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A r i z o n a’ s

Technology Magazine

Aerospace Defense AND

:

Inside

0 12 Raytheon’s Firepower 0 16 bacteria: the next

big fuel? 0 18 student Tech winners 024 Apache: Boeing’s Building a Better Bird 028 Mars Mission’s Team Tucson 037 Tech Leads Battle For Our Border


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leZfddfe i\jlckj linking companies together

linking companies together The Arizona Technology Council is once again hosting the Partnering Conference, a signature event known for bringing Arizona’s technology community together to forge new partnerships. The Partnering Conference gives you access to an extraordinary concentration of emerging and established companies as well as the tools you need to create a successful partnership of your own. See what partneringlinking with other companies can do for the growth of your business!

Conference date: Tuesday, July 22, 2008 from 2:00 to 7:00 pm at the Hilton Scottsdale Resort and Villas. Registration: The cost to attend is $50 for members of the Arizona Technology Council and $75 for non-members. Visit aztechcouncil.org for more information or to register.

companies together


Strategic Thinking GT helps clients develop strategies to protect and leverage their IP portfolios in markets around the world. We have advised thousands of clients on virtually every aspect of IP – from patent prosecution and trademark applications to licensing opportunities, litigation and the IP issues involved in complex commercial transactions.

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[ 1750 ATTORNEYS IN 29 OFFICES * | USA LAW FIRM OF THE YEAR, 2007 CHAMBERS GLOBAL AWARDS † ] Prior results do not guarantee a similar outcome. Greenberg Traurig is a service mark and trade name of Greenberg Traurig, LLP and Greenberg Traurig, P.A. ©2008 Greenberg Traurig, LLP. Attorneys at Law. All rights reserved. Contact: John E. Cummerford or Gerald L. Fellows in Phoenix at 602.445.8000. *These numbers are 5262 subject to fluctuation. †Greenberg Traurig was selected by Chambers and Partners as USA Law Firm of the Year, 2007.


“Strong collaboration exists in Arizona that provides a pro-business environment, attractive operating costs and a skilled workforce.

Top aerospace and defense companies locate here and enjoy a strong supply base and synergies on business issues.” – Obie Jones, General Manager, The Boeing Company, Mesa, Arizona

Arizona is focused on the needs of today’s most innovative companies. Arizona is one of the nation’s fastest growing aerospace centers. Ranked as one of the top five winners of Department of Defense Contracts, Arizona is also regularly among the top 10 states in aerospace exports. A favorable business climate, targeted incentives, recent business tax reductions, respected university-led R & D efforts, a world-class workforce, and modern aviation infrastructure all combine to make Arizona a magnet for established companies and entrepreneurial activities as well. Of course Arizona also offers an enviable quality of life. Beautiful, friendly communities, easy commutes, rich culture and endless recreational opportunities make Arizona a great home for dynamic professionals. For more information on the opportunities in Arizona contact the Arizona Department of Commerce at 1-602-771-1100.

Arizona. Moving innovation and technology forward.

www.AZcommerce.com


Joining Together Tradition and History

When something closes, it’s not usually a cause for celebration, but on February 1, 2008, one historic event led to another and Avnet

“It was an honor to ring the bell on our turf for the state’s first time, joined by our governor, 14 excellent companies on the Big Board, the Cardinals, and representing Avnet’s employees around the world.” – Roy Vallee

www.avnet.com Super Bowl® is a trademark of the NFL

was proud to be a significant part of both. Avnet Chairman and CEO Roy Vallee rang the Closing Bell for the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) from the University of Phoenix Stadium, marking the first time this event has taken place in the state of Arizona, and helping kick off the Super Bowl XLII weekend. The NYSE and Avnet, two organizations coming together to make history for the State of Arizona.


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What’s Inside

A r i z o n a’ s

Technology Magazine

Feature

Phoenix Rises Scientists From The University Of Arizona Are Key Team Members In Historic Mars Exploration Mission.

On the Cover ::

Raytheon’s KillerBee Project

+ Features 024 Apache Longbow

Boeing Ready To Roll Out Improvements That Make Helicopter Stronger And Fiercer.

032 The Secret Is Out

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Close+up :: Next Generation

Aerospace Leaders In Training Will Still Have To Pay Their Dues.

More Close+up...

018 Winners Circle

From Middle School To College, Math And Science Students Compete For Honors.

Sierra Vista And Fort Huachuca Become Ground Zero For Innovation.

039 Tech’s Border Battle Defense Industry Shifts Focus To Defending The Homeland.

InnerView

022 Kurt J. Bunney

Ensynch Founder Leaves Lasting Legacy In Technology Community.

The Network

048 Arizona Technology

Council

New Web Site Features Are Member-Friendly.

Contact us :: editor@techconnectmag.com

In Every Issue 006 President’s Letter 008 Editor’s Letter 010 Tech Support 021 Events 034 Arizona State University 035 Northern Arizona University 036 University of Arizona 040 Science Foundation Arizona


Strong foundation. A successful business grows with connections. Cox Business is here to help you make them so your company can grow stronger and more stable everyday. Good to know, especially when you’re working from the ground up. To develop your business with our reliable voice, data and Internet services call us today.

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President’s Letter computer systems design and related services, which added 1,900 jobs. Another encouraging sign of our growth is that while venture capital investments were down 24 percent from $263 million, Arizona remained strong with $201 million invested here in 2007, ranking us 18th nationwide. As the Arizona Technology Council continues to foster growth and innovation in the state, we want to start by benchmarking the key metrics we will be tracking to measure our future progress. According to Cyberstates, the following are Arizona’s other rankings in the technology industry. All are based on 2006 data except where noted:

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+ No. 17: High-tech firms employed 52 of every 1,000 private-sector workers + No. 18: High-tech payroll of $8.7 billion + No. 18: 5,900 high-tech establishments + No. 21: R&D expenditures of $3.8 billion in 2004 Industry Sectors Employment: + No. 4: Defense electronics manufacturing with 9,500 jobs + No. 14: Computer and peripheral equipment manufacturing with 2,600 jobs

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 When it comes to technology exports, Arizona is in the Top 10. There were 14,700 jobs in Arizona directly supported by technology in 2006, with the state up $1.7 billion from 2005.

or this edition of TechConnect, I decided to take advantage of a remarkable annual report produced by the AeA (formerly the American Electronics Association) called Cyberstates. Meeting with policymakers and business leaders from around the state, it seems we struggle to grasp the magnitude of the technology industry’s impact in Arizona.

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By reintroducing this data, I believe we help to create better context for why diversification of Arizona’s’ economy toward a more balanced, knowledge-based economy is so critical. According to Cyberstates, Arizona’s hightech industry added 5,200 net jobs to our economy—totaling 116,800 jobs, ranking the state 18th nationwide—in 2006, which is the most current data available. AeA sources also indicate these jobs are high

paying, with the average tech worker in Arizona earning $74,200—19th best in the nation—in 2006, or 88 percent more than the average private-sector wage. AeA also reports Arizona remains a critical location for the semiconductor industry with 23,900 jobs in 2006, making it the fourth-ranked state nationwide. The high-tech services sectors also contributed to the net gain in jobs, led by engineering services, which added 2,400 jobs, and

In rankings related to exports, the state was: +N  o. 5: Technology accounted for 48 percent of exports +N  o. 6: $8.7 billion in high-tech exports Leading Export Sectors: + No. 4: Semiconductors at $4.5 billion + No. 6: Industrial electronics at $1.3 billion + No. 6: Electronic components at $774 million Leading Export Destinations: + $2 billion to Mexico + $963 million to China + $776 million to Malaysia

Arizona’s future prosperity depends on continuing to grow this vital component of our economy. Working closely with our member companies, the Arizona Technology Council plans to be a vital part of our state’s future success.

Steven G. Zylstra

President & CEO, Arizona Technology Council


And so are optics, aerospace, information technology, advanced materials, environmental science ...and more! The University of Arizona, one of the nation’s premier research universities, received more than $530 million in research dollars in FY2005. Closely tied to the University and its nationally recognized faculty and departments are the 30 companies and organizations housed at the University of Arizona Science and Technology Park. Within an exceptional atmosphere for discovery and growth, the Park offers companies the opportunity to benefit from the university’s wealth of talent, superior facilities, and commitment to the technology development and commercialization. We invite you to join us, and to blossom here too.

Space and ground leases available, and we will build-to-suit. For more information, please call Peter Douglas at PICOR Commercial Real Estate Services, 520.546.2711, or pdouglas@picor.com.


Editor’s Letter

Publisher Steven G. Zylstra Editor Don Rodriguez Art Director Jim Nissen, Switch Studio

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Designers Chaidi Lobato Jaclyn Threadgill Erin Loukili Kris Olmon

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hen you take on a subject as a lofty as aerospace and defense, our theme for this issue of TechConnect, people naturally think of machines— those that fly, those that protect, those that explore. But a recent visit to The Boeing Co.’s Mesa location was a reminder that you can’t tell the stories of the machines without telling the stories of the people. I was guided through the campus by Carole Thompson. As mom of a young member of the military, the Apache communications manager knows firsthand the value of the helicopters that her company creates. It was readily apparent she was proud of her company’s contribution to protecting our soldiers—and when you think about it, ultimately her son. No matter where we went that day, the employees expressed a willingness to share with this visitor the details of what they were up to—within reason, of course. (After all, there are issues of security to consider.) From a former Apache pilot who is advising Boeing how to improve the helicopter based on his experiences in battle to the manager who makes sure U.S. troops get what they need on time to a member of the team-oriented assembly line who knows there is no

room for error when he does his job—all understand the importance of their roles not just in meeting the bottom line but in making sure people like themselves—with families, mortgages, dreams—have a fighting chance to do their jobs, then come back home. As you read this edition, keep in mind the people who take something beyond a dream. For example, learn about the latest upgrade of the Apache Longbow that is about to pump up the “wow” factor when considering the place this war bird is claiming in military history. Speaking of history, meet some of the researchers and scientists based at The University of Arizona who are keeping their eyes to the heavens in their groundbreaking (no pun intended) exploration of the Mars’ surface. Back on Arizona soil, read how a coalition is creating

new technology to ensure our borders are secure from any threat. Defense contractors and other companies are taking an interest in Arizona’s border region for other reasons as you’ll learn in a story about how Sierra Vista and Fort Huachuca have quietly taken center stage in development of communication and advanced warfare technology. If that’s not enough, check out our new look. Our new design is more vibrant and complementary to what you’ll find in this edition and others to come. It’s the result of our own team’s dream.

Don Rodriguez

Editor, Tech Connect Magazine

Contributing Writers Gremlyn Bradley-Waddell Nikki Capetz // Joseph J. Caspermeyer Amy Erickson // William C. Harris Jimmy Magahern Angela Rabago-Mussi // Lisa Nelson Greg Raupp // Ken Reinstein Bruce A. Wright // Ty Young Trademark // General Counsel Quinn Williams Distribution Partners The Phoenix Business Journal East Valley Tribune Tucson Chamber of Commerce

E-mail editor@techconnectmag.com advertising@techconnectmag.com For queries or customer service, call 602-343-8324 or go to techconnectmag.com. For high-quality article reprints, contact The Reprint Dept., 717-481-8500. TechConnect is published by the Arizona Technology Council, One Renaissance Square, 2 N. Central Ave., Suite 750, Phoenix, AZ 85004.

Entire contents copyright 2008, Arizona Technology Council. Reproduction in whole or in part without permission is prohibited. Products named in these pages are trade names or trademarks of their respective companies. TechConnect is a trademark of the Arizona Technology Council. All rights reserved. Publication of TechConnect is supported by privatesector businesses, and is not financed by state-appropriated funds.


local. G R O W national. THINK

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Tech Support

New Partners for the Council

The Arizona Technology Council has consolidated operations with the Tucsonbased Aerospace, Manufacturing and Information Technology organization, a measure that will let the Council more effectively fulfill its role as a statewide organization serving all technology sectors. The Council will open an office at The University of Arizona Science and Technology Park in Tucson that will be staffed by Justin Williams, former executive director of AMIT. Southern Arizona members will benefit from the statewide organization’s effectiveness as the voice of the technology industry at the state capitol and the sense of community created through the Council’s Web portal and TechConnect while council members will benefit from the enhanced credibility and critical mass resulting from new members.

Arizona Innovation Connection

Get Ready for Invest Southwest

Is your business ready to grow but you lack the capital? Then it’s time to get ready. Get Ready seminars are planned by ASU Technopolis, administrative host of the 2008 Invest Southwest Capital Conference, to provide information about the annual event that connects the region’s most promising ventures with knowledgeable investors and venture capitalists from across the country. Tucson’s seminar will be held July 8 and Scottsdale’s will be held July 10, with each free, two-hour session starting at 8:30 a.m. Invest Southwest will be held December 10-11 at the Four Seasons Resort Scottsdale at Troon North in Scottsdale. For more information, go to www.investsouthwest.org.

Small Business Partners

The Arizona Small Business Association and Comerica Bank are united in an effort to spotlight Arizona-based, second-stage companies that are creating new jobs and sustaining business growth. They will join together in community outreach, educational opportunities and a celebration of this business sector‚s successes. The 2008 Comerica Bank Arizona Companies to Watch event will be held Nov. 11 at the Phoenix Convention Center, where 50 companies will be recognized. Second-stage companies employ 10 to 100 employees and have $1 million to $100 million in revenue while creating jobs and growing sales through innovative products, services and practices. For more information, see www.asba.com.

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In an effort to enhance the state’s global competitiveness by accelerating the pace of discovery, innovation and technology business development, the Arizona Economic Resource Organization and the state Department of Commerce have launched the Arizona Innovation Connection. Each week registrants receive an e-mail featuring state and federal funding opportunities through such entities as the Department of Commerce, Science Foundation Arizona, Department of Defense, Department of Homeland Security, National Science Foundation and other nonprofit and foundation programs. To be added to the Arizona Innovation Connection’s distribution list, send an e-mail to azinnovation@azcommerce.com with “Subscribe to Arizona Innovation Connection – WEB” in the subject line.

TECHCONNECTm ag.COM

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Arizonans in Luxembourg

In a move to establish a bioscience center of excellence, the government of Luxembourg has tapped the Phoenix-based Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen) and the Arizona-based Partnership for Personalized Medicine, which draws on the resources of TGen, The Biodesign Institute at Arizona State University and the Seattle-based Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center. The initiative will include formation of a centralized biobank/tissue repository; two major projects to further research in the field of molecular biology, which is the cornerstone of personalized medicine; and a project to demonstrate the effectiveness of new diagnostics tests for earlier detection and treatment of lung cancer.


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Close+up :: A Collection Of Briefings Focusing On Significant Topics Affecting Technology.

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ITs Mission: Missiles

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Writing & photography by :: R ay theon Missle systems

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Raytheon is a key player when it comes to defending our nation. Its Tucson-based Missile Systems division designs, develops and produces missile systems for U.S. and allied forces, including naval weapon systems, land combat missiles and guided projectiles. These are samples of its latest projects.

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KillerBee

Raytheon Missile Systems teamed with Swift Engineering, Inc. in a competitive bid to provide the U.S. Navy and Marine Corps with an unmanned aircraft system for their respective Small Tactical Unmanned Aircraft Systems and Tier 2 missions. Raytheon offers aircraft and mission systems integration with connectivity to customers’ combat systems and command and control systems. Swift Engineering

of San Clemente, Calif., provides its innovative KillerBee unmanned aerial vehicle, or UAV. KillerBee inserts persistent intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance into the battlespace and rapidly delivers actionable intelligence to combatant commanders. Swift Engineering’s blended wing body design sets KillerBee apart from similar sized UAVs and operates ashore or aboard ships with a minimal footprint.

2 Tomahawk Block IV cruise missile

Raytheon’s Tactical Tomahawk is a surface- and submarinelaunched precision strike standoff weapon. It is the nation’s weapon of choice for critical, long-range precision strike missions against high-value, heavily defended targets. Block IV Tomahawk, which achieved fleet introduction in May 2004, incorporates innovative technologies to provide new operational capabilities while dramatically reducing acquisition, operations and support costs. The capabilities that Block IV Tomahawk brings to the U.S. Navy’s sea strike capability are derived from the missile’s two-way satellite data

link that enables the missile to respond to changing battlefield conditions. 3

Standard Missile-3

Raytheon is producing Standard Missile-3 as part of the Missile Defense Agency’s sea-based Ballistic Missile Defense System. The missiles are being deployed on U.S. and Japanese ships to defend against short-tointermediate range ballistic missile threats in the midcourse phase of flight. Raytheon also is developing the kinetic warhead for SM-3. Earlier this year, an SM-3 was used to destroy a failing satellite containing toxic fuel. SM-3 has an impressive flight test record.


Close+up

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Active Denial System

Active Denial is a non-lethal protection system that employs millimeter wave technology to repel individuals without causing injury. The system emits a focused beam of wave energy that travels at the speed of light and penetrates the skin to a depth of 1/64 inch and produces an intolerable heating sensation that causes targeted individuals to flee. The sensation immediately ceases when the targeted individual moves away from the beam.

Stick with it Writing by :: Gremlyn Br adley-Waddell

Flypaper Helps Build Flashier Web Sites Without Need To Learn Flash Don’t be surprised if you find yourself stuck on flypaper. This software application allows just about anyone to put together a content-rich, Flash-quality Web content without having to make its creators even richer. Models, or specially designed templates, may be uploaded from the Flypaper Web site and changed, saved and shared as desired. “It fills the gap between the simple tools everybody has and custom programming,” says Greg Head, chief marketing officer for the Phoenix-based Flypaper Studio Inc., formerly known as the online training services firm Interactive Alchemy. Steve Knievel of Mesa is already a big fan. “I wanted a way of doing Flash without having to learn the whole Flash package,” says the owner of Awareness Video, which produces virtual home tours for real estate agents. He’s also a Realtor with West USA Realty. Knievel says anyone with enough computer skills to create text boxes, cut and paste

items and insert images into text can handle Flypaper. His Web site at www.bestwebtour. com boasts some of the high-resolution slide shows he’s created with it, and he’s particularly tickled about a 30-minute marketing CD (minus audio) that he made using the software. What’s more, Flypaper costs nothing—yep, it’s free—to download. Knievel estimates he’s saved “hundreds, if not thousands” of dollars by using Flypaper instead of hiring the work out. Head says there are about 10,000 beta users around the world, ranging from individuals to the largest of corporations, which Head notes, proportionately have “the biggest communication problems.” He says that because Flypaper can also publish to, among others, YouTube and iPod, it’s also finding a place among the most tech-savvy, nonbusiness users: teens. A second beta version of Flypaper was released in mid-May and a Flypaper Pro version, which Head says will be available for a “modest” cost, is in the works.

Donors’ Dollars Writing By :: Ken Reinstein

Need to track fundraising leads to MatchMaker

Raytheon is developing Multiple Kill Vehicle (MKV-R) as part of the Missile Defense Agency’s Ballistic Missile Defense System. MKV-R will fit in the nose cone of missile defense interceptors to destroy threat ballistic missiles in the midcourse phase of flight. Raytheon is the world leader in design, development and production of kill vehicles.

Diana Hoyt simply wanted to find a better way to track fundraising. Frustrated that her search for the right software turned up empty, she decided to do it herself. Thus, Heritage Designs was born. “I ended up choosing the lesser of most evils,” said Hoyt, president and founder of the Phoenix-based company, who has 30 years of fund-raising experience. “I said, ‘Gee, I could build a better mousetrap.’” Hoy merged her mathematics degree and philanthropy background, and sat down with a stack of paper to design screens and the flow of information. The result was the MatchMaker Fundraising Software, which has twice been recognized as a top fundraising software. “The hard part was finding a programmer who took a woman seriously and was willing to take directions from her as well as begin to understand fundraising,” Hoyt said. “Most people think you just go out and ask for money, but it’s a lot more complicated.” Ten years after the original program’s creation, Heritage released the Enterprise Edition in March, based on the need for flexibility. It helps organizations manage volunteer work and special events, but the focus is donors. “Donors are people and there are things that make them happy, and Enterprise allows you more customization in working with that individual donor,” Hoyt said. “There is a lot more flexibility. Donors are what fundraising is all about.”

+ Get Connected: www.raytheon.com/businesses/rms

+ Get Connected: www.matchmakerfrs.com

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Multiple Kill Vehicle

+ Get Connected: www.flypaper.com

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Centurion™

TECHCONNECTm ag.COM

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Raytheon’s Centurion™ Land-Based Weapon System intercepts airborne rockets, artillery and mortars before they impact the ground, reducing or eliminating any damage they might cause. Raytheon reconfigured its sea-based Phalanx Close-In Weapon System and mounted it on a modified flat-bed trailer along with a generator, chiller and operator’s station. Centurion and Phalanx combines a proven 20 mm M61A1 Gatling gun, firing self-destruct rounds at a selectable rate of 3,000 or 4,500 shots per minute, with an advanced search and track radar to provide autonomous target detection and engagement. Since mid-2005 Centurion has had 100 successful engagements, saving countless lives.


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Mother LODE

Splashdown Near? Writing by :: Jimmy M agahern

Writing by :: Gremlyn Br adley-Waddell

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As Aerospace’s Greatest Generation Faces Retirement, Arizona Schools Challenged To Produce New Leaders With Right Stuff in Prescott, which trains college kids how to enter this world. “The interesting thing is, it’s these 50-year-olds that are, in fact, the innovators in aerospace because you have to have been there a while before you can do amazing things.” Filling the Void Scott Danielson, chair of mechanical and manufacturing engineering technology at Arizona State University Polytechnic, agrees it’s these remnants of aerospace’s “golden age” who are still running the show. But Danielson predicts the big air companies are in for a splashdown if fresh replacements fail to launch. “Large chunks of their workforce are going to disappear on them really soon,” he says. “And there’s a much smaller pipeline of new talent coming in than there was when they started.” To fill those shoes, corporations have begun turning to the nation’s leading aerospace schools, which include the Arizona colleges. “Funny thing, we’ve only got 1,700 students on campus, and yet we’re one of the largest suppliers of aerospace engineers in the entire

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Most high-tech fields crave everything young and fresh. New ideas are harvested off the brains of bright engineering grads like freshly cut gems, and promising whiz-kids perpetually strut the corridors like rock stars. But aerospace is the last of tech’s old boy networks, a field run by lifers well into their late 40s and 50s who still—darn them—manage to come up with all of the best ideas. How does a young college aerospace major with Buzz Lightyear infinity-and-beyond goals compete with so many old school Major Toms? Answer: He doesn’t. At least not until that young Einstein pushes the mail cart for awhile in their world. Aerospace’s own greatest generation may be facing retirement today—the boom of engineers hired after the moon landings are now eligible for pensions. But these aging space cowboys aren’t ready to hand over the controls to just any quick-study. “These are the guys who signed up for aerospace back in the ’60s and early ’70s, when NASA was really pushing out the programs,” says Don Rabern, dean of the engineering college at EmbryRiddle Aeronautical University

Embry-Riddle’s Prescott, AZ campus

Goware Creates Simplymobile Mom As Free Bridge From Pc To Phone

Arizona State University

industry,” says Rabern. Both Embry-Riddle’s and ASU’s programs encourage internships in the major air corporations, and caution students not to expect to immediately set NASA or Boeing on fire with their radical ideas. “These companies have ways of doing things and tremendous momentum behind those methods,” says Rabern. “And the notion that a lot of 25-year-olds are going to come in and shift that culture in a year or two is very unrealistic.” New ideas are clearly needed, nevertheless. Some of the bigger programs in both aeronomics and astronomics—from the space shuttle to production of the composite-built Boeing 787 aircraft—are ending soon. And the old guard has been responding to intensified demand for lighter, more fuelefficient aircraft with “tweaks,” Danielson says, on tried-andtrue formulas, rather than true innovations. Still, no one gets anywhere in aerospace without first giving props to their elders. “I’m very proud of that generation,” says Rabern. “I think there’s a tremendous amount of corporate knowledge that resides in these people between 30 and 50. And the big challenge for the industry is to pass that on knowledge to the next generation.” + Get Connected: erau.edu/pr, poly.asu.edu/technology/mmet

Tired of forgetting the grocery list at home or having all those sticky yellow notes and mangled pieces of paper cluttering up your purse or falling out of your pocket? Yes, there is a more orderly way of dealing with all those lists and details you need when you’re on the run, and Jason Thibeault and the crew at GoWare are offering it—for free! They’ve created SimplyMobile Mom, which is software that once installed on a home computer allows the user to send content from the computer as text messages to the user’s cell phone. It makes a phone more of a PDA. “You can turn any phone into a smart phone,” says Thibeault, GoWare’s chief technology officer who works out of the Gilbert office, which houses product development. Corporate operations are based in Fremont, Calif. Although the initial target audience is the mothers of the world, the software lends itself to all souls wishing to be better organized. The content can be from any number of sources, including Web sites and Microsoft Office files, or content such as lists or notes can be created. Two versions of SimplyMobile Mom are available; the Web-based one also allows you to send photos and use plug-ins, Thibeault says. Both versions also allow users to share information with friends by sending the messages to their cell phones. GoWare can offer the software for free because it is an ad-driven service. Clients will see advertisements when they check messages, but Thibeault notes that there is a “no spam guarantee” and that the company’s goal is to make all ads “meaningful” to SimplyMobile Mom users. GoWare launched the beta version in early February on an invitationonly basis, he says, and there are now about 1,000 users throughout the United States.

+ Get Connected:

www.simplymobilemoms.com www.goware.com


Arizona State University

Close+up

Brain Trust Writing By :: T y Young

Hospital Gets Powerful MRI Scanner To Boost Research St. Joseph’s Hospital and Medical Center is turning to one of the largest medical scanners in order to find the smallest of ailments. The hospital has installed the Phoenix area’s first 3-Tesla magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanner, which will allow researchers to watch electrical impulses flow through the body and brain in a purely noninvasive way.

Microbe Power

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Writing by :: Joseph J. Caspermeyer

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New Insights Into Fuel Cell That Uses Bacteria To Generate Electricity From Waste Researchers at The Biodesign Institute are using the tiniest organisms on the planet— bacteria—as a viable option to make electricity. Andrew Kato Marcus and colleagues César Torres and Bruce Rittmann have gained critical insights that may lead to commercialization of a promising microbial fuel cell (MFC) technology. “We can use any kind of waste, such as sewage or pig manure, and the microbial fuel cell will generate electrical energy,” said Marcus, a civil and environmental engineering graduate student and a member of the institute’s Center for Environmental Biotechnology. Unlike conventional fuel cells that rely on hydrogen gas as a fuel source, the microbial fuel cell can handle a variety of water-based organic fuels. “There is a lot of biomass out there that we look at simply as energy stored in the wrong place,” said Bruce Rittmann, director of the center. “We can take this waste, keeping it in its normal liquid form, but allowing the bacteria to convert the energy value to our society’s most useful form: electricity. They get food while we get electricity.”

Bacteria have such a rich diversity that researchers can find a bacterium that can handle almost any waste compound in its daily diet. By linking bacterial metabolism directly with electricity production, the MFC eliminates the extra steps necessary in other fuel cell technologies. “We like to work with bacteria, because bacteria provide a cheap source of electricity,” said Marcus. Within the MFC is a complex ecosystem, where bacteria are living within a self-generated matrix that conducts the electrons. “The whole biofilm is acting like the anode itself, a living electrode,” said Marcus. Promise Meeting Potential Bacteria will grow as long as there is an abundant supply of nutrients. The team developed a new model, the Nernst-Monod equation, to describe the rate of bacterial metabolism in response to the “concentration of electrons” or the electrical potential. In their model, the team identified three crucial variables to controlling an MFC: the amount of waste material (fuel), the accumulation of biomass on the anode, and the electrical

potential in the biofilm anode. The third factor is a totally novel concept in MFC research. “Modeling the potential in the biofilm anode, we now have a handle on how the MFC is working and why. We can predict how much voltage we get and how to maximize the power output by tweaking the various factors,” said Marcus. For example, the team has shown that the biofilm produces more current when the biofilm thickness is at a happy medium, not too thick or thin. “If the biofilm is too thick,” said Marcus, “the electrons have to travel too far to get to the anode. On the other hand, if the biofilm is too thin, it has too few bacteria to extract the electrons rapidly from the fuel.” To harvest the benefits of MFCs, the research team is using its innovative model to optimize performance and power output. The project, which has been funded by NASA and industrial partners OpenCEL and NZLegacy, lays out the framework for MFC research and development to pursue commercialization of the technology.

Dr. Jim Pipe

The 12-ton scanner can be used to improve patient diagnosis at the research hospital, opening opportunities for scientists to help the lives of patients now and well into the future. When fully operational, the $1 million scanner will be able to detect and monitor conditions associated with strokes and Alzheimer’s disease while giving physicians an avenue to determine tumor types without surgical biopsies. It is housed at the St. Joseph’s Keller Center, another source of pride for the medical center, said Dr. Jim Pipe, director of neuroimaging research. “St. Joseph’s will be one of a few hospitals in the nation to house a 3-Telsa multinuclear MRI scanner,” he said. “The scanner

Dr. Jim Pipe

will help us develop efficient methods to advance MRI diagnosis imaging.” The 3T scanner allows users to receive images faster and with less powerful signals to obtain them. This is due to advanced magnetic coil technology and more robust hardware and software. The scanner was approved for clinical use in 2003 and is the next generation of MRI scanner, using magnets twice the power of its 1.5 Tesla predecessor. Since it was introduced to the medical world, the scanner has slowly replaced previous scanners, including those at the Penn State Hershey Medical Center, the University of Michigan Health System and the University of Vermont School of Medicine.


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Students from throughout the state mixed business with pleasure when they gathered for the 2008 Arizona Middle School Science Bowl Champions at Arizona State University. The champion of the recent competition was Team One from BASIS Scottsdale, which included students Ivan Iotzov, Alexis Abboud, Sandeep Subramanian, Morgan Davis and Kenny Hulpach. The team’s coach was Patrick Kolb. The team from Madison Park School in Phoenix placed second and Chandler Preparatory Academy took third-place honors. The event challenged sixth- to eighth-grade students to learn about math and science and encouraged them to pursue careers in those fields. Eighteen teams competed in the round-robin format before they advanced through multiple rounds of single-elimination. The first-place team won a trip to the U.S. Department of Energy’s National Science Bowl in Denver, Colo., scheduled for June 19-22. The Arizona teams competing for the coveted title also included BASIS Tucson School, Coronado Elementary School, Desert Ridge Junior High School, Emily Gray Junior High School, Kyrene Altadena Middle School, Oakwood, Veritas Preparatory Academy, Vista Verde Middle School and Westwind Academy. “It is a fun learning experience for students who have a passion for math, science and technology, and the competition highlights the wide array of Arizona career opportunities for students dedicated to these fields of study,” says Steven G. Zylstra, president and CEO of the Arizona Technology Council. The Arizona Technology Council’s Workforce Development Committee last year launched the Middle School Science Bowl for the state. Joining them in hosting this year’s event were primary sponsors Televerde and Solugenix.

The Arizona-American Indian Science and Engineering Fair

Super Bowl of Science

Winners Circle Competitions Test Arizona Students’ Skills In Math And Science W riting By :: A ngel a R a bago-Mussi

rom science fairs to fast-paced technology and entrepreneurial competitions, students are proving it’s never too early to start a career. At the 2008 Arizona Science and Engineering Fair, students from throughout

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the state showcased research projects that were far from the traditional mold-growing or potato-sprouting science experiments. The annual spring event held recently at the Phoenix Convention Center included 17 categories of competition, including biochemistry, bioengineering and environmental analysis. The entries showed a great deal of sophistication. A prime example was the grand-prize winning work of three Hamilton High School students. Taylor Sullivan’s analysis of the physics of black holes using computer simulations won in the astronomy and physics category, while Edward Lee won in the computer science category for creating a computational cancer detection device. Brianna Arendt’s awardwinning environmental analysis work was inspired

by news that housing trailers used by Hurricane Katrina victims had high emissions of formaldehyde. Arendt determined a way to seal the particle board from which the gas seeps. The three students, along with seven other grand-prize winners, won trips to Atlanta to compete at the Intel International Science and Engineering Fair in May. In that competition, Lee won a $1,500 second-place award from the U.S. Air Force in the computer science category. Science teacher Teresa Clark of Hamilton High School explained the students worked on the projects throughout the school year in a science research course. Hamilton also has hosted an annual invitational science and engineering fair for Chandler schools for 10 years. Not surprisingly, Hamilton had the most grand-prize winners at the state science fair and won both school and teacher awards. Along with the Hamilton High students, other grandvw prize winners in the state competition were Camille Kaiser of Academy for Advanced Studies in the elementary division for students in grades 5 through 6 and Jake Sullivan of Santan Junior High School in the junior division for grades


Close+up 7 and 8. In the senior high school age division, the winners were Alexander Fredrickson of Brophy College Preparatory, Ariel Wiley and Scott Boisvert of Basha High School, Emily Simmons of Xavier College Preparatory, Oscar Burciaga of Eagle Point School, and Raymond Hernandez and Alba Sebastian of Mesa High School. Clark says science fairs do more than teach students the scientific process; they build “personal confidence.” She adds: “You can’t replace that experience. It gives them the drive to continue their work in the future. Those kids are going to be our future scientists.”

2008 Avnet Tech Games Winners Writing by :: Angel a R a bago-Mussi

+ AMD Build the Fastest Computer Bogar Castro Felix, Robert Hedge, Stephen Choi Faculty coach: Steve May Gateway Community College

+ A ccenture Tech Challenge Team members from Kyrene Altadena Middle School quickly calculate the answer to a question at the Arizona Middle School Science Bowl.

Bridget Gillespie, Clint Holmquist, Paula Roberson Faculty coach: Scott Shaw Mesa Community College

+ Belkin Patch Panel Madness

Development Showcase A separate competition proved the importance of taking those innovative products to the marketplace. The Spring Venture Development Showcase was the culmination of a year’s work by students in The University of Arizona’s McGuire Center for Entrepreneurship at the Eller College of Management. Business concepts developed by students were judged by local and regional angel investors, and people from the business and academic community. Four

teams advanced to the final round, where they presented their ventures to judges including executives from Amazon.com and The Eller Co. The winning team, Skill IT, created a Web 2.0 community connecting skilled college students with local community members in need of economical and reliable technology help. The four members of the team were Anna Brauer, Terrence Rosen, Tyler Hall and Eric Wilson. But the team won’t stop at winning top prize in an academic competition. Wilson says they are enrolling in a business incubator program with the goal of securing funding commitments from investors and taking their idea into the real world.

Diamond Frizzell, Alijohn Ghassemlouei, Robert Micsky Faculty coach: Al Kelly University of Advancing Technology

+ D efense in Depth Victor Teissler, Bert Regeer, Mark Featherston Faculty coach: Ryan Clarke University of Advancing Technology

+ D esign and Build a Digital Device Joshua Gwinn, Josh Dietz, Ryan Lindmar Faculty coach: Bassam Matar Chandler-Gilbert Community College

+M  icrosoft Build a Business Web Site John Murphy, Richard Ricketts Faculty coach: Jon Storslee Paradise Valley Community College

+M  ultimedia Fast Break Ryan Caldwell, Amy Chow, Alex Ramirez Faculty coach: Anna Thorlaksdottir Scottsdale Community College

+ R obot Race Obstacle Course Avary Jones, Taylor Horn, Matt Vickery Faculty coach: Bassam Matar Chandler-Gilbert Community College

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follow the scenario they gave us and organize the cable in a neat, organized fashion. It was intense and we all had to work together,” says Ghassemlouei, who plans to work in network security.

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Avnet Tech Games The opportunity for challenging competitions doesn’t end after high school. The third annual Avnet Tech Games held recently attracted more than 150 students from Arizona colleges, institutes and universities. Students worked in teams to test their knowledge, creativity, problemsolving and technical skills in real-world scenarios. The multidisciplinary technology competition was held at the University of Advancing Technology in Tempe, where judges included executives from local technology firms, engineers and technical experts. Teams competed in nine different events, which ranged from building the fastest computer with a box of pre-selected parts to connecting and securing a computer network to meet a fictitious company’s business demands. Winners of each event were awarded a $1,000 scholarship. Alijohn Ghassemlouei and two other student team members from the University of Advancing Technology won the Belkin Patch Panel Madness game. The team built a working data network in 21 minutes. Ghassemlouei said the key to a speedy finish was giving each team member a specific assignment. “We had to


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Coaching Corner:

Emotional Intelligence An Asset Among True Leaders

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Writing by :: Nikki Capetz

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What single trait, more than any other, determines your success as a leader? It’s not your education and it’s not your IQ. It is your Emotional Intelligence, or EQ. As leaders move up in their organizations, up to 90 percent of their success factors are in emotional intelligence versus IQ or technical expertise, according to Daniel Goleman, author of the best seller “Emotional Intelligence.” In his book, he identifies 20 EQ core competencies:

Emotional Intelligence Personal

Social

Self-awareness + Emotional self-awareness + Accurate selfassessment + Self-confidence

Social awareness + Empathy + Organizational awareness + Service orientation

Self-Management + Emotional self-control + Trustworthiness + Conscientiousness + Adaptability + Achievement orientation + Initiative

Relationship Management + Influence + Inspirational leadership + Developing others + Building bonds + Teamwork and collaboration + Conflict management + Communication + Change catalyst

There are several ways to measure Emotional Intelligence. The most popular one includes a selfassessment, followed by a 360-degree feedback assessment. This process involves answering questions about yourself and asking others (those with whom you interact regularly) to provide input about you. Cary Cherniss, co-author of “Promoting Emotional Intelligence in Organizations,” compiled data from a variety of sources and organizations. The results build a business case for the ways in which emotional intelligence contributes to the bottom line. Top performer, high emotional competence: Competency research in more than 200 companies and organizations worldwide suggests about one-third of the difference

between top performers and others is due to technical skill and cognitive ability while two-thirds is due to emotional competence. In top leadership positions, more than four-fifths of the difference is due to emotional competence. Prevent executive derailment: Research by the Center for Creative Leadership has found the primary causes of derailment in executives involve deficits in emotional competence. The three main reasons are difficulty in handling change, not being able to work well in a team, and poor interpersonal relations. Leading to success: For 515 senior executives analyzed by the search firm Egon Zehnder International, those primarily strong in emotional intelligence were more likely to succeed than those who were strongest in either relevant previous experience or IQ. Specifically, the executive was high in emotional intelligence in 74 percent of the successes and only in 24 percent of the failures. The goodt news is you can improve emotional intelligence. Tools and techniques to assist in this course of action are often included in leadership programs. Improving emotional intelligence is a common developmental goal when working with an executive coach. The primary key to success is a sincere desire to change behavior. As an executive coach and business consultant, Nikki Capetz of Catalyst Systems, LLC assists entrepreneurs, executives and management teams in corporations and non-profit organizations to reach their personal and professional goals. She has more than 20 years of experience within the IT industry. She can be reached at 602-647-3220 or nikki@catalystsystems.biz.

Strength in Numbers Arizona BioIndustry Association Merges with Tucson Counterpart

n an effort to unify and advance the bioscience industry throughout the state, the Arizona BioIndustry Association (AZBio) has restructured its operations. The move resulted in the Bioindustry Organization of Southern Arizona merging with the Phoenix-based group and a new board of directors being selected to lead the association. “One of the key actions recommended in Arizona’s Bioscience Roadmap is to strengthen the state’s industry representation by creating a true statewide organization,” said board member Saundra Johnson, executive vice president of the Flinn Foundation, which commissioned the 2002 Roadmap study. “The new statewide structure for AZBio addresses this gap. It will help provide greater support and services for Arizona’s bioscience companies and enable the state’s industry to speak with a unified voice.” The not-for-profit trade association promotes the growth of the bioscience industry in Arizona through member services, educational programs, business networking, public policy and entrepreneurial endeavors. AZBio’s public

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policy advocacy, business development and workforce development efforts will likewise have statewide and regional components. Its annual calendar will feature two major statewide anchor events, complemented by a variety of regional events throughout the year.

the new board Of Directors + Rob Ashley, Ashley BioPharm, Tucson + David Cohen, Can-Am Pharmaceutical Services, Tucson + Michael Cusanovich, Arizona Research Labs, UofA + Gordon Goodyear, 3d Biosurfaces, Tucson + Rob Kennedy (treasurer), Apthera, Scottsdale + Edward Koeneman, Kinetic Muscles, Tempe + Loretta Mayer, Senestech, Flagstaff + Christine McAuliffe, Jennings Strouss & Salmon, Phoenix + Jon McGarity, InSys Therapeutics, Phoenix + Michael Mobley (chairman), The Biodesign Institute, ASU + Jacqueline Nicol (secretary), BioVigilant, Tucson + Nina Ossanna (vice chair), BIO5 Institute, University of Arizona + Thomas Rainey, Northern Arizona Center for Emerging Technologies, Flagstaff + Debbie Snyder, TGen Drug Development Services, Scottsdale + Diane Williamson, Earth Friendly Fuels, Flagstaff


Events

Debates to Feature Candidates for Arizona Corporation Commission

Kids Win at Wine and Wii™

Arizona Corporation Commission candidates will make their case before voters at two forums where they’ll debate issues that have an enormous impact on the state’s future and the finances, safety and quality of life of all its citizens, businesses and organizations.

July 15 | Democratic Primary Candidates Debate

Ever see a 6-year-old girl nearly make grown men cry after she beat them at tennis? You would have if you attended the first Wine and Wii™, a fund-raiser for Junior Achievement hosted by the Arizona Technology Council’s Ambassador Committee. More than 150 people hit the tennis court, bowling alley, golf course, baseball diamond and other sports venues to compete against one another at stations set up with Wii™, the interactive electronic game by Nintendo. A total of $10,000 was raised at the June 5 event to sponsor 300 kids who participate in Junior Achievement, which provides programs for K-12 children to inspire them to succeed in the global economy. Plans call for hosting another Wine and Wii™ next year. “This is the kind of event that brings adults together for the good of the children,” says Dena Kidd, senior director of development for Junior Achievement of Arizona. “We can’t wait until next year!” Of course, the wine flowed, too, as business professionals and other guests networked while they competed against one another. There also was a silent auction and raffles for Wii™. Incidentally, the girl wasn’t really 6. She played on the eve of her sixth birthday, so she technically was 5. Maybe those men can get a rematch.

September 15 | General Election Debate

Rio Salado College Conference Center, 2323 W. 14th St., Tempe On July 15, Democratic primary candidates will debate 9-11:30 a.m. followed by the Republicans at 1:30- 4:30 p.m.

Rio Salado College Conference Center, 2323 W. 14th St., Tempe On Sept. 15, a general election debate will be presented 12:30-3:00 pm. The debates will be presented before an audience. Receptions will follow each debate.

The debates will be presented by the Arizona Telecommunications and Information Council (ATIC) with support from the Arizona Citizens Clean Elections Commission. Sign and Spanish language interpreters will be available. Persons with other special needs may request reasonable accommodations by contacting ATIC. Five commissioners are elected to four-year terms. This year eight Republicans and five Democrats are vying for the three open seats. The debates will cover all the services regulated by the commission. The forums offer opportunities to better understand the importance of the panel and hear what the candidates have to say about some of the hot issues they could face: utility rates for water, natural gas, electric and telecommunications services; broadband deployment to rural communities; and Arizona’s investment in utility infrastructure, including renewable energy alternatives. Voters also can view webcasts during and after the debates at the ATIC Web Site, www. arizonatele.com/atic, or watch them on Cox Cable Channel 7 and other cable stations in the state. There also will be an online forum available to discuss issues, propose debate questions and interact with other Arizona voters. Registration for the live events and webcasts are requested. For registration, participation or other information, see the ATIC Web site or contact Steve Peters at 520-321-1309 or cita@tucsonlink.org, or Mark Goldstein at 602-254-5887 or atic@researchedge.

July 8 | IT Security Training Event ITT Technical Institute , 5005 S. Wendler Drive, Tempe | 11:30 a.m.-5 p.m. Phoenix Chapter of Information Systems Security Association presents a panel of security experts. Pre-registration: members, free. At the door, $25. Register at rsvp4issa@yahoo.com.

July 22 | Arizona Technology Council Partnering Conference Hilton Scottsdale Resort & Villas, 6333 N. Scottsdale Road 2-7 p.m. Conference participants will have access to an extraordinary concentration of emerging and established companies in nearly every important technology. Twenty companies will present their partnering opportunities while a high-profile panel of partnering experts will discuss how to expand and innovate through strategic alliances. The conference also will feature a cocktail reception and expo, giving participants the chance to network. Pre-registration: members, $50; non-members, $75.

At the door: members, $60; $85, non-members. Register at www.aztechcouncil .org.

July 31 | Council Connect: Jump Start Your PR Arizona Grand Resort, 8000 S. Arizona Grand Parkway, Phoenix | 7:30-9:30 a.m. The Arizona Technology Council will host a panel of local experts and media insiders who will share strategies and techniques for creating and maintaining an effective PR campaign. Pre-registration: members, $35; non-members $55. At the door: members, $40; non-members, $60. Register at www.aztechcouncil .org.

Sept. 17 | Arizona Technology Council Town Forum US Airways Corporate Headquarters, 111 W. Rio Salado Parkway, Tempe | 8-9:30 a.m. Join the Arizona Technology Council for its semi-annual Town Forum. Hosted by the Ambassador Committee, this forum provides members an update on what is happening within the Council. Registration: Free. Register at www aztechcouncil .org.

Sept. 24-26 | 2008 Governor’s Rural & Regional Development Conference Carefree Resort & Villas, 37220 Mule Train Road, Carefree Many communities. One Arizona. The annual event will behosted by the Arizona Association for Economic Development and the Arizona Department of Commerce. For more inform at ion, see www. a zcommerce.com .

Oct. 27-30 | Fuel Cell Seminar and Exposition Phoenix Convention Center, 100 N. Third St. Are you interested in fuel cell technology, alternative energy or saving the environment? Then become part of the premier event of the season: Fuel Cells for a Greener World. More than 2,000 participants and 175 exhibiting companies will join industry leaders from more than 30 countries at one of the largest and most influential conferences of its kind. Exhibits: free, but people must register. Technical sessions, $675. Inform ation can be found at www.fuelcellseminar.com.


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Remembering a Technology Leader

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Ensynch Founder Kurt Bunney Leaves A Lasting Legacy

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he Arizona Technology Council would like to recognize and honor a great member of our technology community who passed away. Kurt J. Bunney found peace on March 27 after fighting a valiant battle against brain cancer. He was a member of our family who truly impacted not only the direction and evolution of technology in Arizona, but also the pervasive culture of giving back through charitable donations and community service. Bunney was born in 1958 and raised in Denver with his two sisters and two brothers. He completed his studies in computer sciences at Colorado State University and eventually made his way to Phoenix, where a fruitful career in the technology sector evolved into a successful legacy as a technology entrepreneur.

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InnerView Bunney was known for his vision and ability to build unique technology-based businesses from strategy to execution. His latest achievement was founding and serving as CEO of Ensynch, one of Arizona’s top technology companies. Bunney launched the IT services firm in late 2000 at a time when the Internet boom was cooling off quickly. He took a chance, defied conventional thinking and followed his gut, launching Ensynch with the notion the burgeoning midmarket needed the same IT capabilities as enterprise-level companies. He valued and respected those around him, fostering a tremendous culture that led Ensynch to be named to the Phoenix Business Journal’s Best Places to Work list for three consecutive years. Passion For People His leadership was evident and respected in business, but his true leadership came in the way he helped others. He was absolutely passionate about people. An active participant in the community, Bunney recently served as chairman of the board for Goodwill of Central Arizona and also sat on Northern Arizona University’s business

advisory committee. He was a big supporter of the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation, giving time and financial support to help find a cure for the disease. The Lost Boys of Sudan project was very important to Bunney as well, and he personally sponsored and mentored three young men as they entered Arizona from the refugee camps in Kenya to find a better life in the United States. From volunteering to be in a bachelor auction for the American Liver Foundation to getting everyone he knew to fill huge barrels with food for the Phoenix Rescue Mission for the homeless, Bunney always was giving his time and energy for the welfare of others. This giving spirit rubbed off on those around him and inf luenced others to give back to the community and those in need. He enjoyed a well-rounded, active and healthy lifestyle and was an avid cyclist, outdoor enthusiast and marathon runner. He is survived by his son, James; daughter,

Jessica; stepson, Justin Wilson; stepdaughter, Candace Wilson; father, Edmund, and mother, Della; sisters, Madalyn and Dianne, and

His leadership was evident and respected in business, but his true leadership came in the way he helped others. He was absolutely passionate about people. brothers, Michael and Scott; a number of uncles, aunts and cousins; and many, many friends. Memorials may be made to the National Brain Tumor Foundation, 22 Battery St., Suite 612, San Francisco, CA 94111-5520. To donate online or learn more about the Foundation: + Get Connected: www.braintumor.org.

WE’RE PLUGGED INTO ARIZONA’S TECH SECTOR

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Law. From A Business Point of View. ® WWW.LEWISANDROCA.COM • Phoenix • Tucson • Las Vegas • Reno • Albuquerque

602.262.5311 • 40 N. Central Ave. • Suite 1900 • Phoenix, AZ 85004


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Feature

Longbow Upgrades for Mesa-made copter of choice mean better protection for pilots and ground troops W riting by :: Don RODRIGUEZ Photogr aph y by :: Bob Ferguson, Mike Goettings

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Apache

ou’ve no doubt heard y that ad campaign with the message, “We don’t make X, we make it better.” The makers of the AH-64D Apache will tell you the same. But with the pending rollout of the military helicopter’s next major upgrade, pilots will be glad to know The Boeing Co. has molded the products of its supplier into a war machine that is even faster with improved performance and onboard technology.


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Feature The result? More equipment that ultimately has translated into more weight for the aircraft. Bishop says. That’s not too good if you need to get out of a situation fast and seconds could make the distinction between life and death. In Block III, lighter materials have been used to cut down on that weight and boost speed, he says. Better, Not Bigger Some of the Block III improvements include: Better performance: Upgrades to the main rotor blade/drive train system with splittorque technology. With more surface area on the gears, power is boosted without increasing the size of the transmission. Increased survivability: Improved warning systems, an infrared frequency jammer and connectivity to Unmanned Aerial Systems.

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Better target acquisition: The range for detecting targets will increase under various conditions of terrain and visibility.

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Seamless communications: No matter which type of waves or frequencies are used for transmissions by various radios, the pilots will be able to receive the messages and information. The Apache will be the first U.S. Army aviation platform to connect to the Global Information Grid.

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Improved ongoing maintenance: Embedded diagnostics and ongoing monitoring of performance are part of the package. If there is need for servicing in the field, an interactive, CD-based manual can help mechanics resolve issues faster.

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ith the Apache already carrying a reputation of “When Apaches fly, soldiers don’t die,” consider the bad guys warned. July 9 is the date that military officials and other VIPs are scheduled to gather at Boeing’s Mesa manufacturing site for a preview of the Block III Longbow, as the new version of the flying fortress will be known. For the nearly 2,000 workers who work in the Apache program, it’s another milestone in the helicopter’s evolution of which they know has saved countless pilots and ground troops. “What other job in the world can you go out and make a difference?” says Gary M. Bishop, director of the U.S. Army Apache Programs Integrated Defense Systems. It’s his job to make sure the Army’s Apaches work to their potential, whether they are

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new or updated with “condition-based maintenance” to become nearly new. Considering the aircraft is designed to be flown 16 hours a month yet some in Iraq are in the air more than 110 hours a month without problems, his group is getting it right. Over the years, the entire Apache fleet has recorded more than 2.5 million flight hours. Since the first Apache, the AH-64A, rolled off the line in 1982, there have been a number of enhancements. Many needs have been identified with help of returning pilots who visit Boeing to provide details on performance, says Dale A. Macpherson, senior manager in Rotorcraft Operations Analysis of the Rotorcraft Division. His team gathers that information then creates real-life computer simulations that guide engineers on what would make the Apache perform better.

Anything that won’t be made better? Pilots point out the seat gets uncomfortable after spending hour and hour in the two-seat cocoon. But they’ll have to endure it a little longer. “It’s not designed for comfort; it’s designed for crash survivability,” Bishop says. The expectation is that Block III will carry the Apache program through 2016, says Brad Rounding, Apache project manager in the Rotorcraft Division of Integrated Defense Systems. An extended Block III program can mean the Apache is flying beyond 2040, he says. What lies ahead? While there are no specifics to publically announce, Macpherson can say they already are looking at enhancements that could become reality on Apaches as far as a decade from now. About the only restriction would be the customer’s budget, he says. It’s unlikely creativity won’t be in short supply as long as Boeing is involved. + Get Connected: WWW.BOEING.COM/ROTORCRAFT/MILITARY/AH64D


suppliers

Arizona companies are among the scores of U.S. and international suppliers that provide parts for the Apache.

+ Acme Electric Corp. + Armor Holdings + Amor Works + ATK Ordnance + Butler National + Com Tech + D-Velco Manufacturing + E xcaliber Precision + Honeywell Aero + Honeywell International Engines

+ Honeywell International Equipment + IMC Magnetics + Phoenix Logistics + Prescott Aerospace + Robertson Aviation + Sales & Service + Systems 3 + Treffers Precision + Trios Precision + Walters Precision

International Customers

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AriZona

–Gary M. Bishop, Director of the U.S. Army Apache Programs Integrated Defense Systems

There also is a demand overseas for the AH-64A and AH-64D models of the Apache. + Egypt + Greece + Israel + Japan + Kuwait

+ The Netherlands + United Arab Emirates + Singapore + Saudi Arabia + United Kingdom

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What other job in the world can you go out and make a difference?

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Phoenix Rises

Team From The University of Arizona At Center of Mars Exploration

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Compiled from reports by :: The Univ ersit y of Arizona.

Photogr aph y provided By :: Phoenix m a rs mission


Water ice in crater at martian north pole :: ESA/DLR/fu berlin (g.neukum)

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hen journalists mention w “world-class” and “Tucson” in the same sentence, they’re usually writing a travel story about a resort or golf course. Now they can add “mission control” to their choice of words.


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The LANDER :: Water hammer test

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s you read this, the world’s journalists continue calling on a building north of The University of Arizona’s main campus, site of mission control for the Phoenix Mars mission. Although scientists have been looking forward to this new style of excitement in the Old Pueblo since the spacecraft was launched last year, the real work in Tucson began May 25, the day the spacecraft landed on Mars after traveling about 423 million miles. This is the time that Peter Smith has been looking forward to for quite a while. The principal investigator for the mission has worked for UofA’s Lunar and Planetary Laboratory since 1978 but began working on Mars exploration in 1993 when his proposal for a camera was accepted by NASA for the Pathfinder mission. Later in the decade, cameras Smith built for the Polar Lander were lost when the spacecraft crashed on the surface of the Red Planet in 1999, which then led to cancellation of the planned 2001 Surveyor mission.

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But the setback became ancient history when the Phoenix mission spacecraft successfully launched last August and the lander descended to Mars with no problems. The landing, he says, ranked among great moments in his life “somewhere between Mom and apple pie.” The event and the resulting several months of activity in Tucson surely made Smith’s boss happy. “I can think of no better way to capture the imagination of people from around the world and focus it on the extraordinary scientific excellence at the UofA,” says Robert Shelton, president of the university. “This is going to capture so many more young people to pursue careers in science.” While Smith leads the mission, project management is the responsibility of NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory and development partnership at Lockheed Martin. International contributions come from the Canadian Space Agency; the University of Neuchatel, Switzerland; the universities of Copenhagen and Aarhus, Denmark; Max Planck Institute, Germany; and the Finnish Meteorological Institute.

M a rs surface :: NASA/jlp-ca ltech/univ ersit y of arizona


The spacecraft :: Phoenix lowered into thermal vacuum chamber

+ Get Connected: phoenix.lpl.arizona.edu; hirise.lpl.arizona.edu

This is going to capture so many more young people to pursue careers in science. - Robert Shelton, President of The University of Arizona

SUM MER 2008

and we combine separate images taken with different illumination to create color images,” Woida says. Even before the Phoenix Lander touched down, The University of Arizona already was part of history. Its High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment, or HiRISE, aboard the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter captured an image of the lander hanging from its parachute during its descent through the Martian atmosphere. “This is really unique; it’s on my Top 10 favorites list,” says HiRISE principal investigator Alfred McEwen of the Lunar and Planetary Laboratory. “This is the first time that a spacecraft has actually imaged the descent of another spacecraft onto a planetary body.” The biggest surprise for him, McEwen says, is that the very thin cords connecting the lander to the parachute are visible in the image. During the days ahead, there should be more surprises to come.t

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Team Tucson Nonetheless, the spotlight is on the team from Tucson. For example, William Boynton, a colleague of Smith’s at the Lunar and Planetary Laboratory, is lead scientist for the Thermal and Evolved Gas Analyzer. This critical instrument includes a calorimeter that tracks how much heat is needed to melt or vaporize substances in a sample plus a mass spectrometer to examine vapors driven off by the heat. In short, it bakes and sniffs samples. Early in the mission, tests identified a possible short circuit of the instrument. But that didn’t throw Boynton and his team. “We have developed a strategy to gain a better understanding of this behavior, and we have identified workarounds for some of the possibilities,” he says. When the lander lifted its first scoop of Martian soil as a test of the craft’s robotic arm, Pat Woida, a senior engineer in the Lunar and Planetary Laboratory, was involved in preparation of images shot by a camera mounted on the arm. “The camera has its own red, green and blue lights,


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The Secret Is Out

Tech Providers And Their Clients Discov er Sierr a V is ta A nd F or t Hua chuc a Are For More Than The Military

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W riting by :: t y young Photogr a ph y by :: Ta nja L inton / Fort Huachuca Publ ic Affa irs Office

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An “egg beater” antenna is checked on Fort Huachuca’s test range.

ew places in the country can boast a more prominent and longstanding partnership between a city and a military base than Sierra Vista, Southern Arizona’s second largest city. But besides the military and technology communities, it seems too few people know Sierra Vista and sister community Fort Huachuca exist or that both have played an important role in nearly every military conflict since the Civil War. But that is changing—and in a hurry. As the eyes of the world turn to technology as an economic engine and the military ramps up its communication and advanced war fighting regimen, Sierra Vista and Fort Huachuca are becoming the focal point for the future. It is estimated that Fort Huachuca alone provides a $2 billion impact to the state, the largest percentage of military impact here. “The things that are going on at Fort Huachuca and Sierra Vista are simply amazing,” says William C. Harris, president and CEO of Science Foundation Arizona. “It is truly a gem in this state that has gone unnoticed for too long.” Sierra Vista and Fort Huachuca can be found in the annals of military lore, but both are writing a new chapter that could lead them further into the hearts and minds of the next generation of military personnel protecting the land and skies around the world.


Upward Trend Maguire and Potucek both estimate the indirect influence of the base is rising as well. Sierra Vista has a population of approximately 43,000 and is steadily increasing. While much of that comes from soldiers stationed at the base, there is an increasing level of private military contractors opening offices nearby and in Tucson. Tucson’s biggest employer, Raytheon Missile Systems, conducts a lot of business with base operators, as does military contractors like General Dynamics, Lockheed Martin and Orbital Sciences. While they cannot quantify the number of military contractors, Maguire and Potucek says the trend is likely to continue as the Fort becomes the focal point of further communications and flight innovations. “When you run into people around town, many are former military personal who are now doing business in the private sector,” Potucek says. “I don’t think the Fort is wellknown outside of the military and the defense industry contractors yet, but that is changing.” Government agencies are now interested in the Fort and Sierra Vista’s Goldwater Range, a massive swath of land boasting a clear electromagnetic spectrum and an atmosphere clear of interference. It has become optimal

for testing radar, global positioning systems and high-end military equipment. The Department of Homeland Security, the U.S. Drug Enforcement Agency and all branches of the U.S. military are now conducting high-tech training missions at the Fort. This is good news for Sierra Vista which has pinned much of its economy on the direct and indirect impact of the base, Maguire says. “Fort Huachuca is one of the most important economic factors for the state of Arizona, not just Sierra Vista,” he says. “What is really important, especially given the budget shortfalls here, is that military spending is very consistent. You don’t see the cyclical nature like tourism and real estate.”

We have an impact that goes beyond Sierra Vista, but throughout the entire state. - Angela Moncur, Fort Huachuca spokesperson

photography from: Sierra Vista Convention & Visitors Bureau

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New War, New Era After World War II, Fort Huachuca turned a chapter in its history. In 1954, the Fort, its surrounding climate and the small supporting community of Sierra Vista drew the attention of the U.S. Army. Later that year, the area would be taken over by the chief signal officer who wanted an area optimal for electronics and communications training. In an evolution that began with the Wild West mail carriers, Fort Huachuca would soon become the hub of the most intense technological communication devices the world has ever seen.

In 1967, the Fort was designated the U.S. Army Strategic Communications Command. Four years later, it became the home of the U.S. Army Intelligence Center and School. That same year, Sierra Vista annexed the base into its borders, putting the final touches on a partnership that already had spanned more than 90 years. “The very fabric of the Fort is woven deeply into the culture of the city,” says Sierra Vista City Manager Charles P. Potucek. “We like to say we have two entities in one community.” While the Fort’s core functions are Military Intelligence training, electronic testing Signal Corps activity, it is also home to the world’s largest unmanned aerial systems training facility. Currently, U.S. Army, Navy and Marine Corps Unmanned Aerial Systems pilots train here. According to Maguire’s most recent study in 2005, Arizona’s military presence has a $9 billion impact. Much of that comes from the Fort, which is southwestern Arizona’s largest employer. More than 50 percent of the flight training from Luke Air Force Base near Phoenix and Davis-Monthan Air Force Base in Tucson is conducted at Fort Huachuca. “We have an impact that goes beyond Sierra Vista, but throughout the entire state,” says Angela Moncur, Fort Huachuca spokesperson.

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History Based in War More than a century ago, the town eventually named Sierra Vista was known as a tiny, unincorporated community loved by many for its deep starry nights, picturesque sunsets and its close proximity to Arizona’s largest military base. It was nestled in the heart of the Wild West, where the Pony Express would stop to seek protection from Native American and outlaw attacks during their trek in and out of California. The town was largely populated by ranchers and shop owners catering to the nearby military presence, which eventually included the Buffalo Soldiers of the 9th and 10th cavalries. The town has been known by numerous names, including Garden Canyon and Fry, eventually earning its current name which is Spanish for “Mountain View.” Both the Fort and the town were established in 1877, although Sierra Vista was not incorporated into the state until 1956. During World War I, Fort Huachuca was responsible for protecting the U.S.Mexico border. During World War II, every soldier sent to the Pacific Theater to fight the Japanese military was sent through Fort Huachuca and Sierra Vista. At the height of the war, more than 30,000 soldiers were stationed at the Fort, easily tripling the population of nearby Sierra Vista and adding a much needed boost to the local economy. “For many of these soldiers, it would be their last look at U.S. soil. But they were so drawn in by the area’s beauty, that they says if they returned from war, they’d return to Arizona and Sierra Vista,” says Alan Maguire, president and principal economist of The Maguire Company in Phoenix. Maguire has served as economic advisor to Gov. Janet Napolitano and her staff. Maguire has conducted multiple studies on the military’s impact on the state and local economies. While doing so, he has taken a liking to the history of the town and enjoys its evolution. But like others who have known Sierra Vista and Fort Huachuca for years, the best is still ahead, experts claim.


New American Revolution The Soldier Flex PDA is tried at the “On-the-Move” Testbed.

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Military On Front Line As Asu Leads Creation Of Flexible Electronic Information Displays

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W riting by :: Greg R aupp

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rizona State University is at the forefront of the next revolution in information displays, thanks to a substantial investment by the U.S. Army. Unlike today’s flat panel displays that are bulky, glass-based and power-hungry, the next generation will be flexible, ultrarugged, lightweight, low-power and compact. The revolutionary displays will usher in a new era of powerful real-time information sharing through ubiquitous applications in everything from portable human-borne or human-worn devices to permanent or temporary conferencing and command/ control rooms. The cooperative agreement with the U.S. Army Research Laboratory, Sensor and Electron Devices Directorate resulted in the realization of ASU’s Flexible Display Center in 2004. The first half of this 10-year program represents a $43 million investment by the Army and a comparable investment by ASU in infrastructure and equipment. It also includes significant participation by a growing list of industrial partners who pay annual membership fees and make internal investments to support development projects. The Center’s mission is to dramatically accelerate the commercialization of advanced high-information, contentflexible display technologies. This mission is realized through execution of an aggressive strategic plan that simultaneously evolves the technology in the dimensions of form factor, resolution, degree of flexibility and other performance specifications, while developing

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{ Update::ASU } the manufacturing toolsets and processes to fabricate high-quality, readiness-level demonstrators. The cornerstone is a state-of-the-art, pilot manufacturing capability housed at the ASU Research Park. Operated by a staff of professional engineers and technicians, the facility includes 17,500 square feet of class-10 clean room with both a development-scale production line and a GEN II pilot display manufacturing line. GEN II is a standardsized line that produces displays on 370 mm by 470 mm rectangular substrates. The Center works closely with its military system integrator partners—General Dynamics C4S, Honeywell International, L3 Communications, Raytheon and Boeing—to develop demonstration devices that showcase the compelling new capabilities intrinsic to flexible displays. These companies identify demonstrator projects whose success will help meet the technical requirements of their roadmaps for future system offerings. In turn, the display requirements for these projects help define the detailed objectives of the Center’s technology development programs. Soldier’s Friend Although the Center was established less than four years ago, high-performance, 4-inch diagonal Quarter Video Graphics Array flexible display panels using electrophoretic technology from EINK Corp. already are routinely fabricated and are now being integrated into fully functional demonstrator devices. For example, with customer funding and management support coordinated by teams at the U.S. Army Natick Soldier Research, Development and Engineering Center in Massachusetts, a rugged and

compact networked personal digital assistant was developed for use by individual infantry riflemen. This “Soldier Flex PDA” was demonstrated last July at the Army Future Force Warrior “On the Move” Testbed. Both devices weigh well under one pound each compared to PDAs with equivalent functionality that feature conventional, glass liquid-crystal displays that typically weigh more than six pounds but can weigh as much as 20 pounds. Moreover, the low-power requirement of the new displays dramatically extends the useful lifetime of the device on a single battery charge. The Flexible Display Center has pioneered a new technology development approach in a world in which the U.S. industrial base has become more knowledge-intensive and less manufacturing-intensive. A network of worldclass partnerships and a dedicated physical infrastructure have been established to create a unique venue for the development of advanced technology and the associated manufacturing tools and processes. The Center has shown worldwide leadership in the development of large-area, low-temperature amorphous silicon microelectronics, and has received critical acclaim at international meetings and in the trade press. Integrated systems incorporating innovative displays already have been developed and demonstrated. The Center is clearly on track to successfully realize its ultimate goal: creation of the next revolution in information displays. Greg Raupp is director of Arizona State University’s Flexible Display Center.

+ Get Connected: flexdisplay.asu.edu


W riting by :: Amy Erickson and Lisa Nelson

orthern Arizona University and the Translational Genomics Research Institute have joined forces to work on a fiveyear, $4.5 million research grant from the National Institutes of Health to develop new diagnostics and analytical tools for a significant biodefense disease called melioidosis. The illness, also known as Whitmore’s disease, was part of the biowarfare arsenals for the United States and the former Soviet Union during the Cold War era. Although both nations’ biowarfare programs have been disbanded, remnants may exist. Melioidosis is still found mostly in Southeast Asia and results in thousands of cases and deaths every year in countries such as Thailand and Australia. The infectious disease is caused by an organism that has been considered as a

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‘Great Strides Already’ “We have made great strides already with Burk and have identified genetic markers that predict the outcome of disease—essentially predicting whether a particular infection is destined to be fatal without prompt and aggressive treatment,” said Keim, who is a co-

principal investigator on the grant. “We need to quickly develop these markers into accurate diagnostic tools and get them into the clinics where this disease occurs.” The NAU portion of the research will be headed by David Wagner, an assistant professor of biological sciences and the associate director of the NAU Center for Microbial Genetics and Genomics. The Menzies School of Health Research in Darwin, Australia, also will be involved in the effort. “This is truly a collaborative project,” Wagner said. “Although melioidosis is a potential bioterrorism weapon and an important cause of disease in some parts of the world, it does not occur naturally in the United States. As a result, international collaborations are absolutely crucial to allow us to effectively study this important pathogen. “Our partners in Australia bring more than 20 years of experience of working directly with melioidosis in a clinical setting. TGen brings their excellent skills in developing rapid, accurate diagnostic tools, and NAU brings years of experience of working with Burkholderia pseudomallei in the laboratory.” Amy Erickson is a spokeswoman in the Office of Communications at Translational Genomics Research Institute and Lisa Nelson is a director of public affairs at Northern Arizona University.

SUM MER 2008

Nau, TGen Unite To Create Faster Diagnostic For Biological Warfare Agent

potential agent for biological warfare and terrorism. The result of the new research will be a tool that accurately identifies and characterizes the pathogen in clinical samples in a matter of hours. The existing technology requires several days to analyze samples. The research will be conducted at TGen North, the institute’s pathogen genomics and biodefense research facility in Flagstaff. Nationally recognized biosafety expert Paul Keim, director of TGen’s pathogen genomics division and Cowden Endowed Chair in microbiology at NAU, will lead this research effort. His laboratory has developed one of the most comprehensive repositories for melioidosis samples in the world. Keim’s researchers will focus on developing smarter and faster diagnostic tools to give physicians more timely and accurate information on the cause of the disease, a bacterium known as Burkholderia pseudomallei, or “Burk.”

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Front Line Lab

{ Update::NaU }


Bountiful Border Technological Developments In Security Present Opportunities For Arizona W riting by :: Bruce A. W right

t’s hard to pick up a newspaper without reading some bad news about the situation along the U.S.Mexico border. Illegal immigration, crime, environmental issues— all are real challenges for the country and, particularly, for those of us who live and work in Southern Arizona. Yet Arizona’s location along the border is also one of its great strengths. Arizonans share family, business, cultural and historical ties with our neighbors to the south, and those connections contribute to the vitality and richness of our daily lives. Increasingly, our proximity to the border is also translating into tangible economic opportunity for the state as well. One such opportunity is our developing expertise in innovations that will make the border safer and the region more prosperous. Fueled by a number of creative private companies and a burgeoning research enterprise at The University of Arizona, border security and technology is taking its place as one of Southern Arizona’s emerging economic clusters. This expertise was recognized this spring when the U.S. Department of Homeland Security selected the UofA to co-lead its new Center of Excellence for Border Security and Immigration (BSI). The university will lead the research efforts of the Center and the University of Texas at El Paso will head the educational activities. The UofA heads a broad, collaborative effort that includes 12 universities as well as governmental agencies, think tanks, national laboratories, private companies and border stakeholders. BSI will receive $16.5 million in funding from the Department of Homeland Security over a six-year period. Research at BSI will focus on a wide range of technologies to enhance security, such as deception detection and risk assessment. The Center also will examine related policy issues, including immigration, law enforcement, international cooperation, and civil rights and liberties.

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Top-Tier Team Jay F. Nunamaker Jr. serves as principal investigator and director for the Center. A Regents’ and Soldwedel Professor of management information systems, computer science, and communication at the UofA’s Eller College of Management, he brings to the project his research expertise, which focuses on deception detection by using linguistics, vocalics and kinesics. Serving as the Center’s executive director is Elyse Golob, who also is director of the Office of Economic and Policy Analysis for the UA’s Office of Economic Development. “The UofA is in an optimal position to lead this effort because of our location along the U.S.-Mexico border and our long-standing relationships with border stakeholders,” says Golob. “What’s particularly exciting is our ability to call upon the research strengths of the university—for example, emerging technologies for deception detection and our Dark Web terrorism project, which are being developed within the Eller College of Management, as well as new sensor technologies being developed by our Colleges of Optical Science and Engineering—to be part of an integrated effort to enhance national security,” states Nunamaker. But efforts to develop more effective border technologies have an impact beyond the obvious—and critical—need to enhance security. They also are designed to make the border region more prosperous. On a typical day, more than 1.1 million individuals are processed at our nation’s borders. The challenge is to defend our borders against terrorist threats while facilitating the legitimate commerce and travel that supports the region’s economy. A Fine Balance One part of the solution lies in the proposed Border Security Technology Commercialization Center (BSTCC). Located in Nogales, Arizona, the Center will evaluate

and test a variety of new technologies while enhancing the economic development of the border region. “The Center is designed to address the balance between security and trade,” says Golob. “Our challenge is to develop better ways to identify threats while encouraging the efficient flow of legitimate border traffic.” Candidate technology focus areas will include sensor networks, data mining and management, information sharing, detection of chemical and biomedical materials, as well as telemedicine, transportation security, water security, biosecurity and emergency management and public health preparedness. The UofA is leading the effort to establish the Center, and Alion Science and Technology will serve as site/operation manager. Corporate affiliates will conduct training and evaluation on a fee-for-use basis. The work of BTSCC will be informed by the efforts of the Southwest Border Security Consortium, a partnership of nine universities in border states Arizona, California, New Mexico and Texas. In 2006, the UofA took a leading role in establishing the Consortium, which is dedicated to developing and promoting scientific and policy solutions to issues affecting the public and private sectors along the U.S.-Mexico border. Golob notes the UofA has had a longstanding commitment to border issues and she believes it will continue to lead in this area. “The issue of ensuring safe borders while promoting the economic development of the border region will continue to demand national attention,” says Golob. “Our goal is to establish Arizona as a leader in port-of-entry technologies and to capture a competitive advantage in the emerging border security industry.” Bruce A. Wright is associate vice president for economic development at The University of Arizona in Tucson.

+ Get Connected: oed.arizona.edu | www.alionscience.com

{ Update::uofa }

Doctoral student Kevin Moffitt helps demonstrate the near-infrared pupillometry camera technology used in deception detection.


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iCrossing, Inc.

Acquisition of Quality Care Solutions, Inc. by The TriZetto Group, Inc.

Venture Capital Financing led by Goldman, Sachs & Co.

Acquisition of: NewGate Internet, Inc. Spannerworks, Ltd. Sharp Analytics, Inc. Proxicom, Inc.

Acquisition of Grand Canyon Railway, Inc. by Grand Canyon Railway, LLC, an affiliate of Xanterra Parks & Resorts, Inc.

Acquisition of: Neural Intervention Technologies, Inc. Selva Medical, Inc. Amesil, Inc. Absolute Closure Innovations, Inc.

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Information Technology Toolbox Acquisition of Information Technology Toolbox, Inc. by The Corporate Executive Board Company

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CAREfx Venture Capital Financing led by The Carlyle Group

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SUM MER 2008

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Investment in Environmental Support Solutions, Inc. Investment in NetRegulus

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As The Defense Industry Looks To Its Next Frontier, Southern Arizona Companies Are Busy Building War ‘Toys’ Of The Future W riting By :: Ji mmy M aga hern

escribing the innovative fuel system in the new stealth hybrid vehicle that his Tucsonbased engineering firm is helping develop for military use, Michael Lupien can’t help sounding a bit like “Doc” Emmett Brown of “Back To The Future,” demonstrating how the “Mr. Fusion” energy reactor built into the back of his futuristic time machine can convert discarded banana peels and beer suds into super-charged electrical power. “What’s really cool is the base of the unit is all lithium-ion batteries, powered by 10 gallons of mixtured fuel,” says the director of business development for Tucson Embedded Systems, which created the integrated dashboard architecture for the prototype vehicle. “So let’s say you get a gallon of petrol, then you get a gallon of diesel, a gallon of corn oil, a gallon of chicken fat, and a gallon of rocket fuel. You can mix this inside of the turbine, it generates power in the batteries, and then off you go. So you get, with a full tank, 350 miles worth of coverage in this one little unit that can also go from zero to 60 in four seconds.” Code-named the HY-DRA—short for Hybrid-Defense Recon Assault vehicle—and built in collaboration with Raytheon’s Missile Systems division in Tucson and hybrid technology players Bluwav and A123 Systems, the lightweight all-terrain vehicle is primed to become the military’s new secret weapon in what’s shaping up as its next battlefield: the U.S.-Mexico border.

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“The best part about this vehicle is that if you shut off the engine, you’ve got 25 miles of travel on batteries, and you cannot see it with a heat gun,” Lupien says. “So it’s totally quiet and it cannot be detected with a sensor. And with this instrumentation, you’re able to hook up all these other devices—night vision, forward-looking infrared and gunshot detection system. This is what the future will look like for the military or border management.” United Effort Setting aside all the divisive political debates surrounding the immigration issue, the battle over the border is clearly proving a boom to Southern Arizona technology firms. The U.S. Department of Homeland Security already has awarded a $15 million grant toward establishment of a research center led by The University of Arizona to focus on new technologies in border security. Christened the Center of Excellence for Border Security and Immigration, the funds will be split with an educational arm led by the University of Texas at El Paso. Since then, the UofA has enlisted the participation of other universities, government agencies and defense technology firms, including Raytheon’s Tucson division (whose spokesman John Nelson says is contractually barred from discussing most of the projects they’re working on), and Tucson’s Safety Dynamics, makers of a gunshot recognition sensor previously used by police in highcrime areas.

Protecting Trade For companies such Safety Dynamics, led by Tucson’s Hispanic Businesswoman of the Year Sally Fernandez, the question of how its software might be used by the border patrol can be a dicey issue. “Obviously, you don’t want it rigged up to automatically shoot someone when they try to climb the fence,” says Lundeberg, a former Army engineer. “But you also want it to do more than just turn on a light and take a picture, because people won’t care; they’ll know that by the time anyone gets there, they’ll be long gone. At some point, there’ll have to be some consequence for tripping the sensor.” But the technology initiative isn’t just about nabbing illegals and smugglers, says Bruce Wright, associate vice president for economic development at the UofA. By also using the latest technology to identify, say, a truck used by a legitimate produce shipper in Sonora with a barcode that can be electronically scanned at the border, installing motion and chemical sensors in the cargo bay to ensure nothing funny goes on en route, and a GPS device to keep the truck on track, those doing legal trade with the United States will be able to move across the border faster without their produce spoiling in the heat. “Mexico is the U.S.’s second largest trading partner, which is particularly important to the economy of the Southwest,” Wright says. “So there’s a concern that as you clamp down on the border to combat terrorism and illegal traffic of drugs and immigration, you’re also not negatively impacting the legitimate trade that needs to happen across the border.” Or, as Michael Lupien more simply sums it up, “You want to use this technology to catch the bad guys while also helping the good guys.”

SUM MER 2008

Tech’s Border Battle

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TheFocus ::

“What our engineers developed was a biology-based approach that essentially looks at how the brain processes sound patterns, and then we trained the system to look for very specific sounds,” says Safety Dynamics COO Wayne Lundeberg. “If there’s a gunshot, we’re able to detect that sound in less than half a second, and then do something with that, like activate a camera, sound an alarm, turn on a light, whatever.” For border security, Safety Dynamics has expanded the range of its sensors to detect not only gunshots but even the patter of a donkey’s hoof steps—a popular animal for drug smugglers—and the rattling of a chain link fence. “With the fence, we’ve trained it so you can brush by it or push up against it, but if you try to climb it, it will send out an alert to the people monitoring that fence,” Lundeberg says.


William C. Harris (left) with retired Gen. Thomas R. Browning at Luke Air Force Base.

ScienceFoundation ::

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W riting By :: W ill i a m C. H a rris

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y generation shared the excitement and pride of a nation as Neil Armstrong took that one small step for man in summer 1969. Even more awe-inspiring than the Apollo 11 moon landing itself, however, was the fact that it had been little more than eight years since President John F. Kennedy’s visionary pronouncement to Congress: “I believe that this nation should commit itself to achieving the goal, before this decade is out, of landing a man on the moon and returning him safely to the Earth.” And keep in mind that when he made this proclamation, NASA was in its infancy, and Alan Shepard’s historic 15-minute, 28-second suborbital flight had occurred just 20 days earlier. The history of the aerospace and defense industries in the United States is a chronicle of American innovation, and Arizona has had a vibrant presence in the fields for decades. Air transportation, aircraft and parts manufacturing, and guided missiles and space manufacturing round out Arizona’s top aerospace and aviation sectors, employing more than 70,000 people statewide. The average salary in these industries is 52 percent greater than Arizona’s overall average salary. Industry leaders with substantial interests in Arizona include Boeing, Honeywell,

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Raytheon, General Dynamics C4 Systems, Orbital Sciences and Lockheed Martin. Arizona’s infrastructure assets include competitive operating costs, great flying weather, and 81 airports, three of which are international airports. And we have significant U.S. Air Force assets, which provide a unique connection to some exceptionally talented people. But my conversations with leaders of these industries suggest that we may not be providing all the talent that is needed in the workforce, particularly the skills essential to success in this high-tech sector. R&D A Must In order to make Arizona more attractive to this broad-based industry, we should also work in new ways to encourage aerospace leaders to develop new products and software through R&D. To catalyze a greater focus on enhanced R&D activities, Science Foundation Arizona will match competitive research investments that partner with Arizona’s universities and colleges through our Strategic Research Groups investments. And our K-12 investments will focus on skills essential to the 21st century for teachers and students. We want to focus on “brains” and speed to get things done—to give Arizona a competitive advantage. There never has been a better time

for children to study math, science and engineering if quality, high-paying and exciting careers are of interest to them. As we recognize the challenges and opportunities of the global market place, we will soon realize that we must examine what we are doing and increasingly focus on skills essential for success. As a “strawman,” I suggest every student must be computer literate and increasingly technically sophisticated to create the advantage we need to innovate and lead new industries. The rest of the world knows our “old game plan.” We need a new plan and we all need to be on the same team. The aerospace industry needs students with skills to do things. Learn by doing must become our advantage. Top Tier Engineers While our engineering colleges are highly competent, they are not strong enough when global competition is considered. Thus, we must encourage a greater focus on engineering at Arizona State University and the University of Arizona so they can advance to the top tier in the nation. And, to build on engineering excellence, Arizona should consider creating an Arizona Aerospace & Aviation R&D Institute, an organization designed to address problems and opportunities that challenge the entire system. Working smart and in new ways, we can have an impact of reducing fuel use, developing new fuels and addressing all aspects of flight now and in the future. Additionally, the technologies spawned from the Aerospace & Aviation Institute are likely to have dual uses and should result in the creation of new companies and jobs so that Arizona maintains a competitive advantage. When Kennedy said we are going to land a man on the moon and return him to Earth, we had not even been into orbit. Now, nearly 40 years after Armstrong set his first foot on the lunar surface, we’re ready for the next giant leap in the aerospace industry. With hard work, dedication and leaders with vision, perhaps that next giant leap will have significant Arizona connections. Imagine if Arizona is recognized as the leading source for “technology workers”—individuals who will help design and build the future. That would help secure our future. William C. Harris, Ph.D., is president and CEO of Science Foundation Arizona and former director general of Science Foundation Ireland.

+ Get Connected: www.sfaz.org


Critical Choice State Lawmakers Consider R&D Tax Credit To Benefit Technology W riting By :: T y Young

hroughout time, technological innovation has built upon itself in an increasingly brisk pace. Ten years ago people listened to music on compact disk players and began watching films on DVDs rather than tape. Now, like many new technologies from a decade ago, both are nearing extinction as private industry research and development teams usher in the next wave of new creation. Following these new innovations come manufacturing facilities, bringing in employees, their families and a potential windfall of economic development based on technology. This has put states and their leaders in a new-found competition to lure the best and brightest minds across their borders, hoping to foster the next Intel—or lure it from another state. As usual, the bait state governments are using is the tax credit. And just as technology has evolved, so, too, have research and development credits. Arizona is no different, and some industry and government leaders are working overtime to ensure the state is as competitive as others in the country. A legislative bill under consideration by the Senate would put the state in line with its biggest neighbor and economic competitor, California. The bill, which easily passed the state House of Representatives in March, would boost the tax credit for companies spending

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less than $2.5 million in research-based activities from 20 percent to 24 percent of their expenditures. For companies that spend more than $2.5 million, the credit would be a flat $750,000 (a $250,000 increase), plus 15 percent of expenditures above and beyond $2.5 million (up from 11 percent). United Effort “This is the closest we’ve ever been to improving the tax credit and potentially bringing in a more robust knowledgebased economy,” says Steven G. Zylstra, president and CEO of the Arizona Technology Council. “This bill has to pass if we are going to keep up with the rest of the country and put Arizona at the top of technological innovation.” The Arizona Technology Council joined the Arizona Chamber of Commerce & Industry, the East Valley Chamber of Commerce Alliance and the Greater Phoenix Economic Council to support passage of the bill, which is slated to be heard by the Senate Rules Committee. Bill sponsor and Senate President Tim Bee, R-Tucson, sits on the committee, which bodes well for its passage. Gov. Janet Napolitano, who has supported numerous technology-based tax incentives during her two terms, also supports an increase in the R&D incentives. But some political insiders worry that the state’s increasingly grim budget shortfall

may end the passage of tax credits of any sort, especially for those that do not bring immediate results. Still, without improvements to the current R&D tax credit, some of the state’s most prominent companies may consider relocating, says Jason Bagley, Intel’s government affairs manager. “Arizona needs to keep pace with the rest of the country, especially California,” he says. “If not, you are going to see a lot of companies not even looking at Arizona to conduct R&D and you may see those here looking at finding new homes.”

This bill has to pass if we are going to keep up with the rest of the country and put Arizona at the top of technological innovation.

- Steven G. Zylstra, President and CEO of the Arizona Technology Council


Capitol Watch

Arizona: Strong and Vibrant in Aerospace, Defense, Avionics and More W riting By :: Gov. Ja net Na pol ita no

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Equally critical to the health of our economy is the state’s defense and military assets—Davis-Monthan and Luke air force bases, Fort Huachuca, and the Yuma Proving Grounds—as well as cutting-edge astronomical observatories and noteworthy research programs and assets in the space sciences. In May, the Phoenix Mars Lander made its successful descent to the Red Planet. The 422 million-mile, nine-month journey across space puts Arizona and its researchers in the spotlight for three months of groundbreaking research seeking evidence of life on Mars. The initial images from Phoenix had scientists around the globe poring over the first look at the surface of Mars’ polar regions. This mission highlights the talent at The University of Arizona, our research strengths and is just one example of the tremendous achievements possible in Arizona.

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en billion dollars in 2005 and again in 2006: two figures that begin to paint a picture of the significance the aerospace and defense industries have in Arizona. We are home to one of the largest and most exciting aerospace and defense clusters in the United States, where Arizona firms engage in a full range of activities, including production of aircraft, aircraft parts, weaponry, navigation, guidance, optics and aeronautical systems. It is a true driver of our state’s economy. The U.S. States Aerospace Commission reports aerospace industry jobs pay, on average, 52 percent higher salaries than Arizona’s average wage with a total industry payroll of about $3.4 billion. The aerospace, defense and avionics industries have strong roots in the state, with leaders that include Boeing, Honeywell, Raytheon, Northrop Grumman, General Dynamics C4 Systems, Orbital Sciences, Sargent Controls & Aerospace, Universal Avionics Systems, Lockheed Martin and Hamilton Sundstrand. Each of these companies works closely with numerous small- and medium-sized suppliers to support their operations.

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More Work To Do In my conversations with industry and business leaders, there is a sense that Arizona has done well in recent years of capturing a sizeable share of the growing aerospace and defense pie; however, we cannot rest on this perceived success. Other states such as Texas, Florida, Alabama, and Mississippi are taking a disproportionate share of new business in the overall national aerospace and defense industry while New Mexico, Washington, and Illinois are making headlines for adopting aggressive programs and marketing their credentials as bases for aerospace and defense companies. This signals a challenge for creating, attracting and sustaining the aerospace, defense, and avionics industries, which are clearly a critical component of the future economic well-being and prosperity of Arizona. As we move to diversify the Arizona economy, we must also balance investment in new and emerging areas of our mature and well-established sectors of the aerospace, defense and avionics industry. Last October, I announced creation of a new non-profit aimed at improving the state’s economy. The Arizona Economic Resources Organization, or AERO, brings together representatives from private business, nonprofit groups, the public sector, communities, the Arizona Department of Commerce, state universities and institutions of higher learning to focus on a long-term strategy for global success. Supporting the aerospace and defense industries and our home-grown innovations is imperative, and we are actively arming the science and technology leaders in Arizona with a means to increase investment and opportunity.

Education Is Key The most critical component is education. The state’s investment and emphasis on K-12 education and beyond will create a strong and robust pipeline of future workforce—the scientists, engineers, managers, and technicians necessary to attract, create, and sustain a growing knowledge-base industry. Arizona already offers a high quality, young and talented workforce, and we must ensure it is ever stronger to continue supporting the research and development necessary to keep up with accelerating product cycles and global competition. Arizona universities conduct sponsored research for a number of government departments and agencies, including NASA, the U.S. Air Force Office of Scientific Research and the Department of Defense. Arizona State University’s Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering Department is investing more than $5 million in the ASU Flight Research Center, the nation’s only fully dedicated flight research center aligned with a major research university. The Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering Department at the University of Arizona has special strengths in the area of aerodynamics and fluid mechanics. This expertise includes a combination of theory, computational and experimental capabilities that are difficult to find at a single location. Embry Riddle Aeronautical University, a leading aviation and aerospace training institution, has branches in Prescott, Phoenix, Mesa and Tucson. Arizona’s nationally ranked community college system features programs such as the partnership between Chandler-Gilbert Community College and the University of North Dakota’s Odegard School of Aerospace Sciences. We also must create a robust pipeline of business and entrepreneurial opportunities that strengthen and streamline the industry’s supply chain so Arizona maximizes the industry potential. This will involve looking at and strengthening the complete innovation and entrepreneurial eco-system for the aerospace and defense industry, including small and medium, and large firms along with the density and quality of linkages between large and medium aerospace, defense and avionics firms and their first, second, and third tier suppliers. Working together with industry and business leaders, Arizona must and will rigorously develop and implement processes to secure a promising and prosperous future for Arizona’s aerospace, defense and avionics industries.


Sponsors: We Proudly Present

The Arizona Technology Council’s Sponsors Thanks to them, we can serve our members better.

VisionarySponsors ::

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For more information about sponsorship, call the Arizona Technology Council at 602.343.8324.


Phoenix Analysis & Design Technologies is Arizona’s premier provider of mechanical engineering services by team members who have offered simulation, design and prototyping services since 1994 in Arizona and around the world. For analysis, the company delivers world famous FEA and CFD simulation as well as sales and support for tools from ANSYS, Inc. For design, PADT focuses on developing rotating equipment, semi manufacturing tools and medical devices. This offering is rounded out with on-site rapid prototyping, injection molding and precision prototype machining. www.padtinc.com Apex Systems, Inc. is a technical-staffing augmentation firm specializing in temporary, contract-to-hire, and direct hire placement. Founded in 1995, Apex Systems has grown from a single office in Richmond, VA, to one of the largest and fastest-growing staffing firms in the United States, with $398 million in annual revenue and 36 branch offices serving hundreds of Fortune 1000 and mid-sized clients nationwide. It has built a reputation in this industry as a fast, reliable, and highly cost-effective resource for corporate America’s short- and long-term staffing needs. www.apexsystemsinc.com Artic Air is a commercial mechanical contractor with more than 24 years experience in the Valley and specializes in computer data room and other critical heating, ventilating and air-conditioning design, installation and ongoing support services 24/7. Certified to work on LIEBERT, APC and STULZ equipment, the company also offers complete design and build services for new construction as well as tenant improvement work that includes sheet metal, piping, indoor air quality, controls, chillers, water towers, coolers and more. Blue Cross Blue Shield of Arizona, an independent licensee of the Blue Cross Blue Shield Association, is a not-for-profit health insurance company founded in 1939 and based in Phoenix. As Arizona’s largest locally based insurance company, it has more than 1,500 employees in its Phoenix, Tucson, Tempe and Flagstaff offices. It provides health insurance products, services or networks to more than 1.1 million individuals. It is the mission of BCBSAZ to provide the best value in health insurance and to improve the quality of life of Arizonans. www.azblue.com

Capable Software provides superior quality, professional project management, agile application development and strategic rollout services for mid- to large-size companies and government at industry market rates. Its goal is to do the right things the right way at the right time to enable our clients, employees and investors to succeed in achieving their goals. The company helps organizations “get capable” through the implementation of strategic technologies; application of well-defined, purposeful, and vetted processes; and development of on-time, on-budget applications. www.GetCapable.com

Since 1989, Alan Hardy, CPA, CISA, CITP and ESC Software have been one of Arizona’s leading providers of business management software for small- and midsize organizations of all kinds, supporting applications such as accounting, distribution, manufacturing and service/repair. ESC Software provides a full breadth of services, including pre-sales consulting, needs analysis, systems review and design, and implementation. By combining a well-honed implementation methodology with innovative ideas and a personalized approach, the Tempe-based firm has successfully aided hundreds of clients. www.escsoftware.com

Scottsdale-based ChosenList.com is a consumer rich-media company connecting buyers and sellers through free video classified ads, discounted employment ads and a video-enabled social community. The company delivers an online experience safe for families and appropriate for companies to promote their products and services. The easy-to-use Web 2.0 platform of ChosenList.com has five user highways: classifieds, jobs, community, employers and the ChosenList Videographer Network, which certifies people to create effective videos for jobs, resumes and classifieds. www.ChosenList.com

Arizona-based Hardenbrook Consulting is a hightech product development consultancy that advises small- to medium-size companies nationwide on endto-end solutions, guiding companies from the onset of problem identification through implementation. It provides solutions to challenges that all industries face, including benchmarking, technology road mapping, portfolio management, managing complex teams, getting products to market on time and identifying the best projects to develop. The company also offers workshops that focus on strategic planning and the front end of product innovation. hardenbrookconsulting.com

Cilliers, CPA PLLC provides accounting, payroll and tax solutions to its technology clients. Its mission is to provide peace of mind by delivering quality accounting and tax solutions, freeing management to concentrate on the core business. With extensive accounting experience and many years working in the technology organizations of Fortune 100 companies, the company is positioned to assist technology organizations in addressing specific needs. Services range from filing quarterly tax returns to overall responsibility for accounting services. www.cillierscpa.com

HUB International is an insurance brokerage firm that offers personal service and the ability to respond quickly to your changing needs. The company balances the strength of an international firm with the accessibility of a local broker as it offers technology customers the agility, insight and knowledge to help them deal effectively with today’s risks. At the same time, it looks ahead, seeking better ways to support the insurance and risk-management needs of companies helping to shape the future. www.hubinternational.com

CSI is a national leader in the design and implementation of innovative in-building wireless products, services and solutions. It provides complete turnkey coverage solutions—ranging from site survey, design and installation to post-testing analysis and follow-up—to a variety of industries throughout the nation. CSI is the only in-building wireless service organization approved by all major wireless service providers in the United States. Its vast experience and unique approach have propelled the company to become the standard in the wireless industry. www.cellularspecialties.com

ITB Services, LLC provides consulting services for business process, project management and information technology. It couples the flexibility and customer attention expected from a small business with the power of a larger organization through collaborative agreements with other IT services and project management professionals. These agreements allow the company to provide senior-level professionals experienced in multiple industries and disciplines as it works side-by-side with clients, helping provide improved return on operating investment so they can focus on their core business. itbaz.com

DPAir Corp. has more than 20 years experience in designing and maintaining secure, high-technology data centers as well as heating, ventilating and air-conditioning (HVAC) and environmental control systems. It works as a partner with clients to design data centers and HVAC systems to meet their needs today and well into the future. The company’s extensive knowledge and expert team of architects, mechanical and electrical engineers, and consultants provide a distinct advantage for customers. www.dpair.com

The challenges facing today’s technology professionals are increasingly complex, with growing demands that go beyond simply providing information and solutions. Jolex Corp. is committed to providing the highest-quality strategic financial consulting for technology organizations. Its services provide clients with sound data-drive models to support decisions that improve profitability and performance across the organization. This is done by creating cost and predicative models that lead to bottom-line results for its technology partners. www.jolexcorp.com

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Now celebrating its 15th anniversary, Abba Technologies, Inc. provides IT advisory and integration services to customers throughout the Southwest. Abba partners with customers in both government and the private sector to implement comprehensive solutions. Abba’s core practices include server consolidation, storage solutions, networking, secure client computing and converged communications, complemented by workforce augmentation and IT training. www.abbatech.com

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JP Business Solutions LLC is a woman-owned print and promotional products company with more than 30 years’ experience. Focused on customer service and innovative solutions, it can assist in improving clients’ processes to ensure the effectiveness of each printed communication piece—from concept through design to delivery. Subject matter-specialists offer well-conceived strategy, product and total solutions, including bar-code technology, RFID, automated billing solutions, plastic cards, loyalty programs, business forms, commercial print, promotional products or printed materials. www.JPBusinessSolutionsLLC.com

Phoenix Analysis and Design Technologies is Arizona’s premier provider of mechanical engineering services. Its experienced engineers have offered simulation, design and prototyping services since 1994 to high-technology customers in Arizona and around the world. For analysis, the company delivers world-famous FEA and CFD simulation as well as sales and support for tools from ANSYS, Inc. For design, it focuses on developing rotating equipment, semi-manufacturing tools and medical devices. Services also include on-site rapid prototyping, injection molding and precision prototype machining. www.padtinc.com

With the recent invention of high-brightness, white LEDs, Lumey’s Scottsdale headquarters is excited to offer commercial customers the energy saving, forever lasting and perfectly color-controlled light from LEDs. With energy savings 10 times greater than compact fluorescents and no wiring or special fixtures required, Lumey’s LEDs are eligible for utility rebates and meet the requirements of the federal energy mandate. No cost lamp trials as well as fluorescent, Edison-based, candelabra, mogul and halogen LED bulbs are available. www.lumeys.com

Prime Solutions Group, Inc. is an aerospace and defense consulting firm that focuses on successful program execution of large defense contracts. Its personnel are experienced Department of Defense acquisition experts who apply systems engineering and program management expertise to ensure customer expectations are exceeded. PSG’s capabilities contribute to all phases of the program life cycle, with specialization in complex program development and integration as well as net-centric service oriented architectures. Its unique qualifications help customers win new business and maintain existing programs. www.psg-inc.net

NeoKinetics, Inc. is a consulting firm focused on new product introduction, product management and business development through more than 80 years’ experience in senior/corporate management of semiconductor and technology companies. Its technical executives possesses extensive stateside and off-shore corporate experience in initiating and aligning product and technology development programs with synergistic opportunities in varied markets. It offers strategic and tactical processfocused solutions in sales, marketing, engineering, product management, operations, quality and reliability that surpass internal and external customer requirements. www.neokinetics.us

PureTech Systems is a manufacturer of wide-area surveillance solutions for Fortune 1000 firms, utilities, ports, schools, and federal, state and local governments. Its PureActiv™ solution addresses critical security threats to safeguard lives, facilities and other highvalue assets by providing professionals with accurate real-time alarm and video information of suspicious activity occurring in outdoor and remote locations. It also incorporates such features as geographic information systems, advanced video object detection and tracking, and automated security policy response technologies. visionsystems.icxt.com

Nextiva is a local telephone service provider for small businesses. Compared to traditional phone companies, its solutions can save businesses up to 75 percent on their monthly phone bills. In addition to great savings, all packages include a complete set of advanced features, including visual voice mail, automated attendant, find me/follow me, click to dial and online control panel—all at no extra charge. All services are hosted, which means there is no expensive equipment to purchase or install. www.nextiva.com

As the world’s leading provider of business software, SAP delivers products and services that help accelerate business innovation for customers. Company employees believe that doing so will unleash growth and create significant new value—for their company, customers and ultimately, entire industries and the economy at large. Today more than 47,800 customers in more than 120 countries run SAP applications—from distinct solutions addressing the needs of small businesses and midsize companies to suite offerings for global organizations. www.sap.com

PGI Solutions offers the most powerful real-time security monitoring service for companies that must understand and manage significant events in and across their computer networks. Patent-pending technology including Discovery Threading™ collects, correlates and centrally manages network information so administrators can effectively identify, document and control data theft, insider threats and regulatory compliance. Services include security, compliance, forensics, network performance management and investigative services. www.pgisolutionsllc.com

Seale/Krewson Group represents corporations and high-growth companies on all their real estate needs by helping them increase productivity, reduce operating costs and accomplish their overall goals. Its clients on average save 20 percent on their real estate costs through a systematic approach committed to implementing a plan tailored to their specific needs. The company brings together diverse real estate services that make each assignment seem effortless and seamless while ultimately being successful, based upon business goals and objectives. sealekrewsongroup.com

As a business leader responsible for security, how can one choose among motion sensors, keyless entry, infrared systems or inventory chips? Choosing incorrectly will be more than frustrating; it will be expensive. That is where SECURaGLOBE can help. Its professionals are certified in finding optimum solutions to security problems. Whether the challenge is physical security, forensics, monitoring or labor unrest, its team is committed to creating long term client value through expert security solutions. www.askasecurityexpert.com At Secure Computer Professionals the focus is on making Windows, Mac and Linux systems Safe, Simple and Secure (s3) by offering comprehensive business technology consulting services for small businesses through extensive knowledge of proven best practices. It specializes in finding ways to decrease risks associated with information security and business interruption while reducing software, hardware and maintenance costs. The company is proud of its creative, innovative and unique problem-solving approaches and looks forward to helping clients become more successful. www.SCPs3.com ShoreTel, Inc. is a leading provider of Pure IP unified communications solutions. The firm enables companies of any size to seamlessly integrate all communications—voice, video, messaging and data— with their business processes. Independent of device or location, its distributed software architecture eliminates the traditional costs, complexity and reliability issues typically associated with other solutions. The company delivers the highest levels of customer satisfaction, ease of use and manageability while driving down the overall total cost of ownership. www.shoretel.com Steinberg Financial Advisers is a registered investment advisor and insurance agency that designs and implements 401(k) plans and employee benefits while insuring the difficult-to-insure business. As a registered investment advisor, it is free to manage investments such as college endowments and private foundations by using active and passive investments, tactical and strategic asset allocation, and tax-efficient and alternative investments. This allows the firm to adapt and implement strategies for entrepreneurs whose needs can be as complex as they are unique. www.steinbergfinancial.com Superior Salt, Inc.’s 22 years of R&D and large-scale testing of methods for cost-effective and ecologically beneficial recycling of salts from salty waste waters from desalination and water softening led to dominant patent position in the field. In 2007, the company’s California operation received the first and only U.S. Operating Permit for salts recycling before it was sold to private investors. Demonstrations of lower-cost desalination and storage of solar heat for large scale 24/7 refrigeration and heating, ventilating and airconditioning (both patents pending) are moving back to Arizona. jgrott@cox.net


: Members

The Kiosk Store is an interactive solutions provider with products that uniquely enable clients’ businesses to expand by optimizing their own customers’ experiences through effective use of self-service kiosk technology. This is accomplished by providing turn-key solutions that incorporate hardware and software applications, unprecedented customer service, state-of-art software solutions, sleek hardware

At The Durrant Group, architectural and engineering design is their passion and clients are their inspiration. With a focus on technology-based projects, it specializes in laboratories, aviation, data centers, manufacturing, office and higher education by fusing expertise with innovation to deliver vibrant and functional designs. The firm’s more than 300 professionals specialize in architecture, mechanical, electrical, plumbing, civil and structural engineering, planning, security, energy management and life cycle costing. For 75 years, it has offered comprehensive services across the globe. www.durrant.com The ROBB Group Holdings, LLC provides sales benchmarking and due diligence systems, sales reconnaissance and interim sales advisory services to firms involved in mergers and acquisitions, venture capital, investment banking and private equity. The Scottsdale-based company offers advisors across the United States, United Kingdom and the Middle East. Through its subsidiaries and partners, it benchmarks and optimizes sales organizations and deploys strategies, systems and resources to capture spend, displace the competition and grow margins. www.therobbgroupholdings.com Time Warner Telecom Inc. provides managed network services, specializing in Ethernet and transport data networking, Internet access, local and long-distance

voice, VoIP and security to enterprise organizations and communications services companies throughout the United States. As a leading provider of integrated and converged network solutions, the company delivers customers overall economic value, quality, service and improved business productivity. Time Warner Telecom will change its name to tw telecom on July 1. www.twtelecom.com Treehouse Software, Inc. has been a leading provider of mainframe software and services for hundreds of enterprises worldwide for more than 26 years. The privately held company’s current focus is on solutions that enable customers to leverage their investments in legacy systems with real-time data integration, data warehousing, data distribution and conversion, XML and SOA, and additional new technologies. Additionally, it has a division that focuses on business intelligence software and services. www.treehouse.com White Mountain Labs offers outsourced testing services to semiconductor companies. As part of Evans Analytical Group, the company offers services such as electrostatic discharge (ESD), latch-up testing and Automated Test Equipment engineering services. More than 5,000 projects have been successfully completed for more than 100 semiconductor companies in the past seven years, including numerous customers in the United Kingdom, Europe and Israel. The company is an ISO17025 accredited facility performing testing to standards prescribed by the ESD Association, JEDEC, Mil-Std and the Automotive Electronics Council. www.whitemountainlabs.com

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TCR Solutions, Inc. is a full-service computer solutions company specializing in high-quality services at affordable prices. Its range of services include software training, Web design, networking and computer repairs along with specialization in such areas as compliance regulation (i.e. HIPPA and SEC), data recovery and computer forensics. The company’s mission is to meet and exceed clients’ expectations by providing innovative solutions through integrity and team work. It does this by empowering clients to achieve a greater understanding of all solutions it provides. www.tcrsolutions.net

designs and solutions for all budgets. The company develops comprehensive solutions that maximize efficiencies, create customer loyalty and provide new untapped revenue streams for businesses. www.thekioskstore.com

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Taylor Morrison is one of the top homebuilders in North America, building a wide range of product for discerning homebuyers. With more than 280 communities in Arizona, California, Colorado, Florida, Nevada and Texas, the homebuilder offers first-time, mid-market and mid-to-upscale housing in both master-planned communities and urban infill neighborhoods. The company is a wholly owned subsidiary of Taylor Wimpey plc, a homebuilding company with 125 years of experience and operations in the United Kingdom, North America, Spain and Gibraltar. www.taylormorrison.com


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Web Site Offers New Features for Council Members he Arizona Technology Council has launched a redesigned Web site with a new look and feel featuring expanded content and an updated registration system.

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The site features an advanced member tools section that provides resources exclusive to Council members, including a directory to facilitate communications and networking opportunities as well as a member-to-member discount program. “As we expand membership, more effectively lobby for state policy and explore potential partners and alliances with other key technology organizations, we realize we need a more robust presence on the Internet with timely information,” said Steven G. Zylstra, president and CEO of the Council. “Our goal is to build the site into a top favorite among technology professionals that will continue to provide benefits to our members and the community we serve.” On the site, Zylstra will author a blog that offers his insight, analysis and commentary on community news,

noteworthy companies and national trends. The site also will be a portal for AZ Tech News, which offers breaking technology news from Ty Young. Besides writing stories for TechConnect, Young has been a reporter for the Phoenix Business Journal, The Arizona Republic and the Tucson Citizen. The site is powered by WebLinkCONNECT the leading membership management software for chambers of commerce and associations across the United States. Future enhancements to the site include a Career Center, where job seekers will be able to find quality postings while employers will be able to search for talent and find the perfect candidate to build their workforce. + Get Connected: www.aztechcouncil.org | www.weblinkinternational.com

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TechConnect explores the region’s leading companies, under-the-radar change agents and the latest industry trends and issues propelling the...

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