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Experience it!

WE’RE BRINGING THE BAYOU CITY TO LIFE WITH AUGMENTED REALITY. WHEN YOU DOWNLOAD ONE QUICK, FREE APP, THESE PAGES COME TO LIFE ON YOUR MOBILE DEVICE. HERE’S WHAT YOU NEED TO INTERACT WITH BAYOU CITY MAGAZINE:

1 download the free layar app.

2 look for pages with the bayou city now + icons.

3 open the layar app, hold the phone over the entire page and tap to scan.

4 shop, share and experience.

try it now!

SCAN THE COVER TO SEE IT COME ALIVE.

See more about Bayou City Now augmented reality on pages 10 and 11.


Bayou City N+w SCAN THE INTERACTIVE PAGES OF THIS MAGAZINE WITH THE FREE LAYAR APP ON YOUR SMARTPHONE OR TABLET TO BRING THE BAYOU CITY TO LIFE.

1 download the app at get.layar.com.

2 look for bayou city now + icons.

3 scan pages with layar.

4 be amazed as the bayou city comes to life!


Bayou City N+w SCAN THE INTERACTIVE PAGES OF THIS MAGAZINE WITH THE FREE LAYAR APP ON YOUR SMARTPHONE OR TABLET TO BRING THE BAYOU CITY TO LIFE.

1 DOWNLOAD THE APP AT GET.LAYAR.COM.

Congratulations to Becky Davis and Mark Standridge on the launch of their new magazine, “Bayou City.” We wish them the same kind of success we’re experiencing at Boulevard Realty. Return clients. Referrals. Clients who remain friends long after their closings. These are the rewards for our proven results.

2 LOOK FOR BAYOU CITY NOW + ICONS.

3 SCAN PAGES WITH LAYAR.

4 BE AMAZED AS THE BAYOU CITY COMES TO LIFE!

HEIGHTS 1545 Heights Boulevard H o u s t o n Te x a s 7 7 0 0 8

RICE VILLAGE 6117 Kirby Drive H o u s t o n Te x a s 7 7 0 0 5

713.862.1600 | In your neighborhood and online at yourblvd.com

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WE’RE LIVING IN INTERESTING TIMES

After a successful career in real estate for ten years, I purchased an existing agency in 2008. I thought my timing was perfect since the Houston area real estate market had steadily climbed for years. Little did I know of the interesting times ahead. In September 2008, Hurricane Ike—with winds of 110 mph—hit Galveston and roared across Houston. Life without electricity and the modern conveniences for 17 days was only the beginning. In 2009 and 2010, our Nation suffered the worst financial crisis since the Great Depression. During 2011 and 2012, the country’s economic news was swinging on a huge pendulum—jobs, manufacturing, and home prices were up one week and down the next—sometimes seemingly on the same day. Finally, in 2012, Houstonians began experiencing more jobs, fewer foreclosures and a sustainable pattern of growth. And with the ringing in of 2013, Houston became the hottest real estate market in America. My first five years as broker/owner of Boulevard Realty have been interesting times, to say the least. Ups. Downs. Significant changes. More than a few lessons learned along the way. But Boulevard Realty is still here and stronger than ever. Our 60+ agents aren’t just showing homes, but sharing resources, important information, trends, suggestions and fresh ideas with our clients. Yes, we’re living in interesting times, and Boulevard Realty is happy to be here.

Broker/Owner

+ Scan with Layar to see the homes in Boulevard Realty’s MLS listings.

713.862.1600 | yourblvd.com

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+ Scan with Layar to see Eklektik’s rooms.

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NORTON DITTO

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WEST ALABAMA at KIRBY DRIVE

MARKET STREET in THE WOODLANDS

713.688.9800

281.367.0995

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+ Scan with Layar to see our current catalog.

1801 POST OAK BLVD, HOUSTON, TX 77056 713.629.7444 www.tenenbaumandco.com ACTIVELY ACCEPTING TRADE-IN & BUYING JEWELRY & WATCHES WITH IMMEDIATE PAYMENT BULGARI PIRAMIDE 18KT YELLOW, WHITE, AND PINK GOLD RING. • BULGARI ALVEARE 18KT YELLOW GOLD AND DIAMOND NECKLACE. BULGARI DOPPIO CUORE 18KT YELLOW GOLD AND DIAMOND EARRINGS. • BULGARI 18KT YELLOW GOLD AND CITRINE RING. BULGARI 18KT YELLOW GOLD AND CABOCHON GEMSTONE RING. • BULGARI PIRAMIDE 18KT YELLOW GOLD AND DIAMOND EARRINGS. VAN CLEEF AND ARPELS 18KT YELLOW GOLD, DIAMOND, AND PEARL EARRINGS. BULGARI ALLEGRA 18KT YELLOW GOLD, DIAMOND, PEARL, AND MULTI-COLORED GEMSTONE BRACELET.

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contents F E AT U R E S

62 The Bayou City

Comes of Age

We celebrate life in the Bayou City by recognizing people and places that have defined our past and shape our future.

48 Out of the Box From amazing experiences to simple indulgences, the latest trends in gift giving cater to the person who has it all. tablet edition bonus: random acts of kindness

56 Giving Back in Style Bill Baldwin brings the community together to further causes and celebrate success. tablet edition bonus:

Party On

FLORIAN HOLZHERR

From a perch above the trees to an art-filled space, book stress-free entertaining at some of Houston’s most unique party venues.

+

Scan page with Layar to subscribe to the tablet edition and read "Random Acts of Kindness" and "Party On."

bayoucitymagazine.com

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contents D E PA R T M E N T S

explore

THE BAYOU CITY 16

embody

THE BAYOU LIFESTYLE 26

indulge IN BAYOU EATS 36

engage

IN BAYOU EVENTS 73

HERE & NOW

DOWN HOME

F+B

EXPERIENCE IT

What’s trending in the Bayou City

Old Can Be New

Fish for Uchi

Bayou City’s hottest happenings

18

28

38

A+E

TO THE 9s

TASTEMAKER

Goldilocks Rocks

Winter on the Bayou

In the Mix

20

30

FIELD NOTES

FAB 5

Grand Central

Who’s Planning Your Party?

12

EDITOR’S LETTER Welcome to Bayou City

80

WHAT’S YOUR BAYOU IQ?

32

TECH SAVVY

Best Bashes

Smart Wear

40

CRAVINGS Gourmand Goodies

42

THE POUR Cider Revival

44

HOME GROWN Mighty Sweet

22

GET OUT Holidays on Ice

6

46

TOP EATS It’s a Ruff Life

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131010 Ba


SHOPPING

DINING EVENTS ENTERTAINMENT & MORE

GLISTEN

holiday snowflake lighting, music, ice carver & more

NOVEMBER 23 7-9 PM in the plaza presented by

&

SANTA’S HOLIDAY MARKET

shopping, toy dr ive & pi c tu r e s wi th san ta

NOVEMBER 30

10 AM - 4 PM in the plaza presented by

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contents D I G I TA L

+

Scan page with Layar to subscribe.

Bayou City Daily Get the rest of the story (and stay in touch between issues) when you subscribe to our Bayou City Daily email newsletters* and website at BayouCityMagazine.com. Here are some highlights: MONDAY

TUESDAY

LIVING

DOING

WEDNESDAY

DINING

THURSDAY

SHOPPING

FRIDAY

EXPLORING

SATURDAY

SNAPPING

november

4

8

Aftershock dresses you for the season’s events.

To give or to keep: 3 cool H-Town experiences to give or share

13

19

december

There’s more to holiday shows than Panto: check out our holiday show roundup.

Loving hard cider this season? Here's how to pair it up.

More gifts for the foodies in your life.

You’ve done the ICE? Find what else can you do at Discovery Green.

16 Make sure Fido and Fifi are taken care of with Doggie Daycare.

30 Get ready for 2014, fitbit style.

13

Sharing: Pies, pies, pies! Challenge: Show us what you’re doing: Crazy shopping? Football? Laying like broccoli?

25 Delicious dining with a holiday recipe from d'lish!

*Bayou City LIVING shows you how to embody the Bayou lifestyle. • Bayou City DOING exposes you to our curated calendar: the events and happenings worth the time, money and outfit. • Bayou City DINING explores tips, tricks, recipes and behind-thescenes experiences with local chefs and eateries. • Bayou City SHOPPING displays sophisticated styles and trendy ideas, then offers easy access to buy your favorites. • Bayou City EXPLORING unearths local gems for your weekend jaunts. • Bayou City SNAPPING lets you flaunt what you’ve been up to. Share your best snaps from our weekly Instagram challenge for a chance to be featured. • BAYOU WEEK IN REVIEW brings you highlights from the previous week so you never miss a story.

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Unlock Bayou City experiences beyond the printed page with the free Layar app. Point your mobile device at our pages, scan and then see our magazine come to life: Purchase the products we mention, make reservations at the restaurants we profile and see photos and video of the trends we’re spotting. Look for the icon + to see which pages to scan and what to expect. Check page 11 for a list of pages with extended content.

30 4

Bayou City Now

Bayou City Tablet Edition Rich media. Expanded content. Reflowed for an easy reading experience. Look for the Bayou City Magazine app in the iTunes App Store. Download Bayou City Magazine on your iPad for bonus content “Party On” and “Random Acts of Kindness.”

Bayou City Social Connect with us on social media to see the trends we’re pinning, the Bayou life we’re snapping and much more. Look for @bayoucitymag on social media.

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+ Scan with Layar to view seasonal plants.

NATIVE PLANTS | GARDEN ART | URNS & FOUNTAINS

Joshua’s Native Plants and garden antiques Specializing in easy to grow and hard to find plants.

713-862-7444

502 West 18th St at Nicholson St. in The Heights Houston, TX 77008 OPEN TUES - SUN: 10am - 5pm

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contents AUGMENTED

Bayou City N + w Bring Bayou City to life with augmented reality. Just point, scan and experience.

Bayou City Now lets you access interactive digital content and unlock Bayou City experiences beyond the printed page through our partner, Layar. Starting with the magazine’s cover, point your mobile device at the page and scan to discover enhanced, exclusive web content, from videos and photo slideshows to recipes, social media connections, buying opportunities and more.

BAYOU CITY NOW WORKS LIKE THIS:

1 DOWNLOAD the free Layar app from the App Store or Google Play.

INTERACTIVE PRINT

2

Download the free Layar App

POINT your mobile device at a Bayou City magazine interactive page. Hint: Look for the Bayou City Now icons + to see what you can scan.

Look for the Bayou City Now icons to see what pages you can scan.

3 TAP TO SCAN and experience the digital content. Hold the device 6 to 12 inches above the page and tap the scan button to experience digital content. Keep the device steady above the page to get the interactive content. Hint: Scan the entire page to capture all the interactive elements.

4 SHOP, SHARE AND EXPERIENCE

This application works on mobile devices including iPhones, iPads and Android phones, with a copy of Bayou City magazine.

10

Tap on-screen buttons to experience the live, interactive content now available on your mobile device. You can view additional web content, purchase products, get special offers, see videos or image galleries, share and engage with social media and more.

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Scan These Pages!

Use your mobile device and the Layar app to scan these pages and get enhanced content. cover See our cover come alive. 5 Get the “Party On” digital feature. 8 Subscribe to Bayou City. 12 Meet editor-in-chief Becky Davis. 14 Subscribe to Bayou City Daily. 16 Meet the Spindletop design team. 16 Order cupcakes from Crave. 17 See more Street Scenes. 18 Buy tickets to “Panto Goldilocks.” 20 Get a map of the UK hotspots. 22 See video of Discovery Green. 29 See more fall looks. 31 Get more from our party experts. 32 Get the tech. 33 Download these interesting apps. 36 Hear the sounds of Uchi, then make reservations. 38 Get the Bayou City Sunrise recipe and see it made. 40 Get the goods. 44 Get a mighty sweet recipe. 46 See a map of the city’s dog-friendly spots. 52 Read more about paying it forward. 53 See more unconventional gifts on our Pinterest board. 54 Visit the zoo. 56 Experience a party at Bill’s house. 60 Buy tickets for the Summerhouse fundraiser. 65 Hear centennial stories from Rice alumni. 66 See and hear more from the Port. 68 See more of Hermann Park. 70 See and hear Ars Lyrica play. 80 Get social with Bayou City.

YASMIN

ADVERTISERS Don’t miss the enhanced content from our partners. 1 See homes from Boulevard Realty’s MLS listings. 2 See some rooms from Eklektik Interiors. 4 Get Tenenbaum’s current catalog. 9 View some seasonal plants from Joshua’s. 11 Shop with Advantage’s Yasmin Guerrero. 14 Get a discount on a show at UH’s Moores School. 14 Subscribe to Bayou City Daily. 23 Preview Houston Grand Opera’s current season. 41 Scan to get the Bayou City Magazine app. 43 View the catalog and buy tickets for the Theta Charity Antiques Show. 45 Subscribe to Bayou City. 55 Download the Bayou City Magazine app. 72 Get tickets for the historical home tour and wine tasting. 74 Meet Memorial Park Vision’s Dr. Dana Howard. 77 Get discounts for The Tasting Room and Max’s Wine Dive. 78 Preview TUTS’ Elf. 79 Preview Chicago from Broadway Across America –Houston. inside back cover Go behind the scenes with David Peck. back cover Buy chocolates from Cacao & Cardamom.

Where the Ultimate Driving Machine and the ultimate buying experience come together. Thank you and Happy Driving Houston!

Yasmin Guerrero Scan to learn more about the ultimate buying experience.

Advantage BMW-Midtown 1305 Gray St. 713-289-1233 yguerrero@advantagecars.com

bayoucitymagazine.com

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editor's letter +

Scan page with Layar to meet editor-in-chief Becky Davis.

Experience it!

EDITORIAL FOUNDER + EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Becky Davis CO-MANAGING EDITORS

W

Join the conversation: Tell us what (and how!) you’re celebrating right now. Send email to Becky@BayouCMag.com or connect with us on Facebook (facebook.com/ bayoucitymag) or Twitter (@bayoucmag).

elcome to Bayou City magazine. We’ve designed a magazine to fill your life with close-in experiences—from embarking on gastronomic adventures, to unearthing unique finds from stylish designers and boutiques, to exploring neighborhoods, festivals and events. We’ve also worked hard to reinvent the concept of a print magazine. In this issue, we’re introducing augmented reality technology to the Houston marketplace. Using the Layar app, you can bring our pages to life— by accessing extended content and by connecting with featured businesses—on your smartphones and tablets. Download the free Layar application from get.layar.com, then scan this page to see a short video introduction from me! (Read more about using augmented reality with this magazine on page 10.) If you like what you see, then get the complete Bayou City experience by signing up for our all-access pass. In addition to a subscription to the print magazine, you will receive free digital issues to browse on your tablet and daily emails to plan your weekly adventures. In this month’s issue, we celebrate life in our Bayou City, and in upcoming emails, we help you plan and enjoy your holiday season. We’ve found people you must meet, places you must visit and insights that will change how you think about celebrating, both during this season and throughout the year. So get started. Sit back with the magazine, grab your smartphone and prepared to be amazed.

Michelle Jacoby Libby Ingrassia ART DIRECTION + DESIGN Switch Studio STAFF PHOTOGRAHPER Mark Lipczynski CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Dennis Abrams, Robin Barr Sussman, Stacy Barry, Michelle Burgess, Sarah Clark, Betsy Denson, Jessica Mebane, Kim Morgan, Julie Osterman, Cecelia Ottenweller

PUBLISHING & ADVERTISING FOUNDER + PUBLISHER Mark Standridge GENERAL MANAGER Michelle Feser Rogers ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER Mitchell Olszewski ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE Michelle Moore SALES ASSOCIATE Courtney Laine

BAYOU CITY ADVISORS Greg Jones, MULTIMEDIA PUBLISHING STRATEGY Don Nicholas, DIGITAL PUBLISHING & AUDIENCE DEVELOPMENT Jim Nissen, CREATIVE STRATEGY Terry Ribb, DIGITAL CONSUMER STRATEGY Bayou City magazine (Volume 1, Issue 1) is published bi-monthly by Urban Experience Media, 1519 Oxford Street, Houston, Texas, 77008. 713-868-7023. Single issue $4.95; Annual subscription $15. Discounts available to Harris County residents. Editorial inquiries: stories@bayoucmag.com

Becky Davis Editor-in-Chief

Advertising inquiries: mark@bayoucmag.com Subscription inquiries: info@bayoucmag.com POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Bayou City, 1519 Oxford St., Houston, TX, 77008. Copyright 2013 Urban Experience Media

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WE HAVE THE BACKBONE. We continually push the boundaries of neuroscience. At the Mischer Neuroscience Institute at Memorial Hermann–Texas Medical Center, we have a reputation for innovation. We were selected to participate in the nation’s first multi-center trial to study the use of hypothermia following head injury. We established one of the first dedicated stroke programs in the world. We orchestrate more clinical trials for new multiple sclerosis therapies than anyone in Texas. And we are leaders in performing complex spine surgeries and reconstructions. All of this is enabled by our groundbreaking affiliation with The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth) Medical School. Together, we make more neuroscience breakthroughs every day. Learn more at neuro.memorialhermann.org.

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Daily Subscribe for daily coverage of Bayou City trends and experiences.

CELEBRATE

MONDAY

living

the holiday season with music!

NOVEMBER 15 Moores School of Music Jazz Orchestra featuring

Embody the Bayou lifestyle.

TUESDAY

doing

Blue Note recording artist Terence Blanchard, world-renowned trumpeter, composer and band leader. Moores Opera House. 7:30 pm. Tickets: $7 - $12.

Find events & happenings worth the time, money and outfit.

NOVEMBER 21-23 Napoleon and the Battle of Nations featuring

WEDNESDAY

UH Concert Chorale with Mercury – The Orchestra Redefined. Free preview on Nov. 21, 6 pm at Dudley Recital Hall, UH campus. Full concert on Nov. 23, 8 pm at Wortham Center downtown. Tickets: $10 -$65.

dining

Indulge with tips, tricks, recipes and experiences.

NOVEMBER 23 FAMILY ARTS EVENT: “The Best Christmas Pageant

THURSDAY

Ever” presented by the UH School of Theatre & Dance. With a ticket purchase to the 2 pm or 7 pm show, receive free admission to an afternoon of holiday music, crafts and a visit from Santa! Tickets: $10 - $20.

shopping

Follow sophisticated trends and styles.

DECEMBER 6&7 Emerging Choreographers Showcase featuring new

FRIDAY

exploring

work by students in the UH Dance Program. Dec. 6, 12 noon and Dec. 6 & 7, 7:30 pm. Tickets: $8-$20.

DECEMBER 8 Joy to ALL the World Choral Concert featuring

Find local gems for your weekend jaunts.

SATURDAY

the University of Houston’s award-winning choirs and chorales. Moores Opera House, 2:30 pm. Free. For 10% discount on 11/15, please scan Layar icon (right). For all tickets, visit www.uh.edu/uh-arts.

+

+ Scan ad with Layar to subscribe or go to BayouCityMagazine.com

14

snapping Flaunt your photos & take our Instagram challenges.

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explore THE BAYOU CITY

22 GET OUT See Discovery Green light up this season with spectacular holiday displays.

16 HERE & NOW 18 A+E 20 FIELD NOTES 22 GET OUT

20

FIELD NOTES

DISCOVERY GREEN

Eat, shop and explore your way through the Upper Kirby area.

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explore

HERE & NOW A+E FIELD NOTES GET OUT

+

Take Cover

Scan page with Layar to read more of Spindletop Design’s answers.

+

Scan page with Layar to order from Crave.

If you’re anything like us, you love a good challenge—especially when that challenge is creating a design for the inaugural issue of Bayou City magazine.

I

n an interview with the Houston Chronicle in September, John Earles of Spindletop Design noted that Houston businesses tend to seek designers in other cities for their projects, adding, however, that the attitude is changing and “we’re trying to make it change faster.” Admiring their optimism and city pride, we reached out to the folks at Spindletop and asked them to design the cover of this month’s issue. With its bold simplicity, it turned out to be an exciting choice, especially for the first issue, says editor-in-chief Becky Davis. “While a picture may be worth a thousand words, sometimes, a few words will give you the clearest picture,” she notes. For a look inside the world of Spindletop Design, we interviewed principals Joe Ross and Jennifer Blanco, and partner John Earles, who shared their thoughts on design, culture and life in the Bayou City.

HAVE CUPCAKES, WILL TRAVEL This holiday season, nothing is sweeter than giving the gift of cupcakes, especially when they’re delivered right to your loved one’s front door. Crave Cupcakes has launched a new delivery service starting Dec. 1. Customers within a 450-mile radius of the cupcakery can pre-order from a selection of boxes, including the Handcrafted Holiday Box, featuring 12 festively decorated cupcakes rang-

what needs to be communicated.

IF YOU WERE TO COMPARE A TYPICAL DAY AT YOUR STUDIO TO A MOVIE, TV SHOW OR SONG, WHAT WOULD IT BE AND WHY? JE: “Days Of Thunder.” There’s

A lot of people don’t realize that

spectacular wrecks, displays of

Park Blvd. and 5800 Kirby. 713-62-CRAVE,

when you try to say everything in

amazing skill, confidence and fear

cravecupcakes.com

a small space, you end up saying

at the same time, but no one ever

nothing because no one will take

lifts the gas from the floor. Not

the time to read it. It’s all about

even for a second.

as simple and uncluttered as possible, while still communicating

Jennifer Blanco

simplicity and hierarchy of type and imagery—something big and something small.

Joe Ross

WHO OR WHAT INFLUENCES YOUR WORK? JB: It can range from miscella-

WHAT PERSON, PLACE OR THING BEST EPITOMIZES THE BAYOU CITY TO YOU? JB: I think that’s the thing that’s

boxes will be available for such occasions as birthdays and thank-yous. Boxes range from $60 to $80 and include shipping. 1151 Uptown

BEYOND THE BELTWAY

Grab Life by the Horns If you’re looking for an adrenaline rush like no other, try your hand at the Great Bull Run in Baytown this December. Modeled after the famous San Fermin festival in Pamplona, Spain,

ing Houston to anyone and for visi-

this Texas-style version features up to 24 1,500-

tors of our city: It doesn’t have any

pound bulls stampeding down a quarter-mile

ning from the 1800s to 1970s;

one thing that defines or epitomizes

course at the Royal Purple Raceway in Baytown.

Americana photography; never-

it. What is in common—whether

ending research—it really varies

by neighborhood,

every day.

arts, food, culture, architecture,

IN YOUR STUDIO, WHAT IS THE ONE THING YOU CAN’T LIVE WITHOUT? JE: My technical pens and pencils. I draw frequently. Coffee.

16

dark chocolate. Throughout the year, additional

been so challenging about describ-

neous printed ephemera span-

John Earles

ing in flavors from strawberry, red velvet and

And if you’re not quite up to the challenge of having a rush of bulls hot on your heels, catch all the action as a spectator or participate in the Tomato Royale

etc.—is is that it’s

food fight. There’s also live music, food

completely unique

and drink, games and attractions.

depending on what corner you might

Check out thegreatbullrun.com for

find yourself.

more details and information.

SPINDLETOP DESIGN | CRAVE CUPCAKES | THE GREAT BULL RUN

WHAT IS YOUR PHILOSOPHY WHEN IT COMES TO DESIGN? JR: I’m a big fan of keeping things

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+

Scan page with Layar to see more Street Scenes.

STREET SCENES

Share your view of the Bayou City Each Saturday, in our Bayou City Daily: Snapping email, we’ll give you an Instagram project challenge and share some of the previous week’s photos. We’ll share our editor’s pick photo(s) here in each issue of the magazine. This issue, we selected @kelsdossantos’s photo of Allen’s Landing as a response to the “Best Bayou photo” challenge. Look for other great Bayou photos on our Pinterest Street Scenes board. Subscribe to Bayou City Daily emails or get social with us for upcoming challenges, then tag your photos on Instagram with #bayoucitymagstreetscene to be considered (or email to SECRETS, 1990 OIL ON CANVAS (52 X 37 CM) PRIVATE COLLECTION, COURTESY OF ZENO X GALLERY © 2013 STUDIO LUC TUYMANS

streetscenes@bayoucmag.com).

hot list happy birthday to us In “The Bayou City Comes of Age” on page 62, we wish a happy 100 to Rice University, the Houston Symphony, the Houston Ship Channel and Hermann Park. We also tip our hats to a few others with landmark birthdays in 2013-2014: MILLER OUTDOOR THEATER

90 years

CONTEMPORARY ARTS MUSEUM, HOUSTON

65 years

ABOUT FACE

HOUSTONPBS

Considered one of the most influential painters working

60 years

today, Belgian artist Luc Tuymans is known for his under-

NASA

stated yet compelling portraits, in which subjects almost never engage the viewer. Since the late ‘70s,

55 years

he has painted hundreds of likenesses, from

INPRINT

himself and his family, to historical and public

30 years

figures. They have been described as enig-

THE ART GUYS

30 years

matic and defying expectations. Through Jan 5., about 30 of the artist’s paintings will be on display at The Menil Collection, exhibited among the museum’s permanent collection. Viewed together, they are meant to probe the significance of the human face throughout the history of art. The exhibition is accompanied by “Portraits. Luc Tuymans,”

THE JAMES A. BAKER III INSTITUTE AT RICE UNIVERSITY

20 years

KNOWLEDGE IS POWER PROGRAM (KIPP)

20 years

STANTON WELCH, HOUSTON BALLET

a full-illustrated catalogue containing essays by Toby Kamps, Menil curator of modern and contemporary art, and art histo-

10 years

rian Robert Storr. 1533 Ross St. 713-525-9400, menil.org

ARS LYRICA

Bayou City Social We look for #bayoucitymagstreetscene and #bayoucitymag on social media.

DISCOVERY GREEN

bayoucitymag

bayoucitymag

bayoucitymag

10 years

bayoucitymag

5 years

By tagging us, you give us permission to share your photo on our social media and website, and publish it in our magazine. We’ll give you credit wherever we share the photos.

bayoucitymagazine.com

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explore

HERE & NOW A+E FIELD NOTES GET OUT

+

Goldilocks Rocks

Scan page with Layar to purchase tickets to “Panto Goldilocks.”

Stages Repertory Theatre brings the classic fairy tale to life with family-friendly fantasy and audience participation BY MICHELLE BURGESS

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Stages Repertory a well-known fairy successful forerunTheatre continues its tale. It is participaners such as “Panto holiday tradition of panto Pinocchio” and tory, with the audiperformances, which have included “Panto ence encouraged “Panto Cinderella.” Pinocchio” (pictured) and to sing along with The centuries-old “Panto Mother Goose.” certain parts of the Panto format— which is immensely popular in music and shout out phrases to Great Britain, India, Canada and the performers. Stages’ production “is a Australia—is a form of musiwacky take on the old classic cal comedy designed for families, and primarily performed and borrows generously from during the Christmas and New the James Bond movies,” Greco says. “The entire story is spiced Year’s season. It includes songs, up with parodies of great songs slapstick comedy and dancing, employs gender-crossing actors, from the ’60s.” When Greco says this is a and combines topical humor loose interpretation, he means with a story loosely based on

Stages Repertory Theatre 600 Rosine St. 713-527-0123 stagestheatre.com

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CM

MY

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CMY

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STAGES REPERTORY THEATRE

S

ome of us feel truly at home when we’re fifthrow, center-stage on opening night, while others are infinitely more comfortable at home on the couch, TV remote in hand. Regardless of your typical modus operandi, Stages Repertory Theatre’s production of “Panto Goldilocks” is a holiday calendar addition worth considering. Described by Stages’ artistic associate Mitchell Greco as “Mad Men meets Shrek,” Goldilocks is the theater’s sixth Panto production, following

it. Consider this plot synopsis: A Cold War technology race catches notorious spy Goldiana Locksinova in the crosshairs of the UK’s super-secret agent Shames Blonde. On her mission to steal a beauty serum from the Three Brained Bears in Texas, Goldi tangles with the three blind mice, a unicorn and evil Boris Blowfish, ultimately learning a lesson about true beauty. With its fast pace, audience participation and comedic genre bending, “Panto Goldilocks” makes for an ideal holiday outing for families—including those with children who tend to be a bit squirmy. In fact, it’s ideal for anyone, child or otherwise, who tends to be a bit squirmy in typical theater situations. Performances run from Dec. 4 to Jan. 4, Wednesday through Saturday at 7 p.m. Sunday matinees are at 2 p.m. Tickets range from $21 to $64. Greco doesn’t hesitate when asked to sum up the show’s appeal in 10 words or less: “Singing bears, ’60s soundtrack, Russian villains, sexy heroes and a unicorn,” he says. “What more do you need?” Looks like not much else. Stages’ take on the classic fairy tale is just right.

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HERE & NOW A+E FIELD NOTES GET OUT

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Grand Central From shopping to dining to everything in between, Upper Kirby has got it all

Scan page with Layar for a map of these UK hotspots.

SHOP At Kuhl-Linscomb (2424 W Alabama St.), it's the staggering range of items—from fine china and furnishing, to makeup and dog treats—at every price point that makes this a shopper’s paradise. The design and lifestyle store is actually a compound of five different buildings with a sixth, the

BY BETSY DENSON

former Penguin Arms, opening in the near future. Fashionistas everywhere celebrated Tootsie’s (2601 Westheimer) move to the West Ave complex

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in 2011. There’s now 35,000 square feet of space, as well as an in-store runway in case any of your new purchases give you the urge to sashay. Sometimes vintage store can be a euphemism for grandma’s closet. But at Cheeky Vintage (2134 Richmond Ave.), the carefully curated selections earned the store notice from Lucky Magazine as one of the best vintage spots in the country. For those looking for unique finds, it will be a special customer who buys the $40,000 antique wall map of Houston at The Antiquarium (3021 Kirby Drive), but the store also sells more budget-friendly original prints and maps, as well as some reproductions. Winston Churchill would have been right at home at the Cigar Emporium (3514 S. Shepherd Drive), a small shop where a walk-in humidor and wall units display their considerable wares.

TOOTSIES | MARK LIPCZYNSKI

I

t’s fitting that Upper Kirby shares its name with entrepreneur John Henry Kirby, Texas’ first multimillionaire, because business in the district is booming. Once a pass-through for those en route to River Oaks, West University, Montrose and Greenway Plaza, Upper Kirby is a wallflower no longer, with $300 million in current new construction. While it’s hard to miss the high-rise developments that are a new defining feature of the area, there’s plenty of interest at ground level, including the ever increasing number of shops and restaurants, which lure the faithful and the famished. The distinctive red phone booths that pepper the district were the brainchild of the Kirby merchants association in the 1980s, a nod to Upper Kirby’s initials. Once functional, they now serve as light boxes for the streetscape. More than 20,000 people call Upper Kirby home, whether they are the original owners in 1950s neighborhoods, or empty nesters and established professionals who are moving into the new multifamily developments. “We’ve got some of the best restaurants in the city,” says Upper Kirby deputy director Travis Yonkin. “It’s what draws people in to experience the rest, and we want to give people the best environment to do that.” bayou city M AGA ZI NE

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DINE

DO

SEE

Be it challah French toast or fried chicken, the

One visit to McGonigel’s Mucky Duck (2425

What at first might appear to be a residential

food at the Avalon Diner (2417 Westheimer) has

Norfolk St.) and you’ll be hooked—especially if

street— albeit one with really cool houses—turns

been an Upper Kirby tradition since before it was

you like your music venues on the intimate side

out to be Gallery Row (Colquitt off Kirby), a

the UK. Twenty-four-year veteran server Ronald

and have a hankering for Welsh Rarebit. Singers

collection of high-end art galleries that often

Williams says it’s the atmosphere that makes it a

Bob Schneider and Kelly Willis are semiregulars

have openings at the same time. Moody

must-eat.

and there’s also an open mic night if you can

Gallery (2815 Colquitt St.) is one place to start

summon enough liquid courage to participate.

with its focus on Texas artists. On your honor,

Who cares if you don’t know Bilbo Baggins. You’ll love the Hobbit Café (2243 Richmond

At Cactus Music (2110 Portsmouth St.), shop

you should try to visit the Girl Scouts of San

URBAN HARVEST FARMERS MARKET | GREATER HOUSTON CONVENTION AND VISITORS BUREAU

Ave.). The Hobbit-themed décor takes a back-

for CDs, vinyl and eight tracks, then stick around

Jacinto Council Goodykoontz Museum of

seat to the avocado burger, black bean nachos

for free beer and in-store performances by local

Girl Scout History (3110 Southwest Freeway)

and Key lime pie.

acts and touring bands. Sketch comedy and

to learn a little more about the history of the

Just because it’s farm to table doesn’t mean

live music share top billing at the Music Box

100-year-old organization.

the shrimp corndogs are any less tasty at Haven

Theater (2623 Colquitt), where an undersized

(2502 Algerian Way). Next door, Haven’s Cove

performance space just gets you that much

Shepherd Drive) opened in 1939 with a show-

Cold Bar goes a little further afield with sashimi

closer to the action. And for the kid in you, A.D.

ing of “Man About Town” starring Jack Benny.

and dungeness crab. West Ave also has the

Players Theater (2710 W Alabama St.) puts on

Now a Trader Joe’s, the space retains its his-

Indian-fusion Pondicheri (2800 Kirby Drive), where

plays for both children and adults. Coming up in

toric façade, as well as the inside balcony, and

both lunch and happy hour do a brisk business.

2014: “The Diary of Anne Frank” and “Godspell.”

new faux movie posters like “The Best Little

Need a sugar rush? Look no further than

On Saturdays, the Urban Harvest Farmers

The art deco Alabama Theater (2922 S.

Storehouse in Texas.”

Petite Sweets (2700 W. Alabama St.), where you

Market (3000 Richmond Ave.) offers beeswax

can grab a cotton candy macaron or a frozen

candles, pickled quail eggs and goat cheese

(2503 Westheimer) was originally built as a

custard sundae. The espresso is optional.

The Forum of Civics Building and Gardens

amongst myriad other goodies. Wondering

county school in 1910. Given by the Hogg Estate

At Wine & 1919 Mixology (2736 Virginia St.),

about that red caboose in the middle of Upper

to the University of Texas in 1939, it was pur-

the people watching is good. But once the mix-

Kirby? It’s Mark’s Barber Shop (2711 Kipling St.),

chased shortly thereafter by the River Oaks

olgists get going, you’ll want to pay attention,

where the gentlemen from River Oaks have

Garden Club. They’ve done right by the Forum,

especially to the Ratpack, which is lit on fire just

been going for a haircut since 1986.

as evidenced by its 1988 inclusion on the

before being served.

National Register of Historic Places.

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HERE & NOW A+E FIELD NOTES GET OUT

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Holidays On Ice

Scan page with Layar to see video of Discovery Green.

Skate through the season at Discovery Green, where winter-inspired activities are enjoyed by all BY STACY BARRY

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Outdoor skating is back with the majestic model boats on the at ICE at Discovery Houston skyline as boat basin in the Green, where 7,700 a backdrop. spring and summer square feet of ice make it the largest outdoor rink months, to enjoying Musical sounds of in the Southwest. outdoor festivals the season fill the air and whimsical art in the fall, there’s glass railings add to the festive always something to see and do all year round. feel as brightly colored designs In the winter, however, reflect off the ice. After working up an appetite, skaters and specthe park transforms into a tators can retreat to the snack skater’s dream with the ICE at Discovery Green. Featuring bar for authentic Belgian waffles, the main rink, located in gourmet hot chocolate and other wintry treats. the Kinder Lake model boat Discovery Green programming basin, and the Snowbox, a mini-sized, toddler-friendly director Susanne Thies notes that the park is beautiful all year rink for smaller guests, the long, but especially so during the ICE experience offers a variety of family-friendly fun, all holidays. The annual ice carving

Discovery Green 1500 McKinney St. 713-400-7336 discoverygreen.com

DISCOVERY GREEN

M

ild Houston winters coupled with the usual seasonal stress often leave locals looking for ways to chill out this time of year. Those in the know head to the ICE at Discovery Green for what has quickly become a downtown holiday tradition. Starting Nov. 22, outdoor skating is back with a new extended season and more than 7,700 square feet of ice, making it the largest outdoor rink in the Southwest. Since opening five years ago, nearly 230,000 visitors have enjoyed Discovery Green and all it offers. From floating

competition in December will see seven master carvers from around the country competing to turn a ton of ice into a work of art. The winner will further compete in a live “carve off ” with local ice artist Reverend Butter for a cash prize. There’s also Cheapskate Mondays, Live Jazz Tuesdays with Houston jazz musician Jawad (who often dons skates himself), Friday Family Movie Night and Saturday Skating with Santa, among other events. The fun isn’t over after the holidays, either. January traditionally features a variety of cultural festivals, including two new ones: the Vietnamese TET Festival and the Houston Creole Festival. This 12-acre urban oasis is filled with activities for the young and young at heart. Discovery Green has seen its share of first dates and milestone anniversaries. It has been home to some of the city’s most signature experiences. And it hosts a full calendar of outdoor events throughout the year including concerts, exercise classes and writer’s workshops. Admission to the rink is $12, including tax and skate rental, and this year’s season runs through Feb. 4.

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2013–14

Verdi

Stephen Sondheim

Oct. 18 – Nov. 9, 2013

Mar. 7 – 23, 2014

J. Strauss II

WORLD PREMIERE

Scan with Layar to preview the current season.

A Little Night Music

Aida

Die Fledermaus Oct. 25 – Nov. 10, 2013

AMERICAN PREMIERE

Ricky Ian Gordon/Leonard Foglia

A Coffin in Egypt Mar. 14 – 21, 2014

Weinberg

Wagner

Jan. 18 – Feb. 2, 2014

Apr. 11 – 26, 2014

Verdi

Bizet

Jan. 24 – Feb. 9, 2014

Apr. 25 – May 10, 2014

The Passenger Rigoletto

Das Rheingold Carmen

DON’T MISS THIS DAZZLING SEASON AT HGO. THE BOX OFFICE IS WAITING FOR YOUR CALL!

Single tickets start at just $15. Call 713-228-OPERA(6737) or visit HGO.org.

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embody T H E BAYO U L IF EST Y LE

26 DOWN HOME Add salvaged or reclaimed materials to repair older homes or to add style to newer construction.

26 DOWN HOME 28 TO THE 9S

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TECH SAVVY

Wear your heart (monitor) on your sleeve, along with other great wearable technology gadgets.

30 FAB 5 32 TECH SAVVY

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DOWN HOME TO THE 9s FAB 5 TECH SAVVY

Old Can Be New Architectural treasures add style and taste to your home BY KIM MORGAN

T

he white marble mantle is exquisite. The antique doors are fantastic. It doesn’t matter if there isn’t a physical place for them yet—Sam Gianukos is already imagining the house he will create around the doors, the study he will construct around the mantle. “When people are looking at new houses, they will always remember the house with the antique doors,” says Gianukos, owner of Creole Design. “Adding old to new really adds a lot of character.” While Gianukos appreciates the modernday conveniences of user-friendly, energyefficient building supplies, he also enjoys incorporating architectural antiques. Whether it’s porcelain tile or stained-glass windows, salvaged goodies bring creative value and unexpected delight to today’s norm. “I try to do it in all my houses,” he says. “It’s something that if the client is given the option to do it, most of them do it.” OUT WITH THE OLD, IN WITH THE OLD

Stained-glass windows bring character to any room. This window dates back to 1910 and was purchased from an antiques dealer on Westheimer.

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MARK LIPCZYNSKI

New construction aside, the Bayou City is also big on home renovation and restoration. Gilbert Perez of Bungalow Revival says he incorporates salvaged materials when at all possible. The most common items are reclaimed floors, stained glass windows, interior doors and light fixtures. And what’s good for the house is good for the environment. “It’s the greenest and most sustainable thing to do, rather than tearing a house down and building new,” Perez says. “You’re using structure that’s already there. We’re adding to it, but we’re cutting down fewer trees and not filling landfills with materials.” To Perez, it’s also what’s on the inside that counts. “When you walk into a house that’s old, and see an addition where everything is new, the house loses continuity,” he says. “By using reclaimed materials, you get that old feeling throughout.” Ashton Martini, a Realtor at Martha Turner Properties, says homeowners,

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hardware,” she says. “We can also redo light fixtures, as long as they’re disassembled first.” Maness says her customers typically present one of a handful of scenarios: They’ve bought a house and are trying to restore original fixtures and knobs that have been painted on over time; they have hardware in the house that is worn from years of use and cleaning; they have hardware that doesn’t match (perhaps the showerhead is from one manufacturer, but the tub spout another); or they simply want a different look altogether. “Some people don’t realize they can restore or change hardware, but it’s actually pretty popular,” Maness says. “People like the idea that they are restoring something. They like to say, ‘I didn’t waste the old stuff. I saved it and made it pretty again.’ ” A HOUSE BECOMES A HOME

A deliberate mix of old and new, a 2006 painting by Houston artist Liz Conces Spencer is paired with a traditional fireplace fronted by French gate designed by Bill Peck.

architects, builders and interior designers rely on salvaged materials such as reclaimed hardwood floors, windows, claw-foot bathtubs, pedestal sinks and lighting. “Homes and commercial structures in historic districts require obsolete, but necessary structural parts and fixtures for vintage homes, as well as irreplaceable period items,” he says. “These are architectural elements and fixtures that add character to their projects.” IF IT AIN’T BROKE, USE IT

MARK LIPCZYNSKI

While the large items involved in home restoration are obvious, don’t neglect the tiny details—or, as Diane Love Maness likes to say, the “nuts and bolts.” Maness, co-owner of Specialty Metal Finishing, says restored hardware adds a polished finish to any renovated home. “Doorknobs, cabinet knobs, hinges, fixtures, shower heads, door hinges, drains, toilet levers…anything that’s metal is considered

So you’ve got a plan for the stuff you see in the house, now how about for the stuff you use? You can carry the architectural-salvage theme over to your décor. Metalsmith Bill Peck, owner of Peck & Company, designs and creates pieces incorporating salvaged materials. Think furniture like cocktail tables, nightstands, desks, even beds. Think decorative items like wine racks, mirrors and fire screens. Think lighting like chandeliers, sconces and lamps. And think drapery like tiebacks, finials and rods. “People generally have an idea of what they want us to make, but seldom do they have the components,” Peck says. “Whatever you’re doing, you can build it from scratch with wood, metal, glass, doesn’t matter—you can buy the components and build it, or you can utilize architectural items by modifying them.” Peck is particularly fond of antique architectural iron that he brings in from all over the world. They’ve made a console table from a French balcony panel, a candelabra with a baluster from the Plaza Hotel in New York City, and a mirror with a copper window frame from the Flatiron Building, also in New York City. “There’s a sense of romance that goes along with antique pieces,” he says.

diy sweet salvage Houston warehouse filled with reclaimed treasures Once you have all your ducks in a row for your renovation project, it’s time to shop. But where to begin? Bayou City DIYers will tell you the best place to start is the Historic Houston Salvage Warehouse. Whether you’re looking for an antique doorknocker or a period staircase, there’s a good chance you’ll find it here. Run by Historic Houston, a nonprofit organization dedicated to conserving and promoting the city’s historic architectural and cultural resources, the warehouse gets its materials from reclaimed homes or donations to its salvage program. Materials include—but aren’t limited to—reclaimed wood flooring, windows and screens, doors and hardware, siding, paneling, millwork, lumber, bath and kitchen fixtures, cabinetry and exterior ironwork. In 2011, the warehouse was forced to close its doors due to the economic downturn. Fundraising efforts to reopen the warehouse have been ongoing, while donations are being stored in a temporary location in Houston’s East End. The warehouse, located at 4300 Harrisburg Blvd., is open to the public on scheduled days. Check Historic Houston’s website or Facebook page for updates. 713-522-0542, historichouston.org

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DOWN HOME TO THE 9s FAB 5 TECH SAVVY

Winter on the Bayou Fabric and color are key to drool-worthy winter looks in warm weather BY JESSICA MEBANE

Houston designer David Peck's fall/winter collection offers easy yet chic ensembles perfect for winter in the Bayou City.

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for navigating a mercurial and warmish winter climate. According to Ritz, a Houston shopper is savvy—maybe even savvier than those in other markets—so she already knows to “buy according to her climate and stay away from heavier fabrications.” Building on this strength, Ritz’s advice would be to take the styles geared for cooler climates and modify them by changing the fabrics. For example, you might take a wintry look and “translate it into a lighter Ponte knit that transcends the current style.” He also suggests dressing up a featherweight cashmere cardi

CODY BESS PHOTOGRAPHY FOR DAVID PECK

W

inter is here at last! Or is it? Looking out your window on a balmy November morning may leave you scratching your head in climate confusion. After all, many winter mornings here start out in the low 40s and then climb faster and hotter than any socialite wannabe at a River Oaks Junior League open house, leaving you feeling like you can’t wear all the fall and winter looks in the stores and catalogs. Take heart and leave your worries behind. Brad Ritz, owner and founder of Ritz Group—advisor to retailers on women’s apparel and accessories since 1989—has advice

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look for professional occasions, or sporting oversized, boyfriend cuts of sweaters for outerwear. True local fashionistas want to stay with the winter trends in color, and Ritz has great advice for blending the right palette with lighter fabrics. For starters, Ritz says to “stay away from a thick, wool blend of anything, but do wear dark navy to get

Take the styles geared for cooler climates and modify them by changing the fabrics.

DAVE ROSSMAN | MICHELLE WATSON

that winter feel.” So, pick your fall colors, but stick with the lighter fabrics. Which colors should you look for this fall? “We’re seeing lots of purple, plum, aubergine, cranberry and neutrals. And don’t forget that red is a new neutral,” he says. “Black and white is big again this winter, and it will probably transition into spring as well, so it’s a good buy.” Clara Cook Lambert, stylist and owner of Clarafication Possibilities in Houston, agrees. “In places that get real winter, the weight of the fabric isn’t an issue. But here in the South, it is,” she says. Does that mean wool is completely forbidden? Cook Lambert says that just because wool can be “dense, heavy and solid as the top coat of a Navy admiral” doesn’t mean it can’t also be “as sheer, delicate and transparent

Scan page with Layar to see more fall looks.

as a butterfly’s wings.” In fact, wool can actually be cooler than some other fabrics. “Wool is also made of natural fibers, which are breathable, easy and comfortable to the skin,” she says. Her advice is to go ahead and enjoy wool, but “just don’t buy the heavier versions—or the bulky layered looks—that make you hot just looking at them.” Cook Lambert also suggests that blending wool with lighter fabrics can make it comfortable in our climate. “Wool mixed with silk or cotton is a wonderful blend that we can wear here year-round,” she says. The very nature of wool drives Cook Lambert’s advice in terms of color, suggesting that Houstonians can experiment with the “yummy fall colors” because the thread made from wool allows it to take color like almost no other fiber. Thus there’s always a rainbow of offerings to pick from, which allows you to be daring and try something different. “So go ahead and wrap your neck in the finest sheer wool scarf worn over a tailored lightweight wool gabardine pantsuit, complemented by a fine cashmere sweater,” Cook Lambert says. “You’ll look like a million dollars, even if it is December and 80 degrees outside. Wool is in this winter—and it works!”

This season's winter looks took a turn down the runway at the Simon Fashion Show presented by Cadillac on Sept. 5 at The Galleria.

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DOWN HOME TO THE 9s FAB 5 TECH SAVVY

M A N DY B E N N E T T

People eat with their eyes, so if it doesn't look good…they probably won't try it.

JONNY BLACK

The right music and entertainment will make or break your event. Choose wisely.

Who’s Planning Your Party? Five event pros share their tried-and-true tips on throwing the party of the season

MANDY BENNETT

JONNY BLACK

REBEKAH JOHNSON

Caterer, D’Lish Catering

DJ, Jonny Black Productions

Florist, Bergner and Johnson Design

Head of her catering company since 2004,

Numerous brides and grooms, as well as corpo-

From The Menil 25th anniversary gala to parties

Bennett prides herself on “bringing something dif-

rate clients like Shell Oil, BP and Schlumberger,

in the Caribbean, Rebekah Johnson’s one-of-

ferent” to clients such as Kelsey-Seybold and the

have tapped Jonny Black to emcee and DJ their

a-kind take on floral design and event décor is

Houston Rodeo. She says the best types of appe-

events. As for the perfect playlist, Black says

in demand. And for her own gatherings? “I use

tizers for home holiday parties are room tempera-

if the event has a theme, the music should

clippings from my yard, etched glass cham-

ture choices to make it easy on the host, and that

match—and ideally be playing as the guests

pagne cups and lots of candles.” When buying

serving food in smaller dishes—replenishing from

arrive. “This will set the mood for a fun night.”

flowers, Johnson suggests amassing a lot of one

the kitchen as needed—helps keep food fresh.

It’s also essential to pick songs that resonate

thing, both type and color, for more impact. “For

Bennett also emphasizes presentation. “People

with most guests. “Don’t Stop Believing” by

Christmas, I like to incorporate things like pep-

‘eat with their eyes,’ so if it doesn’t look good

Journey and “Shout” from “Animal House” are

permint candies glued into a wreath for a whim-

enough to eat, then they probably won’t try it.”

some crowd favorites.

sical look or cinnamon for a traditional look.”

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D'LISH CATERING | JONNY BLACK PRODUCTIONS

BY BETSY DENSON

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REBEKAH JOHNSON

Get a whole lot of one thing. It has more of an impact.

Scan page with Layar for more from these experts.

WYN BOMAR

Closing the envelope with a wax seal will add a special touch.

SAMANTHA DARR

Throw the tradition book out the window. It’s the 21st century. There is no right or wrong way.

MEGAN LOVOI FOR THE SCOUT GUIDE HOUSTON | STEVE LEE PHOTOGRAPHY | KAREN SACHAR ©2013

SAMANTHA DARR

WYN BOMAR

Event planner, Soiréebliss! Events

Invitation designer, Wyn Bomar Design

Soiréebliss! Events

With a background in interior design and an eye

Twenty-five years of design experience gives

627 W. 19th St. 832-303-9537, soireebliss.com

for detail, Samantha Darr was a natural at event

Wyn Bomar a leg up in collaborating with clients

Bergner and Johnson Design

planning before starting her own company in

like Camp for All and the Houston Public Library

519 Pecore St. 713-662-3769,

2008. Among her tips for at-home holiday par-

Foundation to craft just the right invite. She

bergnerandjohnson.com

ties: Clear the room of unnecessary furniture

says that while a streamlined theme is the key

D’Lish Catering

and accent tables to create more open space.

to a successful invitation, there are also a lot of

1200 McKinney St. 281-953-5474, dlish.net

She also recommends a valet service for guests.

options in the realm of traditional printing. “I like

Jonny Black Productions

“It will naturally elevate the formality of the

to use a fun paper, a funky envelope,” she says

11211 Katy Freeway. 832-867-6911,

celebration. As an extra sweet surprise, have

and suggests shopping for the envelope first,

jonnyblackproductions.com

the valet attendant place a box of chocolates or

then sizing the invitation to fit. Closing the enve-

Wyn Bomar Design

late night snack in the guests’ vehicle.”

lope with a wax seal will add a special touch.

281-300-6413, wynbomardesign.com

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embody

DOWN HOME TO THE 9s FAB 5 TECH SAVVY

+

Scan page with Layar to buy these products.

Smart Wear Streamline your life with this roundup of new wearable technologies BY JESSICA MEBANE

N

ow, everyone remembers the story of finding a lump of coal in their stocking come Christmas morning. In this digital age, a more appropriate moment of holiday reckoning might look like a stocking full of scratched AOL 30-day trial CDs, or some battered, one-way Teletrim pagers. But if you’ve been very good this year, why not ask your tech savvy Santa for some pieces of wearable technology? Personal tech is getting smaller, more intuitive and sleekly stylish as this particular product niche brings humans and their devices even closer together. Here are a few of our favorites:

ELEVATE YOUR MOOD Jawbone, maker of hipster speaker technology solutions that resemble certain colorful interlocking plastic brick-toys from Denmark, has developed Up, a lifestyle-monitoring bracelet that can tell you more about yourself than you thought you knew. This wearable “app for a healthier you” has 12 tracking features, among which include a mood monitor, able to “discover connections that affect how you feel”; a 24/7 activity monitor that logs every step and movement; and painless syncing with your smartphone and several popular exercise apps. The Up bracelet currently comes in four colors and three sizes, (S, M, L). It’s water-resistant and so comfortable, you’ll wear it day and night—because, as the online motto suggests, “the more you track, the more you know.” $129, jawbone.com

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Scan page with Layar to download these apps.

download app-etite Check out a few of our favorite apps this month

IMPROVE YOUR SLEEP In an age where you can track most aspects of your waking life—caloric intake, your kid’s cell phone’s whereabouts and Thursday night’s pizza delivery status—why not measure the last frontier of data analysis: your sleep. The folks at Lark have joined forces with the National Sleep Foundation and Stanford sleep specialist Cheri Mah to develop Lark Pro, a wearable sleep-tracking device that syncs with your iPhone to get a macro-snapshot of just how you roll under the covers. After wearing the breathable wristband device for a week, the Lark Pro Sleep Coach app analyzes and makes recommendations based upon your specific sleep hours and patterns, and even functions as a silent, vibrating alarm clock. The Lark stand charges your phone while you sleep, so both you and your device wake up refreshed and ready for the day. $159, lark.com

WEAR YOUR PHONE Samsung has made ownership of the spy watch-esque Galaxy Gear accessible for the masses after a dramatic, midnight pre-ordering period that began in mid-September. This futuristic design—which combines sapphire-glassed watch facing, stainless steel construction and five possible wristband colors—is also, perhaps, the most ambitious smart watch entry in a crowded holiday field of hits and misses. You can sync with your Samsung phone (Galaxy Note III as of now, with many other Samsung model phones being added soon) to view your picture gallery, answer and make calls, text, access apps and take photos and/or 10-second video vignettes. JAWBONE | LARK | SAMSUNG

It operates in the Samsung “swiping” fashion, with one swipe down activating the teeny camera lens built into the strap, and then tap the screen to take at least two or three pictures—all in the time it takes your companion to dig his phone out of his back pocket. Starting at $300, samsung.com

UP BY JAWBONE Once you’ve selected your Up wristband (in your favorite color, of course), the next step is to download the Up app, which tracks how you sleep, move and eat. Based on the data, you can start making smarter and healthier choices for optimum health. LARK UP While it’s important to track what you do during the day, it’s just as important to assess your sleep. In tandem with the Lark sleep-monitor accessories, this app evaluates your sleep patterns to ensure you get the most out of that much-needed shut-eye. RUNKEEPER Turn your phone into a personal trainer with this app downloaded by—wait for it—more than 22 million people. Track your runs, walks, bike rides, hikes and more using the GPS feature in your phone. HOUSTON SMART TRAVEL GUIDE Brought to you by the travel experts at Citybot, this app creates personal experiences for those looking to get a real feel for the city. Custom itineraries are created based on interests, transportation needs and schedule. BAYOU CITY NOW WITH LAYAR Because we’re not beyond a little self-promotion, we’d like to introduce you to our augmented reality partner Layar, which offers a free downloadable app that lets you access our interactive digital content and unlock Bayou City experiences beyond the printed page. See more on page 10. Find these apps in the iTunes and Google Play app stores.

bayoucitymagazine.com

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Enjoy Subtle Comforts and Culinary Flair FROM ONE OF THE BEST VIEWS ON POST OAK. A blend of French techniques and Texas twists inspire this casual and energetic eatery. With a comfortable, accessible menu, gracious hospitality and Houston’s most extensive wine program, we share in our guest’s memorable moments.

the perfect spot to begin or end your evening. 1800 POST OAK BLVD

BCM-workingpages-10-22d.indd 34 PHIL Bayou City Ad.indd 1

713.439.1000

PHILIPPEHOUSTON.COM

10/27/13 10:18 PMPM 10/9/13 5:40


indulge IN BAYO U E ATS

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36 F+B Austin chef Tyson Cole brings Uchi to the heart of Montrose, delighting those with a taste for refined Japanse cuisine.

36 F+B 38 TASTEMAKER 40 CRAVINGS

MARK LIPCZYNSKI

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TASTEMAKER

Master mixologist Houston Farris introduces the Bayou City Sunrise.

42 THE POUR 44 HOME GROWN 46 TOP EATS

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F+B TASTEMAKER CRAVINGS THE POUR HOME GROWN TOP EATS

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Fish for Uchi Imaginative chef Tyson Cole breaks tradition and delivers the perfect Japanese-American bite BY ROBIN BARR SUSSMAN

Scan page with Layar to hear the sounds of Uchi or to make reservations.

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elebrated chef Tyson Cole’s H-town branch of his Austin sushi shrine is always packed—and for good reason. It’s not for Japanese gold standards like the ubiquitous California roll or sashimi happy hour…or any one thing. At Uchi, it’s all unique, from the setting to the service to the cuisine. Inside the chicly modern exterior of this hotspot designed by Austin restaurant architect of the moment Michael Hsu, find a softly lit rustic Japanese farmhouse ambiance that’s instantly relaxing. The intricate, multifaceted Japanese-American cuisine recharges your senses and makes you want to seriously linger. Think simple, yet sublime fried Brussels sprouts. Or hamache nabe, spanking fresh baby yellowtail poised inside a heated clay bowl at your table with sweet sticky rice. Or uchiviche, an invigorating take on ceviche sans lime juice. Cole is not present daily because he lives in Austin, but the talented culinary team carries on meticulously as if he’s right in the kitchen. When you arrive (hopefully, with a reservation), choose from the glistening marble white sushi bar set up in high style, or a cozy table in the rustic dining room wrapped in red botanical wallpaper. The sushi bar is a welcoming perch to catch the creative action by the friendly sushi chefs who never cease to surprise and delight. Chef de cuisine Kaz Edwards combines unexpected ingredients for dazzling artful dishes, but the attitude is so unpretentious you forget how complex the fare really is. Other dining options include a private dining room for small groups or the community table. When navigating the comprehensive menu, you’ll first spot the Tastings section, a collection of hot and cold dishes. Carnivores zone in on the pork belly-like bacon tataki with black lime, coriander and citrus, or the jar jar duck layered in a jar with endive, candied citrus and a halo of applewood smoke. Dazzling is the cold plate of carefully carved maguro sashimi (big eye tuna) Seared wagyu rib-eye with baby fennel, endive and fennel pollen in a coconut shrimp broth.

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(Clockwise from top) Chef de cuisine Kaz Edwards; hama chili with baby yellowtail, Thai chili and orange supreme; the cool marble-topped sushi bar; chocolate panna cotta with tangerine five-spice caramel, salted caramel gelato, compressed tangerines and whiskey reduction.

dine bayou bites Get the dish on the Bayou City's culinary happenings TEXAS PROVENCE John Sheely, executive chef and owner of Mockingbird Bistro Wine Bar, is bringing his “Texas Provence” cuisine to the Bayou City with his latest venture, Osteria Mazzantini. The Galleria-area eatery celebrates the tastes of the Riviera, France and Italy with a series of “short menus” that emphasize local specialties in pastas, grilled meats, fish and shared plates. 2200 Post Oak Blvd. 713-993-9898. osteriamazzantini.com DINING FOR ALL SEASONS Known for its low-calorie menu (everything is 475 calories or less), Seasons 52 is all about bringing a fresh and healthy approach to dining. Currently, there is only one location in Houston, but that’s about to change with the latest opening at CityCentre at the end of the year. The new location will feature its seasonally inspired menu, as well as a custombuilt wine cellar, piano bar with live music and open patio. 842 W. Sam Houston Parkway. seasons52.com

with goat cheese, pumpkin seed oil and thin slices of Fuji apple. Beyond that, expect salads like an awesome roasted beet number, carefully carved sushi and sashimi, makimono (artistic rolls like tempura shrimp with grapes), or the 10-course omakase chef’s tasting. We like the gently priced small bites/sake social menu served from 5 to 6:30 p.m. And the separately printed daily specials list, which may feature pristinely fresh wild yellowtail with jalapeño, gin and garlic; or hot dishes of Sugi Gama, a delightful origami package of grilled cobia with black tree and oyster mushrooms, punctuated with hot Thai chili and brightened with kumquat and golden raisin. Savory, sweet and heat—it’s all about balance.

Don’t look for cocktails, but do experiment with the crisp and fruity food-loving white wines, an unusual find in most Japanese restaurants. And don’t wave off the mind-blowing treats by pastry chef Monica Glenn. You won’t see creations like this anywhere: kaffir lime ash sorbet with Thai chili meringue or “fried milk,” a play on vanilla pudding fried in cornflakes and served with iced milk sherbet and melted chocolate. Amazing. The Japanese word Uchi translates to “home,” but thrilling fare like this can only come from a home created by Tyson Cole. Uchi 904 Westheimer 713-522-4808

WELCOME, CHEF Restaurateurs and siblings Katie Barnhart and Nick Adair have expanded dinner service at their eponymous restaurant Adair Kitchen by bringing a new chef on board. Landen Davis, formerly of Revival Market, will update and expand their dinner menu, which features new items such as baconwrapped dates, roasted apple and walnut salad, and bone-in braised short ribs. 5161 San Felipe. 713-623-6100. adairkitchen.com IN A SNAP Looking for a healthy alternative to food on the go? Snap Kitchen offers freshmade foods made with local, organic ingredients, as well as pressed juices and specialty elixirs. They're also rolling out a new menu, featuring 15 new dishes. Highlights include oven-dried tomato and goat cheese tart, roasted garlic and mushroom pizza, and Texas grass-fed beef hash. Five Houston locations. snapkitchen.com

uchirestaurants.com

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In the Mix

Scan page with Layar to get the recipe and see it made.

Line & Lariat’s Houston Farris champions Lone Star libations BY MICHELLE BURGESS

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his leadership, the comfortably elegant tavern has greatly expanded its portfolio of Texas-born beers and liquors. “I try to celebrate Texas products as best I can,” he says. “Our menu prominently features cocktails made with Texas distilled spirits, highlighting the characteristics and characters, as well as flavors, of our state.” New this fall, L&L Bar has partnered with Houston’s Yellow Rose Distillery to create two barrel-aged bourbon cocktails. Also new on the menu is the Bayou City Sunrise, created by Farris to commemorate the launch of Bayou City magazine. The colorful concoction marries 100 percent agave reposado tequila, fresh-squeezed lime juice and agave syrup, shaken and strained over ice and then layered with an ounce of red wine and garnished with a lime wheel. It is, he says, a “wholly unique mix, not unlike Houston itself.”

Houston Farris, mixologist at Line & Lariat at the Hotel ICON, prepares the Bayou City Sunrise.

Regardless of what a guest orders, Farris is proud to be an ambassador for the place he calls a cosmopolitan city that hasn’t lost that small-town feel. “Working in a hotel bar is an experience unlike any other,” he says. “I serve people from all

spectrums, all classes, all ethnicities and from all across the globe. Sometimes I’m their very first experience with Houston, so I love getting to tell them all the great things about it.” Line & Lariat, Hotel ICON 220 Main St. 713-224-4266 hotelicon.com/dining/bar

MARK LIPCZYNSKI

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here are a few things you should know about Houston Farris before reading about his celebrated career as one of the Bayou City’s pre-eminent mixologists. First off, yes, he does get asked about his name quite a bit—especially when he’s behind the bar at Hotel ICON’s Line & Lariat. Guests, he says, “can’t get enough of” his moniker and its oh-so-perfect Texasness. But here’s a little secret: Houston is from Harlingen, but for the past 12 years, has called his namesake city home. Next, understand that while Farris is a bartender nonpareil, it doesn’t define his entire life. The 29-year-old husband and father is also a Judeo-Christianity scholar and lay missionary whose interest in bartending began at an early age. “When my family would frequent this one Italian restaurant near my hometown, 6-year-old me would sneak off and talk to the bartenders,” he says. “My taste in wine led to my love of beer, which led to being educated in spirits and cocktails, so here I am today. Through self-study, I’ve been able to be constantly growing.” That dedication to self-evolution has paid off. After just four years behind the bar, Farris was tapped last year to oversee the L&L Bar and its beverage program. Under bayou city M AGA ZI NE

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PARALYZED FROM THE WAIST DOWN, POWERED BY THE NECK UP. THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN PRACTICING MEDICINE AND LEADING IT. At Houston Methodist, we take on the greatest challenges in medicine, like giving paraplegics the ability to walk again. In a collaboration between Houston Methodist doctors and University of Houston engineers, we’re developing an exoskeleton that’s operated by a patient’s brainwaves. Our latest clinical trials combine our advances in neurosciences with the REX Walking Device to enable a paralyzed patient to walk again simply by thinking it.

For more information call 713.790.3333. houstonmethodist.org

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Gourmand Goodies

Scan page with Layar to get the goods.

“Made in Houston” is a gift all epicures on your list will relish

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GANACHE WITH LOVE Araya Artisan Chocolates are locally crafted, jewel-like ganaches and truffles exquisitely spiked with champagne rose, pink salt, infusions, liquors and more. Available in three holiday box sizes or customize each piece per box ($15 to $70). Addicting! 2013 W. Gray. 832-967-7960 1411 Uptown Park Blvd. 713-960-0850 arayachocolate.com

BOTTOMS UP! When it comes to decadent, made-fromscratch, deep-dish pies, Goode Company makes the ultimate for the gourmet sweet tooth on your list. Their Brazos Bottom pecan pie, covered in fresh whole Texas pecans, is fun for proud Texans to ship to out-of-state, too, thanks to its sturdy wooden box emblazoned “made in Texas” ($36). 5015 Kirby Drive. 713-643-5263 goodecompany.com

BIG CHEESE Looking to please the cheesehead in your family? Houston Dairymaids offers gift boxes including Texas Trio ($48) with three mouthmelting cheeses, or Dairymaid Favorites ($75) with five artisan American cheeses. But for the ultimate gift, the Dairymaid Favorites Deluxe comes with all of the above plus Potter’s Crackers, Oregon hazelnuts and wild guajillo honey in a wooden cheese box ($122). 2201 Airline Drive. 713-880-4800 houstondairymaids.com

STREET EATS Hugo Ortega’s “Street Food of Mexico” cookbook is a stunning collection of interior Mexico recipes and stories created by the chef of Hugo’s in Houston and photographed by Penny de los Santos ($34.95). Roll up your sleeves and get inspired! 1600 Westheimer. 713-524-7744 chefhugoortega.com

A CUT ABOVE Bladesmith Russell Montgomery of Serenity Knives hand forges gorgeous kitchen and steak knives from high carbon steel, olive wood and solid wood, sporting special userfriendly handles. Purchase sushi knives ($300), European-style chef knives, steak knives ($200) and more from his website or shop. 410 Harvard St. 832-860-4754 serenityknives.com

BOWLED OVER Steve Campbell of Three Dot Pots spins unique, earthy ceramic plates, bowls and tabletop accessories recently seen on the dining tables of Oxheart and in the new Americas restaurant cookbook. Paella platter ($75), dinnerware plates ($45 each). By appointment only. 5123 Patrick Henry. 713-253-8979 threedotpots.com

ARAYA ARTISAN CHOCOLATES | GOODE COMANY | HOUSTON DAIRYMAIDS | PENNY DE LOS SANTOS | SERENITY KNIVES | THREE DOT POTS

BY ROBIN BARR SUSSMAN

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2102 WEST 34TH ST. HOUSTON, TX 77018 | 713-956-9595 | KITCHENANDBATHWIZARDS.COM Showroom Hours: Mon. to Fri. 8 a.m. – 5:00 p.m. Saturday 9 a.m. – 2 p.m. Closed Sunday

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Cider Revival Move over craft brews, hard cider is creating a buzz in the Bayou City bar scene

Served in a champagne-style corked bottle, Argus Cidery is popping up all over the Bayou City's craft breweries, including The Hay Merchant in Montrose.

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oustonians might reach for American zinfandel to pour with the Thanksgiving feast and then pop champagne to ring in the new year, but nothing could be more appropriate than fruity, ultra-dry hard cider, which is

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trending big in the wine world and among the craft brew set. At the cutting-edge The Pass & Provisions, for instance, uber chefs Terrance Gallivan and Seth Siegel-Gardner brilliantly pair J.K.’s Scrumpy Hard Cider with rabbit, carrot crepinette,

peas and huckleberries on the seasonal tasting menu. It’s a symphony of flavors highlighted with the fizzy fruity— yet not sweet—sip of mellow apple cider with low alcohol, allowing all the ingredients of the food to shine through. And at Philippe Restaurant and Lounge, savvy wine director Vanessa Trevino-Boyd impresses with a wine list including natural and organic selections like Bonny Doon, CA, Querry hard sparkling cider. Hard cider was included in her recent monthly wine dinner spotlighting organic wines across the country and this selection is an ethereal mélange of quince, fragrant pear and succulent apples made by methode ancestrale with fermentation in the bottle. The result is a crisp, quite dry bubbly that pairs well with Asian food, seafood, poultry and charcuterie. Jake Schiffer, founder of Houston-based Leprechaun Ciders, was a brave pioneer of

the hard stuff, starting the first Houston hard cider company based on his travels to Britain and Ireland, and his love of true artisan ciders. Tart, bright and crisp describe his dozen or so variations including Dry, Texas Golden and effervescent Pomegranate ciders. Find them at retail locations including Whole Foods, HEB, Phoenicia Market, and restaurants Eleven XI, the Tasting Room CityCentre, and bars Celtic Gardens and Little Woodrows Midtown. And speaking of pomegranate, hard ciders go beyond the apple core. Ciders can also be made with pears, or infused with different alcohols and spices. Woodchuck Hard Cider, for instance, makes a Belgian white cider made with Belgian beer yeast, coriander and orange notes, as well as a private reserve pumpkin cider. The Vermont-based ciders may be found at Specs and Trader Joe’s. Austin-based Texas Argus Cidery founded by Wes Mickel produces wild fermented, oak barrel, dry-style ciders made from sweet Texas apples and impressively packaged in ultra cool champagne-corked bottles. Look for the just released Lady Goldsmith and a selection of his other ciders at local Whole Foods, Spec’s, and D&Q Market, as well as neighborhood drinking holes such as The Hay Merchant. A little pricey, but worth it for the upcoming holidays.

MARK LIPCZYNSKI

BY ROBIN BARR SUSSMAN

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+ Scan with Layar to view the catalog and buy tickets.

November 21-24, 2013 George R. Brown Convention Center, Houston, Texas Featuring

Bunny Williams

Ellie Cullman and Tracey Pruzan

Danielle Rollins

Celerie Kemble

Alexa Hampton

WWW.THETACHARITYANTIQUESSHOW.COM

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Mighty Sweet

Scan page with Layar for a mighty sweet recipe.

Mother-and-daughter duo scratch out pies in the Heights BY STACY BARRY

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of baking, Davis spearheads marketing needs. They admit, however, that their advertising method is as old-fashioned as their recipes. “We put signs in the window,” Davis says. “And we have repeat customers—some who drive a good distance— and their word of mouth brings in business. We’re lucky to be in a very supportive community.” Situated in what once was a corner barbershop, Mighty Sweet Mini Pies is reminiscent of a farmhouse kitchen, except for the oversized, timeworn glass-front cabinet showcasing the day’s five flavors. “I had such fun decorating it,” says Birden of the antique and tin-strewn space. Customer favorites pecan and peach cobbler are always offered, along with three rotating flavors, including a sugarfree option. Customers can wash it all down with milk, coffee or a glass-bottled soft drink, or top it with a scoop of Blue Bell ice cream. The shop’s monthly menu lets customers know when their favorites are featured. But when they run out for the day, which happens on occasion, the shop closes—kind of like grandma’s kitchen. Mighty Sweet Mini Pies 4525 N. Main 713-862-4960 mightysweetminipies.com

Carolyn Birden and Bianca Davis (left) create homemade pies inspired by their family’s recipes at Mighty Sweet Pies, a charming, vintage-inspired pie shop in the Heights. MARK LIPCZYNSKI

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hen Carolyn Birden and daughter Bianca Davis debuted Mighty Sweet Mini Pies in the Heights last March, they were hoping their vision of peddling individually-portioned treats wasn’t too “pie in the sky” for a cupcake world. Turns out, it was just what folks in this cozy community were craving. Using grandma’s recipe books, the mother/daughter bakers proffered the perfect menu for those whose taste for sweets run toward the traditional. Early each day, the flaky, 5-inch crusts are handmade from scratch, baked and filled with fresh fruit or other allnatural ingredients in a commercial kitchen not far from the shop. Davis remembers her grandmother taking flavor requests before school and having the warm wish granted each afternoon. So she and her mother, whose own grandmother “made two pies a day every day of her life,” come by their passion for pies honestly. “We were always more likely to have pies than cakes or other sweets growing up,” says Birden. As is the case in most familyrun businesses, both women “do it all” and usually work side-by-side, creating pies from approximately 50 recipes. And while Birden is in charge bayou city M AGA ZI NE

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Gen’s Antiques

Subscribe

Free*

Art Antiques Furniture Collectibles Home Decor

713-868-2368 540 W 19th St Houston, TX 77008

Stop lurking around your neighborhood magazine stand—instead, have Bayou City magazine delivered directly to your mailbox.

Scan this ad with Layar to subscribe to our print magazine.

* Launch special. Bayou City magazine subscriptions are free for residents in Harris County. Limit one subscription per household.

Custom Built Classic in Tanglewood

[ Shady River ] Classic one-story home near HCC has wonderful curb appeal, large rooms and lovely patio/pool/gardens. Custom built by Bruce Barnett. Special features include vaulted ceilings, wood windows, large rooms, numerous built-ins, big closets, six-panel doors, interior brick detail and abundant natural light. Four bedrooms, three and one-half baths in main house, plus full quarters. Spacious master suite has bath with whirlpool, shower, double sinks, two dressing areas and custom closet systems. Whole house generator. Automatic driveway gate. $1.4+ million

Lynn Russell

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Broker Associate 713.914.8750 lynn@greenwoodking.com greenwoodking.com/lynnrussell

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It's a Ruff Life

Scan page with Layar for a map of the city's dogfriendly spots.

Pet-friendly restaurants are a dog lover’s dream BY DENNIS ABRAMS You’ll note that, at least for now, most of the dog-friendly restaurants and bars licensed by the city are located in Montrose and in the Heights. But since it only costs a restaurant a onetime fee of $110, try asking your favorite places if they’d like to expand their clientele by allowing dogs on the premises. For a list of all places authorized by the city to serve humans and their dogs, go to houstontx. gov/health/Food/ dogpatios.pdf.

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ELEVEN XI RESTAURANT AND BAR

BONEYARD DOG PARK & DRINKERY

Conveniently located just blocks from the West

With the city’s largest selection of Abitas on

Webster Dog Park, Eleven XI offers four-legged

draft and a 7,000-square-foot, fenced-in dog

customers fresh water bowls on their newly

park, your furry friend can play with his doggie

revamped patio. Diners can enjoy everything

friends while you drink up with your human

from mussels and burgers, washed down with a

ones. What could be better?

frosty beer. What more could you want?

8150 Washington. 832-494-1600,

607 W. Gray St. 713-529-5881,

boneyardhouston.com

elevenxihouston.com CHRISTIAN’S TAILGATE BAR AND GRILL THE DOGWOOD

Besides being dog-friendly, Christian’s dishes

Sit a spell with Fido on the patio, where he’ll

out some of the best burgers in town. Try the

be served a fresh bowl of water to quench

green chili cheeseburger served with crispy

his thirst. Enjoy a great bar, awesome sound

onion rings. In the mood for a little trivia?

system, sweet tea vodka on tap and Dogwood

Check out Tuesday night “trivia night” at the

burgers topped with fried green tomatoes. 2403

midtown location.

Bagby St. 281-501-9075,

2000 Bagby. 713-527-0261; 2820 White Oak.

thedogwoodmidtown.com

713-863-1207, christianstailgate.com

BONEYARDHOUSTON.COM

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itting at home with your dog is great, but bringing him or her out with you is even better (plus, having an adorable pet with you is always a great icebreaker for striking up conversations). Of course, Houston still isn’t Paris. We rarely see well-dressed women with their equally coiffed pooches sitting contentedly in some of our finest restaurants. But we are becoming more accepting of canine customers. So what are some of the best dog-friendly places in H-town? Here are a few spots where man’s best friend is always welcome.

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G Gallery, a Contemporary Art Space located in the Historic Heights, showcases eclectic and often provocative work by outsider, emerging and established artists.

301 East 11th Street • Houston, TX 77008 • 713.869.4770 • ggalleryhouston.com Hours 12:00-5:00 pm, Wednesday through Sunday

Still wondering what this icon 1

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By

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JULIE OSTERMAN

New trends in gift giving cater to the person who has it all

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“Oh, how nice. A pair of gloves.” The feigned enthusiasm of your mother/wife/aunt/ sister/girlfriend cuts like the carving knife on your turducken. Don’t worry, it’s happened to us all. But lucky for you—and for Aunt Suzie—times have changed. Gone are the days of gloves, scarves and ugly sweaters. Bayou City trendsetters turn instead to unique gift ideas that bring meaningful experiences and benevolent acts to the top of the list.



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The gift of experience is the gift that keeps on giving. Treat your foodie friend to a gourmand adventure with Houston Culinary Tours (left) or your favorite sports enthusiast to polo lessons at the Houston Polo Club (below).

The beauty of living in a dynamic, cultural city like Houston is the endless opportunities to experience it. From exploring the city’s culinary prowess to trying out a new adventure to soaking in the arts, there is much to share with that special someone. If you’re fortunate enough to grab tickets to one of the popular Houston Culinary Tours (houstonculinarytours.com), your gift is sure to be revered. These chef-led tours take 16 food aficionados on a sumptuous route to discover the ethnic neighborhood eateries, mom-and-pop shops, food trucks and more that some of Houston’s top chefs frequent on their days off. “I think we all come together around food, especially around the holidays,” says A.J. Mistretta of the Greater Houston Convention & Visitors Bureau, which coordinates this unique Sunday afternoon excursion. “When you share this with someone, it’s something that speaks to the heart. It’s an experience that you can’t box up.” A date night cooking class at Urban Chef (urbanchef houston.com) is another recipe for success. Learn new cooking techniques, meet interesting people and enjoy a romantic meal. “Some people come to improve their cooking skills, while others just come for the fun,” says founder Chara Gafford. Themes for recent date nights include Cajun favorites, Italy and sushi, just to name a few. 50

Grab your mallet and practice your back shot because, honey, you’re going to Polo School. Lessons at the Houston Polo Club (thehoustonpoloclub.com) will allow your mate to discover the exciting equestrian sport of Polo. Lessons are offered year-round, while the eightweek polo school and Sunday polo games begin in April. “No matter what your riding level we all learn to hit the ball at walk,” says riding director Merrily Quincoces. “You could be giving the gift of a new passion.” Get some exercise and learn about the city’s history and natural beauty with a guided kayak tour by the Bayou Shuttle Service (bayoushuttle.com). Choose from a variety of tours exploring Buffalo Bayou, Armand Bayou, Cypress Creek and Greens Bayou. If kayaking isn’t your thing, they also offer bike tours, surfing and stand-up paddle boarding.

JUIE SOEFER/HOUSTON CONVENTION AND VISITORS BUREAU | HOUSTON POLO CLUB

GIVE EXPERIENCES, NOT THINGS

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SIMPLE INDULGENCES

Instead of fretting about the gift, focus on the giving. Whether it’s a soothing spa treatment or a weekend stay at a luxurious resort, thoughtful tokens that celebrate the finer things in life are sure to surprise and delight. If the hustle and bustle of the holidays has you hiding out, get your creative juices flowing and plan a special meal at home. Where would you go to find highquality, locally sourced, artisanal ingredients for such a repast? Why, Revival Market (revivalmarket.com) in the Heights, of course. For the holidays, Revival features hormone-free, free-range turkeys, Berkshire pork, cured and smoked hams, standing rib and crown roasts, heat-and-serve porchetta, housemade tamales and a stellar charcuterie of sausage, prosciutto and salami. Revival co-owner Morgan Weber says the key is to keep it simple. “Use tried and true recipes and don’t be afraid to buy some of the dishes prepared,” he suggests. The week before Thanksgiving, Christmas and New Year’s, the shop offers a wide selection of holiday side dishes and desserts. Here’s a secret: If you call ahead, they will prepare them in your casserole dishes. Another idea for a simple, yet inspired meal: Plan a picnic. Pack your own provisions, or let the folks at Picnic (picnicboxlunches.com) in the Museum District fill your basket. Regulars swear by the chicken salad, roasted turkey and pork tenderloin sandwiches, and refreshing frozen lemonade. Fresh-baked gingerbread,

chocolate bourbon pecan pie and cranberry apple pie add holiday flair. Picnic owners Rob and Sara Cromie identify 10 great spots for an al fresco feast on the deli’s website. Highlights include the tranquil Cullen Sculpture Garden at the Museum of Fine Arts Houston (mfah.org) and the “green, green lawn” at The Menil Collection (menil. org). Miller Outdoor Theatre (milleroutdoortheatre. com) is a no brainer, and turns this simple indulgence into a real experience.

DEBORA SMAIL

Spoil the ones you love with simple, yet unexpected treats that will make them feel extraordinary. Create a special meal for them at Revival Market (left) or plan a perfect outdoor lunch through the folks at Picnic.

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The best gift is the one that helps others. From organizations like Dress for Success Houston (right) to Houston-based Living Water International (far right), we can give the gift of hope and promise.

+ Scan page with Layar to read more about paying it forward in the tablet sidebar “Random Acts of Kindness.”

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With our incredible Southern hospitality and strong economy, it’s no wonder that Houston ranks second in the nation in charitable giving by Charity Navigator. Many locals spread the holiday joy by making a gift donation to their favorite organization in honor of a family member, friend or co-worker. Here are just a few of the countless worthy causes. Child Advocates (childadvocates.com) supports children in Houston who have been a victim of life-threatening abuse or neglect. “They need our voice, our reassurance and our help,” says Cynthia Ramain, who served as a volunteer courtappointed advocate for three years before having her own children. “They, too, deserve a safe and happy childhood—something so many of us take for granted.” Make a tribute donation, or become an advocate yourself. Dress for Success Houston (dressforsuccess.org) empowers disadvantaged women by providing work attire, networking and career development tools. “This is so important to our community, and these women and their families,” says Rebecca Loeb, president and CEO of Houston meetings firm Coterie Spark. In addition to monetary gifts, Dress for Success also accepts donations of business clothes, handbags and accessories. A coalition of 41 area churches, the Christian Community Service Center (ccschouston.org) offers emergency services, food pantry assistance and great children’s programs like Back to School and Jingle Bell Express. Bellaire dweller Katie Alexander calls the center “family friendly” and gives kudos to director Michelle Shonbeck. “She is supportive of teaching kids the importance of volunteerism at an early age,” Alexander says. Based in Greater Houston, but benefitting communities around the world, Living Water International (water. cc) makes safe drinking water a reality for those who are thirsty—not only for consumption, but also for sanitation and better hygiene. Thus far, the organization has completed 12,797 water projects in 23 countries.

DRESS FOR SUCCESS HOUSTON | LIVING WATER INTERNATIONAL

PAY IT FORWARD

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Your Unconventional Gifts One of the hot trends in gift giving is going beyond the ordinary. Here are the best unconventional gifts you’ve given or received. The best unconventional gift I ever gave my husband was a birthday scavenger hunt where we spent the entire day going on adventures to get his different gifts. The greatest one of all came near the end. He is a musician and collects instruments. I bought him a banjolele, but I didn’t just give it to him. Part of his scavenger hunt was that he had to stand on the corner panhandling for money. After he earned a dollar, I told him I would give him his gift, but that once he got it, he couldn’t move on to his next gift until he played on the street corner to earn another dollar. We ended up making some fantastic friends with the people who gave him change when they got into the spirit of our occasion. BONNIE AL-RIFAI, facebook.com/2BirdsPhotography We gave our kids a set of monkey rings a few years back that we hung in our living room! It’s Houston, after all, and there are several months of the year when our backyard is lousy with mosquitoes, so we just thought we’d bring the fun inside…and it worked! Most toys have a pretty short shelf life, but our kids’ delight over these monkey rings has never flagged. Even my mom, who thought we were nuts at the time, agrees now: Best crazy gift ever. KATHERINE CENTER, facebook.com/ katherinecenter I have had many parents give my matchmaking service and coaching to their kids or friends. It is actually a well-received gift. I’ve never had anyone not be excited. Surprised, but usually excited. NINA FRIEDMAN NEISH, facebook.com/yentagirl As a senior in high school, I gave my boyfriend a tour of the Budweiser factory on the east end. He always talked about beer, so naturally I thought a tour would be perfect. We got there 30 minutes early because Miss Just Got My License had no concept of travel times on I-10 east. Sitting in a car and staring at a factory is not all that exciting. But the tour was so cool! Or so I thought. Today, I’d probably give a Saint Arnold’s tour instead. BRANDY HOLMES One year, a friend and her husband found a couple of kittens outside his office. They were so tiny and feral that they weren’t good candidates for adoption, so our friends fostered them to get them healthy and socialized. As my friend’s birthday present that year, I arranged and paid for the kittens’ spaying and neutering. Not your standard gift, but our friends were in a financial bind and this helped everyone—the kittens included. JACINDA TUCKER

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 + Scan page with Layar to visit the zoo.

Giving opportunities that help our community include animal adoption at the Houston Zoo (right) and replanting programs through Trees for Houston (far right).

GIVING GREEN

Everyone seems to be going green these days, from reducing your carbon footprint to supporting your local community’s green initiatives. So why not give green this holiday season? Trees for Houston (treesforhouston.org) aids in replanting the city’s canopy. For a donation of $310 or $450 to the Tribute Trees program, a tree will be planted in a Houston-area park in honor of your friend or family member. “Enduring and beautiful, a planted tree is a unique and thoughtful way of honoring a loved one while also benefitting future generations of Houstonians,” says executive director Barry Ward. Another project dedicated to local beautification is the Houston Parks Board’s Bayou Greenways 2020 Initiative (houstonparksboard.org/bgi/2020). Over the next seven years, this bold capital campaign will create 1,500 acres of new green space along the city’s bayous and 77 miles of trails, connecting all existing and new parkland to each other. Honor the outdoor enthusiast in your life with a gift donation, which, says BikeHouston board chair Regina Garcia, “is our opportunity to create a better Houston for our children, our visitors and our neighbors.” Or focus on conservation by adopting an animal at the Houston Zoo (houstonzoo.org). “Giving the gift of an Adopt at the Houston Zoo is perfect for that loved one or friend who has everything,” 54

says development coordinator Alex Pugh, “especially if they love our animal family as much as we do.” Contributions to the Adopt program support the care and feeding of all 6,000 zoo animals, plus education and conservation efforts around the world. The perfect present for any busy mom: a gift card to Green Plate Kitchen (greenplatekitchen.com), featuring freshs fresh, organic, kid-friendly meals and snacks that the whole family will enjoy. Order online and pick up from New Living in Rice Village (newliving.net), a cool sustainable home store featuring eco-friendly beds, paint and workshops on “healthy green building.”

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Scan page with Layar to experience a party at the Baldwin home.

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GIVING BACK

Bill Baldwin restored a home and the result helped him become a role model for giving back. He’s passionate about creating a sense of place—in his work, home and neighborhood, he brings the community together to further causes and to celebrate success.

by DENNIS ABRAMS

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photographs by M A R K L I P C Z Y N S K I

Bill Baldwin is one of Houston’s most successful and widely recognized Realtors and developers. He lives in an award-winning, 6,700-square-foot home in Woodland Heights with his partner of 10 years, international banker Joe Gonzalez. In the backyard, Bill and Joe keep a kitchen garden and raise chickens, and they often give fresh eggs as gifts to neighbors and friends.

Any one of those things would make him a person of interest. But there’s more. Baldwin will tell you that his passions are art, wine, his neighborhood and local politics. But his real passion is giving back. And by opening his home to support community events and promote his neighborhood an average of twice a week, he’s managed to turn it into an art form. bayoucitymagazine.com

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C O M M U N I T Y A D V O C AT E Both Baldwin and Gonzalez acknowledge that they’re lucky to be in a position to promote their neighborhood, and are grateful they have the opportunity to do so. “We meet fascinating people we would not otherwise be able to meet,” he says. “The number of people who have never been to the Heights constantly amazes me. We have events that give the Heights the exposure it deserves.” But for Baldwin, it’s more than that. Much more. “I’m passionate about improving the neighborhoods that I live, work and play in. It’s about improving schools, businesses, the air, the water, the safety and security; the lifestyles, living in harmony with business and things. That’s really my passion,” he says. “And in doing so, by promoting the schools or having influence over politicians or having exposure for an individual homeowner or group of people who just live here, to have the ability to get in front of politicians, principals, charitable events or artists—it gives us a chance to have some impact in our neighborhood. People need to spend more time together in their neighborhoods. It gives us an opportunity to influence things

that make our neighborhood a better place to live.” As a Realtor and developer, Baldwin is all too aware that neighborhoods can’t be preserved in a time capsule. He knows there’s going to be progress, there’s going to be more traffic and more high-rises and, yes, there will be Walmarts. So instead of complaining about them, the question for Baldwin becomes how can we work together to make them work for our neighborhoods? “Everyone is always telling me what they’re against. I want to know what they’re for,” he says. “There will always be people who are resistant to change. But change is inevitable. If I can bring school principals together and let people visit them, if I can bring city council people together with the sheriff or constable or with the mayor or controller, then there’s a face and there’s a name and there’s an opportunity to interact.” Building on the “third place” trend—which brings

ARTURO RODRIGUEZ

Built in 1910 by William A. Wilson, Baldwin’s home is a featured stop on the Woodland Heights Home Tour.

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people together outside of home and work—Baldwin brings people together at events in his home to improve the entire neighborhood. Baldwin continues, “So, yes, sidewalks, bicycles, parks and the arts are important to me simply because I want to have a better neighborhood. I can’t do much about Syria, and I really can’t do anything about Medicare, Medicaid, the deficit or anything like that. But I do get to influence who this principal is, what the bond elections are going to be for, where the money is going to be spent, whether we’re going to get new sidewalks and which trees are going to be protected. So that part of my passion for ideals is helping inner city neighborhoods like ours so that they can thrive again like they would have in 1910.”

ARTURO RODRIGUEZ

At least 100 times a year, Baldwin and Gonzalez open their home to nonprofit groups and organizations for fundraising efforts and awareness campaigns.

EVENTS FOR A CAUSE On a recent Wednesday night, the chairman of the Sheep and Goat Committee for the Houston Livestock Show and Rodeo hosted an event to raise awareness and promote the committee’s mission of working with sheep, dairy and market goat exhibitors at the rodeo. Forty-eight people attended. Everything was taken care of by the committee, while Baldwin and Gonzalez provided the venue: their home. Three days later, Catholic Charities held an intimate event for 12. “They provided the wine, service and caterers; we provided the wine cellar,” Baldwin says. Just a typical schedule for Baldwin and Gonzalez, who offer their home mostly to organizations focused on promoting their causes, as well as groups wanting to recognize achievements. “We might have teacher orientations for a local elementary school or an event for Reagan High School to recognize their teachers and staff,” says Baldwin. Other events have included a seated dinner for 120 people for the Blackwood Land Institute, a dinner for the wives of the Houston Texans coaches, and gatherings for Opera in the Heights. “We also love to have art events, like a Sunday brunch, which Joe cooks for. We’ll have an artist who will showcase their art and on average it’ll attract a couple of hundred people.” The largest event they’ve ever held saw 600 guests over the course of an evening for White Linen Night, an annual event designed to create interest in the Heights retail district and generate sales during the summer months.

If there was such a thing as the platonic ideal of a residence in the Heights (Woodland Heights, to be exact), it’s a safe bet that the home of Bill Baldwin and Joe Gonzalez comes as close as humanly possible. Built in 1910 by William A. Wilson— and completely gutted and rebuilt by Baldwin and Gonzalez in 2006— the home is inspired in part by the residences the couple had seen and loved in Savannah, but with a feel of Houston timelessness. A gorgeous 2,000-square-foot wraparound porch. A grand staircase with a landing that allows one to take in the downstairs while giving a breathtaking view of the antique chandeliers. Furniture that, while still beautiful, is meant to be used. Books. Art. The kitchen of any foodie’s dreams (and it needs to be—the couple have enough equipment and dishes for a 120-person, sit-down dinner). There’s even a wine cellar, for goodness' sake. But at the same time, it’s not a house just for display and entertaining; it’s a house where a family—the couple and Baldwin’s two children—can live happily ever after. It is about as close to perfect as a house can get. But, as everybody knows, perfection comes at a price. Consider this: The wraparound porch, fully restored by Baldwin to its original splendor, contains 150 spindles—each of which were milled to order at $75 each. The wine cellar added $125,000 to the cost of the rebuilding. Baldwin has been in real estate for a long time; he knows what things are going to cost. But when everything was said and done—every piece of molding, every piece of furniture, every fixture and rug and curtain was in place—the total was $400,000 over the original budget. In Baldwin’s opinion, it was completely worth it.

PLACE WITH A PURPOSE Baldwin’s decision to open his home to nonprofit organizations and community groups came as he was renovating it. Built in 1910 by William A. Wilson, developer of Woodland Heights, the house had been the St. Jude Assisted Living home since 1935 and had long since seen better days. bayoucitymagazine.com

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Join Bayou City magazine to experience the Baldwin home and support The Summerhouse Inside a quaint and charming home on a quiet, tree-lined street in the Heights, there are wonderful things happening. It is here, at The Summerhouse, that young adults with intellectual disabilities are making the transition to a productive, more self-sufficient life. The Summerhouse was started by Donna Fruge and other community volunteers who identified the lack of programs meeting the social and emotional needs of adults with intellectual challenges. Fruge had difficulty finding such programs for her own daughter Summer, and decided to put a plan in action. In 2012, The Summerhouse doors opened, giving clients the opportunities and means to learn everyday skills in a real-world setting. On any given day, clients may be learning how to make grocery lists and plan meals, while others may be learning job skills such as furniture making. The Summerhouse also offers a vocational program called Shred for Independence in which clients shred documents for local businesses. Programs at The Summerhouse are focused on one-on-one interaction and rely on group participation by both clients and staff members. From preparing and eating lunch, to exercise and social outings, everyone at The Summerhouse is actively involved and engaged in the process of transitioning clients to become valued and respected contributing members of society.

To help The Summerhouse continue its programs, a special fundraising event will be held on Jan. 16, 2014, at the home of Bill Baldwin and Joe Gonzales. The special evening will feature a home tour, wine tastings and gourmet offerings prepared by Gonzales himself. The intimate event is limited to 100 guests. For information or to make reservations, visit http://www.eventbrite.com/ event/8877652297.

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As work was being done, Baldwin found himself asking the questions: “How would Wilson use this house as a developer in 1910? What would they do? What would they have? How would they live?” So while Baldwin was installing Viking appliances, he was also trying to find a way to approach the way that the original inhabitants would have used the space. “They would use the house to help sell houses in the Heights,” Baldwin says. “They would have entertained with poetry readings and novelists. I envisioned string quartets, local politicians. There would be the arts, entertainment, family events and social things. These ideas planted the seed of how they’d live and, in turn, helped me realize how I could use the house to help benefit the neighborhood and make it prosper. All that was going on in my mind while we’re redoing the house.” And it was almost immediately after the house was completed and the couple moved in that they started opening it up. “People started asking us if they could use the house for events in the first year. And at that point, we wanted to show it off,” Baldwin says. “It’s an amazing house, nicer than we first envisioned, and we’re fortunate enough to be in a position that we’re able to open it. We love to entertain and the whole thing has just evolved. Joe loves to cook and while at first he envisioned being able to do all the cooking for every event, now there’s just too many.” Just too many is perhaps a bit of an understatement. At least 100 times a year (20 events scheduled during the month of October alone), Baldwin and Gonzalez open their home to others. When they’re not hosting events, Baldwin and Gonzalez use their historical home for projects that may be trendy, urban-living projects today, but are also similar to what the house would have seen 100 years ago. A kitchen garden and backyard chickens provide fresh food for their own table, for example. Bill says his chickens live in “the world’s nicest chicken coop.” The laying hens represent different breeds and lay different color eggs. Next to the chickens, Bill keeps 200,000 bees in alliance with Zelko Bistro’s The Heights HoneyBee Project. Dalia and Jamie Zelko, owners of the Bistro, use some of the honey in recipes for dressings and cheese presentations. But the project is primarily designed to help protect the vanishing, native honeybee. Baldwin’s home supports his passions for enhancing his neighborhood and giving back to the community, but it's also a showcase filled with both beauty and comfort. LABOR OF LOVE A featured stop on the Woodland Heights Home Tour, not only is the home architecturally beautiful inside and out, but the design, furnishings and art in each

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individual room are nearly perfect, as well. Not in a museum “don’t touch anything” kind of way, but in a way that makes you want to settle back into a chair, have a drink (it seems very much a red wine or bourbon kind of place) and appreciate the life you’ve created for yourself. Bill says that the goal was to achieve a sense of “intimacy in every room.” Mission accomplished. Of course, it didn’t happen overnight. When Baldwin and Gonzalez bought the house and property almost 10 years ago, it wasn’t the masterpiece it is today. It had fallen into such a state of disrepair that they weren’t sure if they were going to repair it or just tear the whole thing down. But when the house was gutted and completely stripped down, they were able to see exactly what they had bought and the answer became clear.

“I fell maddeningly, sickeningly in love with the house,” Baldwin says. And that’s when the work began. Four and a half months just to do the windows. Old growth cypress that had been knocked down when Hurricane Rita went through Louisiana was milled for the siding. Fire brick was made so that it would look like it was before. A garage was built that would look like it had always been there. Thirty molding samples were tried and rejected before finding just the right one. But for Baldwin and Gonzalez, it wasn’t a question of simply “restoring” the house. Beyond the goal of making every room perfect and modernizing it, it was more a question of recreating what it would have looked like, what it would have felt like and how it would have been used.

For Baldwin and Gonzalez, their home is architecturally beautiful, while still being a place where they can settle back and appreciate the life they've created for themselves.

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THE BAYOU CITY COMES OF AGE Celebrate major anniversaries of Bayou City institutions that defined our past, helped position us on the global stage and are shaping our future.

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BY C EC E L I A OT T E N W E L L E R & L I B BY I N G R A S S I A

A TIME TRAVELER MIGHT BE SHOCKED AT WHAT HOUSTON HAS BECOME SINCE ITS FOUNDING. VISUALLY, NOT MUCH IS RECOGNIZABLE. BUT ATTITUDINALLY, HE OR SHE WOULD FEEL RIGHT AT HOME. ouston—also known as the Bayou City because of its founding at the intersection of White Oak and Buffalo Bayous—has always been a crazy quilt of communities and cultures, with people coming from all over with a hunger to capitalize on any of the many economic opportunities this amazing city has to offer. From education to the arts, from commerce to community, the city owes much of its current status as the next great American city (Smithsonian),

coolest city (Forbes) and best place for job growth (Forbes) to a few of its landmark institutions. We now have the chance celebrate the 100-year anniversaries of a few of those institutions: Rice in 2012, the Houston Symphony Orchestra in 2013 and both the Houston Ship Channel and Hermann Park in 2014. To celebrate their longevity and achievements, we can marvel a bit at Houston’s history, reflect on how these assets have helped Houston evolve and visit them to experience their influence on our community and on our Bayou City’s bright future. bayoucitymagazine.com

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CELEBRATE BAYOU EDUCATION RICE UNIVERSITY ice University has left its collective fingerprint on nearly every corner of human existence, whether through groundbreaking thought in literature, economics, architecture or art, or by bravely pushing the barriers in astrophysics, engineering or archaeology. But especially in Houston, Rice’s intellectual and cultural contributions are constantly visible and ongoing. Rice celebrated its centennial in 2012 during a weekend of events culminating with a brilliant, internationally acclaimed immersive projected art piece, appropriately titled the “Spectacle.” To bring the celebration to Rice alumni around the world, the Centennial Story Project uses video to let the alums tell their stories and show the vast impact the university has had, from inspiring the building of NASA nearby (on land donated by the university) to getting the Tuskegee airmen off the ground, to educating the architects, artists, leaders and politicians that have built Houston. Reading Rice’s stories is like reading a history of Houston. Take the impact and influence of Rice alumnus (and former mayor and Harris County judge) Roy Hofheinz, for example, who built the Astrodome and brought major league baseball to Houston, among other accomplishments. Appropriately, Rice got its start after a great deal of drama. William Marsh Rice arrived in Houston from Massachusetts in 1837. Savvy, adventurous and quick to act, Rice knew how to grasp opportunity when it knocked. He built his fortune serving both ends of the cotton business through the new Houston Port. Rice eventually became a banker, and started and ran a number of railroads. By 1860, with an estimated $750,000 worth of real estate and personal property, he was one of the five richest men in the entire state of Texas. A company he started, the Houston and Galveston Navigation Company, helped develop the Houston Ship Channel. Rice was also very grateful to his adopted hometown. In 1891, he wrote a will that bequeathed the bulk of his fortune to the founding of the William Marsh Rice institute for the advancement of literature, science and art in Houston. On Sept. 23, 1900, Rice’s personal valet Charles F. Jones murdered Rice while he slept with an overdose of chloroform. Jones was in cahoots with Albert Patrick, an 64

unscrupulous lawyer who forged a new will leaving all of the money to Jones instead of the new institute. Patrick’s plot unraveled when Captain James A. Baker in Houston ordered an autopsy of Rice’s body and Jones turned state’s evidence. The fortune flowed back to Houston, where Captain Baker and the other founders made sure it went to its proper purpose. Rice University isn’t just resting on its storied past, however. Consistently ranking as one of the best universities in the country in research and undergraduate education, Rice also integrates with the community through partnerships and continuing studies programs. The BioScience Research Collaborative is a

Rice University celebrated its centennial in 2012 during a weekend of events culminating with a brilliant, internationally acclaimed immersive projected art piece, appropriately titled the “Spectacle.”

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Scan page with Layar to hear centennial stories from Rice alumni.

RICE UNIVERSITY

multi-institution program that fosters shared research with the Texas Medical Center. The Glasscock School of Continuing Studies supports lifetime learning and community outreach. Programs like the Master of Liberal Studies engage adult learners with faculty on campus. Professional programs that offer nonprofit leadership certifications or training for high school teachers further extend their reach. Here’s just one example of how outside-the-box they can go: Students from Rice’s Beyond Transitional Borders program figured out a way to detect anemia in no-resource settings using a lettuce spinner. That’s right. Are you making a salad tonight? Well, you could be detecting anemia with that plastic basket rather than

drying the arugula. Wow, that’s clever. Even though the centennial celebrations are past, don’t let that stop you from exploring. Start with the wealth of resources online covering the history of our own “Harvard of the South” and then visit the campus. You can go for a run on the 3-mile campus loop, wander the campus in search of the live owl families making it their home (the owl is the school’s mascot), stay for a baseball game or a concert, and experience public art, like James Turrell’s “Twilight Epiphany Skyspace,” or a piece of history with the Berlin wall memorial.

RICE UNIVERSITY 6100 MAIN ST. · 713-348-0000 · RICE.EDU bayoucitymagazine.com

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The Port of Houston and Houston Ship Channel are a vital part of our economy, providing over a million jobs throughout Texas and generating more than $170 billion in overall statewide economic impact.

CELEBRATE BAYOU COMMERCE THE HOUSTON SHIP CHANNEL AND THE PORT OF HOUSTON n the early days, Houston lacked a deepwater port and the compromise that offloaded cargo near Galveston onto barges for the trek up the shallow Buffalo Bayou to Main Street was a costly one. In 2014, we celebrate the centennial of the change that helped launch the “Bayou Boom.” For years, civic leaders pushed for the channel to be dredged so cargo could come directly to Houston, starting all the way back in 1836 when Houston founders Augustus Allen, his wife Charlotte and brother John gazed into the muddy, shallow waters of Buffalo Bayou and saw money—lots and lots of money—flowing towards their pocket books. Houston, they said, would become the “great interior commercial emporium of Texas.” Why did they have such grand dreams? The bayou connected their new city site with the rich cotton-producing Brazos River Valley. Although a better channel and port would enable Houston to control the flow of supplies to the Texas interior and the export of cotton, and later oil and rice, worldwide, it was Galveston’s natural harbor that had the upper hand. It wasn’t until 1900, when a hurricane slammed into the Texas Gulf Coast, wiping out Galveston’s infrastructure, that the case for an inland port was made. Houston’s U.S. Congressman Tom Ball, a major agitant for the creation of the Houston Ship Channel before the storm, redoubled his efforts. By introducing the then-shockingly bold idea of

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Houston sharing the costs for the dredging of the channel with the Federal government, the agreement was struck. The Houston Ship Channel was completed Nov. 10, 1914, and President Woodrow Wilson fired a cannon via remote control from his office in Washington D.C. to mark the occasion. The city of Houston celebrated with a parade through downtown and with 40 blocks strung with yet another new engineering marvel: incandescent lights. The “Bayou Boom” began. By then, cotton no longer controlled the global economy and a new power was unleashed: oil. Hundreds of oil companies (and companies serving them) got their start during this time, many familiar to us today, such as Sharp Hughes Tool Company (Baker Hughes), Cameron Iron Works and Schlumberger. While the busy 25-mile port complex on the east side of town may be outside many people’s regular reach, the port and ship channel have a direct impact on our daily lives. They’re a vital part of our economy, providing over a million jobs throughout Texas and generating more than $170 billion in overall statewide economic impact. When Princess and Norwegian cruises begin sailing to the port this fall and next spring, even more jobs, visitors and money will be flowing through. The port also reaches out to support the community through local educational institutions to support maritime-career programs. Ships arrive from around the world, accelerating our access to trendy goods, from fashion to food. Case in point: In 2003, the Port of Houston became a certified green coffee port, one of four in the U.S. This sparked a surge in coffee businesses, from local micro-roasters to cafes. Part of the celebration of the Port’s centennial is through a Library of Congress-funded Houston Arts Alliance project called “Working the Port.” The project plans to capture 100 recorded interviews of people who work in the businesses supporting—and supported by— Houston’s shipping industry, with a goal of increasing understanding of how the port contributes to the city. To celebrate the anniversary and experience the port and Houston Ship Channel for yourself, take a free 90-minute tour of the port on the M/V Sam Houston.

PORT OF HOUSTON AUTHORITY 111 EAST LOOP NORTH · BOAT TOUR: 7300 CLINTON DR. · 713-670-2400 PORTOFHOUSTON.COM

PORT OF HOUSTON AUTHORITY

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CELEBRATE BAYOU SOUNDS HOUSTON SYMPHONY n the first day of summer in 1913, a small symphonic orchestra played a “test” concert at the New Majestic Theater on Texas Avenue. It was a typical hot Houston summer evening, but that didn’t discourage attendees. The 35-member symphony played Mozart’s Symphony Number 39, Bizet’s “Carmen,” an aria from Gluck’s “Alcest” and the waltz of the flowers from “The Nutcracker.” The house was packed, despite the oppressive heat. The launch of the Houston Symphony Orchestra (HSO) was a resounding success. The new orchestra was the result of many people’s efforts, but first among the organizers was Miss Ima Hogg, Houston philanthropist and “First Lady of Texas.” Graceful, beautiful and talented, Miss Ima, as she preferred to be known, was also an enthusiastic pianist and musician trained in Germany and New York. Back in Houston, as a member of the local Choral Society and the Girl’s Music Club, she used her connections to convince 138 other Houstonians to provide the financial backing needed for the new orchestra. She served as the organization’s president for many years. During its 50th season, under the direction of Sir John Barbirolli, the HSO toured the major cities and concert halls of the Eastern seaboard. The final tour performance was in New York and reviewers raved. Houston’s orchestra achieved national status as one of the country’s major orchestras and returned home to a heroes’ welcome.

Today, HSO is one of America’s oldest and most highly regarded symphony orchestras. Each year, it plays more than 170 performances in Houston and tours around the world. It boasts a long line of internationally recognized musicians and conductors including André Previn, Christoph Eschenbach and Hans Graff. Columbian-born Andrés Orozco-Estrada, the music director designate following Graff ’s retirement, will helm a few concerts in this centennial season along with former directors Graff, Eschenbach and Lawrence Foster, who will make special appearances. Experience Orozco-Foster on the podium for Mozart’s “Jupiter Symphony” and “The Planets and the Earth” in January, and “Bronfman Plays Beethoven 4” in April. As part of its season-long celebration, the Symphony offered a free family concert and a day of music this summer and is releasing a commemorative book, planning alumni appreciation events and has co-commissioned “La Trista Historia,” a multimedia symphonic work and film dedicated to the Day of the Dead, which will have its United States premiere the first week of November. Additional special events and concerts planned for the season are too numerous to list, but a few events of note include a Centennial Wine Dinner and Collector’s Auction and the Centennial Ball as fundraisers for ongoing community engagement. The Family Series of concerts will focus on bringing guest partners from across the Houston arts community, including the Alley Theatre, Houston Grand Opera and more. “Birthday parties are fun! This year, we celebrate our 100th birthday and what a better way to celebrate than to invite friends to our yearlong party,” says associate principal conductor Robert Franz.

HOUSTON SYMPHONY 615 LOUISIANA ST. · 713-224-7575 · HOUSTONSYMPHONY.ORG

HOUSTON SYMPHONY

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CELEBRATE BAYOU COMMUNITY HERMANN PARK s it reaches its centennial, today’s Hermann Park is, according to Hermann Park Conservancy executive director Doreen Stoller, “a miracle of community engagement.” While Hermann Park was established during the nationwide City Beautiful Movement of the early 1900s—an era conducive to cohesive and integrated city planning with a goal of creating a healthy and beautiful community—in the intervening decades there was an inconsistency in its use and maintenance. Over the last 20 years, however, the efforts of the Hermann Park Conservancy and a new master plan have led to a restoration of the historic infrastructure and re-established the park’s central importance to the community. From the 20,000 annual volunteer hours to the $50-a-year members, as well as corporate and community donors, it is the community coming together to refresh and rehabilitate the park that has made it a reflection of culture and diversity in the city. Stoller uses the Japanese garden as an example. Although established by a gift from a group of Japanese and Japanese-American business people, like many other elements in the park there was no plan for how the garden would be maintained and enhanced after it was established. When they realized that the city had neither the funds nor the training to maintain the garden, the donors made a change. Now experts from Japan come each year to consult with and train the park maintenance employees, there is a donor-driven fund for maintenance, and there is a plan for how to make that area of the park more inviting as visitors come off the nearby light rail. These changes are in line with the plan made in the late ’90s that called for restoring historic infrastructure, bringing life to lesser-used areas, enhancing access and community activity in the park and increasing park stewardship. Many of these plans and projects come to fruition as the park begins its year of celebration. Improvements and renovations at the McGovern Lake and Jones Reflection Pool, as well as the new Lake Plaza are already complete. The transformation of the Grand Gateway and Centennial Gardens is in process. These and other improvements continue to make the park a place that supports the diverse needs of the community. 68

“You walk around the lake and hear a dozen different languages. The magic of public spaces is that you’re around people not like you,” says Stoller. Especially as Houston becomes denser, the park becomes people’s backyards. Rather than being isolated in suburbs behind 8-foot privacy fences, people are doing their backyard barbequing and family events in the park. The community can be part of the centennial

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Scan page with Layar to see more of Hermann Park.

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TOM FOX | HERMANN PARK CONSERVANCY

Over the last 20 years, the Hermann Park Conservancy has worked to restore the historic infrastructure and re-establish the park’s importance to the community.

celebrations by donating or volunteering, or attending any of a number of events. The centennial celebrations are intended to offer opportunities to experience different aspects of the park at events across the year. “Art in the Park” is a series of contemporary art installations opening throughout the year, including a permanent mural installation at the train tunnel. The kite festival and dog walk will show off the park in its spring season. Various fundraising events, from the Centennial Gala

to the annual Hats in the Park luncheon, will continue to raise funds to support the park’s ongoing evolution. In the fall of 2014, the Park will open the Centennial Gardens, host their annual fun run and join with the Port Authority to celebrate its joint birthdays with a Park to Port bike ride.

HERMANN PARK 6100 HERMANN PARK DRIVE · 713-526-2183 · HERMANNPARK.ORG bayoucitymagazine.com

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BEYOND THE CENTURY-MARK

Some of Houston’s newer institutions are also celebrating landmark birthdays. They may not have a 100-year history (yet), but they are definitely helping the city shine on the national stage.

CELEBRATE BAYOU ART CELEBRATE BAYOU BAROQUE CONTEMPORARY ARTS MUSEUM, HOUSTON ARS LYRICA The Contemporary Arts Museum, Houston

Incorporated in 2003, Ars Lyrica (which means

“Ars Lyrica’s steady growth over the last

(CAMH) is celebrating its 65th birthday this year

“lyric art”) performs 17th and 18th century music

decade has been very gratifying, and we’re

with an exhibit entitled “Outside the Lines.” This

on period instruments (because of their sweeter

thrilled to have reached this milestone, thanks

six-part exhibition series will explore the past,

sound better suited to the music of the period).

to the enthusiastic support of many in the local

present and future of abstract painting. The first three parts opened October 31, 65

A comparative youngling at only a decade old, Ars Lyrica’s recordings have won national

community,” says Dirst of the anniversary. The 10th anniversary season, Discoveries,

years to the day of the museum’s historic first

and international acclaim, in particular its

promises a decadent serving of lush, gorgeous

exhibition, “This is Contemporary Art.” The 175

recently released world-premiere recording

pieces and, Dirst says, “offers something for

objects featured in that first exhibit “were meant

of Johann Adolph Hasse’s “Marc Antonio e

everyone, from Baroque masterworks to modern

to be examples of art functioning as a funda-

Cleopatra,” which was nominated for a Best

world premieres of recent discoveries.”

mental part of one’s life, including in the home.”

Opera Grammy Award in 2011. The organization

The selections run the gamut, touching on

The opening was mashed together with a

was first formed in 1998 by harpsichordist and

Prussian royal favorites, a New Year’s celebrated

artistic director Matthew Dirst.

Venetian-carnival style, rarely played master-

“Halloween chic” birthday party that included a mayoral proclamation for “Contemporary Arts

Ars Lyrica members aren’t only seen on stage.

Museum Day.” The remaining parts of “Outside

This group is heavily active in the community

the Lines” will open in January.

with K-12 school programs, family concerts, work-

Both that first exhibit and the anniversary series exemplify CAMH’s founding philosophy,

shops for university students and performances anywhere they can set up a music stand.

works by Scarlatti and Handel, then finally two joyful Bach wedding cantatas.

ARS LYRICA HOUSTON 4807 SAN FELIPE ST. · 713-622-7443 · ARSLYRICAHOUSTON.ORG

that contemporary art reflects contemporary society and as such is vital to our daily life. While you’re exploring the exhibit, step into the Museum’s Cullen Education Resource Room where the CAMH’s history will be displayed, including photos, video and artifacts highlighting significant moments in the museum’s history. You can also help CAMH celebrate in March, when it holds a special 65th celebration during its annual gala and art auction as well as a special Christie’s Benefit Auction (in New York). From its volunteer-led origins to the awardwinning institution of today, CAMH continues cultural center.

CONTEMPORARY ARTS MUSEUM, HOUSTON 5216 MONTROSE BLVD. · 713-284-8250 · CAMH.ORG

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JAMES PRINZ | ANTHONY RATHBUN

to contribute to Houston’s place as a national

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CELEBRATE BAYOU STUDENTS KNOWLEDGE IS POWER PROGRAM The Knowledge is Power Program (KIPP) got its humble start in Houston nearly 20 years ago when two Teach for America teachers, Dave Levin and Mike Feinberg, were struggling to provide a new way to reach their rough, unmotivated and practically forgotten urban elementary students. Today, the academies are publicly supported, independent charter schools operating in the country’s toughest urban areas. KIPP has grown to a network of 141 public charter schools in 20 states and the District of Columbia, serving over 50,000 students. In Houston, KIPP serves more than 10,000 students at 22 schools—94 percent of whom graduate from high school and 88 percent enter college. Beyond KIPP’s direct results for its students, the program’s promise and methods also influence other programs in the community, such as Houston ISD’s Apollo 20. “For the past 20 years, KIPP has been focused on making and keeping sacred promises to as many children and families as possible: to get them to and through college,” says KIPP cofounder Mike Feinberg. “In

CELEBRATE BAYOU DANCE STANTON WELCH, HOUSTON BALLET

the process of succeeding with more and more children, KIPP has had an

While the Houston Ballet itself was founded

theater district, which includes training and

impact on the entire city

in 1955—and began to come of age under Ben

rehearsal facilities, dormitories for students at the

of Houston by changing

Stevenson’s artistic direction in the 1970s and

academy and administrative offices.

mindsets and beliefs of what is possible in school

1980s—in the last decade, it has flourished

The Houston Ballet honors Welch’s 10th

and life for children from underserved com-

under Stanton Welch, who became artistic

season with a mixed repertory program that will

munities. When there are so many underserved

director in 2003.

bring world premieres by four choreographers,

children succeeding in school and life, the focus

add eight new works to the ballet’s repertoire

is now on the public education system to help all

gizing and building the company. His success

and showcase the artistic director’s choreo-

children succeed at those levels.”

shows in individual awards won by company

graphic breadth.

Much of Welch’s work has focused on ener-

dancers and the 2013 Dance Award from the

In March 2014, look for the world premiere

The mentor2.0 program sponsored by Big Brothers Big Sisters offers the community a

AMITAVA SARKAR/HOUSTON BALLET | KIPP HOUSTON

Texas Medal of Arts. One of his most profound

of Welch’s “The Young Person’s Guide to the

chance to get involved with helping those chil-

areas of influence has been at the Houston

Orchestra,” a collaboration among all the com-

dren succeed by mentoring a student at one of

Ballet Academy, which enrolls more than 500

pany members of the ballet’s orchestra as part

the KIPP high schools, primarily through email.

students from ages 4 to 60.

of an all-Welch program. The program will also

KIPP’s year-long 20th anniversary celebration

Five Academy students have won prizes at

include Welch’s “Maninyas”—one of the pieces

kicks off in March 2014 with the annual dinner, to

international competition and Welch established

that brought Welch to the Houston Ballet’s

which the community is invited. The 2014 KIPP

the Houston Ballet II as a junior performing com-

attention in 1996—and the Houston premiere of

School Summit (KSS) will also bring several thou-

pany for the academy’s top-level students. The

one of his earliest works, “Of Blessed Memory,”

sand KIPPsters from all over the country—along

company helps students’ progress toward the

which he created for his mother, Australian balle-

with some major political names and Hollywood

professional company by giving them more per-

rina Marilyn Jones, Order of the British Empire.

stars—back to Houston where it all started.

HOUSTON BALLET 501 TEXAS AVE. · 713-227-2787 · HOUSTONBALLET.ORG

KIPP HOUSTON 10711 KIPP WAY · 832-328-1051 · KIPPHOUSTON.ORG

formance opportunities. Under Welch, the ballet has also constructed a new Houston Ballet Center for Dance in the

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w PROMOTION

TASTE, TALK

& Tour

P hotographs by M iro D v ors cak

Enjoy wine tasting and tour the historic Baldwin-Gonzalez home in the Woodland Heights.

Scan this page with Layar to register for this event or go to eventbrite.com/ event/88776522297

THURSDAY, JAN. 16TH 6—9 P.M.

TICKETS $75 Limited Availability Thank you to our sponsors:

Proceeds benefit The Summerhouse of Houston

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engage IN BAYOU EVENTS

HYATT REGENCY HOUSTON

74 EXPERIENCE IT From neighborhood festivals to city-wide extravaganzas, discover the breadth of what you can see, do and experience in our Bayou City. For even more events and happenings, check the Bayou City Daily Doing calendar at bayoucitymagazine.com.

BY SARAH CLARK bayoucitymagazine.com

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engage Scan with Layar to meet Dr. Howard.

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RICE MILITARY / WASHINGTON CORRIDOR

IMPROV 101

Dr. DanaHoward 5535 Memorial Dr. Ste 1 Houston, Texas 77007 281-888-9256

Dec 7th Trunk Show featuring: Oliver Peoples, Prodesign and Maui Jim frame lines.

Voted best Optometrist/Optical in Houston Press 2012 & 2013

WWW.MEMORIALPARKVISION.COM

So what do you know about long-form, comic improv? Probably more than you think, says Jessica Brown of Station Theater. She contends that if you’ve seen an episode of “Seinfeld,” you’ve seen the “The Harold,” a classic long-form, in action. Think you’re the next Seinfeld or just want to learn more? Station Theater offers a free Intro to Improv class Friday nights at 7:30 p.m. Classes are taught in a fun (read nonthreatening) environment with the opportunity to stay, catch the show and even get on stage. Be warned: This activity may be even more fun than you imagined! 7:30 p.m. 1230 Houston Ave. 903-271-3203, stationtheater.com

Comfortable Sedation • Professional Whitening • Invisalign

OAK FOREST / GARDEN OAKS

LOCAL LORE

artisanal breads and handcrafted products. Come early and come hungry. You’ll find Mickey serving up breakfast tacos, omelets, grilled cheese sandwiches and fresh coffee. 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. 938 Wakefield Drive. 832-526-8236 RIVER OAKS / RICE MILITARY / WASHINGTON CORRIDOR

HOUSE TO HOUSE

There’s super-duper, free family fun planned for Nov. 17 at the MFAH Bayou Bend and Rienzi Family Day. Both house museums and their grounds will be open to families, with complimentary shuttle between the two houses. At Bayou Bend, learn about early U.S. settlers, and celebrate fall’s finest with friends and family at Rienzi. Both homes will offer arts, crafts and entertainment galore along with light refreshments. 1 to 5 p.m. (last entry at 4:30 p.m.) 1406 Kirby Drive. 713-639-7300,

281-809-6890

We see children, teens and adults.

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mfah.org MEYERLAND

BOOKED

Think only rock stars and football teams draw crowds? Think again. The 41st Annual Jewish Book and Arts Fair is expecting more than 10,000 attendees during its two-week run. Held at the Evelyn Rubenstein Jewish Community Center of Houston, the fair opened with Peter Sagal,

THE FARM STAND | MUSEUM FINE ARTS HOUSTON

Sedation • Cosmetic • Family Dentistry

Bringing local, sustainablygrown food to the neighborhood is Mickey Morales’ passion—a passion that finds outlet in his “growing” concern, The Farm Stand. Every Saturday morning, rain or shine, like-minded vendors bring seasonal vegetables and fruit (think Satsumas and juicy, thin-skinned Meyer lemons this time of year), goat cheeses; free-range chickens and eggs, local honey, fresh-roasted coffees,

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5601 S. Braeswood. 713-729-3200, erjcchouston.org/bookfair DOWNTOWN

FINE TUNE

GREENWOOD KING

host of NPR’s “Wait Wait…Don’t Tell Me!” on Nov. 2, and closes with Mitch Albom, author of “The Five People You Meet in Heaven,” on Nov. 18. The event also features films, concerts, a family day, and dozens of rising and prominent authors. Advance ticket purchase recommended.

Now Available The 2013 River Oaks Market Forecast published by

CAMERON ANSARI 713.240.2611 cameron@riveroakshouston.com

3201 KIRBY DRIVE | HOUSTON, TEXAS 77098 | 713 524 0888 g r e e n w o o d k i n g . c o m

Will your money retire before you do?

H-E-B’s annual Thanksgiving Day Parade returns on Nov. 28, featuring grand marshal Tommy Tune.

H-E-B/CITY OF HOUSTON

A much-loved Houston family tradition, the 64th Annual Thanksgiving Day Parade presented by H-E-B receives a tune-up this year—a Tommy Tune-up, that is. This year’s event is themed “Houston on Parade” and who better to be grand marshal than native Houstonian and legendary Broadway entertainer Tommy Tune. Joining the festivities on Nov. 28 are Houston Mayor Annise Parker, Santa Claus, marching bands and other civic groups. With new floats, new management and new life breathed into the parade by generous donors, the event Events subject to change.

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The sooner you start investing, the more likely you are to reach your long-term goals. Ask me about State Farm Mutual Funds®. Like a good neighbor, State Farm is there.® CALL ME TODAY. Barry Hoskins Registered Representative Bus: 713-426-4440 www.hoskinsinsurance.com

Before investing, consider the funds’ investment objectives, risks, charges and expenses. Contact State Farm VP Management Corp (1-800-447-4930) for a prospectus or summary prospectus containing this and other information. Read it carefully. Securities are not FDIC insured, are not bank guaranteed and are subject to investment risk, including possible loss of principal. AP2013/03/0938 State Farm VP Management Corp. One State Farm Plaza, Bloomington, Illinois 61710-0001. Neither State Farm nor its agents provide investment, tax, or legal advice. 1101413.4

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engage

promises to be great fun. Come celebrate Houston and the start of the holiday season. Gates open at 7 a.m. 832-393-0868, houstonspecialevents.org UPTOWN / GALLERIA

HOT TO TROT

intimate portraits of highprofile members of today’s LGBTQ community including Lady Bunny, Ellen DeGeneres, Neil Patrick Harris and Cynthia Nixon. No stranger to the art of portraiture, Greenfield-Sanders’ is known for his former projects “About Face: Supermodels Then and Now,” “The Latino List” and “The Black List.” 4520 Blossom St. 713-863-7097, hirambutler.com DOWNTOWN

Get a healthy start to your Thanksgiving festivities by participating in the TXU Energy Turkey Trot on Nov. 28. Runners and walkers are invited to participate in this annual tradition benefiting Sheltering Arms Senior Services. Races include a 5k, 10k or wheelchair run/ walk, as well as 1k run/walks for kids and seniors. Celebrate after the race with free food and fun family activities. 6 a.m. Dillard’s parking lot, 4925 Westheimer. turkeytrot.shelteringarms.org HEIGHTS

THE OUT LIST

What would the holidays be without a spectacular performance of the season’s most timeless traditions? From Nov. 29 to Dec. 29, the Houston Ballet presents “The Nutcracker” at the Wortham Theater Center. Filled with exquisite costumes and stunning sets, this holiday favorite is sure to delight every member of the family. Whether it’s your holiday tradition to attend or it’s your very first time, it will always be a memorable performance. 501 Texas Ave. 713-227-2787, houstonballet.org MEMORIAL PARK

EAT SHOOTS, LEAVES

Through November, Hiram Butler Gallery is exhibiting Timothy Greenfield-Sanders’ “The OUT List,” which showcases

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When you’re outside, off the pavement, hearing the wind, seeing the colors, tasting the plants, touching the earth, you’re interacting with nature at an intimate level—and you’re doing your body good. It’s just this

TXU ENERGY TURKEY TROT | TIMOTHY GREENFIELD-SANDERS/HIRAM BUTLER GALLERY | HOUSTON BALLET

HOLIDAY TRADITION

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+ kind of experience that Dr. Mark “Merriwether” Vorderbruggen, leads his students to discover in his “wildly” popular Edible Wild Plants class at the Houston Arboretum on Dec. 1. According to Vorderbruggen studies show that for kids with ADHD/hyperactivity, just being outdoors two to three times per week for 30 minutes lessens hyperactivity. 1 to 5 p.m. 4501 Woodway Drive. 713681-8433, houstonarboretum.org DOWNTOWN

HOME RUN Scan

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TEJAS CUSTOM BOOTS On Dec. 7, runners and walkers are invited to participate in the Trafigura Run for the House benefiting Ronald McDonald House Houston. TRAFIGURA/HMRMH RUN FOR THE HOUSE

In its fourth year, the Trafigura Run for the House brings together people of all ages to show their support for the Ronald McDonald House Houston. Held on Dec. 7 in Sam Houston Park, this year’s event features 5K and 10K competitive races, as well as a 5K Run/Family Walk (strollers and dogs welcome). Individual and four-person team registrants receive T-shirts, medals, goodie bags and an after-party with food, entertainment and family fun. Early registration is recommended, reduced rates for teams and families of four. Registration

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begins at 6:30 a.m. 1000 Bagby St. rmhrunforthehouse.com

Events subject to change.

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engage

+

RIVER OAKS

ROUND SOUND

Scan with Layar to preview TUTS’ Elf.

“Messiah” for its text, musical intricacy and glorious choruses, and “Pops” for its wonderfully familiar carols and tunes served with a side of humor (audience participation is highly encouraged!). Performances run from Dec. 13-22; check website for specific show times and information. $29 to $130. 615 Louisiana St. 713-224-7575, houstonsymphony.org

$55. 6003 Memorial Drive. 713-665-2700, rocohouston.org DOWNTOWN

CHRISTMAS TOPS

DECEMBER 6 – 22 HOBBY CENTER

CALL TODAY FOR BEST SEATS! TICKETS START AT ONLY $24!

TUTS.COM 713.558.TUTS

MUSEUM DISTRICT

FIRST EDITION

International best-selling author Amy Tan brings her latest novel “Valley of Amazement” to the Asia Society Texas Center’s “Books in Conversation” series on Dec. 16. Presented in partnership with Brazos Books, Tan is sure to delight her fans as she supports the Asia Society’s mission of building bridges of understanding between Americans and Asians. Ticket price includes an entry to the event and a first-edition copy of the book. Tan will be available for book signing following her appearance. 7 p.m. $35. 1370 Southmore Blvd. 713-496-9901, asiasociety.org

Each December, the Houston

Season Sponsor

PG

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Symphony Orchestra and Chorus

MEDICAL CENTER

presents two much-loved Houston holiday traditions: Handel’s “Messiah” and “Very Merry Pops.” As different as they are from each other, they both have audience appeal—the

GAME ON!

Houston may not have a “true” fall season, but it does have football season and plenty of fans. In fact, last year, 30,000 of them snatched up tickets to

RIVER OAKS CHAMBER ORCHESTRA | HOUSTON CONVENTION AND VISITORS BUREAU | AMY TAN/ASIA SOCIETY

How lucky are we to live in a city where you can sit outside and actually enjoy the weather in December? Combine that with fantastic Yuletide music, coffee, small bites and beautiful surroundings, and you have a great event perfect for the holiday season. On Dec. 9, Yuletide Concert and Coffee features the harmonious sounds of the River Oaks Chamber Orchestra Brass Quintet, performed in the Diana Garden at Bayou Bend Collection and Garden. Seasonal attire encouraged. 10 a.m.

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LIVE LIVE

the Texas Bowl before teams were even announced. This year, there’s added incentive to attend the Texas Bowl, which is being held on Dec. 27 at Reliant Stadium. Beyond the thrill of being there, 2013 ticket holders receive priority access to tickets for the 2014 Texas Bowl and beyond. That’s when the match-up is between Big XII and SEC teams, and when the Texas Bowl moves up to No. 3 in the team selection process. 5 p.m. 2 Reliant Parkway. 832-6672390, thetexasbowl.com DOWNTOWN

VENETIAN CARNIVAL

Ring in the New Year Carnivalstyle at the Ars Lyrica Houston Venetian Carnival New Years Eve celebration. On Dec. 31, the Grammy-nominated ensemble will host an evening filled with exotic offerings from the City of Masks, including music from Monteverdi to Vivaldi. Following the performance, a gala reception will be in full swing, featuring a silent auction, champagne, hors d’oeuvres and sweets. 9 p.m. $35

MONTROSE

GO GREEN

Archway Gallery member artists Judy Elias and Harold Joiner will show their latest works in a new exhibit called “Fifty Shades of Green.” Inspired by environments from around the world to their own backyards in Houston, the artists came together to create a show using green as a modifier. The exhibit runs from Jan. 3-30, with an opening reception and artists’ talk on Jan. 4.

8570 Katy Freeway, Suite 111, Houston, TX 77024 713.827.9292 | backrowantiques.com

5 to 8 p.m. 2305 Dunlavy. 713-5222409, archwaygallery.com

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DOWNTOWN

ROCK ON

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Scan with Layar to preview Chicago.

2013-2014 SEASON

EXPERIENCE IT.

1 LONG

to $55 performance only; $75 gala. Hobby Center, 800 Bagby St. 713-

The

315-2525, arslyricahouston.org

ESTRUNNING

DOWNTOWN “MY GREEN HEAVEN,” JUDY ELIAS/ARCHWAY GALLERY | THEATRE UNDER THE STARS

WATCH IT DROP

Ever wonder what it feels like to have 50,000 balloons cascade upon you and hundreds of other New Years revelers? Kick off 2014 in spectacular style on Dec. 31 at the Hyatt Regency Houston’s New Year’s Eve Party, which features an all-night celebration complete with live music from the ‘60s by The Fab 5 and Texas country music performer Roger Creager. It will be a night to remember! Starting at $89.

AMERICAN

1200 Louisiana St. 713-654-1234,

The hilarious, multi-awardwinning and record-breaking “We Will Rock You” comes to Theatre Under the Stars from Jan. 22 to Feb. 2 at the Hobby Center. Jump to your feet and sing along to the greatest hits of the legendary rock group Queen. This worldwide smash hit musical is in Houston for a limited engagement, and you don’t want to miss out on this party! Starting at $24. 800

hyattregencyhouston.com

Bagby St. 713-558-8887, tuts.com

Events subject to change.

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#

MUSICAL

in Broadway History!

Starring PAIGE DAVIS from "Trading Spaces"

ON SALE NOW! NOVEMBER 12-17 •

BroadwayAtTheHobbyCenter.com • 800.982.2787 Groups 10+ 888.451.5986

Due to the nature of live entertainment, dates, times, prices, shows, actors, venues and sales are subject to change without notice. All tickets subject to convenience charges.

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what's your bayou IQ? +

What is your most memorable Bayou City celebration?

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n this issue, we’re celebrating life in the Bayou City, from giving memorable gifts and throwing unforgettable parties, to recognizing people and institutions that are shaping our future. We asked some Bayou City luminaries, “What is your most memorable celebration in the Bayou City?” Here are a few of their answers.

My most memorable celebration was the Celebration of Excellence we held on campus after the Carnegie Foundation classified us a Tier One research university in 2011. We thought it would take nearly a decade to achieve that distinction, but we did it in four years! At the celebration, everyone was so proud and excited. We had the band playing, local politicians and leaders giving rousing speeches, and Shasta the mascot leading the audience with shouts of “Whose house? Coogs’ house!” At the end, we had this terrific balloon drop, showering the stage in red and white. What a wonderful experience—for me, for our university and for the whole city. Renu Khator, chancellor and president, University of Houston @UHpres

Or email to BayouIQ@BayouCMag.com

Growing up, my favorite celebration was the Houston Rodeo Parade. I remember standing at my school fence and watching them go by. It’s a great memory for me. Nowadays, I really enjoy Houston’s Art Car Parade. It’s fun, funky, unique and different every year!” Annise Parker, Houston mayor @anniseparker

To launch the “SUITS” project (“SUITS: The Clothes Make the Man,” July 25, 1998), we staged a parade in downtown Houston with just The Art Guys (no floats, no bands) walking along a seven-block route. More than 3,000 people attended this circus-like event, surely a world-record attendance for a two-man parade. The Art Guys, think tank, art team @TheArtGuys

The Bayou City’s got questions and we know you’ve got the answers. Want to join the conversation? For our January/February issue, tell us where you play in the Bayou City to stay young. Submit your answers and we’ll publish the ones that inform or engage us (or just tickle our fancy).

I would have to say the Art Car Ball. It is quintessentially Houston and I’ve been going to it for around 20 years off and on (I’m on my third art car—the second art car caught on fire during my recent Ignite Your Life! road trip). It’s the best celebration in town. So fun, in fact, that last year, when the ball was rained out, all the “cartists” still gathered and dressed in costumes anyway. We mainly did it not because there was a crowd, but because we love to wear costumes! Sarah Gish, artist, Gish Creative @sarahgish

It would have to be when the city asked me to be in the Pride Parade and ride on the wine-o art car. I almost got arrested (don’t ask) and my new best friends, including a cop from Louisiana, no less, helped me out of that jam and then became my parade flaglets! Prior to this, I had only been to maybe two parades—never in one—and then here I am, in my own city, seeing my daughter’s friends and their parents and friends of mine plus a sea of screaming people. It was awesome. Monica Pope, chef and owner, Sparrow Bar + Cookshop, Beaver’s @monicapope

We reserve the right to edit submissions for space and clarity. By submitting or tagging us, you give us permission to publish your answers.

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UNIVERSITY OF HOUSTON | OFFICE OF MAYOR ANNISE PARKER | SARAH GISH | JACK THOMPSON | MARK LIPCZYNSKI

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