great job for a lot longer than [you’ve] been here,” Miles says. “There’s no reason to try to reinvent anything. Find out how they were successful, take the lead there and adapt when times change.” ▪ September/October 2016

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“Millennials will work their butts off for you.” —Don Harkey, chief innovation officer, People Centric Consulting Group SEE PAGE 84

PHOTOS BY BRAD ZWEERINK

EVERYWHERE YOU NEED TO BE

Clint Rosdahl makes a Smoked Old Fashioned behind the bar at The Order during the weekly In Party at Hotel Vandivort.

CALENDAR

SCENE

Diana Werner shows off her Biz 417 Commercial Design Award. Read more on p. 80.

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Commercial Design Awards The In Party The Biz Review Party Biz Killers

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Springfield Chamber Lunch PRSA’s Regional Conference Biz 417 B-School Breakfast Series Downtime September/October 2016

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NETWORK 7:30–8:30 a.m., Thursday, September 1 Thursday, October 6

GOOD MORNING, SPRINGFIELD! Rise and shine with Springfield Area Chamber of Commerce members at this monthly networking event. September’s event will discuss food access in the Ozarks. In October, Presiding Commissioner Bob Cirtin presents on the State of Greene County. $15 for members, $20 for nonmembers; location varies; for more information, call 417-862-5567 11:30 a.m.–1 p.m., Thursday, September 1 Thursday, October 6

WORKING OZARK WOMEN Connect and learn from women in business during these monthly lunches and informative presentations hosted by the Ozark Chamber of Commerce. Chamber membership required to attend. $12 with registration in advance, $17 at the door; Ozark Community Center, 1530 W. Jackson St., Ozark; call 417-581-6139 for more information 5:30–9 p.m., Thursday, September 1 Thursday, October 6

SPRINGFIELD CREATIVES HAPPY HOUR Each month, Springfield Creatives members head to Scotch & Soda for networking and happy hour specials to connect and share strategies and insider tips. Free; Scotch & Soda, 310 South Ave., Springfield; for more information visit springfieldcreatives.com 7–8 a.m., Friday, September 2 Friday, October 7

FIRST FRIDAY COFFEE Morning coffee and networking with the Branson Area Chamber of Commerce gives your business a boost. Each month’s meeting is hosted by a different chamber member business or restaurant. Free for members; location varies;

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for more information, visit members. bransonchamber.com/events or call 417-334-4084 9–10 a.m., every Wednesday

1 MILLION CUPS Local entrepreneurs are energizing the community. Keep your finger on the pulse of their sprouting businesses and innovative ideas at this weekly presentation program. Free; Springfield Art Museum, 1111 E. Brookside Dr., Springfield; for more information, visit 1mcsgf.com 5–7 p.m., Thursday, September 8 Thursday, October 13

BUSINESS AFTER HOURS Mix and mingle with Springfield Chamber of Commerce members at this monthly happy hour. $5 for members, $15 for nonmembers; location varies; for more information, call 417-862-5567 11:30 a.m.–1 p.m., Tuesday, September 13 Tuesday, October 11

GENERAL MEMBERSHIP LUNCHEON Join the Nixa Chamber of Commerce for lunch, networking and an update on the Chamber’s progress, activities and events. Prices vary; The Bridge, 308 W. Mt. Vernon St., Nixa; go online to business.nixachamber.com/events for more information 4–7 p.m., Tuesday, September 13

SCHMOOZAPALOOZA Get your schmooze at this event hosted by the Branson Area Chamber of Commerce. While you wine and lightly dine, hear from about 45 business vendors. $5 for members and non-members; Branson Convention Center, 200 S. Sycamore St., Branson; call 417-334-4084 or visit members. bransonchamber.com/events for more information 7:30–8:30 a.m., Thursday, September 15 Thursday, October 20

GOOD MORNING BRANSON Breakfast: It’s the most important BIZ417.COM


Morning Event

Lunch Event

meal of the day, especially when it could result in your next business collaboration. Network with other chamber members and stay upto-date on what’s new in the local business community. $10 for members, $15 for future members; locations vary; for more information, head online to members.bransonchamber.com/ events or call 417-334-4084 BUSINESS2 BUSINESS SPONSORED EVENT CONNECTION LUNCHEON The Springfield Chamber of Commerce’s Business2Business Connection Luncheon is speednetworking small-business style with the chance to promote your business and network with chamber members. When: noon–1:30 p.m., Thursday, September 15 Where: Springfield Area Chamber of Commerce, 202 S. John Q. Hammons Pkwy., Springfield Cost: $15 for members More Information: 417-862-5567 4–5 p.m., Thursday, September 15 Thursday, October 20

SIX DEGREES OF NETWORKING Mix and mingle at this dynamic, high-energy event hosted by the Nixa Chamber of Commerce, and hear from featured speakers and career coaches each month. Membership not required to attend. Free for members and non-members; Nixa Area Chamber of Commerce, 566 W. Mt. Vernon St., Nixa; call 417-725-1545 or head online to business.nixachamber.com/events for more information 4–5:30 p.m., Thursday, September 15; Thursday, October 20

MATA IDEA MASHUP The Mid-America Technology Alliance presents a monthly happy hour centered around panel discussions on technology with an eye toward retaining and attracting a strong tech workforce. Beverages BIZ417.COM

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Evening Event

All Day

and food provided. Prices vary; The eFactory, 405 N. Jefferson Ave., Springfield; for details, visit matasgf.com/idea_mashup or call Sherry Coker at 417-343-3017 5–7 p.m., Thursday, September 15

THE EFACTORY SOCIAL Chat it up with other innovators and businesspeople at this casual networking event. Free; Barley Wheat & Rye, 2144 E. Republic Rd., Springfield; for more information, call 417-837-2600 or visit efactory.missouristate.edu/events 11:30 a.m.–1 p.m., Tuesday, September 20 Tuesday, October 18

WORKING WOMEN IN NIXA LUNCHEON Enjoy lunch while meeting other businesswomen at this monthly event by the Nixa Chamber of Commerce featuring speakers, lunch and networking. $12 for members in advance, $15 for members two days before, $20 for non-members; The Bridge, 308 W. Mt. Vernon St., Nixa; for details, call 417-725-1545 or head online to business.nixachamber.com/events 11:30 a.m.–1 p.m., Thursday, September 22 Thursday, October 27

GOOD AFTERNOON OZARK! This monthly event is more than just your typical business lunch. Join the Ozark Chamber of Commerce to network with fellow businesspeople and hear from a variety of speakers. $12 with registration in advance, $17 at the door; Ozark Community Center, 1530 W. Jackson St., Ozark; call 417-581-6139 for details 5:30–8 p.m., Thursday, September 22

SMALL BUSINESS, CHARITY AND CHAMPION OF HEALTHCARE AWARDS Celebrate the 2016 Small Business of the Year, Charity of the Year and Champion of Healthcare at this (continued p. 76) September/October 2016

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(continued from p. 75) annual awards dinner. $45 per ticket, $450 for table of eight; Sycamore Creek Family Ranch, 2657 Sunset Inn Rd., Branson; visit members.bransonchamber.com/ events for tickets

the complimentary appetizers and cash bar at this event hosted by The Network. Free for The Network members and guests; Hotel Vandivort, 305 E. Walnut St., Springfield; for more information call 417-450-6764

11:30 a.m.–12:30 p.m., Friday, September 23 Friday, October 28

11 a.m.–6:30 p.m., Monday, October 3

BUSINESS CONNECTION LUNCHEON Take a break from the daily grind and enjoy lunch with fellow and future members of the Branson Area Chamber of Commerce. $15 for members, $20 for nonmembers; location varies; for details, visit members.bransonchamber.com/ events or call 417-334-4084 20 UNDER 30 PARTY Celebrate 417-land’s best SPONSORED EVENT and brightest—the 20 leaders who have made a name for themselves before turning 30. Join us as we toast the class of 2016. When: 6–9 p.m., Friday, September 23 Where: Missouri Spirits, 507 W. Walnut St., Springfield Cost: $15 through September 18, $20 on or after September 19 More Information: 417-883-7417, biz417.com/20under30 11:30 a.m.–1 p.m., Tuesday, September 27 Tuesday, October 25

XMIN (EXCEPTIONAL BUSINESSMEN IN NIXA) This Nixa Chamber of Commerce event is catered toward businessmen looking to build relationships with business owners in a variety of industries and fields. Price varies; Nixa Area Chamber of Commerce, 566 W. Mt. Vernon St., Nixa; call 417-725-1545 or visit business.nixachamber.com/events for more information 4:30–6:30 p.m., Tuesday, September 27

SEPTEMBER SOCIAL Come for the networking, stay for

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JOINT OZARK/NIXA CHAMBER GOLF TOURNAMENT Friendly competition is the name of the game at the sixth annual golf tournament for members of Ozark and Nixa chambers. Price varies; Fremont Hills Country Club, 1953 Fremont Hills Drive, Nixa; call 417-581-6139 for details 6:30–8 p.m., Thursday, October 6

STATE OF THE COMMUNITY DINNER Hear from representatives in Ozark’s city government, schools and Christian County as they discuss the latest news and future plans for the city. Ozark Community Center, 1530 W. Jackson St., Ozark; for prices and other details, visit business. ozarkchamber.com/events or call 417-581-6139 5–6:30 p.m., Tuesday, October 11

BUSINESS AFTER HOURS Mix and mingle with Branson Chamber of Commerce members at this after-work gathering. $5 for members, $10 for nonmembers; Baymont Inn & Suites, 100 West Main St., Branson; call 417-3344084 for more information 10 a.m., Monday, October 24

ACCELERATOR COHORT NO. 1 DEMO DAY Come see what The eFactory’s first Accelerator cohort has achieved since starting the program 12 weeks ago. Chat with players in the local startup community. Free with registration; The Gallery at Gillioz Theatre, 325 Park Central E., Springfield; call 417-837-2600 or visit efactory.missouristate.edu/events for more information BIZ417.COM

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LEARN Ongoing

SMALL BUSINESS & TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT CENTER COURSES Try the SBTDC’s small business training courses and seminars. Course topics in September and October include managing your company’s finances and navigating human resources. Prices vary by class; The eFactory, 405 N. Jefferson Ave., Springfield; go to sbtdc.missouristate.edu for more information 11:30 a.m.–1 p.m., Tuesday, September 6 Tuesday, October 4

THE ASSOCIATION FOR WOMEN IN COMMUNICATIONS LUNCHEON The Association for Women in Communications features a monthly speaker focusing on trends, tips and ideas to increase the knowledge of the attendees to help further their careers. Prices vary; 425 Downtown, 425 W. Walnut St., Springfield; visit awcspringfieldmo.org for more information 7:30 a.m.–4:30 p.m., Friday, September 9

SOUTHWEST MISSOURI HUMAN RESOURCES CONFERENCE & EXPO Join the Springfield Area Human Resources Association for a day of learning about leadership and management. This year’s keynote speaker is Lela Panagides, CEO of Leap Into Leadership. Prices vary; DoubleTree Hotel, 2431 N. Glenstone Ave., Springfield; visit sahramo.org for more information Noon–1 p.m., Tuesday, September 13

SPEAKER SERIES: THE REVITALIZATION OF THE CASSETTE TAPE Join The eFactory for lunch as Steve Sapp discusses how National Audio Company became the country’s largest manufacturer of proBIZ417.COM

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Evening Event

All Day

fessional quality audio cassettes. Lunch provided with registration. Free with registration; The eFactory, 405 N. Jefferson Ave., Springfield; call 417-837-2600 or head online to efactory.missouristate.edu/events for more information HEALTH CARE INDUSTRY ROUNDSPONSORED EVENT TABLE DISCUSSION Start the day with breakfast and dialogue at the City’s Department of Workforce Development roundtable series. Join key players to discuss short- and long-term goals for closing the skills gap in healthcare. When: 7:30–9 a.m., Wednesday, September 14 Where: Missouri Career Center, 2900 E. Sunshine St., Springfield Cost: Free with registration More Information: This event is one of a four-part series. For more event details or to RSVP, contact Megan Short at mshort@springfieldmo.gov 2–4 p.m., every other Wednesday

LEGAL OFFICE HOURS Every other Wednesday, drop into The eFactory for a free legal consultation with Amanda Tummons of Husch Blackwell. Free with registration; The eFactory, 405 N. Jefferson Ave., Springfield; visit efactory.missouristate.edu/events for more information BRANDWICH: MAKE MULTI-CHANNEL SPONSORED EVENT ADVERTISING WORK FOR YOU Learn how to take your marketing up a level at this engaging lunchtime panel discussion hosted by Revel Advertising. When: 11:30 a.m.–1 p.m., Thursday, September 15 Where: The eFactory in CoxHealth Innovation Room, 405 N. Jefferson Ave., Springfield Cost: $10 More Information: call 417-3686966 or buy tickets at 417tix.com

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SIGNSNOWSPRINGFIELD.COM 417-881-1536 SPRINGFIELD, MO

SIGNS NOW

Trade Show Displays | Vehicle Graphics and Wraps | Banners | Real Estate/Yard Signs | Outdoor/Construction Signs

WE’VE GOT YOU COVERED. LET US HELP YOU STAND OUT IN A CROWDED WORLD! 78

6–9 p.m., Wednesday, September 14 & Thursday, September 15, Wednesday, October 12 & Thursday, October 13

THE SUCCESSFUL BUSINESS: PLANNING & FUNDING Kickstart your business with this two-day course hosted by the Small Business & Technology Development Center. You will learn how to create a sustainable business plan and secure funding. $139 includes business planning software and workbook; The eFactory, 405 N. Jefferson Ave., Springfield; visit sbtdc.missouristate.edu for more information 7:30–9:30 a.m., Friday, September 16 Friday, October 21

LEADERSHIP MASTERMIND People Centric Consulting Group gathers organizational leaders each month for a strategic breakdown of ways to manage and lead effectively. Join local leaders for dynamic presentations, engaging discussions and breakfast. $89 per session or $890 for a year; 425 Downtown, 425 W. Walnut St., Springfield; purchase tickets at 417tix. com or call 417-887-6760 for details 11:30 a.m.–1 p.m., Tuesday, September 20

CEO SERIES: HAL DONALDSON Most people know Hal Donaldson as president and co-founder of Convoy of Hope, but at this luncheon hosted by The Network, hear from the distinguished journalist and author about how he got to where he is today. Free for The Network members and guests; Convoy of Hope World Distribution Center, 330 S. Patterson Ave., Springfield; call 417-450-6764 for more information Noon–1 p.m., Tuesday, September 20

LUNCH & LEARN: HANDLING PAYROLL & TAXES Experts from Great Southern Bank and The Payroll Company discuss the basics of payroll and taxes at

this eFactory event. Free with registration; The eFactory, 405 N. Jefferson Ave., Springfield; visit efactory.missouristate.edu/events for more information 3:45–5 p.m., Tuesday, September 20 Tuesday, October 18

MEMBER BRIEFING Learn how to get the most out of your Springfield Chamber of Commerce membership and hear all the great perks available to you at this member briefing. Free; Springfield Area Chamber of Commerce, 202 S. John Q. Hammons Pkwy., Springfield; call 417-862-5567 for more information 11:30 a.m.–1 p.m., Wednesday, September 21

AITP MONTHLY MEETING Get the lowdown on the latest cybersecurity news at this monthly lunch event hosted by the Association of Information Technology Professionals. Free to members and guests with registration, $10 lunch for guests; Hilton Garden Inn, 4155 S. Nature Center Way, Springfield; visit aitpspringfield.com for more information 6 p.m., Wednesday, September 21 Wednesday, October 19

SPRINGFIELD CREATIVES MONTHLY MEETING The September meet-up of the Springfield Creatives will feature a student membership drive. In October, don’t miss the second part of the Getting a J-O-B series to help you land your dream job. Free with membership; for location information and more, visit springfieldcreatives.com 11:30 a.m.–1 p.m., Friday, September 23 Friday, October 21

LUNCH+20 SERIES Professional development meets networking at this monthly series hosted by OTC’s Center for Workforce Development. In September, Randy Will discusses characterBIZ417.COM

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Morning Event

Lunch Event

based leadership. Then in October, learn about revenue-driven employees from Kari Stewart. $10; 425 Downtown, 425 W. Walnut St., Springfield; visit workforce.otc. edu/business-solutions/lunch20 for more information 8 a.m.–5 p.m., Friday, September 30

PEOPLE CENTRIC MANAGEMENT SEMINAR Managing people can be the toughest part of a job, which is why People Centric Consulting Group is hosting this one-day management training. No matter how much experience you have, you will leave feeling ready to lead after the day’s presentations. $495; 425 Downtown, 425 W. Walnut St., Springfield; purchase tickets at 417tix.com or call 417-8876760 for more information INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY SPONSORED EVENT INDUSTRY ROUNDTABLE DISCUSSION Assessing the short- and longterm goals for closing the skills gap in IT takes center stage at the City’s Department of Workforce Development roundtable breakfast in October. When: 7:30–9 a.m., Wednesday, October 12 Where: Missouri Career Center, 2900 E. Sunshine St., Springfield Cost: Free with registration More Information: This event is one of a four-part series. For more event details or to RSVP, contact Megan Short at mshort@springfieldmo.gov 11:45 a.m.–1 p.m., Wednesday, October 12

60 MINUTES TO SUCCESS This educational series from the Springfield Area Chamber of Commerce will keep you in the know so you can stay at the top of your business. Prices vary; Springfield Area Chamber of Commerce, 202 S. John Q. Hammons Pkwy., Springfield; call 417-862-5567 for more information BIZ417.COM

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Evening Event

All Day

B-SCHOOL BREAKFAST SERIES SPONSORED EVENT Hear from some of the 20 Under 30 class of 2016 as they discuss how they have hustled to get ahead and learned to grow in their roles. When: 7:30–9 a.m., Thursday, October 13 Where: Andy B’s Entertainment Center, 1127 E. Battlefield Rd., Springfield Cost: $15 in September, $20 in October More Information: See who the panelists are at biz417.com. Submit questions online or by tweeting using #bizbschool EMPLOYABILITY Learn how to make your SPONSORED EVENT workplace more inclusive at this second annual summit presented by the EmployAbility Collaborative in conjunction with the Springfield Area Human Resources Association. When: 10:30 a.m.–1 p.m., Thursday, October 20 Where: The Old Glass Place, 521 E. St. Louis St., Springfield Cost: $30 per person, $240 for table of eight More Information: Register at springfieldmo.gov/employability TECH IT OUT TECHNOLOGY SHOWCASE & EXPO Join the Southwest Missouri chapter of the Association of Information Technology Professionals to learn about the latest advancements in the technology world. When: 8 a.m.–5 p.m., Thursday, October 20 Where: Oasis Convention Center, 2546 N. Glenstone Ave., Springfield Cost: $20 More Information: techitoutexpo.com SPONSORED EVENT

FOR MORE EVENTS, CHECK OUT THE FULL CALENDAR AT BIZ417.COM. September/October 2016

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[THE SCENE]

Biz 417’s Commercial Design Awards Reception

The 417 Home Design Awards and Biz 417 Commercial Design Awards were presented at a reception at Ocean Zen.

Five stunning commercial spaces were honored at the Biz 417 Commercial Design Awards reception.

Megan Clause, Colby Morrell and John Pryor mingle before the awards ceremony begins.

“If you want to get more, you have to give more.” —Melissa Turpin, Treasurer, Springfield Design Association

Honors were awarded for five categories: general office space, hospitality, medical, financial and general commercial space.

Jon Nuessle flips through the 417 Home and Biz 417 issues to see the winning designs featured.

Signey Akins and Joyce Buxton

Nathan Taylor from Obelisk Home took home a total of nine awards, eight residential and one commercial.

Event Info: DATE: July 12, 2016 | LOCATION: Ocean Zen | WEBSITE: biz417.com

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PHOTOS BY BRAD ZWEERINK

Peter Young, Jeannie Tinsley, Richard Werner, Christiana Werner, Diana Werner, Debbie Allen and Jasmine Lechner

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PHOTOS BY BRAD ZWEERINK

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[THE SCENE]

The In Party at Hotel Vandivort

Miles Brown, Lauren Petit, Michael Petit and JP Roberts

Shaun Munday performs for guests.

Karen Favor, Melanie Pulscher and Becky Thornton

David Cole, Evan Van Ostran and Kevin Stokes

Michael Stelzer, left, talks to Don Leveque.

Attendees mingle over appetizers and cocktails.

Tony Signorino, Josh Sullivan, Vance Hall and Steve Eudaly

Event Info: DATE: July 13, 2016 | LOCATION: Hotel Vandivort | PERFORMER: Shaun Munday | WEBSITE: facebook.com/HotelVandivort

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PHOTOS BY BRAD ZWEERINK

Clint Rosdahl makes a Smoked Old Fashioned behind the bar at The Order.

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PHOTOS BY BRAD ZWEERINK

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[THE SCENE]

The Biz Review Party

Kenneth Clem and Amber Throckmorton

Gary Whitaker speaks at the Biz 417 Review party.

Pages from the July/August issue of Biz 417 were on display at the Davis-Harrington Welcome Center.

“If it weren’t for those of you in this room, this magazine would not be what it is.” —Gary Whitaker, Publisher, Biz 417

Emily Christopher and Samuel Knox

Biz 417 staffers and advertisers mingle at the party.

Michael Sapp, Carrie Sapp, Sterling Huff and Bret McGowne

Dr. Luke Van Kirk and Don Harkey PHOTOS BY BRAD ZWEERINK

Springfield celebrated one year of Biz 417 at the Davis-Harrington Welcome Center at Missouri State University

Event Info: DATE: July 21, 2016 | LOCATION: Davis-Harrington Welcome Center at Missouri State University | WEBSITE: biz417.com

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PHOTOS BY BRAD ZWEERINK

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[THE SCENE]

Biz Killers: The Next Workforce

Kelli Stewart and Marshall Kinne

Karen Shannon and Candy Letterman

JR Huyck listens to the discussion of millennial workers.

Emily Christopher talks with Suzanne Reed.

Don Harkey of People Centric Consulting Group, Karen Shannon of Ollis/Akers/Arney and Amanda Kastler of Elliott, Robinson and Company shared how to attract, engage and retain millennials in the workforce.

Amanda Kastler and Michal Moss Early

Chelsea Warren and Emily Laurie

Event Info: DATE: July 22, 2016 | LOCATION: 417 Magazine office | SPEAKERS: Don Harkey, Amanda Kastler, Karen Shannon | WEBSITE: biz417.com

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PHOTOS BY BRAD ZWEERINK

Don Harkey speaks at the Biz Killers lunch.

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PHOTOS BY BRAD ZWEERINK

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[THE SCENE]

Springfield Chamber of Commerce Annual Membership Lunch

Matt Morrow speaks to chamber members.

Stephanie Shadwick and Mary Guccione

Rick Lamb performs at the Springfield Area Chamber of Commerce’s Annual Membership Lunch.

“For the Chamber, your business is our business. Your success translates into a stronger chamber and a stronger community.” —Debbie Shantz Hart, Chairman, Springfield Area Chamber of Commerce

Debbie Shantz Hart speaks to chamber members.

Matt Morrow, Mary Ling, Joe Reynolds, Melanie Stinnett and Sally Hargis

Scott Miller, Conrad Griggs and Mike Hoppman

Brandon Welch, Dennis Wilson, Brad Palmer and Marcus Crigler PHOTOS BY BRAD ZWEERINK

Caleb Arthur and Tom Chiles

Event Info: DATE: July 27, 2016 | LOCATION: Ramada Plaza Hotel & Oasis Convention Center | SPEAKERS: Sally Hargis, Mary Ling, Matt Morrow, Joe Reynolds, Melanie Stinnett | WEBSITE: springfieldchamber.com

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CLUB MANAGEMENT SERVICES C O M P L E T E A S S O C I AT I O N S O L U T I O N S

Finalist for

Jean Harmison

the 2016 Springfield Area Chamber of Commerce Small Business of the Year

Thank you 417-land for being a great place to live, work and raise a family!

www.clubmanagementservices.com

PHOTOS BY BRAD ZWEERINK

417.886.8606 - 1717 E. Republic Rd., Ste. A, Springfield, MO

BIZ417.COM

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[THE SCENE]

Southwest Missouri PRSA’s Regional Professional Development Conference

Marci Bowling and Louise Knauer

Dan Stewart of deep speaks about trends in the industry.

Cheryl Casselman and Robin Strathdee

“Especially in PR, you want to stay up to date with the trends. These types of conferences are valuable for that.” —Jill Finney, Conference Chair

Jeff Schrag, founder of Mother’s Brewing Company, speaks to the attendees.

Bethany Bell, Nicole Wisdom and Mackenzie Hernandez have fun showing how many hats they wear as public relations professionals.

Valorie Coleman, Stacy McNeill and Katie Farris

Daniel Bell, Kevin Agee and Paul Kincaid PHOTOS BY BRAD ZWEERINK

Karen Davis, Randy Berger, Jason Sprenger and Yaryna Klimchak

Event Info: DATE: July 28–29, 2016 | LOCATION: Hilton Garden Inn | KEYNOTE SPEAKERS: Scott Holste, Bob Priddy | WEBSITE: prsa.org

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Y A D I L O H EVENTS MEET ME

B

AT THE ®

PHOTOS BY BRAD ZWEERINK

1127 E. Battlefield Rd., Springfield

andybspringfield.com

417.883.1234 Gourmet Restaurant. Full Bar. Luxury Bowling. Concerts. Laser Tag. Elite Arcade. Sports Viewing. Events, Meetings & Parties. BIZ417.COM

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[THE SCENE]

B-School Breakfast Series: Creating a Winning Culture

Chris Lazzaro, Kolby Kallweit and Joey Pate

Logan Swope arrives early to get a good seat.

Abigail James-O’Quinn and Kiley Haynes

“If you really don’t believe in your culture and values, everybody can tell.” —Darrel Hopkins, Controller, Prime Inc.

Dylan Whitaker asks the panel questions at the B-School Breakfast Series.

Attendees enjoyed breakfast and listened to the panelists talk about their own work culture and how managers can improve culture in the workplace.

Holly Coulter, Justin Bess, Rebecca Weddle and Alicia Hampton

Tessa Diehl and Debra Dickinson PHOTOS BY BRAD ZWEERINK

Darrel Hopkins, Jarad Johnson and Randy Johnson have fun answering questions.

Event Info: DATE: August 11, 2016 | LOCATION: Andy B’s Entertainment Center | SPEAKERS: Shawn Finger, Darrel Hopkins, Jarad Johnson, Randy Johnson WEBSITE: biz417.com

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PHOTOS BY BRAD ZWEERINK

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[THE SCENE]

B-School Breakfast Series: Creating a Winning Culture

Jonathan Garard, Darrel Hopkins and Amy Rinne

Don Harkey shares takeaways on how employees can improve company culture.

Audience members learn about culture in the workplace.

“Not every business is right to have a foosball table. So understand what your core values are, demonstrate them and be consistent in the application.” —Shawn Finger, Executive Creative Director, The

Alchemedia Project

Shawn Finger, Darrel Hopkins, Jarad Johnson and Randy Johnson answer questions for the audience.

Don Harkey talks with Sara Choate.

Lauren Gandy and Antoinette Shields PHOTOS BY BRAD ZWEERINK

Reth Yim with Elite Automotive Group spoke to attendees before the panel began.

Join Us Next Time: DATE: October 13, 2016 | LOCATION: Andy B’s Entertainment Center | TOPIC: Hustle & Grow | TICKETS: biz417.com

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PHOTOS BY BRAD ZWEERINK

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PHOTO COURTESY RICK HUGHLETT

DOWNTIME

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FLYING HIGH Rick Hughlett, owner of Rick’s Automotive, is fearless. That’s what it takes to turn a two-man operation into the largest independent auto-repair shop in southwest Missouri. When he’s not promoting his business, Hughlett is likely gliding over the Ozarks in a hot-air balloon. “Every flight is completely unique,” he says. “You don’t know where you’re going to land, and people always approach you when you do. It’s kind of a community experience.”

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Proudly Serving 417 Land for Over 30 Years in All Levels of Architectural Design & Planning

COMING SOON!

Farmers Park Building 5

SDAARCHITECTS.COM 417.877.9600


2111 S. Eastgate Ave. Springfield, MO 65809

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September 2016 Biz417  

September 2016 Biz417  

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