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MAY / JUNE 2017 | $4.95 May/June 2017

OLD SCHOOL COOL How Hudson Hawk has revolutionized Springfield’s barber shop scene

STEERING THE SHIP Titanic Branson’s Mary Kellogg-Joslyn on branding, customer satisfaction and being the boss

A SUDSY STARTUP | WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT | INSIDE GIVE OZARKS DAY

Trouble Attracting Talent?

MAYBE IT’S YOU.

BIZ417.COM


#BIZBSCHOOL JUNE 8

TROUBLE ATTRACTING TOP TALENT? It’s not them. It’s you.

Learn how to develop a workforce that wins. Listen in as top executives in multiple industries share their secrets for attracting top talent in a competitive job market. This is your chance to go beyond the page and network in 417 fashion at this high-energy business education event.

Developing Local Talent

Celeste Cramer

CoxHealth System Director of Recruitment and Retention

SPONSORED BY SPRINGFIELD

Creating An Inviting Culture

Ramping Up Recruitment

Amanda Kastler

Scot Scobee

Elliott Robinson & Company, LLP CPA, CFE, Partner

SRC Director of Human Resources


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INSIGHT

WHAT YOU DON’T KNOW WILL HURT YOU.

F

ifty-one percent of all employees in the United States are currently looking for or actively considering taking a different job. Sixty-seven percent of these same employees are disengaged or outright toxic at work. These staggering statistics are hurting your business, limiting your profitability, and distracting you from focusing on growth. You might be wondering who to blame for these numbers? Is it society? Is it the Millennials? Is it bad parenting? No. It’s you. Up to 70 percent of disengagement can be assigned to managers who aren't effective at leading and motivating their teams. Even the most well-meaning managers make regular mistakes ranging from micromanaging their employees to failing to hold people accountable for poor performance or bad attitudes. Managers aren't taught to have difficult discussions and spend their day managing processes instead of managing people. The good news is that change is possible. A few months ago, an employee of a manager who attended our People Centric Management Seminar called

our office. The employee wanted to thank our team for helping their manager to become a more effective leader. The employee felt energized and empowered. Change can happen, but it starts with building knowledge. It starts with training your managers to become better leaders, better communicators, better facilitators, better coaches and better accountability partners. It changes when those same leaders take their new skills back to their work and begin to re-engage the two-thirds of your workforce who has yet to realize their potential. Whether you are a new manager or an experienced one, what you don't know will hurt you, so it’s time to get the knowledge. Sign up for our next People Centric Management Seminar and join supervisors from other businesses. Or, if you have several supervisors, contact us and learn about how we can bring the management seminar into your business. Either way, change starts now if you act.

Join us at our next People Centric Management Seminar. SEPTEMBER 22, 2017, 8AM TO 5PM | $495/PERSON Learn more and register at PeopleCCG.com/events

417.887.6760 PEOPLECCG.COM


Song Simphaly works on a new assembly line at Springfield ReManufacturing Corp.’s Heavy Duty facility in west Springfield. The company held a hiring fair in March to fill about 40 positions.

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IT’S NOT THEM. IT’S YOU. Ditch your failing hiring tactics. Here’s how companies across 417-land are attracting and growing their workforces now. BY STEPHANIE TOWNE BENOIT

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GROOMED FOR GROWTH PHOTO BY BRAD ZWEERINK

Hudson Hawk Barber & Shop continues to bring cutting-edge strategies to the barbershop game since opening four years ago. Owners Paul Catlett and Thad Forrester tell us what’s next. BY SAVANNAH WASZCZUK

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PHOTO BY BRAD ZWEERINK


SPARKS OF INSPIRATION

Spotting the right talent

11 TAKEAWAY

A skimmer’s guide to what’s inside

BREAKTHROUGH STRATEGIES

16 FOUR TO FOLLOW

18 UP CLOSE

16 TIPS

20 MEET THE MAKER

17 THE REPORT

21 STYLE

17 Q&A

BREAKTHROUGHS

Stephanie Bryant’s digital musts How to start contingency planning Quick and healthy meal-makers Sips on the go from 7Cs Winery

18 NIGHTSTAND

Seven ways to create stronger teams

The tech goods to keep your work flowing

16 Show Me Systems 18 Ninja Narwhal Coffee Co.

55 CHART IT

50 PLAN IT

56 WORKSPACE

51 WHAT IF?

60 THE BIG QUESTION

51 JUMPSTART

61 VANTAGE POINT

52 ADVICE & WHISKEY

61 HOW-TO

54 GIVING BACK

62 NEXT GEN

Save the earth—and your property values Benefit from your vacation policy Mary Kellogg-Joslyn talks marketing Planning 417-land’s most charitable day

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A sudsy startup finds its audience

50 CULTURE CLUB

Three spots for your corporate retreat

Reader reactions and celebrations

Matt E. Miller’s idea-catcher

TOOLS TO HELP YOU DOMINATE

Keeping Silver Dollar City’s culture alive

12 FEEDBACK

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What’s on Ashley French’s phone Strumming while they work Prioritize employees’ emotional health PFI Western Store’s risk-taking rewards

Get prepped to install your office’s VPN A father-daughter team that’s the wheel deal PHOTOS BY BRANDON ALMS, BRAD ZWEERINK

10 PUBLISHER’S NOTE

EVERYWHERE YOU NEED TO BE

66 CALENDAR

Where to go and what to do

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May/June 2017

72 SCENE

Relive moments from the best events

BIZ417.COM


PHOTOS BY BRANDON ALMS, BRAD ZWEERINK


facebook.com/biz417

@biz417

linkedin.com/company/biz-417

BIZ417.COM

ADVISORY BOARD Rachel Anderson

LATHERING UP BUSINESS

Already familiar with the world of men’s products, The 1906 Gents co-owner Dante LaCivita embarked on a new business this past year. Read about the successful Kickstarter campaign that got Brawl Soap Co. on its feet on p. 20 before heading to biz417.com to read about the soap-making process.

Entrepreneurial Specialist | The eFactory Co-founder | Alumni Spaces Philip Baird

Owner | Spirit Factory and Spirit Box Business Development Manager | Stingray Overseas Manufacturing Brooke Bigham

Managing Partner EOS LLC

OFFICE GETAWAY

There’s nothing like an off-site retreat to get your team thinking big. Start planning by picking the right place on p. 50. Go to biz417.com to find even more places that can get big ideas flowing.

FRESH CROP OF IDEAS

Having already cornered the market on mead in 417land, Dwight and Jean Anne Crevelt of 7Cs Winery recently began offering their libations in recyclable pouches. Read about that and more on p. 17, and visit biz417.com to learn how the Crevelts separate their business from the competition.

WIN THE WEEK

Make Mondays fun again with our free weekly e-newsletter Biz Break. Filled with helpful tips, insightful stories and networking opportunities, Biz Break is everything you need to help you win the week. Get it delivered straight to your inbox by subscribing at biz417.com/subscribe.

Stephanie Bryant

Dean Missouri State University College of Business Teresa Coyan

Legislative and Public Affairs Manager CoxHealth Trevor Crist

CEO Nixon & Lindstrom Insurance Diana Day

Chief Business Officer People Centric Consulting Group Lyle Foster

Owner Big Momma’s Coffee & Espresso Bar Jeff Johnson

Senior Vice President–Commercial Lending Simmons Bank Samuel Knox

Managing Editor Unite.Publication

WOMEN OF WORTH It’s time for 417 Magazine’s annual “10 Most Beautiful Women” feature. Read about the 20 finalists in the June issue of 417 Magazine, and tell us who you think is most deserving at 417mag.com/10MB. Voting runs May 31 through June 9. The 10 winners will appear at 417 Magazine’s Indulge on September 14.

Jack Stack

Founder, President, CEO SRC Holdings Corporation Kurt Theobald

CEO Classy Llama

BUSINESS PUBLISHER

Gary Whitaker gary@417mag.com PRESIDENT/ ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER

Logan Aguirre logan@417mag.com

SEE THIS MARK? LOOK ONLINE FOR EXTENDED CONTENT AT BIZ417.COM

VICE PRESIDENT OF OPERATIONS

Megan Johnson mjohnson@417mag.com VICE PRESIDENT OF SALES

Ammie Scott ascott@417mag.com

VICE PRESIDENT OF FINANCE

Joan Whitaker joan@417mag.com

SUBSCRIPTION RATES: 6 issues, $24. Please call or visit Biz417.com/subscribe. Allow 4–6 weeks for processing orders, payment and changes of address. SINGLE ISSUE: $4.95; back issues, $6 plus $8 shipping and handling, if available. No back issue orders or subscriptions outside the United States. ADDRESS CHANGES: Include both new address and mailing label with old address. Biz 417 (ISSN 23763604) is published bimonthly by Whitaker Publishing, LLC, 2111 S. Eastgate Ave., Springfield, MO 65809–2146. © Whitaker Publishing, LLC. All rights reserved. Reproduction or use in any manner, in whole or in part, without written permission of the publisher is strictly prohibited. Postage paid in Springfield, Missouri, and additional mailing offices. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Biz 417, 2111 S. Eastgate Ave., Springfield, MO 65809–2146. The magazine accepts no responsibility for unsolicited manuscripts, artwork or cartoons. Printed in the United States of America.

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PHOTOS COURTESY BRAWL SOAP CO., SHUTTERSTOCK

B-SCHOOL BREAKFAST SERIES: IT’S NOT THEM, IT’S YOU Stop struggling to find new employees, and start learning from three local executives who have done it right at B-School. Join us on June 8 at Andy B’s Entertainment Center to get strategies for growing your workforce and retaining top talent. Class is in session at 7:30 a.m. Get your ticket at biz417.com/bschool.


May/June · Volume 2, Issue 4 · 2017

EDITORIAL EDITOR

Adrienne Donica EDITORIAL DIRECTOR

Katie Pollock Estes SENIOR EDITOR

Savannah Waszczuk ANCILLARIES EDITOR

Rose Marthis

PRODUCTION EDITOR

Claire Porter

STAFF WRITER

Stephanie Towne Benoit EDITORIAL INTERNS

Asia Key, Casey Struble DIGITAL DIRECTOR

Dayle Duggins

DIGITAL PRODUCER

JuliRose Sullivan

DIGITAL ASSISTANT

Rachel Smith

DIGITAL INTERNS

Danielle Bolyard, Becca Keathley

CREATIVE DIRECTOR

Heather Kane DESIGNED BY

Jim Nissen | SWITCH Studio EDITORIAL ART MANAGER

Paije Luth

SENIOR PHOTOGRAPHER & DESIGNER

Brandon Alms

EDITORIAL DESIGNER

Liz Leonard

EDITORIAL DESIGNER

Ryan Saunders

EDITORIAL ART COORDINATOR

Vivian Wheeler

DESIGN & STYLE INTERN

Dylan Lyle

CONTRIBUTORS

Jennifer Adamson, Ettie Berneking, Josh Boston, Chris Brown, Mike Cullinan, Julie Sedenko Davis, Juliana Goodwin, Jeremy Mason McGraw, Kevin O’Riley, Aaron J. Scott, Brad Zweerink

SALES & MARKETING DIRECTOR OF MARKETING AND EVENTS

Stacy Antonelli

MARKETING MANAGER

Trevor Collins

EVENTS MANAGER

Janelle Haik

EVENTS COORDINATOR

Logan Swope

BRAND DESIGNER

Khaley Watts

MARKETING ASSISTANT

Danielle Leonarduzzi

MARKETING INTERNS

SALES MANAGER

Katherine Newman ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE

Megan DiVito

ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE

Chris Nemeth

ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE

Debbie Ophoven

ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE

Drew Owen

ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE

Chelsea Warren

ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE

Jami Wightman

Eden Garrett, Jonathan Kirby, Kaycee Vandelicht

SALES ASSISTANT

FINANCE DIRECTOR

PRODUCTION DIRECTOR

ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT

CREATIVE COORDINATOR

Carley Inskeep

Bernadette Pry

SUBSCRIBER CARE & BACK ISSUES

Terin Leigh

Brittni Bynum Callie Henry

CREATIVE COORDINATOR

Kaedy Hess

Please call Trevor Collins at 417-883-7417.

CREATIVE COORDINATOR

TO ADVERTISE

CREATIVE COORDINATOR

Please call Ammie Scott at 417-883-7417. PERMISSIONS & REPRINTS

Please call Brittni Bynum at 417-883-7417.

Maggie Sholes Alex Solomon

BRAND COORDINATOR

Christy Howell

Legal counsel for Whitaker Publishing provided by

BIZ417.COM

May/June 2017

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Hiring for the X-Factor

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May/June 2017

PHOTO BY KEVIN O’RILEY

GARY’S FAVORITE LESSON

An innovative idea is only as good as a company’s follow through. Dwight and Jean Anne Crevelt, owners of 7Cs Winery, know this better than most (read about 7Cs on p. 17). By paying attention to demand, they have turned “neat” ideas such as making mead and selling wine in recyclable pouches into profitable ventures that separate their business from others in the industry.

One of the challenges of hiring a new employee is getting them into the rhythm of your company—helping them learn the corporate culture, how people communicate and how systems in each department interact and overlap for the best possible outcome. Conversely, one of the biggest advantages of hiring a new employee is listening when they ask, “Why do we do things that way?” And if the answer is, “Well, because we’ve always done it that way,” then it’s time to take advantage of their outside perspective, fresh eyes and new voice to find a better way. Our cover story on workforce development (“It’s Not Them. It’s You.” on p. 24) primarily focuses on how companies are trying different ways to attract people with specific skills to specific jobs. But maybe more important than finding workers with competence is finding employees with character. In this era of disruption, attracting people who can do the work at hand but also innovate and navigate seas of change is critical. Identifying what makes a great innovator is tricky. There is no Innovation University or Dial-an-Innovator service. Taking a class at Harvard Business School on innovation best practices is not the same as having a genuine capability for creating and understanding new technologies and ideas. Innovation and design consulting firm Fahrenheit 212 offers a checklist for hiring people with the ability to do the job they are hired to do better. For starters, read the whole resume, especially the interests section. We’ve hired mountain climbers, miniature model makers and synchronized swimmers. These are people who might be more likely to respond positively to the stimulus of innovation. Look for signs of curiosity. Innovators love to ask questions, devour new information and constantly seek insights, stimulation and opportunities. Hire travelers. Restless people take holidays in unusual places and come back to share what they’ve learned. (One note of caution: You might occasionally lose an employee for a year or more while they backpack across New Zealand. I’m looking at you, Krysten.) Seek out expats. People who have lived or studied abroad are, by definition, confident risk-takers who share that sensibility of looking to see what’s around the corner. We just added a Brit to our staff, plus we boast a long line of current and former employees who studied in Europe, Asia and Australia. Hire daring eaters. People who explore new foods, restaurants and concepts are curious seekers. For us, that curiosity not only makes for a richer magazine but also comes in handy as our staff is full of wannabe chefs who review restaurants in between constant potluck lunches and baking contests. Beyond just looking for round pegs to go in your round holes, be alert to the unusual quirk that catches you off guard and suggests someone’s potential is more than it seems. You’ve never done it that way, you say? That’s a sure sign it’s time for a new way.

Gary Whitaker Publisher, Biz 417 BIZ417.COM


Safe at Home

Show Me Systems is about more than home security. While the company’s innovative home alert systems have been a great asset to elderly people, owners Julia and John Conley know that finding new applications and industries for their products will keep their company prospering. PAGE 16

It’s Not Them. It’s You.

Today’s competitive job market can make finding your perfect hire difficult, but attracting the talent you need is possible. Local companies in health care, manufacturing, technology, construction and more have figured out how. The simple keys are to be proactive in your search, build partnerships and now, more than ever, focus on creating a culture where employees want to work.

Join the Crowd

The third annual Give Ozarks Day is this May. One of the most charitable days in 417-land got its start during a social media boot camp. Community Foundation of the Ozarks has relied on strong partnerships with other local firms to create an ideal platform for giving. PAGE 54

PAGE 24

The Best Laid Plans

It’s never too early to start thinking about what your business would do without you. John Piatchek and Kenny Gott of financial planning firm Piatchek & Associates recommends taking contingency planning one step at a time and giving your employees more responsibility to grow their leadership. PAGE 16

Groomed For Growth

After opening its first location in 2013, Hudson Hawk Barber & Shop exploded. Between 2014 and 2016, the company led by Paul Catlett and Thad Forrester has grown by two locations each year. The business’s strong branding and culture provide a strong foundation for continued growth. PAGE 36

Quality Food on the Fly

Blue Apron and Hello Fresh might be booming, but in 417-land, so are meal services that offer healthy meals to go. We checked in with four businesses to see how their prices stack up. PAGE 17

A Package Deal

Dwight and Jean Anne Crevelt of 7Cs Winery aren’t afraid of going their own way. That attitude has led the winery to win awards for its mead and to introduce popular, new packaging that is as flexible as it is eco-friendly. Ultimately, the owners have learned to capitalize on opportunities as they present themselves. PAGE 17

Searching for the Silver Bullet

PHOTOS BY BRANDON ALMS, COURTESY SILVER DOLLAR CITY, RANDY LITTLE

PHOTO BY KEVIN O’RILEY

The most useful lessons of this issue to help you get ahead faster

The team behind Ninja Narwhal Coffee Co. has learned what many other startup owners before them have: There’s no quick way to the top. Instead the business has opted to go to events where potential customers are and put in the work to build those relationships. PAGE 18

Brawl Out

The 1906 Gents is known for its handmade wood products, especially shaving brushes. It was a natural fit for co-owner Dante LaCivita to invest in another business: Brawl Soap Co. By keeping his products simple, LaCivita has been able to quickly identify and market to his core customer base. PAGE 20

Culture of Gold

Working at an amusement park isn’t for everyone, but Silver Dollar City manages to keep seasonal employees returning year after year and full-time staffers happy. Vice President of Human Resources Deanna Partridge says the company’s values and many perks are only part of the reason why. The other factor is that leaders buy into the park’s culture. PAGE 50

Cleaning Up Your Act

Don’t be scared when potential environmental contamination issues pop up during a property deal. Jason Smith of Environmental Works Inc. walks through how to get cleaning and close that deal. PAGE 51

Out of Office

Solidifying your vacation policy before summertime saves you headaches later but also helps you attract talented new employees, says Neil Brady, president and CEO of Anderson Engineering Inc. PAGE 51

Straight Up Brand-Building with Mary Kellogg-Joslyn

The former CBS and Walt Disney Co. executive knows how to create perfect customer experiences. It starts with pinpointing your target consumers. Only then can you build on current trends and your existing momentum.

Behind the Screen

You can tell a lot about a person by what’s on their phone. We took a peek at Ashley French’s to find out what apps the CEO of Big Brothers Big Sisters of the Ozarks uses to keep her work and life on track. PAGE 55

Under Pressure

The easiest way to fight burnout is to avoid becoming a workaholic. Psychologist Gary June says it’s vital for professionals to take breaks and participate in wellness programs or activities, but whether they can depends on their company’s culture. PAGE 60

Act, Don’t React

After customers showed a greater interest in clothing than agricultural products, PFI Western Store Owner Randy Little learned a valuable business philosophy: be proactive to get ahead. Since then, Little has taken steps to separate his company from the competition. PAGE 61

V for VPN-detta

The ubiquity of cloud programs has left many professionals free to work from anywhere, but a VPN, or virtual private network, is still one of the most secure options. Josh Bates, vice president of service delivery at Northern Summit Technology, explains the infrastructure your office will need and the policies to institute if you’re still VPN-free. PAGE 61

Taking the Wheel

G.L. Moore Tire Pros & Automotive Inc. is transitioning to its third generation of family leaders as Whitney Moore steps up to take charge. Moore shares how she’s balancing her father’s goals for the company with her own. PAGE 62

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May/June 2017

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Feedback

O

ur March/April issue featured our second annual “Women Who Mean Business” cover story and our first “Excellence in Technology Awards.” You were just as inspired by the honorees’ journeys are we were.

They Mean Business “Shout out to personal friends and amazing women Robin Robeson and Crista Hogan! Biz 417’s Women Who Mean Business #SGFStrongWomen”

—Stephanie Bryant, Missouri State University College of Business dean and 2016 Women Who Mean Business honoree

In addition to Robin and Crista, we also recognized Marla Calico and Elle Feldman this year.—Editors

“Crista Hogan you are amazing. So glad to have your leadership in our community.”

—Jennifer McClure

“What a fantastic morning at Biz 417’s Women Who Mean Business breakfast at Andy B’s Entertainment Center! Thank you to our COO Robin Robeson for your leadership, inspiration and guidance. You are so deserving of this outstanding achievement, and we’re very proud of you!” —The Facebook page of Guaranty Bank

“The March/April issue is a great one for our members! In addition to Crista Hogan and Elle Feldman being honored with the Women Who Mean Business distinction and a fantastic write-up about becoming involved with Junior League of Springfield, this issue features member Crystal Mapp from KPM CPAs & Advisors and discusses the community program she developed at her firm called KPM CARES. We have such amazing women leaders and are proud of the work they do to make Springfield a better place!” —The Facebook page of Junior League of Springfield MO

Getting Techie With It “We were honored to receive the Software Application Award at the Biz 417 and AITP of the Ozarks Excellence in Technology Awards last week! Thank you to the judges, participants and attendees for coming together to recognize the innovators in our community.”

—The Facebook page of PaperWise

We honored seven companies and five IT professionals for their pioneering spirit and commitment to the local tech community. Read about them all at biz417.com/excellence.—Editors

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“What a great time at the first-ever Excellence in Technology Awards! Kudos to Biz 417, AITP of the Ozarks and Jeff Jenkins for hosting such a great event. Congrats to our very own Richard Reding for winning the award for Customer Experience!” —The Facebook page of HCOMM Solutions

Search Game Strong “Thank you Biz 417 for your tip on creating a ‘Google My Business’ profile. Just set mine up as a result.”

—The Twitter account of Your Leadership Trainer LLC

Two local experts shared the ins and outs of improving your company’s search engine optimization. Read the article at biz417.com.—Editors

Corrections: In “Finding the Egg” from the March/April issue, we incorrectly credited the photo of Gino Barbo. Brad Lyons was the photographer. Additionally, Salon Service Group’s only office environment is its headquarters. In “Branding a Culture of Philanthropy” from the same issue, we published incorrect statistics about KPM CPAs & Advisors. At the end of 2016, there were 102 employees, and KPM had volunteered 2,200 hours, contributed $228,155 and reached 129 organizations. We regret the errors.

HOW TO CONTACT BIZ 417 Social Media facebook.com/biz417 @biz417 linkedin.com/company/biz-417

Snail Mail Adrienne Donica/Letters to the Editor Biz 417 2111 S. Eastgate Ave., Springfield, MO 65809

Email Send your notes, feedback and story ideas to

biz@417mag.com www.

BIZ417.COM

Biz417.com

Visit biz417.com, scroll to the bottom of the home page and submit your questions and email address in the suggestion box. May/June 2017

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PHOTOS BY VIVIAN WHEELER, COURTESY SHUTTERSTOCK

BREAKTHROUGH STRATEGIES

“We keep looking for that silver bullet, but there is no such thing.” –Darold Gutierrez, co-owner of Ninja Narwhal Coffee Company

A CLEAN EXPANSION One of the co-owners behind The 1906 Gents is bringing a new product to the local hygiene scene.

18 16 16 16 17

Breakthrough Four to Follow Tips The Report

17 18 18 18

Q&A Nightstand Biz 100 Up Close Watercooler

18 20 21 21

Breakthrough Meet the Maker Style Nailed It Failed It

PAGE 20 BIZ417.COM

May/June 2017

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FOUR TO FOLLOW

WITH STEPHANIE BRYANT BY: KATIE POLLOCK ESTES

The Missouri State University College of Business Dean shares the social media accounts that keep her current in all areas of her life.

CLIF SMART

“For anything that’s happening at Missouri State, in higher education or with the legislature in Missouri, Clif is very good.”

@ClifSmart

C-SUITE BOOK CLUB

SAFE AT HOME The Problem

When Julia Conley retired from the FBI in 2013, she and her husband, John, moved from London back to Springfield to be closer to their aging parents. That’s when John saw a need for technology that could relieve worries about aging parents and give them enough independence to avoid assisted living.

The Big Idea

John had been working in Washington, D.C., in the security systems industry and owned security and technology companies in Arizona and Missouri. The two drew on their experience to create Show Me Systems, which offers assistive technology to customers with aging parents, relatives with disabilities or anyone needing extra care. These wellness systems use only sensors to monitor behaviors in the home, including bedtime habits, medication monitoring, doors opening and closing and even water and electricity consumption.

The Learning Curve

With assistive technology ever-changing, the Conleys have to make sure their business is just as adaptive. Show Me Systems has twice made “some pretty serious adjustments to follow trends,” John says. What started as mainly a security systems business has developed into focusing on wellness systems and personal alert buttons. As the growing elderly population has created more demand, Show Me Systems has started to gain nationwide partnerships.

“I read a lot of business books, and these are the books that CEOs and C-suite people are reading.”

@CSuiteBookClub THE SKIMM

“It’s written in a very colloquial voice. It’s more for younger people to get them interested in reading and get them up on current events. I recommend it for young people like college students.”

@theSkimm

TED WOMEN

“I follow a lot of women’s empowerment topics. I like TED Women because it’s substantive and meaningful to me.”

@TEDWomen

The Takeaway

The Conleys are still exploring industries their business can team up with to help even more people. What Show Me Systems offers could help people in domestic violence situations. The sensor reports could also easily pair with telemedicine efforts in the health care field. One of the biggest lessons they have learned over the years is to not focus on solving only one problem. “We are constantly amazed that we’re going in such a drastically different direction than the start,” Julia says.—Rose Marthis

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May/June 2017

FIVE ON FIRE HAL DONALDSON VIRGINIA FRY RICK HUGHLETT JEFF LAYMAN CARRIE TERGIN

[TIPS]

THE BEST LAID PLANS If you had to stop working tomorrow, could your company continue without you? That’s one of the things Kenny Gott and John Piatchek of financial planning firm Piatchek & Associates aim to prepare businesspeople for in their new book, Bottom Line Financial Planning. “In a way it’s a love letter,” Gott says of the book. “It covers decades of stories and experiences that have led us to where we are.” Before you get the field guide, here are a few freebies. BY: CASEY A. STRUBLE

Tip 1: Make clear priorities

“You can’t tackle everything at once,” Gott says. “We have people come in and get intimidated by everything needed to be done.” Instead, identify the thing that keeps you up at night, he advises. Once you have addressed your biggest concern, you’ll feel better as the next steps start to fall into place. Also make sure to identify your business’s greatest risks and central business strategies.

Tip 2: Use short-term problems to

guide long-term solutions

Often contingency plans for the short- and long-term can have similar implementations and results. It might be chaotic and stressful when an employee suddenly leaves or when you find yourself temporarily unable to work, but use these experiences to prepare your team for other leadership transitions.

Tip 3: Groom your team

“We generally work with very talented people dedicated to their craft, but we need to get them out of the weeds,” Gott says. Identifying the key players who can help run your company’s day-to-day operations is vital to contingency planning, Piatchek adds. Take a step back and allow employees to take on extra responsibility that benefits their growth. Their multi-faceted skills will give you stronger candidates to fill open leadership roles. BIZ417.COM

ILLUSTRATION COURTESY SHUTTERSTOCK; PHOTO COURTESY PIATCHEK & ASSOCIATES

[BREAKTHROUGH]


[THE REPORT]

[Q&A]

$ 11–13

AVERAGE COST OF GRAB-AND-GO MEALS SOLD BY LOCAL BUSINESSES

$ 7–8

$ 8.50 $6

A PACKAGE DEAL Since opening 7Cs Winery in 2009, Dwight and Jean Anne Crevelt have developed a successful niche making mead and more recently selling their wines in portable, recyclable pouches. Dwight reveals why they started using the distinctive packaging and what they’ve learned about staying nimble in their industry. BY: STEPHANIE TOWNE BENOIT Dwight Crevelt

AVERAGE COST PER MEAL/SERVING

BIZ 417: WHERE DID YOU FIRST ENCOUNTER THE POUCHES? D.C.: We saw those a couple years ago at one of the wine conferences and thought they were a neat idea. We have one that’s a 750-milliliter pouch that’s just like a full bottle and it has a little tap on it like box wines. And there’s also one that’s 375 milliliters that’s half the size, and it’s like a little Capri Sun for an adult with a little screw cap on top.

Meals by Monica

Eat Fit Go Healthy Foods

Homemade. Delivered.

Hörrmann Meats

BUSINESS

PHOTO BY BRANDON ALMS, COURTESY 7CS WINERY, SHUTTERSTOCK

QUALITY FOOD ON THE FLY When meal-kit services like Blue Apron and Plated started popping up a few years ago, the idea was almost too good to be true: Week after week and with a few clicks of a mouse, all the ingredients you needed to cook a quality dinner at home could be delivered right to your doorstep. As customers caught on, so did other businesses, and today there are countless options. On a local level, businesses are taking the trend a step further. Several companies sell meals that are already assembled—all you have to do is pay, heat and eat. “Our meals are ready to pop in the microwave or oven so our customers can enjoy time spent with their families and avoid the drive-thru or hours in the kitchen,” says Monica Wingert of Meals by Monica, who started her meal delivery service in 2007. D.J. Vokolek, operations manager at Eat Fit Go Healthy Foods in Springfield, says when Eat Fit Go opened a location here in December 2016, it had a similar goal in mind. “We wanted an alternative for people who are looking to change the way they eat but have to do it in a quick fashion,” he says. Denise LeBolt joined in on the trend in 2013 when she started her mealservice company called Homemade. Delivered., and Springfield’s Hörrmann Meats jumped on board in January 2017 when it started offering lunch and dinner meal options that are Whole30 Diet and Paleo Diet compliant and feature many locally sourced ingredients.—Savannah Waszczuk BIZ417.COM

BIZ: WHY DID YOU START SELLING YOUR PRODUCTS IN THESE POUCHES? D.C.: There’s no corkscrew required. They are all made with totally recyclable materials. Plus, it goes where glass can’t go: lakes, float trips. We have a lot of people buy them for that and for camping. They cool off much faster because you don’t have to cool off all that glass, and they are very lightweight. They are great for camping, biking, anything you want to do. Last year, literally over 53 percent of our sales were pouches. BIZ: WHAT HAVE YOU LEARNED AS YOUR BUSINESS HAS GROWN AND CHANGED? D.C.: You have to be flexible because whatever your business plan is, whatever you think is going to happen, something else is going to jump out and get ya. We were looking at mead being about 20 percent of our business at most, and here it is 60 percent of our business, so we had to shift gears and switch to produce mead. Now, I buy honey in 55-gallon drums. That’s a lot of honey, so you have to have the appropriate equipment to be able to handle those drums and do things like that. No other winery has that stuff. And we never even considered that as a possibility.

HEAD TO BIZ417.COM FOR MORE INSIGHTS FROM DWIGHT CREVELT, INCLUDING HOW THE BUSINESS CORNERED THE REGIONAL MEAD MARKET. May/June 2017

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[BREAKTHROUGH]

NIGHTSTAND

WATERCOOLER BOOMING

Tiger Woods swung by 417-land to announce he’s designing two golf courses for Big Cedar Lodge. The news joins several other development projects in the Branson area including The Alley, a year-round snow tubing hill and a second mountain coaster. BREWING

UP CLOSE Pick a student housing property in Springfield, and there’s a good chance Matt E. Miller, owner of Miller Commerce LLC, is the man behind it. Here’s how the Kickapoo High School alum starts his days and keeps them on track. HIS MORNING ROUTINE:

“I don’t use an alarm. I’m up between 4:30 and 5:30 a.m. I have a morning routine that consists of coffee first, followed by two hours of personal time with no emails, lights or talking allowed!”

APP HE COULDN’T LIVE WITHOUT:

Notes by Apple. “It’s all in there, baby!”

NUMBER OF TIMES HE CHECKS HIS EMAIL:

“I shoot for three times a day or less.” Miller sets his phone to not push emails into his inbox.

HOW HE KEEPS NOTES AND CAPTURES IDEAS:

Typically Miller uses his iPhone, but there are exceptions. “I do have a cool sketch pad that I use in the mornings and when I travel,” he says.

MAGAZINES HE SUBSCRIBES TO:

“Fast Company, The Week, Dwell.”

A 417-LANDER WORTH WATCHING:

“Matt Max Miller (‘Drury Matt’).”

READ MORE ABOUT MATT E. MILLER AND THE REST OF THE BIZ 100 AT BIZ417.COM/BIZ100.

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May/June 2017

The local craft beer scene is getting craftier. Springfield Brewing Co. expanded distribution into northwest Arkansas. Meanwhile, Tie & Timber Beer Co. is set to open in Rountree neighborhood next March. SELLING

REAL Trends released its annual list of the top residential real estate companies in the country, and four of the 13 Missouri firms on the list are in 417land. They include Murney Associates, Realtors and the Keller Williams Realty Inc. firms in Springfield, Branson and Joplin. DRIVING

In April, the Missouri legislature passed regulations to allow ridesharing companies like Uber and Lyft to expand service statewide. Getting home after a night out just got a whole lot easier.

SEARCHING FOR THE SILVER BULLET The Problem

When Ninja Narwhal Coffee Co. began, the goal was to highlight small-batch coffee roasters across the country. “These roasters are not in big stores,” says Darold Gutierrez, who co-owns the company with his wife, Michele, and cousin Scott Morris. “How do they get in front of customers?” He found a lot of roasters partner with coffee shops, but that relationship doesn’t highlight the roaster. Through coffeeunicorn.com, Ninja Narwhal Coffee Co. aims to change that.

The Big Idea

Sitting in their living room, Gutierrez, Michele and their daughter, came up with the idea of the Ninja Narwhal: a shape-shifting whale ninja who helps coffee-lovers find the perfect roast. “We saw there were existing sites that help people find coffee,” Gutierrez says. “We knew we could do that differently, so our site drives traffic to those roasters.” Coffeeunicorn.com launched in October 2015 with the help of Ninja Narwhal’s first partnership, Copper Canyon Coffee Roasters out of Battlefield.

The Learning Curve

“The biggest challenge was getting roasters to trust us to represent their brand,” Gutierrez says. Partnering with Copper Canyon gave Ninja Narwhal credibility to pull in more roasters. The company now represents Intent Coffee Roasting out of Oregon as well. The next challenge was finding customers. “We keep looking for that silver bullet, but there is no such thing,” Gutierrez says. “It takes time, patience, building brand awareness and excitement. It doesn’t happen overnight.” The company has been gradually building its audience by attending local events and selling coffee and branded merchandise. On its website, the company also sells its own Ninja Roasts made by partner roasters.

The Takeaway

“You have to get out and meet your customers,” Gutierrez says. “You’re one website among millions. It’s extra-difficult to attract attention online. That’s part of why we get out of the building and go to events and participate with the community and schools. We’re still realizing this is very much progressive, and it takes time.” —Ettie Berneking Darold Gutierrez BIZ417.COM

PHOTOS COURTESY SHUTTERSTOCK, PATRICK MCWHIRT, NINJA NARWHAL COFFEE COMPANY

“[Love Works is] one of my favorite books. This book describes how to use seven basic principles to build healthy relationships with your co-workers and in turn develop a nurturing work environment suited for long-term success.”—Jeff P. Morrissey, chief information officer at Missouri State University


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[MEET THE MAKER]

After noting an increased interest in men’s grooming products while working with The 1906 Gents, Dante LaCivita launched Brawl Soap Co.

well as through his other business, The 1906 Gents (the1906gents.com), which started in 2012. After four years of crafting and selling hardwood products, including shaving brushes, LaCivita says the next logical move was to capitalize on local retailers’ decisions to open shelf space for men’s grooming merchandise. Crowdfunding enabled the company to overcome the early financial struggle most businesses face. The capital is used for making soap and storage as well as for packaging equipment and supplies. LaCivita says this new business venture allows him take the same attention to quality that The 1906 Gents is known for and apply it to grooming products. Brawl purposefully offers a limited number of soaps, all made with simple ingredients. There are five main, all-natural ingredients in the company’s three shaving soaps. The simplicity of the products mirrors the attitude of the brand’s core demographic: men in their mid-30s to 50s. “He doesn’t want to think about it; he doesn’t want to shop around,” LaCivita says. Brawl Soap Co. identified it’s key demographic quickly, a feat not all businesses can claim. LaCivita says finding success can be achieved by simply reaching out to others and finding resources that might help you. To make its soap, the company was encouraged to rent out kitchen space early on rather than purchase it, LaCivita says. “Springfield is very supportive, sharing and nurturing to businesses,” he says. “Reach out. Don’t be embarrassed to ask for help.” FIND OUT THE STEPS BRAWL SOAP CO. TAKES TO MAKE ITS PRODUCTS AT BIZ417.COM.

BEHIND THE BUSINESS

Following a successful foray into men’s grooming products through The 1906 Gents, co-owner Dante LaCivita has found a market for a new creation: Brawl Soap Co. BY: MIKE CULLINAN

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May/June 2017

S

Date opened: October 2016 Number of employees: 5

From mind to market: Four days to two weeks, depending on the product. Soaps take one to five days to ship.

PHOTO BY VIVIAN WHEELER

BRAWL OUT

till a relatively young business venture, Brawl Soap Co. is already a bit of a sudsy success. The Springfield-based company, which offers shaving soaps for men, quickly landed on solid financial ground after a successful Kickstarter this past October. The campaign raised more than $8,100— well over the original $5,000 goal. Owner Dante LaCivita offers 8-ounce tins of soap at nearly a dozen local retailers, as

Most popular item: Cedarwood soap Maker’s choice: “I like all of them,” LaCivita says. BIZ417.COM


[STYLE]

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This Urban Armor Gear Composite Case for MacBook Pro has impact-resistant bumpers and an armor shell, $54.95 at Database Systems.

BY HEATHER KANE

#NAILED IT FAILED IT Share your triumphs and stumbles with us on Twitter with the hashtag #naileditfailedit. #Nailed It Failed It

Focus in and minimize background noise with over-ear headphones, $15 at Database Systems.

Style meets function in this STM Grace Sleeve for MacBook Pro, $34.95 at Database Systems.

Natalie Halverson, see her story on p. 60 When Halverson first started her job as a foster care case manager, she says she #FailedIt by letting her coworkers’ perspectives on a certain case influence her actions even though she disagreed. “I let myself get bullied into believing I felt the same way, and when I was given the opportunity to express how I felt, I didn’t say what I really thought,” she says. Eventually the parent lost their rights. “I consider it a failure for me because I didn’t have the confidence in what I do.” That feeling taught her how to speak up, and now her #NailedIt moments are the ones where she knows she’s valuable on the team and is able to express her opinions openly. “The things that I wouldn’t say before and am willing to say now may resonate with somebody and make them think of something they haven’t done,” she says. “I am here to do a job.”

#Nailed It Failed It

PHOTO BY BRANDON ALMS

PHOTO BY VIVIAN WHEELER

An integrated laptop cage protects your tech from shock and damage in this Incase Reform Tensaerlite backpack, $119.95 at Database Systems.

BIZ417.COM

The Otterbox Profile Series iPad Air 2 Portfolio cover offers superior protection in a slim design, $49.95. at Database Systems.

Randy Little, see his story on p. 61 Little says moving PFI Western Store to its current location near Battlefield Road and U.S. 65 was a big #NailedIt moment. “It was a big move, and we wanted the visibility,” Little says. “If we hadn’t moved here, we would not have grown.” His #FailedIt happens a little more frequently. “We don’t always get it right when predicting trends,” he says. “Twice a year, in March and October, you can see what we didn’t pick out right at our Tent Sale.” To that we say what’s one man’s failure can be another man’s treasure.

May/June 2017

21


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WHITEPAPERS

WHAT IS

SEXUAL

HARASSMENT?

AND IS IT HAPPENING IN

YOUR

WORKPLACE? BY RICHARD OLLIS

Employment-related litigation is prevalent in the United States. In fact, according to a 2015 Hiscox report, U.S. companies have at least an 11.7 percent chance of having an employment charge filed against them. Missouri is rated as a high-risk state where businesses are 15 percent more likely to be involved in litigation and one of several states where state laws are more rigorous than some federal regulations. Recently, sexual harassment allegations have been in the headlines. In February, Susan Fowler, an engineer who worked at Uber, said her manager made sexual advances. She was told it was the man’s first offense and they wouldn’t feel comfortable punishing a “high performer.” Uber’s CEO announced an “urgent investigation” and said, “there can be absolutely no place for this kind of behavior at Uber.” Customers have begun deleting the Uber app from their phone.

22

May/June 2017

That same month, Sterling Jewelers, the parent company of Kay and Jared Jewelers, has been accused of allowing a culture of sexual harassment. Declarations from roughly 250 employees at Sterling have been filed as part of a class action case. They alleged that female employees at the company were routinely groped, demeaned and urged to sexually cater to their bosses to stay employed. Although many could debate why these claims are being investigated and litigated at an alarming rate, everyone would agree

that the best course of action would be to reduce and eliminate this type of behavior in the workplace. By implementing best practices around hiring, managing and employment policies, many of these instances can be mitigated to everyone’s satisfaction. Zero tolerance of this behavior should be everyone’s ultimate goal.

BIZ417.COM


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SEXUAL HARASSMENT IS NO LAUGHING MATTER.

There are two types of sexual harassment defined as illegal by the federal Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC): 1. Quid Pro Quo – this is a Latin term meaning “this for that.” The most blatant type of this sexual harassment occurs when employment decisions–hiring, promotions, salary increases, or performance evaluations–are based on a willingness to grant sexual favors. 2. Hostile Work Environment – this type of sexual harassment occurs when verbal, physical or visible behavior is prevalent in the workplace. It can be sexual in nature, focused on gender, unwelcome and affects the work environment and the employee’s ability to perform their job.

IT CREATES POOR

CULTURES, aND poor working

environments and is against the law.

Both of these types of harassment are very serious and can cause significant harm to people and the company. Good policies, training, investigations, discipline and documentation for companies are critical to address any alleged incidents and to minimize/ eliminate future activity. The real key is to make it clear this type of behavior will not be tolerated and, as importantly, is addressed immediately. Regular communication and training also reinforces that the company and its staff strongly believe the behavior is unacceptable. Developing the proper policies and protocols will significantly reduce the likelihood of issues. However, financial protection from incidents, factual or not, is also worth consideration. According to Thompson Rueters, incidents that end up in court have a median judgement of $200,000 plus the cost of defense. About 25 percent of cases that wind

up in court result in a judgment of $500,000 or more. Employment Practices Liability Insurance can be purchased to protect a company by reimbursing it for defense costs and a judgement, if applicable. Most policies also provide highly trained defense counsel that specializes in employment matters, specifically sexual harassment. Sexual harassment is no laughing matter. It creates poor cultures, and poor working environments and is against the law. As is always the case, prevention and swift action is the best method of addressing this employment exposure. Having financial protection can also mitigate any unforeseen incidents. Being prepared and always addressing any incidents will be positive for all concerned.

Avoid litigation. We’re ready to provide expert advice in: • Hiring Practices • Sexual Harassment Training • Management Education Training • HR Policy Guideline Review and Updating • Mitigation and Prevention • Insurance Coverage Review: Including Defense Cost Structure

Richard Ollis Richard Ollis is a fourth generation risk and insurance advisor specializing in business risk and has been in the industry more than thirty years. He serves as CEO of Ollis/Akers/Arney, Springfield’s largest independent insurance agency, founded in 1885. Richard holds a Bachelor’s Degree in Finance from Missouri State University and serves on their College of Business Advisory Board. He regularly writes for the Springfield Business Journal and has hosted the radio talk show “Insurance Talk.” A veteran of the U. S. Navy, he is a Past-Chairman of the Springfield Area Chamber of Commerce and Past-President of the Board of Directors for Springfield Little Theatre. He has also served on boards for Commerce Bank, Springfield Convention and Visitor Bureau, Springfield/Branson National Airport, Hickory Hills Country Club, and the Safety Council of the Ozarks.

BIZ417.COM

May/June 2017

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May/June 2017

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IT’S NOT THEM. IT’S YOU. WHILE MANY LOCAL COMPANIES STRUGGLE TO RECRUIT WORKERS, SOME ORGANIZATIONS ARE FACING THE REGION’S WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT CHALLENGES HEAD-ON WITH DEDICATED EFFORTS TO ATTRACT, TRAIN AND RETAIN EMPLOYEES WHO WILL POWER ECONOMIC GROWTH IN SOUTHWEST MISSOURI NOW AND IN YEARS TO COME. BY: STEPHANIE TOWNE BENOIT

A

t the height of the Great Recession, the scheduling board in the office of Brookline Doorworks, a Springfield garage door installer and retailer owned by Mark Foley, was woefully empty. With demand drying up and builders hunkering down to weather the storm, contractors and suppliers of all stripes felt the pinch.

BIZ417.COM

Reluctant to lay off staff, Foley cut workers’ hours and struggled to find odd jobs to fill their days at work. “We tried to keep everybody busy,” Foley says. “For a while, there were some people working maybe three days a week. There wasn’t enough work.” Fast forward a few years. The economy recovered, putting more

money in homeowners’ pockets and encouraging developers to bring new projects online, causing Foley’s business to surge. “When I look at our scheduling board, there’s a lot more new construction installs,” he says. “A few years ago we might have had four or five a week, or three a week—now, we have several per day.” May/June 2017

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But as demand for new commercial and residential construction increased, another demand—the need for skilled workers— skyrocketed, too. “It’s always been more difficult to find someone with experience in this line of work,” Foley says. “Now, it’s harder than ever.” That need for skilled labor, and the difficulty in finding it, translates across industries in the region. According to the Ozark Region Workforce Development Board and Missouri Job Center’s 2017 State of the Workforce Survey, 72 percent of its 576 respondents reported having difficulty filling positions during the past year, up from 59 percent in last year’s report. The situation is likely to grow in severity due to a low 3.9 percent unemployment rate as of March, technology-driven shifts in industries and other market and demographic forces. But despite those obstacles, local companies are taking steps to find solutions for their immediate and long-term workforce needs by implementing robust strategies to attract talent, equipping current staff with resources to grow into hard-to-fill roles and reaching out to future generations in hopes of drawing workers into fields in need of skilled labor.

Ramping Up Recruitment The manufacturing floor at Springfield ReManufacturing Corp.’s Heavy Duty facility hums with activity as dozens of associates take apart, clean, inspect, weld, assemble and test engine components. In the heart of that bustling space is a 2,000-squarefoot area now filled by a new assembly line dedicated to diesel engines for a new client, an over-the-road trucking company. Although that new business is a major coup, it also posed a colossal challenge for Scot Scobee, SRC’s human resource director, as the company prepared to send those orders to the production floor starting this May. “We are going to double our engine line capacity and add about 100,000 hours in our shop,” Scobee says. “The challenge is we are, in essence, hiring the same amount of people we did all last year in two months.” To do just that, SRC held its first hiring fair in more than a decade this past March. About 200 job seekers took part in on-the-spot interviews and tours of the facility. Some of those applicants attended

WORKING WONDERS Connecting locals with employers is all in a day’s work at the City of Springfield’s Department of Workforce Development, which is housed in and operates the Missouri Job Center-Ozark Region. Learn about some of the department’s initiatives that are helping address the region’s pressing workforce needs.

JET

The department launched its JET (Jobs, Education, and Training) program to provide funding to companies interested in specialized training for current staff. “This is one program where you can see some direct benefit and probably see it in a shorter period of time,” says Mary Ann Rojas, director of workforce development at the city. “If you are developing or manufacturing a product and you are having difficulty with your current workforce understanding how to build a product maybe due to new technologies, requirements or regulations, and then you are able to get that training, it’s just going to help you be more competitive.”

Ozarks Promise

The need for health care professionals is striking: In the 2017 State of the Workforce Survey, health care organizations reported having more difficulty finding qualified job applicants than any other sector. But a $3 million U.S. Department of Labor grant issued to the Department of Workforce Development in partnership with Ozarks Technical Community College will help make a dent in that deficit. Known as Ozarks Promise, the grant allows 372 individuals to receive tuitionfree training and certifications in occupations such as behavioral support specialists, nursing assistants and registered nurses in hopes of drawing those graduates into local health care jobs in the years to come.

Connect

The Missouri Job Center plays a major role in getting people in the Missouri Work Assistance program, the statewide program offering employment and training assistance to people receiving aid through Temporary Assistance to Needy Families, workforce-ready. Based on individuals' employment plans and specific situations, participants receive training that helps them brush up on their soft skills—the lack of which is pinpointed as a hiring impediment for employers—before heading to local employers such as Mercy for several months of hands-on training. “If they see that they are a viable candidate for permanent placement, they hire them,” Rojas says. The program provides those individuals with steady jobs while helping local companies find new staff.

Financial Literacy

Inspired by Zone Blitz, launched last year to combine efforts of community partners to improve quality of life in northwest Springfield, Regions Bank approached the Department of Workforce Development to see how they could support the initiative. Realizing that employers often cited financial literacy as an impediment to workers’ productivity and job readiness, the Missouri Job Center began offering a financial basics workshop in its north Springfield location taught by Regions Bank associates. Since the workshop debuted in December 2016, dozens of participants have learned about credit scores, direct deposit, establishing checking accounts, budgeting and other topics leading to stronger financial health.

(continued on p. 29)

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The challenge is we are, in essence, hiring the same amount of people we did all last year in two months.” —Scot Scobee, Springfield ReManufacturing Corp. Human Resource Director

CAREER TEST-DRIVE With GO CAPS, local high schoolers undergo hands-on training in local industries and explore potential career paths along the way.

BIZ417.COM

“What do you want to be when you grow up?” It’s the question that most teens puzzle over, some avoid and others dread. But high school juniors and seniors from 14 districts across the region are diving headlong into their futures thanks to the Greater Ozarks Centers for Advanced Professional Studies (GO CAPS). Brought to the region by Springfield Public Schools Superintendent John Jungmann, GO CAPS is based on Northland CAPS, a similar program that Jungmann, then superintendent of Liberty Public Schools, helped establish. Designed to immerse students in local industries, the yearlong program allows participants to take part in hands-on professional experiences so they can discover a

passion, develop real-world skills and gain a better understanding of possible career paths. “Each student is able to explore the career that they are interested in, and we are able to support them in that career exploration through a variety of experiences within that industry or within that business or within that area of focus,” says Lindsay Haymes, Springfield Area Chamber of Commerce vice president of workforce development and executive director of GO CAPS. Students choose one of four strands—engineering and manufacturing, entrepreneurship, medicine and health care and technology solutions—that are hosted during the school day in classrooms embedded

in companies including Mercy, CoxHealth, The eFactory and SRC Holdings Corp. Students earn high school and optional college credit while shadowing, completing collaborative business projects and more. Haymes views the program as part of a collaborative strategy to address regional workforce challenges. “We’ve really tried to come up with innovative solutions, as well as partner with the many great partners that are tackling this, from the Missouri Job Center to OTC to Springfield Public Schools, and really think about that talent pipeline in our area and how we can not only have short-term needs met, but think holistically about how we have long-term solutions to our workforce challenges,” she says. May/June 2017

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We have seen an increase in companies looking at using a [staffing] service that might never have used one before because they are struggling at getting enough people in their doors to fill out applications just on their own.” —Paula Adams, President of Penmac Staffing Services Inc.

WORKFORCE BY THE NUMBERS

In February, the Missouri Job Center-Ozark Region and Workforce Development Board released findings from its annual State of the Workforce Survey zeroing in on workforce issues and trends. Here are five key tidbits from the survey.

% 85

% % 59 72

More than 85 percent of respondents indicated that most or some of their current employees needed improvement in areas such as time management, leadership and problem solving.

Almost two-thirds of organizations reporting difficulty in finding qualified applicants said they were most likely to respond by increasing recruitment efforts in the region, while 35 percent said they would respond by not filling the open position.

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May/June 2017

Last year, 67 percent of respondents reported that at least some of their positions required having a science, technology, engineering or mathematics background. This year, that number climbed to 72 percent.

% 45

% 38

Almost half of organizations indicated that they plan to hire additional full-time staff over the next year, an increase from the 2015 and 2016 surveys.

More than one-third of organizations surveyed said they were partnering with regional high schools, community colleges and universities on initiatives such as curriculum, training programs and apprenticeships, up from 29 percent in 2016.

HEAD OF THE CLASS Founded in 1906, College of the Ozarks has focused on making students career ready since its inception. “For 110 years now, we’ve been doing workforce development,” says Marvin Schoenecke, the college’s dean of work education and administration. Today, the school requires full-time students to work 15 hours per week at one of more than 100 workstations, allowing students to attend without paying tuition, as well as gain valuable professional experiences and soft skills like communication, collaboration, problem-solving and much more. “Those are some of the skills that students are having to deal with day in, day out during their four years here, so it does give them a leg up,” Schoenecke says, noting that students are often in high demand for jobs after graduating. Although students gain much from the college, Schoenecke believes that the college couldn’t function half as well without its bright, hardworking students. “Students learn from C of O, and C of O wouldn’t exist without the students,” he says. BIZ417.COM


(from p. 26)

thanks to employee referrals, which SRC incentivized during a dedicated push in the weeks prior. But Scobee and leaders from other SRC Holdings Corp. divisions are thinking beyond this single recruitment drive. “If we are going to grow from a half-a-billion- to a billion-dollar company in next three to five years, which is our plan, we’ve got to bring new people into the organization,” Scobee says. Growth is also top of mind for Jim Jones, president of JRI Holdings, which designs and manufactures industrial cleaning systems under two brands, JRI Industries Inc. and Jensen Fabricating Engineers Inc. “Probably one of the single biggest hurdles is going to be finding new employees and people to allow us to grow and expand in Springfield as much as we want,” Jones says. Jones says that challenge has existed for some time, which lead JRI to approach the Missouri Division of Workforce Development when the company needed help finding qualified candidates about eight years ago. During that process, JRI was asked whether it would consider applicants who had recently left prison. JRI agreed, thus expanding the company’s applicant pool and helping it attract great employees. “Obviously you’ve got to be somewhat interested in people’s background, but we always understand people have made mistakes,” Jones says. “If we can find somebody who wants to work and checks out, we are committed to them, kind of almost regardless of what they’ve done in the past.” It’s not just the manufacturing sector that’s redoubling recruitment efforts. For example, if there’s a career fair happening at a local college, seeing representatives from American National Property And Casualty Company in attendance is practically guar-

anteed. That’s because the company takes full advantage of its proximity to regional universities to maintain a talent pipeline for its Springfield corporate center, particularly for entry-level positions. “We just have better luck in this area with the entry-level market because it is so saturated with colleges,” says Megan Trower, who leads American National’s talent management department. American National recruits much of that talent through a dynamic paid internship program with the goal of finding positions for interns within the company after they graduate. As career development trainees, participants gain valuable experience while contributing to the company alongside current staff in key capacities, such as assisting with underwriting or working in American National’s Client Service Center. In addition to bringing students to American National’s corporate offices, the company builds bridges to college-aged prospects by engaging in classroom spaces. Human resources staff members regularly present in courses at Evangel University, several employees teach technical courses at Ozarks Technical Community College and a University of Arkansas graduate on staff returned to his alma mater to visit with actuarial students. Coupled with the internship program and dedicated career fair attendance, this classroom presence helps students gain a better understanding of the company and the opportunities available there. “Name recognition is huge,” Trower says. Building name recognition has also been essential for Penmac Staffing Services Inc. In recent years, more companies have been seeking Penmac’s assistance in finding qualified candidates for jobs. “We have seen an increase in companies looking at using a [staffing] service that might never have used

one before because they are struggling at getting enough people in their doors to fill out applications just on their own,” Penmac President Paula Adams says. To meet that demand and drive more job seekers to openings, Penmac has increased its marketing budget, allowing the firm to intensify time-tested strategies like online and social media marketing, as well as to utilize new tools such as mass calling and texting services. The company has also increased its advertising budget and expanded to new platforms including TV. A mobile app is also in the works to help ease communication with Penmac’s current employees and ap-

COMMUNITY

COLLEGE CORPS Ozarks Technical Community College isn’t just helping 417-land businesses address workforce challenges. This March, OTC and Missouri’s 11 other community colleges officially formulated the Missouri Community College Workforce Development Network with the goal of helping companies across the state equip their workforce. The network allows the colleges to pool their resources, which are then made available to all Missouri businesses regardless their location in the state. If an organization needs a specific type of training that their local community college lacks but another possesses, that valuable information is now accessible through the network.

HIRING HELP PHOTOS BY BRAD ZWEERINK

In March, Springfield ReManufacturing Corp. held a hiring fair with interviews and tours to prepare for a new production line at one of its facilities. Austin Murray gets a tour of the facility from Michael Ward. BIZ417.COM

Maintenance Supervisor Darrell Miller, right, interviews Victor Bulik for one of the open positions. May/June 2017

29


The shortage in health care workers is here, and we must be creative in how we fill current vacancies while we proactively find new ways to build the workforce. International recruiting is just to supplement the high demand, but our focus is on growing and retaining local talent.” —Celeste Cramer, System Director of Recruitment and Retention at CoxHealth

NEW POWER GENERATION With Generation Z nearing adulthood, we asked CultureWaves Chief Insights Officer Locke Hilderbrand for do’s and don’ts so companies can attract this tech-savvy, entrepreneurial age group—born starting in the mid-’90s—once it joins the labor pool. 30

May/June 2017

DO: SPEAK OPENLY ABOUT THE FUTURE. Hilderbrand says Gen Z job candidates appreciate frank discussions about their future in a company. “I think one of the biggest things is to help guide them and show them where they fit in the grand scheme of things instead of trying to bend over backwards and change the workforce to fit their needs,” he says.

even at young ages, so what’s going to be really interesting is encouraging that idea,” Hilderbrand says. Conversely, Gen Z staffers will likely become frustrated with processes that they deem inefficient or redundant.

DON’T: NEGLECT WORKPLACE BONDING. Generation Z live in a digital world, but “these guys are very experience-driven,” Hilderbrand says, so creating opportuniDON’T: FORCE INEFFICIENT TECHNOLOGY SHIFTS. ties for bonding and doing things together Gen Zers don’t want technology for techoutside of the office is key. “That idea of nology’s sake. Limit your company’s relihaving experiences in the workplace is ance on tech to only when it’s truly useful. something that I think they are going to “For example, if there’s a big company end up pioneering,” he says. meeting, they would rather do it together DO: EMBRACE WELLNESS because they can collaborate together PROGRAMS. instead of trying to all sit in a chat room,” Because Generation Z grew up with a Hilderbrand says. pronounced awareness of health and DO: EMPHASIZE EFFICIENCY. wellness, they will likely appreciate “These guys are always looking for companies that invest in their physical, a way to make things easier and better, emotional and spiritual well-being by

offering perks like a company meditation day or passes to a yoga studio.

DO: ALLOW FLEXIBILITY. Having grown up in a digital world and experienced a highly scheduled upbringing, Generation Z prizes flexible work arrangements. “There is an expectation that we’ve hit 2017, the world is digital, and if I can do the same thing 1,000 miles away, why do I need to be at a desk all the time to do it?” Hilderbrand says. DON’T: POST AND PRAY. Instead of waiting for Generation Z to find your job openings, actively recruit them with engaging content like branded videos showing a day in the life at the office. “Start thinking in that mindset that you’re not putting out a request for employment—you are putting out a piece of branded content from your brand, and you are trying to attract interesting people with it,” Hilderbrand says. BIZ417.COM


plicants about job opportunities. “We use all of the media possibilities that we can to try to reach them,” Adams says. On top of increased marketing efforts, incentives and perks for current employees are also part of Penmac’s strategy to attract applicants. For example, those who found their current position through Penmac become eligible for a bonus when they refer a friend to Penmac and after that new person works for a set period of time. Although this bonus incentive has been available for more than a decade, Penmac increases bonus pay rates or reduces eligibility requirements during certain recruitment promotions. Penmac also makes every effort to remove factors impeding willing people from applying to open positions, such as offering a van service for a small fee to employees who lack reliable transportation, a perk available since 1988, when founder Patti Penny bought a van and personally drove employees to work. Penmac has maintained a fleet over the years and recently added an additional van and part-time driver due to increased demand.

Leveraging the Community For JMARK Business Solutions Inc., an IT managed service provider, attracting talent has hinged on company culture and benefits—such as generous paid time off policies, flexible working hours and opportunities to work from home—more than ever before, especially for high-level positions. Russell Winterberg, JMARK’s director of talent management, offers the example of a role like system administrator. “You can be a system administrator at one of 50 companies within Springfield, Missouri, and so then a lot of times [your] deciding factor is not based on the actual position duties,” he says. “Most of the time those duties are going to be pretty similar. What it ends up coming down to is, ‘What’s the culture of your company like? What are some of the different benefits that you offer? What can I expect from the environment?’ And that becomes a bigger thing to them than the actual position itself.” Winterberg says promoting the region’s livability has also become important, particularly when recruiting experienced employees who have ties to Springfield but live in larger metro areas, a population group that the company targets. “Some of probably the best employees that we’ve gotten are people that have come back—they left and went to the BIZ417.COM

big city and are like, ‘You know what? I’d like will have two Level I trauma centers the size of Mercy and CoxHealth, and the schools to eliminate that hour-and-a-half commute just can’t produce enough nurses to support every day,’” he says. Downtown Springfield’s both systems,” Cramer says. resurgent arts, culture and restaurant scene She also notes that the international has been useful when cultivating prospects, nurses, all of whom possess many years of too. “That can be a selling point to candiexperience and meet high care standards, dates as well, especially people that have not fill the specific need for nurses with greater been here in a while,” Winterberg says. “You levels of experience while serving as a vital have them come in, and they are like, ‘Holy stopgap to the larger issue at hand. “The cow, this place has changed quite a bit.’” shortage in health care workers is here, and CoxHealth also leverages 417-land’s we must be creative in how we fill current quality of life when recruiting new staff. In vacancies while we proactively find new March, CoxHealth hosted a hiring event ways to build the workforce,” Cramer says. for experienced nurses at Hotel Vandivort “International recruiting is just to supplein hopes of recruiting attendees—such as ment the high demand, but our focus is on traveling nurses from other cities working growing and retaining local talent.” at CoxHealth on short-term contracts—by demonstrating the exciting aspects of living in 417-land. When attending job fairs outside the area, Celeste Cramer, system CoxHealth discovered a new means of develdirector of recruitment and retention at CoxHealth, uses videos from the Springfield oping that local talent while working on the international recruiting project. While workArea Chamber of Commerce that illustrate ing with specialized agencies and learning the region’s livability. about their training processes, Cramer and But those events are just one piece of the others wondered if there were ways that health care giant’s wide-ranging strategy some of their current staff—specifically, to fulfill its workforce needs, particularly people working in departments such as as physicians, nurses and other health housekeeping but who were certified nurses professionals near retirement and patient in their home countries—could benefit. care morphs to accommodate an increased “We started talking to these individuals, [and] number of cases requiring a one-to-one we were like, ‘Well, how can we help you patient-nurse ratio. “Those ratios really become a nurse?’” Cramer says. impact things,” Cramer says. The next steps included partnering with To meet those challenges, CoxHealth Cox College to create a curriculum designed is taking a multipronged approach, even to get participants, who don’t have to be developing tools such as proactive recruiting affi liated with CoxHealth, up to speed for software. Once completed, the software will their licensure examination to become regisbe able to predict retirement trends within tered nurses and prepare them to join the the system based on the hospital’s data from hospital’s staff . “The cost was relatively low, previous years. “We aren’t just sitting here but it has a very big impact on their lives,” waiting for retirements to come through,” Cramer says. Cramer says. “We want to proactively adCoxHealth offers similar opportunities for dress those [vacancies] so as soon as they other staff, such as a $10,000 scholarship are posted, we already have a candidate to for current employees interested in becomslot in there.” ing surgical technicians or participating in a Due to immediate need, CoxHealth took new medical coding program designed with the locally unprecedented step of hiring OTC. Both are part of a growing strategy about 100 international nurses, who started within the health care system to fill key posiarriving in fall 2016. A common approach tions with qualifi ed individuals from within in other parts of the country, the move its own ranks. received some criticism due to concerns OTC’s training programs have also been that the nurses would be paid less than their vital to SRC, which, along with other dividomestic counterparts or that local candisions of SRC Holdings Corp., partnered dates were passed over. Cramer says both with the college to create an industrial are misconceptions and that the move was technology degree as a means of training necessitated by the lack of local candidates existing workers to fill vital jobs. Scobee ready to join the workforce. “It is really hard says that such internal workforce developbecause it’s pretty rare that a city of this size ment has been crucial, especially for roles

Growing Talent Internally

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There’s always going to be a shortage of people to do what you need and what you want. But, we hire based on the person first and probably the technical skills second. We can train the technical skills.” —Russell Winterberg, JMARK Business Solutions Inc. Director of Talent Management

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like maintenance technicians, which the program helps train. He recalls receiving more than 200 applications for maintenance technician positions last year, but not one of the candidates panned out due to various reasons, including that they lacked the right skills. “Instead of buying them from the market, we are trying to build them from within,” he says. American National places a similar emphasis on internal recruiting. That’s an especially important approach when it comes to positions requiring greater expertise. “When we are looking at more of that skilled workforce or particular type of IT knowledge, that’s where it gets a little bit more difficult [to recruit] in this area and where we need to be working on our workforce development internally,” Trower says. “Training people for those types of things becomes more imperative.” That’s been a particularly beneficial tactic for claims, a division of the company which tends to have higher turnover. Last year, American National launched a training program to create a stronger pipeline for that division. “It’s meant to be kind of a springboard program,” Trower says. “They learn the ins and outs of all of the claims functions that they would handle, and they backfill or move into positions created at various levels of our claims area.” Drawing a combination of internal and external participants, the program boasts 100 percent retention of the first three classes, totaling 26 people, since it began in January 2016. JMARK also stresses employee growth, so much so that all new hires and their directors meet with a technical trainer to map out their career path in the company. That emphasis on staff development—including covering the costs of necessary certifications, seminars, conferences and other educational opportunities—plays a part in securing JMARK’s workforce in years to come. “There’s always going to be a shortage of people to do what you need and what you want,” Winterberg says. “But, we hire based on the person first and probably the technical skills second. We can train the technical skills. That is a big thing for us.” Such investment will pay big dividends for companies down the line, says Lindsay Haymes, Springfield Area Chamber of Commerce vice president of workforce development. “It’s about empowering indiBIZ417.COM

RETENTION 101 To maintain a vibrant workforce, retaining great workers is as essential as recruiting them. Leadership consultant Terri Tucker, owner of Tucker Resources and director of company culture and people development at Phoenix Home Care & Hospice, shares strategies to help managers keep their employees engaged and committed long-term.

Foster Communication

Creating an open dialogue and ensuring that employees feel heard is critical for retention. To ensure such communication at Phoenix, Tucker encourages “stand ups”—short, casual meetings between managers and staff on a regular basis—and “stay” interviews, during which supervisors praise top employees and ask them about what they find satisfying in the company.

Focus on Purpose

In meetings at Phoenix, Tucker says staff members are encouraged to discuss how specific patient interactions and experiences on the job advance the company’s mission. Such conversations boost retention by helping employees develop a greater sense of ownership in their roles as well as a deeper connection with that big-picture mission.

Emphasize Employee Growth

Tucker says retention can hinge on workers’ belief that they can advance within the company’s structure. “They need to know that they are progressing toward something,” she says. At Phoenix, that happens in one-on-one conversations mapping out employees’ individual trajectories. Another piece of the puzzle is communicating the company’s broader vision for future growth, which Tucker says Phoenix does transparently and often.

Fight Burnout

Rather than waiting for big annual or quarterly milestones, Tucker recommends creating opportunities to encourage workers and boost engagement throughout the year. To do that, Phoenix launched RAFE, or Rising Above For Excellence, a peer-to-peer program through which employees receive regular recognition and rewards for going above and beyond.

Empower Through Education

Creating opportunities for employees to gain new skills and improve themselves helps fight the disengagement that can cause them to move on. To battle such stagnation, Phoenix offers continuing education classes known as the Captain Series. These courses allow employees to gain practical skills and learn about leadership, critical thinking, conflict resolution and more, often in the context of relevant on-the-job scenarios.

Democratize Company Culture

Tucker says Phoenix’s culture isn’t shaped solely from the top down. Phoenix empowers staff members to impact culture—as well as develop a sense of ownership—through initiatives like Flight Attendant, which inspires employees to take small, simple actions, such as popping popcorn or buying someone a cup of coffee, that accumulate in creating a positive, fun working environment. May/June 2017

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The Missouri Job Center and local construction experts are teaming up to train potential workers for various positions during the Multi-Trade Pre-Apprenticeship program.

Retaining Talent  Instructors Doug Mannell, back left, and Ron Shaffer talk with Erica Watts and Meranda Doll as Jacob Sharp, left front, and Robert Pinkman work on a floor layout project.

Instructor Doug Mannell helps Darius Thomas as he works on a layout project. Flooring was one focus during the preapprenticeship program.

In addition to flooring, students learned about carpentry and working as a laborer in the construction industry.

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Elliott, Robinson & Company LLP is one local company that has taken advantage of tangible benefits, such as flexible hours and telecommuting, to attract and retain employees. According to Amanda J. Kastler, a partner at the firm, there are two conundrums perplexing the public accounting industry: managing the around-the-clock burden of tax season and retaining staff, particularly people who have between four and eight years of experience. “That’s always been a magical time frame,” Kastler says. “If people leave public accounting, it’s in that space.” With those challenges top-of-mind and knowing millennials’ workplace preferences would likely differ from those of prior generations, Kastler and others in leadership took a hard look at the firm’s culture. “We tried to stay in front of the curve to keep the great people that we had and potentially attract people from other firms that weren’t getting what they needed,” she says. To do that, the firm began offering flexible work hours, even allowing personnel to put a cap on the amount of time they put in during tax season, a historically rare perk in the industry. That flexibility was made possible by the addition of part-time staff to help shoulder the burden. This year, one of those part-time workers—a former staffer who moved to Las Vegas— telecommuted, which the firm hopes to offer more in the future as a way to retain employees even if they relocate. Kastler says those shifts—made during the last three to five years—have paid off in a big way. Last year, the company had less than 6 percent turnover, a fraction of what it was about eight years ago, when

the firm experienced industry-average turnover in the 10 to 15 percent range. Retention is also a major focus for SRC’s Scobee. “How are we going to ensure that we have access to staff ?” he asks. “The first thing is, keep the ones you get. That’s the smartest and the best strategy.” At SRC, that retention hinges on culture, which is built on philosophies from President and CEO Jack Stack’s book and coaching program, The Great Game of Business. Those concepts include transparency, empowering associates and offering MiniGames, or short, focused campaigns to affect change. That focus plays out through initiatives like a MiniGame incentivizing associates to submit new ideas, and Leading Edge, a professional development program geared toward future leaders in the company. These efforts all play into employee engagement, the company’s key focus for 2017, and retention. “That’s going translate to lower turnover, which translates into better profits,” Scobee says.

Reaching New Generations For some industries, such as construction, the biggest labor challenges take shape long before retention ever comes into play. But thanks to a dedicated community push, that might be changing. This past April, about 900 hard hat– sporting high school students flooded the Ozark Empire Fairgrounds and Event Center’s E*Plex for Build My Future, hosted by the Missouri Job Center, Home Builders Association of Greater Springfield (HBA), Springfield Contractors Association, Missouri Department of Transportation and others. Some kids high-tailed it to a dump truck simulator, others tried brick laying, while others worked on floor-covering designs, leveled sand and much more. Modeled after iBuild, a Kansas City expo similarly highlighting careers in construction, the inaugural event introduced students to the industry at a time of dire labor shortages, causing project delays and increased costs. “There are all of these opportunities out there directly tied to the construction industry, and we desperately need people filling those jobs,” says HBA CEO Charlyce Ruth. “This sounds silly, but if we don’t get more plumbers out there, you are going to start paying a plumber more than you pay an attorney.” BIZ417.COM

PHOTOS BY BRAD ZWEERINK

GETTING SKILLED

viduals and companies to be able to take their own steps toward closing their own skills gaps,” Haymes says. “And another piece of that is that it’s incredibly costly to find new people. It’s a lot easier to train your own and promote them within.” Plus, such investment provides a powerful retention tool. “When you invest in your people, they feel more valued. They feel like you care about them and you want them to be successful, and so there’s a lot of that kind of more intangible benefit that turns into tangible benefit when the employee stays and you don’t have to try to find someone else,” she says.


This sounds silly, but if we don’t get more plumbers out there, you are going to start paying a plumber more than you pay an attorney.” —Charlyce Ruth, CEO of the Home Builders Association of Greater Springfield

Although there is more work to be done, Brookline Doorworks’ Foley is pleased at the prospect of bringing more young people into the industry through outreach like Build My Future. “That’s a good step in the right direction,” he says. Derick Barnes, business agent for the Heavy Construction Laborers’ Union Local 663, echoes Ruth’s concern. “The pool of people to pull from in construction as a whole is drying up,” Barnes says. To help expand that pool, Barnes and others in organized labor banded together with the Missouri Job Center last spring to launch a Multi-Trade Pre-Apprenticeship program designed to prepare participants for apprenticeships with local unions. Born out of the Missouri Job Center’s industry-specific roundtable discussions, the program helps participants obtain their OSHA 10 certification and boost their preparedness for the construction industry with classroom learning and hands-on trainBIZ417.COM

ing with the plumbers and pipefitters, local carpenters and heavy construction unions. That training paid off: Each of the four trainees that participated in the first class joined the construction industry. In 2017, a second pre-apprenticeship program—one geared toward 18- to 24-yearolds—began, bringing similar training to 10 participants, all of whom were hired in construction. Barnes says the program would have been worthwhile if only one of the participants had joined the industry because of it. “I really believe that life is about opportunities,” he says. “These kids are seeing an opportunity. If it wasn’t for the career center and our partnership, they would never have that opportunity.” Other communities are taking note of that partnership. In March, Barnes, the Springfield Chamber’s Lindsay Haymes and Mary Ann Rojas, director of workforce development for the City of Springfield, traveled to Washington, D.C., where they

discussed the success of various collaborative efforts at the National Association of Workforce Boards’ Forum conference. Another trip is scheduled for this May, when Barnes and Rojas will each present sessions at the National Association of Workforce Development Professionals conference in New Orleans. For Haymes, such collaboration among business, government, education and others bodes well for the future of 417-land as the region tackles its labor shortages. “We have the right formula in southwest Missouri to get out in front of the workforce challenges and try to bring real, practical solutions to the business community when it comes to talent because of our collaboration, because of our partnerships and because of the talented individuals that are both leading various organizations and the teams that make them up,” Haymes says. “It’s just a really great time in the workforce ecosystem in southwest Missouri.” May/June 2017

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Groomed for

Growth In 2013, Paul Catlett and Thad Forrester joined forces to open Hudson Hawk Barber & Shop, a new-to-Springfield concept that paired a brand-new business with the look, feel and services of an old-school barbershop. Fast forward four years, and their company has grown to include four shops in Springfield, one in Kansas City and even a customized mobile Airstream that’s used for philanthropic and branding opportunities. Here’s how they grew one downtown shop into a company that’s five locations strong and growing. BY: SAVANNAH WASZCZUK PHOTOS BY: JOSH BOSTON

P

aul Catlett has a casual confidence about him. He’s dressed in a perfectfitting button up and some quality denim jeans, both of which were most definitely made in the U.S.A.—he has a love for quality, American-made textiles. He’s worked in the hair industry for nearly 20 years and is easily considered one of Springfield’s most-sought stylists. Once he starts talking, it quickly becomes obvious that he is also very much an artist. “I don’t really believe in boundaries or lines,” he says. “I’ve always kind of colored outside of the

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Paul Catlett (left) and Thad Forrester (right) perfected the old-school barber shop concept when they opened Hudson Hawk Barber & Shop in 2013. Their success keeps on rolling in their newest concept, a fully renovated Airstream offering a complete barber shop on the go (top). There, clients can get a full haircut (middle), or if they’d rather stay in place, they can opt for one of the many luxury services, like a hot shave, at one of Hudson Hawk’s five locations in town (bottom).

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Hudson Hawk Barber & Shop’s newest concept, an Airstream trailer housing a barbershop, has signature Hudson Hawk branding right down to the black and white interior.

GROWTH ata GLANCE APRIL 2013: The first Hudson Hawk Barber & Shop opens in downtown Springfield. MARCH 2014: A second location

opens in Farmers Park.

SEPTEMBER 2014: A third location opens on Springfield’s East Sunshine Street. MAY 2015: A fourth location opens on

Springfield’s Kearney Street. Now this location serves as an operations center for the company.

OCTOBER 2015: Hudson Hawk opens a fifth location on South Campbell Avenue. SEPTEMBER 2016: Hudson Hawk’s

Airstream is put into use.

OCTOBER 2016: The company’s first out-of-market location opens on Westport Road in Kansas City. MORE TO COME Hudson Hawk has hopes of launching its new product line sometime in 2017. Stay tuned. 38

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lines and had a different feel for life and business. And for how I live my life.” This has worked out well for him. He first opened Studio 417 salon in downtown Springfield in 2000, then in 2005 he married Hannah, who became a partner in the salon and a key part of its growth. Today they have two sons, Link and Hawk, who come first. In 2013, Catlett expanded his business repertoire when he opened Hudson Hawk Barber & Shop with co-owner Thad Forrester, a formerly corporate-minded man who met Catlett during a haircut at Studio 417. Forrester is married to Megan, and they have three children: Ollie, Anabel and Hudson. And like Catlett, Forrester always puts his family first. But since the beginning of their business relationship, that’s one of the few things the two had in common. Until about five years ago, Forrester was part of corporate America. He had a schedule filled with client meetings and finished most outfits with a tailored blazer. With a communications degree from Drury University, he kicked off his career at The Marlin Company Advertising Agency working for big-name brands including Starbucks Coffee and Mission Foods. He learned the ins and outs of brand identity and marketing—the science of selling things. Later he partnered with his brother to start Forrester Tech, a high-end custom technology business. Day in and day out, Forrester was the picture of your typical American family businessman. But he wasn’t completely happy.

Then one day while Catlett was giving Forrester a routine haircut, things changed. Catlett asked him if he’d be interested in starting a new barbershop with him in Springfield. Forrester discussed the idea with his wife and family, did some praying and then decided to go for it. “I think it was a week later when he walked in when I was in the middle of a haircut,” Catlett says. “He said, ‘I quit my job—I start barber school on Monday.’” After barber school, Forrester received additional training at the Sassoon Academy in Santa Monica.

The Yin and the Yang As the partners went on to open first one barber shop and then eventually four more—and the shop is still growing—they’ve learned that their starkly different experiences are one of the keys to their success. “Thad has a marketing background; I do not,” Catlett says. “I’m a bootson-the-ground, kind of aggressive, ‘Customer service and quality of product we’re putting out is all we need’ kind of guy. That was always my mentality. But Thad has taken a totally new perspective on things. We’ve added technology, marketing, design and more, and we’ve developed a really strong ability to reach out and not only get people in, but retain people.” Sit in the same room with the two of them, and you’ll witness their dynamic. They finish each other’s sentences. Forrester is quick to speak to dates, numbers and other hard details about Hudson Hawk. Catlett nails questions BIZ417.COM


about the company’s culture and the unique look of each shop; each one was planned to have an identity all its own. Catlett talks about how he wants the customers to feel when they walk in the doors, and Forrester talks about what they did to get them there in the first place. But something that they both know to its absolute core is the company’s vision.

Defining the Brand “As a business owner, it’s important to note that if your vision isn’t clear at the top—if the guys running the business don’t know what’s going on, well, then how do you think someone on down the chain is going to know what’s going on?” Forrester says. This is why the two worked to define what they saw as the company’s identity and direction, and they explain it to new employees as soon as they join the team. So, what does that brand look like? That question can be answered a few ways. Of course, there’s the big-picture concept: Hudson Hawk Barber & Shop was the first in Springfield to tackle the throwback barbershop idea. “We’re kind of the new American barbershop,” Forrester says. “Everything from our photography to our website to our in-shop merchandising and design—it’s all cohesive, and it’s all built around this idea of being a barbershop for all generations.” It starts with a look. The shops combine industrial, old-style barber garb with modern, clean design. When you step inside, the decor establishes a cool factor— something customers would never find at a chain, mass-market salon. It’s home to something extra—something that sets it apart. That theme continues in the array of services offered, which includes haircuts, clean-ups, shaves and beard grooming. “I had a World War II veteran come in and

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say, ‘This is what the barbershop used to be like when I was growing up,’” Forrester says. “Our goal was to really help revitalize something that we didn’t want to see die off in the industry.” Aside from and perhaps even more important than the look of the shops are the employees who work there—each one is coached on the company’s vision from day one. “For us, it’s more about teaching them and showing them that there is no ceiling,” Catlett says. This sets up Hudson Hawk’s culture of constant growth in the very beginning. “In life, in happiness, in barbering—barbering is just a small part of what these guys do,” Catlett says. “They’re counselors. They’re friends. They’re husbands. They’re wives. And we just let them know at the very beginning that you can be as great as you want to be and go as far as you want in this company, as long as you’re willing to give it everything you have.” They’ve held true to their words. Several employees who started by sweeping up hair and answering phones have become top barbers around town, and a few have even relocated to Kansas City to work at the newest location. Forrester and Catlett credit the company’s growth to these quality employees. “We had so many amazing people— and still do—who came in, became a part of our culture, grew and blossomed,” Catlett says. “Then they had these friends who wanted to be a part of it, and these great people would come in, but there was nowhere to put them. The only way to find a place for them was to build another shop.” This is proof of the company’s organic growth, but there was also a strategic side that started in the early stages. “You have to think about yourself as a Fortune 500 company, even when you’re getting started, if you want to be successful and have a true trajectory of growth,” Forrester says.

‘‘

You have to think about yourself as a Fortune 500 company, even when you’re getting started, if you want to be successful and have a true trajectory of growth.” —Thad Forrester, co-owner

True to Hudson Hawk branding, the new Airstream combines vintage in the form of the classic aluminum finish with hip in the form of matte black wrapping.

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Going Mobile Hudson Hawk has grown exponentially in the past five years. In addition to its five shops, the company recently started operating a customized Airstream as a mobile barbershop. “One of the things that Thad and I have always been really involved in—from the very beginning from the second we opened the doors—was our philanthropic push,” Catlett says. Since the beginning they’ve given back by providing free services or donating unsold merchandise to local organizations. “Whether it’s cutting homeless guys’ hair or cutting kids’ hair before school starts,” Catlett says. “Every product or every T-shirt we don’t sell here, we get it to [Great Circle]. We’ve also created a culture with our staff that gives back.” One area they were struggling with, though, was lugging 300- and 400-pound barber chairs around to do these cuts and facing unsanitary conditions. “Cutting hair in auditoriums and gymnasiums and even out on front steps—it was difficult,” Catlett says. That’s why he took it upon himself to renovate an Airstream for the task. He then surprised Forrester with it. “I wanted to create an environment where we could pull up anywhere, at any time and in any weather conditions, and give back to our community,” Catlett says. “Because part of what we do is creating a culture, it’s creating a design aspect to everything we do. Finally, whenever [Forrester] saw it, he was kind of blown away. It’s everything that we do, mobile.” The Airstream’s tailored look sets it apart. The exterior pairs the classic polished silver finish with a matte black paint job that makes the logo practically pop off the side. Two barber chairs and a wash bowl are situated within a refinished interior with creamy white painted walls, wood accents and plenty of clean lines. It feels hip and stylish yet comfortable, making it right on-brand with all of Hudson Hawk’s operations. And for good reason. “We actually have a whole brand guide that we’re using now,” Forrester says. “That’s something we’ve worked with our creative team on, and they’ve made it abundantly clear. Regardless of where you’re at, your logo, your name—these are all a big part of how you’re represented, and we work to make sure that it’s all cohesive.”

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The barbers at Hudson Hawk set the company’s fast-paced growth.

In addition to philanthropic events, the team plans to use the Airstream for promotional purposes, including corporate events and festivals across the state and, eventually, even around the country. Currently mobile barbershops and salons are illegal, but since Hudson Hawk doesn’t charge for the cuts they give there, they’re free to operate it as they please. And they’re thinking big with it. “My personal goal is to have 10 Airstreams,” Catlett says.

Looking Ahead After accomplishing such big strides in five years, Catlett and Forrester are in-tune with growing their company, and there’s a lot more to come. The Kansas City shop was the first out-of-Springfield location, but they’ve hinted at plans for more. And opening shops isn’t all they’re doing—they’ve also been working on developing a product line for the past two and a half years. “We’re working with the best scientists and the best chemists to put together a line that is really something special,” Forrester says. The two chose a top American manufacturer to develop three styling products they consider the greatest hits of barbering products. “I’ve been in the industry for 20 years, and Thad has been in it for four years,” Catlett says. “We’ve looked at every men’s grooming line in the country that we’ve sold and that we’ve used, and we’ve taken what’s great about it.” And now they’re working on getting it just right, filling a need they saw years ago. “There were so many issues with the products that we were getting,”

Catlett says. “It was kind of organic in the fact that we really wanted to be able to control the product that we are selling to our clients.” Although the goal is to launch the product line sometime in 2017, they’re not guaranteeing a date at this point. “We don’t want to come to market until it’s the right time,” Forrester says. Just as the growth of the shops is dependent upon finding quality people to stand behind the chair, the launch of the products is dependent upon getting everything right upfront. “We’re all for growth and expansion of our brand, but the thing we’re not willing to sacrifice is the quality in any aspect of anything we do,” Forrester says. “So that’s why everything is being done very deliberately, and with a plan and a lot of good information and support systems and numbers behind it.” But when the time does come, you’ll likely hear about it, and don’t be surprised if you hear a whole lot more about Hudson Hawk. “This is the most exciting year in our company’s history,” Forrester says. “April marked our four-year anniversary, and I feel like we’re just hitting the starting line. It’s a really exciting place to be, for everybody involved.” At the head of it all, Catlett and Forrester are strategically paving the way, supplementing each other’s strengths to grow their Springfield-based barbershop to levels many small businesses never dream of. “We are rock solid in our plans and the way we’re working together now, and it’s exciting,” Forrester says. “We’re totally different people, but we create a really dynamic duo.” BIZ417.COM


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B I Z 417 P R E S E N T S

MEET MASTERS the

EACH ISSUE WE INTRODUCE YOU TO 417-LAND’S TOP PROFESSIONALS. There are many experts in 417-land who set the bar high for others in the industry. From masters in creating the perfect sign for your business to building or refreshing your rooftop, find out what makes those businesses, and those who are behind them, so exceptional.

BIZ417.COM

01. SPRINGFIELD SIGN AND NEON 02. COX ROOFING May/June 2017

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meet the masters in

SIGNS

LOOKS ARE POWERFUL. But they aren’t everything. Everyone knows what’s underneath really matters. Springfield Sign is a master of both. The company’s expertise is housed in a 145,000-square-foot facility on the northeast side of Springfield. The impressive expansion comes after three decades of cultivating customer partnerships and creating visuals that signify quality. From design to delivery and maintenance, everything happens right here. Having manufacturing happen 100% in-house means having control over every detail of every project. Springfield Sign owner Mark Wessell is an engineer by trade, along with other members of his elite staff. Not many sign companies have engi-

HAVING MANUFACTURING HAPPEN 100% IN-HOUSE MEANS HAVING CONTROL OVER EVERY DETAIL OF EVERY PROJECT.

neers on board. It means Springfield Sign customers can be confident their products are professionally engineered using sound principles and quality materials that last. It’s easy to go for the lowest bid. Those people usually end up with a sign of poor quality that is likely to bend, fade or deteriorate early in its lifespan. The money saved gets shelled out for repairs. Springfield Sign Marketing Director, Michal Moss Early, understands a company’s sign is synonymous with their story. She says, “If people see a quality sign they associate a quality business.” Most business owners are dreamers. They already have a vision for their brand. They simply need the right designer to listen. To make it happen.

SPRINGFIELD SIGN 4825 E. Kearney St. Springfield, MO

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417-862-2454

springfieldsign.com BIZ417.COM


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meet the masters in

SIGNS

It just so happens there’s a team of talented designers at Springfield Sign. The kind of people who listen. Who collaborate with customers to make the vision happen. Here, clients are valued members and an integral part of the sign process. (After all, it’s the customer’s name being put in lights.) Image is crucial in business. With an infinite number of things vying for people’s attention, Springfield Sign creates products to showcase a company’s image. It’s the ultimate brand awareness. In other words, customers will see a sign and immediately know that company. That image. That reputation of quality. Springfield Sign has manufactured some of the most recognizable insignias locally and na-

BIZ417.COM

CLIENTS ARE VALUED MEMBERS AND AN INTEGRAL PART OF THE SIGN PROCESS.

tionwide. One-of-a-kind signs and mass quantity manufacturing. Customers include names like WalMart, CoxHealth, Bass Pro, Culver’s, Applebee’s, Mercy and Sam’s. Other premier custom signs include BYOP (Build Your Own Pizza) and Branson’s Dick Clark Theater. CEO and Founder of America’s Incredible Pizza Company says, “We consider Springfield Sign a key vendor that has played a major role in our success.” Looks matter. So does what’s underneath. Whether it’s a pylon sign or an LED message board, Springfield Sign has mastered it all.

May/June 2017

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meet the masters in

ROOFING

Left to right: Chuck Hinkley, Production Manager; Rebecca Morton, Office Manager; Ron Cox, Founder/Sales Manager; Ken Mills, President

THE PEOPLE AND THE ITEMS we love most… they all find protection under one thing: a roof. Having a roof that withstands the crazy Ozark weather is important. Because the people and heirlooms underneath are important. In business nearly 40 years, Cox Roofing has a reputation for roofing done right. It starts with the right estimators. People trained in all things roof-related. They look at the entire roof system (not just shingles)… sheathing, flashing, vents, soffit, fascia, gutters and downspouts. Of course, having the right roofers is paramount. Only the best are hired. That’s right… hired. Not subcontracted. Cox Roofing has several fully staffed roof-

THIS COMPANY MAINTAINS AN A+ RATING WITH THE BETTER BUSINESS BUREAU AND HAS NEARLY FIVE-STAR ONLINE FEEDBACK.

ing crews. People who work together every day. People who know roofs inside and out. They’re licensed and insured. When a roof is done right, backing it up with a warranty isn’t a problem. Cox Roofing services have a 10 year labor warranty. And, most products come with a manufacturer’s warranty on top of that. There’s a reason property managers and real estate companies trust Cox Roofing. This company maintains an A+ rating with the Better Business Bureau and has nearly five-star online feedback. Cox Roofing protects its customers by doing roofing right.

COX ROOFING 3221 S Scenic Springfield, MO

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417-887-3874

coxroofing.net BIZ417.COM


ADVERTISING

417.877.0395 | northernsummit.com

3 WAYS YOUR OLD ANTI-VIRUS SOFTWARE IS LEAVING YOUR BUSINESS VULNERABLE TO CRIMINALS

If you’re relying on traditional anti-virus solutions to prevent advanced attacks, you are an EASY target for these criminals. You’ve done everything you know to do: select a firewall, keep your anti-virus software up to date and train your employees—so you’re safe from these crooks, right?

WRONG! According to recent studies, anti-virus only stops about 35% of malicious software. That means that a whopping 65% of threats may be infiltrating YOUR network because today’s attacks are sneakier, stealthier AND spread much more easily than in the past.

SO HOW DO YOU KEEP YOURSELF SAFE FROM THIS? While nothing is 100% foolproof, there are advanced solutions that boast up to a 99.6% success rate. Any advanced solution must protect you during three critical times:

1

Before an attack. Every solution you evaluate must focus on keeping your network safe before a threat even begins. That solution should not react to yesterday’s news, but should proactively keep you safe from current threats.

an attack. It is important that the attack. Some threats will 3 After 2 During your solution is sophisticated enough to sneak through even the best defenses. It detect malicious software and shut it down immediately so it doesn’t spread through your network.

is imperative that you have the ability to see what files were compromised, what countries your network connected to and exactly how the threat got into your network AND clean it up!

CHECK OUT OUR WEBSITE AT NORTHERNSUMMIT.COM TO FIND OUT HOW YOU CAN GET A FREE NETWORK ASSESSMENT TO MAKE SURE YOUR COMPANY IS PROTECTED.

BIZ417.COM

May/June 2017

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TOOLS TO HELP YOU DOMINATE

PHOTOS BY JEREMY MASON MCGRAW, COURTESY SILVER DOLLAR CITY

Summer is the perfect time to get refreshed on a company retreat. Find out where to take your employees on p. 50.

WORTH EVERY DOLLAR

BIZ417.COM

Investments in employees pay off in a family atmosphere at Silver Dollar City. PAGE 50

50 50 50 51 51

Culture Club Plan It What If Jumpstart

52 54 55 56

Advice & Whiskey Giving Back Chart It Workspace

60 61 61 62

The Big Question Vantage Point How To Next Gen May/June 2017

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If it’s just a mission statement on a wall, that doesn’t really do anything. You really have to have the buy-in from the leadership team. —Deanna Partridge, Vice President of Human Resources at Silver Dollar City Attractions

Silver Dollar City places high importance on getting to know each employee at the park.

Culture of Gold At Silver Dollar City, family fun starts with treating employees like family. BY: ADRIENNE DONICA

Y

ear after year families flock to Branson to enjoy the rides, attractions, shows and more at Silver Dollar City. So do several hundred seasonal employees. “Over 90 percent return on our rehire, which is really unheard of in the theme park business,” says Deanna Partridge, vice president of human resources for Silver Dollar City Attractions. That statistic is an indicator of SDC’s long-standing culture at work. “We retain them because we treat them right, and they want to come back,” Partridge says. Seasonal workers aren’t the only ones drawn to the park’s culture. There are people like June Ward, the 72-year-old namesake behind Aunt June’s Copper Kettle Candies. Ward was hired in 1968, started making candy a year later and has yet to stop. After

years of participating in the National Crafts & Cowboy Festival, Jeff Walker was persuaded to join the team as master potter in part because of the company culture. “This whole place is family,” he says. Getting to know employees and providing them with resources for success has long been a priority of the company. That starts with having open, honest communication between the leadership team and the rest of the staff. Department directors are also tasked with creating annual “great place to work” plans focused on improving employees’ experiences at work. There are tangible benefits, like the Share It Forward Program and Mary’s Well House. “One of the things that was a challenge to us prior to [the Affordable Care Act] was being able to provide a health option to our seasonal employees,” Partridge says. The park created a walk-in clinic called Mary’s Well House giving staffers and dependents access to a full-time doctor and nurse from Cox Branson for basic care and preventative medicine. “Share It Forward was designed to be a program where employees could help other employees, and the company matches every dollar that’s donated,” Partridge says. Originally the money was granted to employees facing unexpected financial difficulties, but the program has since expanded to include scholarships, child assistance and education on topics such as financial basics. Ultimately, Partridge says protecting company culture is up to business leaders. “If it’s just a mission statement on a wall, that doesn’t really do anything,” she says. “You really have to have the buy-in from the leadership team.” Executives can hire and promote employees who also fit with the culture. SDC vets job candidates at group “fun-terviews” where a panel of employees from different departments observes individuals as they participate in team-oriented exercises. “I think hiring great people is the success to any culture,” Partridge says.

[PLAN IT ]

PLAN THE PERFECT CORPORATE RETREAT 50

May/June 2017

Planning a corporate retreat? Head to these locations to relax, reenergize and renew your company’s connectedness. Find more retreat locales at biz417.com.

SKY HARBOR RESORT

Enjoy Table Rock Lake and a fully equipped workspace at the recently renovated Sky Harbor Resort (417-779-0090, skyharborresort.com). It has a large conference room, a dining area and the technology you’ll need.

ANDY B’S ENTERTAINMENT CENTER

Andy B’s (417-883-1234, andybspringfield.com) boasts a VIB lounge with 10 private lanes, a staffed bar, jumbo screens, LCD projectors and wireless microphones for group brainstorms.

BIG CEDAR LODGE

The Ridgedale resort holds up to 1,000 guests with meeting rooms that can turn into conference, theater, banquet or classroom styles. Big Cedar Lodge (1-800225-6343, bigcedar.com) also offers team building activities. BIZ417.COM

PHOTO COURTESY SILVER DOLLAR CITY

[CULTURE CLUB]


[WHAT IF]

[JUMPSTART]

CLEANING UP YOUR ACT Buying, leasing or redeveloping property is a big step for your business. Don’t let Mother Nature get in the way. Here’s what to do if you find environmental contamination on your business’s potential new digs. BY: CLAIRE PORTER

OUT OF OFFICE The summer sun will soon be calling, meaning your employees will be itching to take a vacation. Before the time-off requests start rolling in, button up your company’s vacation policy. BY: ADRIENNE DONICA

Bundle Up

PHOTOS COURTESY SHUTTERSTOCK, NEIL BRADY

B

efore you sign on the dotted line for a property, you need to make sure you’re getting the perfect spot. Your vetting isn’t truly complete until you’ve found out whether the location has any environmental damage. Consulting companies like Environmental Works Inc. help clients assess property transactions and manage any environmental problems that might arise. “It really matters what [the property] was before, not just right before, but 40 or 50 years before,” Environmental Works President Jason Smith says. Industries like manufacturing or transportation come with an expected level of risk, but even businesses located on the site of old gas stations or dry cleaners come with a chance of past damage. “Dry cleaners, particularly in the past, used chemicals that are carcinogens, so that would be something you’d want to know about before you buy a property,” he says. That’s where a Phase 1 study, a historical report showing if a property’s prior use could have caused damage, comes in. Smith says a potential buyer or lender’s biggest mistake is not having a study done because it gives them an innocent landowner’s defense— meaning if you’ve done the research, you are not responsible for issues discovered later. And a study doesn’t always mean bad news. “A Phase 1 can end with: ‘There are no environmental conditions,’” Smith says, BIZ417.COM

which gives the buyer or lender confidence that there won’t be problems down the road. If there are signs of potential damage, Smith says you have options: “You can walk away from the deal or refuse to finance it. More than likely, though, if you’re interested in the property, you’re going to want to spend a little bit more money and determine if there really is a problem there.” Enter the Phase 2 study, which involves collecting soil or groundwater samples to test if your property is safe for its planned usage and if present contamination falls within acceptable regulated limits. Smith says there are grants, funds and voluntary cleanup programs that sometimes mitigate the cost of cleanup and give you a regulatory stamp of approval. With a professional by your side to identify those opportunities, navigating the murky waters of an environmental cleanup doesn’t have to be a headache. And it protects you in the long run. “We’ve certainly seen plenty of scenarios where people have bought contaminated property, and they had no idea,” Smith says. “They didn’t cause the contamination, and it might not even be something that anybody is going to require them to do anything about, but it might make selling that property when they’re ready to sell it very difficult.” Do yourself a favor and request a Phase 1. Your wallet (and your wellbeing) will thank you.

Prior to 2008, Anderson Engineering Inc. had separate vacation and sick time policies, which President and CEO Neil Brady says led to some people taking advantage of sick days. So the company moved to a scaled paid time off program. Employees receive more PTO the longer they have been employed, and accrued time can be used for sick days and vacation days.

Write It Down

This seems obvious, but without a formal, written PTO policy, you could be setting yourself up for a sticky situation, especially when it comes to unused time. “Clearly state if employees leave service if they get paid for that or not,” Brady says. There are exceptions, but Anderson typically pays out any time employees haven’t taken.

Use It to Your Benefit

Remember, a PTO policy isn’t just for current employees; it can be used to attract new talent. “We found that, especially with a lot of our professionals, that they look for that PTO policy and want to know what that is,” Brady says. He recommends comparing your company’s policy with others in your industry. “Stay competitive, or you’re not going to get the best or the top employees,” he says.

Neil Brady May/June 2017

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[ADVICE & WHISKEY]

Straight Up Brand-Building with Mary Kellogg-Joslyn Mary Kellogg-Joslyn, co-founder and co-owner of the Titanic Museum Attraction, likes to say the people who board her ships in Branson and Pigeon Forge, Tennessee, every day come in as guests but walk away as passengers. At the Hilton Branson Convention Center Hotel, the former executive at CBS and Walt Disney Co. shares how she creates experiences customers crave. BY: ADRIENNE DONICA

Mary Kellogg-Joslyn steers her ships of Titanic employees toward success.

“The first thing you have to ask yourself is, ‘What comes first: your employees or your guests?’ And what comes first is your employees. Our communications with our employees and the programs we have for our employees make them happy employees, which in turn makes them happy that our guests are here.” “I know if somebody understands marketing or not when I ask the following questions: ‘Who do you market to? Who is your customer?’ And if they say to me, ‘Well, you know, we kind of hit everybody,’ then I know they don’t know who their customer is. So the first thing to do is identify who your customer is. If you know your core value and you can market to that first, then you can expand.” “You have to stay current. If you stay in your own little world, you will never grow.” “When Walt Disney built Disneyland, he had a vision. He listened to his guests, and he listened to his cast members, and he decided what worked and what didn’t work. So that’s exactly the concept I used. We went to Pigeon Forge, and we started doing the drawings of what we were going to do. I knew the things we should have done better and could develop better, but I listened to my crew, and I listened to my guests, and we made those changes.” “Every employee and every owner has to be an ambassador of their business. If you have negatives, keep them within your own company and figure out how to fix it. Don’t be out there bashing the company.”

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ILLUSTRATION BY HEATHER KANE

“My job is to make every employee look good. So it doesn’t matter how many vow renewals we do on the Branson staircase, there will be a rehearsal backstage [so] that they feel comfortable. My reward is when people come back and they say, ‘God, your crew is unbelievable.’ That didn’t happen by accident.”

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[GIVING BACK]

FOUNDING YEAR:

2015

NUMBER OF BENEFITING ORGANIZATIONS:

200+

MINIMUM GIFT:

$5

INCREASE IN DONATIONS FROM 2015 TO 2016:

20%

NUMBER OF UNIQUE ONLINE DONORS:

Give Ozarks Day is one of the busiest days of the year at the Community Foundation of the Ozarks’ operations center.

Join the Crowd Community Foundation of the Ozarks’ signature fundraiser, Give Ozarks Day, relies on quality partnerships and thoughtful branding.

BY: JULIE SEDENKO DAVIS

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5,500

G

iving is the backbone of Community Foundation of the Ozarks. In its four decades of serving central and southern Missouri, a lot has changed, including how the nonprofit raises money. Louise Knauer, CFO’s senior vice president of communications and marketing, makes it her job to stay relevant in the head-spinning world of crowd-funding. Several years ago, Knauer attended Drury University’s first social media boot camp. It was there she began to envision an online giving day combined with Kickstarter-style campaigns, now known as Give Ozarks Day. The 24-hour fundraiser nets millions of dollars in donations and brings enormous community awareness to local nonprofits. But before that could happen, the project required collabora-

The Community Foundation of the Ozarks members in Marshfield held a town square event in 2015.

tion among several local companies. Knauer networked with classmates and others in the field, eventually hiring The Marlin Company Advertising Agency. “Marlin took us through a discovery and branding process,” she says. “We had to brand the whole thing just like you’d do in a product launch.” With a clear mission established, finding the right platform became the challenge. “We wanted to do online giving but couldn’t find a platform we liked,” Knauer says. “We had to figure out what the toolkit would be, what the nonprofits needed.” Marlin hired web development firm Mostly Serious to create exactly what CFO wanted. The organization started with a projectbased plan in which CFO’s partners could post a project for 45 days and set a goal. Donations in the first year were mainly from acquaintances of the nonprofits involved, but by the second year unique donors had increased by 87 percent and online giving by 74 percent. Now CFO offers $100,000 for Give Ozarks Day endowment challenges. It also raises $100,000 for prizes awarded to agencies for various campaign achievements. The 200plus nonprofits involved cover a spectrum of human needs, animal welfare, education, social services, arts and more. Even though Give Ozarks Day is a fundraiser, Knauer says CFO also hopes it’s a starting point for continued community involvements. Although Knauer never would have predicted it, Give Ozarks Day became a million-dollar project in the first year and has continued that success thanks to careful planning, effective branding and successful collaborations with other local companies. BIZ417.COM

PHOTOS BY AARON J. SCOTT

PHILANTHROPIC PROFILE


[CHART IT ]

BEHIND THE SCREEN Nearly a year into her role as CEO of Big Brothers Big Sisters of the Ozarks, Ashley French is as busy as ever. We caught up with her to peek inside the tool that helps her make it all happen: her new iPhone SE. BY: ROSE MARTHIS

PHOTO COURTESY BIG BROTHERS BIG SISTERS OF THE OZARKS; ILLUSTRATION BY JIM NISSEN

Ashley French

Favorite emojis:

Lock-screen images:

Weekday alarm setting:

ALL FOOD

MY KIDS

5:45 A.M.

App you couldn’t live without:

First app checked in the morning:

GOOGLE MAPS

KINDLE APP

Preferred music app and mostlistened-to genre:

Last app checked before bedtime:

Cities listed in weather and world clock app:

KSPR WEATHER

CUPERTINO, NEW YORK… NO CLUE WHAT THAT MEANS

I HEART RADIO: COUNTRY OR MODERN POP

Favorite fitness app:

FATSECRET

33,905

Number of Contacts:

420

BIZ417.COM

Siri user?

YES

Number of all unread emails

May/June 2017

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1

[WORKSPACE]

THE SOUND OF SOFTWARE As a former musician-turnedsoftware CEO, Phil Reynolds needed a multifunctional home office with equipment that supported his endeavors as CEO and co-founder of BriteCore and as a hobby musician. He and his wife, Chastin, moved into their home two years ago and created an office that showcases professional tools and personal touches. BY: ROSE MARTHIS

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2

1

Phil and Chastin Reynolds spend most of their working time at their home office. Part of why they bought the home was this room, which has tons of natural light and midcentury modern features. The Reynoldses designed the room themselves, and most of the furniture came from Grooms Office Environments when the company moved commercial offices.

2

Phil’s desk setup includes the boom microphone and keyboard for recording music. The equipment is also perfect for recording software demos for clients. Planning for sound in the room was very important, and the sound-absorbing panels help minimize echoes when Phil is recording or on video chats. The speaker system is a professional studio-monitoring system hooked up to a subwoofer, so clients (and sometimes neighbors) have no problems hearing what Phil is playing for them.

3

After graduating college Phil became a professional musician, recording solo acts and playing with bands. He hasn’t put down the guitars just yet and still records music. On the wall sit four of his favorites (pictured in photo 1): from left to right, a limited-edition Taylor 810ce Brazilian Rosewood, a Fender Texas Special Strat, an electric five-string bass and a Taylor custom maple CE model that he’s had for 20 years. BIZ417.COM


4

5

6

7

3

8

PHOTOS BY BRAD ZWEERINK

4

For Father’s Day last year, Chastin gifted Phil a mandolin and a year’s worth of lessons at The Acoustic Shoppe. His guitar playing gave him a good foundation, but he’s still learning the quickness, he says.

5

Phil spends an average of two to four hours a day on video chats with clients. Sometimes he doesn’t have that much warning, so when he needs to quickly look professional he hops over to the closet and throws on a dress shirt. It was Chastin’s idea to keep some of his wardrobe in the office.

BIZ417.COM

6

Phil and Chastin honeymooned in Hawaii and brought a black rock sculpture back with them. This spring they traveled to The Wizarding World of Harry Potter in Orlando with their 10-year-old son, Will, and couldn’t leave without bringing back their own wands. Phil is passing down his love of science and architecture to Will by building model sculptures with him.

7

Phil’s love for science is present in his Audible account and in his Einstein and Darwin figurines. “[These] scientists defied the thinking of those around

them, radically altering the way we think about the world,” he says. “I aspire to bring innovative, disciplined exploration of the truth to my own position.” The guitar is also special to Phil—it was a gift from his close friend Lona, a manager at Newk’s Eatery where he has eaten a salmon Caesar salad for lunch every day for the past four years.

8

Chastin spotted this chair at Centro Modern Furnishings in St. Louis and immediately fell in love. She had to convince Phil to love it, but now it’s a favorite spot for Chastin to do her job as BriteCore’s marketing director and for Phil to strum as he solves problems. Phil admits that the unique shape is perfect for him to sit while holding his guitar, something he does when working through a software issue. “This is where most of BriteCore’s problems get solved,” he says. May/June 2017

57


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S P OT L I G H T S

Business Spotlight

C OX H E A LT H O N - S I T E H E A LT H C A R E F O R YO U R T E A M

AS A BUSINESS LEADER, you already know that a healthy workforce is integral to your company’s success. With the region’s most complete array of workers’ compensation and telehealth services, CoxHealth is your partner in that effort. Have you ever wanted an on-site employee clinic, without the high overhead? DirectConnect makes it possible. Through live, secure, online video consults, DirectConnect brings excellent medical care to your employees, when and where they need it. DirectConnect includes basic care for conditions such as colds or sore throats and wellness coaching on topics you choose—healthy nutrition, weight management and even smoking cessation. And when an employee is hurt on the job, CoxHealth occupational medicine experts are available to immediately assess the injury and identify appropriate care and next steps. It’s all just a few clicks away. With DirectConnect, employees are often able to remain at work, instead of traveling for evaluation and treatment. Would you like to know more? Let’s talk!

417-269-2915 3 3 5 4 S . N AT I O N A L AV E . SPRINGFIELD C OX H E A LT H . C O M

Employee Spotlight

DL MEDIA D I G I TA L M E D I A M A N AG E R Layla Harding 417-725-1816 720 WEST CENTER CIRCLE NIXA DLMEDIA.COM

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May/June 2017

LAYLA HARDING, DL MEDIA’S DIGITAL MEDIA MANAGER, has been with the company for three years but has been a part of the advertising and marketing world almost her entire professional life. During her time with DL Media, she has developed a true passion for the digital world. Online advertising is fast-paced and ever-changing. Layla works constantly to stay ahead of the trends, ensuring the success of our clients’ online campaigns. Her excitement over new Google toys and tools is awesomely nerdy. She is happiest when digging through Analytics and discovering new ways to optimize campaigns. DL Media also utilizes her skills to write radio and television scripts, website content and ad copy. Her first major project was content for drugfreeva. org. This website is a part of a multi-media campaign, Sink or Swim, focusing on drug and alcohol addiction and recovery. She recently completed content for stophomegrownhate.org, an initiative for the state of Virginia addressing domestic extremism, and will soon begin working on communityoftwo.org, a website for suicide prevention. All three campaigns, along with others still in development, are part of an umbrella, One Ocean Drop, which covers vital social issues facing our communities. Layla also has a heart for her community. As a board member for CASA of Southwest Missouri, Layla is Chair for the PR/Development Committee. She also manages the online grant programs for SW MO CASA and Missouri CASA Association. And yes, the dachshunds argue every day over who gets to come to the office with Mom. BIZ417.COM


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S P OT L I G H T S

NOT ALL BANKS ARE THE SAME. One bank stands out for an important reason: its focus on customers. That bank is Great Southern. Great Southern offers long business hours so people can bank when it’s convenient… like after work, instead of during their lunch hour. For even more convenience, Great Southern offers online banking as well as mobile, text and telephone banking services. It’s all about customer convenience. If there’s an easy way to manage money, it’s available to Great Southern customers. That includes more than 100 banking centers in six states and 24-hour access to cash through a large network of ATMs and ITMs (Interactive Teller Machines). Every banking product a person could want is available at Great Southern: deposit accounts, business and consumer loans, home loans and more. Handling these services are experienced professionals who understand that the meaning of customer service is serving the customer. Great Southern cares about its customers and takes the time to actually know them, their families and their needs. Not all banks are the same. Try Great Southern and see why it stands out.

Business Spotlight

G R E AT SOUTHERN BANK C U S TO M E R C O N V E N I E N C E

417-881-7722 1736 EAST SUNSHINE, STE 801 SPRINGFIELD G R E AT S O U T H E R N B A N K . C O M

MED-PAY, INC. IS A TOP CHOICE FOR employers looking to partner to find offerings that bring value to their employees and organization. They are a Third Party Administrator for self-funded benefit plans and a full-service employee benefits broker. The company is locally owned and has spent more than 30 years helping 417-land businesses find successful employee benefit solutions. They represent one of the largest buying markets in southwest Missouri with more than 30,000 covered lives and clients that range from public sector institutions and regional employers to locally owned entrepreneurial businesses. Through Med-Pay’s market knowledge, resources and innovative thinking, they work with these organizations, large and small, to help find the best options at the best value. They help clients build offerings that retain and attract top talent, while managing their costs through various programs. Businesses have the opportunity to receive all of their employee benefit options under one roof right here in Springfield. It is unique for an employee benefits broker to provide self-funded administrative services. This is Med-Pay’s bread and butter, and when coupled with their other services, it results in a company of unrivalled abilities.

BIZ417.COM

Business Spotlight

M E D - PAY, I N C . E M P LOY E E B E N E F I T S

In business since 1984 417-886-6886 1 6 5 0 E . B AT T L E F I E L D R D, S U I T E 3 0 0 SPRINGFIELD M E D - PAY. C O M

May/June 2017

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[THE BIG QUESTION]

Under Pressure High-stress career or not, everyone struggles with feeling overwhelmed. So, how do you tackle your own mounting stress while keeping your employees calm, too?

W

hen Natalie Halverson joined Presbyterian Children’s Homes and Services of Missouri in 2010, she was like many new employees: excited and eager to get to work. Halverson is a foster care case manager. Once children are in state custody, she becomes their legal guardian and works with the kids and their parents to provide support and resources. The ultimate goal is to reunite families, but this can be a long, difficult process. Typically Halverson has 12 to 15 cases, but at times when the office has been busy, that number has grown to 21. Halverson’s enthusiasm led her to start answering work phone calls after hours. “I was on the clock 24 hours a day, and I was ignoring my needs, my family, my friends, you know, not taking care of myself emotionally and finally just had to kind of take a step back,” she says. Halverson isn’t alone. In 2016, 58 percent of Americans reported work was a significant source of stress, according to the American Psychological Association. Stress is associated with negative health effects—such as headaches and feeling anxious, depressed or

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overwhelmed—and decreased productivity, which can end up impacting companies’ bottom lines and profits. In Halverson’s case, she wasn’t the only one losing out from her constant working. “Being there 24/7 for my families and my kids wasn’t helpful,” she says. She notes that her behavior encouraged her clients to depend on her instead of empowering them to solve their own problems. Halverson began limiting herself to only working when she was at the office and picking back up some of the hobbies she previously didn’t have time for. “When I started doing that, I recognized I was better able to do my job here,” Halverson says. Most recently, she joined Rosie to continue connecting with the Springfield community. Whether employees can prioritize their emotional and mental health depends on an office’s culture, Burrell Behavioral Health Psychologist Gary June says. “Does the leadership value mental health?” June says. “Do they model exercises and behavior that [prompt] their employees to take care of themselves? Is the culture conducive to individuals valuing their own sense of well-being?”

June points to the technology sector as an industry that’s leading the way. For example, a former software engineer at Google became the company’s jolly good fellow to promote mindfulness and health after he started practicing mindfulness and meditation. Your office doesn’t have to go that far, but June recommends employers promote break time for employees as well as other activities relating to health and well-being. As for individuals, regular physical activity, a balanced diet, time with friends and family and leisure hobbies like reading or crafting are all good habits to maintain, June says. Stress isn’t always a bad thing, he adds. “Too little stress, we’re not motivated,” June says. “We’re kind of blasé. Too much stress and our performance suffers.” Instead, employers and employees should strive for a range known as optimal stress where people feel they can accomplish tasks and contribute. Adjusting your priorities can be tough. To make it work long term, Halverson suggests making one change each week. Soon enough, you’ll be less stressed and better equipped to get the job done. BIZ417.COM

ILLUSTRATION COURTESY SHUTTERSTOCK

BY: ADRIENNE DONICA


[VANTAGE POINT]

that edge of Battlefield Road, but Little wanted visibility from the highway. “Everyone said I was crazy, but I knew we would make it work,” he says. That’s an example of Little’s business philosophy: “Act, don’t react.” He believes Since the early years of PFI in making bold decisions, and this location Western Store, owner Randy would grow his store. Today, half of its cusLittle has steered his business tomers come from more than 300 miles away. into a Western-wear empire. He also focused on brick-and-mortar while others put their resources online. “Less than BY: JULIANA GOODWIN 9 percent of retail sales are done online, yet Randy Little everyone is flocking in that direction,” Little or a man with no previous retail says. “Technology is changing the industry but experience, Randy Little hasn’t done it takes a big wheel to make a circle.” Although too bad. Perched on the edge of U.S. PFI has a strong internet presence, Little 65 and Battlefield is the headquarters of his believes customers still want to feel, smell and 50,000-square-foot, multi-million dollar touch boots before they buy, so the company Western-wear retail empire. Little built his strives to offer top-notch customer service and company by watching customer demand, variety with 15,000 styles of boots. “You can’t making bold decisions and relying on innovahave an experience online that you get in this tive marketing techniques. store,” he says. The business started Instead of following with five partners in 1975 traditional advertisas Preferred Farmers Ining methods, Little corporated, a feed and farm created his own. In supply store in northwest 2002, he brought the Springfield. When the PBR Extreme Nationadjoining Western clothing als Professional Bull store was for sale, they —Randy Little Ride to Springfield. bought it, and the clothes In conjunction, Little Owner of PFI Western Store were included in the deal. hosts a mega concert, The idea was to sell off the clothes and then Party in the Parking Lot, and donates the expand the feed store, but as clothes flew off proceed to charities. PFI also sponsors Larry’s the shelves, Little quickly came to a realizaCountry Diner, a show broadcast on RFD-TV tion. “I needed to be in the ‘want’ business, that reaches 1.3 million people. But Little is not the ‘need’ business,” he says. So instead, not just a logo or tag line after the credits; the partners restocked the Western wear and he appears on screen branding the exclusive eventually renamed it PFI Western Store. Boot Daddy line. He continues to expand In the early 1980s, Little became sole owner private labels and reinforce brand recognition with his wife, Johnelle, serving as lead buyer. with items like moonshine and jam. “I don’t In 1993, he decided to relocate the store off consider us an ordinary retailer,” he says. “I U.S. 65. At that time, there was nothing on consider us a marketing Western store.”

ACT, DON’T REACT

F

‘‘

PHOTOS COURTESY OF RANDY LITTLE, NORTHERN SUMMIT, BY CHRIS BROWN; ILLUSTRATIONS COURTESY SHUTTERSTOCK

I needed to be in the ‘want’ business, not the ‘need’ business.”

[HOW-TO]

V FOR VPN-DETTA Working remotely has never been easier thanks to a plenitude of cloud programs, but a secure virtual private network connection offers even more benefits. BY: ADRIENNE DONICA

Think about a VPN as a tunnel between only your computer and the rest of the internet, says Josh Bates, vice president of service delivery at Northern Summit Technology. Security is a main advantage of adding a VPN to your company’s technology suite, but it’s not the only one. “It gives you the benefit of being able to work from home and still access the files that you would access at your office,” Bates says. Here’s what you need to know to be work-from-home friendly. ADD A WALL Before you fire up your remote connection, Bates says you’ll need a VPN-capable hardware firewall with good security. Most firewalls also come with an agent, another key part of the process. Agents require users to input credentials before giving them access to a secure connection. SPEED IT UP Because VPNs work via the web, computers requesting a connection must have internet access. Most consumer-grade bandwidths should be fine, Bates says, unless your work involves large data. Coffee shop Wi-Fi bringing down your productivity? Head somewhere with fewer people on the network. LAY GROUND RULES Share terms of use with your employees. Bates recommends tracking activity to protect company data from any disgruntled employees. Although it’s hard to enforce, requiring employees to download anti-virus and firewall software can also keep your network virus-free. EXPAND EASILY Companies with multiple locations can connect securely using a site-to-site VPN. The only difference in this type of VPN is that each location will need its own hardware firewall.

The PFI Western Store is at the edge of Battlefield Road. BIZ417.COM

Josh Bates May/June 2017

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Mark Moore will soon split ownership of G.L. Moore Tire Pros & Automotive Inc. with his daughter, Whitney Moore.

[NEXT GEN]

Taking the Wheel After more than four decades in business, G.L. Moore Tire Pros & Automotive Inc. is ushering in a third generation of leadership. At 33 years old, Whitney Moore prepares to become coowner in a male-dominated industry.

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hitney Moore describes herself as determined, passionate and ambitious—three traits that are a must for a female leader trying to make a name for herself in the male-dominated, nononsense automotive industry. Moore is office manager at G.L. Moore Tire Pros & Automotive Inc., a family-run company serving the Ozarks since 1971. Her dad, Mark, inherited the business from his aunt and uncle Sandy and Gary “G.L.” Moore, and soon he will split ownership of the business with Whitney, eventually leaving her in the driver’s seat. “I don’t know that it was necessarily ever a plan for me to be an owner,” Whitney says. “My parents never wanted to force the shop and business on me. They wanted me to want it.” After more than a decade of mentorship from Mark, she is prepared and excited about the transition but admits there is some pressure to uphold the legacy her family has established. When she first joined the company, Whitney was a 19-year-old working her way through the criminal justice program at Missouri State

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University and, like most college students, needed some extra cash. She took a part-time job doing odds and ends around the shop. Answering phones turned into answering payroll questions, and soon she was the go-to person for all things business related. “At the time, there weren’t a lot of females in the industry, and I liked that challenge a little bit,” she says. “Having that level of trust and responsibility that was given to me gave me confidence in myself.” By 2003, Whitney was thriving as office manager and had switched her major to business, intent on learning all she could about how to run a successful company. Her dad was now her mentor, grooming her for the transition to upper management. “I knew what it was going to take to get there,” Mark says. “Whether she agreed with my decisions or not, we were good. I’m not saying my way was always the right way, but I’m really good at what I do. I believe that. And I think she saw that.” Whitney says her relationship with her dad is built on respect, and although it’s sometimes hard to put their personal connection aside, BIZ417.COM

PHOTOS BY BRAD ZWEERINK

BY: JENNIFER ADAMSON


‘‘

My parents never wanted to force the shop and business on me. They wanted me to want it.” —Whitney Moore, Office Manager at G.L. Moore Tire Pros & Automotive Inc.

she’s learned to accept his criticism and advice and suggests other next generation leaders follow her example. “It’s kind of setting that ego aside for the betterment of the company,” she says. “You know, letting him be right sometimes, stepping back and understanding he knows what he’s talking about. That patience gives me a broader perspective that comes from some perspective he has that I haven’t learned yet.” But as more of the workload gets handed down, she is finding a balance between doing things her dad’s way and implementing her own ideas, such as giving customers access to tablets so they can see different types of tires in action. “You can’t be scared to make it your own, but at the same time, you can’t discount the generations before,” she says. In turn, her dad is moving into the passenger lane and giving her room to charge ahead full speed. Now, there’s a lot riding on her shoulders. The fear of tarnishing the company’s reputation is real as she strives to prove she’s more than just the boss’s daughter. “There’s a lot of pressure with employees and coworkers,” Whitney says. “I didn’t get a lot of respect when I first started, but now I think I’ve earned it. I definitely credit that to my parents and my upbringing. I have a strong work ethic, determination, knowledge, education, experience.” Mark agrees. “She’s got a drive in her, and that’s what I gained from [my] dad and Gary, a drive to be as best as you can be,” he says. “Statistics go that the third generation is always the one that seems to take the business in the wrong way, but I can’t see her failing for any reason.”

Bryan Seagraves mounts a tire on a wheel in the automotive shop.

BIZ417.COM

Wheel weights are used to balance tires for customers who need repairs or rotations.

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“Nonprofit is a tax status not a business plan.” —Marla Calico, President and CEO of the International Association of Fairs and Expositions

SEE PAGE 84 EVERYWHERE YOU NEED TO BE

PHOTO BY BRAD ZWEERINK

Caleb Arthur celebrates the newest and best in tech, like virtual reality, at Biz 417 ’s Excellence in Technology Awards.

CALENDAR

SCENE

66 Network 69 Learn

72 Excellence in Technology Awards 78 Springfield Creatives Women’s Panel 80 The Network March Social 74 Good Morning Branson 76 When Humans Become Resources 82 2017 Health Care Outlook

BIZ417.COM

84 B-School Breakfast Series 88 Downtime

May/June 2017

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NETWORK

SPONSORED EVENT

SMALL BUSINESS WEEK

Celebrate local small businesses during Springfield Small Business Week. The week includes several events including a kickoff breakfast on Monday and the Springfield Area Chamber of Commerce’s 25th annual Small Business Award luncheon on Wednesday. When: May 1–5 Where: Locations vary Cost: Prices vary More Information: 417-837-2600 or springfieldsmallbusinesweek.com 8:30–10 a.m., Wednesdays

1 MILLION CUPS

Local entrepreneurs are energizing the community. Keep your finger on the pulse of their sprouting businesses and innovative ideas at this weekly programming event. Free; Springfield Art Museum, 1111 E. Brookside Drive, Springfield; visit 1mcsgf.com for more info THE IN PARTY

Mix and mingle in Springfield’s living room at this weekly event featuring live music from local musicians and half-price happy hour specials. When: 5–7 p.m.,Wednesdays Where: Hotel Vandivort, 305 E. Walnut St., Springfield Cost: Free More Information: 417-832-1515 SPONSORED EVENT

SPONSORED EVENT

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SPIN66 INNOVATION SUMMIT 2017

Get ready for a day full of innovative solutions, expert knowledge and a whole lot of coffee. SPIN66 features three keynote speakers, a startup panel, the ever-competitive pitch pit in which five young startups compete for the $10,000 grand prize and more. When: Kickoff party May 4, 6 p.m.; main event May 5, 9 a.m. Where: The eFactory, 405 N. Jefferson Ave., Springfield May/June 2017

Cost: $95, $25 for students More Information: spin66.org 7–8 a.m., Friday, May 5 and June 2

FIRST FRIDAY COFFEE

The Ozark Chamber of Commerce hosts a monthly meetand-greet for its members. Enjoy a cup of joe, and get to know other businesspeople. Drop in for a few minutes or stay for the whole hour. Free for chamber members, Ozark residents and Ozark businesses; location varies; for location and other information, call 417-581-6139 or visit ozarkchamber.com GIVE OZARKS DAY

Do your part to make SPONSORED EVENT Give Ozarks Day the most charitable 24 hours in 417-land. Now in its third year, the fundraising event has 250 participating organizations. Show your support to one or more of those without even leaving your desk. Visit giveozarks.org to contribute. When: Tuesday, May 9 Minimum donation: $5 More Information: 417-864-6199 or giveozarks.org 11:30 a.m.–1 p.m., Tuesday, May 9 and June 13

GENERAL MEMBERSHIP LUNCHEON

Join the Nixa Chamber of Commerce for lunch, networking and an update on the Chamber’s activities, progress and events. $12–15 for members, $20 for nonmembers; The Bridge, 308 W. Mt. Vernon St., Nixa; for more info, call 417-725-1545 or visit business. nixachamber.com/events 7:30–8:30 a.m., Thursday, May 11 and June 1

GOOD MORNING, SPRINGFIELD!

Knock out some networking before the day really begins at the Springfield Area Chamber of Commerce’s monthly breakfast event. Hear the latest news from BIZ417.COM


Morning Event

Lunch Event

the city, county and chamber. $20 for members, $25 for nonmembers; location varies; for location and other information, call 417-862-5567 or visit springfieldchamber.com 5–7 p.m., Thursday, May 11 and June 8

BUSINESS AFTER HOURS

Take a break from the day-today to rub elbows with other Springfield Area Chamber of Commerce members at this monthly happy hour. $5 for members, $15 for nonmembers; location varies; for location and other information, call 417-862-5567 or visit springfieldchamber.com

SPONSORED EVENT

SPRINGFIELD CREATIVES HAPPY HOUR

Each month, Springfield Creatives members head to Scotch & Soda for networking and happy hour specials to connect and share strategies and insider tips. When: 5:30–9 p.m., Thursday, May 11 and June 8 Where: Scotch & Soda, 310 South Ave., Springfield Cost: Free More Information: springfieldcreatives.com 11:30 a.m.–1 p.m., Tuesday, May 16 and June 20

WORKING WOMEN IN NIXA LUNCHEON

Business advice often means most from someone who has been in your shoes. Enjoy lunch while meeting other businesswomen at this monthly event hosted by the Nixa Area Chamber of Commerce, featuring speakers, lunch and networking. $12–15 for members, $20 for nonmembers; The Bridge, 308 W. Mt. Vernon St., Nixa; for more info, call 417-725-1545 or visit business. nixachamber.com/events ROSIE MAY EVENT SPONSORED EVENT

BIZ417.COM

Meet up with other

Evening Event

All Day

boss ladies at this Rosie event. Designed to provide a network and resources to Springfield’s businesswomen, Rosie meets quarterly to foster connections in the community. When: 4–6 p.m., Tuesday, May 16 Where: Location TBD Cost: Free for members More Information: rosiesgf.com 5:30–7 p.m., Tuesday, May 16 and June 20

TIE TUESDAY AFTER HOURS

The Ozark Chamber of Commerce invites the local business community to Take It Easy at this laid-back networking event held every month. Don’t forget your business cards! Free for members, Ozark residents and Ozark businesses; location varies; for location and other information, call 417-581-6139 or visit ozarkchamber.com 11:30 a.m.–1 p.m., Wednesday, May 17 and June 21

AITP LUNCH MEETING

Step away from your computers for networking and updates from the Association of IT Professionals of the Ozarks. The May event features a panel discussion about software and development. Free to members and guests with registration, $18 lunch for guests; Hilton Garden Inn, 4155 S. Nature Center Way, Springfield; for more info and details about the June meeting, visit aitpspringfield.org 4–5 p.m., Thursday, May 18 and June 15

SIX DEGREES OF NETWORKING

Mix and mingle at this dynamic, high-energy event hosted by the Nixa Chamber of Commerce and hear from featured speakers and career coaches or participate in a networking activity each month. This event is open to the public. Free; Nixa Area Chamber of Commerce, 106 W. Sherman Way, Suite 6, Nixa; for more information, call 417-725-1545 or visit business. nixachamber.com/events May/June 2017

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n u F p u o r G

5–6:30 p.m., Thursday, May 18

BUSINESS AFTER HOURS

Break out your business cards at this Branson/Lakes Area Chamber of Commerce event. Chat with other chamber and community members, who might be future clients or confidants. $10 for members, $15 for nonmembers; Ancient Ozarks Natural History Museum, 190 Top of the Rock Road, Ridgedale; for more information, call 417-334-4084 or visit bransonchamber.com 8–9 a.m., Friday, May 19 and June 16

COLLABORATION COFFEE

Share ideas, troubleshoot challenges and more with the Ozark Chamber of Commerce, the Carl G. Hefner Enterprise Center and other business owners at this monthly roundtable series. Free with registration; Ozark Chamber of Commerce, 1471 W. South St., Ozark; for more information, call 417-581-6139 or visit ozarkchamber.com 7:30–9 a.m., Tuesday, May 23

BRANSON BUSINESS BREAKFAST: OUR GENERATIONAL WORKFORCE

Conversations about millennials in the workplace might be so last year, but generational differences between employees will always be relevant. Keynote Speaker Libby Spears discusses how to improve communication in your office at this Branson/Lakes Area Chamber of Commerce event. $35 for members, $50 for nonmembers; Chateau on the Lake Resort Spa & Convention Center, 415 N. State Highway 265, Branson; for more information, call 417-334-4084 or visit bransonchamber.com LEARN MORE AT

1127 E. Battlefield Rd. | 417.883.1234

andybspringfield.com Restaurant/Bar | Luxury Bowling | Laser Tag Elite Arcade | Meeting Space | High Energy Music

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11:30 a.m.–1 p.m., Tuesday, May 23 and June 27

XMIN LUNCHEON (EXCEPTIONAL BUSINESSMEN IN NIXA)

This Nixa Area Chamber of

Commerce event is catered toward businessmen looking to build long-term relationships with business owners in a variety of industries and fields. Join the XMIN for lunch, networking and a roundtable discussion. $12–15 for members, $20 for nonmembers; Nixa Area Chamber of Commerce, 106 W. Sherman Way, Suite 6, Nixa; for more information, call 417-725-1545 or visit business. nixachamber.com/events 11:30 a.m.–1 p.m., Thursday, May 25 and June 22

GOOD AFTERNOON OZARK

Being successful means staying current. Get updates from the Ozark Chamber of Commerce and other city entities while networking with fellow chamber members at this monthly luncheon. $12 in advance, $17 day of, free for first-time guests; Ozark Community Center, 1530 W. Jackson St., Ozark; for more information, call 417-5816139 or visit ozarkchamber.com 7:30–9 a.m., Friday, May 26 and June 23

CHAMBER COFFEE CONNEXION

Re-energize your morning with a jolt of coffee and valuable networking with Nixa Chamber of Commerce members at this monthly meet-up. Chamber membership is required to attend. Free for members; location varies; for location and other information, call 417-725-1545 or visit business. nixachamber.com/events 6–7:30 p.m., Tuesday, June 6

MANUFACTURER’S ROUNDTABLE

Join the Ozarks Small Business Incubator and local manufacturers for an evening of networking, idea sharing and troubleshooting. Free, dinner provided; Ozarks Small Business Incubator, 408 Washington Ave., West Plains; for more info, call 417-256-9724 or visit ozsbi.com BIZ417.COM


Morning Event

Lunch Event

6–9 p.m., Friday, June 9

417

TIX

SUMMER FEST

Springfield young professionals, get ready to party like it’s 1999 at this year’s Summer Fest hosted by The Network and the City of Springfield. Enjoy food, drinks, entertainment from The Mixtapes and fun. Must be 21 or older to attend. $30, includes two drinks; Farmers Park Pavilion, 2144 E. Republic Road, Springfield; for more information, call 417-862-5567 7:30–8:30 a.m., Thursday, June 15

GOOD MORNING BRANSON

Join the Branson/Lakes Area Chamber of Commerce for Good Morning Branson. Get updates from regional stakeholders at this quarterly event. $10 for members, $15 for nonmembers; Branson Public School District Office, 1756 Bee Creek Road, Branson; for more information, call 417-334-4084 or visit bransonchamber.com 5–7 p.m., Thursday, June 29

SOCIAL & LIVE COOKING DEMONSTRATION WITH CHEF TONY GARCIA

The Network’s June Social is packed with activities. Watch as chef Tony Garcia from Avanzare prepares dishes, enjoy complimentary drinks and enter to win prizes, all while getting to know other young professionals in the community. Free; Metro Appliances & More, 3253 N. Glenstone Ave., Springfield; for more information, call 417-862-5567 LEARN Ongoing

SMALL BUSINESS & TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT CENTER COURSES

Take advantage of the Small Business & Technology Development Center’s training BIZ417.COM

Evening Event

All Day

courses and seminars created with small business owners and hopefuls in mind. Class times and prices vary. Topics include financial business basics, predicting your company’s cash needs, how to get noticed on Google and more. Prices vary by class; The eFactory, 405 N. Jefferson Ave., Springfield; for more information, call 417-837-2615 or visit sbtdc.missouristate.edu Ongoing

MANAGEMENT DEVELOPMENT INSTITUTE TRAINING PROGRAMS

Get a leg up in business with an array of certificate and training programs offered by the Missouri State Management Development Institute. Housed in The eFactory, the MDI offers a range of courses on administrative and HR training, management and supervisory tactics and more. $209 per seminar; The eFactory, 405 N. Jefferson Ave., Springfield; for more information, call 417-837-2615 or visit mdi.missouristate.edu 8:30 a.m.–3:30 p.m., Wednesday, May 3, May 10 and May 17

QUICKBOOKS PRO COURSES

Learn QuickBooks basics and more advanced techniques at three courses hosted by OTC’s Center for Workforce Development. $150–160; for location and more information, visit workforce.otc.edu/ professional-development 2–4 p.m., every other Wednesday

LEGAL OFFICE HOURS

When legal questions or troubles arise, don’t stress over the legalese. Instead, drop by The eFactory every other Wednesday for a free legal consultation with Amanda Tummons, a partner at Husch Blackwell with an industry focus on technology, manufacturing and transportation. Free with registration; The eFactory, 405 N. Jefferson Ave., Springfield; for details, call 417-837-2600 or visit efactory.missouristate.edu/events May/June 2017

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7:30 a.m.–3:30 p.m., Friday, May 5

LEADERCAST 2017

Tune into the annual Leadership Live broadcast with the Nixa Area Chamber of Commerce. The conference theme is Powered by Purpose, and speakers discuss a broad range of leadership topics. $75, $65 per ticket for groups of five or more; The Bridge, 308 W. Mt. Vernon, Nixa; for more information, call 417-725-1545 or visit business. nixachamber.com/events 6–9 p.m., Wednesday and Thursday, May 10–11 and June 7–8

THE SUCCESSFUL BUSINESS: PLANNING & FUNDING

Kickstart your business with this two-day course hosted every month by the Small Business & Technology Development Center at Missouri State University. You will learn how to create a sustainable business plan and secure funding. $139; The eFactory, 405 N. Jefferson Ave., Springfield; call 417-837-2615 or visit sbtdc.missouristate.edu for more info 1:30–2:30 p.m., Wednesday, May 17 and June 21

AITP SHOP TALK GROUP

Get input and advice from other managers, owners and executives facing business decisions and operations in the technology field at this monthly meetup of the Association of IT Professionals of the Ozarks. The event coincides with the AITP lunch meeting. Free to members and guests with registration; Hilton Garden Inn, 4155 S. Nature Center Way, Springfield; for more information, visit aitpspringfield.org

SPONSORED EVENT

SPRINGFIELD CREATIVES MONTHLY MEETING

Get in touch with other creative types at the monthly meeting of Springfield Creatives, which incorporates useful activities and presentations from notable

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community members. When: 6 p.m., Wednesday, May 17 and June 21 Where: Location varies Cost: Free for members More Information: springfieldcreatives.com 11:30 a.m.–1 p.m., Thursday, May 18

DIVERSITY & INCLUSION PANEL

Panelists at this event hosted by The Network unpack diversity and inclusion efforts in the workplace and across the city of Springfield. Don’t miss this engaging dialogue. Free; Springfield Area Chamber of Commerce, 202 S. John Q. Hammons Parkway, Springfield; for more information, call 417-862-5567 Noon–1 p.m., Thursday, May 18

LUNCH & LEARN: PROTECT WHAT MATTERS MOST

Learn how an AirMedCare Network membership helps save lives during a medical emergency at this event hosted by the Ozarks Small Business Incubator. Free (lunch provided); Ozarks Small Business Incubator, 408 Washington Ave., West Plains; for more information, call 417-256-9724 or visit ozsbi.com 4–5:30 p.m., Thursday, May 18 and June 15

MATA IDEA MASHUP

The Mid-America Technology Alliance presents a monthly happy hour centered on panel discussions on technology with an eye toward retaining and attracting a strong tech workforce. Beverages and food provided. Prices vary; The eFactory, 405 N. Jefferson Ave., Springfield; for more information, call Sherry Coker at 417-343-3017 or visit matasgf.com 7:30–9:30 a.m., Friday, May 19 and June 16

LEADERSHIP MASTERMIND

People Centric Consulting Group gathers organizational BIZ417.COM


Morning Event

Lunch Event

leaders each month for a strategic breakdown of ways to manage and lead effectively. Join speaker Don Harkey and local leaders for dynamic presentations, engaging discussions and breakfast. In May, learn how to keep your team moving in the right direction despite turnover or bad company breakups. $89 per session or $890 for the year; 425 Downtown, 425 W. Walnut St., Springfield; for more information and details about the June event, call 417-887-6760 or visit 417tix.com 4–5:30 p.m., Tuesday, May 23

MEMBER HUDDLE

Get the most out of your Springfield Area Chamber of Commerce membership by learning new opportunities and benefits. Don’t forget to bring your business cards for the networking mixer. Free; Springfield Area Chamber of Commerce, 202 S. John Q. Hammons Parkway, Springfield; for more information, call 417-862-5567 or visit springfieldchamber.com 4–5:30 p.m., Wednesday, May 24

CRAFTING A SHARED VISION FOR SPRINGFIELD’S FUTURE

Where will Springfield be in five or 10 years? That’s the focus of this discussion hosted by The Network. Learn about the Springfield Area Chamber of Commerce’s community visioning process and how you can help. Free; location TBD; for more information, call 417-862-5567

Evening Event

All Day

business.nixachamber.com/events or call 417-725-1545 11:30 a.m.–1 p.m., Tuesday, June 6

THE ASSOCIATION FOR WOMEN IN COMMUNICATIONS LUNCHEON

The Association for Women in Communications features a monthly speaker focusing on trends and tips to increase to help further the careers of attendees. $15 for members, $14 for student members, $25 for returning guests, free for first-time guests; 425 Downtown, 425 W. Walnut St., Springfield; for details, visit awcspringfieldmo.org

SPONSORED EVENT

B-SCHOOL BREAKFAST SERIES: IT’S NOT THEM. IT’S YOU.

Breakfast is served with a side of expertise from local hiring masters. Discover how to capitalize on your company’s strengths to attract, train and retain valuable employees now. When: 7:30–9 a.m., Thursday, June 8 Where: Andy B’s Entertainment Center, 1127 E. Battlefield, Springfield Cost: $15 in May, $20 in June More Information: 417-883-7417 or biz417.com/bschool

10–10:45 a.m., Thursday, May 25 and June 22

MEMBER BRIEFING AND ORIENTATION

Learn the ins and outs of the Nixa Chamber of Commerce and hear about how to get the most out of your membership. Free with reservation; Nixa Area Chamber of Commerce, 106 W. Sherman Way, Suite 6, Nixa; for more information, go online to BIZ417.COM

FOR MORE EVENTS, CHECK OUT THE FULL CALENDAR AT BIZ417.COM. May/June 2017

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Biz 417’s Excellence in Technology Awards presented by AITP

Ben and Izzy Clayton

Guests enjoyed pre-ceremony drinks and dinner at The Old Glass Place.

Ken Thrasher and Julie Oziah look over the Tesla Model S.

Convoy of Hope accepts the Best Use of A/V award.

Jeff Jenkins delighted the audience while emceeing the award show.

The inaugural event honored 417-land’s top tech innovators.

Myke Bates, Jason Arend, Amber Drysdale and Shawna Baron PHOTOS BY BRAD ZWEERINK

Derek Smith, Ashley O’Reilly and Trip Rhodes

Event Info: DATE: March 2, 2017 | LOCATION: The Old Glass Place | SPEAKERS: Jeff Jenkins, Jason Klein | WEBSITE: biz417.com/excellence

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STRUGGLING TO T GAIN TRAC A TION AC ONLINE?

We all understand the importance of being on page one of Google search results, yet many of us struggle to get there. 417 Marketing utilizes a proven method to help clients dominate search results, maximize traffic and generate qualified leads. When looking for an SEO, I wanted to find a full-service firm that I could rely on for all aspects of SEO, including keyword strategy, technical website optimization, visibility, conversion tracking, and more. I needed a partner that I could trust to do the right thing and make wise recommendations for the benefit of my business.

417 MARKETING HAS EXCEEDED MY EXPECTATIONS. I FOUND MY PARTNER. JAY SANDIDGE

INTERNATIONAL MARKETING DIRECTOR, POSITRONIC

417 MARKETING HAS DONE SUCH AN AMAZING JOB WITH OUR SEO CAMPAIGN! They are pleasant, efficient, and fast! We love working with them!

CHERYL BRIGGS

OWNER, DERMAHEALTH

417 MARKETING IS BY FAR THE BEST SEO COMPANY I HAVE WORKED WITH.

I tried three other companies over the past five years, and 417 Marketing blows them all away. I wish I would have found them sooner.

417 Marketing has done everything they said they would do and more when it comes to increasing visibility, traffic, and conversions with our website, hitandruncandlesticks.com.

I CAN'T EVEN BEGIN TO EXPLAIN HOW EASY THEY ARE TO WORK WITH. THEY DO EXACTLY WHAT THEY SAY THEY WILL DO. RICK SADDLER

PRESIDENT, HIT & RUN CANDLESTICKS

PATRICK PRUTSMAN

OWNER, SOUND RELIEF HEARING CENTER

417 Marketing has been providing world-class SEO services since 2010 and knows what it takes to get you results.

CALL OR VISIT US ONLINE TO SCHEDULE A FREE CONSULTATION.

417.889.0044 417MARKETING.COM


[THE SCENE]

Good Morning Branson

Branson Public Schools Superintendent Brad Swofford

Patti Brinegar, Jay Brinegar and Kevin McConnell

Jenna Malinen and Clint Cross

Dan Lennon speaks at the Good Morning Branson breakfast.

Dan Lennon shares his insights on strategic tourism marketing with the crowd.

(Clockwise from back left) Erika Jernigan, Mya Cramer, Deborah Cohen, Yvonne Long, Liz Mabe, Olivia Bippert and Kristiana Wajnblom

Branson City Administrator Bill Malinen PHOTOS BY BRAD ZWEERINK

Dan Lennon, director of the Missouri Division of Tourism, talks with Branson City Administrator Bill Malinen.

Event Info: DATE: March 16, 2017 | LOCATION: Fritz’s Adventure | SPEAKER: Dan Lennon | WEBSITE: bransonchamber.com

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When Humans Become Resources

Attendees learn how to leverage strategic planning and management strategies to build sustainable profits.

Amanda Corcoran and Mailyn Knight

Brandon Lee and Brad Lawing

Stacye Perriman, Alexis Bundy and Robin Horton

Phil Brandt with AAIM Employers’ Association shares his insights.

Lori Ruzicka and Carol Williams

Denise Nickles and Jeremy Lee PHOTOS BY BRAD ZWEERINK

Madi Giesler, Megan Short and Alex Greiwe

Event Info: DATE: March 16, 2017 | LOCATION: DoubleTree by Hilton Hotel Springfield | SPEAKER: Phil Brandt | WEBSITE: sahramo.org

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Like all of us at SFC, he’s dedicated to continuing our success—and yours.

BIZ417.COM

May/June 2017

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Springfield Creatives Presents: A Women’s Panel

Jennifer Jester and Rachel Anderson

Crystal Moody, Brittany Bilyeu and Kendra Miller

Carl Glasemeyer and Catherine Whitaker

“We can only do so much as an employer or as a company to create a culture of inclusion. It’s a community task.” —Sheri Austin, Executive Vice President/

General Manager of Marlin Network

Summer Trottier, Sheri Austin, Maranda Provance, Katie Canada, Jessica Pearson and Jennifer Jester were the five panelists at the event.

Emma Allman and Sarah Forgey

Cole Lawrence and Sheri Austin

PHOTOS BY BRAD ZWEERINK

Nick Warnock, Vincent Nolden and Nathan Gregg

Event Info: DATE: March 22, 2017 | LOCATION: The eFactory | SPEAKERS: Jennifer Jester, Katie Canada, Maranda Provance, Sheri Austin, Summer Trottier, Rachel Anderson | WEBSITE: springfieldcreatives.com

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[THE SCENE]

The Network’s March Social

Jason Klein and Nick Menke

The Network members were able to enjoy a few frames of bowling at the quarterly social.

Nick Menke was one of The Network members who came out to Andy B’s.

Destiny Minor, Taylor Wells and Aaron Dimatulac

Daniel Senn bowls during The Network’s March Social.

Megan Short, Jason Klein and Justin Coyan

Destiny Minor and Shauna Mitchell PHOTOS BY BRAD ZWEERINK

Jennifer Ashley, Jackie Haldiman and Alex Haldiman

Event Info: DATE: March 28, 2017 | LOCATION: Andy B’s Entertainment Center | WEBSITE: springfieldchamber.com

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[THE SCENE]

2017 Health Care Outlook

Anita Michel, Cynthia Collins and Jill Wiggins

Attendees listen to local experts highlight the health care industry trends and innovation in Springfield.

Jerry Gardner and Rob Cavagnol

“We know that 85 percent of our graduates are going to stay local, and that’s a big win for all of us.” —Michelle Howard, Director of OTC’s Allied

Health Simulation Center

Josh Sapp and Travis Tindall

Matt Morrow, Jennifer McNay, Michelle Howard, Scott Rogers and Kelly Quigg discuss the state of health care in 417-land and what the community can expect in the future.

Brad Erwin, Eric Fawcett and Josh Reich

Beth Keeling and Dori Grinder

Event Info: DATE: March 29, 2017 | LOCATION: White River Conference Center | SPEAKERS: Michelle Howard, Scott Rogers, Jennifer McNay, Kelly Quigg, Matt Morrow | WEBSITE: springfieldchamber.com

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PHOTOS BY BRAD ZWEERINK

Jennifer McNay, Michelle Howard and Scott Rogers take part in a panel discussion.


Standing the test of time Quality Products Since 1988

1364 N Kelly Ave Nixa MO 65714

417-725-TILE uniquetile.com

BIZ417.COM

May/June 2017

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[THE SCENE]

B-School Breakfast Series

Jennifer Corbett, Elle Feldman and Maria Neider

Biz 417 ’s 2017 Women Who Mean Business are Marla Calico, Crista Hogan, Elle Feldman and Robin Robeson.

Jessica Birchem-Isley and Leslie Yearta-Brown

Antoinette Shields and Jerilyn Osborn

Robin Robeson shares her experience with the crowd.

Marla Calico discussed how to motivate your team during the event.

Bridgette Robles and Laura Whisler

Event Info: DATE: April 13, 2017 | LOCATION: Andy B’s Entertainment Center | SPEAKERS: Crista Hogan, Marla Calico, Robin Robeson, Elle Feldman, Adrienne Donica WEBSITE: biz417.com/bschool

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PHOTOS BY BRAD ZWEERINK

Crista Hogan, one of Biz 417 ’s Women Who Mean Business


UNIFIED WORKFORCE

MANAGEMENT in the palm of your hand. Real Time Visibility & Data Access

Accrual & Absence Management

Payroll Human Resources Affordable Care Act

Time & Attendance Marketplace

www.apluspayroll.com • 417-890-6404

CLUB MANAGEMENT SERVICES C O M P L E T E A S S O C I AT I O N S O L U T I O N S

Don’t get tangled up.

We’ll manage the details so you can get back to business.

It takes a lot to run your association. Let us manage the details, giving you the freedom to focus on the big picture. We can help. After all, your mission is our passion.

www.clubmanagementservices.com

417.886.8606 - 1717 E. Republic Rd., Ste. A, Springfield, MO BIZ417.COM

May/June 2017

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B-School Breakfast Series

Reth Yim and Rick Vanlent from Elite Mercedes

Marla Calico and Lindsay Haymes

Steve Siever, Rebekah Lee and Kate Turner

“I’ve known my whole life that you have to be the person to put your hand out first. You have to be the person to introduce yourself because if you don’t, it’s probably not going to happen.” —Robin Robeson, Executive Vice President and Chief

Operating Officer at Guaranty Bank

Attendees listen to the 2017 Women Who Mean Business honorees share their experiences.

Larry Askren, Stan Krempges and David Pomerenke

Lacy Martin and Stephanie Murphy PHOTOS BY BRAD ZWEERINK

Kelsey Holman and Mark Speake from Essential Strategies

Join Us Next Time: DATE: June 8, 2017 | LOCATION: Andy B’s Entertainment Center | TOPIC: It’s Not Them. It’s You. | TICKETS: biz417.com/bschool

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PHOTO BY BRANDON ALMS

DOWNTIME

A CUT ABOVE

The water jet and routing machines Larry Askren uses in his business, Advanced Fabrication Technologies, are the same tools he relies on for his own creative projects. He has made church icons, park signs, engravings and more, but one of his favorite projects is making art tangible. Askren’s half-tone engravings print photographs in the same style of newspaper photos. Up close, the engravings are a series of dots in paint or wood finishes. Farther away, the portraits and landscapes come to life.

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NOW HIRING!

A Bluegreen / Big Cedar Vacations, LLC Development Project

MEP Engineer:

HP Engineering, Inc. Phone: 479-899-6370

Geotechnical:

Palmerton & Parrish, Inc. Phone: 417-864-6000

Interior Desig

Company -6897

Structural Engineer:

Wells & Scaletty Phone: 417-890-7711

Landscape Architect:

SWT Design Phone: 314-644-5700

Graphics:

er Engineering -9697

NO W HIRIN G EXPERIENCE D PR OJE C T MA NA GE R S & S U P E R INT E NDE NT S Surveyor: Wolfe Surveying, Inc. Phone: 417-334-8820

-2065

BU I L D ING TRU ST SINCE 1 978. 4820 N TOWNE CENTRE DR | O ZARK, MO 65721 | PHONE: 417-887-6897 | FAX: 417-447-3040 | WWW.LSCINC.COM


MAY / JUNE 2017 | $4.95

05 2111 S. Eastgate Ave. Springfield, MO 65809

0

74470 29349

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VOLUME 2 ISSUE 4

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May/June 2017 Biz417  

May/June 2017 Biz417  

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